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Sample records for dynamic compressive loading

  1. Damage and failure rule of rock undergoing uniaxial compressive load and dynamic load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Yu-jun; LI Xi-bing; ZHOU Zi-long; MA Chun-de; ZHANG Yi-ping; WANG Wei-hua

    2005-01-01

    For understanding the damage and failure rule of rock under different uniaxial compressive loads and dynamic loads, tests on red sandstone were carried out on Instron 1342 electro-servo controlled testing system with different uniaxial compressive loads of 0, 2, 4 and 6 MPa. It is found that peak stress, peak strain, elastic modulus and total strain energy decrease with the increase of static compressive stress. Based on the test results, the mechanism on damage and failure of rock was analyzed, and according to the equivalent strain hypothesis, a new constitutive model of elastic-plastic damage was established, and then the calculated results with the established model were compared with test results to show a good agreement. Furthermore the rule of releasing ratio of damage strain energy was discussed.

  2. Static and dynamic moduli of posterior dental resin composites under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hirayama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    Dental resin composites are commonly used as restorative materials for dental treatment. To comprehend the static and dynamic moduli of dental resin composites, we investigated the mechanical behaviors of resin composites under static and dynamic loading conditions. Four commercially available resin composites for posterior restorations were evaluated. The percentages, by weight, of inorganic fillers of resin composites were examined by the ashing technique. The static compressive tests were undertaken with a constant loading speed of 1.0 mm/min using a computer-controlled INSTRON testing machine. The dynamic properties of composites were determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique. When inorganic filler content was increased, a remarkable increase in the static modulus and dynamic modulus were observed. Furthermore, there was a strong relationship between the static modulus and dynamic modulus (r(2) = 0.947). The SHPB technique clearly demonstrated the dynamic properties of composites, and was a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of composites under dynamic compressive loading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Compressive Loads on the Lumbar Spine During Lifting: 4D WATBAK versus Inverse Dynamics Calculations

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    M. H. Cole

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous two- and three-dimensional biomechanical models exist for the purpose of assessing the stresses placed on the lumbar spine during the performance of a manual material handling task. More recently, researchers have utilised their knowledge to develop specific computer-based models that can be applied in an occupational setting; an example of which is 4D WATBAK. The model used by 4D WATBAK bases its predications on static calculations and it is assumed that these static loads reasonably depict the actual dynamic loads acting on the lumbar spine. Consequently, it was the purpose of this research to assess the agreement between the static predictions made by 4D WATBAK and those from a comparable dynamic model. Six individuals were asked to perform a series of five lifting tasks, which ranged from lifting 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg and were designed to replicate the lifting component of the Work Capacity Assessment Test used within Australia. A single perpendicularly placed video camera was used to film each performance in the sagittal plane. The resultant two-dimensional kinematic data were input into the 4D WATBAK software and a dynamic biomechanical model to quantify the compression forces acting at the L4/L5 intervertebral joint. Results of this study indicated that as the mass of the load increased from 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg, the static compression forces calculated by 4D WATBAK became increasingly less than those calculated using the dynamic model (mean difference ranged from 22.0% for 2.5 kg to 42.9% for 22.5 kg. This study suggested that, for research purposes, a validated three-dimensional dynamic model should be employed when a task becomes complex and when a more accurate indication of spinal compression or shear force is required. Additionally, although it is clear that 4D WATBAK is particularly suited to industrial applications, it is suggested that the limitations of such modelling tools be carefully considered when task-risk and employee

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Aluminum Honeycombs Subjected to Dynamic Indentation and Compression Loads

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    A.S.M. Ayman Ashab

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of aluminum hexagonal honeycombs subjected to out-of-plane dynamic indentation and compression loads has been investigated numerically using ANSYS/LS-DYNA in this paper. The finite element (FE models have been verified by previous experimental results in terms of deformation pattern, stress-strain curve, and energy dissipation. The verified FE models have then been used in comprehensive numerical analysis of different aluminum honeycombs. Plateau stress, σpl, and dissipated energy (EI for indentation and EC for compression have been calculated at different strain rates ranging from 102 to 104 s−1. The effects of strain rate and t/l ratio on the plateau stress, dissipated energy, and tearing energy have been discussed. An empirical formula is proposed to describe the relationship between the tearing energy per unit fracture area, relative density, and strain rate for honeycombs. Moreover, it has been found that a generic formula can be used to describe the relationship between tearing energy per unit fracture area and relative density for both aluminum honeycombs and foams.

  5. Region specific response of intervertebral disc cells to complex dynamic loading: an organ culture study using a dynamic torsion-compression bioreactor.

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    Samantha C W Chan

    Full Text Available The spine is routinely subjected to repetitive complex loading consisting of axial compression, torsion, flexion and extension. Mechanical loading is one of the important causes of spinal diseases, including disc herniation and disc degeneration. It is known that static and dynamic compression can lead to progressive disc degeneration, but little is known about the mechanobiology of the disc subjected to combined dynamic compression and torsion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanobiology of the intervertebral disc when subjected to combined dynamic compression and axial torsion or pure dynamic compression or axial torsion using organ culture. We applied four different loading modalities [1. control: no loading (NL, 2. cyclic compression (CC, 3. cyclic torsion (CT, and 4. combined cyclic compression and torsion (CCT] on bovine caudal disc explants using our custom made dynamic loading bioreactor for disc organ culture. Loads were applied for 8 h/day and continued for 14 days, all at a physiological magnitude and frequency. Our results provided strong evidence that complex loading induced a stronger degree of disc degeneration compared to one degree of freedom loading. In the CCT group, less than 10% nucleus pulposus (NP cells survived the 14 days of loading, while cell viabilities were maintained above 70% in the NP of all the other three groups and in the annulus fibrosus (AF of all the groups. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong up-regulation in matrix genes and matrix remodeling genes in the AF of the CCT group. Cell apoptotic activity and glycosaminoglycan content were also quantified but there were no statistically significant differences found. Cell morphology in the NP of the CCT was changed, as shown by histological evaluation. Our results stress the importance of complex loading on the initiation and progression of disc degeneration.

  6. Grain size dependence of dynamic mechanical behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under compressive shock loading

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    Asgari, H., E-mail: hamed.asgari@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Zeng, L.J.; Olsson, E. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    The effects of grain size on the dynamic deformation behavior of rolled AZ31B alloy at high strain rates were investigated. Rolled AZ31B alloy samples with grain sizes of 6, 18 and 37 μm, were subjected to shock loading tests using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at room temperature and at a strain rate of 1100 s{sup −} {sup 1}. It was found that a double-peak basal texture formed in the shock loaded samples. The strength and ductility of the alloy under the high strain-rate compressive loading increased with decreasing grain size. However, twinning fraction and strain hardening rate were found to decrease with decreasing grain size. In addition, orientation imaging microscopy showed a higher contribution of double and contraction twins in the deformation process of the coarse-grained samples. Using transmission electron microscopy, pyramidal dislocations were detected in the shock loaded sample, proving the activation of pyramidal slip system under dynamic impact loading. - Highlights: • A double-peak basal texture developed in all shock loaded samples. • Both strength and ductility increased with decreasing grain size. • Twinning fraction and strain hardening rate decreased with decreasing grain size. • ‘g.b’ analysis confirmed the presence of dislocations in shock loaded alloy.

  7. Study on Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Limestone under Uniaxial Impact Compressive Loads

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    Fei Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic mechanical properties of limestone are studied with 5 types of impact pressure acting on limestone samples in axial direction in this paper. The rubber shaper with a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm is adopted. Besides the conical punch of split pressure bar of Hopkinson with a diameter of 50 mm is also used. The half-sinusoid pulse is obtained by using the pulse shaper method and special punch method; the constant strain rate deformation of the sample is realized. Dynamic compressive properties and failure modes of limestone under different impact pressure are investigated. In addition, energy dissipation is studied in the process of experiment. The results show that the dynamic compressive strength of limestone has an exponent relation to strain rate. The failure strain, degree of fragmentation, incident energy, and absorption energy increase, while the energy absorbency decreases with the increasing of strain rate. However, the initial elastic modulus is not sensitive to the strain rate. The research method and conclusions have reference value for the dynamic mechanical properties of other brittle materials.

  8. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load; Charakteristik und Modellierung von Fichtenholz unter dynamischer Druckbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-28

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The

  9. The Study of the Frequency Effect of Dynamic Compressive Loading on Primary Articular Chondrocyte Functions Using a Microcell Culture System

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    Wan-Ying Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive stimulation can modulate articular chondrocyte functions. Nevertheless, the relevant studies are not comprehensive. This is primarily due to the lack of cell culture apparatuses capable of conducting the experiments in a high throughput, precise, and cost-effective manner. To address the issue, we demonstrated the use of a perfusion microcell culture system to investigate the stimulating frequency (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz effect of compressive loading (20% and 40% strain on the functions of articular chondrocytes. The system mainly integrates the functions of continuous culture medium perfusion and the generation of pneumatically-driven compressive stimulation in a high-throughput micro cell culture system. Results showed that the compressive stimulations explored did not have a significant impact on chondrocyte viability and proliferation. However, the metabolic activity of chondrocytes was significantly affected by the stimulating frequency at the higher compressive strain of 40% (2 Hz, 40% strain. Under the two compressive strains studied, the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs synthesis was upregulated when the stimulating frequency was set at 1 Hz and 2 Hz. However, the stimulating frequencies explored had no influence on the collagen production. The results of this study provide useful fundamental insights that will be helpful for cartilage tissue engineering and cartilage rehabilitation.

  10. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  11. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  12. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A. [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France); Maysonnave, T. [International Technologies for High Pulsed Power, F-46500 Thégra (France); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or

  13. Compressive Acquisition of Dynamic Scenes

    CERN Document Server

    Sankaranarayanan, Aswin C; Chellappa, Rama; Baraniuk, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a new approach for the acquisition and recovery of sparse signals and images that enables sampling rates significantly below the classical Nyquist rate. Despite significant progress in the theory and methods of CS, little headway has been made in compressive video acquisition and recovery. Video CS is complicated by the ephemeral nature of dynamic events, which makes direct extensions of standard CS imaging architectures and signal models difficult. In this paper, we develop a new framework for video CS for dynamic textured scenes that models the evolution of the scene as a linear dynamical system (LDS). This reduces the video recovery problem to first estimating the model parameters of the LDS from compressive measurements, and then reconstructing the image frames. We exploit the low-dimensional dynamic parameters (the state sequence) and high-dimensional static parameters (the observation matrix) of the LDS to devise a novel compressive measurement strategy that measures only the...

  14. Dynamic compressive behavior of foamed polyethylene film

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    Tateyama Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The foamed film as the shock absorption material has attracted much attention because it is thin (100 μm ∼ 400 μm and has a closed cell structure. However, the dynamic mechanical properties have not been reported in the foamed film. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the compressive behavior of the foamed polyethylene film at the wide strain rate range. First, the new compressive test apparatus for the dynamic strain rate, the drop-weight testing machine with opposed load cell, was developed, which can be also evaluated the dynamic stress equilibrium of the specimen. It is confirmed that the compressive flow stress increased with increasing the strain rate, regardless of the film thickness. The foamed polyethylene film has the high strain rate sensitivity in the quasi-static deformation. On the other hand, there is almost no change of the strain rate sensitivity in the dynamic and the impact deformation. In order to investigate the mechanism of strain rate dependence, the foamed polyethylene film was observed by X-ray computed tomography scanner before and after compressive test. The fracture of the closed cell only occurred in the quasi-static deformation. It was clarified that the strain rate sensitivity of the foamed film depends strongly on that of the construction material, polyethylene.

  15. Beryllium strain under dynamic loading

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    Pushkov Victor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some data (not much on dynamic characteristics of beryllium that are important, for example, when estimating construction performance at NPP emergencies. A number of data on stress-strain curves, spall strength, shear strength, fracture and structure responses of shock loaded beryllium have obtained in US and Russian laboratories. For today the model description of this complex metal behavior does not have a reasonable agreement with the experimental data, thus a wider spectrum of experimental data is required. This work presents data on dynamic compression-test diagrams of Russian beryllium. Experiments are performed using Hopkinson bar method (SHPB. Strain rates were ε ∼ 103 s−1.

  16. Blind compressive sensing dynamic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-06-01

    We propose a novel blind compressive sensing (BCS) frame work to recover dynamic magnetic resonance images from undersampled measurements. This scheme models the dynamic signal as a sparse linear combination of temporal basis functions, chosen from a large dictionary. In contrast to classical compressed sensing, the BCS scheme simultaneously estimates the dictionary and the sparse coefficients from the undersampled measurements. Apart from the sparsity of the coefficients, the key difference of the BCS scheme with current low rank methods is the nonorthogonal nature of the dictionary basis functions. Since the number of degrees-of-freedom of the BCS model is smaller than that of the low-rank methods, it provides improved reconstructions at high acceleration rates. We formulate the reconstruction as a constrained optimization problem; the objective function is the linear combination of a data consistency term and sparsity promoting l1 prior of the coefficients. The Frobenius norm dictionary constraint is used to avoid scale ambiguity. We introduce a simple and efficient majorize-minimize algorithm, which decouples the original criterion into three simpler subproblems. An alternating minimization strategy is used, where we cycle through the minimization of three simpler problems. This algorithm is seen to be considerably faster than approaches that alternates between sparse coding and dictionary estimation, as well as the extension of K-SVD dictionary learning scheme. The use of the l1 penalty and Frobenius norm dictionary constraint enables the attenuation of insignificant basis functions compared to the l0 norm and column norm constraint assumed in most dictionary learning algorithms; this is especially important since the number of basis functions that can be reliably estimated is restricted by the available measurements. We also observe that the proposed scheme is more robust to local minima compared to K-SVD method, which relies on greedy sparse coding. Our

  17. Dynamic loads in the glove machine due to the carriages reciprocating motion and the dynamic load reduction

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    Vitaliy V. Chaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is devoted to analyzing the dynamic loads generated in the glove machine at reciprocating motion of knitting and intermediate carriages. Proposed is a method for determining the maximum dynamic loads in the glove machine carriages’ drive. It is noted that the dynamic loads reduction can be achieved by equipping the drive with energy accumulation and compensation units, in which quality it is expedient to use the cylindrical compression springs. The obtained dependence allows to determine the necessary stiffness of compression springs (energy accumulating and compensating units, at which the dynamic loads due to the carriages masses’ inertia can be almost completely eliminated.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the Mechanical Behavior of Strongly Anisotropic Light-Weight Metallic Fiber Structures under Static and Dynamic Compressive Loading

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    Olaf Andersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rigid metallic fiber structures made from a variety of different metals and alloys have been investigated mainly with regard to their functional properties such as heat transfer, pressure drop, or filtration characteristics. With the recent advent of aluminum and magnesium-based fiber structures, the application of such structures in light-weight crash absorbers has become conceivable. The present paper therefore elucidates the mechanical behavior of rigid sintered fiber structures under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Special attention is paid to the strongly anisotropic properties observed for different directions of loading in relation to the main fiber orientation. Basically, the structures show an orthotropic behavior; however, a finite thickness of the fiber slabs results in moderate deviations from a purely orthotropic behavior. The morphology of the tested specimens is examined by computed tomography, and experimental results for different directions of loading as well as different relative densities are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using real structural data derived from the computed tomography data. Depending on the direction of loading, the fiber structures show a distinctively different deformation behavior both experimentally and numerically. Based on these results, the prevalent modes of deformation are discussed and a first comparison with an established polymer foam and an assessment of the applicability of aluminum fiber structures in crash protection devices is attempted.

  19. Dynamic loads in the glove machine due to the carriages reciprocating motion and the dynamic load reduction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This research is devoted to analyzing the dynamic loads generated in the glove machine at reciprocating motion of knitting and intermediate carriages. Proposed is a method for determining the maximum dynamic loads in the glove machine carriages’ drive. It is noted that the dynamic loads reduction can be achieved by equipping the drive with energy accumulation and compensation units, in which quality it is expedient to use the cylindrical compression springs. The obtained dependence allows to ...

  20. Effect of compressive loading on the risk of spalling

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    Carré H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading is an important parameter of spalling phenomenon likely to occur in concrete during heating. Several tests in laboratory have shown an increase of the risk of spalling in the compressed areas. In this study, a specific metallic frame has been developed to apply uniaxial and biaxial stresses on slabs during fire tests. Tests carried out on an ordinary concrete (fc28 = 37 MPa exposed to ISO 834-1 temperature curve with several levels of uniaxial loading are presented. No spalling was observed when samples were loaded at 0, 5 and 10 MPa. In the opposite, spalling was observed when the compressive stress was increased to 15 MPa.

  1. Dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive relations of lanthanum metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huanran; CAI Canyua; CHEN Danian; MA Dongfang; DENG Gaotao

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive relations of Lanthanum (La) metal was determined by using the first compression in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests at different strain rates and temperatures.The constitutive relation of La metal determined in a certain range of strains was employed and adjusted in numerically simulating large deformations of La metal spEcimens generated by multi-compression in SHPB tests and recorded by a high-speed camera.The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive relations of La metal under multiple SHPB tests loading was also revealed.The results of scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation of the recovered La metal specimens for typical tests showed that there was a variety of deformation microstructures depending on strain rate,temperature and stress state.

  2. Study of an anisotropic polymeric cellular material under compression loading

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    Mauricio Francisco Caliri Júnior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper emphasizes the influence of micro mechanisms of failure of a cellular material on its phenomenological response. Most of the applications of cellular materials comprise a compression loading. Thus, the study focuses on the influence of the anisotropy in the mechanical behavior of cellular material under cyclic compression loadings. For this study, a Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique (named Correli was applied, as well as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy images were analyzed. The experimental results are discussed in detail for a closed-cell rigid poly (vinyl chloride (PVC foam, showing stress-strain curves in different directions and why the material can be assumed as transversely isotropic. Besides, the present paper shows elastic and plastic Poisson's ratios measured in different planes, explaining why the plastic Poisson's ratios approach to zero. Yield fronts created by the compression loadings in different directions and the influence of spring-back phenomenon on hardening curves are commented, also.

  3. In vivo dynamic compression has less detrimental effect than static compression on newly formed bone of a rat caudal vertebra

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    Benoit, A.; Mustafy, T.; Londono, I.; Grimard, G.; Aubin, C-E.; Villemure, I.

    2016-01-01

    Fusionless devices are currently designed to treat spinal deformities such as scoliosis by the application of a controlled mechanical loading. Growth modulation by dynamic compression was shown to preserve soft tissues. The objective of this in vivo study was to characterize the effect of static vs. dynamic loading on the bone formed during growth modulation. Controlled compression was applied during 15 days on the 7th caudal vertebra (Cd7) of rats during growth spurt. The load was sustained in the “static” group and sinusoidally oscillating in the “dynamic” group. The effect of surgery and of the device was investigated using control and sham (operated on but no load applied) groups. A high resolution CT-scan of Cd7 was acquired at days 2, 8 and 15 of compression. Growth rates, histomorphometric parameters and mineral density of the newly formed bone were quantified and compared. Static and dynamic loadings significantly reduced the growth rate by 20% compared to the sham group. Dynamic loading preserved newly formed bone histomorphometry and mineral density whereas static loading induced thicker (+31%) and more mineralized (+12%) trabeculae. A significant sham effect was observed. Growth modulation by dynamic compression constitutes a promising way to develop new treatment for skeletal deformities. PMID:27609036

  4. Efficient compression of molecular dynamics trajectory files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Patrick; Kenwood, Julian; Smith, Keegan Carruthers; Kuttel, Michelle M; Gain, James

    2012-10-15

    We investigate whether specific properties of molecular dynamics trajectory files can be exploited to achieve effective file compression. We explore two classes of lossy, quantized compression scheme: "interframe" predictors, which exploit temporal coherence between successive frames in a simulation, and more complex "intraframe" schemes, which compress each frame independently. Our interframe predictors are fast, memory-efficient and well suited to on-the-fly compression of massive simulation data sets, and significantly outperform the benchmark BZip2 application. Our schemes are configurable: atomic positional accuracy can be sacrificed to achieve greater compression. For high fidelity compression, our linear interframe predictor gives the best results at very little computational cost: at moderate levels of approximation (12-bit quantization, maximum error ≈ 10(-2) Å), we can compress a 1-2 fs trajectory file to 5-8% of its original size. For 200 fs time steps-typically used in fine grained water diffusion experiments-we can compress files to ~25% of their input size, still substantially better than BZip2. While compression performance degrades with high levels of quantization, the simulation error is typically much greater than the associated approximation error in such cases.

  5. Chloride permeability of concrete under static and repeated compressive loading

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    Saito, Mitsuru; Ishimori, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Inst. of Technology, Ishikawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    The chloride permeability of normal weight concrete subjected to static and repeated compressive loading was evaluated by using the AASHTO T277 test method. The results of concrete under static loading showed that the application of loads up to 90% of the ultimate strength had little effect on the chloride permeability. It was found from the results of concrete under repeated loading that load repetitions at the maximum stress levels of 60% or more caused the chloride permeability to increase significantly. The test results also indicated that the chloride permeability of concrete subjected to static and repeated loading increased at an increasing rate with its residual strain. The relation between the chloride permeability obtained and the cracking behavior of concrete previously reported was discussed.

  6. Loading rate sensitivity of open hole composites in compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowinski, Steve J.; Guynn, E. G.; Elber, Wolf; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The results are reported of an experimental study on the compressive, time-dependent behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates with open holes. The effect of loading rate on compressive strength was determined for six material systems ranging from brittle epoxies to thermoplastics at both 75 F and 220 F. Specimens were loaded to failure using different loading rates. The slope of the strength versus elapsed time-to-failure curve was used to rank the materials' loading rate sensitivity. All of the materials had greater strength at 75 F than at 220 F. All the materials showed loading rate effects in the form of reduced failure strength for longer elapsed-time-to-failure. Loading rate sensitivity was less at 220 F than the same material at 70 F. However, C12000/ULTEM and IM7/8551-7 were more sensitive to loading rate than the other materials at 220 F. AS4/APC2 laminates with 24, 32, and 48 plies and 1/16 and 1/4 inch diameter holes were tested. The sensitivity to loading rate was less for either increasing number of plies or larger hole size. The failure of the specimens made from brittle resins was accompanied by extensive delaminations while the failure of the roughened systems was predominantly by shear crippling. Fewer delamination failures were observed at the higher temperature.

  7. Dynamical compressibility of dense granular shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Trulsson, Martin; Bouzid, Mehdi; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    It has been conjectured by Bagnold [1] that an assembly of hard non-deformable spheres could behave as a compressible medium when slowly sheared, as the average density of such a system effectively depends on the confining pressure. Here we use discrete element simulations to show the existence of transverse and sagittal waves associated to this dynamical compressibility. For this purpose, we study the resonance of these waves in a linear Couette cell and compare the results with those predic...

  8. A dynamic ball compression test for understanding rock crushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S; Liu, H; Xia, K

    2014-12-01

    During crushing, rock particles are subjected to complicated loading. It is desired to establish the relation between the loading and the fragmentation parameters for better understanding rock crushing mechanism. In this work, a split Hopkinson pressure bar system in combination with high speed cameras is utilized in the dynamic ball compression test, in which the spherical rock sample is adopted to avoid the shape effect. Using elasticity theory, the loading rate and the dynamic indirect tensile strength are first calculated. With the aid of the moment-trap technique and high speed cameras, the surface energy is determined for each sample. The relations between the loading rate and the fragmentation parameters, i.e., the number of fragments and the surface energy are established. The application of this method to a granitic rock shows that it is flexible and can be applied to the crushing study of generic brittle solids.

  9. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A N Vishwanatha Rao; O N Ramesh

    2007-02-01

    In air-compression systems, instabilities occur during operation close to their peak pressure-rise capability. However, the peak efficiency of a compression system lies close to this region of instability. A surge is a violent mode of instability where there is total breakdown of flow in the system and pressure-rise capability is lost drastically. Generally, all compression systems operate with a margin defined as the ‘surge margin’, and, consequently, system operational efficiency is lower. It is of interest to study compression-system surge to understand its dynamics in order to operate compression systems close to the instability for achieving high efficiency safely without encountering surge. Unsteady pressure data from a compression system, captured during surge oscillations, reveal many aspects of flow physics and are analysed to understand the surge dynamics of the system. A set of controlled experiments was conducted with a simple desktop experimental test set-up and essential aspects of surge dynamics have been characterised.

  10. Characterization of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 thermoplastic composite under longitudinal compression loading at high strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeckl, Marina; Kuhn, Peter; Koerber, Hannes

    2015-09-01

    In the presented work, an experimental investigation has been performed to characterize the strain rate dependency of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 composite for longitudinal compression loading. An end-loaded compression specimen geometry, suitable for contactless optical strain measurement via digital image correlation and dynamic loading in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, was developed. For the dynamic experiments at a constant strain rate of 100 s-1 a modified version of the Dynamic Compression Fixture, developed by Koerber and Camanho [Koerber and Camanho, Composites Part A, 42, 462-470, 2011] was used. The results were compared with quasi-static test results at a strain rate of 3 · 10-4 s-1 using the same specimen geometry. It was found that the longitudinal compressive strength increased by 61% compared to the strength value obtained from the quasi-static tests.

  11. Fatigue Properties of Plain Concrete Under Triaxial Compressive Cyclic Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹伟; 宋玉普; 刘海成

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were made on plain concrete subjected to triaxial static loading and constant-amplitude compressive fatigue loading with a constant lateral pressure in two directions. The initial confining pressure was O, 0. 1fc, 0.25fc andO. 4fc, respectively, for the static test, and 0. 1fc and 0.25fc for the fatigue test. Based on the triaxial compressive constitutive behavior of concrete, the inflexion of confining pressure evolution was chosen to be the fatigue damage criterion during the test. The rule of evolution of longitudinal maximum and minimum strains, longitudinal cyclic modulus and damage were recorded and analyzed. According to the Fardis-Chen criterion model and the concept of equivalent fatigue life and equivalent stress level, a unified S-N curve for multi-axial compressive fatigue loading was proposed. Thus, the fatigue strength factors for different fatigue loading cases can be obtained. The present investigation provides information for the fatigue design of concrete structures.

  12. Collapse dynamics of bubble raft under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alexander; Dennin, Michael; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Irvine Collaboration; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We report on the collapse of bubble rafts under compression in a closed rectangular geometry. A bubble raft is a single layer of bubbles at the air-water interface. A collapse event occurs when bubbles submerge beneath the neighboring bubbles under applied compression causing the structure of the bubble raft to go from single-layer to multi-layer. We studied the collapse dynamics as a function of compression velocity. At higher compression velocity we observe a more uniform distribution of collapse events, whereas at lower compression velocities, the collapse events accumulate at the system boundaries. We will present results that compare the distribution of collapse probability in the experiments to simulations based on a one-dimensional Ising model with elastic coupling between spin elements. Both the experimental system and simulations are excellent models for collapse in a number of complex systems. By comparing the two systems, we can tune the simulation to better understand the role of the Ising and elastic couplings in determining the collapse dynamics. We acknowledge DMR-1309402.

  13. Durability of Modified Expanded Polystyrene Concrete after Dynamic Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available EPS concrete was produced by mixing the expanded polystyrene spheres (EPS and polymer emulsion and thickener to the matrix concrete, and this concrete had good vibration energy absorption characteristics. Based on the experimental data obtained on EPS volume ratio of 0%, 20%, 30%, and 40% by replacing matrix or coarse aggregate, the two design styles had nearly the same compressive strength. By applying frequency of 5 Hz, 50000 or 100000 times, 40 KN, 50 KN, and 60 KN cyclic loading, it is shown that the higher the inclusion size was, the lower the compressive strength of the EPS concrete would be; the larger the applying dynamic cyclic load was, the more obvious the compressive strength changing would be. Meanwhile, the strength of EPS concrete had no evident change after durability test. The results of this research had practical significance on using EPS concrete in some long-term cyclic dynamic load engineering.

  14. Direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-01-19

    Anterior tibial loading is a major factor involved in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanism during ski impact landing. We sought to investigate the direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact of intact knee joints without quadriceps activation. Twelve porcine knee specimens were procured. Four specimens were used as non-impact control while the remaining eight were mounted onto a material-testing system at 70 degrees flexion and subjected to simulated landing impact, which was successively repeated with incremental actuator displacement. Four specimens from the impacted group underwent pre-impact MRI for tibial plateau angle measurements while the other four were subjected to histology and microCT for cartilage morphology and volume assessment. The tibial plateau angles ranged from 29.4 to 38.8 degrees . There was a moderate linear relationship (Y=0.16X; R(2)=0.64; p<0.001) between peak axial impact compressive load (Y) and peak anterior tibial load (X). The anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group sustained surface cartilage fraying, superficial clefts and tidemark disruption, compared to the control group. MicroCT scans displayed visible cartilage deformation for both anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group. Due to the tibial plateau angle, increased axial impact compressive load can directly elevate anterior tibial load and hence contribute to ACL failure during simulated landing impact. Axial impact compressive load resulted in shear cartilage damage along anterior-posterior tibial plateau regions, due to its contribution to anterior tibial loading. This mechanism plays an important role in elevating ACL stress and cartilage deformation during impact landing.

  15. Dynamic cyclic compression modulates the chondrogenic phenotype in human chondrocytes from late stage osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Hua Jia; Fung, Hon Sing; Yeung, Pan; Lam, K L; Yan, Chun Hoi; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2017-02-16

    Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes (hOACs) are characterized by their "dedifferentiated" and catabolic phenotype and lack the ability for restoring their inherent functions by themselves. Here we investigated whether extrinsically supplemented mechanical signal via compression loading would affect the phenotype of hOACs. Specifically, we applied cyclic compression loading on cultured hOACs-collagen constructs and measured the expression of the major chondrogenic factors, cell-matrix interaction molecules and matrix degradation enzymes. Dynamic compression loading stimulates the expression and nuclear localization of sox9 in hOACs and reduces the catabolic events via downregulated expression of collagenases. These results contribute to better understanding towards mechanoregulation of hOACs.

  16. Experimental study of aluminium honeycomb behaviour under dynamic multiaxial loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar system (SHPB with large-diameter and Nylon bars introducing a shear-compression loading device is used in order to investigate the dynamic behaviour of aluminium honeycomb under multiaxial loadings conditions. All shear-compression configurations including the loading angle variation from 0∘ to 60∘ are performed with an impact velocity of about 15m/s. The adapted SHPB system with the device are validated numerically and a phenomenon of separation between the input bar and the input beveled bar is observed. Numerical results suggest that this phenomenon provides a cutting of the reflected wave. An electro optical extensometer is employed in experiments. A good agreement between the numerical elastic waves and the experimental ones is obtained. Experimental results show a significant effect of the loading angle on the apparent stress-strain curves. The initial peak value and the plateau stress decrease with the increase of the loading angle. The combined shear-compression device with an enhancement at the alignment set-up provides efficient results for samples dynamically loaded. This device will be used to investigate the influence of the in-plane orientation angle on the deformation mechanisms and multiaxial behaviour of aluminium honeycomb under dynamic and quasi-static loading conditions.

  17. Force response of the fingertip pulp to repeated compression--effects of loading rate, loading angle and anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serina, E R; Mote, C D; Rempel, D

    1997-10-01

    Repeated loading of the fingertips has been postulated to contribute to tendon and nerve disorders at the wrist during activities associated with prolonged fingertip loading such as typing. To fully understand the pathomechanics of these soft tissue disorders, the role of the fingertip pulp in attenuating the applied dynamic forces must be known. An experiment was conducted to characterize the response of the in vivo fingertip pulp under repeated, dynamic, compressive loadings, to identify factors that influence pulp dynamics, and to better understand the force modulation by the pulp. Twenty subjects tapped repeatedly on a flat plate with their left index finger, while the contact force and pulp displacement were measured simultaneously. Tapping trials were conducted at three fingertip contact angles from the horizontal plane (0 degree, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees) and five tapping rates (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 Hz). The fingertip pulp responds as a viscoelastic material, exhibiting rate-dependence, hysteresis, and a nonlinear force-displacement relationship. The pulp was relatively compliant at forces less than 1 N, but stiffened rapidly with displacement at higher forces for all loading conditions. This suggests that high-frequency forces of a small magnitude (< 1 N) are attenuated by the nonlinearly stiffening pulp while these forces of larger magnitude are transmitted to the bone. Pulp response was significantly influenced by the angle of loading. Fingertip dimensions, gender, and subject age had little to no influence on pulp parameters.

  18. Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Guo, Zherui; Hudspeth, M.; Claus, Benjamin; Fezzaa, Kamel; Sun, Tao; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, dynamic fracture mechanisms of single and contacting spherical glass particles were observed using high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging. A modified Kolsky bar setup was used to apply controlled dynamic compressive loading on the soda-lime glass particles. Four different configurations of particle arrangements with one, two, three, and five particles were studied. In single particle experiments, cracking initiated near the contact area between the particle and the platen, subsequently fragmenting the particle in many small sub-particles. In multi-particle experiments, a crack was observed to initiate from the point just outside the contact area between two particles. The initiated crack propagated at an angle to the horizontal loading direction, resulting in separation of a fragment. However, this fragment separation did not affect the ability of the particle to withstand further contact loading. On further compression, large number of cracks initiated in the particle with the highest number of particle-particle contacts near one of the particle-particle contacts. The initiated cracks roughly followed the lines joining the contact points. Subsequently, the initiated cracks along with the newly developed sub-cracks bifurcated rapidly as they propagated through the particle and fractured the particle explosively into many small fragments, leaving the other particles nearly intact.

  19. Investigation of compressibility effects on dynamic stall of pitching airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Jyoti; Sengupta, Tapan K.; Suchandra, Prasoon

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, effects of compressibility on the dynamic stall of NACA 0012 airfoil, pitching sinusoidally from 5.03° to 24.79°, are investigated computationally using implicit large eddy simulations in a finite difference framework. Simulations of two-dimensional (2D), high Reynolds number, compressible flows are carried out without any transition or turbulence model to capture the physics of the dynamic stall process. The problem is formulated in a body-fixed, rotating, non-inertial frame. High accuracy, dispersion relation preserving optimized upwind compact scheme is used to compute convective flux derivatives, and an optimized three-stage Runge-Kutta method is used for time integration. Results are presented for free stream Mach number M∞ = 0.283, 0.4, and 0.5, where the Mach number is varied independent of the Reynolds number. The computations have been quite successful in capturing the essential features of the dynamic stall mechanism. It is observed that dynamic moment and lift stalls occur at smaller angles of attack as the Mach number increases. Reduction in the size of airload hysteresis loops and maximum attainable load coefficients are observed with increasing Mach number. Weak shock waves are observed near the leading edge (LE) at M∞ = 0.4, and lambda-shock is formed near the LE for M∞ = 0.5. It is observed that with increasing Mach number, the impact of dynamic stall on the aerodynamic loads (Cl, Cd, and Cm) becomes less dramatic as the maximum value attained by these aerodynamic loads decreases with an increase in the Mach number. An increase in positive damping area in the hysteresis loop is observed with an increase in the Mach number, inhibiting possible vulnerability to stall flutter.

  20. Dynamic Spectrum Detection Via Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Odeyomi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum congestion is a major concern in both military and commercial wireless networks. To support growing demand for ubiquitous spectrum usage, Cognitive Radio is a new paradigm in wireless communication that can be used to exploit unused part of the spectrum by dynamically adjusting its operating parameters. While cognitive radio technology is a promising solution to the spectral congestion problem, efficient methods for detecting white spaces in wideband radio spectrum remain a challenge. Conventional methods of detection are forced to use the high sampling rate requirement of Nyquist criterion. In this paper, the feasibility and efficacy of using compressive sensing (CS algorithms inconjunction with Haar wavelet for identifying spectrum holes in the wideband spectrum is explored. Compressive sensing is an emerging theory that shows that it’s possible to achieve good reconstruction, at sampling rates lower than that specified by Nyquist. CS approach is robust in AWGN and fading channel.

  1. Active stabilization of thin-wall structures under compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Jared; Calius, Emilio P.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2003-08-01

    The active suppression of elastic buckling instability has the potential to significantly increase the effective strength of thin-wall structures. Despite all the interest in smart structures, the active suppression of buckling has received comparatively little attention. This paper addresses the effects of embedded actuation on the compression buckling strength of laminated composite plates through analysis and simulation. Numerical models are formulated that include the influence of essential features such as sensor uncertainty and noise, actuator saturation and control architecture on the buckling process. Silicon-based strain sensors and diffuse laser distance sensors are both considered for use in the detection of incipient buckling behavior due to their increased sensitivity. Actuation is provided by paired distributions of piezo-electric material incorporated into both sides of the laminate. Optimal controllers are designed to command the structure to deform in ways that interfere with the development of buckling mode shapes. Commercial software packages are used to solve the resulting non-linear equations, and some of the tradeoffs are enumerated. Overall, the results show that active buckling control can considerably enhance resistance to instability under compressive loads. These buckling load predictions demonstrate the viability of optimal control and piezo-electric actuation for implementing active buckling control. Due to the importance of early detection, the relative effectiveness of active buckling control is shown to be strongly dependent on the performance of the sensing scheme, as well as on the characteristics of the structure.

  2. FEM modelling of soil behaviour under compressive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungureanu, N.; Vlăduţ, V.; Biriş, S. Şt

    2017-01-01

    Artificial compaction is one of the most dangerous forms of degradation of agricultural soil. Recognized as a phenomenon with multiple negative effects in terms of environment and agricultural production, soil compaction is strongly influenced by the size of external load, soil moisture, size and shape of footprint area, soil type and number of passes. Knowledge of soil behavior under compressive loads is important in order to prevent or minimize soil compaction. In this paper were developed, by means of the Finite Element Method, various models of soil behavior during the artificial compaction produced by the wheel of an agricultural trailer. Simulations were performed on two types of soil (cohesive and non-cohesive) with known characteristics. By applying two loads (4.5 kN and 21 kN) in footprints of different sizes, were obtained the models of the distributions of stresses occuring in the two types of soil. Simulation results showed that soil stresses increase with increasing wheel load and vary with soil type.

  3. DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC FLUID FOR COMPRESSIBLE GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the relativistic fluid dynamics for compressible gas is studied.We show that the strict convexity of the negative thermodynamical entropy preserves invariant under the Lorentz transformation if and only if the local speed of sound in this gas is strictly less than that of light in the vacuum.A symmetric form for the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented,and thus the local classical solutions to these equations can be deduced.At last,the non-relativistic limits of these local cla...

  4. UHPC SANDWICH STRUCTURES WITH COMPOSITE COATING UNDER COMPRESSIVE LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Markowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC sandwich structures with composite coating serve as multipurpose load-bearing elements. The UHPC’s extraordinary compressive strength is used in a multi-material construction element, while issues regarding the concrete’s brittle failure behaviour are properly addressed. A hollow section concrete core is covered by two steel tubes. The outer steel tube is wrapped in a composite material. By this design, UHPC is used in a material- and shape-optimised way with a low dead weight ratio[1] concerning the load-bearing capacity and stability[2]. The cross-section’s hollow shape optimises the construction’s buckling stability while saving self-weight. The composite coating on the column’s outside functions both as a layer increasing the construction’s durability and as a structural component increasing the the maximum and the residual load capacity. Investigations on the construction’s structural behaviour were performed.

  5. Loading and Boundary Condition Influences in a Poroelastic Finite Element Model of Cartilage Stresses in a Triaxial Compression Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Pedersen, Doug R; Martin, James A; Brown, Thomas D

    2006-01-01

    Background: We developed a poroelastic finite element (FE) model of cartilage in dynamic triaxial compression to parametrically analyze the effects of loading and boundary conditions on a baseline model. Conventional mechanical tests on articular cartilage such as confined and unconfined compression, indentation, etc., do not fully allow for modulation of compression and shear at physiological levels whereas triaxial compression does. A Triaxial Compression Bioreactor, or TRIAX, has been developed to study chondrocyte responses to multi-axial stress conditions under cyclic loading. In the triaxial setting, however, a cartilage explant's physical testing environment departs from the ideal homogeneous stress state that would occur from strict linear superposition of the applied axial and transverse pressure. Method of Approach: An axisymmetric poroelastic FE model of a cartilage explant (4 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thick) in cyclic triaxial compression was created. Axial and transverse loads (2 MPa at 1 Hz.) were applied via a platen and containment sheath. Parameters of interest included the rise time and magnitude of the applied load, in addition to the containment sheath modulus and the friction coefficient at the cartilage/platen interfaces. Metrics of interest in addition to whole explant axial strain included axial (surface normal) stress, shear stress, pore pressure, and the fluid load carriage fraction within the explant. Results: Strain results were compared to experimental data from explants tested in the TRIAX under conditions similar to the baseline model. Explant biomechanics varied considerably over numbers of load cycles and parameter values. Cyclic loading caused an increase in accumulated strain for the various loading and boundary conditions. Conclusions: Unlike what would be expected from linear superposition of the homogeneous stresses from the applied axial and transverse pressure, we have shown that the stress state within the TRIAX is considerably

  6. Characterization of focal muscle compression under impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. J.; Sory, D. R.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern wars over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome of the extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions.

  7. Local Dynamic Stability Associated with Load Carrying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Current study confirmed the sensitivity of local dynamic stability measure in load carrying situation. It was concluded that load carrying tasks were associated with declined local dynamic stability, which may result in increased risk of fall accident. This finding has implications in preventing fall accidents associated with occupational load carrying.

  8. Anisotropy of Dynamic Compressive Properties of Non-Heat-Treating Cold-Heading-Quality Steel Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunmin; Kang, Minju; Bae, Chul Min; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, a non-heat-treating cold-heading-quality steel bar was fabricated by cold drawing of a rolled bar, and anisotropic mechanical properties of the as-rolled and cold-drawn bars were investigated by quasistatic and dynamic compressive tests of 0 deg (longitudinal)-, 45 deg-, and 90 deg (transverse)-orientation specimens. Under the dynamic compressive loading, the trend of strength variation was similar to that of the quasistatic compressive loading, while the strength level was considerably increased by the strain rate hardening effect. Stress-strain curves of the cold-drawn bar specimens showed the nearly same strain hardening behavior, irrespective of specimen orientation and strain rate, but the yield stress and compressive flow stress increased in the order of the 0 deg-, 90 deg-, and 45 deg-orientation specimens. In the 45 deg- and 90 deg-orientation specimens, the pearlite bands had the stronger resistance to the stress acting on the maximum shear stress plane than in the 0 deg-orientation specimens, thereby resulting in the higher strengths. In some dynamically compressed specimens, pearlite bands were dissolved to form bainitic microstructures. Locations of these bainitic microstructures were well matched with hemispherical-shaped heat-trap zones, which confirmed that bainitic microstructures were formed by the temperature rise occurring during the dynamic compressive loading.

  9. Effects of Instantaneous Multiband Dynamic Compression on Speech Intelligibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzke Tobias

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment phenomenon, that is, the reduced dynamic range between threshold and uncomfortable level, is attributed to the loss of instantaneous dynamic compression on the basilar membrane. Despite this, hearing aids commonly use slow-acting dynamic compression for its compensation, because this was found to be the most successful strategy in terms of speech quality and intelligibility rehabilitation. Former attempts to use fast-acting compression gave ambiguous results, raising the question as to whether auditory-based recruitment compensation by instantaneous compression is in principle applicable in hearing aids. This study thus investigates instantaneous multiband dynamic compression based on an auditory filterbank. Instantaneous envelope compression is performed in each frequency band of a gammatone filterbank, which provides a combination of time and frequency resolution comparable to the normal healthy cochlea. The gain characteristics used for dynamic compression are deduced from categorical loudness scaling. In speech intelligibility tests, the instantaneous dynamic compression scheme was compared against a linear amplification scheme, which used the same filterbank for frequency analysis, but employed constant gain factors that restored the sound level for medium perceived loudness in each frequency band. In subjective comparisons, five of nine subjects preferred the linear amplification scheme and would not accept the instantaneous dynamic compression in hearing aids. Four of nine subjects did not perceive any quality differences. A sentence intelligibility test in noise (Oldenburg sentence test showed little to no negative effects of the instantaneous dynamic compression, compared to linear amplification. A word intelligibility test in quiet (one-syllable rhyme test showed that the subjects benefit from the larger amplification at low levels provided by instantaneous dynamic compression. Further analysis showed that the increase

  10. DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF AL-ALLOY FOAM BEAM DAMAGED BY COMPRESSIVE FATIGUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Gaun Kim; Ilhyun Kim; Amkee Kim; Seung-Joon Kim; Junhong Park

    2008-01-01

    The permanent residual strain in aluminum (Al) alloy foams induced by compressive fatigue gradually increases with the increasing number of loading cycles.Consequently,the progressive shortening of Al-alloy foam degrades the dynamic material performance by the failure and ratcheting of multi-cells in the foam.In this paper,the dynamic properties of Al-alloy foams damaged by compressive fatigue were studied.The beam specimens with various residual strains were made by cyclic compression-compression stress.The dynamic bending modulus and loss factor were evaluated by using a beam transfer function method.As a result,the dynamic bending stiffness of Al-alloy foam turned out to be decreased due to damage while the loss factor was improved because of the increasing energy dissipation of such factors as cracked cell walls formed during the shortening process of the foam.The loss factor shows a manifest dependence on the fatigue residual strain.

  11. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...... of differences in the peak-to-average ratio, compression has little perceptual effect other than increased loudness or clipping effects that only occur at high levels of compression. One explanation for the inconsistency between data and belief might result from the fact that compression is frequently...

  12. Perceptual effects of dynamic range compression in popular music recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...... of differences in the peak-to-average ratio, compression has little perceptual effect other than increased loudness or clipping effects that only occur at high levels of compression. One explanation for the inconsistency between data and belief might result from the fact that compression is frequently...

  13. Load Bearing and Deformation Characteristics of Granular Spoils under Unconfined Compressive Loading for Coal Mine Backfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The load bearing capacity and deformation response of granular spoils under uniaxial compression are numerically and experimentally investigated, aiming to shed light on the performance of back filled waste spoils while controlling ground subsidence after coal extraction. In numerical study, the particles are assembled in PFC commercial code in light of the digitized real shape of spoils with image technique, which is proved to be consistent with the physical test. The results from numerical and laboratory experiments showed that the complete compressive process of spoils tended to have spatial and temporal characteristics. The load-strain curves of investigated specimens could be divided into three stages (stage I, rearranging stage; stage II, breaking stage; stage III, consolidating stage and three zones (I, rearranging zone; II, interlocking zone; III, consolidated zone from outside to inside. During stage I, the load increasing rate of smaller spoils is relatively low, but it increases faster than larger ones in stages II and III. In addition, spoils with Talbot’s gradation are greater than single gradations. The magnitude of the density in consolidated zone is maximum, indicating that it is the main part holding the overlying strata weight.

  14. The effect of compressive loading magnitude on in situ chondrocyte calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Ryan M J; Han, Sang-Kuy; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte metabolism is stimulated by deformation and is associated with structural changes in the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), suggesting that these cells are involved in maintaining tissue health and integrity. Calcium signaling is an initial step in chondrocyte mechanotransduction that has been linked to many cellular processes. Previous studies using isolated chondrocytes proposed loading magnitude as an important factor regulating this response. However, calcium signaling in the intact cartilage differs compared to isolated cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of loading magnitude on chondrocyte calcium signaling in intact cartilage. We hypothesized that the percentage of cells exhibiting at least one calcium signal increases with increasing load. Fully intact rabbit femoral condyle and patellar bone/cartilage samples were incubated in calcium-sensitive dyes and imaged continuously under compressive loads of 10-40 % strain. Calcium signaling was primarily associated with the dynamic loading phase and greatly increased beyond a threshold deformation of about 10 % nominal tissue strain. There was a trend toward more cells exhibiting calcium signaling as loading magnitude increased (p = 0.133). These results provide novel information toward identifying mechanisms underlying calcium-dependent signaling pathways related to cartilage homeostasis and possibly the onset and progression of osteoarthritis.

  15. Experimental Research on the Dynamic Compressive Behaviors of CA Mortar Due to Cyclic Loading History%循环荷载历史下 CA 砂浆的动态受压试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王平; 王彪; 徐浩

    2015-01-01

    研究目的:为研究历经不同循环荷载历史和不同应变速率对铁路轨道系统 CRTSⅠ型板式无砟轨道水泥乳化沥青砂浆(CA 砂浆)的抗压强度、弹性模量和峰值应变的影响规律,进行 CA 砂浆圆柱体试件历经循环加载历史后,在应变速率为1×10-5~1×10-2 s -1时的单轴受压特性试验。  研究结论:(1)应变速率和循环荷载历史对 CA 砂浆的力学性能影响显著;(2)CA 砂浆的抗压强度、弹性模量和峰值应变均随应变速率的增大而提高;(3)在相同的应变速率下,CA 砂浆的抗压强度随循环荷载次数和循环荷载幅值的增加而降低,最大降低幅度为8.34%;(4)当循环荷载幅值较小时,CA 砂浆的弹性模量随循环荷载次数的增加而增大,最大增加幅度为59.17%;(5)在相同的应变速率下,CA 砂浆的峰值应变随循环荷载次数及循环荷载幅值的增大呈降低趋势,且应变速率对峰值应变的影响小于循环荷载历史的影响;(6)该研究成果为进一步了解历经循环加载历史后板式无砟轨道的力学性能提供必要的试验依据,进而应用于指导 CA 砂浆材料优化设计中。%Research purposes:In order to analyze the influence on the change rule of compressive strength,elastic modulus and peak strain of China railway track system(CRTS)Ⅰslab track cement asphalt mortar(CA mortar)by different cyclic loading histories and strain rates.The uniaxial compression characteristic test of CA mortar cylinder specimens due to cyclic loading histories with the strain rates ranging from 1 ×10 -5 s -1 to 1 ×10 -2 s -1 was carried out. Research conclusions:(1)The mechanical property of CA mortar is affected obviously by strain rates and cyclic loading histories.(2)The compressive strength,elastic modulus and peak strain of CA mortar are increase with the strain rate. (3)The compressive strength of CA mortar

  16. Dynamic Brazilian Tests of Granite Under Coupled Static and Dynamic Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zilong; Li, Xibing; Zou, Yang; Jiang, Yihui; Li, Guonan

    2014-01-01

    Rocks in underground projects at great depth, which are under high static stresses, may be subjected to dynamic disturbance at the same time. In our previous work (Li et al. Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 45(5):739–748, 2008), the dynamic compressive behaviour of pre-stressed rocks was investigated using coupled-load equipment. The current work is devoted to the investigation of the dynamic tensile behaviour of granite rocks under coupled loads using the Brazilian disc (BD) method with the aid of a ...

  17. The monitoring of pipeline strength in dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuriakov, N. E.; Lopa, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    The article considers the strength of a dynamically loaded pipeline at hydraulic blow. We propose, in diagnosing the pipeline quality, to determine the pipe material stress-strain state based on the wave problem solution on the distribution of radial pressure waves in the pipe, both taking into account the falling radial compressive stress waves and the interference of falling and reflected stress waves that form on the free surface. It is shown that the mechanical pressures from the loaded surface to the free surface significantly reduced. The calculations results of the necessary pipe wall thickness the are given at averaging the effective stresses for various transport environments.

  18. Performance Comparision of Dynamic Load Balancing Algorithm in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita kaushik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing as a distributed paradigm, it has the latent to make over a large part of the Cooperative industry. In cloud computing it’s automatically describe more technologies like distributed computing, virtualization, software, web services and networking. We review the new cloud computing technologies, and indicate the main challenges for their development in future, among which load balancing problem stands out and attracts our attention Concept of load balancing in networking and in cloud environment both are widely different. Load balancing in networking its complete concern to avoid the problem of overloading and under loading in any sever networking cloud computing its complete different its involves different elements metrics such as security, reliability, throughput, tolerance, on demand services, cost etc. Through these elements we avoiding various node problem of distributing system where many services waiting for request and others are heavily loaded and through these its increase response time and degraded performance optimization. In this paper first we classify algorithms in static and dynamic. Then we analyzed the dynamic algorithms applied in dynamics environments in cloud. Through this paper we have been show compression of various dynamics algorithm in which we include honey bee algorithm, throttled algorithm, Biased random algorithm with different elements and describe how and which is best in cloud environment with different metrics mainly used elements are performance, resource utilization and minimum cost. Our main focus of paper is in the analyze various load balancing algorithms and their applicability in cloud environment.

  19. LOAD CARRYING CAPABILITY OF LIQUID FILLED CYLINDRICAL SHELL STRUCTURES UNDER AXIAL COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QASIM H. SHAH

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Empty and water filled cylindrical Tin (Sn coated steel cans were loaded under axial compression at varying loading rates to study their resistance to withstand accidental loads. Compared to empty cans the water filled cans exhibit greater resistance to axially applied compression loads before a complete collapse. The time and load or stroke and load plots showed three significant load peaks related to three stages during loading until the cylinder collapse. First peak corresponds to the initial structural buckling of can. Second peak occurs when cylindrical can walls gradually come into full contact with water. The third peak shows the maximum load carrying capability of the structure where pressurized water deforms the can walls into curved shape until can walls fail under peak pressure. The collapse process of water filled cylindrical shell was further studied using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH technique in LSDYNA. Load peaks observed in the experimental work were successfully simulated which substantiated the experimental work.

  20. Theoretical and computational dynamics of a compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Shih-I; Luo, Shijun

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the theoretical and computational fluid dynamics of a compressible fluid is presented. The general topics addressed include: thermodynamics and physical properties of compressible fluids; 1D flow of an inviscid compressible fluid; shock waves; fundamental equations of the dynamics of a compressible inviscid non-heat-conducting and radiating fluid, method of small perturbations, linearized theory; 2D subsonic steady potential flow; hodograph and rheograph methods, exact solutions of 2D insentropic steady flow equations, 2D steady transonic and hypersonic flows, method of characteristics, linearized theory of 3D potential flow, nonlinear theory of 3D compressibe flow, anisentropic (rotational) flow of inviscid compressible fluid, electromagnetogasdynamics, multiphase flows, flows of a compressible fluid with transport phenomena.

  1. Dynamic compressive properties obtained from a split Hopkinson pressure bar test of Boryeong shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minju; Cho, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang Gon; Park, Jaeyeong; Jeong, Myeong-Sik; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic compressive properties of a Boryeong shale were evaluated by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, and were compared with those of a Hwangdeung granite which is a typical hard rock. The results indicated that the dynamic compressive loading reduced the resistance to fracture. The dynamic compressive strength was lower in the shale than in the granite, and was raised with increasing strain rate by microcracking effect as well as strain rate strengthening effect. Since the number of microcracked fragments increased with increasing strain rate in the shale having laminated weakness planes, the shale showed the better fragmentation performance than the granite at high strain rates. The effect of transversely isotropic plane on compressive strength decreased with increasing strain rate, which was desirable for increasing the fragmentation performance. Thus, the shale can be more reliably applied to industrial areas requiring good fragmentation performance as the striking speed of drilling or hydraulic fracturing machines increased. The present dynamic compressive test effectively evaluated the fragmentation performance as well as compressive strength and strain energy density by controlling the air pressure, and provided an important idea on which rock was more readily fragmented under dynamically processing conditions such as high-speed drilling and blasting.

  2. Damage Characteristic of Interpenetrating Phase Composites under Dynamic Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fuchi; ZHANG Xu; WANG Yangwei; WANG Lu; MA Zhuang; FAN Qunbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the damage characteristic of ceramic-metal interpenetrating phase composite (IPC) under dynamic loading, uniaxial dynamic compression was performed to characterize the failure of SiC/Al composite with 15%porosity using a modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB). High speed photography was used to capture the failure procedure and set up the relationship between deformation and real stress. The deformation control technology was used to obtain collected samples in different deformations under dynamic loading. Micro CT technology was utilized to acquire real damage distribution of these specimens. Moreover, SEM was employed in comparing the damage characteristics in IPC. A summary of the available experimental results showed that IPC without lateral confinement formed double cones. The different features compared with ceramic materials without restraint was shown to be the result of the lateral restraint effect provided by metal phase to ceramics skeleton.

  3. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...

  4. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....

  5. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpyak, O. G., E-mail: ogkumpyak@yandex.ru; Galyautdinov, Z. R., E-mail: gazr@yandex.ru; Kokorin, D. N., E-mail: kokorindenn@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  6. Study on dynamic compression performance of K9 glass with prefabricated defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changming; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Lingcang; Liu, Cangli

    2012-03-01

    We conducted several planar impact experiments to study dynamic compression properties of K9 glass on powder gun using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measure system. Samples are prefabricated some internal meso-defects by laser three-dimensional erosion technique before shock loading. Free surface velocities recorded by high temporal-spatial resolution PDV array or multi-point PDV. All these experimental results show some different properties influenced by evolutions of pre-existed internal defects face on free surface velocity profiles. The critical compression strength and dynamic evolution information of pre-existed internal defects can be derived from the experimental results tentatively.

  7. Study on one-dimensional consolidation of soil under cyclic loading and with varied compressibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Ying-chun; XIE Kang-he

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method to solve one dimensional consolidation problem by taking consideration of varied compressibility of soil under cyclic loading. In the method, soil stratum is divided equally into n layers while load and consolidation time are also divided into small parts and time intervals accordingly. The problem of one-dimensional consolidation of soil stratum under cyclic loading can then be dealt with at each time interval as one-dimensional linear consolidation of multi-layered soils under constant loading. The compression or rebounding of each soil layer can be judged by the effective stress of the layer. When the effective stress is larger than that in the last time interval, the soil layer is compressed, and when it is smaller, the soil layer rebounds. Thus, appropriate compressibility can be chosen and the consolidation of the layered system can be analyzed by the available analytical linear consolidation theory. Based on the semi-analytical method, a computer program was developed and the behavior of one-dimensional consolidation of soil with varied compressibility under cyclic loading was investigated, and compared with the available consolidation theory which takes no consideration of varied compressibility of soil under cyclic loading. The results showed that by taking the variable compressibility into account, the rate of consolidation of soil was greater than the one predicted by conventional consolidation theory.

  8. Use of loading-unloading compression curves in medical device design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciornei, M. C.; Alaci, S.; Ciornei, F. C.; Romanu, I. C.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a method and experimental results regarding mechanical testing of soft materials. In order to characterize the mechanical behaviour of technological materials used in prosthesis, a large number of material constants are required, as well as the comparison to the original. The present paper proposes as methodology the comparison between compression loading-unloading curves corresponding to a soft biological tissue and to a synthetic material. To this purpose, a device was designed based on the principle of the dynamic harness test. A moving load is considered and the force upon the indenter is controlled for loading-unloading phases. The load and specimen deformation are simultaneously recorded. A significant contribution of this paper is the interpolation of experimental data by power law functions, a difficult task because of the instability of the system of equations to be optimized. Finding the interpolation function was simplified, from solving a system of transcendental equations to solving a unique equation. The characteristic parameters of the experimentally curves must be compared to the ones corresponding to actual tissue. The tests were performed for two cases: first, using a spherical punch, and second, for a flat-ended cylindrical punch.

  9. Dynamic Relative Compression, Dynamic Partial Sums, and Substring Concatenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li;

    2016-01-01

    Given a static reference string R and a source string S, a relative compression of S with respect to R is an encoding of S as a sequence of references to substrings of R. Relative compression schemes are a classic model of compression and have recently proved very successful for compressing highl...

  10. Distributed dynamic load balancing in wireless networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); I. Saniee; P.A. Whiting

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractSpatial and temporal load variations, e.g. flash overloads and traffic hot spots that persist for minutes to hours, are intrinsic features of wireless networks, and give rise to potentially huge performance repercussions. Dynamic load balancing strategies provide a natural mechanism for

  11. Dynamic Multi-class Network Loading Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic network loading problem (DNLP) consists in determining on a congested network, timedependent arc volumes, together with arc and path travel times, given the time varying path flow departure rates over a finite time horizon. The objective of this paper is to present the formulation of an analytical dynamic multiclass network loading model. The model does not require the assumption of the FIFO condition. The existence of a solution to the model is shown.

  12. Compressive damage mechanism of GFRP composites under off-axis loading: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H.W.; Li, H.Y.; Gui, L.L.;

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies of the microscale mechanisms of damage formation and evolution in unidirectional glass fiber reinforced polymer composites (GFRP) under axial and off-axis compressive loading are carried out. A series of compressive testing of the composites with different a...

  13. Property of Corroded Concrete under Compressive Uniaxial Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Yingfang; HU Zhiqiang; ZHOU Jing; LI Xin

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the compressive property of corroded concrete, accelerated corrosion test were performed on concrete C30.6 corrosive solutions, including hydraulic acid solution (pH=2), hydraulic acid solution (pH=3) were applied as the corrosive medium. 6 series of corrosion tests, including 111 specimens,were carried out. Mechanical properties of all the corroded specimens were tested respectively. Compressive properties of the corroded specimens (e.g. compressive strength, stress-strain relation, elastic modulus etc.) were achieved. Taking the strength degradation ratio and strain energy loss as damage index, effects of the corrosion solution on the compressive property of corroded concrete were discussed in detail. Relationship between the damage index and corrosion state of specimens were achieved.

  14. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Davies Benjamin M; Davidson Jerome A; O'Connor-Read Laurence M; Matthews Michael G; Smirthwaite Paul

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS) and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN) were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded...

  15. Effect Of Compression Ratio On The Performance Of Diesel Engine At Different Loads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Reddy G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Variable compression ratio (VCR technology has long been recognized as a method for improving the automobile engine performance, efficiency, fuel economy with reduced emission. The main feature of the VCR engine is to operate at different compression ratio, by changing the combustion chamber volume, depending on the vehicle performance needs .The need to improve the performance characteristics of the IC Engine has necessitated the present research. Increasing the compression ratio to improve on the performance is an option. The compression ratio is a factor that influences the performance characteristics of internal combustion engines. This work is an experimental investigation of the influence of the compression ratio on the brake power, brake thermal efficiency, brake mean effective pressure and specific fuel consumption of the Kirloskar variable compression ratio duel fuel engine. Compression Ratios of 14, 15, 16 and 18 and engine loads of 3kg to 12 kg, in increments of 3kg, were utilized for Diesel.

  16. Direct and indirect loading of the Ilizarov external fixator: the effect on the interfragmentary movements and compressive loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Jan; Baecker, Hinnerk; Jettkant, Birger; Muhr, Gert; Seybold, Dominik

    2011-04-01

    The amount of weight bearing and the force transmission to the frame have an important influence on the results of treatment with an Ilizarov external fixator. The frame provides beneficial interfragmentary movements and compressive loads at the fracture site through elastic wires. Mobilisation can be achieved by applying a weight-bearing platform at the distal end of the fixator. The effect on the interfragmentary movements and the compressive loads in indirect and direct loading were analysed in this study using a composite tibia bone model. Displacement transducers were attached to measure the interfragmentary movements and to detect relative movements of the bone fragments and movements between the rings. The compressive loads in the osteotomy were measured with loading cells in the defect zone. The weight-bearing platform had a substantial effect on the biomechanical behaviour of the frame. It led to an indirect force transmission through the fixator with respect to the osteotomy, resulting in lower compressive loads, lower interfragmentary movements and higher mechanical stress on the frame.

  17. Damage development under compression-compression fatigue loading in a stitched uniwoven graphite/epoxy composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermey, Nancy E.; Morris, Don H.; Masters, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Damage initiation and growth under compression-compression fatigue loading were investigated for a stitched uniweave material system with an underlying AS4/3501-6 quasi-isotropic layup. Performance of unnotched specimens having stitch rows at either 0 degree or 90 degrees to the loading direction was compared. Special attention was given to the effects of stitching related manufacturing defects. Damage evaluation techniques included edge replication, stiffness monitoring, x-ray radiography, residual compressive strength, and laminate sectioning. It was found that the manufacturing defect of inclined stitches had the greatest adverse effect on material performance. Zero degree and 90 degree specimen performances were generally the same. While the stitches were the source of damage initiation, they also slowed damage propagation both along the length and across the width and affected through-the-thickness damage growth. A pinched layer zone formed by the stitches particularly affected damage initiation and growth. The compressive failure mode was transverse shear for all specimens, both in static compression and fatigue cycling effects.

  18. Effect of Static-Dynamic Coupling Loading on Fracture Toughness and Failure Characteristics in Marble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Yin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fracture experiments in a notched semi-circular bend configuration were conducted to test the dynamic fracture toughness of a marble under static-dynamic coupling load using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar. The fracture process of the specimen was monitored using a high speed (HS camera. Based on digital image correlation (DIC and strain gauges, the full-field strain fields and time-to-fracture of the marble were measured under static-dynamic coupling load. Experimental results show that dynamic fracture toughness was well determined, and the HS-DIC technique provides reliable full-field strain fields in the specimens under static-dynamic coupling loads. The failure characteristics of the marble under external impact were affected obviously by pre-compression stress. Increase of axial pre-compression stress was helpful to improve the crack propagation velocity, and dynamic crack initiation toughness was decreased.

  19. STATIC AND FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF IMPACTED AS4/PEEK THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES UNDER COMPRESSION LOAD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Static and fatigue tests under compression load were made on impacted AS4/PEEK and T300/913C graphite/epoxy with [45/90/-45/0]5S stacking sequence. The comparison of the damage tolerance assessment for thermosetting and thermoplastic composites shows that thermoplastics are more damage tolerant under compression. Impacted thermoplastic composites have excellent compression-compression fatigue behavior. The damage growth life is only a few percent of their total fatigue life and no regular damage growth can be found. Some design principles for thermosetting composite structures may still be used.

  20. Shaft Center Orbit in Dynamically Loaded Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coefficients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 and described further in 1972. Several authors have refined this method over...... Jorgen W. Lund pointed out in lecture notes that the dynamic damping coefficients of the bearing could be used to find the shaft orbit for dynamically loaded bearings. For simplicity the "Short-Width-Journal-Bearing Theory" is used as a basis for finding the damping coefficients in this work...

  1. Compressive Loading and Modeling of Stitched Composite Stiffeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Linton, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of single-frame and single-stringer compression tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center on specimens harvested from a large panel built using the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. Different frame and stringer designs were used in fabrication of the PRSEUS panel. In this paper, the details of the experimental testing of single-frame and single-stringer compression specimens are presented, as well as discussions on the performance of the various structural configurations included in the panel. Nonlinear finite element models were developed to further understand the failure processes observed during the experimental campaign.

  2. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  3. Crystal Plasticity Analysis on Compressive Loading of Magnesium with Suppression of Twinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayama, Tsuyoshi; Ohashi, Tetsuya; Higashida, Kenji; Kawamura, Yoshihito

    The compressive loading behavior of single crystals and bicrystals of magnesium without consideration of deformation twinning has been investigated by crystal plasticity finite element analysis with the aim of fundamental understanding of kink band formation in magnesium alloys with long period stacking ordered structure (LPSO) phase. The basal plane of the single crystal model is set to be parallel to the compressive direction. The result of the compressive loading analysis of single crystals indicates the significant influence of suppression of twinning on the activation of nonbasal slip systems and stress-strain behavior. The compressive analysis of symmetric bicrystal is also performed to clarify the influence of the angle between basal plane and the loading axis. The influence of the introduction of grain boundary and the slight change of crystal orientation is discussed in terms of activated deformation modes.

  4. Optimum design of laminated composite under axial compressive load

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N G R Iyengar; Nilesh Vyas

    2011-02-01

    In the present study optimal design of composite laminates, with and without rectangular cut-out, is carried out for maximizing the buckling load. Optimization study is carried out for obtaining the maximum buckling load with design variables as ply thickness, cut-out size and orientation of cut-out with respect to laminate. Buckling load is evaluated using a ‘simple higher order shear deformation theory’ based on four unknown displacements $u,v,w_b$ and $w_s$. A C1 continuous shear flexible finite element based on HSDT model is developed using Hermite cubic polynomial. It is observed that for thick anti-symmetric laminates, the non-dimensional buckling load decreases with increase in aspect ratio and increase in fibre orientation angle. There is a decrease in the non-dimensional buckling load of symmetric laminate in the presence of cut-out.

  5. Tensile stresses generated in pharmaceutical tablets by opposing compressive line loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, K R; Newton, J M; Mokhtary-Saghafi, S; Davies, P N

    2007-03-01

    The distribution of tensile stress, across the splitting plane, has been investigated for the case when circular and square tablets are subjected to opposing compressive line loads acting in the through thickness direction. This type of loading is referred to in the paper as axial compression. Analytical solutions for the two-dimensional problem of a rectangular strip have been used to investigate the variation of stress in the through thickness direction and to consider the effects of load spreading. Three-dimensional finite element analysis has been used to investigate the variation in stress across the diameter, or breadth, of the tablets. It is shown that the magnitude of the tensile stress varies significantly throughout and that load spreading has an important influence on the stress distribution in the through thickness direction. Experiments have been carried out with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102) material for circular and square tablets to determine their breaking loads when subjected to axial compression and diametral compression. The experimental results show higher breaking loads for the case of axial compression. It is concluded that the platen contact width must be known in order to evaluate the exact value of the tensile strength of the tablet material when applying this test procedure.

  6. Dynamic compressibility of air in porous structures at audible frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafarge, Denis; Lemarinier, Pavel; Allard, Jean F.;

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic compressibility of air-filled porous sound-absorbing materials are compared with predictions involving two parametere, the static thermal permeability k'_0 and the thermal characteristic dimension GAMMA'. Emphasis on the notion of dynamic and static thermal permeability...

  7. Failure of Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) amyloid nanofibrils under compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-04-01

    Amyloids are associated with severe degenerative diseases and show exceptional mechanical properties, in particular great stiffhess. Amyloid fibrils, forming protein nanotube structures, are elongated fibers with a diameter of ≈8 nm with a characteristic dense hydrogen-bond (H-bond)patterning in the form of beta-sheets (β-sheets). Here we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study mechanical failure properties of a twofold symmetric Aβ(l-40) amyloid fibril, a pathogen associated with Alzheimer’s disease. We carry out computational experiments to study the response of the amyloid fibril to compressive loading. Our investigations reveal atomistic details of the failure process, and confirm that the breakdown of H-bonds plays a critical role during the failure process of amyloid fibrils. We obtain a Young’s modulus of ≈12.43 GPa, in dose agreement with earlier experimental results. Our simulations show that failure by buck-ling and subsequent shearing in one of the layers initiates at ≈1% compressive strain, suggesting that amyloid fibrils can be rather brittle mechanical elements.

  8. Effect of Axial Pre-Compression on Lateral Performance of Masonry Under Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed HassanFarooq

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening of masonry against seismic events is very essential and getting maximum attention of researchers around the globe. An extensive experimental program was carried out to study the in-plane lateral performance of un-reinforced masonry, strengthened and retrofitted masonry wall panels under lateral cyclic loading. Twenty tests were carried out; four tests under monotonic lateral loading, twelve tests under static cyclic loading and four tests under pure compression. The test results were analyzed in five groups and this paper presents the analysis of group 4, which deals with effect of axial pre-compression on masonry seismic performance. Three single leaf panels with aspect ratio of 0.67 having size 1.65x1.1m were constructed using same material and workmanship. All the three un-reinforced walls were tested under 0, 0.5 and 1.0MPa vertical pre-compression and displacement controlled static cyclic loading. The wall tested under 0.5MPa pre-compression was reference specimen. The key parameters studied were hysterics behavior, peak lateral load, ultimate lateral displacement, energy dissipation, ductility, response factor and damping ratio. It was observed that level of axial pre-compression has significant effect on lateral capacity, failure mode and performance of masonry. In case of zero pre-compression the lateral capacity was very less and wall went into rocking failure at early stages of loading. Increase in pre-compression to 1.0MPa enhanced the lateral capacity by a factor of 1.92 times. After analysis of test results, it is found that pre-compression has significant effect on lateral capacity, failure mode and performance of masonry. In case of zero pre-compression the lateral capacity was very less and wall went into rocking failure at early stages of loading. Increase in pre-compression to 1.0MPa enhanced the lateral capacity by a factor of 1.92 times. After analysis of test results, it is found that pre-compression has very

  9. Behaviour of Soil Subjected to Dynamic Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, L.

    1998-01-01

    Many geotechnical problems involve design of dynamically loaded foundations. The design criterion fr dynamically loaded foundations is often described in terms of limiting values for the displacements. The displacements in the soil are normally very small when dealing with dynamically loaded...... foundations, and hence it is necessary to know the deformation properties for the soil at very low strain level. The main topic of the project is to increase the knowledge of the behaviour of Danish soils at small strain levels and to extend the laboratory facilities to deal with testing at small strains....... The soil behaviour at very small strain levels is non-linear, and the most common testing technique for this situation is the resonant column technique. One of the aims of this project is to install, check, get familiar with and perform tests on different kinds of Danish soils in a new Drnevich...

  10. Dynamic Brazilian Tests of Granite Under Coupled Static and Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zilong; Li, Xibing; Zou, Yang; Jiang, Yihui; Li, Guonan

    2014-03-01

    Rocks in underground projects at great depth, which are under high static stresses, may be subjected to dynamic disturbance at the same time. In our previous work (Li et al. Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 45(5):739-748, 2008), the dynamic compressive behaviour of pre-stressed rocks was investigated using coupled-load equipment. The current work is devoted to the investigation of the dynamic tensile behaviour of granite rocks under coupled loads using the Brazilian disc (BD) method with the aid of a high-speed camera. Through wave analyses, stress measurements and crack photography, the fundamental problems of BD tests, such as stress equilibrium and crack initiation, were investigated by the consideration of different loading stresses with abruptly or slowly rising stress waves. The specially shaped striker method was used for the coupled-load test; this generates a slowly rising stress wave, which allows gradual stress accumulation in the specimen, whilst maintaining the load at both ends of the specimen in an equilibrium state. The test results showed that the tensile strength of the granite under coupled loads decreases with increases in the static pre-stresses, which might lead to modifications of the blasting design or support design in deep underground projects. Furthermore, the failure patterns of specimens under coupled loads have been investigated.

  11. Compression Sensibility of Magnetic-concentrated Fly Ash Mortar under Uniaxial Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xingwen; ZHANG Yajie; QIAN Jueshi

    2012-01-01

    The electrical conductivity,compression sensibility,workability and cost are factors that affect the application of conductive smart materials in civil structures.Consequently,the resistance and compression sensibility of magnetic-concentrated fly ash (MCFA) mortar were investigated using two electrode method,and the difference of compression sensibility between MCFA mortar and carbon fiber reinforced cement (CFRC)under uniaxial loading was studied.Factors affecting the compression sensibility of MCFA mortar,such as MCFA content,loading rate and stress cycles,were analyzed.Results show that fly ash with high content of Fe3O4 can be used to prepare conductive mortar since Fe3O4 is a kind of nonstoichiometric oxide and usually acts as semiconductor.MCFA mortar exhibits the same electrical conductivity to that of CFRC when the content of MCFA is more than 40% by weight of sample.The compression sensibility of mortar is improved with the increase of MCFA content and loading rate.The compression sensibility of MCFA mortar is reversible with the circling of loading.Results show that the application of MCFA in concrete not only provides excellent performances of electrical-functionality and workability,but also reduces the cost of conductive concrete.

  12. DELAMINATION FORMATION AND DELAMINATION PROPAGATION OF COMPOSITE LAMINATES UNDER COMPRESSIVE FATIGUE LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fatigue tests of the smooth composite laminates and the notched composite laminates under compressive cyclic loading have been carried out. The damage mechanism is discussed and analyzed. Damage evolution is monitored using stiffness decay. From these tests, it is found that the initial delamination occurs at the free boundary of smooth specimens, or the notch boundary of notched specimens, subjected to the compression-compression cyclic load. A point of view in relation to two-phases of compression fatigue delamination of composites is proposed, namely, compression-compression delamination consists of the delamination formation phase and the delamination propagation, and there is a "damage transition point" to separate this two-phases. Furthermore, an empirical modulus degradation formula and its parameters fitting method are presented. According to the test data handling results, it is shown that this formula is univocal and can fit the test data conveniently. In addition, two kinds of new anti-buckling devices are designed for these tests. At last, the E-N curves, the D-N curves and the S-N curve of the smooth carbon fiber reinforced composite laminates of T300/648C are determined to predict the fatigue life of the notched composite laminate. And the E-N curve of the notched specimens at the given load ratio R=10 and minimum load P min=-0.45 kN is also measured to verify the estimated result of fatigue life.

  13. Spinal muscles can create compressive follower loads in the lumbar spine in a neutral standing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kap-Soo; Rohlmann, Antonius; Yang, Seok-Jo; Kim, Byeong Sam; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2011-05-01

    The ligamentous spinal column buckles under compressive loads of even less than 100N. Experimental results showed that under the follower load constraint, the ligamentous lumbar spine can sustain large compressive loads without buckling, while at the same time maintaining its flexibility reasonably well. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of follower loads produced by spinal muscles in the lumbar spine in a quiet standing posture. A three-dimensional static model of the lumbar spine incorporating 232 back muscles was developed and utilized to perform the optimization analysis in order to find the muscle forces, and compressive follower loads (CFLs) along optimum follower load paths (FLPs). The effect of increasing external loads on CFLs was also investigated. An optimum solution was found which is feasible for muscle forces producing minimum CFLs along the FLP located 11 mm posterior to the curve connecting the geometrical centers of the vertebral bodies. Activation of 30 muscles was found to create CFLs with zero joint moments in all intervertebral joints. CFLs increased with increasing external loads including FLP deviations from the optimum location. Our results demonstrate that spinal muscles can create CFLs in the lumbar spine in a neutral standing posture in vivo to sustain stability. Therefore, its application in experimental and numerical studies concerning loading conditions seems to be suitable for the attainment of realistic results. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Mechanical properties of Indonesian-made narrow dynamic compression plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewo, P; van der Houwen, E B; Sharma, P K; Magetsari, R; Bor, T C; Vargas-Llona, L D; van Horn, J R; Busscher, H J; Verkerke, G J

    2012-09-01

    Osteosynthesis plates are clinically used to fixate and position a fractured bone. They should have the ability to withstand cyclic loads produced by muscle contractions and total body weight. The very high demand for osteosynthesis plates in developing countries in general and in Indonesia in particular necessitates the utilisation of local products. In this paper, we investigated the mechanical properties, i.e. proportional limit and fatigue strength of Indonesian-made Narrow Dynamic Compression Plates (Narrow DCP) as one of the most frequently used osteosynthesis plates, in comparison to the European AO standard plate, and its relationship to geometry, micro structural features and surface defects of the plates. All Indonesian-made plates appeared to be weaker than the standard Narrow DCP because they consistently failed at lower stresses. Surface defects did not play a major role in this, although the polishing of the Indonesian Narrow DCP was found to be poor. The standard plate showed indications of cold deformation from the production process in contrast to the Indonesian plates, which might be the first reason for the differences in strength. This is confirmed by hardness measurements. A second reason could be the use of an inferior version of stainless steel. The Indonesian plates showed lower mechanical behaviour compared to the AO-plates. These findings could initiate the development of improved Indonesian manufactured DCP-plates with properties comparable to commonly used plates, such as the standard European AO-plates.

  15. Cortical and trabecular bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherholt, Alyssa M; Fuchs, Robyn K; Warden, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    The mouse tibial axial compression loading model has recently been described to allow simultaneous exploration of cortical and trabecular bone adaptation within the same loaded element. However, the model frequently induces cortical woven bone formation and has produced inconsistent results with regards to trabecular bone adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model, with the ultimate goal of revealing a load that simultaneously induced lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation. Adult (16 weeks old) female C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three load magnitude groups (5, 7 and 9N), and had their right tibia axially loaded using a continuous 2-Hz haversine waveform for 360 cycles/day, 3 days/week for 4 consecutive weeks. In vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to longitudinally assess midshaft tibia cortical bone adaptation, while ex vivo micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to assess both midshaft tibia cortical and proximal tibia trabecular bone adaptation. A dose response to loading magnitude was observed within cortical bone, with increasing load magnitude inducing increasing levels of lamellar cortical bone adaptation within the upper two thirds of the tibial diaphysis. Greatest cortical bone adaptation was observed at the midshaft where there was a 42% increase in estimated mechanical properties (polar moment of inertia) in the highest (9N) load group. A dose response to load magnitude was not clearly evident within trabecular bone, with only the highest load (9N) being able to induce measureable adaptation (31% increase in trabecular bone volume fraction at the proximal tibia). The ultimate finding was that a load of 9N (engendering a tensile strain of 1833 με on medial surface of the midshaft tibia) was able to simultaneously induce measurable lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation

  16. Dynamic control of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Mehresh, Parag; Schuh, David; Kieser, Andrew J.; Hergart, Carl-Anders; Hardy, William L.; Rodman, Anthony; Liechty, Michael P.

    2008-06-03

    A homogenous charge compression ignition engine is operated by compressing a charge mixture of air, exhaust and fuel in a combustion chamber to an autoignition condition of the fuel. The engine may facilitate a transition from a first combination of speed and load to a second combination of speed and load by changing the charge mixture and compression ratio. This may be accomplished in a consecutive engine cycle by adjusting both a fuel injector control signal and a variable valve control signal away from a nominal variable valve control signal. Thereafter in one or more subsequent engine cycles, more sluggish adjustments are made to at least one of a geometric compression ratio control signal and an exhaust gas recirculation control signal to allow the variable valve control signal to be readjusted back toward its nominal variable valve control signal setting. By readjusting the variable valve control signal back toward its nominal setting, the engine will be ready for another transition to a new combination of engine speed and load.

  17. Damage assessment of compression loaded debond damaged sandwich panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar;

    2010-01-01

    Sandwich composites with face sheets of fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) and cores of polymer foam offer a lightweight construction that is well suited to wind turbine blades, naval and other vessels for high-speed operation or where payload considerations require that the structural weight...... with an implanted circular face/core debond. Compression tests were conducted on intact sandwich panels and panels with an implanted circular face/core debond with three different types of foam core materials (PVC H130, PVC H250 and PMI 51-IG). The strains and out-of-plane displacements of the debonded region were...

  18. Dynamical Functional Theory for Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2017-01-01

    the Thouless Anderson-Palmer (TAP) equations corresponding to the ensemble. Using a dynamical functional approach we are able to derive an effective stochastic process for the marginal statistics of a single component of the dynamics. This allows us to design memory terms in the algorithm in such a way...

  19. Development of Experimental Device for Compression Load Deflection of Car Door Seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建才; 朱训生; 万德安

    2003-01-01

    A new experimental device has been developed for analyzing compression load deflection of the door seal by using stereovision theory. Precision instruments of optical grating and force sensor are also integrated in this device. Force-displacement response characteristics of compression at varied speed can be controlled. Solid foundations for characteristic and structure as well as optimization design of the car door seal are elucidated.

  20. Dynamic Gust Load Analysis for Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic load of helicopter rotors due to gust directly affects the structural stress and flight performance for helicopters. Based on a large deflection beam theory, an aeroelastic model for isolated helicopter rotors in the time domain is constructed. The dynamic response and structural load for a rotor under the impulse gust and slope-shape gust are calculated, respectively. First, a nonlinear Euler beam model with 36 degrees-of-freedoms per element is applied to depict the structural dynamics for an isolated rotor. The generalized dynamic wake model and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model are applied to calculate the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic forces on rotors. Then, we transformed the differential aeroelastic governing equation to an algebraic one. Hence, the widely used Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is employed to simulate the dynamic gust load. An isolated helicopter rotor with four blades is studied to validate the structural model and the aeroelastic model. The modal frequencies based on the Euler beam model agree well with published ones by CAMRAD. The flap deflection due to impulse gust with the speed of 2m/s increases twice to the one without gust. In this numerical example, results indicate that the bending moment at the blade root is alleviated due to elastic effect.

  1. Material properties under intensive dynamic loading

    CERN Document Server

    Cherne, Frank J; Zhernokletov, Mikhail V; Glushak, B L; Zocher, Marvin A

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the physical and thermomechanical response of materials subjected to intensive dynamic loading is a challenge of great significance in engineering today. This volume assumes the task of gathering both experimental and diagnostic methods in one place, since not much information has been previously disseminated in the scientific literature.

  2. The Effect of Cyclic Loading on the Compressive Strength of Core Build-Up Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zankuli, Muayed A; Silikas, Nick; Devlin, Hugh

    2015-01-15

    To evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on compressive strength of core build-up materials. Four dual-cured composites (Core.X Flow, Grandio Core, Bright Flow Core, Spee-Dee) and one light-cured reinforced resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC) were tested. One hundred cylindrical specimens (4 mm × 6 mm) were prepared. Each material had two groups (ten specimens to be tested under static loading and ten specimens to be tested after cyclic loading). The specimens were stored wet, and after 30 days, one group of each material was cyclically loaded (for 250,000 cycles with a frequency of 1.6 Hz under stress load of 68.6 N) in a chewing simulator CS-4.2. Then specimens were subjected to static compressive loading until failure in a universal testing machine. Mean compressive strength values before cycling ranged from 144 MPa (15.8) for Fuji II LC to 277 MPa (23.2) for Grandio Core. Independent t-test showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in the compressive strength of each material before and after cycling (p = 0.7 Grandio Core, p = 0.3 Core.X Flow, p = 0.6 Bright Flow Core, p = 0.2 Spee-Dee, p = 0.6 Fuji II LC); however, there was a statistically significant difference between the materials when comparing before and after cycling. All tested materials showed no reduction in the compressive strength after cycling. Therefore, the tested materials can survive 1 year in service without a reduction in compressive strength. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Anisotropic compressive response of Stone-Thrower-Wales defects in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, G.; Parashar, Avinash

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene sheet can be tailored with the help of topological defects. In this research article, the effects of Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects on the mechanical properties of graphene sheet was investigated with the help of molecular dynamics based simulations. Authors has made an attempt to analyse the stress field developed in and around the vicinity of defect due to bond reorientation and further systematic evaluation has been carried out to study the effect of these stress fields against the applied axial compressive load. The results obtained with the pristine graphene were made to compare with the available open literature and the results were reported to be in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. It was predicted that graphene with STW defect cannot able to bear compressive strength in zigzag direction, whereas on the other hand it was predicted that graphene sheet containing STW defect can bear higher compressive load in armchair direction, which shows an anisotropic response of STW defects in graphene. From the obtained results it can be observed that orientation of STW defects and the loading direction plays an important role to alter the strength of graphene under axial compression.

  4. Shaft Center Orbit in Dynamically Loaded Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coe±cients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 [1]and described further in 1972 [2]. Several authors have re¯ned this method...... seventies Jorgen W. Lund pointed out in lecture notes that the dynamic damping coe±cients of the bearing could be used to ¯nd the shaft orbit for dynamically loaded bearings. For simplicity the "Short-Width-Journal-Bearing Theory" is used as a basis for ¯nding the damping coe±cients in this work...

  5. [Biomechanical properties (compressive strength and compressive pressure at break) of hyaline cartilage under axial load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, G; Wittig, R

    2003-01-01

    Explanations concerning the physical properties of hyaline cartilage are different. It was the intention of this study to determine the material parameters of hyaline cartilage under axial load (elasticity, plasticity, elasticity and module pressure stress to break). Specimens from the medial femoral condyle (chondro-cortical ships) from adult female domestic pigs (n=28) were used for the experiments. The specimens were completely embedded in plaster to minimize shearing. Axial load was carried out by an universal mechanical testing machine (Zwick Z2.5/TS1S, Ulm, Germany) to determine elastic and plastic deformation and pressure stress to break. Axial load up to 5 MPa produces an almost elastic deformation, an increasing axial load results in a plastic deformation. In the range of 3 to 5 MPa the principle of Hooke is valid. The elasticity module amounted to 39.2 +/- 11.9 N/mm(2), determined under 3.8 MPa axial load. An axial load of 25.8 +/- 5.2 MPa (sigma max ) causes a break of cartilage. A strong correlation between break resistance and thickness of the chondral slice (r=0.71; p .05) was observed. The low module of chondral elasticity characterizes this tissue as "soft". Moderate axial load causes an ideal elastic, higher axial load a plastic deformation. The medium pressure to break to amounted 25.8 MPa. The medium pressure to break of 25.8 MPa is comparable with the forces produced by an unrestrained limited downfall from a height of 4.3 m. It must be concluded that isolated chondral fractures are rare consequences of a trauma as long as accompanying ligamentous or osseous damages are not found.

  6. Phonon dynamics in a compressible classical Heisenberg chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fivez, Jan; Raedt, Hans De; Raedt, Bart De

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the compressible classical Heisenberg chain with bilinear coupling are investigated. The sound velocity is calculated exactly. The Fourier-transformed displacement-displacement correlation function is studied as a function of temperature, wave vector, and the model paramete

  7. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    processing, temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) and “supra-threshold” modulation-depth discrimination (MDD) thresholds were obtained in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with and without wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC). The TMTFs were obtained using tonal carriers of 1...

  8. IMPACT OF TONE MAPPING IN HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGE COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Narwaria, Manish; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu; Le Callet, Patrick; Pépion, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Tone mapping or range reduction is often used in High Dynamic Range (HDR) visual signal compression to take advantage of the existing image/video coding architectures. Thus, it is important to study the impact of tone mapping on the visual quality of decompressed HDR visual signals. To our knowledge, most of the existing studies focus only on the quality loss in the resultant low dynamic range (LDR) signal (obtained via tone mapping) and typically employ LDR displays f...

  9. A novel phenomenological model for dynamic behavior of magnetorheological elastomers in tension-compression mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatandoost, Hossein; Norouzi, Mahmood; Masoud Sajjadi Alehashem, Seyed; Smoukov, Stoyan K.

    2017-06-01

    Tension-compression operation in MR elastomers (MREs) offers both the most compact design and superior stiffness in many vertical load-bearing applications, such as MRE bearing isolators in bridges and buildings, suspension systems and engine mounts in cars, and vibration control equipment. It suffers, however, from lack of good computational models to predict device performance, and as a result shear-mode MREs are widely used in the industry, despite their low stiffness and load-bearing capacity. We start with a comprehensive review of modeling of MREs and their dynamic characteristics, showing previous studies have mostly focused on dynamic behavior of MREs in shear mode, though the MRE strength and MR effect are greatly decreased at high strain amplitudes, due to increasing distance between the magnetic particles. Moreover, the characteristic parameters of the current models assume either frequency, or strain, or magnetic field are constant; hence, new model parameters must be recalculated for new loading conditions. This is an experimentally time consuming and computationally expensive task, and no models capture the full dynamic behavior of the MREs at all loading conditions. In this study, we present an experimental setup to test MREs in a coupled tension-compression mode, as well as a novel phenomenological model which fully predicts the stress-strain material behavior as a function of magnetic flux density, loading frequency and strain. We use a training set of experiments to find the experimentally derived model parameters, from which can predict by interpolation the MRE behavior in a relatively large continuous range of frequency, strain and magnetic field. We also challenge the model to make extrapolating predictions and compare to additional experiments outside the training experimental data set with good agreement. Further development of this model would allow design and control of engineering structures equipped with tension-compression MREs and all

  10. Final Report 02-ERD-033: Rapid Resolidification of Metals using Dynamic Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitz, F H; Nguyen, J H; Orlikowski, D; Minich, R; Moriarty, J A; Holmes, N C

    2005-02-11

    compression time to several microseconds and makes accessible states beyond the principal Hugoniot and isentrope. The strain rate in these quasi-isentropic compression experiments vary from 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}, effectively bridging the gap between static compression and previous quasi-isentropic compression techniques [4, 7]. The primary deliverable associated with this LDRD-ER is the creation a new experimental capability for the lab: the ability to control pressure and temperature loading rates in a dynamic compression experiment by using functionally graded impactors in the light gas gun facility. The new capability will enable dynamic experiments exploring a broader area of pressure and temperature phase space, ultimately enabling further experiments on the kinetics of phase transitions at high temperature and pressure. Using our unique arbitrary-density graded impactors, scientists can now investigate various aspects of the solidification phase transition including (a) time scale, (b) loading rate dependence and (c) sample size effects.

  11. Chloride transport under compressive load in bacteria-based self-healing concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binti Md Yunus, B.; Schlangen, E.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in this study to investigate the effect of compressive load on chloride penetration in self-healing concrete containing bacterial-based healing agent. Bacteria-based healing agent with the fraction of 2 mm – 4 mm of particles sizes were used in this contribution. ESEM w

  12. Mechanical Properties of Steel-FRP Composite Bars under Tensile and Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The factory-produced steel-fiber reinforced polymer composite bar (SFCB is a new kind of reinforcement for concrete structures. The manufacturing technology of SFCB is presented based on a large number of handmade specimens. The calculated stress-strain curves of ordinary steel bar and SFCB under repeated tensile loading agree well with the corresponding experimental results. The energy-dissipation capacity and residual strain of both steel bar and SFCB were analyzed. Based on the good simulation results of ordinary steel bar and FRP bar under compressive loading, the compressive behavior of SFCB under monotonic loading was studied using the principle of equivalent flexural rigidity. There are three failure modes of SFCB under compressive loading: elastic buckling, postyield buckling, and no buckling (ultimate compressive strength is reached. The increase in the postyield stiffness of SFCB rsf can delay the postyield buckling of SFCB with a large length-to-diameter ratio, and an empirical equation for the relationship between the postbuckling stress and rsf is suggested, which can be used for the design of concrete structures reinforced by SFCB to consider the effect of reinforcement buckling.

  13. Chloride transport under compressive load in bacteria-based self-healing concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binti Md Yunus, B.; Schlangen, E.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in this study to investigate the effect of compressive load on chloride penetration in self-healing concrete containing bacterial-based healing agent. Bacteria-based healing agent with the fraction of 2 mm – 4 mm of particles sizes were used in this contribution. ESEM w

  14. Loading rate sensitivity of open-hole composite specimens in compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowinski, S. J.; Guynn, E. G.; Elber, W.; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of an experimental study on the compressive, time-dependent behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates with open holes. The effect of loading rate on compressive strength was determined for six material systems ranging from brittle epoxies to thermoplastics at both 75 F and 220 F. Specimens were loaded to failure using different loading rates. The slope of the strength versus elapsed time-to-failure curve was used to rank the materials' loading rate sensitivity. All of the materials had greater strength at 75 F than at 220 F. All the materials showed loading rate effects in the form of reduced failure strength for longer elapsed-time-to-failure. Loading rate sensitivity was less at 220 F than the same material at 70 F. However, C12000/ULTEM and IM7/8551-7 were more sensitive to loading rate than the other materials at 220 F. AS4/APC2 laminates with 24, 32, and 48 plies and 1/16 and 1/4 inch diameter holes were tested. The sensitivity to loading rate was less for either increasing number of plies or larger hole size. The failure of the specimens made from brittle resins was accompanied by extensive delaminations while the failure of the roughened systems was predominantly by shear crippling. Fewer delamination failures were observed at the higher temperature.

  15. Dynamic queuing transmission model for dynamic network loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new macroscopic multi-class dynamic network loading model called Dynamic Queuing Transmission Model (DQTM). The model utilizes ‘good’ properties of the Dynamic Queuing Model (DQM) and the Link Transmission Model (LTM) by offering a DQM consistent with the kinematic wave theory...... and allowing for the representation of multiple vehicle classes, queue spillbacks and shock waves. The model assumes that a link is split into a moving part plus a queuing part, and p that traffic dynamics are given by a triangular fundamental diagram. A case-study is investigated and the DQTM is compared...

  16. Analysis of fracture process zone in brittle rock subjected to shear-compressive loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU De-quan; CHEN Feng; CAO Ping; MA Chun-de

    2005-01-01

    An analytical expression for the prediction of shear-compressive fracture process zone(SCFPZ) is derived by using a proposed local strain energy density criterion, in which the strain energy density is separated into the dilatational and distortional strain energy density, only the former is considered to contribute to the brittle fracture of rock in different loading cases. The theoretical prediction by this criterion shows that the SCFPZ is of asymmetric mulberry leaf in shape, which forms a shear-compression fracture kern. Dilatational strain energy density along the boundary of SCFPZ reaches its maximum value. The dimension of SCFPZ is governed by the ratio of KⅡ to KⅠ . The analytical results are then compared with those from literatures and the tests conducted on double edge cracked Brazilian disk subjected to diametrical compression. The obtained results are useful to the prediction of crack extension and to nonlinear analysis of shear-compressive fracture of brittle rock.

  17. Water diffusion pathway, swelling pressure, and biomechanical properties of the intervertebral disc during compression load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, H.; Tsuji, H.; Hirano, N.; Ishihara, H.; Katoh, Y.; Yamada, H. (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The behavior of water in the intervertebral disc of pig tail and its physiologic and biomechanical properties were investigated in relation to compression load. The water content, chemical composition, and swelling pressure in the intervertebral disc were measured, and the mechanism of the generation of the swelling pressure in relation to compression load stress was studied. The swelling pressure, through regulation of the water content of the disc and the resistance of the external load, differs with the region of the intervertebral disc. In the nucleus pulposus and the inner layer of the anulus fibrosus, the swelling pressure rises in proportion to the load, but few changes occur in the outer layer of the anulus fibrosus, and the constant pressure environment is thus maintained. The tritiated water (3H2O) uptake of the disc under various loads was measured. The molar partition coefficient of tritiated water is almost equal to 1 even under a compression load, which suggests that water is freely exchangeable. The diffusion of 3H2O in the intervertebral disc was traced using two pathway models: the perianular route and the end-plate route. The diffusion of water in the unloaded disc for both uptake and washout was about 2 to 3 times larger in the perianular route than in the end-plate route. Under load, the water diffusion was inhibited in both pathways. The relation between the load and displacement revealed viscoelastic properties indicating creep and stress relaxation. Young's modulus and the stiffness increased with a rise in load speed.

  18. Nonlinear dynamical characteristics of bed load motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Yuchuan; XU; Haijue; XU; Dong

    2006-01-01

    Bed forms of various kinds that evolve naturally on the bottom of sandy coasts and rivers are a result of the kinematics of bed load transport. Based on the group motion of particles in the bed load within the bottom layer, a study on the nonlinear dynamics of bed load transport is presented in this paper. It is found that some development stages, such as the initiation, the equilibrium sediment transport, and the transition from a smooth bed to sand dunes, can be accounted for by different states in the nonlinear system of the bed load transport. It is verified by comparison with experimental data reported by Laboratoire Nationae D'Hydraulique, Chatou, France, that the evolution from a smooth bed to sand dunes is determined by mutation in the bed load transport. This paper presents results that may offer theoretical explanations to the experimental observations. It is also an attempt to apply the state-of-the-art nonlinear science to the classical sediment transport mechanics.

  19. Role of Inelastic Transverse Compressive Behavior and Multiaxial Loading on the Transverse Impact of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Sockalingam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity transverse impact of ballistic fabrics and yarns by projectiles subject individual fibers to multi-axial dynamic loading. Single-fiber transverse impact experiments with the current state-of-the-art experimental capabilities are challenging due to the associated micron length-scale. Kevlar® KM2 fibers exhibit a nonlinear inelastic behavior in transverse compression with an elastic limit less than 1.5% strain. The effect of this transverse behavior on a single KM2 fiber subjected to a cylindrical and a fragment-simulating projectile (FSP transverse impact is studied with a 3D finite element model. The inelastic behavior results in a significant reduction of fiber bounce velocity and projectile-fiber contact forces up to 38% compared to an elastic impact response. The multiaxial stress states during impact including transverse compression, axial tension, axial compression and interlaminar shear are presented at the location of failure. In addition, the models show a strain concentration over a small length in the fiber under the projectile-fiber contact. A failure criterion, based on maximum axial tensile strain accounting for the gage length, strain rate and multiaxial loading degradation effects are applied to predict the single-fiber breaking speed. Results are compared to the elastic response to assess the importance of inelastic material behavior on failure during a transverse impact.

  20. Subjected to Axial Compressive Load and Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Feng Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactive behaviors between transverse magnetic fields and axial loads of a magnetoelastic (ME beam subjected to general boundary conditions are investigated. In particular, the instability criterion for the magneto-mechanical buckling problem is intricately discussed based on the structure characteristics and the initial conditions. The equation of motion for the proposed physical model is introduced according to the Hamilton's principle, and the stability criterion is obtained by using the method of multiple scales implemented on both spatial and time domains. Eventually a so-called Schrodinger equation with cubic nonlinearity (NLS can be generated by suitably changing the variables; as a result, the stable criterion for the magnetoelastic beam can be acquired after dissecting the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and requiring the imaginary part of the time domain solution to be vanished. Stability criterion curve for the dispersion equation of the ME beam is firstly depicted in order to reveal the magnificent influence of the structure characteristic itself, followed by the instability constraint due to the variation of initial conditions and the observation locations. The results indicate that the prior one actually denotes a parabola, whereas the latter one is sometimes a diamond-like or ellipse-like region spotting along the prior one.

  1. Optimization of composite sandwich cover panels subjected to compressive loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Juan R.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis and design method is presented for the design of composite sandwich cover panels that include the transverse shear effects and damage tolerance considerations. This method is incorporated into a sandwich optimization computer program entitled SANDOP. As a demonstration of its capabilities, SANDOP is used in the present study to design optimized composite sandwich cover panels for for transport aircraft wing applications. The results of this design study indicate that optimized composite sandwich cover panels have approximately the same structural efficiency as stiffened composite cover panels designed to satisfy individual constraints. The results also indicate that inplane stiffness requirements have a large effect on the weight of these composite sandwich cover panels at higher load levels. Increasing the maximum allowable strain and the upper percentage limit of the 0 degree and +/- 45 degree plies can yield significant weight savings. The results show that the structural efficiency of these optimized composite sandwich cover panels is relatively insensitive to changes in core density. Thus, core density should be chosen by criteria other than minimum weight (e.g., damage tolerance, ease of manufacture, etc.).

  2. Normal dynamic deformation characteristics of non-consecutive jointed rock masses under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sheng; Jiang, Bowei; Sun, Bing

    2017-08-01

    In order to study deformation characteristics of non-consecutive single jointed rock masses under impact loads, we used the cement mortar materials to make simulative jointed rock mass samples, and tested the samples under impact loads by the drop hammer. Through analyzing the time-history signal of the force and the displacement, first we find that the dynamic compression displacement of the jointed rock mass is significantly larger than that of the intact jointless rock mass, the compression displacement is positively correlated with the joint length and the impact height. Secondly, the vertical compressive displacement of the jointed rock mass is mainly due to the closure of opening joints under small impact loads. Finally, the peak intensity of the intact rock mass is larger than that of the non-consecutive jointed rock mass and negatively correlated with the joint length under the same impact energy.

  3. Importance of anisotropy on design of compression-loaded composite corrugated panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdal, Zafer; Young, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the importance of anisotropic terms in the design of composite corrugated panels, for a range of axial compressive load intensities. The two panel configurations treated were panels with tailored laminates and panels with a continuous laminate; both are of interest to aircraft designers and prone to anisotropic effects which are of as-yet undetermined extent. The importance of the anisotropic terms is measured by the difference between the design load and the buckling load obtained from the ultimate structural analysis.

  4. On dynamic loads in parallel shaft transmissions. 2: Parameter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Edward Hsiang-Hsi; Huston, Ronald L.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Solutions to the governing equations of a spur gear transmission model, developed in NASA TM-100180 (AVSCOM TM-87-C-2), are presented. Factors affecting the dynamic load are identified. It is found that the dynamic load increases with operating speed up to a system natural frequency. At operating speeds beyond the natural frequency the dynamic load decreases dramatically. Also. it is found that the applied load and shaft inertia have little effect on the dynamic load. Damping and friction decrease the dynamic load. Finally, tooth stiffness has a significant effect on dynamic loading; the higher the stiffness, the lower the dynamic loading. Also, the higher the stiffness the higher the rotating speed required for dynamic response.

  5. A Numerical and Experimental Study of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2006-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study on the effects of laminate orthotropy and circular cutout size on the response of compression-loaded composite curved panels are presented. Several 60-in-radius composite panels with four different laminate configurations were tested with cutout diameters that range from 10% to 60% of the panel width. Finite-element analyses were performed for each panel in order to identify the effects boundary conditions, measured initial geometric imperfections and thickness variations had on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels. The compression-loaded panels considered herein exhibited two separate types of behavior depending on the laminate stacking sequence and cutout size. More specifically, some of the panels exhibited the classical snap-through type buckling response; however, some of the panels exhibited a monotonically increasing stable response and achieved compressive loads in excess of twice the predicted linear bifurcation buckling load. In general, the finite-element analyses were able to predict accurately the nonlinear response and buckling loads of the panels and the prebuckling and postbuckling out-of-plane deformations and strains.

  6. Responses of intramembranous bone and sutures upon in vivo cyclic tensile and compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptan, Alexandra I; Lopez, Aurora; Kopher, Ross A; Mao, Jeremy J

    2008-02-01

    Cranial vault and facial sutures interpose between mineralized bones of the skull, and may function analogously to appendicular and cranial base growth plates. However, unlike growth plates that are composed of chondrocyte lineage, cranial and facial sutures possess heterogeneous cell lineages such as mesenchymal cells, fibroblasts, and osteoblasts, in addition to vascular-derived cells. Despite recently intensified effort, the biological responses of intramembranous bone and sutures to mechanical loading are not well understood. This study was designed to investigate whether brief doses of tensile or compressive forces induce modeling and growth responses of intramembranous bone and sutures. In different groups of growing rabbits in vivo, cyclic tensile or compressive forces at 1 N and 8 Hz were applied to the maxilla for 20 min/day over 12 consecutive days. Computerized histomorphometric analyses revealed that the average sutural widths of both the premaxillomaxillary suture (PMS) and nasofrontal suture (NFS) loaded in either tension or compression were significantly higher than age- and sex-matched sham controls (P<0.01). The average cell densities of tension- or compression-loaded PMS and NFS were significantly higher than sham controls (P<0.01). The average osteoblast occupied sutural bone surface loaded under tension was significantly higher than that of sham control (P<0.05). Interestingly, tensile loading significantly reduced the average osteoclast surface, in comparison to sham control (P<0.05). For the NFS, tensile loading significantly increased the average osteoblast occupied sutural bone surface, in comparison with that of sham control (P<0.05). Also for the NFS suture, compression significantly reduced the average sutural osteoclast surface in comparison with sham control (P<0.05). Taken together, the present data suggest that high-frequency cyclic forces in either tension or compression induce modeling and growth changes in cranial sutures. Due to

  7. Laser-Based Dynamic Compression of Geological Materials to Ultrahigh Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-based dynamic compression provides new opportunities to study the structures and properties of geological materials to ultrahigh pressure conditions reaching 1 terapascal and beyond. By controlling the shape and duration of the incident laser pulse, either shock or ramp (shockless) loading can be produced. Samples can be compressed for ~10s of nanoseconds on spatial scales of ~1 millimeter. Diagnostics include velocity interferometry from which the stress-density response of the material can be determined and X-ray diffraction from which lattice-level structural information is obtained. Our experiments are being carried out at a suite of facilities including the Omega Laser (U. of Rochester), Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), and National Ignition Facility (Livermore). Using ramp compression we have constrained pressure-density states in a variety of materials including iron, magnesium oxide, and carbon. X-ray diffraction has been used as a diagnostic to probe the B1-B2 phase transition in MgO under both ramp and shock loading to multi-megabar pressures. We have also examined this same phase transition at more modest pressures on sodium chloride at the LCLS, observing both the B1-B2 transition upon compression and its back transformation upon release. X-ray diffraction measurements have also been used to study the melting curves and high-pressure phase stability of transition metals and alloys, including compositions relevant to the cores of Earth and super-Earth planets.

  8. Dynamic Loading of Carrara Marble in a Heated State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Li, Zhihuan; Kang, Hyeong Min; Teh, Cee Ing

    2017-06-01

    Useable land is a finite space, and with a growing global population, countries have been exploring the use of underground space as a strategic resource to sustain the growth of their society and economy. However, the effects of impact loading on rocks that have been heated, and hence the integrity of the underground structure, are still not fully understood and has not been included in current design standards. Such scenarios include traffic accidents and explosions during an underground fire. This study aims to provide a better understanding of the dynamic load capacity of Carrara marble at elevated temperatures. Dynamic uniaxial compression tests are performed on Carrara marble held at various temperatures using a split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) setup with varying input force. A customized oven is included in the SHPB setup to allow for testing of the marble specimens in a heated state. After the loading test, a three-wave analysis is performed to obtain the dynamic stress-strain curve of the specimen under loading. The fragments of the failed specimens were also collected and dry-sieved to obtain the particle size distribution. The results reveal that the peak stress of specimens that have been heated is negatively correlated with the heating temperature. However, the energy absorbed by the specimens at peak stress at all temperatures is similar, indicating that a significant amount of energy is dissipated via plastic deformation. Generally, fragment size is also found to show a negative correlation with heating temperature and loading pressure. However, in some cases this relationship does not hold true, probably due to the occurrence of stress shadowing. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics has been found to be generally applicable to specimens tested at low temperatures; but at higher temperatures, Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics will give a more accurate prediction. Another contribution of this study is to show that other than the peak stress of the

  9. The impact of posture and prolonged cyclic compressive loading on vertebral joint mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooyers, Chad E; McMillan, Robert D; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P

    2012-08-01

    An in vitro biomechanics investigation exposing porcine functional spinal units (FSUs) to submaximal cyclic or static compressive forces while in a flexed, neutral, or extended posture. To investigate the combined effect of cyclically applied compressive force (e.g., vibration) and postural deviation on intervertebral joint mechanics. Independently, prolonged vibration exposure and non-neutral postures are known risk factors for development of low back pain and injury. However, there is limited basic scientific evidence to explain how the risk of low back injury from vibration exposure is modified by other mechanical factors. This work examined the influence of static postural deviation on vertebral joint height loss and compressive stiffness under cyclically applied compressive force. Forty-eight FSUs, consisting of 2 adjacent vertebrae, ligaments, and the intervening intervertebral disc were included in the study. Each specimen was randomized to 1 of 3 experimental posture conditions (neutral, flexed, or extended) and assigned to 1 of 2 loading protocols, consisting of (1) cyclic (1500 ± 1200 N applied at 5 Hz using a sinusoidal waveform, resulting in 0.2 g rms acceleration) or (2) 1500 N of static compressive force. RESULTS.: As expected, FSU height loss followed a typical first-order response in both the static and cyclic loading protocols, with the majority (~50%) of the loss occurring in the first 20 minutes of testing. A significant interaction between posture and loading protocol (P posture (P Posture is an important mechanical factor to consider when assessing the risk of injury from cyclic loading to the lumbar spine.

  10. Deformation and Damage Accumulation in a Ceramic Composite under Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenkov, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.; Naymark, O. B.; Khorechko, U. V.; Ruchina, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Methods of computer modelling were used to investigate the processes of deformation and microdamage formation in ceramic composite materials under intense dynamic loading. It was shown that there was no damage caused by dynamic compression in the vicinity of phase borders of a nanostructured aluminum oxide matrix and reinforcing particles of tetragonal zirconium dioxide. Also, the local origination of microdamages occurs only in the zones close to micropores.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of asphalt-pavement structure dynamic responses under heavy load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Lijuan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With the 3-Dimensional finite-element dynamic model,the influence of axis-load,axis-speed,and pavement structure parameters on dynamic performance of pavement structure is studied.The results show that with the increase in load,the dynamic response of pavement is nearly proportional to axis-load and increases noticeably;Axis-speed influences the dynamic response to some extent.With the increase of axis-speed,dynamic response of pavement structure increases firstly.With axis-speed further increasing,dynamic response of pavement structure then decreases gradually.For fatigue failure,the influence of heavy-load with common moving speed is much greater than that of static load.Among the pavement structure parameters,thickness of surface-layer has a significant effect on shear stress and the compression stress at road surface.Subgrade modulus has a significant effect on road surface deflection,tensile stress at the bottom of subbase,and compression-strain at the top of subgrade.

  12. Dynamic and stress relaxation properties of the whole porcine temporomandibular joint disc under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Eva; Pelayo, Fernández; Tanaka, Eiji; Lamela-Rey, María Jesús; Fernández-Canteli, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of the whole porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc were investigated. The aim of the study was to develop a new simple method for the evaluation of joint viscoelasticity, enabling examination of the load-bearing capacity and joint flexibility of the entire disc. For the experiments, a novel testing fixture that reproduces the condylar and fossa surfaces of the TMJ was developed to replicate TMJ disc geometry. Ten porcine discs were used in the experiments. Each disc was dissected from the TMJ and sinusoidal compressive strain was applied to obtain the storage and loss moduli. Static strain control tests were carried out to obtain the relaxation modulus. The result of static and dynamic tests indicated that the whole disc presented viscoelastic behavior under compression. Storage and loss moduli increased with frequency and the relaxation modulus decreased over time. The loss tangent showed less frequency dependence, with values ranging from 0.2 to 0.3, suggesting that the viscous properties of the disc cannot be neglected. These results provide a better understanding of whole disc mechanical compression behavior under realistic TMJ working conditions.

  13. Retention Strength after Compressive Cyclic Loading of Five Luting Agents Used in Implant-Supported Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Alvarez-Arenal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the retention strength of five cement types commonly used in implant-retained fixed partial dentures, before and after compressive cyclic loading. In five solid abutments screwed to 5 implant analogs, 50 metal Cr-Ni alloy copings were cemented with five luting agents: resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI, resin composite (RC, glass ionomer (GI, resin urethane-based (RUB, and compomer cement (CC. Two tensile tests were conducted with a universal testing machine, one after the first luting of the copings and the other after 100,000 cycles of 100 N loading at 0.72 Hz. The one way ANOVA test was applied for the statistical analysis using the post hoc Tukey test when required. Before and after applying the compressive load, RmGI and RC cement types showed the greatest retention strength. After compressive loading, RUB cement showed the highest percentage loss of retention (64.45%. GI cement recorded the lowest retention strength (50.35 N and the resin composite cement recorded the highest (352.02 N. The type of cement influences the retention loss. The clinician should give preference to lower retention strength cement (RUB, CC, and GI if he envisages any complications and a high retention strength one (RmGI, RC for a specific clinical situation.

  14. a Study of the Shock Sensitivity of PBX 9501 Damaged by Compressive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. G.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Hooks, D. E.; Peterson, P. D.; DeLuca, R.; Stahl, D. B.; Hagelberg, S. I.; Alcon, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the effects of damage caused by compressive loading on the shock sensitivity of the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. PBX 9501 consists of 95 wt. % HMX and 5 wt. % nitroplasticized Estane binder. The binder is a mixture of 49 wt. % Estane® 5703 (BF Goodrich), 49 wt. % Nitroplasticizer (a eutectic mixture of bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)formal and bis(2,2 dinitropropyl)acetal), and 2 wt. % Irganox® 1010 stabilizer. PBX 9501 cubes, 25.4 mm on a side, were compressed to various uniaxial loads in an Instron machine. After loading, 10×10 mm cross-sections, 3.5 mm thick, were taken from the center of each cube. These slices were then subjected to nearly identical 35 kbar shocks. Transmitted shock wave profiles were measured using interface velocimetry (VISAR). Comparison of shock wave growth is a measure of shock sensitivity. Results on four samples indicate little change in sensitivity caused by compressive loading.

  15. Motion-Compensated Compression of Dynamic Voxelized Point Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Queiroz, Ricardo L; Chou, Philip A

    2017-05-24

    Dynamic point clouds are a potential new frontier in visual communication systems. A few articles have addressed the compression of point clouds, but very few references exist on exploring temporal redundancies. This paper presents a novel motion-compensated approach to encoding dynamic voxelized point clouds at low bit rates. A simple coder breaks the voxelized point cloud at each frame into blocks of voxels. Each block is either encoded in intra-frame mode or is replaced by a motion-compensated version of a block in the previous frame. The decision is optimized in a rate-distortion sense. In this way, both the geometry and the color are encoded with distortion, allowing for reduced bit-rates. In-loop filtering is employed to minimize compression artifacts caused by distortion in the geometry information. Simulations reveal that this simple motion compensated coder can efficiently extend the compression range of dynamic voxelized point clouds to rates below what intra-frame coding alone can accommodate, trading rate for geometry accuracy.

  16. Predicting catastrophes in nonlinear dynamical systems by compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Yang, Rui; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Kovanis, Vassilios; Grebogi, Celso

    2011-04-15

    An extremely challenging problem of significant interest is to predict catastrophes in advance of their occurrences. We present a general approach to predicting catastrophes in nonlinear dynamical systems under the assumption that the system equations are completely unknown and only time series reflecting the evolution of the dynamical variables of the system are available. Our idea is to expand the vector field or map of the underlying system into a suitable function series and then to use the compressive-sensing technique to accurately estimate the various terms in the expansion. Examples using paradigmatic chaotic systems are provided to demonstrate our idea.

  17. Predicting catastrophes in nonlinear dynamical systems by compressive sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Kovanis, Vassilios; Grebogi, Celso

    2011-01-01

    An extremely challenging problem of significant interest is to predict catastrophes in advance of their occurrences. We present a general approach to predicting catastrophes in nonlinear dynamical systems under the assumption that the system equations are completely unknown and only time series reflecting the evolution of the dynamical variables of the system are available. Our idea is to expand the vector field or map of the underlying system into a suitable function series and then to use the compressive-sensing technique to accurately estimate the various terms in the expansion. Examples using paradigmatic chaotic systems are provided to demonstrate our idea.

  18. The Effects of Geometric and Loading Imperfections on the Response and Lower-Bound Buckling Load of a Compression-Loaded Cylindrical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegesmann, Benedikt; Hilburger, Mark W.; Rolfes, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of a thin-walled compressionloaded isotropic circular cylindrical shell with initial geometric and loading imperfections are used to determine a lower bound buckling load estimate suitable for preliminary design. The lower bound prediction techniques presented herein include an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple (similar to the lateral pertubation imperfection), and a distributed load imperfection that induces a nonuniform load in the shell. The ABAQUS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for selected imperfection amplitudes and imperfection types are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. The results indicate that compression-loaded shells subjected to a lateral perturbation load or a single dimple imperfection, and a nonuniform load imperfection, exhibit similar buckling behavior and lower bound trends and the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding design recommendation NASA SP-8007 for the design of buckling-critical shells. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the distributed load imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via laboratory testing.

  19. Dynamic ice loads on conical structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Two series of model tests were performed to observe the dynamic ice loads on conical structures.The variable testing parameters include the water line diameter of the model cone and ice parameters.During small water line diameter tests,two-time breaking is found to be the typical failure of ice on steep conical structure,and also be controlled by other factors,such as ice speed and the cone angle.During big water line diameter tests,the ice sheet failed nonsimultaneously around the cone.Several independe...

  20. Damage Characteristics and Residual Strength of Composite Sandwich Panels Impacted with and Without Compression Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, David M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the impact damage characteristics and residual strength of composite sandwich panels impacted with and without a compression loading are presented. Results of impact damage screening tests conducted to identify the impact-energy levels at which damage initiates and at which barely visible impact damage occurs in the impacted facesheet are discussed. Parametric effects studied in these tests include the impactor diameter, dropped-weight versus airgun-launched impactors, and the effect of the location of the impact site with respect to the panel boundaries. Residual strength results of panels tested in compression after impact are presented and compared with results of panels that are subjected to a compressive preload prior to being impacted.

  1. A high-dynamic range transimpedance amplifier with compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mičušík, D.; Zimmermann, H.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) with the logarithmic compression of the input current signal. The presented TIA has two regions of operation: a linear one for small input current signals and a compression one for high input currents, that could otherwise saturate the TIA. The measured -3dB bandwidth in the linear region of operation is 102MHz. The measured maximum input current overdrive is 20.5mA. However, the maximum of the monotonic compression is approx. 8mA. Using the compression technique we could achieve low rms equivalent input noise current (~20.2nA) within the measured bandwidth and with approx. 2pF capacitance at the input. Thus the dynamic range at the input of the TIA is approx. 120dB considering the maximal current overdrive. The proposed TIA represents the input stage of a optical receiver with integrated differential 50Ω output driver. The optical receiver occupies approx. 1.24mm2 in 0.35 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and consumes 78mA from 5V supply.

  2. Examination of dynamic recrystallization during compression of AZ31 magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN RenLong; WANG BingShu; CHEN XingPin; HUANG GuangJie; LIU Qing

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior during compression of mag-nesium alloy AZ31. Cylinder samples were cut from the extruded rod and hot rolled sheet AZ31 for compression test. The samples were compressed using a Gleeble 1500D at a temperature of 300Ⅱ and a strain rate of 0.01 s-1. Grain orientations and misorientation angles across grain boundaries for the tested samples were obtained by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The results showed that strong basal texture was observed after 50% compression (ε = 0.69) on both the extruded and hot rolled samples, which have different initial textures. It was observed that with increased strain, DRX grains gradually rotated to basal orientation, and grain boundaries with misorientation angle of near 30° was formed in the samples. At the strain of 0.69, a high fraction of high-angle (> 60°) bounda-ries was present in the extruded sample, whereas almost no high angle boundaries were observed in the hot rolled sheet sample.

  3. Examination of dynamic recrystallization during compression of AZ31 magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior during compression of magnesium alloy AZ31. Cylinder samples were cut from the extruded rod and hot rolled sheet AZ31 for compression test. The samples were compressed using a Gleeble 1500D at a temperature of 300℃ and a strain rate of 0.01 s-1. Grain orientations and misorientation angles across grain boundaries for the tested samples were obtained by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The results showed that strong basal texture was observed after 50% compression (ε = 0.69) on both the extruded and hot rolled samples, which have different initial textures. It was observed that with increased strain, DRX grains gradually rotated to basal orientation, and grain boundaries with misorientation angle of near 30° was formed in the samples. At the strain of 0.69, a high fraction of high-angle (> 60°) bounda-ries was present in the extruded sample, whereas almost no high angle boundaries were observed in the hot rolled sheet sample.

  4. Dynamic Load Balancing using Graphics Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mohan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To get maximum performance on the many-core graphics processors, it is important to have an even balance of the workload so that all processing units contribute equally to the task at hand. This can be hard to achieve when the cost of a task is not known beforehand and when new sub-tasks are created dynamically during execution. Both the dynamic load balancing methods using Static task assignment and work stealing using deques are compared to see which one is more suited to the highly parallel world of graphics processors. They have been evaluated on the task of simulating a computer move against the human move, in the famous four in a row game. The experiments showed that synchronization can be very expensive, and those new methods which use graphics processor features wisely might be required.

  5. MA-core loaded untuned RF compression cavity for HIRFL-CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li-rong; Xu, Zhe; Yuan, You-jin; Jin, Peng; Bian, Zhi-bin; Zhao, Hong-wei; Xia, Jia-wen

    2012-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high energy density physics and plasma physics research at HIRFL-CSR the goal of achieving a higher accelerating gap voltage was proposed. Therefore, a magnetic alloy (MA)-core loaded radio frequency (RF) cavity that can provide a higher accelerating gap voltage compared to standard ferrite loaded cavities has been studied at IMP. In order to select the proper magnetic alloy material to load the RF compression cavity, measurements of four different kinds of sample MA-cores have been carried out. By testing the small cores, the core composition was selected to obtain the desired performance. According to the theoretical calculation and simulation, which show reasonable consistency for the MA-core loaded cavity, the desired performance can be achieved. Finally about 1000 kW power will be needed to meet the requirements of 50 kV accelerating gap voltage by calculation.

  6. The mechanical behavior of locking compression plates compared with dynamic compression plates in a cadaver radius model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael J; Brophy, Robert H; Campbell, Deirdre; Mahajan, Amit; Wright, Timothy M; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to compare the mechanical behavior of a locked compression plate, which uses threaded screw heads to create a fixed angle construct, with a dynamic compression plate construct in a cadaver radius model. Mechanical study with cyclic testing and high-speed optical motion analysis. Biomechanics laboratory at an academic institution. Eighteen pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver radii were divided into 3 groups of 6 to be tested as a group in each of the following force applications: anteroposterior (AP) bending, mediolateral bending, or torsion. Each bone was osteotomized leaving a 5-mm fracture gap and then fixed with a plate. For each pair, 1 radius received a standard plate (limited-contact dynamic compression plates; LC-DCP), the contralateral radius was fixed with a locking compression plate (LCP), and specimens underwent cyclic loading. Normalized stiffness, average energy absorbed, and Newton-cycles to failure were calculated. In addition, a 3-dimensional, high-speed, infrared motion analysis system was used to evaluate motion at the fracture site. Construct stiffness, fracture site motion, cycles to failure, and energy absorption. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to detect differences between groups with time. In the torsion group, LCP specimens failed at 60% greater Newton-cycles than the LC-DCP (1473 vs. 918; P different biomechanical behavior with time. As cycling progressed in the LC-DCP specimens under torsion testing, stiffness (measured at the actuator at the bone ends) did not change significantly; however, fracture motion (measured at the fracture surfaces) decreased significantly (P = 0.04). The LCP specimens did not display similar behavior. Our findings indicated that LCP constructs may demonstrate subtle mechanical superiority compared with the LC-DCP. The LCP specimens had less energy absorption in the AP group and survived longer in the torsion group. Discordance of motion between measurement regions was

  7. Closed-form solution of the Ogden-Hill's compressible hyperelastic model for ramp loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezvai, Szabolcs; Kossa, Attila

    2017-05-01

    This article deals with the visco-hyperelastic modelling approach for compressible polymer foam materials. Polymer foams can exhibit large elastic strains and displacements in case of volumetric compression. In addition, they often show significant rate-dependent properties. This material behaviour can be accurately modelled using the visco-hyperelastic approach, in which the large strain viscoelastic description is combined with the rate-independent hyperelastic material model. In case of polymer foams, the most widely used compressible hyperelastic material model, the so-called Ogden-Hill's model, was applied, which is implemented in the commercial finite element (FE) software Abaqus. The visco-hyperelastic model is defined in hereditary integral form, therefore, obtaining a closed-form solution for the stress is not a trivial task. However, the parameter-fitting procedure could be much faster and accurate if closed-form solution exists. In this contribution, exact stress solutions are derived in case of uniaxial, biaxial and volumetric compression loading cases using ramp-loading history. The analytical stress solutions are compared with the stress results in Abaqus using FE analysis. In order to highlight the benefits of the analytical closed-form solution during the parameter-fitting process experimental work has been carried out on a particular open-cell memory foam material. The results of the material identification process shows significant accuracy improvement in the fitting procedure by applying the derived analytical solutions compared to the so-called separated approach applied in the engineering practice.

  8. Prediction of the critical buckling load of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timesli, Abdelaziz; Braikat, Bouazza; Jamal, Mohammad; Damil, Noureddine

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new explicit analytical formula of the critical buckling load of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) under axial compression. This formula takes into account van der Waals interactions between adjacent tubes and the effect of terms involving tube radii differences generally neglected in the derived expressions of the critical buckling load published in the literature. The elastic multiple Donnell shells continuum approach is employed for modelling the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The validation of the proposed formula is made by comparison with a numerical solution. The influence of the neglected terms is also studied.

  9. Evaluation of Composite Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Under Compressive Loads at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen composite honeycomb sandwich panels were tested to failure under compressive loading. The test specimens included panels with both 8 and 24-ply graphite-bismaleimide composite facesheets and both titanium and graphite-polyimide core materials. The panels were designed to have the load introduced through fasteners attached to pairs of steel angles on the ends of the panels to simulate double shear splice joints. The unloaded edges were unconstrained. Test temperatures included room temperature, 250F, and 300F. For the room and 250F temperature tests, the 24-ply specimen failure strains were close to the unnotched allowable strain values and failure loads were well above the design loads. However, failure strains much lower than the unnotched allowable strain values, and failure loads below the design loads were observed with several of the 8-ply specimens. For each individual test temperature, large variations in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 8-ply specimens. Dramatic decreases in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 24-ply specimens as the test temperature was increased from 250F to 300F. All 8-ply specimens appeared to have failed in a facesheet strength failure mode for all test temperatures. The 24-ply specimens displayed appreciably greater amounts of bending prior to failure than the 8-ply specimens, and panel buckling occurred prior to facesheet strength failure for the 24-ply room and 250F temperature tests.

  10. Loading dynamics of a sliding DNA clamp.

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Won-Ki

    2014-05-22

    Sliding DNA clamps are loaded at a ss/dsDNA junction by a clamp loader that depends on ATP binding for clamp opening. Sequential ATP hydrolysis results in closure of the clamp so that it completely encircles and diffuses on dsDNA. We followed events during loading of an E. coli β clamp in real time by using single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Three successive FRET states were retained for 0.3 s, 0.7 s, and 9 min: Hydrolysis of the first ATP molecule by the γ clamp loader resulted in closure of the clamp in 0.3 s, and after 0.7 s in the closed conformation, the clamp was released to diffuse on the dsDNA for at least 9 min. An additional single-molecule polarization study revealed that the interfacial domain of the clamp rotated in plane by approximately 8° during clamp closure. The single-molecule polarization and FRET studies thus revealed the real-time dynamics of the ATP-hydrolysis-dependent 3D conformational change of the β clamp during loading at a ss/dsDNA junction.

  11. Concrete-Filled-Large Deformable FRP Tubular Columns under Axial Compressive Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Omar I. Abdelkarim; Mohamed A. ElGawady

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of concrete-filled fiber tubes (CFFT) polymers under axial compressive loading was investigated. Unlike the traditional fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) such as carbon, glass, aramid, etc., the FRP tubes in this study were designed using large rupture strains FRP which are made of recycled materials such as plastic bottles; hence, large rupture strain (LRS) FRP composites are environmentally friendly and can be used in the context of green construction. This study performed finite...

  12. Dynamic blade row compression component model for stability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, W. A.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a generalized dynamic model which has been developed for use in compression component aerodynamic stability studies. The model is a one-dimensional, pitch-line, blade row, lumped volume system. Arbitrary placement of blade free volumes upstream, within, and downstream of the compression component as well as the removal of bleed flow from the exit of any rotor or stator are model options. The model has been applied to a two-stage fan and an eight-stage compressor. The clean inlet pressure ratio/flow maps and the surge line have been reproduced, thereby validating the capability of the dynamic model to reproduce the steady-flow characteristics of the compression component. A method for determining the onset of an aerodynamic instability which is associated with surge is described. Sinusoidally time-varying inlet and exit boundary conditions have been applied to the eight stage compressor as examples of the manner in which this model may be used for stability studies.

  13. Concrete-Filled-Large Deformable FRP Tubular Columns under Axial Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Abdelkarim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of concrete-filled fiber tubes (CFFT polymers under axial compressive loading was investigated. Unlike the traditional fiber reinforced polymers (FRP such as carbon, glass, aramid, etc., the FRP tubes in this study were designed using large rupture strains FRP which are made of recycled materials such as plastic bottles; hence, large rupture strain (LRS FRP composites are environmentally friendly and can be used in the context of green construction. This study performed finite element (FE analysis using LS-DYNA software to conduct an extensive parametric study on CFFT. The effects of the FRP confinement ratio, the unconfined concrete compressive strength ( , column size, and column aspect ratio on the behavior of the CFFT under axial compressive loading were investigated during this study. A comparison between the behavior of the CFFTs with LRS-FRP and those with traditional FRP (carbon and glass with a high range of confinement ratios was conducted as well. A new hybrid FRP system combined with traditional and LRS-FRP is proposed. Generally, the CFFTs with LRS-FRP showed remarkable behavior under axial loading in strength and ultimate strain. Equations to estimate the concrete dilation parameter and dilation angle of the CFFTs with LRS-FRP tubes and hybrid FRP tubes are suggested.

  14. Bending moment resistance of dowel corner joints in case-type furniture under diagonal compression load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mosayeb Dalvand; Ghanbar Ebrahimi; Mehdi Tajvidi; Mohammad Layeghi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated bending moment resistance under diagonal compression load of corner doweled joints with plywood members. Joint members were made of 11-ply hardwood plywood of 19 mm thickness. Dowels were fabricated of Beech and Hornbeam species. Their diameters (6, 8 and 10 mm) and depths of penetration (9, 13 and 17 mm) in joint members were chosen variables in our experiment. By increasing the connector’s diameter from 6 to 8 mm, the bending moment resistance under diagonal compressive load was increased, while it decreased when the diameter was increased from 8 to 10 mm. The bending moment re-sistance under diagonal compressive load was increased by increasing the dowel’s depth of penetration. Joints made with dowels of Beech had higher resistance than dowels of Hornbeam. Highest resisting moment (45.18 N·m) was recorded for joints assembled with 8 mm Beech dowels penetrating 17 mm into joint members Lowest resisting moment (13.35 N·m) was recorded for joints assembled with 6 mm Hornbeam dowels and penetrating 9 mm into joint members.

  15. Dry plant extracts loaded on fumed silica for direct compression: preparation and preformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, S D; Manzo, R H; Allemandi, D A

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to load fumed silica with vegetal material (solid residue) from a liquid extract to obtain a solid loaded silica product (LSP) with satisfactory flow properties and compressibility to be processed by direct-compression technology. Extracts of Melissa officinalis L. (M.o.), Cardus marianus L. (C.m.), and Peumus boldus L. (P.b.) were used to load silica support. The release of boldine from LSP (P.b.) reached 100% in HCl 0.1 N solution and only approximately 70% in water. Some physical-mechanical properties of LSP (M.o. and C.m.) alone and LSP-excipient mixtures were determined. The densities (bulk and tap) of LSP were higher than those of fumed silica alone. Consequently, good flow properties of LSP products were observed. On the other hand, flowability, densities, and compactibility of directly compressible excipients (lactose, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and microcrystalline cellulose) were not adversely affected when mixed with LSP.

  16. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. H.; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-01

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  17. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  18. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  19. Mechanical Characterization of Brain Tissue in Compression at Dynamic Strain Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.01.022

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when local mechanical load exceeds certain tolerance levels for brain tissue. Extensive research has been done previously for brain matter experiencing compression at quasistatic loading; however, limited data is available to model TBI under dynamic impact conditions. In this research, an experimental setup was developed to perform unconfined compression tests and stress relaxation tests at strain rates < 90/s. The brain tissue showed a stiffer response with increasing strain rates, showing that hyperelastic models are not adequate. Specifically, the compressive nominal stress at 30% strain was 8.83 +/- 1.94, 12.8 +/- 3.10 and 16.0 +/- 1.41 kPa (mean +/- SD) at strain rates of 30, 60 and 90/s, respectively. Relaxation tests were also conducted at 10%-50% strain with the average rise time of 10 ms, which can be used to derive time dependent parameters. Numerical simulations were performed using one-term Ogden model with initial shear modulus mu_0 = 6.06 +/- 1.44, 9.44 +/-...

  20. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  1. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; Fechner, K. P.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  2. Nucleation of hcp and fcc phases in bcc iron under uniform compression: classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B T; Shao, J L; Zhang, G C; Li, W D; Zhang, P

    2010-11-03

    By classical molecular dynamics simulations employing an embedded atom method potential, we have simulated the bcc to hcp/fcc structural transition in single-crystal iron under uniform compression. Results showed that the transition pressure is different from uniaxial compression and shock loading. The transformation occurs on a picosecond timescale and the transition time decreases along with the increase of pressure. The nucleation and growth of the hcp and fcc phases under constant pressure and temperature are analyzed in detail. The nucleation planes, all belonging to the {110}(bcc) family and parallel to the three compression directions [100], [010], and [001], have been observed. About 20% bcc atoms have transformed to fcc phase under pressure just over the critical point, and under higher pressure the fraction of the fcc phase increases steadily to exceed that of the hcp phase. We have investigated the transition mechanism of iron from initial bcc to hcp/fcc and found that the transition mainly consists of compression, rotation, and shuffle.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of hcp/fcc nucleation and growth in bcc iron driven by uniaxial compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B T; Shao, J L; Zhang, G C; Li, W D; Zhang, P

    2009-12-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the structural transition in bcc iron under uniaxial strain loading. We found that the transition pressures are less dependent on the crystal orientations, ∼14 GPa for [001], [011], and [111] loadings. However, the pressure interval of a mixed phase for [011] loading is much shorter than loading along other orientations. In addition, the temperature increased amplitude for [001] loading is evidently lower than other orientations. The nucleation and growth of the hcp/fcc phases, and their crystal orientation dependence, were analyzed in detail, where the atom structure was presented by the topological medium-range-order analysis. For [001] compression, the hcp structure occurs first and grows into a laminar morphology in the (011)(bcc) plane with some fcc atoms as an intermediate structure. For loading along [011] and [111] directions, both hcp and fcc structure nucleation and growth along the {110}(bcc) planes are observed; their morphology is also discussed.

  4. Behavior of sandwich panels subjected to bending fatigue, axial compression loading and in-plane bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Haley Aaron

    This thesis investigates experimentally and analytically the structural performance of sandwich panels composed of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) skins and a soft polyurethane foam core, with or without thin GFRP ribs connecting skins. The study includes three main components: (a) out-of-plane bending fatigue, (b) axial compression loading, and (c) in-plane bending of sandwich beams. Fatigue studies included 28 specimens and looked into establishing service life (S-N) curves of sandwich panels without ribs, governed by soft core shear failure and also ribbed panels governed by failure at the rib-skin junction. Additionally, the study compared fatigue life curves of sandwich panels loaded under fully reversed bending conditions (R=-1) with panels cyclically loaded in one direction only (R=0) and established the stiffness degradation characteristics throughout their fatigue life. Mathematical models expressing fatigue life and stiffness degradation curves were calibrated and expanded forms for various loading ratios were developed. Approximate fatigue thresholds of 37% and 23% were determined for non-ribbed panels loaded at R=0 and -1, respectively. Digital imaging techniques showed significant shear contribution significantly (90%) to deflections if no ribs used. Axial loading work included 51 specimens and examined the behavior of panels of various lengths (slenderness ratios), skin thicknesses, and also panels of similar length with various rib configurations. Observed failure modes governing were global buckling, skin wrinkling or skin crushing. In-plane bending involved testing 18 sandwich beams of various shear span-to-depth ratios and skin thicknesses, which failed by skin wrinkling at the compression side. The analytical modeling components of axially loaded panels include; a simple design-oriented analytical failure model and a robust non-linear model capable of predicting the full load-displacement response of axially loaded slender sandwich panels

  5. Dynamic Behaviours of a Single Soft Rock-Socketed Shaft Subjected to Axial Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-jiao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The soft rock was simulated by cement, plaster, sand, water, and concrete hardening accelerator in this paper. Meanwhile, uniaxial compressive strength tests and triaxial compression tests were conducted to study the mechanical properties of simulated soft rock samples. Model tests on a single pile socketed in simulated soft rock under axial cyclic loading were conducted by using a device which combined test apparatus with a GCTS dynamic triaxial system. Test results show that the optimal mix ratio is cement : plaster : medium sand : water : concrete hardening accelerator = 4.5% : 5.0% : 84.71% : 4.75% : 1.04%. The static load ratio (SLR, cyclic load ratio (CLR, and the number of cycles affect the accumulated deformation and cyclic secant modulus of the pile head. The accumulated deformation increases with increasing numbers of cycles. However, the cyclic secant modulus of pile head increases and then decreases with the growth in the number of cycles and finally remains stable after 50 cycles. According to the test results, the development of accumulated settlement was analysed. Finally, an empirical formula for accumulated settlement, considering the effects of the number of cycles, the static load ratio, the cyclic load ratio, and the uniaxial compressive strength, is proposed which can be used for feasibility studies or preliminary design of pile foundations on soft rock subjected to traffic loading.

  6. Mathematical simulation and calculation of the soil compaction under dynamic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotarevskaya, D. I.

    2011-04-01

    The deformation and compaction of loamy sandy soddy-podzolic soils under linear dynamic changes in the compressive stresses and in the course of the soil creeping were studied in field experiments. The rheological properties of these soils occurring in the viscoelastic state were described by a first-order differential equation relating the compressive stresses, the rates of their changes, and the velocities of the relative vertical compressive deformation. Regression equations were derived for the viscoelastic properties of the studied soil as functions of its density, moisture, and linear compaction velocity. Methods were proposed for the calculation of indices of the stress-strain state and the compaction of soils under specified conditions of changes in their compressive stresses with time and in the course of the soil creeping after the initial linear increase in load. Corresponding computer programs were developed. The effect of the main factors due to the linear increase in the compressive loads and in the course of the soil creeping on the rheological properties, the stress-strain state, and the density of soils was quantitatively estimated. The calculation showed that the values of the soil deformation and the density under compressive stresses lower than the ultimate strength were stabilized with time, and the properties of the viscoelastic soil approached elastic ones.

  7. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  8. Experimental and theoretical research on residual strength of plain concrete under compressive fatigue loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xian-hong; SONG Yu-pu

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the residual strength of concrete under fatigue loading, experiments were conducted to determine the functional relation between residual strength and the number of cycles. 80 100mm×100mm×100ram specimens of plain concrete were tested under uniaxial compressive fatigue loading. Based on probabili-ty distribution of the residual strength of concrete under fatigue loading, the empirical expressions of the residual strength corresponding to the number of cycles were obtained. There is a good correlation between residual strength and residual secant elastic modulus. Thus the relationship between residual secant elastic modulus and the number of cycles is established. A damage variable based on the longitudinal maximum strain is defined, and a good linearity relationship between residual strength and damage is found out.

  9. Parametric Study on the Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of a parametric study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling and postbuckling response of three unstiffened thinwalled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells with different orthotropic and quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates are presented. The imperfections considered include initial geometric shell-wall midsurface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform applied end loads, and variations in the boundary conditions including the effects of elastic boundary conditions. A high-fidelity nonlinear shell analysis procedure that accurately accounts for the effects of these imperfections on the nonlinear responses and buckling loads of the shells is described. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable response characteristics.

  10. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  11. Forced Transverse Vibration of a Closed Double Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube System Containing a Fluid with Effect of Compressive Axial Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Nasirshoaibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Rayleigh beam theory, the forced transverse vibrations of a closed double single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT system containing a fluid with a Pasternak layer in-between are investigated. It is assumed that the two single-walled carbon nanotubes of the system are continuously joined by a Pasternak layer and both sides of SWCNTs containing a fluid are closed. The dynamic responses of the system caused by arbitrarily distributed continuous loads are obtained. The effect of compressive axial load on the forced vibrations of the double single-walled carbon nanotube system is discussed for one case of particular excitation loading. The properties of the forced transverse vibrations of the system are found to be significantly dependent on the compressive axial load. The steady-state vibration amplitudes of the SWCNT decrease with increasing of length of SWCNT. Vibrations caused by the harmonic exciting forces are discussed, and conditions of resonance and dynamic vibration absorption are formulated. The SWCNT-type dynamic absorber is a new concept of a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA, which can be applied to suppress excessive vibrations of corresponding SWCNT systems.

  12. Experiments on channel columns with inclined simple edge stiffeners under compression loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chungang; ZHANG Yaochun; ZHANG Zhuangnan

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the compression behavior of pin-ended cold-formed channel columns with inclined simple edge stiffeners,a total of 30 pin-ended cold-formed channel columns with three sections (sloping lip stiffener turned at 45°,90°,and 135°to the flange,respectively) and three different lengths (500 mm,1 250 mm,and 2 000 mm)were tested.It was found that the inclination angles and loading positions have an obvious effect on compression ultimate load-carrying capacities and failure modes.All three sections have certain post-buckling strength,and the failure modes of most of the specimens contained distortional buckling.The capacity of the specimens with 45° inclined angle for bearing compression is appreciably higher than the other two types of specimens with 90° or 135° inclined angles at the same negative eccentricity,but obviously lower than the other two at the same positive eccentricity.Furthermore,tests were simulated by finite element analysis.Results from the analysis are in great agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Fracture Behaviours in Compression-loaded Triangular Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid N.Z.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure modes occurring in sandwich panels based on the corrugations of aluminium alloy, carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP and glass fibre-reinforced plastic (GFRP are analysed in this work. The fracture behaviour of these sandwich panels under compressive stresses is determined through a series of uniform lateral compression performed on samples with different cell wall thicknesses. Compression test on the corrugated-core sandwich panels were conducted using an Instron series 4505 testing machine. The post-failure examinations of the corrugated-core in different cell wall thickness were conducted using optical microscope. Load-displacement graphs of aluminium alloy, GFRP and CFRP specimens were plotted to show progressive damage development with five unit cells. Four modes of failure were described in the results: buckling, hinges, delamination and debonding. Each of these failure modes may dominate under different cell wall thickness or loading condition, and they may act in combination. The results indicate that thicker composites corrugated-core panels tend can recover more stress and retain more stiffness. This analysis provides a valuable insight into the mechanical behaviour of corrugated-core sandwich panels for use in lightweight engineering applications.

  14. Static and dynamic mechanics of the temporomandibular joint: plowing forces, joint load and tissue stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, J; Spilker, R; Iwasaki, L; Gonzalez, Y; McCall, W D; Ohrbach, R; Beatty, M W; Marx, D

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVES - To determine the combined effects 1) of stress-field aspect ratio and velocity and compressive strain and 2) joint load, on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc mechanics. SETTING AND SAMPLE POPULATION - Fifty-two subjects (30 female; 22 male) participated in the TMJ load experiments. MATERIAL AND METHODS - In the absence of human tissue, pig TMJ discs were used to determine the effects of variables 1) on surface plowing forces, and to build a biphasic finite element model (bFEM) to test the effect of human joint loads and 2) on tissue stresses. In the laboratory, discs received a 7.6 N static load via an acrylic indenter before cyclic movement. Data were recorded and analysed using anova. To determine human joint loads, Research Diagnostic Criteria calibrated investigators classified subjects based on signs of disc displacement (DD) and pain (+DD/+pain, n = 18; +DD/-pain, n = 17; -DD/-pain, n = 17). Three-dimensional geometries were produced for each subject and used in a computer model to calculate joint loads. RESULTS - The combined effects of compressive strain, and aspect ratio and velocity of stress-field translation correlated with plowing forces (R(2) = 0.85). +DD/-pain subjects produced 60% higher joint loads (ANOVA, p dynamic variables of the stress-field and subject-dependent joint load significantly affect disc mechanics.

  15. Calculation of dynamic load impact on reinforced concrete arches in the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbashev Nikita Petrovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete arches are widely used in the construction of underground facilities. The analysis of their work under dynamic loads (blasting, shock, seismic will improve the efficiency of design and application. The article addresses the problems of calculation of reinforced concrete arches in the ground in terms of the action of dynamic load - compression wave. The calculation is made basing on the decision of a closed system of equations that allows performing the calculation of elastic-plastic curved concrete structures under dynamic loads. Keeping in mind the properties of elastic-plastic reinforcement and concrete in the process of design variations, σ-ε diagrams are variable. The calculation is performed by the direct solution of differential equations in partial derivatives. The result is based on a system of ordinary differential equations of the second order (expressing the transverse and longitudinal oscillations of the structure and the system of algebraic equations (continuity condition of deformation. The computer program calculated three-hinged reinforced concrete arches. The structural calculations were produced by selection of the load based on the criteria of reaching the first limit state: ultimate strain of compressed concrete; ultimate strain tensile reinforcement; the ultimate deformation of the structure. The authors defined all the characteristics of the stress-strain state of the structure. The presented graphs show the change of bending moment and shear force in time for the most loaded section of the arch, the dependence of stresses and strains in concrete and reinforcement, stress changes in time for the cross-sectional height. The peculiarity of the problem is that the action of the load provokes the related dynamic forces - bending moment and longitudinal force. The calculations allowed estimating the carrying capacity of the structure using the criteria of settlement limit states. The decisive criterion was the

  16. Comparison of the Mechanical Behaviour of Selected Oilseeds under Compression Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David HERAK

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides information about the comparison of mechanical behaviour of selected oil bearing crops namely rapeseeds (Brassica napus L., sunflower seeds (Helianthus annus L. and jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas L. under compression loading. In this research, the compression device ZDM 50 with a chart recorder and a pressing vessel with diameter 100 mm were used to determine the relationship between the magnitude of the pressing force and deformation characteristics of the oilseed crops pressed at initial height 80 mm. From the compression test, the amounts of true deformation, maximal deformation energy and compressive force of the pressed samples were calculated and also mathematical equations describing the limit deformation, maximal deformation ratio, energy ratio and oil point deformation ratio were determined. The oil point position on the deformation curve, that is, the first leakage of oil from the pressing vessel of the various oilseeds was determined and compared. Based on the measured amounts rapeseeds achieved the highest values followed by jatropha seed and then sunflower seed. The amount of deformation energy required for the seed deformation gives the indication the amount of energy needed for obtaining the oil from the seed. It was found that the measured amounts as well as the oil point position on the force-deformation curve of the pressed samples showed varying results due to the seeds physical and inherent characteristics.

  17. Dynamic buckling of stiffened plates subjected to explosion impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Guo, J.; Yao, X. L.; Zhang, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic buckling characteristics and criteria of a ship's structural stiffened plate subjected to underwater explosion impact loads are investigated in this study. Using the structural deformations observed in the experiments of underwater explosions against a plated grillage model, the mode shapes of the dynamic buckling were obtained. Through the construction of a computational model of stiffened plates subjected to an underwater explosion shock wave, the impact load was theoretically calculated and transformed into a rectangular pulse. According to the different response patterns of stiffened plates under different impact loads, a dynamic buckling criterion for the stiffened plates subjected to an explosion shock wave was proposed. Additionally, the static buckling phenomenon in the stiffened plates was analysed based on the minimum excess principle. In combination with the dynamic buckling criterion, the effects of various stiffening configurations on the dynamic and static buckling loads are discussed. The calculation results show that when the equivalent rectangular pulse is 2-3 times that of the static buckling load, the responses of the stiffened plates under the original shock load and the equivalent rectangular pulse are virtually identical. The impact load amplitude is the primary influencing factor in the dynamic buckling of stiffened plates subjected to underwater explosive impact loads. The stiffened plate aspect ratio has a substantial influence on the dynamic load factor. The analytical method and results are presented, which can be used to design stiffened optimum hull structures to enhance the dynamic load carrying capacity to withstand underwater shock damage.

  18. New hose materials for dynamic loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, P.; Weber, J.; Wohlfarth, L. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Dynamically stressed hoses continue to represent a challenge in the various areas where they are used in the automobile. This is true not only as regards the selection of suitable hose materials but also the necessary reinforcement technology. This is due to increasing requirements for temperature and chemical resistance resulting from new and further developments in the field of engines and assemblies. In addition to the 'classic' hose materials with internal and external elastomeric layers in conjunction with reinforcing elements (for example, servo hose or brake hose materials), the beginning of the 1990s saw increasing interest on the part of the automotive industry in hose and pipe materials made of thermoplastic elastomers (for example, TEEE) in the fields of intake and crankcase ventilation as well as plastic / rubber composite concepts for hoses. These plastic / rubber composite designs in particular are to be regarded as tailor-made problem solutions for specific functional and environmental aspects (minimisation of the permeation / emission of liquid or gaseous substances) in conjunction with a dynamic load-bearing capacity. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-02-10

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings.

  20. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kirchberger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings.

  1. Variable Quality Compression of Fluid Dynamical Data Sets Using a 3D DCT Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddoch, A.; Schmalzl, J.

    2005-12-01

    In this work we present a data compression scheme that is especially suited for the compression of data sets resulting from computational fluid dynamics (CFD). By adopting the concept of the JPEG compression standard and extending the approach of Schmalzl (Schmalzl, J. Using standard image compression algorithms to store data from computational fluid dynamics. Computers and Geosciences, 29, 10211031, 2003) we employ a three-dimensional discrete cosine transform of the data. The resulting frequency components are rearranged, quantized and finally stored using Huffman-encoding and standard variable length integer codes. The compression ratio and also the introduced loss of accuracy can be adjusted by means of two compression parameters to give the desired compression profile. Using the proposed technique compression ratios of more than 60:1 are possible with an mean error of the compressed data of less than 0.1%.

  2. Compressive dynamic range imaging via Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xin

    2016-12-01

    We apply the Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning into compressive dynamic-range imaging. By attenuating the luminous intensity impinging upon the detector at the pixel level, we demonstrate a conceptual design of an 8-bit camera to sample high-dynamic-range scenes with a single snapshot. Coding strategies for both monochrome and color cameras are proposed. A Bayesian reconstruction algorithm is developed to learn a dictionary in situ on the sampled image, for joint reconstruction and demosaicking. We use global-local shrinkage priors to learn the dictionary and dictionary coefficients representing the data. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed camera and the superior performance of the Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning algorithm.

  3. The ultimate strength of doubler plate reinforced Y-joints under compression loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENQ Qi; TAN Jia-hua

    2005-01-01

    It is common practice in the offshore industry to solve the punching shear problem due to compression by using doubler plate. The finite-element method is a useful tool for studying this problem. The aim of this paper is to study the static strength of doubler plate reinforced Y-joints subjected to compression loading. The finite-element method is adopted in numerical parametric studies. The individual influences of the geometric parameters βand τd (doubler plate to chord wall thickness ratio) and ld/d1(dubler plate length to brace diameter ratio) on the ultimate strength are made clear. The results show the size of plate may have important effects on the strength of reinforced joints. It is found that the ultimate strength of Y-joints reinforced with appropriately proportioned doubler plates can be greatly improved nearly up tothree times to un-reinforced Y-joints.

  4. ACCELERATORS Study of a magnetic alloy-loaded RF cavity for bunch compression at the CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Da-Yu; Liu, Yong; Xia, Jia-Wen; Li, Peng; Zhao, Yong-Tao; Yang, Lei; Qi, Xin

    2010-12-01

    The Heavy Ion Research Facility and Cooling Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) accelerator in Lanzhou offers a unique possibility for the generation of high density and short pulse heavy ion beams by non-adiabatic bunch compression longitudinally, which is implemented by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, an RF cavity with high electric field gradient loaded with Magnetic Alloy cores has been developed. The results show that the resonant frequency range of the single-gap RF cavity is from 1.13 MHz to 1.42 MHz, and a maximum RF voltage of 40 kV with a total length of 100 cm can be obtained, which can be used to compress heavy ion beams of 238U72+ with 250 MeV/u from the initial bunch length of 200 ns to 50 ns with the coaction of the two single-gap RF cavity mentioned above.

  5. Stress State Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Masonry Columns Reinforced with FRP under Concentric Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Witzany

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strengthening and stabilization of damaged compressed masonry columns with composites based on fabrics of high-strength fibers and epoxy resin, or polymer-modified cement mixtures, belongs to novel, partially non-invasive and reversible progressive methods. The stabilizing and reinforcing effect of these fabrics significantly applies to masonry structures under concentric compressive loading whose failure mechanism is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cracks accompanied by an increase in horizontal masonry strain. During the appearance of micro and hairline cracks (10−3 to 10−1 mm, the effect of non-pre-stressed wrapping composite is very small. The favorable effect of passive wrapping is only intensively manifested after the appearance of cracks (10−1 mm and bigger at higher loading levels. In the case of “optimum” reinforcement of a masonry column, the experimental research showed an increase in vertical displacements δy (up to 247%, horizontal displacements δx (up to 742% and ultimate load-bearing capacity (up to 136% compared to the values reached in unreinforced masonry columns. In the case of masonry structures in which no intensive “bed joint filler–masonry unit” interaction occurs, e.g., in regular coursed masonry with little differences in the mechanical characteristics of masonry units and the binder, the reinforcing effect of the fabric applies only partially.

  6. Fatigue Properties of Plain Concrete under Triaxial Constant-Amplitude Tension-Compression Cyclic Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋玉普; 曹伟; 孟宪宏

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted on tapered plain concrete prism specimens under triaxial constant-amplitude tension-compression cyclic loading. The low stress of the cyclic loading was taken as 0.2fc and the upper stress ranged from 0.20ft to 0.65ft. Three constant lateral pressures were 0.1fc, 0.2fc and 0.3fc respectively. Based on the results, the three-stage evolution nile of the fatigue stiffness, maximttm(minimum) longitudinal strain and damage were analyzed, and a unified S-N curve to calculate fatigue strength factors was worked out. The results show that the fatigue strength and fatigue life under triaxial constant-amplitude tension-compression cyclic loading are smaller than those under uniaxial fatigue condition. Moreover, the secondary strain creep rate is related to the fatigue life, a formula for describing their relation was derived. The investigation of this paper can provide information for the fatigue design of concrete structures.

  7. Compression Dispersion Efficiency of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Struts At Different Load Concentration Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rakesh Kumar, Dr.P.K Mehta,Devbrat Singh, Anup Kumar Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infrastructure development activities in India have increased many folds in recent times. This has resulted in increase in the demand of construction materials like cement, coarse aggregate, fine aggregate etc. Huge quantities of concrete wastes are produced due to demolition of old structures. If recycled aggregate from this waste is used for construction purpose, it will not only make the structures economical and eco-friendly butwill also solve the problem of waste disposal.Recycling old waste concrete by crushing and grading into coarse aggregates for use in new structural concrete is drawing the attention of engineers, environmentalists and researchers since last three decades. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the compression dispersion behaviour of struts of natural coarse aggregate (NCA and recycle coarse aggregate (RCA at different load concentration ratio and aspect ratio. For the study, struts of 450 mm height and 75mm thickness with varying widths starting from 75mm to 450mm, using NCA and RCA concrete, were cast. The testing of struts was carriedout on loading frame of capacity 500 kN. The struts were tested to failure under in-plane compressive load applied through symmetrically placed steel plate (75×75×10 mm at top andbottom of the struts.

  8. The Behaviour of Palm Oil Fibre Block Masonry Prism under Eccentric Compressive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Mardiha; Kolop, Roslan; Baizura Hamid, Nor; Kaamin, Masiri; Farhan Rosdi, Mohd; Ngadiman, Norhayati; Sahat, Suhaila

    2017-08-01

    Dry-stacked masonry offers great benefits in constructing masonry buildings. Several examples from previous research show that dry masonry is reasonable alternative to the traditional building system. By addition of fibre, the ductility and the propagation of cracking will be improved. This study investigates the dry stack oil palm fibre block prisms which were subjected to eccentricity compression loads. These concrete blocks were cast using a single mould with suitable fibre-cement composition namely 1:4 (cement: sand) and 0.40 water to the cement ratio based on cement weight. Prisms test using 400 (length) × 150 (width) × 510 (height) mm specimen was carried under eccentric load. There were forty eight (48) prisms built with different configurations based on their volume of fibre. In this study, one types of grout were used namely the fine grout of mix 1:3:2 (cement: sand: aggregate (5mm maximum). Based on the test performed, the failure mechanism and influencing parameters were discussed. From compressive strength test result, it shows that the strength of concrete block decreased with the increase of fibre used. Although the control sample has the higher strength compared to concrete with EFB, it can be seen from mode failure of masonry prism that fibre could extend the cracking time. These results show that the oil palm fibre blocks can improve the failure behaviour and suitable to be used as load bearing wall construction in Malaysia.

  9. Closed-form solution of the Ogden-Hill's compressible hyperelastic model for ramp loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezvai, Szabolcs; Kossa, Attila

    2016-09-01

    This article deals with the visco-hyperelastic modelling approach for compressible polymer foam materials. Polymer foams can exhibit large elastic strains and displacements in case of volumetric compression. In addition, they often show significant rate-dependent properties. This material behaviour can be accurately modelled using the visco-hyperelastic approach, in which the large strain viscoelastic description is combined with the rate-independent hyperelastic material model. In case of polymer foams, the most widely used compressible hyperelastic material model, the so-called Ogden-Hill's model, was applied, which is implemented in the commercial finite element (FE) software uc(Abaqus). The visco-hyperelastic model is defined in hereditary integral form, therefore, obtaining a closed-form solution for the stress is not a trivial task. However, the parameter-fitting procedure could be much faster and accurate if closed-form solution exists. In this contribution, exact stress solutions are derived in case of uniaxial, biaxial and volumetric compression loading cases using ramp-loading history. The analytical stress solutions are compared with the stress results in uc(Abaqus) using FE analysis. In order to highlight the benefits of the analytical closed-form solution during the parameter-fitting process experimental work has been carried out on a particular open-cell memory foam material. The results of the material identification process shows significant accuracy improvement in the fitting procedure by applying the derived analytical solutions compared to the so-called separated approach applied in the engineering practice.

  10. The shock compression of microorganism-loaded broths and emulsions: Experiments and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Appleby-Thomas, G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract By carefully selecting flyer plate thickness and the geometry of a target capsule for bacterial broths and emulsions, we have successfully subjected the contents of the capsule to simultaneous shock and dynamic compression when subjected to a flyer-plate impact experiment. The capsules were designed to be recovered intact so that post experimental analysis could be done on the contents. ANSYS? AUTODYN hydrocode simulations were carried out to interrogate the deformation of...

  11. Thermal residual stresses and stress distributions under tensile and compressive loadings of short fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The thermal residual stresses and the stress distributions of short fiber reinforced metal matrix composite under tensile and compressive loadings were studied using large strain axisymmetric elasto-plastic finite element method. It is demonstrated that the thermal residual stresses can result in asymmetrical stress distributions and matrix plasticity. The thermal residual stresses decrease the stress transfer in tension and enhance the stress transfer in compression. The fiber volume fraction has more important effects on the thermal residual stresses and the stress distributions under tensile and compressive loadings than the fiber aspect ratio and the fiber end distance.

  12. Dynamic loadings of deepwater spar palatform - A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Narasimhan, M.C.; Ambulgekar, P.P.

    Various wave loadings are considered separately on the deepwater Spar platform, with the wave propagation along x-axis and dynamic analyses are carried out at 1150m water depth using Newmark- beta approach The dynamic responses along six degrees...

  13. Compressive sampling based approach for identification of moving loads distribution on cable-stayed bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fujian; Ou, Jinping

    2013-04-01

    A moving loads distribution identification method for cable-stayed bridges based on compressive sampling (CS) technique is proposed. CS is a technique for obtaining sparse signal representations to underdetermined linear measurement equations. In this paper, CS is employed to localize moving loads of cable-stayed bridges by limit cable force measurements. First, a vehicle-bridge model for cable-stayed bridges is presented. Then the relationship between the cable force and moving loads is constructed based on the influence lines. With the hypothesis of sparsity distribution of vehicles on bridge deck (which is practical for long-span bridges), the moving loads are identified by minimizing the `l2-norm of the difference between the observed and simulated cable forces caused by moving vehicles penalized by the `l1-norm' of the moving load vector. The resultant minimization problem is convex and can be solved efficiently. A numerical example of a real cable-stayed bridge is carried out to verify the proposed method. The robustness and accuracy of the identification approach with limit cable force measurement for multi-vehicle spatial localization are validated.

  14. Dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member under axial compression considering creep effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X. T.; Wang, Y. D.; Dai, C. H.; Ding, M.

    2017-08-01

    The finite element model of concrete-filled steel tubular member was established by the numerical analysis software considering material nonlinearity to analyze concrete creep effect on the dynamic responses of the member under axial compression and lateral impact. In the model, the constitutive model of core concrete is the plastic damage model, that of steel is the Von Mises yield criterion and kinematic hardening model, and the creep effect at different ages is equivalent to the change of concrete elastic modulus. Then the dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member considering creep effects was simulated, and the effects of creep on contact time, impact load, deflection, stress and strain were discussed. The fruits provide a scientific basis for the design of the impact resistance of concrete filled steel tubular members.

  15. Dynamic triaxial compression experiments on Cor-Tuf specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Alex B.

    A set of dynamic triaxial compression experiments at 50 MPa, 100 MPa, and 200 MPa confinement have been conducted with a modified Kolsky bar on cylindrical ultra high strength concrete Cor-Tuf specimens of diameter 19 mm and length of 12.7 mm. The experiment is composed of a hydrostatic phase which occurs at a quasi-static strain rate followed by a dynamic shear phase which occurs at a high strain rate. A set of 28 experiments were conducted at strain rates of 100 s-1 and 200 s-1. The experiments show that the fracture strength of the material increases under the test conditions. The specimens showed higher strength in the dynamic confined experiments than both the quasi-static TXC tests and the unconfined dynamic tests. The strength increase was attributed to specimen size difference and not a strain rate or confinement effect. Although the trend towards brittle ductile transition is observed the specimens were not tested in a high enough confinement for the phase change to occur.

  16. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  17. Response of Rubble Foundation to Dynamic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1993-01-01

    The soil beneath vertical monolithic structures is subjected to a combination of static load due to the submerged weight of the structure and stochastic non-stationary loads as a result of the wave loads on the vertical wall. The stress conditions in the soil below a foundation exposed to both st...

  18. Response of Rubble Foundation to Dynamic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1994-01-01

    The soil beneath vertical monolithic structures is subjected to a combination of static load due to the submerged weight of the structure and stochastic non-stationary loads as a result of the wave loads on the vertical wall. The stress conditions in the soil below a foundation exposed to both st...

  19. An efficient dynamic load balancing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagaros, Nikos D.

    2014-01-01

    In engineering problems, randomness and uncertainties are inherent. Robust design procedures, formulated in the framework of multi-objective optimization, have been proposed in order to take into account sources of randomness and uncertainty. These design procedures require orders of magnitude more computational effort than conventional analysis or optimum design processes since a very large number of finite element analyses is required to be dealt. It is therefore an imperative need to exploit the capabilities of computing resources in order to deal with this kind of problems. In particular, parallel computing can be implemented at the level of metaheuristic optimization, by exploiting the physical parallelization feature of the nondominated sorting evolution strategies method, as well as at the level of repeated structural analyses required for assessing the behavioural constraints and for calculating the objective functions. In this study an efficient dynamic load balancing algorithm for optimum exploitation of available computing resources is proposed and, without loss of generality, is applied for computing the desired Pareto front. In such problems the computation of the complete Pareto front with feasible designs only, constitutes a very challenging task. The proposed algorithm achieves linear speedup factors and almost 100% speedup factor values with reference to the sequential procedure.

  20. Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries (HLL) Technology for Audio Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, A.; Lomuscio, A.; Nunzio, L. Di

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we apply hardware acceleration to embedded systems running audio applications. We present a new framework, Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries or HLL, to dynamically load hardware libraries on reconfigurable platforms (FPGAs). Provided a library of application-specific processors,...

  1. Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries (HLL) Technology for Audio Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, A.; Lomuscio, A.; Nunzio, L. Di

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we apply hardware acceleration to embedded systems running audio applications. We present a new framework, Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries or HLL, to dynamically load hardware libraries on reconfigurable platforms (FPGAs). Provided a library of application-specific processors...

  2. The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1 which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device.

  3. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FOREARM FRACTURES TREATED WITH LOCKING COMPRESSION PLATE LIMITED CONTACT DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandra Reddy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study has been carried out to compare the functional outcome of fracture fixation in diaphyseal forearm fractures by using Locking Compression Plate versus Limited contact dynamic compression Plate. To study the difference in the duration of union & complications with LCP & LC - DCP. METHODOLOGY: It is a prospective randomised comparative study which was carried out from December 2012 to December 2014 in our In stitution. In Group I, 20 patients were subjected to open reduction and internal fixation with 3.5 mm stainless steel LCP and locking head/nonlocking screws. In Group II, 20 patients were managed by 3.5mm LCDCP and non - locking screws. Clinical assessments regarding pain and function, radiological assessments were undertaken at the final follow - up. RESULTS - The time required for LCP fixation (mean 93.5 min, range 75 - 120 min was found to be more than that required for LC - DCP (mean 81.94 min, range 60 - 110 mi n. But this time difference was not significant (P=0.07, unpaired t test. The mean time of union for the forearm fixed with LCP was found to be 18 weeks (range 14 - 26 weeks in comparison to 16 weeks (range 10 - 22 weeks for the LC - DCP group. CONCLUSION - LC plating is an effective treatment option for fractures shaft of forearm. The present study could not prove the superiority of LCP over LC - DCP. It is the proper application of the principles of plating and not the type of plate which decides the outco me. Further long - term multicentric study is required to prove behaviors of the implant.

  5. Profile modification to minimize spur gear dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. H.; Townsend, D. P.; Oswald, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical computer simulation program for dynamic modeling of low-contact-ratio spur gear systems is presented. The procedure computes the static transmission error of the gears operating under load and uses a fast Fourier transform to generate the frequency spectrum of the static transmission error at various tooth profile modifications. The dynamic loading response of an unmodified (perfect involute) gear pair was compared with that of gears with various profile modifications. Correlations were found between various profile modifications and the resulting dynamic loads. An effective error, obtained from frequency domain analysis of the static transmission error of the gears, gave a very good indication of the optimum profile modification to reduce gear dynamic loading. Design curves generated by dynamic simulation at various profile modifications are given for gear systems operated at various loads. Optimum profile modifications can be determined from these design curves for improved gear design.

  6. Efficient Data Compression Scheme using Dynamic Huffman Code Applied on Arabic Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Ghwanmeh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of an efficient compression scheme to process the Arabic language represents a difficult task. This paper employs the dynamic Huffman coding on data compression with variable length bit coding, on the Arabic language. Experimental tests have been performed on both Arabic and English text. A comparison was made to measure the efficiency of compressing data results on both Arabic and English text. Also a comparison was made between the compression rate and the size of the file to be compressed. It has been found that as the file size increases, the compression ratio decreases for both Arabic and English text. The experimental results show that the average message length and the efficiency of compression on Arabic text was better than the compression on English text. Also, results show that the main factor which significantly affects compression ratio and average message length was the frequency of the symbols on the text.

  7. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, C.C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Y.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Peng, X.B., E-mail: pengxb@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wei, Y.P. [Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Fluid Solid Coupling Systems, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Mao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, W.X.; Qian, X.Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-02-15

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads. - Graphical abstract: From the comparison between the experimental curves and the predicted curves calculated by adopting the corrected m, it is very clear that the new model is of great capability to explain the deformation behavior of the tungsten material under dynamic compression at high temperatures. (EC, PC and PCM refers to experimental curve, predicted curve and predicted curve with a corrected m. Different colors represent different scenarios.). - Highlights: • Test research on dynamic properties of tungsten at working temperature range and strain rate range of divertors. • Constitutive equation descrbing strain hardening, strain rate hardening and temperature softening. • A guidance to estimate dynamical response and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under impact.

  8. A Dynamic Model of a Vapor Compression Refrigeration Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiromu; Yanagisawa, Tetsuji; Izushi, Minetoshi

    A dynamic model of a vapor compression refrigeration cycle composed of a compressor with a high-pressure chamber, cross finned heat exchangers, an expansion valve and pipes is developed. In order to prove the effectiveness of the model, start-up simulation results are compared with experimental result obtained for a prototype refrigeration cycle. In these experiments, the refrigerant mass distribution in the refrigeration cycle is set and two start-up operations are performed. One operation is called "hot-start", which means starting-up from a high temperature in the compressor chamber. The other is called "cold-start", which means starting-up from a low temperature. The simulation results well support the experimental results for both operations and prove the effectiveness of the developed model.

  9. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruszka Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1 and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  10. A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF IN VIVO MOUSE TIBIAL COMPRESSION LOADING: INFLUENCE OF BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Razi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Though bone is known to adapt to its mechanical challenges, the relationship between the local mechanical stimuli and the adaptive tissue response seems so far unclear. A major challenge appears to be a proper characterization of the local mechanical stimuli of the bones (e.g. strains. The finite element modeling is a powerful tool to characterize these mechanical stimuli not only on the bone surface but across the tissue. However, generating a predictive finite element model of biological tissue strains (e.g., physiological-like loading encounters aspects that are inevitably unclear or vague and thus might significantly influence the predicted findings. We aimed at investigating the influence of variations in bone alignment, joint contact surfaces and displacement constraints on the predicted strains in an in vivo mouse tibial compression experiment. We found that the general strain state within the mouse tibia under compressive loading was not affected by these uncertain factors. However, strain magnitudes at various tibial regions were highly influenced by specific modeling assumptions. The displacement constraints to control the joint contact sites appeared to be the most influential factor on the predicted strains in the mouse tibia. Strains could vary up to 150% by modifying the displacement constraints. To a lesser degree, bone misalignment (from 0 to 20° also resulted in a change of strain (+300 µε = 40%. The definition of joint contact surfaces could lead to up to 6% variation. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of the specific boundary conditions in the in vivo mouse tibia loading experiment for the prediction of local mechanical strain values using finite element modeling.

  11. Closure behavior of rock joint under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-hua; LI Xi-bing; ZHANG Yi-ping; ZUO Yu-jun

    2007-01-01

    The normal compression tests on intact samples and artificial joints with different saw-tooth shape under cyclic loading and half-sine waves of different frequencies were performed by using Instron1342 servo-controlled material testing machine. The specimens were made artificially with mortar. The loading frequency ranged from 0.005 Hz to 0.1 Hz. The experimental results show that joint closure curves are non-linear and concave up. The stress-deformation curves under cyclic loading exhibit hysteresis and permanent set that diminish rapidly and keep constant finally on successive cycles. Normal displacement successively decreases from the joint J1 to J2, to J3 under the same normal loads regardless of frequency. Considering the loading frequency effect, normal displacement of joint J1 decreases with increasing the loading frequency except that the loading frequency is 0.05 Hz. Normal displacement of joint J2 increases with increasing the loading frequency. Normal displacement of joint J3 increases with increasing the loading frequency when the frequency ranges from 0.005 Hz to 0.05 Hz. Its normal displacement, however, becomes least when the loading frequency is 0.1 Hz.

  12. Identifying the dynamic compressive stiffness of a prospective biomimetic elastomer by an inverse method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, Steven P; Forster, Aaron M; Hunston, Donald; Rhorer, Richard; Everett, Richard K; Simmonds, Kirth E; Bagchi, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Soft elastomeric materials that mimic real soft human tissues are sought to provide realistic experimental devices to simulate the human body's response to blast loading to aid the development of more effective protective equipment. The dynamic mechanical behavior of these materials is often measured using a Kolsky bar because it can achieve both the high strain rates (>100s(-1)) and the large strains (>20%) that prevail in blast scenarios. Obtaining valid results is challenging, however, due to poor dynamic equilibrium, friction, and inertial effects. To avoid these difficulties, an inverse method was employed to determine the dynamic response of a soft, prospective biomimetic elastomer using Kolsky bar tests coupled with high-speed 3D digital image correlation. Individual tests were modeled using finite elements, and the dynamic stiffness of the elastomer was identified by matching the simulation results with test data using numerical optimization. Using this method, the average dynamic response was found to be nearly equivalent to the quasi-static response measured with stress-strain curves at compressive strains up to 60%, with an uncertainty of ±18%. Moreover, the behavior was consistent with the results in stress relaxation experiments and oscillatory tests although the latter were performed at lower strain levels.

  13. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  14. Dynamic Fractal Transform with Applications to Image Data Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王舟; 余英林

    1997-01-01

    A recent trend in computer graphics and image processing is to use Iterated Function System(IFS)to generate and describe both man-made graphics and natural images.Jacquin was the first to propose a fully automation gray scale image compression algorithm which is referred to as a typical static fractal transform based algorithm in this paper.By using this algorithm,an image can be condensely described as a fractal transform operator which is the combination of a set of reactal mappings.When the fractal transform operator is iteratedly applied to any initial image,a unique attractro(reconstructed image)can be achieved.In this paper,a dynamic fractal transform is presented which is a modification of the static transform.Instea of being fixed,the dynamic transform operator varies in each decoder iteration,thus differs from static transform operators.The new transform has advantages in improving coding efficiency and shows better convergence for the deocder.

  15. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  16. [Mechanisms of changes in the human spinal column in response to static and dynamic axial mechanic loading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, Yu B

    2014-01-01

    The study was concerned with the human spinal column reaction to axial static and dynamic loading. Fresh segments of the column from dorsal vertebra XI to lumber vertebra II were exposed to axial static (20 mm/min) and dynamic (200 and 500 mm/min) loading. Measured variables included load value, whole segment deformation, anterior surfaces of intervertebral disk Th(XI)-Th(XII) and dorsal vertebra XII, and acoustic emission signals indicative of spongy bone microdestruction. It was found that vertebral body deformation augmented less in comparison with the intervertebral disk and that central parts of the spinal end plates compress greater than peripheral. This difference was more considerable due to static loading rather than dynamic. To produce deformation of a spinal segment by dynamic loading same as by the static one, it is necessary to overcome a stronger resistance of a larger number of trabecular bones. Herefrom it follows that, first, to cause an equal segment compression the dynamic load must be heavier than static and, which is of paramount practical significance, dynamic strength of the column is markedly higher than static. Secondly, spinal stiffness during impact is higher as compared with the static condition. Thirdly, same degree of deformation due to dynamic loading should result in a larger volume of microdestructions comparing with static loading, which is testified by a reliable difference in the number of AE signals accumulated prior to fracture. The number of AE signals amounts to 444.2 ± 308.2 and 85.0 ± 36.6 in case of the dynamic and static loading, respectively (p < 0.05 according to Student's t-criterion).

  17. Axially compressed buckling of an embedded boron nitride nanotube subjected to thermo-electro-mechanical loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Jalili, Nader

    2007-04-01

    Unlike widely-used carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have shown to possess stable semiconducting behavior and strong piezoelectricity. Such properties along with their outstanding mechanical properties and thermal conductivity, make BNNTs promising candidate reinforcement materials for a verity of applications especially nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Motivated by these abilities, we aim to study the buckling behavior of BNNT-reinforced piezoelectric polymeric composites when subjected to combined electro-thermo-mechanical loadings. For this, the multi-walled structure of BNNT is considered as elastic media and a set of concentric cylindrical shell with van der Waals interaction between them. Using three-dimensional equilibrium equations, Donnell shell theory is utilized to show that the axially compressive resistance of BNNT varies with applying thermal and electrical loads. The effect of BNNT piezoelectric property on the buckling behavior of the composites is demonstrated. More specifically, it is shown that applying direct and reverse voltages to BNNT changes the buckling loads for any axial and circumferential wavenumbers. Such capability could be uniquely utilized when designing BNNT-reinforced composites.

  18. Damage propagation in a masonry arch subjected to slow cyclic and dynamic loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the damage propagation of a masonry arch induced by slow cyclic and dynamic loadings is studied. A two-dimensional model of the arch is proposed. A nonlocal damage-plastic constitutive law is adopted to reproduce the hysteretic characteristics of the masonry material, subjected to cyclic static loadings or to harmonic dynamic excitations. In particular, the adopted cohesive model is able to take into account different softening laws in tension and in compression, plastic strains, stiffness recovery and loss due to crack closure and reopening. The latter effect is an unavoidable feature for realistically reproducing hysteretic cycles. In the studied case, an inverse procedure is used to calibrate the model parameters. Then, nonlinear static and dynamic responses of the masonry arch are described together with damage propagation paths.

  19. Centrifugal experimental study of suction bucket foundations under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaobing; Wu, Yongren; Jiao, Bintian; Wang, Shuyun

    2007-12-01

    Centrifugal experiments were carried out to investigate the responses of suction bucket foundations under horizontal and vertical dynamic loading. It is shown that when the loading amplitude is over a critical value, the sand at the upper part around the bucket is softened or even liquefied. The excess pore pressure decreases from the upper part to the lower part of the sand layer in the vertical direction and decreases radially from the bucket’s side wall in the horizontal direction. Large settlements of the bucket and the sand layer around the bucket are induced by dynamic loading. The dynamic responses of the bucket with smaller height (the same diameter) are heavier.

  20. Experimental behaviour of concrete-filled rectangular thin welded steel stubs (compression load case)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhoune, Noureddine; Zeghiche, Jahid

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, results of tests conducted on thin welded rectangular steel-concrete stubs are presented. The studied section was made of two cold steel plates with U shape and welded (with electric arc) to form a steel box. The cross section dimensions were: 100×70×2 mm. The main studied parameters were: the height (50, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 mm), the effect of the in filled concrete and its age, the discontinuous weld. The tests were carried out at 28 days and 3 years after the date of casting. All tests were achieved under axial compression in a 50 tf machine up to failure. A total of 21 stubs were tested, 8 were empty, 8 filled with concrete whose gravel was made of crushed crystallized slag tested at 28 days of casting and 8 composites as the previous but tested after 3 years. The aim of the study is to bring some light on the behaviour of such composite section. Also, to provide some evidence that the use of crushed slag could be integrated in the manufacturing of non-conventional concrete. All failure loads were predicted numerically and by using the Eurocodes EC3 and EC4 from test results it was confirmed that the length of empty stubs had a drastic effect on the load carrying capacity and the failure mode was rather a local buckling mode with steel sides deformed outwards and inwards. Both numerical EC3 predictions were higher and on the unsafe side when compared to experimental corresponding loads for empty steel samples. For composite stubs, the load carrying capacity increased significantly; the EC4 numerical load predictions were higher in the higher range 300-500 mm and lower in the higher range 50-200 mm. The failure mode of composite stubs was a local buckling mode with all steel sides deformed outwards. The experimental loads obtained after 3 years of casting were higher than the corresponding tested at 28 days. The load ratio (3 years/28 days) was found to be increasing linearly with the increase of the stubs height. More test results

  1. Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid Dynamics: A Challenge for Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwick, A.

    2017-03-01

    The possibility that compression as well as rarefaction shocks may form in single phase vapours was envisaged first by Bethe (1942). However calculations based on the Van der Waals equation of state indicated that the latter type of shock is possible only if the specific heat at constant volume cv divided by the universal gas constant R is larger than about 17.5 which he considered too large to be satisfied by real fluids. This conclusion was contested by Thompson (1971) who showed that the type of shock capable of forming in arbitrary fluids is determined by the sign of the thermodynamic quantity to which he referred to as fundamental derivative of gas dynamics. Here v, p, s and c denote the specific volume, the pressure, the entropy and the speed of sound. Thompson and co-workers also showed that the required condition for the existence of rarefaction shocks, that Γ may take on negative values, is indeed satisfied for a number of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon vapours. This finding spawned a burst of theoretical studies elaborating on the unusual and often counterintuitive behaviour of shocks with rarefaction shocks present. These produced both results of theoretical character but also results suggesting the practical importance of Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid Dynamics in general. The present paper addresses some of the challenges encountered in connection with the theoretical treatment of the associated flow behaviour. Weakly nonlinear acoustic waves of finite amplitude serve as a starting point. Here mixed rather than strictly positive nonlinearity generates a wealth of phenomena not possible in perfect gases. Examples of steady flows where these non-classical effects play a decisive role (and which may be useful also for future experimental work) are quasi one-dimensional nozzle flows and transonic two-dimensional flows past corners. The study of viscous effects concentrates on laminar flows of boundary layer type. Here non-classical phenomena are caused by the

  2. SHS and RHS stainless steel slender members loaded by compression and bending interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Židlický, Břetislav; Jandera, Michal

    2017-09-01

    Behaviour of stainless steel slender members loaded by interaction of axial compressive force and bending moment is investigated in this research. Square hollow sections (SHS) made of austenitic stainless steel grade are considered. An initial numerical parametric study in FE software Abaqus is given and its results are compared to the existing design procedures and design standard rules. The investigated parameters are mainly the column slenderness, section slenderness, ratio between the applied bending moment and axial compressive force and the moment distribution along the member. The necessity of having additional design rules for stainless steels is firstly demonstrated on the values of interaction factors ky which are significantly higher for stainless steel members due to the material nonlinearity with decreased stiffness even at lower stress levels. As an alternative, the General Method is used for comparison to the Abaqus GMNIA model results. The limitation of the method when used for members of non-linear material behaviour is shown and a safe modification of design procedure is suggested.

  3. An experimentally validated micromechanical model of a rat vertebra under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Wroe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, finite element analysis (FEA) has been increasingly applied to examine and predict the mechanical behaviour of craniofacial and other bony structures. Traditional methods used to determine material properties and validate finite element models (FEMs) have met with variable success, and can be time-consuming. An implicit assumption underlying many FE studies is that relatively high localized stress/strain magnitudes identified in FEMs are likely to predict material failure. Here we present a new approach that may offer some advantages over previous approaches. Recently developed technology now allows us to both image and conduct mechanical tests on samples in situ using a materials testing stage (MTS) fitted inside the microCT scanner. Thus, micro-finite element models can be created and validated using both quantitative and qualitative means. In this study, a rat vertebra was tested under compressive loading until failure using an MTS. MicroCT imaging of the vertebra before mechanical testing was used to create a high resolution finite element model of the vertebra. Load-displacement data recorded during the test were used to calculate the effective Young's modulus of the bone (found to be 128 MPa). The microCT image of the compressed vertebra was used to assess the predictive qualities of the FE model. The model showed the highest stress concentrations in the areas that failed during the test. Clearly, our analyses do not directly address biomechanics of the craniofacial region; however, the methodology adopted here could easily be applied to examine the properties and behaviour of specific craniofacial structures, or whole craniofacial regions of small vertebrates. Experimentally validated micro-FE analyses are a powerful method in the study of materials with complex microstructures such as bone. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2010 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Innovative design of composite structures: Axisymmetric deformations of unsymmetrically laminated cylinders loaded in axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Paraska, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The study focuses on the axisymmetric deformation response of unsymmetrically laminate cylinders loaded in axial compression by known loads. A geometrically nonlinear analysis is used. Though buckling is not studied, the deformations can be considered to be the prebuckling response. Attention is directed at three 16 layer laminates: a (90 sub 8/0 sub 8) sub T; a (0 sub 8/90 sub 8) sub T and a (0/90) sub 4s. The symmetric laminate is used as a basis for comparison, while the two unsymmetric laminates were chosen because they have equal but opposite bending-stretching effects. Particular attention is given to the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany the cool-down of any unsymmetric laminate from the consolidation temperature. Simple support and clamped boundary conditions are considered. It is concluded that: (1) The radial deformations of an unsymmetric laminate are significantly larger than the radial deformations of a symmetric laminate, although for both symmetric and unsymmetric laminates the large deformations are confined to a boundary layer near the ends of the cylinder; (2) For this nonlinear problem the length of the boundary layer is a function of the applied load; (3) The sign of the radial deformations near the supported end of the cylinder depends strongly on the sense (sign) of the laminate asymmetry; (4) For unsymmetric laminates, ignoring the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany cool-down results in load-induced deformations that are under predicted; and (5) The support conditions strongly influence the response but the influence of the sense of asymmetry and the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations are independent of the support conditions.

  5. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  6. The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ECCOMAS Young Investigators Conference 6th GACM Colloquium, July 20–23, 2015, Aachen, Germany The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures R. Suliman, N. Peake Abstract. The deformation of slender elastic structures due...

  7. Dynamical Model of Rocket Propellant Loading with Liquid Hydrogen

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A dynamical model describing the multi-stage process of rocket propellant loading has been developed. It accounts for both the nominal and faulty regimes of...

  8. Comparison of the load-sharing characteristics between pedicle-based dynamic and rigid rod devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yoon-Ho [Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Engineering Center, Incheon 403712 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, W-M [Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Lee, Kwon-Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Woo [Department of Neurosurgery, Kwang-Hye Spine Hospital, Seoul 135280 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Jae [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae 621749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjl@bme.inje.ac.kr

    2008-12-01

    Recently, numerous types of posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) devices have been introduced as an alternative to the fusion devices for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine. It is hypothesized that the use of 'compliant' materials such as Nitinol (Ni-Ti alloy, elastic modulus = 75 GPa) or polyether-etherketone (PEEK, elastic modulus = 3.2 GPa) in PDS can restore stability of the lumbar spine without adverse stress-shielding effects that have often been found with 'rigid' fusion devices made of 'rigid' Ti alloys (elastic modulus = 114 GPa). Previous studies have shown that suitably designed PDS devices made of more compliant material may be able to help retain kinematic behavior of the normal spine with optimal load sharing between the anterior and posterior spinal elements. However, only a few studies on their biomechanical efficacies are available. In this study, we conducted a finite-element (FE) study to investigate changes in load-sharing characteristics of PDS devices. The implanted models were constructed after modifying the previously validated intact model of L3-4 spine. Posterior lumbar fusion with three different types of pedicle screw systems was simulated: a conventional rigid fixation system (Ti6Al4V, {phi} = 6.0 mm) and two kinds of PDS devices (one with Nitinol rod with a three-coiled turn manner, {phi} = 4.0 mm; the other with PEEK rod with a uniform cylindrical shape, {phi} = 6.0 mm). To simulate the load on the lumbar spine in a neutral posture, an axial compressive load (400 N) was applied. Subsequently, the changes in load-sharing characteristics and stresses were investigated. When the compressive load was applied on the implanted models (Nitinol rod, PEEK rod, Ti-alloy rod), the predicted axial compressive loads transmitted through the devices were 141.8 N, 109.8 N and 266.8 N, respectively. Axial forces across the PDS devices (Nitinol rod, PEEK rod) and rigid system (Ti-alloy rod) with facet

  9. FPGA Acceleration by Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomuscio, Andrea; Nannarelli, Alberto; Re, Marco

    Hardware acceleration is a viable solution to obtain energy efficiency in data intensive computation. In this work, we present a hardware framework to dynamically load hardware libraries, HLL, on reconfigurable platforms (FPGAs). Provided a library of application-specific processors, we load on...

  10. Development of the Gliding Hole of the Dynamics Compression Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, U. A.; Suyitno; Magetsari, R.; Mahardika, M.

    2017-02-01

    The gliding hole of the dynamics compression plate is designed to facilitate relative movement of pedicle screw during surgery application. The gliding hole shape is then geometrically complex. The gliding hole manufactured using machining processes used to employ ball-nose cutting tool. Then, production cost is expensive due to long production time. This study proposed to increase productivity of DCP products by introducing forming process (cold forming). The forming process used to involve any press tool devices. In the closed die forming press tool is designed with little allowance, then work-pieces is trapped in the mould after forming. Therefore, it is very important to determine hole geometry and dimensions of raw material in order to success on forming process. This study optimized the hole sizes with both geometry analytics and experiments. The success of the forming process was performed by increasing the holes size on the raw materials. The holes size need to be prepared is diameter of 5.5 mm with a length of 11.4 mm for the plate thickness 3 mm and diameter of 6 mm with a length of 12.5 mm for the plate thickness 4 mm.

  11. 100-J UV laser for dynamic compression research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweiback, J.; Fochs, S. F.; Bromage, J.; Broege, D.; Cuffney, R.; Currier, Z.; Dorrer, C.; Ehrich, B.; Engler, J.; Guardalben, M.; Kephalos, N.; Marozas, J.; Roides, R.; Zuegel, J.

    2016-03-01

    A 100-J, 351-nm laser has been developed for the Dynamic Compression Sector located at the Advanced Photon Source. This laser will drive shocks in solid-state materials which will be probed by picosecond x-ray pulses available from the synchrotron source. The laser utilizes a state-of-the-art fiber front end providing pulse lengths up to 20 ns with pulse shapes tailored to optimize shock trajectories. A diode-pumped Nd:glass regenerative amplifier is followed by a four-pass, flash-lamp-pumped rod amplifier. The regenerative amplifier is designed to produce up to 20 mJ with high stability. The final amplifier uses a six-pass, 15-cm, Nd:glass disk amplifier based on an OMEGA laser design. A KDP Type-II/Type-II frequency tripler configuration converts the 1053-nm laser output to a wavelength of 351 nm and the ultraviolet beam is image relayed to the target chamber. Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion and polarization smoothing have been optimized to produce uniform shocks in the materials to be tested. Custom control software collects all diagnostic information and provides a central location for all aspects of laser operation.

  12. Reconnection dynamics with secondary tearing instability in compressible Hall plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn; Wang, L. C.; Li, L. J. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The dynamics of a secondary tearing instability is systematically investigated based on compressible Hall magnetohydrodynamic. It is found that in the early nonlinear phase of magnetic reconnection before onset of the secondary tearing instability, the geometry of the magnetic field in the reconnection region tends to form a Y-type structure in a weak Hall regime, instead of an X-type structure in a strong Hall regime. A new scaling law is found that the maximum reconnection rate in the early nonlinear stage is proportional to the square of the ion inertial length (γ∝d{sub i}{sup 2}) in the weak Hall regime. In the late nonlinear phase, the thin elongated current sheet associated with the Y-type geometry of the magnetic field breaks up to form a magnetic island due to a secondary tearing instability. After the onset of the secondary tearing mode, the reconnection rate is substantially boosted by the formation of the X-type geometries of magnetic field in the reconnection regions. With a strong Hall effect, the maximum reconnection rate linearly increases with the increase of the ion inertial length (γ∝d{sub i})

  13. Dynamic Shock Compression of Copper to Multi-Megabar Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haill, T. A.; Furnish, M. D.; Twyeffort, L. L.; Arrington, C. L.; Lemke, R. W.; Knudson, M. D.; Davis, J.-P.

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an important material for a variety of shock and high energy density applications and experiments. Copper is used as a standard reference material to determine the EOS properties of other materials. The high conductivity of copper makes it useful as an MHD driver layer in high current dynamic materials experiments on Sandia National Laboratories Z machine. Composite aluminum/copper flyer plates increase the dwell time in plate impact experiments by taking advantage of the slower wave speeds in copper. This presentation reports on recent efforts to reinstate a composite Al/Cu flyer capability on Z and to extend the range of equation-of-state shock compression data through the use of hyper-velocity composite flyers and symmetric planar impact with copper targets. We will present results from multi-dimensional ALEGRA MHD simulations, as well as experimental designs and methods of composite flyer fabrication. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock Compressed Quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geom- etry optimised system of a polar slab in a 3-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under repres...

  15. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Effect of Axial and Transverse Compression on the Residual Tensile Properties of Ballistic Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib C. Chowdhury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic impact induces multiaxial loading on Kevlar® and polyethylene fibers used in protective armor systems. The influence of multiaxial loading on fiber failure is not well understood. Experiments show reduction in the tensile strength of these fibers after axial and transverse compression. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD simulations to explain and develop a fundamental understanding of this experimental observation since the property reduction mechanism evolves from the atomistic level. An all-atom MD method is used where bonded and non-bonded atomic interactions are described through a state-of-the-art reactive force field. Monotonic tension simulations in three principal directions of the models are conducted to determine the anisotropic elastic and strength properties. Then the models are subjected to multi-axial loads—axial compression, followed by axial tension and transverse compression, followed by axial tension. MD simulation results indicate that pre-compression distorts the crystal structure, inducing preloading of the covalent bonds and resulting in lower tensile properties.

  16. A Dynamic Load Balancing Mechanism for Distributed Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝有然

    1996-01-01

    It is desirable in a distributed system to have the system load balanced evenly among the nodes so that the mean job response time is minimized.In this paper,we present a dynamic load balancing mechanism(DLB).It adopts a cntralized approach and is network topology independent.The DLB mechanism employs a set of threscholds which are automatically adjusted as the system load changes.It also provides a simple mechanism for the system to switch between periodic and instantaneous load balancing policies with ease.The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by intensive simulations for various parameters.Te simulation results show that the mean job response time in a system implementing DLB algorithm is significantly lower than the same system without load balancings.Furthermore,compared with a previously proposed algorithm,DLB algorithm demonstrates improved performance,especially when the system is heavily loaded and the load is unevenly distributed.

  17. Local compression properties of double-stranded DNA based on a dynamic simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Xiaoling; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The local mechanical properties of DNA are believed to play an important role in their biological functions and DNA-based nanomechanical devices. Using a simple sphere-tip compression system, the local radial mechanical properties of DNA are systematically studied by changing the tip size. The compression simulation results for the 16 nm diameter sphere tip are well consistent with the experimental results. With the diameter of the tip decreasing, the radial compressive elastic properties under external loads become sensitive to the tip size and the local DNA conformation. There appears a suddenly force break in the compression-force curve when the sphere size is less than or equal to 12 nm diameter. The analysis of the hydrogen bonds and base stacking interaction shows there is a local unwinding process occurs. During the local unwinding process, first the hydrogen bonds between complement base pairs are broken. With the compression aggregating, the local backbones in the compression center are unwound from ...

  18. Stochastic dynamic programming for noise load management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, T.R.; van Kraaij, M.J.A.L.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Dijk, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Noise load reduction is among the primary performance targets for some airports. For airports with a complex lay-out of runways, runway selection may then be carried out via a preference list, an ordered set of runway combinations such that the higher on the list a runway combination, the better thi

  19. Fracture of Structural Materials under Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-25

    Neverthe- less, the band provides a reliable ludication of the shape and average location of the Instability curve and thus allows discriminative...specimen before and after it was placed in the testing machine. The specimens were loaded in a hydraulically activated mechanical testing machine by the

  20. Effects of Acoustic Emission and Energy Evolution of Rock Specimens Under the Uniaxial Cyclic Loading and Unloading Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingbin; Zhang, Mingwei; Han, Lijun; Pu, Hai; Nie, Taoyi

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of energy accumulation, evolution, and dissipation in uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression of 30 sandstone rock specimens under six different loading rates were explored. Stress-strain relations and acoustic emission characteristics of the deformation and failure of rock specimens were analyzed. The densities and rates of stored energy, elastic energy, and dissipated energy under different loading rates were confirmed, and an effective approach for the equivalent energy surface was presented. The energy evolution of rock deformation and failure were revealed. It turns out that the rock deformation behavior under uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression remained almost unchanged compared with that of uniaxial compression. The degree of match between reloading stress-strain curves and previous unloading curves was high, thereby demonstrating the memory function of rock masses. The intensity of acoustic emission fluctuated continually during the entire cyclic process. Emissions significantly increased as the stress exceeded the unloading level. The peak of acoustic emission increased with increasing loading stress level. Relationships between energy density and axial load indicate that the rock mass possesses a certain energy storage limitation. The energy evolution of rock masses is closely related to the axial loading stress, rather than to the axial loading rate. With increasing axial loading stress, stored energy varied most rapidly, followed by that of the elastic energy, then dissipated energy. Energy accumulation dominates prior to the axial load reaching peak strength; thereafter, energy dissipation becomes dominant. The input energy causes the irreversible initiation and extension of microcracks in the rock body. Elastic energy release leads to sudden instability of rock bodies and drives rock damage.

  1. Continuous dynamic recrystallization and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in 99.99% polycrystalline aluminum during hot compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chu-ming; JIANG Shu-nong; ZHANG Xin-ming

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic restoration behavior of 99.99% polycrystalline aluminum was investigated.The deformation was carried out by compression test at 533-773 K and initial strain rate of 0.002-2 s 1 to a true strain of 1.0followed by water quench.Polarized optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to observe the deformation microstructure.It's found that discontinuous dynamic recrystallization,which is commonly observed in lower stacking fault energy metals or ultra-high purity aluminum(≥99.999%),occurs when ZennerHollomon parameter(Z parameter) is low,but the true stress-strain curve doesn't accompany stress oscillation.Continuous dynamic recrystallization occurs when Z parameter is intermediate,and only dynamic recovery takes place if Z parameter is high.

  2. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic camber airfoil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Chandrasekhara

    2007-02-01

    This study reports control of compressible dynamic stall through management of its unsteady vorticity using a variable droop leading edge (VDLE) airfoil. Through dynamic adaptation of the airfoil edge incidence, the formation of a dynamic stall vortex was virtually eliminated for Mach numbers of up to 0·4. Consequently, the leading edge vorticity flux was redistributed enabling retention of the dynamic lift. Of even greater importance was the fact that the drag and pitching moment coefficients were reduced by nearly 50%. The camber variations introduced when the leading edge was drooped are explained to be the source of this benefit. Analysis of the peak vorticity flux levels allowed the determination of minimum necessary airfoil adaptation schedule.

  3. Effect of Porosity and Cell Size on the Dynamic Compressive Properties of Aluminum Alloy Foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of open-cell aluminum alloy foams with different relative densities and cell sizeshave been investigated by compressive tests. The strain rates varied from 700 s-1 to 2600 s-1. The experimentalresults showed that the dynamic compressive stress-strain curves exhibited a typical three-stage behavior: elastic,plateau and densification. The dynamic compressive strength of foams is affected not only by the relative densitybut also by the strain rate and cell size. Aluminum alloy foams with higher relative density or smaller cell size aremore sensitive to the strain rate than foams with lower relative density or larger cell size.

  4. Compression-based investigation of the dynamical properties of cellular automata and other systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zenil, Hector

    2009-01-01

    A method for studying the qualitative dynamical properties of abstract computing machines based on the approximation of their program-size complexity using a general lossless compression algorithm is presented. It is shown that the compression-based approach classifies cellular automata (CA) into clusters according to their heuristic behavior, with these clusters showing a correspondence with Wolfram's main classes of CA behavior. A compression based method to estimate a characteristic exponent to detect phase transitions and measure the resiliency or sensitivity of a system to its initial conditions is also proposed, constituting a compression-based framework for investigating the dynamical properties of cellular automata and other systems. Keywords: cellular automata classification, Wolfram's four classes, phase transition detection, program-size complexity, compression-based clustering, non-linear dynamics, Lyapunov characteristic exponents.

  5. Centrifugal experimental study of suction bucket foundations under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing Lu; Yongren Wu; Bintian Jiao; Shuyun Wang

    2007-01-01

    Centrifugal experiments were carded out to investigate the responses of suction bucket foundations under horizontal and vertical dynamic loading. It is shown that when the loading amplitude is over a critical value, the sand at the upper part around the bucket is softened or even liq-uefied. The excess pore pressure decreases from the upper part to the lower part of the sand layer in the vertical direc-tion and decreases radially from the bucket's side wall in the horizontal direction. Large settlements of the bucket and the sand layer around the bucket are induced by dynamic load-ing. The dynamic responses of the bucket with smaller height (the same diameter) are heavier.

  6. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Carly W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Goto, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  7. Study on Dynamic Compression Properties of K9 Glass with Doppler Pins Array Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changming, Hu; Xiang, Wang; Lingcang, Cai; Cangli, Liu

    2009-06-01

    K9 glass is one of archetypal brittle materials for studies of dynamic fracture, failure wave, and so on. This paper presented the dynamic compression properties of K9 glass under uniaxial strain condition. Experimental sample is K9 glass with internal pre-existed defects, and the shape of pre-existed defects is disc with less than 0.5 mm diameter. All tests were conducted by power gun with 37 mm diameter chamber. Doppler Pins array with high space-time resolutions, which consists of sixteen pins in range of 2 mm line length, were applied to measure the particle velocity histories in different positions at the sample rear surface, and the space-resolution is 127 μm, Experimental results show failure waves initiate at internal micro-surfaces of the sample under shock loading, and the dynamic stress concentration is likely attributed to be a physical mechanism of the initiation of the failure wave. These defects that by the controlled laser irradiation in advance are some internal micro-surfaces. Meanwhile, the experimental results show that internal micro-surfaces of the sample have influence on the elastic precursor wave decay.

  8. Delamination growth behavior in cross-ply composites under compressive cyclic (fatigue) loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegri, Assimina A.

    A mode dependent fatigue delamination growth law for anisotropic composite plates is presented in this thesis. The novelty of the presented law lies in the mode dependency of the material and laminate constants m(Psi) and C(Psi). The model describing the mode dependent delamination growth law consists of an initial postbuckling solution accounting for general delaminated composites, i.e. with no restrictive assumptions on the delamination dimensions, and a fracture mechanics solution. A numerical code was developed for the implementation of the closed form solution which gives the loading and geometrical quantities as well as the energy release rates and the mode mixities. The computer code was especially designed for parametric studies. Parameters assigned in this particular investigation were: end conditions, delamination position (h/T), and applied strain. The effect of the end conditions, i.e. clamped-clamped versus simply-supported ends on the initial postbuckling and growth behavior of delaminated plates was also investigated. In conjunction with the previous analysis, a detailed experimental study was designed and carried out in order to validate the proposed model. The tests were designed so that the effect of certain parameters on the delamination growth behavior could be evaluated. The parameters included in the investigation were: initial delamination length, applied strain and delamination position (h/T). Compressive static, compressive fatigue (constant displacement amplitude), and double cantilever beam (DCB) tests were conducted. Data acquisition and analysis for these tests were performed. By comparing analytical and experimental results it is shown that a very good correlation exists, and the presented mode dependent fatigue delamination growth law can accurately predict fatigue lives of delaminated composite structures.

  9. The role of elastic compressibility in dynamic subduction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austmann, Walter; Govers, Rob; Burov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in geodynamic numerical models show a trend towards more realistic rheologies. The Earth is no longer modeled as a purely viscous fluid, but the effects of, for example, elasticity and plasticity are also included. However, by making such improvements, it is essential to include these more complex rheologies in a consistent way. Specifically, compressibility needs also to be included, an effect that is commonly neglected in numerical models. Recently, we showed that the effect of elastic compressibility is significant. This was done for a gravity driven cylinder in a homogeneous Maxwell fluid bounded by closed boundaries. For a fluid with a realistic compressibility (Poisson ratio equals 0.3), the settling velocity showed a discrepancy with the semi-analytical steady state incompressible solution of approximately 40%. The motion of the fluid was no longer restricted by a small region around the cylinder, but the motion of the cylinder compressed also the fluid near the bottom boundary. This compression decreased the resistance on the cylinder and resulted in a larger settling velocity. Here, we examine the influence of elastic compressibility in an oceanic subduction setting. The slab is driven by slab pull and a far field prescribed plate motion. Preliminary results indicate that elastic compressibility has a significant effect on the fluid motion. Differences with respect to nearly incompressible solution are most significant near material boundaries. In line with our earlier findings, the flow is increased in regions of confined flow, such as the mantle wedge or the subduction channel. As a consequence, an increasing compressibility results in a larger slab velocity. We seek to identify surface observables, such as topography and plate motion, that allow us to distinguish the compressible and incompressible behavior.

  10. Shaft centre orbit for dynamically loaded radial bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coefficients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 Booker1 and described further in 1972 Booker2. Several authors have refined...... seventies Jorgen W. Lund pointed out in lecture notes that the dynamic damping coefficients of the bearing could be used to find the shaft orbit for dynamically loaded bearings. For simplicity the "Short-Width-Journal-Bearing Theory" is used as a basis for finding the damping coefficients in this work...

  11. Neuromuscular fatigue during dynamic maximal strength and hypertrophic resistance loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon; Davis, Lisa; Avela, Janne; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute neuromuscular fatigue during dynamic maximal strength and hypertrophic loadings, known to cause different adaptations underlying strength gain during training. Thirteen healthy, untrained males performed two leg press loadings, one week apart, consisting of 15 sets of 1 repetition maximum (MAX) and 5 sets of 10 repetition maximums (HYP). Concentric load and muscle activity, electromyography (EMG) amplitude and median frequency, was assessed throughout each set. Additionally, maximal bilateral isometric force and muscle activity was assessed pre-, mid-, and up to 30 min post-loading. Concentric load during MAX was decreased after set 10 (Pmuscle activity during HYP loading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SOILS SUBJECT TO IMPACT LOADINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhirong Niu; Guoyun Lu; Dongzuo Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic properties of soil under impact loads are studied experimentally and numerically.By analyzing the microstructural photos of soils with and without impact,it is shown that impact loads can destroy the original structures in the compact area,where the soil grains are rearranged regularly and form the compact whirlpool structure.Simultaneously,the dynamic impact process of soil is simulated by using the software of Ls-dyna.The time-dependent distribution of the dynamic stress and density is obtained in the soil.Furthermore,the simulation results are consistent with the experimental results.The reinforcement mechanism and the rule of dynamic compaction of soils due to impact load are also elucidated.

  13. Monitoring dynamic loads on wind tunnel force balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Alice T.; White, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Two devices have been developed at NASA Langley to monitor the dynamic loads incurred during wind-tunnel testing. The Balance Dynamic Display Unit (BDDU), displays and monitors the combined static and dynamic forces and moments in the orthogonal axes. The Balance Critical Point Analyzer scales and sums each normalized signal from the BDDU to obtain combined dynamic and static signals that represent the dynamic loads at predefined high-stress points. The display of each instrument is a multiplex of six analog signals in a way that each channel is displayed sequentially as one-sixth of the horizontal axis on a single oscilloscope trace. Thus this display format permits the operator to quickly and easily monitor the combined static and dynamic level of up to six channels at the same time.

  14. Internet traffic load balancing using dynamic hashing with flow volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Yoohwan; Chao, H. Jonathan; Merat, Francis L.

    2002-07-01

    Sending IP packets over multiple parallel links is in extensive use in today's Internet and its use is growing due to its scalability, reliability and cost-effectiveness. To maximize the efficiency of parallel links, load balancing is necessary among the links, but it may cause the problem of packet reordering. Since packet reordering impairs TCP performance, it is important to reduce the amount of reordering. Hashing offers a simple solution to keep the packet order by sending a flow over a unique link, but static hashing does not guarantee an even distribution of the traffic amount among the links, which could lead to packet loss under heavy load. Dynamic hashing offers some degree of load balancing but suffers from load fluctuations and excessive packet reordering. To overcome these shortcomings, we have enhanced the dynamic hashing algorithm to utilize the flow volume information in order to reassign only the appropriate flows. This new method, called dynamic hashing with flow volume (DHFV), eliminates unnecessary flow reassignments of small flows and achieves load balancing very quickly without load fluctuation by accurately predicting the amount of transferred load between the links. In this paper we provide the general framework of DHFV and address the challenges in implementing DHFV. We then introduce two algorithms of DHFV with different flow selection strategies and show their performances through simulation.

  15. Dynamic CT perfusion image data compression for efficient parallel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Renan Sales; Olabarriaga, Silvia Delgado; Borst, Jordi; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Posthuma, Jorrit S; Streekstra, Geert J; van Herk, Marcel; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing size of medical imaging data, in particular time series such as CT perfusion (CTP), requires new and fast approaches to deliver timely results for acute care. Cloud architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide the processing capacity required for delivering fast results. However, the size of CTP datasets makes transfers to cloud infrastructures time-consuming and therefore not suitable in acute situations. To reduce this transfer time, this work proposes a fast and lossless compression algorithm for CTP data. The algorithm exploits redundancies in the temporal dimension and keeps random read-only access to the image elements directly from the compressed data on the GPU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to present a GPU-ready method for medical image compression with random access to the image elements from the compressed data.

  16. Studying plastic shear localization in aluminum alloys under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilalov, D. A.; Sokovikov, M. A.; Chudinov, V. V.; Oborin, V. A.; Bayandin, Yu. V.; Terekhina, A. I.; Naimark, O. B.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of plastic shear localization mechanisms observed under dynamic deformation using the shear-compression scheme on a Hopkinson-Kolsky bar has been carried out using specimens of AMg6 alloy. The mechanisms of plastic shear instability are associated with collective effects in the microshear ensemble in spatially localized areas. The lateral surface of the specimens was photographed in the real-time mode using a CEDIP Silver 450M high-speed infrared camera. The temperature distribution obtained at different times allowed us to trace the evolution of the localization of the plastic strain. Based on the equations that describe the effect of nonequilibrium transitions on the mechanisms of structural relaxation and plastic flow, numerical simulation of plastic shear localization has been performed. A numerical experiment relevant to the specimen-loading scheme was carried out using a system of constitutive equations that reflect the part of the structural relaxation mechanisms caused by the collective behavior of microshears with the autowave modes of the evolution of the localized plastic flow. Upon completion of the experiment, the specimens were subjected to microstructure analysis using a New View-5010 optical microscope-interferometer. After the dynamic deformation, the constancy of the Hurst exponent, which reflects the relationship between the behavior of defects and roughness induced by the defects on the surfaces of the specimens is observed in a wider range of spatial scales. These investigations revealed the distinctive features in the localization of the deformation followed by destruction to the script of the adiabatic shear. These features may be caused by the collective multiscale behavior of defects, which leads to a sharp decrease in the stress-relaxation time and, consequently, a localized plastic flow and generation of fracture nuclei in the form of adiabatic shear. Infrared scanning of the localization zone of the

  17. Quantitative analysis of the deformation of polypropylene foam under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plougonven, Erwan; Bernard, Dominique; Viot, Philippe

    2006-08-01

    A dynamic crash loading experiment is performed on a polypropylene foam. Several interrupted shocks are conducted, in between which microtomographic acquisitions are made, showing the evolution of the sample during its compression. This data can help construct and validate predictive models, although, because this material is multiscale (consitutive grains at the mesoscopic scale are made of microscopic closed cells), image processing is required to extract useful quantitative measures. Such processing is described here, so as to determine a representative volume for each grain of the sample, in order to associate to each grain and to each stage of the compression values such as grain density. This can help build a predictive model at the mesoscopic scale.

  18. Dynamically loaded beam failure under corroded conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, R.P.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    De-icing salts, used on roads in heavy winters, may enter reinforced concrete (RC) structures via its capillary pore system or via cracks, initiating reinforcement corrosion and reducing its remaining service-life. Vehicles passing real bridges exert a dynamic impact action that might activate a fat

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of initially imperfect functionally graded circular cylindrical shell under complex loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. Z.; Hao, Y. X.; Zhang, W.; Chen, J.; Li, S. B.

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear vibration of a simply supported FGM cylindrical shell with small initial geometric imperfection under complex loads is studied. The effects of radial harmonic excitation, compressive in-plane force combined with supersonic aerodynamic and thermal loads are considered. The small initial geometric imperfection of the cylindrical shell is characterized in the form of the sine-type trigonometric functions. The effective material properties of this FGM cylindrical shell are graded in the radial direction according to a simple power law in terms of the volume fractions. Based on Reddy's third-order shear deformation theory, von Karman-type nonlinear kinematics and Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear partial differential equation that controls the shell dynamics is derived. Both axial symmetric and driven modes of the cylindrical shell deflection pattern are included. Furthermore, the equations of motion can be reduced into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by applying Galerkin's method. In the study of the nonlinear dynamics responses of small initial geometric imperfect FGM cylindrical shell under complex loads, the 4th order Runge-Kutta method is used to obtain time history, phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Poincare maps with different parameters. The effects of external loads, geometric imperfections and volume fractions on the nonlinear dynamics of the system are discussed.

  20. Dynamic Efficiency of a Container Crane’s Hoisting Transmission System under Hoisting Dynamic Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic efficiency of hoisting transmission system on a container crane is fundamental for accurate efficiency prediction, while the dynamic efficiency of hoisting transmission system has not been investigated sufficiently. This paper will focus on dynamic efficiency of hoisting transmission system under hoisting dynamic load. A power loss model of gearbox was built. Then the dynamic model of gear transmission was developed including time-varying mesh stiffness and hoisting dynamic load was studied. Power loss, dynamic efficiency, and equivalent static efficiency were conducted in hoisting and lowering working conditions. The result shows that dynamic efficiency which consists of the significant lower frequency component coincided with hoisting load torque of the higher frequency component which is directly related to dynamic mesh and bearing force. And in two processes, the equivalent static efficiency in constant speed stage is min, whereas maximum value occurs in different stage. The research results lay a foundation for hoisting gear transmission dynamic efficiency analysis.

  1. Effects of dynamic range compression on spatial selective auditory attention in normal-hearing listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew H.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2013-01-01

    Many hearing aids introduce compressive gain to accommodate the reduced dynamic range that often accompanies hearing loss. However, natural sounds produce complicated temporal dynamics in hearing aid compression, as gain is driven by whichever source dominates at a given moment. Moreover, independent compression at the two ears can introduce fluctuations in interaural level differences (ILDs) important for spatial perception. While independent compression can interfere with spatial perception of sound, it does not always interfere with localization accuracy or speech identification. Here, normal-hearing listeners reported a target message played simultaneously with two spatially separated masker messages. We measured the amount of spatial separation required between the target and maskers for subjects to perform at threshold in this task. Fast, syllabic compression that was independent at the two ears increased the required spatial separation, but linking the compressors to provide identical gain to both ears (preserving ILDs) restored much of the deficit caused by fast, independent compression. Effects were less clear for slower compression. Percent-correct performance was lower with independent compression, but only for small spatial separations. These results may help explain differences in previous reports of the effect of compression on spatial perception of sound. PMID:23556599

  2. A Numerical Simulation of Time-Dependent Interface Failure Under Shear and Compressive Loads in Single-Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Yoshimura, Akinori; Kawada, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Yuichiro

    2010-02-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of a time-dependent interfacial failure accompanied by a fiber failure, and examined their evolution under shear and compressive loads in single-fiber composites. The compressive load on the interface consists of Poisson’s contraction for matrix resin subjected to longitudinal tensile load. As time progresses, compressive stress at the interface in the fiber radial direction relaxes under the constant longitudinal tensile strain condition for the specimen, directly causing the relaxation of the interface frictional stress. This relaxation facilitates the failure of the interface. In this analysis, a specific criterion for interface failure is applied; apparent interfacial shear strength is enhanced by compressive stress, which is referred as quasi-parabolic criterion in the present study. The results of the stress recovery profile around the fiber failure and the interfacial debonding length as a function of time simulated by the finite element analysis employing the criterion are very similar to experimental results obtained using micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Discontinuity of Gas-dynamic Variables in the Center of the Compression Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Viktorovich Bulat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research-the study of the flow in the center of the centered isentropic compression waves. Gas-dynamic discontinuities cover shocks, shockwaves, interfaces and sliding surfaces and also the center of the centered compression wave one-dimensional and two-dimensional. For a long time there has been no analysis of the shockwave structures arising in the center of compression waves. At the same time, the problem of development of supersonic and hypersonic air inlets demands to consider the process of the stream isentropic compression. This problem is connected (three-dimensional case to the problem of arising inside the streams of hinged shocks as opposite to the usual discontinuities not resulted by interaction of supersonic streams, waves and discontinuities, but like from nowhere. This study sets the problem for study in the terms of the developed theory of the interference of gas-dynamic discontinuities of the area of existing solutions for the structures of possible types. We have obtained the relations describing the parameters in the center of the compression wave. We have considered the neutral polar of neither compression meeting the case when in the center of the compression wave there neither shocks nor depression waves. The analysis of properties of the centered compression wave adds to the theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities. We have specified the borders of the shock structure existence area optimal for development of supersonic diffusers.

  4. Structural model for the dynamic buckling of a column under constant rate compression

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic buckling behavior of a column (rod, beam) under constant rate compression is considered. The buckling is caused by prescribed motion of column ends toward each other with constant velocity. Simple model with one degree of freedom simulating static and dynamic buckling of a column is derived. In the case of small initial disturbances the model yields simple analytical dependencies between the main parameters of the problem: critical force, compression rate, and initial disturbance. It is shown that the time required for buckling is inversely proportional to cubic root of compression velocity and logarithmically depends on the initial disturbance. Analytical expression for critical buckling force as a function of compression velocity is derived. It is shown that in a range of compression rates typical for laboratory experiments the dependence is accurately approximated by a power law with exponent equal to $2/3$. Theoretical findings are supported by available results of laboratory experiments. Keywords...

  5. Evaluation of flawed piping under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E. (Applied Science and Technology, Inc., Poway, CA (United States)); Quinones, D.F. (Cloud (Robert L.) and Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Gilman, J.D. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This report describes analytical and interpretative research on results of large-scale dynamic tests of flawed pipe which were conducted for the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG). Here, the adequacy of dynamic analysis methods is examined, as well as margins against failure associated with flaw evaluation criteria. Experimental and analytical results are related to requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes. Code limits of operability bound all test results. Guidance is offered on selection of Z-factors'' for austenitic materials to retain code safety margins. In the IPIRG tests, efforts to produce a nearly instantaneous full severance pipe break were unsuccessful, indicating that this hypothetical basis for plant accident evaluations is conservative.

  6. Dynamic Load Model using PSO-Based Parameter Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Hisao; Matsuki, Junya; Tomoda, Michiya; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Yamagishi, Yoshio; Kanao, Norikazu

    This paper presents a new method for estimating unknown parameters of dynamic load model as a parallel composite of a constant impedance load and an induction motor behind a series constant reactance. An adequate dynamic load model is essential for evaluating power system stability, and this model can represent the behavior of actual load by using appropriate parameters. However, the problem of this model is that a lot of parameters are necessary and it is not easy to estimate a lot of unknown parameters. We propose an estimating method based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) which is a non-linear optimization method by using the data of voltage, active power and reactive power measured at voltage sag.

  7. Two-way Shape Memory Effect of NiTi under Compressive Loading Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Ik; Lee, Jung Ju

    In this study, the two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) of a Ni-54.5 at.% Ti alloy was investigated experimentally to develop a NiTi linear actuator. The two-way shape memory effect was induced through a compressive shape memory cycle composed of four steps: (1) loading to maximum deformation; (2) unloading; (3) heating; (4) and cooling. Six types of specimens (one solid cylindrical and five tubular) were used to obtain the twoway shape memory strain and two-way recovery stress and to evaluate the actuating capacity. The two-way actuating strain showed a convergent tendency after several training cycles for the same maximum deformation. A maximum value of the two-way strain was obtained for 7% of maximum deformation, independently of the geometry of the tubular specimens. The two-way strains obtained by the shape memory cycles and two-way recovery stress linearly increase as a function of the maximum deformation and the two-way strain, respectively, and the geometry of specimen affects the two-way recovery stress. Although the results show that sufficient recovery stress can be generated by either the two-way shape memory process or by the one-way shape memory process, the two-way shape memory process can be applied more conveniently to actuating applications.

  8. Biological responses of three-dimensional cultured fibroblasts by sustained compressive loading include apoptosis and survival activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Kanazawa

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are characterized by chronicity, which results in delayed wound healing due to pressure. Early intervention for preventing delayed healing due to pressure requires a prediction method. However, no study has reported the prediction of delayed healing due to pressure. Therefore, this study focused on biological response-based molecular markers for the establishment of an assessment technology to predict delayed healing due to pressure. We tested the hypothesis that sustained compressive loading applied to three dimensional cultured fibroblasts leads to upregulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs, CD44, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 along with apoptosis via disruption of adhesion. First, sustained compressive loading was applied to fibroblast-seeded collagen sponges. Following this, collagen sponge samples and culture supernatants were collected for apoptosis and proliferation assays, gene expression analysis, immunocytochemistry, and quantification of secreted substances induced by upregulation of mRNA and protein level. Compared to the control, the compressed samples demonstrated that apoptosis was induced in a time- and load- dependent manner; vinculin and stress fiber were scarce; HSP90α, CD44, HAS2, and COX2 expression was upregulated; and the concentrations of HSP90α, hyaluronan (HA, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were increased. In addition, the gene expression of antiapoptotic Bcl2 was significantly increased in the compressed samples compared to the control. These results suggest that compressive loading induces not only apoptosis but also survival activity. These observations support that HSP90α, HA, and, PGE2 could be potential molecular markers for prediction of delayed wound healing due to pressure.

  9. Effect of contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Chuen-Huei; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    A computer simulation is presented which shows how the gear contact ratio affects the dynamic load on a spur gear transmission. The contact ratio can be affected by the tooth addendum, the pressure angle, the tooth size (diametral pitch), and the center distance. The analysis presented was performed using the NASA gear dynamics code, DANST. In the analysis, the contact ratio was varied over the range 1.20 to 2.40 by changing the length of the tooth addendum. In order to simplify the analysis, other parameters related to contact ratio were held constant. The contact ratio was found to have a significant influence on gear dynamics. Over a wide range of operating speeds, a contact ratio close to 2.0 minimized dynamic load. For low contact ratio gears (contact ratio less than 2.0), increasing the contact ratio reduced the gear dynamic load. For high contact ratio gears (contact ratio = or greater than 2.0), the selection of contact ratio should take into consideration the intended operating speeds. In general, high contact ratio gears minimized dynamic load better than low contact ratio gears.

  10. A Framework for Distributed Dynamic Load Balancing in Heterogeneous Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Nehra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Dynamic load balancing (DDLB is an important system function destined to distribute workload among available processors to improve throughput and/or execution times of parallel computer in Cluster Computing. Instead of balancing the load in cluster by process migration, or by moving an entire process to a less loaded computer, we make an attempt to balance load by splitting processes into separate jobs and then balance them to nodes. In order to get target, we use mobile agent (MA to distribute load among nodes in a cluster. In this study, a multi-agent framework for load balancing in heterogeneous cluster is given. Total load on node is calculated using queue length which is measured as the total number of processes in queue. We introduce types of agents along with policies needed to meet the requirements of the proposed load-balancing. Different metrics are used to compare load balancing mechanism with the existing message passing technology. The experiment is carried out on cluster of PC's divided into multiple LAN's using PMADE (Platform for Mobile agent distribution and execution. Preliminary experimental results demonstrated that the proposed framework is effective than the existing ones.

  11. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  12. Dynamic Analysis of Structural Columns Subjected to Impulsive Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Shunfeng; LU Yong; GAO Feng; JIN Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    For a building structure subjected to impulsive loading,particularly shock and impact loading,the response of the critical columns is crucial to the behaviour of the entire system during and after the blast loading phase.Therefore,an appropriate evaluation of the column response and damage under short-duration impulsive loading is important in a comprehensive assessment of the performance of a building system.This paper reports a dynamic analysis approach for the response of RC columns subjected to impulsive loading.Considering that the dynamic response of a column in a frame structure can also be affected by the floor movement which relates to the global vibration of the frame system,a generic column-mass model is used,in which a concentrated mass is attached to the column top to simulate the effect of a global vibration.To take into account the high shear effect under impulsive load,the model is formulated using Timoshenko beam theory,and three main nonlinear mechanisms are considered.Two typical scenarios,one under a direct air blast loading,and another under a blast-induced ground excitation,are analyzed and the primary response features are highlighted.

  13. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  14. Radiation sterilized bone response to dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardas, Marcin, E-mail: marcin.mardas@skpp.edu.pl [Department of Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Szamarzewskiego 82/84, 60-569 Poznan (Poland); Kubisz, Leszek [Department of Biophysics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Fredry 10, 61-701 Poznan (Poland); Biskupski, Piotr; Mielcarek, Slawomir [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Stelmach-Mardas, Marta [Department of Bromatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Marcelinska 420, 60-354 Poznan (Poland); Kaluska, Iwona [Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-08-01

    Allogeneic bone grafts are used on a large scale in surgeries. To avoid the risk of infectious diseases, allografts should be radiation-sterilized. So far, no international consensus has been achieved regarding the optimal radiation dose. Many authors suggest that bone sterilization deteriorates bone mechanical properties. However, no data on the influence of ionizing radiation on bone dynamic mechanical properties are available. Bovine femurs from 2-year old animal were machine cut and irradiated with the doses 10, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 50 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed at 1-10 Hz at the temperature range of 0-350 Degree-Sign C in 3-point bending configuration. No statistically significant differences in storage modulus were observed. However, there were significant decreased values of loss modulus between the samples irradiated with doses of 10 ({down_arrow}14.3%), 15, 45 and 50 kGy ({down_arrow}33.2%) and controls. It was stated that increased irradiation dose decreases the temperature where collagen denaturation process starts and increases the temperature where the collagen denaturation process finishes. It was shown that activation energy of denaturation process is significantly higher for the samples irradiated with the dose of 50 kGy (615 kJ/mol) in comparison with control samples and irradiation with other doses (100-135 kJ/mol). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the storage modulus and loss modulus of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the denaturation temperature of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the activation energy of denaturation process of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy.

  15. Yielding and post-yield behaviour of closed-cell cellular materials under multiaxial dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesenjak, Matej; Ren, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    The paper focuses on characterisation of yielding and post-yield behaviour of metals with closed-cell cellular structure when subjected to multiaxial dynamic loading, considering the influence of the relative density, base material, strain rate and pore gas pressure. Research was conducted by extensive parametric fully-coupled computational simulations using the finite element code LS-DYNA. Results have shown that the macroscopic yield stress of cellular material rises with increase of the relative density, while its dependence on the hydrostatic stress decreases. The yield limit also rises with increase of the strain rate, while the hydrostatic stress influence remains more or less the same at different strain-rates. The macroscopic yield limit of the cellular material is also strongly influenced by the choice of base material since the base materials with higher yield limit contribute also to higher macroscopic yield limit of the cellular material. By increasing the pore gas filler pressure the dependence on hydrostatic stress increases while at the same time the yield surface shifts along the hydrostatic axis in the negative direction. This means that yielding at compression is delayed due to influence of the initial pore pressure and occurs at higher compressive loading, while the opposite is true for tensile loading.

  16. Comparison of Fracture Characteristics of Openhole-Notch Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites Subjected to Tensile and Compressive Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M.-U.; Chen, Z. F.; Chen, Z. H.; Li, B. B.

    2017-01-01

    Open-hole tension (OHT) and open-hole compression (OHC) tests were carried out on hot-pressed carbon-fiberreinforced composite samples with a singular open hole. The fracture surfaces of the OHT- and OHC-tested specimens were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM micrographs showed significant features on the surface of carbon fiber, matrix, and especially in the fiber/matrix interface. Interpretation of these micrographs revealed the possible failure mechanism of composite samples with an open hole under tensile and compressive loadings. Furthermore, a comparative study of these micrographs also pointed to certain specific differences between the fracture characteristics of open-hole composite samples failed under tension and compression. This information is useful in the post-failure analysis of a composite structure.

  17. Feasibility of Applying Controllable Lubrication to Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estupinan, Edgar Alberto; Santos, Ilmar

    2009-01-01

    A multibody dynamic model of the main mechanical components of a hermetic reciprocating compressor is presented in this work. Considering that some of the mechanical elements are interconnected via thin fluid films, the multibody dynamic model is coupled to the equations from the dynamics...... levels, wear and power losses of the system components. From the point of view of actively controlled lubrication and specifically for the case of dynamically loaded journal bearings, the injection pressure should be controlled in time domain. However, taking into account that the gas pressure...... and reaction forces in a reciprocating compressor have a cyclic behavior, periodic oil pressure injection rules based on the instantaneous crank angle and load bearing condition can be established. In this paper, several bearing configurations working under different oil pressure injection rules conditions...

  18. Influence of linear profile modification and loading conditions on the dynamic tooth load and stress of high contact ratio gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chinwai; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation for the dynamic response of high-contact-ratio spur gear transmissions is presented. High contact ratio gears have the potential to produce lower dynamic tooth loads and minimum root stress but they can be sensitive to tooth profile errors. The analysis presented examines various profile modifications under realistic loading conditions. The effect of these modifications on the dynamic load (force) between mating gear teeth and the dynamic root stress is presented. Since the contact stress is dependent on the dynamic load, minimizing dynamic loads will also minimize contact stresses. It is shown that the combination of profile modification and the applied load (torque) carried by a gear system has a significant influence on gear dynamics. The ideal modification at one value of applied load will not be the best solution for a different load. High-contact-ratio gears were found to require less modification than standard low-contact-ratio gears. High-contact-ratio gears are more adversely affected by excess modification than by under modification. In addition, the optimal profile modification required to minimize the dynamic load (hence the contact stress) on a gear tooth differs from the optimal modification required to minimize the dynamic root (bending) stress. Computer simulation can help find the design tradeoffs to determine the best profile modification to satisfy the conflicting constraints of minimizing both the load and root stress in gears which must operate over a range of applied loads.

  19. Undrained dynamical behavior of Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand under cyclic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国兴; 刘雪珠; 战吉艳

    2008-01-01

    A series of dynamic behavior tests on Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand were performed by using the WFI cyclic triaxial apparatus made in England. The dynamic behaviors of Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand under different static deviator stress levels and cyclic stress ratios were studied. Through comparing the effective stress path under cyclic loading with static loading, the processes of liquefaction of saturated Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand with development of dynamic pore-water pressure, including the initial compact state, compression state and dilative state, were investigated. The variation of the shear stiffness with the number of cycles and cyclic strain was investigated by analyzing the secant shear modulus in each unload-reload loop of dynamic stress-strain relationship. And by means of the exponential function, the empirical equations of the relationship between secant shear modulus Gsec, shear modulus ratio Gsec/Gmax and cyclic strain ε were established based on series of test results. The results show that according to different combinations of static deviator stress and cyclic stress, two kinds of failure patterns with deviator stress reversal or no deviator stress reversal are observed in the samples tested in this series, including cyclic mobility and the failure of accumulation residual strain. In addition, the degradation of dynamic shear modulus is due to the development of vibration pore-water pressure and it is observed that the shear modulus reduces with the progressive number of cycles.

  20. Effect of compressibility on the nonlinear prediction of the aerodynamic loads on lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The vortex-lattice technique for incompressible flow which accounts for separation at sharp edges is modified to account for compressibility. This is accomplished by extending the Prandtl-Glauert transformation to moderate angles of attack. Thus, the aerodynamic characteristics for the compressible case are obtained from the solution of an equivalent incompressible problem. Numerical results are presented for parallelogram and delta wings to assess the effects of compressibility. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  1. Impact of the variation in dynamic vehicle load on flexible pavement responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanuzzaman, Md

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the dynamic variation in asphalt pavement critical responses due to dynamic tire load variations. An attempt was also made to develop generalized regression equations to predict the dynamic response variation in flexible pavement under various dynamic load conditions. The study used an extensive database of computed pavement response histories for five different types of sites (smooth, rough, medium rough, very rough and severely rough), two different asphalt pavement structures (thin and thick) at two temperatures (70 °F and 104 °F), subjected to a tandem axle dual tire at three speeds 25, 37 and 50 mph (40, 60 and 80 km/h). All pavement responses were determined using the 3D-Move Analysis program (Version 1.2) developed by University of Nevada, Reno. A new term called Dynamic Response Coefficient (DRC) was introduced in this study to address the variation in critical pavement responses due to dynamic loads as traditionally measured by the Dynamic Load Coefficient (DLC). While DLC represents the additional varying component of the tire load, DRC represents the additional varying component of the response value (standard deviation divided by mean response). In this study, DRC was compared with DLC for five different sites based on the roughness condition of the sites. Previous studies showed that DLC varies with vehicle speed and suspension types, and assumes a constant value for the whole pavement structure (lateral and vertical directions). On the other hand, in this study, DRC was found to be significantly varied with the asphalt pavement and function of pavement structure, road roughness conditions, temperatures, vehicle speeds, suspension types, and locations of the point of interest in the pavement. A major contribution of the study is that the variation of pavement responses due to dynamic load in a flexible pavement system can be predicted with generalized regression equations. Fitting parameters (R2) in the

  2. The Study of Stability of Compression-Loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of Elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively). The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  3. Aeroelastic Deformation and Buckling of Inflatable Wings under Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew; Smith, Suzanne; Jacob, Jamey

    2006-11-01

    Inflatable wings have recently been used to control a vehicle in flight via wing warping. Internal pressure is required to maintain wing shape and externally mounted mechanical actuators are used to asynchronously deform the wing semi-spans for control. Since the rigidity of the inflatable wing varies as a function of inflation pressure, there is a need to relate the wing shape with aerodynamic loads. Via wind tunnel tests, span-wise deformations, twist and flutter have been observed under certain dynamic loading conditions. Photogrammetry techniques are used to measure the static aeroelastic deformation of the wings and videogrammetry is used to examine the dynamic shape changes (flutter). The resulting shapes can be used to determine corresponding aerodynamic characteristics. For particular inflation pressures, buckling can be induced at sufficiently high dynamic loads either through high dynamic pressure or large angle of attack. This results in a set of critical loading parameters. An inflatable winged vehicle would require operation within these limits. The focus of the presentation will be on defining and exploring the unsuitable operating conditions and the effects these conditions have on the operation of the wing.

  4. Discontinuity effects in dynamically loaded tilting pad journal bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two discontinuity effects that can occur when modelling radial tilting pad bearings subjected to high dynamic loads. The first effect to be treated is a pressure build-up discontinuity effect. The second effect is a contact-related discontinuity that disappears when a contact...

  5. Coupling Dynamics Interlip Coordination in Lower Lip Load Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Pascal; Neufeld, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of lower lip loading on lower and upper lip movements and their coordination to test predictions on coupling dynamics derived from studies in limb control. Method: Movement data were acquired using electromagnetic midsagittal articulography under 4 conditions: (a) without restrictions, serving as a baseline; (b) with…

  6. Consolidation of a poroelastic half-space with anisotropic permeability and compressible constituents by axisymmetric surface loading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarva Jit Singh; Raman Kumar; Sunita Rani

    2009-10-01

    The fully coupled Biot quasi-static theory of linear poroelasticity is used to study the consolidation of a poroelastic half-space caused by axisymmetric surface loads.The fluid and solid constituents of the poroelastic medium are compressible and its permeability in the vertical direction is different from its permeability in the horizontal direction.An analytical solution of the governing equations is obtained by taking the displacements and the pore pressure as the basic state variables and using a combination of the Laplace and Hankel transforms.The problem of an axisymmetric normal load is discussed in detail.An explicit analytical solution is obtained for normal disc loading.Detailed numerical computations reveal that the anisotropy in permeability as well as the com-pressibilities of the fluid and solid constituents of the poroelastic medium have significant effects on the consolidation of the half-space.The anisotropy in permeability may accelerate the consolidation process and may lead to a dilution in the theoretical prediction of the Mandel –Cryer effect. The compressibility of the solid constituents may also accelerate the consolidation process.

  7. Reliability analysis of wind turbines exposed to dynamic loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2014-01-01

    . Therefore the turbine components should be designed to have sufficient reliability with respect to both extreme and fatigue loads also not be too costly (and safe). This paper presents models for uncertainty modeling and reliability assessment of especially the structural components such as tower, blades...... the reliability of the structural components. Illustrative examples are presented considering uncertainty modeling and reliability assessment for structural wind turbine components exposed to extreme loads and fatigue, respectively.......Wind turbines are exposed to highly dynamic loads that cause fatigue and extreme load effects which are subject to significant uncertainties. Further, reduction of cost of energy for wind turbines are very important in order to make wind energy competitive compared to other energy sources...

  8. Dynamic Regression Intervention Modeling for the Malaysian Daily Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhilah Abdrazak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a unique country due to having both fixed and moving holidays.  These moving holidays may overlap with other fixed holidays and therefore, increase the complexity of the load forecasting activities. The errors due to holidays’ effects in the load forecasting are known to be higher than other factors.  If these effects can be estimated and removed, the behavior of the series could be better viewed.  Thus, the aim of this paper is to improve the forecasting errors by using a dynamic regression model with intervention analysis.   Based on the linear transfer function method, a daily load model consists of either peak or average is developed.  The developed model outperformed the seasonal ARIMA model in estimating the fixed and moving holidays’ effects and achieved a smaller Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE in load forecast.

  9. A New Fuzzy Approach for Dynamic Load Balancing Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Karimi, Abbas; Jantan, Adznan b; Ramli, A R; Saripan, M Iqbal b

    2009-01-01

    Load balancing is the process of improving the Performance of a parallel and distributed system through is distribution of load among the processors [1-2]. Most of the previous work in load balancing and distributed decision making in general, do not effectively take into account the uncertainty and inconsistency in state information but in fuzzy logic, we have advantage of using crisps inputs. In this paper, we present a new approach for implementing dynamic load balancing algorithm with fuzzy logic, which can face to uncertainty and inconsistency of previous algorithms, further more our algorithm shows better response time than round robin and randomize algorithm respectively 30.84 percent and 45.45 percent.

  10. A New Fuzzy Approach for Dynamic Load Balancing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Karimi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Load balancing is the process of improving the Performance of a parallel and distributed system through is distribution of load among the processors [1-2]. Most of the previous work in load balancing and distributed decision making in general, do not effectively take into account the uncertainty and inconsistency in state information but in fuzzy logic, we have advantage of using crisps inputs. In this paper,we present a new approach for implementing dynamic load balancing algorithm with fuzzy logic, which can face to uncertainty and inconsistency of previous algorithms, further more our algorithm shows better response time than round robin and randomize algorithm respectively 30.84% and 45.45%.

  11. Beam dynamics analysis in pulse compression using electron beam compact simulator for Heavy Ion Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a final stage of an accelerator system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF, pulse shaping and beam current increase by bunch compression are required for effective pellet implosion. A compact simulator with an electron beam was constructed to understand the beam dynamics. In this study, we investigate theoretically and numerically the beam dynamics for the extreme bunch compression in the final stage of HIF accelerator complex. The theoretical and numerical results implied that the compact experimental device simulates the beam dynamics around the stagnation point for initial low temperature condition.

  12. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wauthle, Ruben, E-mail: ruben.wauthle@3dsystems.com [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); 3D Systems - LayerWise NV, Grauwmeer 14, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Mulier, Michiel [KU Leuven, Department of Orthopaedics, Weligerveld 1, 3212 Pellenberg (Belgium); Zadpoor, Amir Abbas [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Weinans, Harrie [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics & department of Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Humbeeck, Jan [KU Leuven, Department of Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, PB 2450, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kruth, Jean-Pierre [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan [KU Leuven, Department of Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, PB 2450, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Prometheus, Division of Skeletal Tissue Engineering, PB 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants. - Highlights: • The mechanical properties of CP Ti grade 1 porous structures are studied. • The results are compared with identical structures in Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. • Ti6Al4V ELI structures are about two times stronger under a static compressive load. • CP Ti structures deform continuously without fracture while loaded statically. • CP Ti structures have a higher fatigue life compared to Ti6Al4V ELI structures.

  13. Electronic dynamics and plasmons of sodium under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ding, Yang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Lebègue, Sébastien; Lazicki, Amy; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-12-20

    Sodium, which has long been regarded as one of the simplest metals, displays a great deal of structural, optical, and electronic complexities under compression. We compressed pure Na in the body-centered cubic structure to 52 GPa and in the face-centered cubic structure from 64 to 97 GPa, and studied the plasmon excitations of both structures using the momentum-dependent inelastic X-ray scattering technique. The plasmon dispersion curves as a function of pressure were extrapolated to zero momentum with a quadratic approximation. As predicted by the simple free-electron model, the square of the zero-momentum plasmon energy increases linearly with densification of the body-centered cubic Na up to 1.5-fold. At further compressions and in face-centered cubic Na above 64 GPa, the linear relation curves progressively toward the density axis up to 3.7-fold densification at 97 GPa. Ab initio calculations indicate that the deviation is an expected behavior of Na remaining a simple metal.

  14. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. S.; Ding, J. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. In addition, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  15. PPOOLEX experiments on dynamic loading with pressure feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2011-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the dynamic loading experiments (DYN series) carried out with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiments was to study dynamic loads caused by different condensation modes. Particularly, the effect of counterpressure on loads due to pressure oscillations induced by chugging was of interest. Before the experiments the condensation pool was filled with isothermal water so that the blowdown pipe outlet was submerged by 1.03-1.11 m. The initial temperature of the pool water varied from 11 deg. C to 63 deg. C, the steam flow rate from 290 g/s to 1220 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 132 deg. C to 182 deg. C. Non-condensables were pushed from the dry well into the gas space of the wet well with a short discharge of steam before the recorded period of the experiments. As a result of this procedure, the system pressure was at an elevated level in the beginning of the actual experiments. An increased counterpressure was used in the last experiment of the series. The diminishing effect of increased system pressure on chugging intensity and on measured loads is evident from the results of the last experiment. The highest pressure pulses both inside the blowdown pipe and in the condensation pool were about half of those measured with a lower system pressure but otherwise with similar test parameters. The experiments on dynamic loading gave expected results. The loads experienced by pool structures depended strongly on the steam mass flow rate, pool water temperature and system pressure. The DYN experiments indicated that chugging and condensation within the blowdown pipe cause significant dynamic loads in case of strongly sub-cooled pool water. The level of pool water temperature is decisive

  16. PPOOLEX experiments on dynamic loading with pressure feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2011-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the dynamic loading experiments (DYN series) carried out with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiments was to study dynamic loads caused by different condensation modes. Particularly, the effect of counterpressure on loads due to pressure oscillations induced by chugging was of interest. Before the experiments the condensation pool was filled with isothermal water so that the blowdown pipe outlet was submerged by 1.03-1.11 m. The initial temperature of the pool water varied from 11 deg. C to 63 deg. C, the steam flow rate from 290 g/s to 1220 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 132 deg. C to 182 deg. C. Non-condensables were pushed from the dry well into the gas space of the wet well with a short discharge of steam before the recorded period of the experiments. As a result of this procedure, the system pressure was at an elevated level in the beginning of the actual experiments. An increased counterpressure was used in the last experiment of the series. The diminishing effect of increased system pressure on chugging intensity and on measured loads is evident from the results of the last experiment. The highest pressure pulses both inside the blowdown pipe and in the condensation pool were about half of those measured with a lower system pressure but otherwise with similar test parameters. The experiments on dynamic loading gave expected results. The loads experienced by pool structures depended strongly on the steam mass flow rate, pool water temperature and system pressure. The DYN experiments indicated that chugging and condensation within the blowdown pipe cause significant dynamic loads in case of strongly sub-cooled pool water. The level of pool water temperature is decisive

  17. The effects of physiologic dynamic compression on bone healing under external fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, H.T.; Kelly, P.J.; Lewallen, D.G.; Chao, E.Y. (Mayo Clinic/Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The effects of early physiologic dynamic compression on fracture healing were studied in the dog. Transverse midtibial osteotomies were performed bilaterally and stabilized with a relatively rigid external fixation system in a neutralization mode (800 microns) to prevent compression of the osteotomy ends during weight bearing. On the 15th day, one osteotomy in each animal was subjected to dynamic compression through weight bearing by release of the fixator-telescoping mechanism (axial dynamization), while the other side remained unchanged as the control. Analysis of sequential roentgenograms showed that the callus distribution was more symmetric on the dynamic compression side. The two sides showed no significant differences in quantitative technetium-99 bone scans or in osteotomy-site blood flow. There were no statistical differences in new bone formation, bone porosity, or maximum torque between sides. The fixation had maintained the initially created osteotomy gap on the control side and tended to unite through a gap-healing mechanism. The dynamic compression side showed reduction in gap size and union by more of a contact-healing mechanism. There were no statistical differences in the rate of pin loosening, but its distribution according to pin location was significantly different between the two sides.

  18. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  19. A dynamic Fourier series for the compression of ECG using FFT and adaptive coefficient estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Nashash, H A

    1995-04-01

    In this article, a new ECG data compression technique is proposed. The method relies on modelling quasi-periodic ECG signals as a dynamic Fourier series. Fourier coefficients are continuously estimated using either an FFT algorithm or the adaptive least mean square algorithm. Results from simulated normal and pathological ECGs are presented and discussed. The merits of each of the above two methods are also illustrated. Furthermore, a comparison with other compression techniques is also discussed.

  20. Compressive mapping of number to space reflects dynamic encoding mechanisms, not static logarithmic transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Guido Marco; Anobile, Giovanni; Burr, David C

    2014-05-27

    The mapping of number onto space is fundamental to measurement and mathematics. However, the mapping of young children, unschooled adults, and adults under attentional load shows strong compressive nonlinearities, thought to reflect intrinsic logarithmic encoding mechanisms, which are later "linearized" by education. Here we advance and test an alternative explanation: that the nonlinearity results from adaptive mechanisms incorporating the statistics of recent stimuli. This theory predicts that the response to the current trial should depend on the magnitude of the previous trial, whereas a static logarithmic nonlinearity predicts trialwise independence. We found a strong and highly significant relationship between numberline mapping of the current trial and the magnitude of the previous trial, in both adults and school children, with the current response influenced by up to 15% of the previous trial value. The dependency is sufficient to account for the shape of the numberline, without requiring logarithmic transform. We show that this dynamic strategy results in a reduction of reproduction error, and hence improvement in accuracy.

  1. A stack-based flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell for large quasi-static loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Shi, Zhifei; Wang, Jianjun; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell (F-C PEHC) is proposed. This cell has a large load capacity and adjustable force transmission coefficient assembled from replaceable individual components. A statically indeterminate mechanical model for the cell is established and the theoretical force transmission coefficient is derived based on structural mechanics. An inverse correlation between the force transmission coefficient and the relative stiffness of Element 1’s limbs is found. An experimental study is also conducted to verify the theoretical results. Both weakened and enhanced modes are achieved for this experiment. The maximum power output approaches 4.5 mW at 120 kΩ resistive load under a 4 Hz harmonic excitation with 600 N amplitude for the weakened mode, whereas the maximum power output approaches 17.8 mW at 120 kΩ under corresponding load for the enhanced mode. The experimental measurements of output voltages are compared with the theoretical ones in both weakened and enhanced modes. The experimental measurements of open-circuit voltages are slightly smaller for harmonic excitations with amplitudes that vary from 400 N to 800 N and the errors are within 14%. During the experiment, the maximum load approaches 2.8 kN which is quite large but not the ultimate bearing capacity of the present device. The mechanical model and theoretical transmission coefficient can be used in other flex-compressive mode energy transducers.

  2. Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

  3. Dynamic response of scale models subjected to impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsdon, Graham K.

    1997-05-01

    Presented with the problem of possible failure of large structures due to dynamic loading, and the cost of staging full scale tests. The Oxford University's Department of Engineering Science, supported by British Gas and Rolls Royce, has been scale modeling these events experimentally. The paper looks at two areas of research: (1) The structural integrity of a particular type of Liquified Natural Gas Storage Tank, and its vulnerability to blast loading. (2) The ability of Large Aero Engine Fan blades to withstand impacts associated with birds, stones, ice etc.

  4. Dynamic Response during PEM Fuel Cell Loading-up

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Gou; Pengcheng Li; Xing Yuan; Pucheng Pei

    2009-01-01

    A study on the effects of controlling and operating parameters for a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell on the dynamic phenomena during the loading-up process is presented. The effect of the four parameters of load-up amplitudes and rates, operating pressures and current levels on gas supply or even starvation in the flow field is analyzed based accordingly on the transient characteristics of current output and voltage. Experiments are carried out in a single fuel cell with an active ar...

  5. Dynamic Load Balancing Data Centric Storage for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daesik Ko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new data centric storage that is dynamically adapted to the work load changes is proposed. The proposed data centric storage distributes the load of hot spot areas to neighboring sensor nodes by using a multilevel grid technique. The proposed method is also able to use existing routing protocols such as GPSR (Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing with small changes. Through simulation, the proposed method enhances the lifetime of sensor networks over one of the state-of-the-art data centric storages. We implement the proposed method based on an operating system for sensor networks, and evaluate the performance through running based on a simulation tool.

  6. Laser-Driven Ramp Compression to Investigate and Model Dynamic Response of Iron at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourou Amadou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficient laser shock processing of materials requires a good characterization of their dynamic response to pulsed compression, and predictive numerical models to simulate the thermomechanical processes governing this response. Due to the extremely high strain rates involved, the kinetics of these processes should be accounted for. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the dynamic behavior of iron under laser driven ramp loading, then we compare the results to the predictions of a constitutive model including viscoplasticity and a thermodynamically consistent description of the bcc to hcp phase transformation expected near 13 GPa. Both processes are shown to affect wave propagation and pressure decay, and the influence of the kinetics of the phase transformation on the velocity records is discussed in details.

  7. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    CERN Document Server

    Grether, A; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (Ic) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and Ic of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  8. Reversible compression of an optical piston through Kramers dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schnoering, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    We study the reversible crossover between stable and bistable phases of an over-damped Brownian bead inside an optical piston. The interaction potentials are solved developing a method based on Kramers' theory that exploits the statistical properties of the stochastic motion of the bead. We evaluate precisely the energy balance of the crossover. We show that the deformation of the optical potentials induced by the compression of the piston is related to a production of heat which measures the non-adiabatic character of the crossover. This reveals how specific thermodynamic processes can be designed and controlled with a high level of precision by tailoring the optical landscapes of the piston.

  9. Fast Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Organic Liquids under Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc; Niklasson, Anders; Manner, Virginia; McGrane, Shawn; Dattelbaum, Dana

    2013-06-01

    The responses of liquid formic acid, acrylonitrile, and nitromethane to shock compression have been studied using quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations with the self-consistent tight-binding code LATTE. Microcanonical Born-Oppenheimer trajectories with precise energy conservation were computed without relying on an iterative self-consistent field optimization of the electronic degrees of freedom at each time step via the Fast Quantum Mechanical Molecular Dynamics formalism. The input shock pressures required to initiate chemistry in our simulations agree very well with recent laser- and flyer-plate-driven shock compression experiments. On-the-fly analysis of the electronic structure of the liquids over hundreds of picoseconds after dynamic compression revealed that their reactivity is strongly correlated with the temperature and pressure dependence of their HOMO-LUMO gap.

  10. Cervical Spine Functional Anatomy and the Biomechanics of Injury Due to Compressive Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Erik E; Floyd, R. T; Cendoma, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To provide a foundation of knowledge concerning the functional anatomy, kinematic response, and mechanisms involved in axial-compression cervical spine injury as they relate to sport injury.

  11. Effects of Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should also be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  12. Molecular dynamics of shock loading of metals with defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belak, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The finite rise time of shock waves in metals is commonly attributed to dissipative or viscous behavior of the metal. This viscous or plastic behavior is commonly attributed to the motion of defects such as dislocations. Despite this intuitive understanding, the experimental observation of defect motion or nucleation during shock loading has not been possible due to the short time scales involved. Molecular dynamics modeling with realistic interatomic potentials can provide some insight into defect motion during shock loading. However, until quite recently, the length scale required to accurately represent a metal with defects has been beyond the scope of even the most powerful supercomputers. Here, the author presents simulations of the shock response of single defects and indicate how simulation might provide some insight into the shock loading of metals.

  13. Damage Analysis of a Ferritic SiMo Ductile Cast Iron Submitted to Tension and Compression Loadings in Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Hervas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tensile and compression tests were carried out on a ductile cast iron for temperatures up to 1073 K. The damage caused inside and around graphite nodules was evaluated as a function of the local equivalent plastic strain by using microstructural quantifications. The mechanical properties are strongly dependent on a temperature above 773 K. Concerning tensile behavior, an evolutional law issued from the Gurson model representing the void growth as a function of the deformation and temperature was successfully employed. It is demonstrated that the strain state and the temperature have a strong influence on the void growth function. In the case of compression tests, the temperature has a weak influence on the nodule deformation for temperatures lower than 773 K, and the mechanical behavior is driven by the viscoplastic properties of the ferrite. For higher temperatures, the mechanical properties in compression are progressively modified, since graphite nodules tend to remain spherical, and ferrite grains are severely deformed. A synthesis of the damage mechanisms is proposed in the studied range of temperature and plastic strain. It appears that the graphite nodule aspect ratio can be used as an indicator of the deformation under compression loading for temperatures ranging from room temperature to 673 K.

  14. Dynamic recrystallization of AZ91 magnesium alloy during compression deformation at elevated temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑波; 王艳秋; 郑明毅; 吴昆

    2004-01-01

    High temperature compressive tests of AZ91 Mg alloy were carried out at 573 -723 K and strain rates of 0. 001 - 1s -1. The microstructures of as-compressed samples were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the microhardness was also tested. It is shown that with the increase of temperature or the decrease of strain rate, the flow stress decreases, at the same time the dynamic recrystallization (DRX)of the alloy is more noticeable. The microstructures reveal that continuous dynamic recrystallization, which develops through conversion of low-angle grain boundaries into high-angle boundaries, occurs preferentially at the grain boundary.

  15. Dynamic response of a poroelastic stratum to moving oscillating load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic response of a poroelastic stratum subjected to moving load is studied. The governing dynamic equations for poroelastic medium are solved by using Fourier transform. The general solutions for the stresses and displacements in the transformed domain are established. Based on the general solutions, with the consideration of boundary conditions, the final expressions of stresses and displacements in physical domain are put forward for the three-dimensional single-layer medium. Some numerical solutions for the stresses, displacements and pore fluid pressure are presented and reveal that the response of a poroelastic stratum varies obviously with the moving velocity.

  16. Parametric Dynamic Load Prediction of a Narrow Gauge Rocket Sled

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    sensitivity of dynamic loading to design parameter variation was investigated numerically by Nedimovic (2004), and sensitivity to changes in rail...measured data sets and to give insight into model behavior with regard to input parameters to help determine initial model sensitivities and design...LSR and CO tests was considered to be 74 WL 0.00 #115 Payload Aft Attachment Vertical Force ( SGB ) #138 Payload Aft Attachment Lateral Force

  17. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Abusara

    Full Text Available When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD, respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests.

  18. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests.

  19. Lossy compression of floating point high-dynamic range images using JPEG2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Dominic; Kaup, Andre

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a new technique called High Dynamic Range (HDR) has gained attention in the image processing field. By representing pixel values with floating point numbers, recorded images can hold significantly more luminance information than ordinary integer images. This paper focuses on the realization of a lossy compression scheme for HDR images. The JPEG2000 standard is used as a basic component and is efficiently integrated into the compression chain. Based on a detailed analysis of the floating point format and the human visual system, a concept for lossy compression is worked out and thoroughly optimized. Our scheme outperforms all other existing lossy HDR compression schemes and shows superior performance both at low and high bitrates.

  20. Strain distribution in the intervertebral disc under unconfined compression and tension load by the optimized digital image correlation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Tai-Yong; Yang, Xiu-Ping; Li, Kun; Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Guo, Yue-Hong

    2014-05-01

    The unconfined compression and tension experiments of the intervertebral disc were conducted by applying an optimized digital image correlation technique, and the internal strain distribution was analysed for the disc. It was found that the axial strain values of different positions increased obviously with the increase in loads, while inner annulus fibrosus and posterior annulus fibrosus experienced higher axial strains than the outer annulus fibrosus and anterior annulus fibrosus. Deep annulus fibrosus exhibited higher compressive and tensile axial strains than superficial annulus fibrosus for the anterior region, while there was an opposite result for the posterior region. It was noted that all samples demonstrated a nonlinear stress-strain profile in the process of deforming, and an elastic region was shown once the sample was deformed beyond its toe region.

  1. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihatsch, Michael S., E-mail: michael.mihatsch@aer.mw.tum.de; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  2. Maximum Allowable Dynamic Load of Mobile Manipulators with Stability Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidary H. R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High payload to mass ratio is one of the advantages of mobile robot manipulators. In this paper, a general formula for finding the maximum allowable dynamic load (MADL of wheeled mobile robot is presented. Mobile manipulators operating in field environments will be required to manipulate large loads, and to perform such tasks on uneven terrain, which may cause the system to reach dangerous tip-over instability. Therefore, the method is expanded for finding the MADL of mobile manipulators with stability consideration. Moment-Height Stability (MHS criterion is used as an index for the system stability. Full dynamic model of wheeled mobile base and mounted manipulator is considered with respect to the dynamic of non-holonomic constraint. Then, a method for determination of the maximum allowable loads is described, subject to actuator constraints and by imposing the stability limitation as a new constraint. The actuator torque constraint is applied by using a speed-torque characteristics curve of a typical DC motor. In order to verify the effectiveness of the presented algorithm, several simulation studies considering a two-link planar manipulator, mounted on a mobile base are presented and the results are discussed.

  3. Node reserve mechanism (over dynamic load-balancing)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Francisco Junqueira; Azevedo, Carlos Vicente Goulart de; Dalle, Hugo Moura, E-mail: muniz@cdtn.br, E-mail: cvga@cdtn.br, E-mail: dallehm@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Multiple-Instruction Multi-Data (MIMD) distributed-memory processing systems (such as an IBM like set of PCs, connected by a communication device) are since long time commercially available and in use. But many Research Institutions still use them as a mono-user facility: they are much more cost effective if used as a (multi-user) shared resource. However, the use of MIMD machines as a shared resource is often limited due to lack of an efficient, easy-to-use and on hand dynamic load-balancing technique. This work describes the arrangements that were made to establish the interface between a mechanism of processing power availability (resource determined from a shared computer facility) and simultaneous users, demand for resources. The key point is to allow the application designer to ask for (at once) as many nodes as he needs (a multi-reserve mechanism). The system runs over Linux/X86 computing nodes (a cluster). In order to show the interface functionality, the startup module of a MCNP package was modified in such a way that the multi-reserve node mechanism together with a multi-user dynamic load-balancing approach could be used. Nodes set demand is an intrinsic feature of MCNP package. Such modified MCNP package was successfully run over a dynamic load-balancing system. (author)

  4. Dynamic Response of RPC-Filled Steel Tubular Columns with High Load Carrying Capacity Under Axial Impact Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhimin; WU Ping'an; JIA Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Experimental investigation into impact-resistant behavior of reactive powder concrete (RPC)-filled steel tubular columns was conducted, and dynamic response of the columns under axial impact loading was studied by means of numerical simulation method.Increase coefficient of load carrying capacity and ratio of load carrying capacity between steel tube and RPC core of columns were obtained.

  5. Analysis of Dynamic Properties of Piezoelectric Structure under Impact Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model of the dynamic properties is established for a piezoelectric structure under impact load, without considering noise and perturbations in this paper. Based on the general theory of piezo-elasticity and impact mechanics, the theoretical solutions of the mechanical and electrical fields of the smart structure are obtained with the standing and traveling wave methods, respectively. The comparisons between the two methods have shown that the standing wave method is better for studying long-time response after an impact load. In addition, good agreements are found between the theoretical and the numerical results. To simulate the impact load, both triangle and step pulse loads are used and comparisons are given. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters is discussed so as to provide some advices for practical use. It can be seen that the proposed analytical model would benefit, to some extent, the design and application (especially the airport runway of the related smart devices by taking into account their impact load performance.

  6. Study of Lysozyme-Loaded Poly-L-Lactide (PLLA Porous Microparticles in a Compressed CO2 Antisolvent Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qian Su

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme (LSZ-loaded poly-L-lactide (PLLA porous microparticles (PMs were successfully prepared by a compressed CO2 antisolvent process in combination with a water-in-oil emulsion process using LSZ as a drug model and ammonium bicarbonate as a porogen. The effects of different drug loads (5.0%, 7.5% and 10.0% on the surface morphology, particle size, porosity, tapped density and drug release profile of the harvested PMs were investigated. The results show that an increase in the amount of LSZ added led to an increase in drug load (DL but a decrease in encapsulation efficiency. The resulting LSZ-loaded PLLA PMs (LSZ-PLLA PMs exhibited a porous and uneven morphology, with a density less than 0.1 g·cm−3, a geometric mean diameter of 16.9–18.8 μm, an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.8 μm, a fine particle fraction (FPF of 59.2%–66.8%, and a porosity of 78.2%–86.3%. According to the results of differential scanning calorimetry, the addition of LSZ improved the thermal stability of PLLA. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurement reveal that no significant changes occurred in the molecular structures of LSZ during the fabrication process, which was further confirmed by the evaluation of enzyme activity of LSZ. It is demonstrated that the emulsion-combined precipitation with compressed antisolvent (PCA process could be a promising technology to develop biomacromolecular drug-loaded inhalable carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

  7. Effect of Two Interacting Localized Defects on the Critical Load for Thin Cylindrical Shells Under Axial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Khamlichi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many modern structures are made from thin shells. Design of these elements depends to a large extent on their buckling behavior which is hugely affected by the initial geometric imperfections. Approach: For axially compressed isotropic circular cylindrical shells, axisymmetric localized geometric imperfections were found to reduce severely the buckling strength. Among various axisymmetric shapes of localized defects that were investigated, the entering triangular form was recognized to yield the most adverse case. Since multiple localized defects may be present in the same shell structure and interact, studying their mutual effect on the buckling load is of great importance for shell design. Results: In this study, the effect of two interacting entering triangular localized axisymmetric initial geometric imperfections on shell buckling strength under uniform axial compression was modeled by means of the finite element method. A special software package which was dedicated to buckling analysis of quasi axisymmetric shells was used in order to compute the buckling load either via the linear Euler buckling analysis or through the full non linear iterative procedure. A set of five factors including shell aspect ratios, defect characteristics and the distance separating the localized initial geometric imperfections had been found to govern the buckling problem. A statistical approach based on the Taguchi method was used then to study their relative influence on the buckling load reduction. It was shown by comparison with the single imperfection case that further diminution of the critical load was obtained. Conclusion/Recommendations: In the range of investigated parameters, the distance separating the localized geometric imperfections and imperfection wavelength were found to yield major influences on the critical load. Further studies must be performed in order to assess shell buckling strength in the presence of more than two

  8. Deformation mechanisms during compressive loading of tantalum and tantalum-2.5 weight percent tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Rajeev

    In this study it was attempted to understand the deformation behavior of tantalum and tantalum alloyed with 2.5 weight % tungsten. Uniaxial compressive deformation was carried out on polycrystalline Ta, Ta-2.5%W, and single crystal Ta. Experiments were carried out for a range of strain rates (10sp{-4}/s to 3000/s), and for a range of temperatures (77K, 296K-1000K). During high strain rate adiabatic plastic deformation of Ta-2.5%W, the energy converted to heat was directly measured using an infra-red method, and indirectly, using the recovery Hopkinson bar technique. It was concluded that within experimental error close to 100% of the work is converted to heat. During high strain rate deformation, the internal dislocation structure of both Ta and Ta-2.5%W was found to be independent of testing temperature. Thus the flow stress could be separated into two types of components, one type which are strain rate - temperature dependent and the other type which are only strain dependent. However, at lower strain rates prominent dynamic strain aging is observed and the effect of strain is coupled with the strain rate - temperature effect. At these lower strain rates, the evolution of structure does depend on the applied strain rate and temperature. When deformed at liquid nitrogen temperature, tantalum twins even at strain rates as low as 0.001/s. In the high strain rate - room temperature regime no twinning is observed. With the addition of tungsten to tantalum, the temperature and strain rate sensitivity of flow stress reduces. In addition to this, twinning is inhibited and occurs only at high strain rates - liquid nitrogen temperatures. Experiments on single crystal tantalum carried out revealed that the temperature sensitivity of flow stress on the (211) (111) slip system is similar to that on the (101) (111) slip system. Further experiments carried out on single crystal tantalum to study latent hardening did show 10% latent hardening on the \\{211\\} intersecting slip

  9. Deformation Curve Characteristics of Rapeseeds and Sunflower Seeds Under Compression Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divišová M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The deformation curve characteristics of rapeseeds and sunflower seeds compressed using the equipment ZDM 50-2313/56/18 and varying vessel diameters (40, 60, 80, and 100 mm were investigated. Maximum compressive force of 100 kN was applied on bulk oilseeds of rape and sunflower of measured height 20-80 mm and deformed at a speed of 60 mm∙min-1. The compression test using the vessel diameters of 40 and 60 mm showed a serration effect while the vessel diameters of 80 and 100 mm indicated an increasing function effect on the force-deformation characteristic curves. Clearly, the increasing function effect described the region with oil flow and that of serration effect described the region without any oil flow. However, it was observed that the serration effect could be due to the higher compressive stress inside the smaller vessel diameters (40 and 60 mm compared to those with bigger vessel diameters (80 and 100 mm. Parameters such as deformation, deformation energy, and energy density were determined from the force-deformation curves dependency showing both increasing function and serration effect. The findings of the study provide useful information for the determination of specific compressive force and energy requirements for extracting maximum oil from oilseed crops such as rape and sunflower.

  10. Fluid Compressibility Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hydrostatic Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the dynamic performance characteristics of laminar flow, capillar/orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The analysis considers in detail the effect of fluid compressibility in the bearing recesses. At high frequency excitations beyond a break frequency, the bearing hydrostatic stiffness increases sharply and it is accompanied by a rapid decrease in direct damping. Also, the potential of pneumatic hammer instability (negative damping) at low frequencies is likely to occur in hydrostatic bearing applications handling highly compressible fluids. Useful design criteria to avoid undesirable dynamic operating conditions at low and high frequencies are determined. The effect of fluid recess compressibility is brought into perspective, and found to be of utmost importance on the entire frequency spectrum response and stability characteristics of hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings.

  11. Compressive loading at the end plate directly regulates flow and deformation of the basivertebral vein: an analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic diseases and infections frequently involve the spine. This is the result of seeding of the vertebral body by tumor cells or bacteria delivered by venous blood from Batson's plexus, which is hypothesized to enter the vertebral body via the epidural veins. Isolated spinal segments deform significantly at the bony end plate when under compression. This deformation could cause a volume change of the vertebral body and may be accompanied by retrograde flow of venous blood. To date, this process has not been investigated quantitatively. The purpose of this study was to determine the volume changes of the vertebral body and basivertebral vein for a vertebral body under compression. Methods A three-dimensional finite element mesh model of the L4 segment with both adjacent discs was modified from a 3-D computed tomography scan image. An octagon representing the basivertebral vein was introduced into the center of the vertebral body in the model. Four compressive orientations (1500 N were applied on the top disc. The volume change of the vertebral body model and the basivertebral vein were then computed. Results The volume change of the vertebral body was about 0.1 cm3 (16.3% of the basivertebral vein for the four loading conditions. The maximum cross-sectional area reductions of the basivertebral vein and volume reduction were 1.54% and 1.02%, for uniform compression. Conclusion Our study quantified the small but significant volume change of a modeled vertebral body and cross-sectional areas and that of the basivertebral vein, due to the inward bulging of the end plate under compression. This volume change could initiate the reverse flow of blood from the epidural venous system and cause seeding of tumors or bacterial cells.

  12. Volume digital image correlation to assess displacement field in compression loaded bread crumb under X-ray microtomography

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present an original approach to assess structural changes during bread crumb compression using a mechanical testing bench coupled to 3D X-ray microtomography. X-ray images taken at different levels of compression of the bread crumb are processed using image analysis. A subset-based digital volume correlation method is used to achieve the 3D displacement field. Within the limit of the approach, deterministic search strategy is implemented for solving subset displacement in each deformed image with regards to the undeformed one. The predicted displacement field in the transverse directions shows differences that depend on local cell arrangement as confirmed by finite element analysis. The displacement component in the loading direction is affected by the magnitude of imposed displacement and shows more regular change. Large displacement levels in the compression direction are in good agreement with the imposed experimental displacement. The results presented here are promising in a sense of possible identification of local foam properties. New insights are expected to achieve better understanding of structural heterogeneities in the overall perception of the product. Industrial relevance: Texture evaluation of cereal product is an important aspect for testing consumer acceptability of new designed products. Mechanical evaluation of backed products is a systemic route for determining texture of cereal based product. From the industrial viewpoint, mechanical evaluation allows saving both time and cost compared to panel evaluation. We demonstrate that better understanding of structural changes during texture evaluation can be achieved in addition to texture evaluation. Sensing structural changes during bread crumb compression is achievable by combining novel imaging technique and processing based on image analysis. We present thus an efficient way to predict displacements during compression of freshly baked product. This method can be used in different

  13. Dynamic impedance of piles in visco-elastic material considering axial loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jian-guo; ZHOU Xu-hong; ZHANG Jia-sheng

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic impedance function of pile in visco-elastie material considering axial loads under lateral dynamic force was analyzed, and the beam dynamic differential equation was used to induce the dynamic impedance function. After analyzing the edge conditions, the dynamic impedance functions were deduced. Contrasted with the result that does not consider axial loads, the axial loads have obvious influence on the dynamic impedance function.And the results show that the dimensionless prarmeter of the dynamic impedance will change from 6 % to 9 % when considering axial loads, and dimensionless prarmeter of the dynamic impedance of the coupling horizontal-sway will increase by 31 %.

  14. Compression creep rupture of an E-glass/vinyl ester composite subjected to combined mechanical and fire loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Steven Earl

    Polymer matrix composites are seeing increasing use in structural systems (e.g. ships, bridges) and require a quantitative basis for describing their performance under combined mechanical load and fire. Although much work has been performed to characterize the flammability, fire resistance and toxicity of these composite systems, an understanding of the structural response of sandwich type structures and laminate panels under combined mechanical and thermal loads (simulating fire conditions) is still largely unavailable. Therefore a research effort to develop a model to describe the structural response of these glass/vinyl esters systems under fire loading conditions is relevant to the continuing and future application of polymer matrix composites aboard naval ships. The main goal of the effort presented here is to develop analytical models and finite element analysis methods and tools to predict limit states such as local compression failures due to micro-buckling, residual strength and times to failure for composite laminates at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition where failure is controlled by viscoelastic effects. Given the importance of compression loading to a structure subject to fire exposure, the goals of this work are succinctly stated as the: (a) Characterization of the non-linear viscoelastic and viscoplastic response of the E-glass/vinyl ester composite above Tg. (b) Description of the laminate compression mechanics as a function of stress and temperature including viscoelasticity. (c) Viscoelastic stress analysis of a laminated panel ([0/+45/90/-45/0] S) using classical lamination theory (CLT). Three manuscripts constitute this dissertation which is representative of the three steps listed above. First, a detailed characterization of the nonlinear thermoviscoelastic response of Vetrotex 324/Derakane 510A--40 through Tg was conducted using the Time--Temperature--Stress--Superposition Principle (TTSSP) and Zapas--Crissman model. Second

  15. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL STUDIES ON DYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE BEHAVIOR OF REACTIVE POWDER CONCRETES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghua Wang; Zhengdao Wang; Xiaoyan Liang; Minzhe An

    2008-01-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique is used to determine the dynamic strength of reactive powder concretes (RPCs) with different steel-fiber contents.Two types of pulse shapers with different thicknesses are considered to reduce the high-frequency-oscillation effect and achieve a nearly constant strain rate over a certain deformation range.It is known that the compressive strength of concrete-like materials is hydrostatic-stress-dependent,and the apparent dynamic strength enhancement comes from both the effects of the hydrostatic stress and strain rate.In order to differentiate them,numerical method is used to calculate the contribution of the hydrostatic stress,and then the genuine strain-rate effect on dynamic compressive strength of RPCs is determined.In addition,the effect of steel-fibers on dynamic strength and failure mode of RPCs is discussed.

  16. Dynamic instability and chaos of empty and fluid-filled circular cylindrical shells under periodic axial loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicano, F.; Amabili, M.

    2006-05-01

    In the present paper the dynamic stability of circular cylindrical shells subjected to static and dynamic axial loads is investigated. Both Donnell's nonlinear shallow shell and Sanders-Koiter shell theories have been applied to model finite-amplitude static and dynamic deformations. Results are compared in order to evaluate the accuracy of these theories in predicting instability onset and post-critical nonlinear response. The effect of a contained fluid on the stability and the post-critical behaviour is analyzed in detail. Geometric imperfections are considered and their influence on the dynamic instability and post-critical behaviour is investigated. Chaotic dynamics of pre-compressed shells is investigated by means of nonlinear time-series techniques, extracting correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponents.

  17. Low Complexity Connectivity Driven Dynamic Geometry Compression for 3D Tele-Immersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, R.N.; Bulterman, D.C.A.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    Geometry based 3D Tele-Immersion is a novel emerging media application that involves on the fly reconstructed 3D mesh geometry. To enable real-time communication of such live reconstructed mesh geometry over a bandwidth limited link, fast dynamic geometry compression is needed. However, most tools a

  18. Dynamic compressive response of wrought and additive manufactured 304L stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Erik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM technology has been developed to fabricate metal components that include complex prototype fabrication, small lot production, precision repair or feature addition, and tooling. However, the mechanical response of the AM materials is a concern to meet requirements for specific applications. Differences between AM materials as compared to wrought materials might be expected, due to possible differences in porosity (voids, grain size, and residual stress levels. When the AM materials are designed for impact applications, the dynamic mechanical properties in both compression and tension need to be fully characterized and understood for reliable designs. In this study, a 304L stainless steel was manufactured with AM technology. For comparison purposes, both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels were dynamically characterized in compression Kolsky bar techniques. They dynamic compressive stress-strain curves were obtained and the strain rate effects were determined for both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels. A comprehensive comparison of dynamic compressive response between the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels was performed. SAND2015-0993 C.

  19. Intermittent foot claudication caused by a dynamic compression of the posterior tibial artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczynski, Jakub; Topliss, Claire; Fligelstone, Louis

    2016-07-14

    A young adult presented with an atypical intermittent foot claudication caused by a dynamic compression of the posterior tibial artery by a ganglion. This case highlights the diagnostic challenges when dealing with an entrapment syndrome. Subsequent open surgical treatment was successful, and the patient has made a good recovery.

  20. Dynamic Behaviour CO2 Capture and Compression: An Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.; Khakharia, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; De Kler, R.

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  1. Dynamic behaviour CO2 capture and compression: an assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.H.L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Kler, R.F.C. de

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  2. Dynamic behaviour CO2 capture and compression: an assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.H.L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Kler, R.F.C. de

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  3. Dynamic Behaviour CO2 Capture and Compression: An Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.; Khakharia, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; De Kler, R.

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  4. Dynamic compressive mechanical response of a soft polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical behaviour of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) was studied using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Mechanical properties have been determined at moderate to high strain rates. Real time deformation and fracture were recorded using a high-speed camera. Frac

  5. Interferometric Investigations of Compressible Dynamic Stall Over a Transiently Pitching Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Carr, L.W.; Wilder, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.2514/6.1993-211 The dynamic stall flow field over a NACA 0012 airfoil pitching transiently from 0 - 60 degrees at a constant rate under compressible flow conditions has been studied using the real-time technique of point diffraction interferometrv. This investigation using nonintrusive diagnostics-provides a quantitative description of the overall flow field, including the finer details of dynamic...

  6. Numerical study of an arcan tensile compression shear test in dynamic: application to bonded joints

    OpenAIRE

    Valès, B.; Marguet, S.; Créac'hcadec, R.; Sohier, L; Ferrero, J-F.; Navarro, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the Arcan TCS testing device under dynamic conditions. This test is commonly used to characterize the mechanical behavior of bonded joints subjected to combined quasi-static loadings. In this study, the question of its extensibility to dynamic loadings by the use of an impactor guided in a drop tower is investigated. A dedicated finite element model is built under the plane stress assumption. Stress distributions in the adhesive are analysed trought ti...

  7. Constitutive Models for Compressive Deformation of AZ80 Magnesium Alloy under Multiple Loading Directions and Strain Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-qing CHANG; Li-ying ZHANG; Yong-biao YANG; Jing-li REN

    2016-01-01

    Two constitutive models,the modified Johnson-Cook model and the logarithm linear relation model based on empirical approach and data analysis,were presented to illustrate compressive deformation of magnesium alloys AZ80 under multiple loading directions and strain rates.The results of stress-strain curve analysis and sensitivity in-dex analysis suggested that the stress held large fluctuations in loading direction of 90°.Model testing signified that the logarithm linear relation model was more proper than the modified Johnson-Cook model in view of relative mean square error and correlation coefficients.Moreover,numerical simulation building on established models also indica-ted that the logarithm linear model is more precise than the modified Johnson-Cook model.

  8. On the Effect of Curvature in Debonded Sandwich Panels Subjected to Compressive Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian; Branner, Kim

    2008-01-01

    with a circular debond. The Crack Surface Displacement Extrapolation (CSDE) method is used to calculate fracture parameters in the interface. Compression tests were carried out on two types of debonded curved panels with different curvature using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) measurements to determine the full-field...

  9. Structural transitions and hysteresis in clump- and stripe-forming systems under dynamic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Danielle; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Reichhardt, Charles

    2016-11-28

    Using numerical simulations, we study the dynamical evolution of particles interacting via competing long-range repulsion and short-range attraction in two dimensions. The particles are compressed using a time-dependent quasi-one dimensional trough potential that controls the local density, causing the system to undergo a series of structural phase transitions from a low density clump lattice to stripes, voids, and a high density uniform state. The compression proceeds via slow elastic motion that is interrupted with avalanche-like bursts of activity as the system collapses to progressively higher densities via plastic rearrangements. The plastic events vary in magnitude from small rearrangements of particles, including the formation of quadrupole-like defects, to large-scale vorticity and structural phase transitions. In the dense uniform phase, the system compresses through row reduction transitions mediated by a disorder-order process. We characterize the rearrangement events by measuring changes in the potential energy, the fraction of sixfold coordinated particles, the local density, and the velocity distribution. At high confinements, we find power law scaling of the velocity distribution during row reduction transitions. We observe hysteresis under a reversal of the compression when relatively few plastic rearrangements occur. The decompressing system exhibits distinct phase morphologies, and the phase transitions occur at lower compression forces as the system expands compared to when it is compressed.

  10. Modified virtual internal bond model for concrete subjected to dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Mayuri

    Concrete is often used as a primary material to build protective structures. There is a wide range of research work being performed to simulate the behavior of reinforced concrete under impact and blast loading. This behavior is studied from both material and structural points of view. The research study presented in this thesis focuses on material aspects of modeling. LS-DYNARTM is an effective software for modeling and finite element analysis of structural members. It allows the user to define the material through commercially available or user-defined constitutive material models. Each material model has a distinct set of parameters to define a material which is further assigned to elements and used for simulations. This research study presents a user defined material model called Modified Concrete Virtual Internal Bond Model (MC-VIB). The basic constitutive model of VIB assumes the body as a collection of randomly oriented material points interconnected by a network of internal bonds. The model was modified by several researchers for different purposes. This research presents the MC-VIB for concrete under dynamic loading and studies its implementation into LS-DYNARTM. The modifications include incorporation of shear behavior and accounting for the difference in behavior of concrete in tension and compression. This project includes the calibration of the model based on stress-strain behavior of single element and cylinder model of concrete. The parameters are based on concrete with a uniaxial compressive strength of 27.6 MPa (4 ksi). These numerical curves are compared to those obtained from conventionally used material models for concrete and standard curves obtained by accepted equations to check the accuracy of prediction. The material model available in LS-DYNARTM requires a number of input parameters to define concrete behavior. These properties are normally derived from actual tests performed on the concrete under consideration. Often the properties are

  11. Dynamic Load Balancing Strategies for Parallel Reacting Flow Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Meneses, Esteban; Givi, Peyman

    2014-11-01

    Load balancing in parallel computing aims at distributing the work as evenly as possible among the processors. This is a critical issue in the performance of parallel, time accurate, flow simulators. The constraint of time accuracy requires that all processes must be finished with their calculation for a given time step before any process can begin calculation of the next time step. Thus, an irregularly balanced compute load will result in idle time for many processes for each iteration and thus increased walltimes for calculations. Two existing, dynamic load balancing approaches are applied to the simplified case of a partially stirred reactor for methane combustion. The first is Zoltan, a parallel partitioning, load balancing, and data management library developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. The second is Charm++, which is its own machine independent parallel programming system developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The performance of these two approaches is compared, and the prospects for their application to full 3D, reacting flow solvers is assessed.

  12. Ultimate Load Capacity and Behavior of Thin-Walled Curved-Steel Square Struts, Subjected to Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Mohammad Reza Mortazavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been some experimental tests on hollow curved-steel struts with thin-walled square sections, in order to investigate their general behavior, particularly their capacity for bearing differing loads. One set of square tubes are cold-formed into segments of circular arcs with curvature radii, equal to 4000 mm. Different lengths of curved struts are fabricated so as to cover a practical range of slenderness ratios. The struts tests were pin-ended and had slenderness ratios, based on the straight length between ends ranging from 31-126. The cold-forming operation induces initial inelastic behavior and associated residual stresses. There is, therefore, an interaction among material effects, such as the strain hardening capacity, the Bauschinger effect, strain aging, and residual stresses, together with the significant geometrical effect of the initial curvature, caused by the cold-forming operation. Eventually the results from three series of tests, which are taken on fully-aged and stress-relief-annealed square curved struts, are compared. The variations in load carrying response are discussed.

  13. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthle, Ruben; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber; Mulier, Michiel; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants.

  14. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Richard

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  15. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  16. The dynamics of gait transitions: effects of grade and load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, F J; Warren, W H

    1998-03-01

    Diedrich and Warren (1995a) proposed that gait transitions behave like bifurcations between attractors, with the relative phase of the leg segments as an order parameter and stride frequency and stride length as control parameters. In the present experiments, the authors tested the prediction that manipulation of the attractor layout, either through the addition of load to the ankles or through an increase in the grade of the treadmill, induces corresponding changes in the walk-run transition. As predicted, the load manipulation shifted the most stable walk and the transition to lower stride frequencies. In contrast, the grade manipulation shifted the most stable walk and the transition to shorter stride lengths. Other features of the dynamic theory were also replicated, including enhanced fluctuations of phase and systematic changes in stride length and frequency at the transition. Overall, in these experiments a shift of the attractors in control parameter space yielded a corresponding shift of the transition.

  17. Effects Of Polylactic Acid Coating and Compression Load on the Delivery of Protein and Steroid from HA Ceramic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benghuzzi, Hamed; Tucci, Michelle A; Ibrahim, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Density variations, due to particle size and time and temperature of sintering, affect the delivery profile of substances from ceramic delivery devices. This investigation was conducted to study the effect of polylactic acid (PLA) impregnation on the porosity of hydroxyapatite (HA) capsules by studying the delivery rate of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and testosterone (TE). HA capsules were fabricated by cold compressing calcined particles at 1000, 3000, and 5000 lbs. Each group was subdivided into PLA-impregnated and non-PLA impregnated capsules. Each capsule was loaded with either 40 mg of TE (impregnated or nonimpregnated with PLA polymer) or BSA. Data obtained in this study suggest that: (1) PLA impregnation of HA ceramic capsules decreases the rate of release of drugs from the ceramic reservoir, (2) Physiochemical characteristics of the drugs to be delivered is an instrumental key in the sustained release profiles, (3) Compression load of HA reservoirs is a key factor in predicting the duration and level of sustained delivery, and (4) Polymer coating of HA ceramic capsules reduces the pore size, as well as, blocking some of the pores on the surface.

  18. DYNAMIC JOINT LOAD TRANSFER EFFICIENCY OF RIGID PAVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Xinhua

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available the mechanistic analysis presented in this paper is only the beginning of new approach for understanding the real joint load transfer capability on airport and highway concrete pavements. It gives up the two major assumptions those have been popularly adopted by hundreds of published papers: the load is transferred under a wheel with zero speed and with fixed position. The real load transfer in field is always under wheels with non-zero speed and with varied position at any moment. The objective of this study focuses on quantifying the dynamic effects of a moving wheel while it is crossing a joint on a pavement. The analysis is conducted using a model of two-slab system on Kelvin foundation under a moving wheel with variable speed v, different pavement damping Cs, foundation reaction modulus k and foundation damping Ck. The dynamic joint load transfer efficiency is temporarily and empirically defined by the peak strain ratio LTE(S on the two sides of a joint. The primary findings include: (1 The higher speed of a moving wheel leads to the higher LTE(S;(2 The larger the pavement damping Cs leads to the higher LTE(S;(3 The numerical ratio c(=LTE(Sdynamic/ LTE(Sstatic varies in the range 1 to 2 mainly depending on speed v and damping Cs;(4 The LTE(Sdynamic is not sensitive to foundation reaction modulus k and foundation damping Ck. Further researches are needed for appropriate applications of the new model in practice.

  19. Failure mechanism and coupled static-dynamic loading theory in deep hard rock mining: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibing Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rock failure phenomena, such as rockburst, slabbing (or spalling and zonal disintegration, related to deep underground excavation of hard rocks are frequently reported and pose a great threat to deep mining. Currently, the explanation for these failure phenomena using existing dynamic or static rock mechanics theory is not straightforward. In this study, new theory and testing method for deep underground rock mass under coupled static-dynamic loading are introduced. Two types of coupled loading modes, i.e. “critical static stress + slight disturbance” and “elastic static stress + impact disturbance”, are proposed, and associated test devices are developed. Rockburst phenomena of hard rocks under coupled static-dynamic loading are successfully reproduced in the laboratory, and the rockburst mechanism and related criteria are demonstrated. The results of true triaxial unloading compression tests on granite and red sandstone indicate that the unloading can induce slabbing when the confining pressure exceeds a certain threshold, and the slabbing failure strength is lower than the shear failure strength according to the conventional Mohr-Column criterion. Numerical results indicate that the rock unloading failure response under different in situ stresses and unloading rates can be characterized by an equivalent strain energy density. In addition, we present a new microseismic source location method without premeasuring the sound wave velocity in rock mass, which can efficiently and accurately locate the rock failure in hard rock mines. Also, a new idea for deep hard rock mining using a non-explosive continuous mining method is briefly introduced.

  20. Dynamical Process of Liner Implosion in the Electromagnetic Flux Compression for Ultra-high Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H; Takeyama, Shojiro

    2013-01-01

    The spatial distribution of magnetic fields that are generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique is investigated, with emphasis on the dynamical processes of an imploding liner. By comparing with the results of computer simulations, we found that the non-uniform implosion of a liner is important in order to explain the magnetic field's distribution during the liner's implosion. In addition, our results suggest that the initial inwards compressing spool-like motion of the liner subsequently turns out to be outwards stretching barrel-like motion along the magnetic field axis.

  1. Dynamic load balancing algorithm for molecular dynamics based on Voronoi cells domain decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattebert, J.-L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glosli, J.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for automatic parallel load balancing in classical molecular dynamics. It assumes a spatial domain decomposition of particles into Voronoi cells. It is a gradient method which attempts to minimize a cost function by displacing Voronoi sites associated with each processor/sub-domain along steepest descent directions. Excellent load balance has been obtained for quasi-2D and 3D practical applications, with up to 440·106 particles on 65,536 MPI tasks.

  2. Failure Behavior of Unidirectional Composites under Compression Loading: Effect of Fiber Waviness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroop Narayanan Nair

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The key objective of this work is to highlight the effect of manufacturing-induced fiber waviness defects on the compressive failure of glass fiber-reinforced unidirectional specimens. For this purpose, in-plane, through-thickness waviness defects (with different waviness severities are induced during the manufacturing of the laminate. Numerical and experimental results show that the compressive strength of the composites decreases as the severity of the waviness defects increases. A reduction of up to 75% is noted with a wave severity of 0.075. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of the failed specimens reveal that kink-bands are created in the wavy regions and lead to failure.

  3. Compressibility effects on the dynamic characteristics of gas lubricated mechanical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghir, Mihai; Matta, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    The present Note deals with the effects of compressibility on the linearized dynamic characteristics of gas lubricated mechanical components (journal and thrust bearings). Although the effect of compressibility on the static characteristics is well known, its influence on the dynamic characteristics is still not clearly understood. The present Note uses Lubrication's simplest model problems (the 1D slider) to qualitatively describe this effect. An analytic solution obtained for the parallel 1D slider depicts the variation of stiffness and damping with the excitation frequency and shows that this nonlinearity must be taken into account for squeeze number larger than 1. A convenient way of handling this nonlinearity in a dynamic system is described for an aerodynamic thrust bearing. To cite this article: M. Arghir, P. Matta, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  4. Compressing Dynamic Range of Wind Lidar Signals by Gate-control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Songhua; LIU Zhishen; LIU Jintao; HE Yan; SONG Xiaoquan

    2001-01-01

    Laser backscattering signals in the atmosphere have a dynamic range of 105 or 106, with the intensity varying from near-field to far-field, such as one to ten kilometers. The attenuation varies with the distance as exponential and inverse square law. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the dynamic range with a gate-control to compress laser backscattering signals. This paper presents a description of gate-control applications in a wind lidar which can compress the dynamic range of laser backscattering signals from the near field atmosphere. In addition, a photomultiplier with gate-controlling can improve the detection distance and signal-to-noise. The study on Gate-controlled photomultiplier EMI 9214 has been carried out.

  5. A novel simultaneous dynamic range compression and local contrast enhancement algorithm for digital video cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chi-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article addresses the problem of low dynamic range image enhancement for commercial digital cameras. A novel simultaneous dynamic range compression and local contrast enhancement algorithm (SDRCLCE is presented to resolve this problem in a single-stage procedure. The proposed SDRCLCE algorithm is able to combine with many existent intensity transfer functions, which greatly increases the applicability of the proposed method. An adaptive intensity transfer function is also proposed to combine with SDRCLCE algorithm that provides the capability to adjustably control the level of overall lightness and contrast achieved at the enhanced output. Moreover, the proposed method is amenable to parallel processing implementation that allows us to improve the processing speed of SDRCLCE algorithm. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed method outperforms three state-of-the-art methods in terms of dynamic range compression and local contrast enhancement.

  6. Effects of ADC Nonlinearity on the Spurious Dynamic Range Performance of Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzong Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analog-to-information converter (AIC plays an important role in the compressed sensing system; it has the potential to significantly extend the capabilities of conventional analog-to-digital converter. This paper evaluates the impact of AIC nonlinearity on the dynamic performance in practical compressed sensing system, which included the nonlinearity introduced by quantization as well as the circuit non-ideality. It presents intuitive yet quantitative insights into the harmonics of quantization output of AIC, and the effect of other AIC nonlinearity on the spurious dynamic range (SFDR performance is also analyzed. The analysis and simulation results demonstrated that, compared with conventional ADC-based system, the measurement process decorrelates the input signal and the quantization error and alleviate the effect of other decorrelates of AIC, which results in a dramatic increase in spurious free dynamic range (SFDR.

  7. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  8. Strength of Tubular Joints Made by Electromagnetic Compression at Quasistatic and Cyclic Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Barreiro, P.; Beerwald, C.; Homberg, W.; Kleiner, M.; Löhe, D.; Marré, M.; Schulze, V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic compression of tubular profiles with high electrical conductivity is an innovative joining process for lightweight structures. The components are joined using pulsed magnetic fields which apply radial pressures of up to 200 MPa to tubular workpieces, causing a symmetric reduction of the diameter with typical strain rates of up to 10^4 sec^(-1). This process avoids any surface damage of the workpiece because there is no contact between component and forming tool. The strength o...

  9. Strength and failure behaviour of spark plasma sintered steel-zirconia composites under compressive Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, L.; Decker, S.; Ehinger, D. [Institute of Materials Engineering, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Ohser-Wiedemann, R.; Martin, S.; Martin, U.; Seifert, H.J. [Institute of Materials Science, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Several composites, consisting of a metastable austenitic steel matrix and varying amounts of MgO partially stabilized zirconia particles (Mg-PSZ), were produced through spark plasma sintering (SPS). Compression tests were carried out at room temperature in a wide range of strain rate (4 . 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, 2 . 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}, 10{sup -1} s{sup -1}, 1 s{sup -1}, 10{sup 2} s{sup -1}). In conjunction with subsequent microstructural investigations, the mechanical material behaviour was clarified. All composites showed a good ductility and a high strength. The strength increased with an increase of the ceramic content and with higher strain rates. Both, the martensitic transformation of the steel matrix and of the ceramic particles, could be proved at all strain rates. In this study no significant influence of the strain rate on the amount of transformed ceramic could be detected while the steel matrix showed less {alpha}'-martensite after compression at rising strain rates. Local material failure occurred around 0.3 true compressive strain depending on the applied strain rate and the amount of the Mg-PSZ powder. The main reason for the damage is the relatively weak ceramic-ceramic interface within the ceramic clusters. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. X-ray diffraction studies of dynamically compressed diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-06-10

    We propose a series of experiments to use X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study material properties using the NIF. XRD is the best way to determine the structure, lattice deformation, and texture of materials. Advances in synchrotron XRD facilities in the past two decades have revolutionized the study of materials at static high pressure in diamond anvil cells (DACs) up to about 3 Mbar. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the potential to do the same for dynamic materials studies at high-pressure. Members of our scientific team have pioneered XRD on many smaller laser facilities around the world. Our results suggest that diffraction on solids approaching 100 Mbar may be possible on the NIF, providing access to new regime for matter at extreme conditions.

  11. Cardiac looping may be driven by compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity. Observations on a physical simulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg eMänner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of the straight embryonic heart tube into a helically wound loop is named cardiac looping. Such looping is regarded as an essential process in cardiac morphogenesis since it brings the building blocks of the developing heart into an approximation of their definitive topographical relationships. During the past two decades, a large number of genes have been identified which play important roles in cardiac looping. However, how genetic information is physically translated into the dynamic form changes of the looping heart is still poorly understood. The oldest hypothesis of cardiac looping mechanics attributes the form changes of the heart loop (ventral bending → simple helical coiling → complex helical coiling to compressive loads resulting from growth differences between the heart and the pericardial cavity. In the present study, we have tested the physical plausibility of this hypothesis, which we call the growth-induced buckling hypothesis, for the first time. Using a physical simulation model, we show that growth-induced buckling of a straight elastic rod within the confined space of a hemispherical cavity can generate the same sequence of form changes as observed in the looping embryonic heart. Our simulation experiments have furthermore shown that, under bilaterally symmetric conditions, growth-induced buckling generates left- and right-handed helices (D-/L-loops in a 1:1 ratio, while even subtle left- or rightward displacements of the caudal end of the elastic rod at the pre-buckling state are sufficient to direct the buckling process towards the generation of only D-loops or L-loops, respectively. Our data are discussed with respect to observations made in biological ‘models’. We conclude that compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity play important roles in cardiac looping. Asymmetric positioning of the venous heart pole may direct these forces towards a biased

  12. The origin of the compressibility anomaly in amorphous silica: a molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Andrew M [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Sullivan, Lucy A [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Trachenko, Kostya [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Bruin, Richard P [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); White, Toby O H [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Dove, Martin T [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Tyer, Richard P [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Todorov, Ilian T [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wells, Stephen A [Center for Biological Physics, Arizona State University, Bateman Physical Sciences Building, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2007-07-11

    We propose an explanation for the anomalous compressibility maximum in amorphous silica based on rigidity arguments. The model considers the fact that a network structure will be rigidly compressed in the high-pressure limit, and rigidly taut in the negative pressure limit, but flexible and hence softer at intermediate pressures. We validate the plausibility of this explanation by the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. In fact this model is quite general, and will apply to any network solid, crystalline or amorphous; there are experimental indications that support this prediction. In contrast to other ideas concerning the compressibility maximum in amorphous silica, the model presented here does not invoke the existence of polyamorphic phase transitions in the glass phase.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of the plastic behavior anisotropy of shock-compressed monocrystal nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Zhou; Zhou, Liu-Cheng; He, Wei-Feng; Sun, Yu; Li, Ying-Hong; Jiao, Yang; Luo, Si-Hai

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the plastic behavior of monocrystalline nickel under shock compression along the [100] and [110] orientations. The shock Hugoniot relation, local stress curve, and process of microstructure development were determined. Results showed the apparent anisotropic behavior of monocrystalline nickel under shock compression. The separation of elastic and plastic waves was also obvious. Plastic deformation was more severely altered along the [110] direction than the [100] direction. The main microstructure phase transformed from face-centered cubic to body-centered cubic and generated a large-scale and low-density stacking fault along the family of { 111 } crystal planes under shock compression along the [100] direction. By contrast, the main mechanism of plastic deformation in the [110] direction was the nucleation of the hexagonal, close-packed phase, which generated a high density of stacking faults along the [110] and [1̅10] directions.

  14. Exact Dynamic Support Tracking with Multiple Measurement Vectors using Compressive MUSIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jong Min; Ye, Jong Chul

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic tracking of sparse targets has been one of the important topics in array signal processing. Recently, compressed sensing (CS) approaches have been extensively investigated as a new tool for this problem using partial support information obtained by exploiting temporal redundancy. However, most of these approaches are formulated under single measurement vector compressed sensing (SMV-CS) framework, where the performance guarantees are only in a probabilistic manner. The main contribution of this paper is to allow \\textit{deterministic} tracking of time varying supports with multiple measurement vectors (MMV) by exploiting multi-sensor diversity. In particular, we show that a novel compressive MUSIC (CS-MUSIC) algorithm with optimized partial support selection not only allows removal of inaccurate portion of previous support estimation but also enables addition of newly emerged part of unknown support. Numerical results confirm the theory.

  15. Study on heat under dynamic loading of rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Igumenova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies on heat buildup in tire rubber surface scan method samples using a thermal imaging camera. Investigated the exothermic chemical reaction mechanical destruction rubber when loading designs permanent cyclic stretching with deformation of the working zone 50%. Percentage of deformation of the working zone was chosen on the basis of the actual data on the stretch-compression zone "Rusk" tires, which is the maximum level difference of deformation during run-in. Experiment plan provided for periodic relaxation samples of at least 72 hours for more accurate simulation of operation process of structural products. Created and processed data on temperature changes in samples for bar and line profile for rubber compounds with the introduction of nanomodificator (fullerene-containing technical carbon in comparison with the control sample without him. The data obtained reflect the nature of heat depending on the composition of the compound. Identified common patterns of thermal nature of physicochemical process mechanical destruction rubbers. For rubber with nanomodifikatorom there has been an increase in the temperature interval reaction from a minimum to a maximum 2 degrees that is also linked to the rise in the average temperature of the reaction on the histogram also at 2-3 degrees of deformation under the same conditions and the level of cyclic loading. However, the temperature in the control sample that is associated with the beginning of the formation of hardened rubber structures, economies of Mallinza-Petrikeeva, occurs with delay twice compared with modified Fullerenes. Measurement of physic-mechanical indicators selected in the course of testing of samples showed the beginning of formation of structure with increased strength of samples in the sample temperature zone that corresponds to the thermal effect of èndotermičeskomu recombination reactions of macromolecules.

  16. Timoshenko beam-column with generalized end conditions on elastic foundation: Dynamic-stiffness matrix and load vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda-Monsalve, Luis G.; Zapata-Medina, David G.; Aristizabal-Ochoa, J. Darío

    2008-03-01

    The dynamic-stiffness matrix and load vector of a Timoshenko beam-column resting on a two-parameter elastic foundation with generalized end conditions are presented. The proposed model includes the frequency effects on the stiffness matrix and load vector as well as the coupling effects of: (1) bending and shear deformations along the member; (2) translational and rotational lumped masses at both ends; (3) translational and rotational masses uniformly distributed along its span; (3) axial load (tension or compression) applied at both ends; and (4) shear forces along the span induced by the applied axial load as the beam deforms according to the "modified shear equation" proposed by Timoshenko. The dynamic analyses of framed structures can be performed by including the effects of the imposed frequency ( ω>0) on the dynamic-stiffness matrix and load vector while the static and stability analyses can be carried out by making the frequency ω=0. The proposed model and corresponding dynamic-stiffness matrix and load vector represent a general solution capable to solve, just by using a single segment per element, the static, dynamic and stability analyses of any elastic framed structure made of prismatic beam-columns with semi-rigid connections resting on two-parameter elastic foundations. Analytical results indicate that the elastic behavior of framed structures made of beam-columns is frequency dependent and highly sensitive to the coupling effects just mentioned. Three comprehensive examples are presented to show the capacities and validity of the proposed method and the obtained results are compared with the finite element method and other analytical approaches.

  17. Multichannel Dynamic-Range Compression Using Digital Frequency Warping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Hoberg Arehart

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A multichannel dynamic-range compressor system using digital frequency warping is described. A frequency-warped filter is realized by replacing the filter unit delays with all-pass filters. The appropriate design of the frequency warping gives a nonuniform frequency representation very close to the auditory Bark scale. The warped compressor is shown to have substantially reduced group delay in comparison with a conventional design having comparable frequency resolution. The warped compressor, however, has more delay at low than at high frequencies, which can lead to perceptible changes in the signal. The detection threshold for the compressor group delay was determined as a function of the number of all-pass filter sections in cascade needed for a detectible change in signal quality. The test signals included clicks, vowels, and speech, and results are presented for both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects. Thresholds for clicks are lower than thresholds for vowels, and hearing-impaired subjects have higher thresholds than normal-hearing listeners. A frequency-warped compressor using a cascade of 31 all-pass filter sections offers a combination of low overall delay, good frequency resolution, and imperceptible frequency-dependent delay effects for most listening conditions.

  18. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  19. Dynamic performance of slender suspension footbridges under eccentric walking dynamic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Hui; Thambiratnam, David P.; Perera, Nimal J.

    2007-06-01

    This paper treats the vibration of slender suspension footbridges caused by eccentrically distributed walking dynamic loads. A suspension footbridge model with reverse profiled cables in both the vertical and horizontal planes was used in this conceptual study, while SAP2000 package is adopted in the numerical analysis. The dynamic behaviour of slender footbridges under walking dynamic loads is simulated by resonant vibration caused by synchronous excitations. It is found that slender suspension footbridges with shallow cable profiles often have coupled vibration modes such as coupled lateral-torsional or coupled torsional-lateral modes. When these coupled vibration modes are excited by walking pedestrians, excessive lateral vibration can be induced. Results also show that the effects of the reverse profiled cables on the dynamic performance in different vibration modes are complex. Reverse profiled cables in the horizontal plane can significantly suppress the lateral vibration in coupled lateral-torsional modes, but slightly increase the lateral vibration in coupled torsional-lateral modes.

  20. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  1. Constitutive modelling and multiaxial testing of concrete under non proportional compressive loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzaiene, A.; Massicotte, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Mecanique

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program was conducted to calibrate and validate an analytical model, and to determine some characteristics of the behaviour of concrete under increasing lateral confinement. A three-dimensional constitutive relation based on hypoelastic theory was developed for plain concrete under both monotonic and non-proportional loading, taking into account the effect of increasing confinement on the transition of failure mechanisms from brittle to ductile degradation under cyclic loading. The stress-strain responses predicted by the model were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, and the constitutive relationship was found to apply well for various loading conditions. Based on these results the model was considered to offer a good compromise between simplicity and accuracy for unified constitutive models for plain concrete. 13 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  2. Loads and Structural Dynamics Requirements for Spaceflight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenneth P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish requirements relating to the loads and structural dynamics technical discipline for NASA and commercial spaceflight launch vehicle and spacecraft hardware. Requirements are defined for the development of structural design loads and recommendations regarding methodologies and practices for the conduct of load analyses are provided. As such, this document represents an implementation of NASA STD-5002. Requirements are also defined for structural mathematical model development and verification to ensure sufficient accuracy of predicted responses. Finally, requirements for model/data delivery and exchange are specified to facilitate interactions between Launch Vehicle Providers (LVPs), Spacecraft Providers (SCPs), and the NASA Technical Authority (TA) providing insight/oversight and serving in the Independent Verification and Validation role. In addition to the analysis-related requirements described above, a set of requirements are established concerning coupling phenomena or other interaction between structural dynamics and aerodynamic environments or control or propulsion system elements. Such requirements may reasonably be considered structure or control system design criteria, since good engineering practice dictates consideration of and/or elimination of the identified conditions in the development of those subsystems. The requirements are included here, however, to ensure that such considerations are captured in the design space for launch vehicles (LV), spacecraft (SC) and the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). The requirements in this document are focused on analyses to be performed to develop data needed to support structural verification. As described in JSC 65828, Structural Design Requirements and Factors of Safety for Spaceflight Hardware, implementation of the structural verification requirements is expected to be described in a Structural Verification Plan (SVP), which should describe the verification of each

  3. Performance analysis of dynamic load balancing algorithm for multiprocessor interconnection network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.U. Bokhari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiprocessor interconnection network have become powerful parallel computing system for real-time applications. Nowadays the many researchers posses studies on the dynamic load balancing in multiprocessor system. Load balancing is the method of dividing the total load among the processors of the distributed system to progress task's response time as well as resource utilization whereas ignoring a condition where few processors are overloaded or underloaded or moderately loaded. However, in dynamic load balancing algorithm presumes no priori information about behaviour of tasks or the global state of the system. There are numerous issues while designing an efficient dynamic load balancing algorithm that involves utilization of system, amount of information transferred among processors, selection of tasks for migration, load evaluation, comparison of load levels and many more. This paper enlightens the performance analysis on dynamic load balancing strategy (DLBS algorithm, used for hypercube network in multiprocessor system.

  4. Influence of loading pulse duration on dynamic load transfer in a simulated granular medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, A.; Sadd, M. H.; Xu, Y.; Tai, Q. M.

    1993-11-01

    AN EXPERIMENTAL and numerical investigation was conducted to study the dynamic response of granular media when subjected to impact loadings with different periods or wavelengths. The granular medium was simulated by a one-dimensional assembly of circular disks arranged in a straight single chain. In the experimental study, the dynamic loading was produced using projectile impact from a gas gun onto one end of the granular assembly, and the measured wave signal was collected using strain gages. The numerical simulations were conducted using the distinct element method. It was found from the experiments and numerical simulations that input waves with a short period (τ ≈ 90 μs) will propagate in this granular medium with little waveform change under steady amplitude attenuation ; whereas longer waves (τ $̆200 μs) will propagate with significant waveform dispersion. For these longer wavelength signals, the smooth waveform will undergo separation into a series of short oscillatory signals, and this rearrangement of energy allows a portion of the transmitted signal to increase in amplitude during the initial phases of propagation. Thus the granular medium acts as a nonlinear wave guide, and local microstructure and contact nonlinearity will allow input signals of sufficiently long wavelength to excite resonant sub-units of the medium to produce this observed ringing separation. Following a modeling scheme originally proposed by NESTERENKO[J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 5,733 (1983)], a nonlinear wave equation model was developed which is related to soliton dynamics and leads to travelling wave solutions of specific wavelength found in our experimental and numerical studies.

  5. Penetrating annulus fibrosus injuries affect dynamic compressive behaviors of the intervertebral disc via altered fluid flow: an analytical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Arthur J; Iatridis, James C

    2011-08-01

    Extensive experimental work on the effects of penetrating annular injuries indicated that large injuries impact axial compressive properties of small animal intervertebral discs, yet there is some disagreement regarding the sensitivity of mechanical tests to small injury sizes. In order to understand the mechanism of injury size sensitivity, this study proposed a simple one dimensional model coupling elastic deformations in the annulus with fluid flow into and out of the nucleus through both porous boundaries and through a penetrating annular injury. The model was evaluated numerically in dynamic compression with parameters obtained by fitting the solution to experimental stress-relaxation data. The model predicted low sensitivity of mechanical changes to injury diameter at both small and large sizes (as measured by low and high ratios of injury diameter to annulus thickness), with a narrow range of high sensitivity in between. The size at which axial mechanics were most sensitive to injury size (i.e., critical injury size) increased with loading frequency. This study provides a quantitative hypothetical model of how penetrating annulus fibrosus injuries in discs with a gelatinous nucleus pulposus may alter disc mechanics by changing nucleus pulposus fluid pressurization through introduction of a new fluid transport pathway though the annulus. This model also explains how puncture-induced biomechanical changes depend on both injury size and test protocol.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamic Wave Loading by a Compressible Two-Phase Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, R.; Loots, G.E.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    2006-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hydrodynamic wave loading on different types of offshore structures is important to predict forces on and water motion around these structures. This paper presents a numerical study of the effects of two-phase flow on an offshore structure subject to breaking waves. The

  7. Numerical simulation of hydrodynamic wave loading by a compressible two-phase flow method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, Rik; Luppes, Roelf; Veldman, Arthur; Bunnik, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamic wave loading on and in offshore structures is studied by carrying out numerical simulations. Particular attention is paid to complex hydrodynamic phenomena such as wave breaking and air entrapment. The applied CFD method, ComFLOW, solves the Navier–Stokes equations with an improved Volu

  8. Parallel Cellular Automata-based simulation of laser dynamics using dynamic load balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guisado, J.L.; Fernández de Vega, F.; Jiménez Morales, F.; Iskra, K.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Garnica, Ó.

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze the feasibility of executing a parallel bioinspired model of laser dynamics on a heterogeneous non-dedicated cluster, we evaluate its performance including artificial load to simulate other tasks or jobs submitted by other users. As the model is based on a synchronous cellular

  9. Parallel Cellular Automata-based simulation of laser dynamics using dynamic load balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guisado, J.L.; Fernández de Vega, F.; Jiménez Morales, F.; Iskra, K.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Garnica, Ó.

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze the feasibility of executing a parallel bioinspired model of laser dynamics on a heterogeneous non-dedicated cluster, we evaluate its performance including artificial load to simulate other tasks or jobs submitted by other users. As the model is based on a synchronous cellular au

  10. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  11. Dynamic Range Enhancement of High-Speed Electrical Signal Data via Non-Linear Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, Matthew C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for high-speed compression of dynamic electrical signal waveforms to extend the measuring capabilities of conventional measuring devices such as oscilloscopes and high-speed data acquisition systems are discussed. Transfer function components and algorithmic transfer functions can be used to accurately measure signals that are within the frequency bandwidth but beyond the voltage range and voltage resolution capabilities of the measuring device.

  12. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...... to 700 sec-1. The results are compared with the CEB Model Code and the Spilt Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique is briefly de-scribed....

  13. Effect of thermal residual stresses on yielding behavior under tensile or compressive loading of short fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁向东; 连建设; 江中浩; 孙军

    2001-01-01

    Using large strain two-dimension axisymmetric elasto-plastic finite element method and the modified law of mixture, the effects of thermal residual stresses on the yielding behavior of short fiber reinforced metal matrix composite and their dependencies on the material structure parameters (fiber volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio and fiber end distance) were studied. It is demonstrated that the stress-strain partition parameter can be used to describe the stress transfer from the matrix to the fiber. The variation of the second derivation of the stress-strain partition parameter can be used to determine the elastic modulus, the proportion limit, the initial and final yield strengths. In the presence of thermal residual stress, these yielding properties are asymmetric and are influenced differently by the material structure parameters under tensile and compressive loadings.

  14. A STUDY OF SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES OF HUMERUS BY DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATE OSTEOSYNTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the fractures, mechanism of injury, union rates and functional results of humeral shaft fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation with dynamic compression plate. RESULTS: In present study, 25 patients of diaphyseal fractures of humerus, surgically managed by dynamic compression plate & screws, between O ctober 2012 to S eptember 2014 in government general hospital attached to kurnool medical college were included. The average age of the patient is 38.9 years, road traffic accidents being the most common mode of accident with 72%, middle third fractures were commonest with 80%, transverse fractures were the commonest with 52%, anterolateral approach was used in 88%, union achieved in 88% with mean time for union 15.56 weeks, iatrogenic radial nerve palsy in 4%, postoperative infection in 4%, full range of movements in 80%, with 8% nonunion . CONCLUSION : By the analysis of the data collected in the present study, dynamic compression plate & screws remains the implant of choice in the management of diaphyseal fractures of humerus.

  15. Structural Dynamics of Materials under Shock Compression Investigated with Synchrotron Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Ichiyanagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing material dynamics in non-equilibrium states is a current challenge in material and physical sciences. Combining laser and X-ray pulse sources enables the material dynamics in non-equilibrium conditions to be directly monitored. In this article, we review our nanosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies with 100-ps X-ray pulses from synchrotron radiation concerning the dynamics of structural phase transitions in non-equilibrium high-pressure conditions induced by laser shock compression. The time evolution of structural deformation of single crystals, polycrystals, and glass materials was investigated. In a single crystal of cadmium sulfide, the expected phase transition was not induced within 10 ns at a peak pressure of 3.92 GPa, and an over-compressed structure was formed. In a polycrystalline sample of Y2O3 stabilized tetragonal zirconia, reversible phase transitions between tetragonal and monoclinic phases occur within 20 ns under laser-induced compression and release processes at a peak pressure of 9.8 GPa. In polycrystalline bismuth, a sudden transition from Bi-I to Bi-V phase occurs within approximately 5 ns at 11 GPa, and sequential V–III–II–I phase transitions occur within 30 ns during the pressure release process. In fused silica shocked at 3.5 GPa, an intermediate-range structural change in the nonlinear elastic region was observed.

  16. Experimental study on energy absorption of foam filled kraft paper honeycomb subjected to quasi-static uniform compression loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Kadir, N.; Aminanda, Y.; Ibrahim, M. S.; Mokhtar, H.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of factor and to obtain the optimum configuration of Kraft paper honeycomb. The factors considered in this study include density of paper, thickness of paper and cell size of honeycomb. Based on three level factorial design, two-factor interaction model (2FI) was developed to correlate the factors with specific energy absorption and specific compression strength. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA), the most influential factor on responses and the optimum configuration was identified. After that, Kraft paper honeycomb with optimum configuration is used to fabricate foam-filled paper honeycomb with five different densities of polyurethane foam as filler (31.8, 32.7, 44.5, 45.7, 52 kg/m3). The foam-filled paper honeycomb is subjected to quasi-static compression loading. Failure mechanism of the foam-filled honeycomb was identified, analyzed and compared with the unfilled paper honeycomb. The peak force and energy absorption capability of foam-filled paper honeycomb are increased up to 32% and 30%, respectively, compared to the summation of individual components.

  17. Particle and gaseous emissions from compressed natural gas and ultralow sulphur diesel-fuelled buses at four steady engine loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, E R; Ristovski, Z D; Meyer, N; Morawska, L

    2009-04-01

    Exhaust emissions from thirteen compressed natural gas (CNG) and nine ultralow sulphur diesel in-service transport buses were monitored on a chassis dynamometer. Measurements were carried out at idle and at three steady engine loads of 25%, 50% and 100% of maximum power at a fixed speed of 60 km h(-1). Emission factors were estimated for particle mass and number, carbon dioxide and oxides of nitrogen for two types of CNG buses (Scania and MAN, compatible with Euro 2 and 3 emission standards, respectively) and two types of diesel buses (Volvo Pre-Euro/Euro1 and Mercedez OC500 Euro3). All emission factors increased with load. The median particle mass emission factor for the CNG buses was less than 1% of that from the diesel buses at all loads. However, the particle number emission factors did not show a statistically significant difference between buses operating on the two types of fuel. In this paper, for the very first time, particle number emission factors are presented at four steady state engine loads for CNG buses. Median values ranged from the order of 10(12) particles min(-)(1) at idle to 10(15) particles km(-)(1) at full power. Most of the particles observed in the CNG emissions were in the nanoparticle size range and likely to be composed of volatile organic compounds The CO2 emission factors were about 20% to 30% greater for the diesel buses over the CNG buses, while the oxides of nitrogen emission factors did not show any difference due to the large variation between buses.

  18. The Effects of Hearing Aid Compression Parameters on the Short-Term Dynamic Range of Continuous Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Rebecca L. Warner; Bentler, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and quantitatively model the independent and interactive effects of compression ratio, number of compression channels, and release time on the dynamic range of continuous speech. Method: A CD of the Rainbow Passage (J. E. Bernthal & N. W. Bankson, 1993) was used. The hearing aid was a…

  19. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  20. Engineered particles demonstrate improved flow properties at elevated drug loadings for direct compression manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trementozzi, Andrea N; Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Irdam, Erwin; Lin, Yiqing; MacPhee, J Michael; Boulas, Pierre; Karki, Shyam B; Zawaneh, Peter N

    2017-05-15

    Optimizing powder flow and compaction properties are critical for ensuring a robust tablet manufacturing process. The impact of flow and compaction properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) becomes progressively significant for higher drug load formulations, and for scaling up manufacturing processes. This study demonstrated that flow properties of a powder blend can be improved through API particle engineering, without critically impacting blend tabletability at elevated drug loadings. In studying a jet milled API (D50=24μm) and particle engineered wet milled API (D50=70μm and 90μm), flow functions of all API lots were similarly poor despite the vast difference in average particle size (ffc10) compared with the jet milled API blends. Investigation of the compaction properties of both wet and jet milled powder blends also revealed that both jet and wet milled material produced robust tablets at the drug loadings used. The ability to practically demonstrate this uncommon observation that similarly poor flowing APIs can lead to a marked difference upon blending is important for pharmaceutical development. It is especially important in early phase development during API selection, and is advantageous particularly when material-sparing techniques are utilized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Dynamic Behaviors of Single Crystal RDX Under Ramp Wave Loading to 15GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Cai, Jintao; Zhao, Jianheng; Zhao, Feng; Wu, Gang; Tan, Fuli; Sun, Chengwei

    Based on high pulsed power generator CQ-4, the single crystal RDX explosive was researched along different crystal orientations under ramp wave loadings up to 15 GPa. The typical three-wave structures were obtained by means of laser interferometry PDV, which show the elastic-plastic transition and α to γ phase transition. The ramp elastic limit (REL) and yield strength of RDX along 210 and 100 crystal orientations were respectively calculated and the resuts show obvious effects of crystal orientaions for RDX. The ramp elastic limit σIEL of RDX along 210 orientation is 0.688-0.758GPa, and the σIEL of RDX along 100 is 1.039 -1.110 GPa. The α to γ phase transformation characteristics were also analyzed based on the experimental data. The initial phase transition pressure for the two crystal orientation of RDX are about 3.5 to 4 GPa, which agree well with the data of about 4-5GPa given by MD simulation. The data directly validate the results given by Raman Spectrum under shock compression and static high pressure, which couldn't be observed by wave profiles. The experimental data can be used to verify and validate the new models of RDX under dynamic loading. Supported by NSFC of China under Contract No.11327803 and 11176002

  2. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  3. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  4. Chemical reactivity of the compressed noble gas atoms and their reactivity dynamics during collisions with protons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Chattaraj; B Maiti; U Sarkar

    2003-06-01

    Attempts are made to gain insights into the effect of confinement of noble gas atoms on their various reactivity indices. Systems become harder, less polarizable and difficult to excite as the compression increases. Ionization also causes similar effects. A quantum fluid density functional technique is adopted in order to study the dynamics of reactivity parameters during a collision between protons and He atoms in different electronic states for various projectile velocities and impact parameters. Dynamical variants of the principles of maximum hardness, minimum polarizability and maximum entropy are found to be operative.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation on the buckling behavior of GaN nanowires under uniaxial compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is one of the most promising methods for investigating the mechanical behavior of nanostructures, such as nanowires and nanotubes. Atomistic simulations are performed to investigate the buckling properties of [001], [11¯0] and [110] oriented GaN nanowires under uniaxial compression, these three types of nanowires correspond to experimentally synthesized nanowires. The effects of simulation temperature, and wire length on the buckling behavior are investigated. The simulation results show that critical stress decreases with the increase of wire length, which is in agreement with the Euler theory. Buckling occurs as a result of dynamic processes, buckling strain (and corresponding stress) decreases as temperature is increased.

  6. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  7. Aggregated Residential Load Modeling Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai

    2014-09-28

    Abstract—It is already obvious that the future power grid will have to address higher demand for power and energy, and to incorporate renewable resources of different energy generation patterns. Demand response (DR) schemes could successfully be used to manage and balance power supply and demand under operating conditions of the future power grid. To achieve that, more advanced tools for DR management of operations and planning are necessary that can estimate the available capacity from DR resources. In this research, a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is derived, trained, and tested that can model aggregated load of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems. DBNs can provide flexible and powerful tools for both operations and planing, due to their unique analytical capabilities. The DBN model accuracy and flexibility of use is demonstrated by testing the model under different operational scenarios.

  8. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures’ biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption.

  9. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fushing

    Full Text Available High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS, and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors.

  10. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors.

  11. DECREASING OF MECHANISMS DYNAMIC LOADING AT THE TRANSIENT STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Loveikin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is necessary to select modes of motion to reduce the dynamic loads in the mechanisms. This choice should be made on optimization basis. The purpose of research is to study methods of synthesis regimes of mechanisms and machines motion that provide optimal modes of movement for terminal and integral criteria. Methodology. For research the one-mass dynamic model of the mechanism has been used. As optimization criteria the terminal and comprehensive integral criteria were used. The stated optimization problem has been solved using dynamic programming and variational calculation. The direct variation method, which allowed finding only approximate solution of the original problem of optimal control, has been used as well. Findings. The ways of ensuring the absolute minimum of terminal criterion have been set for each method of problem solving. The stated characteristics show softness changes of kinematic functions during braking of mechanism. They point to the absolute minimum of adopted terminal criterion in the calculation. Originality. It is necessary to introduce new variables in the system equations during the solving of optimal control problems using dynamic programming to achieve an absolute minimum of terminal criteria. In general, to achieve a minimum of n-order terminal criterion an optimization problem should find relatively (n+1-th order function. When optimization problems is solving by variational calculation in order to ensure a minimization of n-th order terminal criterion by selecting the appropriate boundary conditions, it is necessary to solve the Euler-Poisson 2(n+1-th order equation (subject to symmetric setting boundary conditions. It is a necessary condition for an extremum of the functional with the (n+1-th order integrant. Practical value. Minimizing of adopted terminal criterion in the calculation allows eliminate the brunt in kinematic gearing of mechanisms, which increases their operational life. In addition

  12. An Efficient and Scalable Content Based Dynamic Load Balancing Using Multiparameters on Load Aware Distributed Multi-Cluster Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N.Anitha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, more people are accessing the internet service for their daily activities. This dramatically increases requirement of server utilization, bandwidth requirement and resource availability. To serve this, cluster servers are used. But as number of users increases , several challenges are faced by cluster servers like congestion, delay in serving the request, load balancing ,heterogeneity and complexity of services. The existing dynamic load balancing does not scale up the performance in an Distributed heterogeneous environment. To avoid this, we propose an efficient and scalable content based Dynamic Load Balancing using multi parameters on load aware distributed multi-cluster servers. In this paper ,because of heterogeneity the Dynamic Load Balancing takes place based on client request category and dynamically estimating server workload using multi parameters like queue size, processing speed , bandwidth utilization etc on distributed multi clustered servers. Our simulation results shows that, the proposed method dynamically andefficiently balance the load to scale up the services , reducing response time, throughput on clustered servers.

  13. Failure Loads for Model Adhesive Joints Subjected to Tension, Compression or Torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-25

    014’ 61SCRT LSSPCTO PTI PGQUu aem V4TV CLASWtPICATI@ OF ThIS PASS (3h urO & Weee Measurements have been made of the failure loads under finston, cowlpres...Tech. Center Silver Spring, MD 20910 Code D Indian Head, MD 20640 Dr. T.D. Austin 1 Naval Surface Weapons Center Mr. C.L. Adams Code R16 Naval Ordnance...Station White Oak Laboratory Code 5253 Silver Spring, MD 20910 Indian Head, MD 20640 Mr. G.L. Mackenzie 1 Dr. William Tolles Naval Surface Weapons Center

  14. Loading Rate Effects on the One-Dimensional Compressibility of Four Partially Saturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    OF FUNDING NUMBERS See reverse PROGRAM IPROJECT ITASK IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. 1NO. NO ACCESSION NO 1i rITLE (include SeCUrit ClaMfireme~n) Loading Rate...AOaa (2K - 4G ) Er (3-2) where: Aaa= change in axial stress K = bulk modulus of the soil G = shear modulus of the soil Since the change in axial...ratio of decrease in axial stress to radial stress, which he called the fractional error and expressed as: G-2 = (2K - 4G ) = (M - 2G) (3-3) Or 2Gst

  15. Accelerating PS model-based dynamic cardiac MRI using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Xie, Guoxi; Shi, Caiyun; Su, Shi; Zhang, Yongqin; Liu, Xin; Qiu, Bensheng

    2016-02-01

    High spatiotemporal resolution MRI is a challenging topic in dynamic MRI field. Partial separability (PS) model has been successfully applied to dynamic cardiac MRI by exploiting data redundancy. However, the model requires substantial preprocessing data to accurately estimate the model parameters before image reconstruction. Since compressed sensing (CS) is a potential technique to accelerate MRI by reducing the number of acquired data, the combination of PS and CS, named as Stepped-SparsePS, was introduced to accelerate the preprocessing data acquisition of PS in this work. The proposed Stepped-SparsePS method sequentially reconstructs a set of aliased dynamic images in each channel based on PS model and then the final dynamic images from the aliased images using CS. The results from numerical simulations and in vivo experiments demonstrate that Stepped-SparsePS could significantly reduce data acquisition time while preserving high spatiotemporal resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic recrystallization and precipitation in high manganese austenitic stainless steel during hot compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir Momeni; Shahab Kazemi; Golam Ebrahimi; Alireza Maldar

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic recrystallization and precipitation in a high manganese austenitic stainless steel were investigated by hot compression tests over temperatures of 950-1150°C at strain rates of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. All the flow curves within the studied deformation regimes were typ-ical of dynamic recrystallization. A window was constructed to determine the value of apparent activation energy as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature. The kinetics of dynamic recrystallization was analyzed using the Avrami kinetics equation. A range of apparent activation energy for hot deformation from 303 kJ/mol to 477 kJ/mol is obtained at different deformation regimes. Microscopic characterization confirms that under a certain deformation condition (medium Zener-Hollomon parameter (Z) values), dynamic recrystalliza-tion appears at first, but large particles can not inhibit the recrystallization. At low or high Z values, dynamic recrystallization may occur be-fore dynamic precipitation and proceeds faster. In both cases, secondary phase precipitation is observed along prior austenite grain bounda-ries. Stress relaxation tests at the same deformation temperatures also confirm the possibility of dynamic precipitation. Unexpectedly, the Avrami's exponent value increases with the increase of Z value. It is associated with the priority of dynamic recrystallization to dynamic pre-cipitation at higher Z values.

  17. The buckling of FGM truncated conical shells subjected to axial compressive load and resting on Winkler-Pasternak foundations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofiyev, A.H., E-mail: asofiyev@mmf.sdu.edu.t [Department of Civil Engineering, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, the buckling analysis of the simply supported truncated conical shell made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) is presented. The FGM truncated conical shell subjected to an axial compressive load and resting on Winkler-Pasternak type elastic foundations. The material properties of functionally graded shells are assumed to vary continuously through the thickness. The modified Donnell type stability and compatibility equations are solved by Galerkin's method and the critical axial load of FGM truncated conical shells with and without elastic foundations have been found analytically. The appropriate formulas for homogenous and FGM cylindrical shells with and without elastic foundations are found as a special case. Several examples are presented to show the accuracy and efficiency of the formulation. Finally, parametric studies on the buckling of FGM truncated conical and cylindrical shells on elastic foundations are being investigated. These parameters include; power-law and exponential distributions of FGM, Winkler foundation modulus, Pasternak foundation modulus and aspect ratios of shells.

  18. A non-linear homogeneous model for bone-like materials under compressive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, M; Voide, R; de Bien, C; Freichels, H; Jérôme, C; Léonard, A; Toye, D; Müller, R; van Lenthe, G H; Ponthot, J P

    2012-02-01

    Finite element (FE) models accurately compute the mechanical response of bone and bone-like materials when the models include their detailed microstructure. In order to simulate non-linear behavior, which currently is only feasible at the expense of extremely high computational costs, coarser models can be used if the local morphology has been linked to the apparent mechanical behavior. The aim of this paper is to implement and validate such a constitutive law. This law is able to capture the non-linear structural behavior of bone-like materials through the use of fabric tensors. It also allows for irreversible strains using an elastoplastic material model incorporating hardening. These features are expressed in a constitutive law based on the anisotropic continuum damage theory coupled with isotropic elastoplasticity in a finite strain framework. This material model was implemented into metafor (LTAS-MNNL, University of Liège, Belgium), a non-linear FE software. The implementation was validated against experimental data of cylindrical samples subjected to compression. Three materials with bone-like microstructure were tested: aluminum foams of variable density (ERG, Oakland, CA, USA), polylactic acid foam (CERM, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium), and cancellous bone tissue of a deer antler (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium).

  19. INFLUENCE OF UTILIZED LOAD OF DRIVE OF COMPRESSING STATION UPON PARAMETERS OF GTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abrazovski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today it is required to use secondary energy resources (STR, which we have in gas-transport system of the country, more efficiently. In this system (STR smoke gases of gas transforming aggregates with turbogas drive installations are presented primarily.For using STR of turbogas drives it is necessary to forecast heat exchange equipment installation, this causes the growth of aerodynamic resistance of exhaust channel. This influences on all plant’s work. It was experimentally proved that the usage of utilized equipment influences upon increasing  of power efficiency. For this reason the perturbation method was used, which allow to determine rate of influence. Convenience of this method is that the solution can be obtained in the form of evident analytical dependence and it does not depend on formulated problem, number of variable and definite relations between them.Using the perturbation method influence efficiency was obtained, which influences on exhaust channel resistance changes and as a result changes power efficiency and in the whole plant’s efficiency. Besides, in this article the dependence of influence efficiency from stating parameters of cycle was presented in graphs: temperature of burning products before turbine and air compression.

  20. Influence of the Saturation Ratio on Concrete Behavior under Triaxial Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Dung Vu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When a concrete structure is subjected to an impact, the material is subjected to high triaxial compressive stresses. Furthermore, the water saturation ratio in massive concrete structures may reach nearly 100% at the core, whereas the material dries quickly on the skin. The impact response of a massive concrete wall may thus depend on the state of water saturation in the material. This paper presents some triaxial tests performed at a maximum confining pressure of 600 MPa on concrete representative of a nuclear power plant containment building. Experimental results show the concrete constitutive behavior and its dependence on the water saturation ratio. It is observed that as the degree of saturation increases, a decrease in the volumetric strains as well as in the shear strength is observed. The coupled PRM constitutive model does not accurately reproduce the response of concrete specimens observed during the test. The differences between experimental and numerical results can be explained by both the influence of the saturation state of concrete and the effect of deviatoric stresses, which are not accurately taken into account. The PRM model was modified in order to improve the numerical prediction of concrete behavior under high stresses at various saturation states.

  1. Study of the interrelation between the electrotechnical parameters of the plasma focus discharge circuit and the plasma compression dynamics on the PF-3 and PF-1000 facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrkn@inbox.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz-vi@nrcki.ru, E-mail: vkrauz@yandex.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Grabovski, E. V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Myalton, V. V.; Vinogradov, V. P. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Paduch, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (Poland); Scholz, M. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Karpiński, L. [Łukasiewicz University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering (Poland)

    2015-05-15

    The main stages of the plasma current sheath (PCS) dynamics on two plasma focus (PF) facilities with different geometries of the electrode system, PF-3 (Filippov type) and PF-1000 (Mather type), were studied by analyzing the results of the current and voltage measurements. Some dynamic characteristics, such as the PCS velocity in the acceleration phase in the Mather-type facility (PF-1000), the moment at which the PCS reaches the anode end, and the plasma velocity in the radial stage of plasma compression in the PF-3 Filippov-type facility, were determined from the time dependence of the inductance of the discharge circuit with a dynamic plasma load. The energy characteristics of the discharge circuit of the compressing PCS were studied for different working gases (deuterium, argon, and neon) at initial pressures of 1.5–3 Torr in discharges with energies of 0.3–0.6 MJ. In experiments with deuterium, correlation between the neutron yield and the electromagnetic energy deposited directly in the compressed PCS was investigated.

  2. Dynamic Loads Due to Synchronized Movements of People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S.O.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2002-01-01

    , and the paper focus on the load harmonics determining the load effects o f synchronized movements. The Jack of load correlation is determined by correlation coefficients, which are specified as fimetion o f the load harmonic considered. The model is calibrated to measured data and simplified procedures...

  3. Continuous Compressed Sensing for Surface Dynamical Processes with Helium Atom Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex; Tamtögl, Anton; Calvo-Almazán, Irene; Hansen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques are used to measure and reconstruct surface dynamical processes with a helium spin-echo spectrometer for the first time. Helium atom scattering is a well established method for examining the surface structure and dynamics of materials at atomic sized resolution and the spin-echo technique opens up the possibility of compressing the data acquisition process. CS methods demonstrating the compressibility of spin-echo spectra are presented for several measurements. Recent developments on structured multilevel sampling that are empirically and theoretically shown to substantially improve upon the state of the art CS techniques are implemented. In addition, wavelet based CS approximations, founded on a new continuous CS approach, are used to construct continuous spectra. In order to measure both surface diffusion and surface phonons, which appear usually on different energy scales, standard CS techniques are not sufficient. However, the new continuous CS wavelet approach allows simultaneous analysis of surface phonons and molecular diffusion while reducing acquisition times substantially. The developed methodology is not exclusive to Helium atom scattering and can also be applied to other scattering frameworks such as neutron spin-echo and Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Anomalous dynamics of the extremely compressed magnetosphere during 21 January 2005 magnetic storm

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V; Chao, J -K; Wang, C B; Rastaetter, L; Panasyuk, M I; Lazutin, L L; Kovtyukh, A S; Veselovsky, I S; Myagkova, I N

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of the dayside magnetosphere and proton radiation belt was analyzed during unusual magnetic storm on 21 January 2005. We have found that during the storm from 1712 to 2400 UT, the subsolar magnetopause was continuously located inside geosynchronous orbit due to strong compression. The compression was found to be extremely strong from 1846 to 2035 UT when the dense plasma of fast erupting filament produced the solar wind dynamic pressure Pd peaked up to >100 nPa and, in the first time, the upstream solar wind was observed at geosynchronous orbit during almost 2 hours. Under the extreme compression, the outer magnetosphere at L > 5 was pushed inward and the outer radiation belt particles with energies of several tens of keV moved earthward, became adiabatically accelerated and accumulated in the inner magnetosphere at L 20%, which is well appropriate for erupting filaments and which is in agreement with the upper 27% threshold for the He/H ratio obtained from Cluster measurements.

  5. Using compressibility factor as a predictor of confined hard-sphere fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Jeetain

    2009-10-22

    We study the correlations between the diffusivity (or viscosity) and the compressibility factor of bulk hard-sphere fluid as predicted by the ultralocal limit of the barrier hopping theory. Our specific aim is to determine if these correlations observed in the bulk equilibrium hard-sphere fluid can be used to predict the self-diffusivity of fluid confined between a slit-pore or a rectangular channel. In this work, we consider a single-component and a binary mixture of hard spheres. To represent confining walls, we use purely reflecting hard walls and interacting square-well walls. Our results clearly show that the correspondence between the diffusivity and the compressibility factor can be used along with the knowledge of the confined fluid's compressibility factor to predict its diffusivity with quantitative accuracy. Our analysis also suggests that a simple measure, the average fluid density, can be an accurate predictor of confined fluid diffusivity for very tight confinements ( approximately 2-3 particle diameters wide) at low to intermediate density conditions. Together, these results provide further support for the idea that one can use robust connections between thermodynamic and dynamic quantities to predict dynamics of confined fluids from their thermodynamics.

  6. Comparison of limited-contact dynamic compression plate and locking compression plate constructs for proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis in the horse

    OpenAIRE

    Rocconi, Richard A.; Carmalt, James L.; Sampson, Sarah N.; Elder, Steve H.; Gilbert, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared in vitro monotonic and cyclic mechanical properties of equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodeses stabilized using an open or closed technique combined with axial 4.5 mm narrow limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) or 4.5 mm narrow locking compression plate (LCP). Ten forelimb pairs were randomly assigned to LCP or LC-DCP groups. One limb in each pair was assigned to either open or closed technique. Limbs were tested for cyclic fatigue at 20 000 cycles ...

  7. Numerical analysis of two pile caps with sockets embedded, subject the eccentric compression load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Delalibera

    Full Text Available The structural behavior of pile caps with sockets embedded is influenced by interface of column-socket, which can be smooth or rough. With intent to analyze the behavior of two pile caps with embedded socket, considering the friction between the column and the socket, with eccentric normal load, the numerical simulations were carried out, using a program based on the Finite Element Methods (FEM. In the numerical analysis the non-linear behavior of materials was considered, also the friction between the column and the socket. It was considered perfect bond between the reinforcement and the concrete around. It was observed that the embedded length is preponderant factor in the structural behavior of the analyzed element.

  8. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C. C.; Song, Y. T.; Peng, X. B.; Wei, Y. P.; Mao, X.; Li, W. X.; Qian, X. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads.

  9. Compressing molecular dynamics trajectories: breaking the one-bit-per-sample barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Huwald, Jan; Dittrich, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations yield large amounts of trajectory data. For their durable storage and accessibility an efficient compression algorithm is paramount. State of the art domain-specific algorithms combine quantization, Huffman encoding and occasionally domain knowledge. We propose the high resolution trajectory compression scheme (HRTC) that relies on piecewise linear functions to approximate quantized trajectories. By splitting the error budget between quantization and approximation, our approach beats the current state of the art by several orders of magnitude given the same error tolerance. It allows storing samples at far less than one bit per sample. It is simple and fast enough to be integrated into the inner simulation loop, store every time step, and become the primary representation of trajectory data.

  10. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-10-27

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  11. Enhancement of a dynamic porous model considering compression-release hysteresis behavior: application to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, B.; Seisson, G.; Hébert, D.; Bertron, I.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.

    2016-08-01

    Because of their shock wave attenuation properties, porous materials and foams are increasingly used for various applications such as graphite in the aerospace industry and polyurethane (PU) foams in biomedical engineering. For these two materials, the absence of residual compaction after compression and release cycles limits the efficiency of the usual numerical dynamic porous models such as P-α and POREQST. In this paper, we suggest a simple enhancement of the latter in order to take into account the compression-release hysteresis behavior experimentally observed for the considered materials. The new model, named H-POREQST, was implemented into a Lagrangian hydrocode and tested for simulating plate impact experiments at moderate pressure onto a commercial grade of porous graphite (EDM3). It proved to be in far better agreement with experimental data than the original model which encourages us to pursue numerical tests and developments.

  12. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Austin P; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-25

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions.

  13. Acceleration of conventional data acquisition in dynamic contrast enhancement: comparing keyhole approaches with compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethanath, Sairam; Gulaka, Praveen K; Kodibagkar, Vikram D

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a valuable clinical tool for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. DCE MRI provides pharmacokinetic parameters dependent on the extravasation of small molecular contrast agents, and thus high temporal resolution and/or spatial resolution is required for accurate estimation of parameters. In this article we investigate the efficacy of 2 undersampling approaches to speed up DCE MRI: a conventional keyhole approach and compressed sensing-based imaging. Data reconstructed from variants of these methods has been compared with the full k-space reconstruction with respect to data quality and pharmacokinetic parameters Ktrans and ve. Overall, compressive sensing provides better data quality and reproducible parametric maps than key-hole methods with higher acceleration factors. In particular, an undersampling mask based on a priori precontrast data showed high fidelity of reconstructed data and parametric maps up to 5× acceleration.

  14. Testing Studies on Rock Failure Modes of Statically Loads Under Dynamic Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Zhouyuan; LI Xibing; LIU Xiling; MA Chunde; YIN Tubing

    2008-01-01

    By means of the improved split Hopkionson pressure bar(SHPB) with axial pre-pressure and confined pressure,two series of experiments on sandstone are earned out to research the failure mode of rock during the course of exploitation of resources in deep.One is under the conditions that the confining pressure is fixed and the axial pressure is changeable.The other is under the conditions that the confining pressure becomes and the axial pressure is fixed.It is found that samples break up evenly after impacting when axial static pressures are low,there is great disparity in size of fragments when axial static pressures are high,and the main bodies of samples after the tests under the combination of dynamic and static loads frequently show the type of V or X.The samples are more close-grained at the elastic stage and impacts make many cracks be generated and developed,as makes samples more crackable.At the initial phase of damage stage,the static pressures make some cracks in the samples which are undeveloped and the impacts' role is similar to that at the elastic stage.At the metaphase or anaphase of damage stage,these cracks in the samples develop adequately and the impacts mainly accelerate samples' failure.The main bodies of samples show the type of V or X after impacting due to the confining pressures' restraining samples' lateral formation at the elastic stage or the initial phase of damage stage,the main bodies of samples have almost formed at the stage loading static pressures and the results after impacting usually are similar to those under the axial pressures tests.

  15. Dynamic Compressive Sensing of Time-Varying Signals via Approximate Message Passing

    CERN Document Server

    Ziniel, Justin

    2012-01-01

    In this work the dynamic compressive sensing (CS) problem of recovering sparse, correlated, time-varying signals from sub-Nyquist, non-adaptive, linear measurements is explored from a Bayesian perspective. While there has been a handful of previously proposed Bayesian dynamic CS algorithms in the literature, the ability to perform inference on high-dimensional problems in a computationally efficient manner remains elusive. In response, we propose a probabilistic dynamic CS signal model that captures both amplitude and support correlation structure, and describe an approximate message passing algorithm that performs soft signal estimation and support detection with a computational complexity that is linear in all problem dimensions. The algorithm, DCS-AMP, can perform either causal filtering or non-causal smoothing, and is capable of learning model parameters adaptively from the data through an expectation-maximization learning procedure. We provide numerical evidence that DCS-AMP performs within 3 dB of oracl...

  16. Numerical simulations on the flow fields of dynamic axial compression columns in chromatography processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien Liang, Ru; Che Liu, Cheng; Tsai Liang, Ming; Chen, Jiann Lin

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic axial compression (DAC) columns are key elements in Simulated Moving Bed, which is a chromatography process in drug industry and chemical engineering. In this study, we apply the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique to analyze the flow fields in the DAC column and propose rules for distributor design based on mass conservation in fluid dynamics. Computer aided design (CAD) is used in constructing the numerical 3D modelling for the mesh system. The laminar flow fields with Darcy’s law to model the porous zone are governed by the Navier-Stokes equations and employed to describe the porous flow fields. Experimental works have been conducted as the benchmark for us to choose feasible porous parameters for CFD. Besides, numerical treatments are elaborated to avoid calculation divergence resulting from large source terms. Results show that CFD combined with CAD is a good approach to investigate detailed flow fields in DAC columns and the design for distributors is straightforward.

  17. New insight into deformation-dependent hydraulic permeability of gels and cartilage, and dynamic behavior of agarose gels in confined compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, W Y; Yao, H; Huang, C Y; Cheung, H S

    2003-04-01

    Equilibrium, creep, and dynamic behaviors of agarose gels (2.0-14.8%) in confined compression were investigated in this study. The hydraulic permeabilities of gels were determined by curve-fitting creep data to the biphasic model (J. Biomech. Eng. 102 (1980) 73) and found to be similar in value to those published in the literature (AIChE J. 42 (1996) 1220). A new relationship between intrinsic permeability and volume fraction of water was found for agarose gel, capable of predicting deformation-dependent permeabilities of bovine articular cartilage and 2% agarose gel published in literature. This relationship is accurate for gels and cartilage over a wide range of permeabilities (four orders of magnitude variation). The dynamic stiffness of the gels increases with gel concentration and loading frequency (0.01-1.0Hz). The increase in dynamic stiffness with loading frequency is less pronounced for gels with higher concentrations. The results of this study provide a new insight into deformation-dependent permeability behavior of agarose gel and cartilage, and are important for understanding biological responses of cells to interstitial fluid flow in gel or in cartilage under dynamic mechanical loading.

  18. RETRACTED: The Nonlinear Compressive Response and Deformation of an Auxetic Cellular Structure under In-Plane Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the request of the Author, the following article Zhang, W, Hou, W, Hu, Ping and Ma, Z (2014 The Nonlinear Compressive Response and Deformation of an Auxetic Cellular Structure under In-Plane Loading Advances in Mechanical Engineering published 17 November 2014. doi: 10.1155/2014/214681has been retracted due to errors discovered by the authors. On Page 3, the definition of component force in Equation 4 is incorrect. (2 On Page 4, the definition of component force in Equation 11 is incorrect. Moreover this equation should not have parameterM(length of cell wall, because a mistake was made in the process of calculation. Because of the above reasons, the conclusion obtained from the mechanical model is incorrect and should instead state that the Elastic Buckling and Plastic Collapse are both yield modes of this structure (3 On Page 5, the FEA model used in this article is not appropriate, because the deformation of single cell is not homogeneous, which means that the geometrical non-linear effect on single cell model is greater. So in the actual whole structure we may not obtain the results that were described in Page 6 Paragraph 2. (4 The data in figures 8 (page 6 and 9 (page 7 is incorrect and the values of effective Young’s modulus and plateau stress are much larger than reasonable values. The definition of effective stress is wrong in the FEA model, which means the effective stress should be calculated by the total width of cell instead of length of horizontal cell wall. For example, in Figure 8, the plateau stress can reach 140Mpa, this is not reasonable because there are many holes in this cellular structure, and its mechanical properties should be much lower than material properties of cell wall. The reasonable plateau stress should be around 2Mpa. The authors takes responsibility for these errors and regret the publication of invalid results. The nonlinear compressive response and deformation of an auxetic cellular structure that has

  19. Effect of SrCO3 addition on the dynamic compressive strength of ZTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Arab; Roslan Ahmad; Zainal Arifin Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic parts usually experience dynamic load in armor applications. Therefore, studying the dynamic behaviors of ceramics is important. Limited data are available on the dynamic behaviors of ceramics;thus, it is helpful to predict the dynamic strength of ceramics on the basis of their mechanical properties. In this paper, the addition of SrCO3 into zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) was demonstrated to improve the fracture toughness of ZTA due to the formation of the SrAl12O19 (SA6) phase. The porosity of ZTA was found to be increased by the addition of SrCO3. These newly formed pores served as the nucleation sites of cracks under dynamic load;these cracks eventually coalesced to form damaged zones in the samples. Although the KIC values of the samples were improved, the dynamic strength was not en-hanced because of the increase in porosity;in fact, the dynamic strength of ZTA ceramics decreased with the addition of SrCO3.

  20. 3D deformation and dynamics of the human cadaver abdomen under seatbelt loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamielle, Sophie; Vezin, Philippe; Verriest, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Philippe; Trosseille, Xavier; Vallancien, Guy

    2008-11-01

    According to accident analysis, submarining is responsible for most of the frontal car crash AIS 3+ abdominal injuries sustained by restrained occupants. Submarining is characterized by an initial position of the lap belt on the iliac spine. During the crash, the pelvis slips under the lap belt which loads the abdomen. The order of magnitude of the abdominal deflection rate was reported by Uriot to be approximately 4 m/s. In addition, the use of active restraint devices such as pretensioners in recent cars lead to the need for the investigation of Out-Of-Position injuries. OOP is defined by an initial position of the lap belt on the abdomen instead of the pelvis resulting in a direct loading of the abdomen during pretensioning and the crash. In that case, the penetration speed of the belt into the abdomen was reported by Trosseille to be approximately 8 to 12 m/s. The aim of this study was to characterize the response of the human abdomen in submarining and OOP. A total of 8 PMHS abdomens were loaded using a lap belt. In order to investigate the injury mechanisms, the abdominal deflection rate and the compression were imposed such that they were not correlated. The specimens were seated upright in a fixed back configuration. The lap belt was placed at the level of the mid-umbilicus, between the iliac crest and the 12th rib. The belt was pulled horizontally along the sides of the specimens causing a symmetrical loading of the abdomen. In addition to the local parameters such as the belt and back forces or the belt displacements, the 3D external deformation of the abdomen was recorded. The forces measured between the back of the cadaver and the seat showed that a mass effect should be taken into account in the abdominal behaviour in addition to viscosity. The back force was greater than the belt force in low speed (submarining like) tests while it was lower for high-speed (OOP like) tests. A lumped parameter model was developed to confirm the experimental results and

  1. Numerical model of nonhydrostatic ocean dynamics based on methods of artificial compressibility and multicomponent splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesny, V. B.; Gusev, A. V.; Fomin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    An algorithm is proposed for solving three-dimensional ocean hydrodynamics equations without hydrostatic approximation and traditional simplification of Coriolis acceleration. It is based on multicomponent splitting of the modified model with artificial compressibility. The original system of equations is split into two subsystems describing the transport of three velocity components and adjustment of the density and velocity fields. At the adjustment stage, the horizontal velocity components are represented as a sum of the depth means and deviations; the two corresponding subsystems are derived. For barotropic dynamics, the compressibility effect is represented as the boundary condition at the free surface, while for the baroclinic subsystem, it is introduced as ɛ-regularization of the continuity equation. Then, the baroclinic equations are split into two subsystems describing the hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic dynamics. The nonhydrostatic dynamics is computed at a separate splitting stage. The algorithm is included into the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Sciences model based on "primitive" equations and verified by solving the hydrodynamics problem for the Sea of Marmara.

  2. Effects of moving dynamic tyre loads on tyre-pavement contact stresses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to indicate the effect that moving dynamic tyre loads has on the tyre-pavement contact stresses used in pavement analysis. Traditionally tyre loads (in pavement analysis) are modelled as constant loads applied through...

  3. Treatment of middle-third clavicle fractures using anterior plating with a dynamic compression plate (DCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Padmanabhan; Joshi, Meera; Shilston, Sophie; Wallace, Donald; Pearce, Oliver J

    2013-03-01

    Significantly displaced midshaft clavicle fractures can be managed operatively to restore anatomy and allow early mobilization. Several techniques have described using precontoured anatomically designed plates placed on the superior surface of the bone or reconstruction plates contoured by the surgeon placed either superiorly or anteriorly. We describe the use of the dynamic compression plate placed anteriorly on the clavicle in treating these fractures and discuss the relative advantages of this technique. We have a case series of 8 patients over a 2-year period, who were followed up and all went on to successful fracture union.

  4. Sliding window and compressive sensing for low-field dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Toraci, Cristian; Ceriani, Stefano; Wilson, David; Fato, Marco; Piana, Michele

    2014-01-01

    We describe an acquisition/processing procedure for image reconstruction in dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The approach requires sliding window to record a set of trajectories in the k-space, standard regularization to reconstruct an estimate of the object and compressed sensing to recover image residuals. We validated this approach in the case of specific simulated experiments and, in the case of real measurements, we showed that the procedure is reliable even in the case of data acquired by means of a low-field scanner.

  5. Measurement of the dynamic response of compressed hydrogen by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Fortmann, C.; Y Khattak, F.; Kleppe, A. K.; Riley, D.; Toleikis, S.; Wark, J.; Wilhelm, H.; Gregori, G.

    2010-08-01

    Measurement of the dynamic properties of hydrogen and helium under extreme pressures is a key to understanding the physics of planetary interiors. The inelastic scattering signal from statically compressed hydrogen inside diamond anvil cells at 2.8 GPa and 6.4 GPa was measured at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility in the UK. The first direct measurement of the local field correction to the Coulomb interactions in degenerate plasmas was obtained from spectral shifts in the scattering data and compared to predictions by the Utsumi-Ichimaru theory for degenerate electron liquids.

  6. Dynamic behaviors of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass under ramp wave and shock wave loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binqiang Luo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behaviors of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 bulk metallic glass were investigated using electric gun and magnetically driven isentropic compression device which provide shock and ramp wave loading respectively. Double-wave structure was observed under shock compression while three-wave structure was observed under ramp compression in 0 ∼ 18GPa. The HEL of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 is 8.97 ± 0.61GPa and IEL is 8.8 ± 0.3GPa, respectively. Strength of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 estimated from HEL is 5.0 ± 0.3GPa while the strength estimated from IEL is 3.6 ± 0.1GPa. Shock wave velocity versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under shock compression appears to be bilinear and a kink appears at about 18GPa. The Lagrangian sound speed versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under ramp wave compression exhibits two discontinuances and are divided to three regions: elastic, plastic-I and plastic-II. The first jump-down occurs at elastic-plastic transition and the second appears at about 17GPa. In elastic and plastic-I regions, Lagrangian sound speed increases linearly with particle velocity, respectively. Characteristic response of sound speed in plastic-I region disagree with shock result in the same pressure region(7GPa ∼ 18GPa, but is consistent with shock result at higher pressure(18-110GPa.

  7. Dynamic Behaviour of Concrete Sandwich Panel under Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yongxiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface contact explosion experiments were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of concrete sandwich panel subjected to blast loading. Experimental results have shown that there are four damage modes explosion cratering, scabbing of the backside, radial cracking induced failure, and circumferential cracking induced failure. It also illustrates that different foam materials sandwiched in the multi-layered medium have an important effect on damage patterns. Due to the foam material, the stress peak decreases one order of magnitude and the duration is more than four times that of the panel without the soft layer by numerical simulation. Additionally, the multi layered medium with concrete foam demonstrates the favourable protective property compared with that of aluminum foam. Meanwhile, the optimal analysis of the thickness of the foam material in the sandwich panel was performed in terms of experimental and numerical analyseis. The proper thickness proportion of soft layer is about 20 percent to the total thickness of sandwich panel under the conditions in this study.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(1, pp.22-29, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1480  

  8. Adaptive reshaper for high dynamic range and wide color gamut video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Taoran; Pu, Fangjun; Yin, Peng; Pytlarz, Jaclyn; Chen, Tao; Husak, Walt

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) and Wider Color Gamut (WCG) content represents a greater range of luminance levels and a more complete reproduction of colors found in real-world scenes. The characteristics of HDR/WCG content are very different from the SDR content. It poses a challenge to the compression system which is originally designed for SDR content. Recently in MPEG/VCEG, two directions have been taken to improve compression performances for HDR/WCG video using HEVC Main10 codec. The first direction is to improve HDR-10 using encoder optimization. The second direction is to modify the video signal in pre/post processing to better fit compression system. The process therefore is out of coding loop and does not involve changes to the HEVC specification. Among many proposals in the second direction, reshaper is identified to be the key component. In this paper, a novel luma reshaper is presented which re-allocates the codewords to help codec improve subjective quality. In addition, encoder optimization can be performed jointly with reshaping. Experiments are conducted with ICtCp color difference signal. Simulation results show that if both joint optimization of reshaper and encoder are carried out, there is evidence that improvement over the HDR-10 anchor can be achieved.

  9. The dynamic response of Copper 101 under high-rate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragov, A. M.; Lomunov, A. K.; Abramov, A. V.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Sergeichev, I. V.; Braithwaite, C.; Proud, W. G.; Church, P. D.; Cullis, I. G.; Gould, P.

    2006-01-01

    The initial results of an investigation into the dynamic behavior of copper C101 are presented. This study involved several experimental technicques; quasi-static, compressive Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), a modified Taylor test and a direct impact method. From these studies dynamic and stati

  10. Experimental study on settlement of model piles in frozen soil under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建明; 朱元林; 张家懿

    1999-01-01

    Test results show that the settlement process of model piles is mainly the rheological process of frozen soil under shear loading. The settlement rate of model piles increases with increasing temperature of frozen soil, decreasing roughness of pile surface and increasing rigidity of pile foundation. As the water content of frozen soil reaches its saturation value, the settlement rate is the least. When the level of loading is higher, the settlement rate under dynamic loading is less than that under static loading. With the level of loading lowering, the effect between dynamic and static loading on the settlement rate becomes close gradually. Under the present test conditions, the settlement rate of model piles is independent of the frequency of dynamic loads.

  11. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  12. Research of dynamic loading in a drivetrain by means of mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov-Dobrev, N. S.; Ljashenko, M. V.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Potapov, P. V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes the development of the initial full dynamic model of a caterpillar agricultural tractor ‘Chetra 6C-315’ drivetrain, the processes of the model reduction; the mathematical apparatus for defining loads acting on drivetrain shafting elements. The main results of computational researches of dynamic loadings of drivetrain elements in various tractor operation modes are presented.

  13. Fracto-mechanoluminescent light emission of EuD4TEA-PDMS composites subjected to high strain-rate compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Kimberley, Jamie

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to understand light emission characteristics of fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) europium tetrakis(dibenzoylmethide)-triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. As a sensing material that can play a pivotal role for the self-powered impact sensor technology, it is important to understand transformative light emission characteristics of the FML EuD4TEA crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. First, EuD4TEA crystals were synthesized and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to fabricate EuD4TEA-PDMS composite test specimens. Second, the prepared EuD4TEA-PDMS composites were tested using the modified Kolsky bar setup equipped with a high-speed camera. Third, FML light emission was captured to yield 12 bit grayscale video footage, which was processed to quantify the FML light emission. Finally, quantitative parameters were generated by taking into account pixel values and population of pixels of the 12 bit grayscale images to represent FML light intensity. The FML light intensity was correlated with high strain-rate compressive strain and strain rate to understand the FML light emission characteristics under high strain-rate compressive loading that can result from impact occurrences.

  14. Experimental evaluation of the effect of compression ratio on performance and emission of SI engine fuelled with gasoline and n-butanol blend at different loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinu Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Never ending demand for efficient and less polluting engines have always inspired newer technologies. Extensive study has been done on variable compression ratio, a promising in-cylinder technology, in the recent past. The present work is an experimental investigation to examine the variation of different parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, exhaust gas temperature and emissions with respect to change in compression ratio in a single-cylinder carbureted SI engine at different loads with two different fuels. Experiments were conducted at three different compression ratios (CR = 7:1, 8.5:1 and 10:1. The fuels used in this study are pure gasoline and 20% n-butanol blend (B20 in gasoline. The results showed that brake thermal efficiency increases with CR at all loads. Further, the experimental results showed the scope of improving the part-load efficiency of SI engine by adopting the concept of variable compression ratio (VCR technology, especially when fuels with better anti-knock characteristics are used. The uncertainty analysis of the experiments based on the specifications of the equipment used is also tabulated.

  15. Prediction of the structural response of the femoral shaft under dynamic loading using subject-specific finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwansik; Kim, Taewung; Forman, Jason; Panzer, Matthew B; Crandall, Jeff R

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this study was to predict the structural response of the femoral shaft under dynamic loading conditions using subject-specific finite element (SS-FE) models and to evaluate the prediction accuracy of the models in relation to the model complexity. In total, SS-FE models of 31 femur specimens were developed. Using those models, dynamic three-point bending and combined loading tests (bending with four different levels of axial compression) of bare femurs were simulated, and the prediction capabilities of five different levels of model complexity were evaluated based on the impact force time histories: baseline, mass-based scaled, structure-based scaled, geometric SS-FE, and heterogenized SS-FE models. Among the five levels of model complexity, the geometric SS-FE and the heterogenized SS-FE models showed statistically significant improvement on response prediction capability compared to the other model formulations whereas the difference between two SS-FE models was negligible. This result indicated the geometric SS-FE models, containing detailed geometric information from CT images with homogeneous linear isotropic elastic material properties, would be an optimal model complexity for prediction of structural response of the femoral shafts under the dynamic loading conditions. The average and the standard deviation of the RMS errors of the geometric SS-FE models for all the 31 cases was 0.46 kN and 0.66 kN, respectively. This study highlights the contribution of geometric variability on the structural response variation of the femoral shafts subjected to dynamic loading condition and the potential of geometric SS-FE models to capture the structural response variation of the femoral shafts.

  16. Contribution of static and dynamic load balancing in a real-time distributed air defence simulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available and Dynamic Load Balancing In A Real-Time Distributed Air Defence Simulation Mr Bernardt Duvenhage; Mr Jan J. Nel Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) bduvenhage@csir.co.za, cnel@csir.co.za Abstract. Simulations with a large number... system. The measure to which dynamic load balancing could further enhance the performance is then explored. Such knowledge forms the basis for further load balance research. 1. INTRODUCTION The South African Council for Scientific and Industrial...

  17. Compressible magma/mantle dynamics: 3-D, adaptive simulations in ASPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo

    2016-12-01

    Melt generation and migration are an important link between surface processes and the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's interior. However, their vastly different timescales make it difficult to study mantle convection and melt migration in a unified framework, especially for 3-D global models. And although experiments suggest an increase in melt volume of up to 20 per cent from the depth of melt generation to the surface, previous computations have neglected the individual compressibilities of the solid and the fluid phase. Here, we describe our extension of the finite element mantle convection code ASPECT that adds melt generation and migration. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. Applying adaptive mesh refinement to this type of problems is particularly advantageous, as the resolution can be increased in areas where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. Together with a high-performance, massively parallel implementation, this allows for high-resolution, 3-D, compressible, global mantle convection simulations coupled with melt migration. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of benchmarks and model setups, compare results of the compressible and incompressible formulation, and show the effectiveness of adaptive mesh refinement when applied to melt migration. Our model of magma dynamics provides a framework for modelling processes on different scales and investigating links between processes occurring in the deep mantle and melt generation and migration. This approach could prove particularly useful applied to modelling the generation of komatiites or other melts originating in greater depths. The implementation is available in the Open Source ASPECT repository.

  18. Development of High Speed Imaging and Analysis Techniques Compressible Dynamics Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Wilder, M. C.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic stall has limited the flight envelope of helicopters for many years. The problem has been studied in the laboratory as well as in flight, but most research, even in the laboratory, has been restricted to surface measurement techniques such as pressure transducers or skin friction gauges, except at low speed. From this research, it became apparent that flow visualization tests performed at Mach numbers representing actual flight conditions were needed if the complex physics associated with dynamic stall was to be properly understood. However, visualization of the flow field during compressible conditions required carefully aligned and meticulously reconstructed holographic interferometry. As part of a long-range effort focused on exposing of the physics of compressible dynamic stall, a research wind tunnel was developed at NASA Ames Research Center which permits visual access to the full flow field surrounding an oscillating airfoil during compressible dynamic stall. Initially, a stroboscopic schlieren technique was used for visualization of the stall process, but the primary research tool has been point diffraction interferometry(PDI), a technique carefully optimized for use in th is project. A review of the process of development of PDI will be presented in the full paper. One of the most valuable aspects of PDI is the fact that interferograms are produced in real time on a continuous basis. The use of a rapidly-pulsed laser makes this practical; a discussion of this approach will be presented in the full paper. This rapid pulsing(up to 40,000 pulses/sec) produces interferograms of the rapidly developing dynamic stall field in sufficient resolution(both in space and time) that the fluid physics of the compressible dynamic stall flowfield can be quantitatively determined, including the gradients of pressure in space and time. This permits analysis of the influence of the effect of pitch rate, Mach number, Reynolds number, amplitude of oscillation, and other

  19. The estimation of uniaxial compressive strength conversion factor of trona and interbeds from point load tests and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, H.; Altinpinar, M.

    2017-07-01

    The point load (PL) test is generally used for estimation of uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of rocks because of its economic advantages and simplicity in testing. If the PL index of a specimen is known, the UCS can be estimated using conversion factors. Several conversion factors have been proposed by various researchers and they are dependent upon the rock type. In the literature, conversion factors on different sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks can be found, but no study exists on trona. In this study, laboratory UCS and field PL tests were carried out on trona and interbeds of volcano-sedimentary rocks. Based on these tests, PL to UCS conversion factors of trona and interbeds are proposed. The tests were modeled numerically using a distinct element method (DEM) software, particle flow code (PFC), in an attempt to guide researchers having various types of modeling problems (excavation, cavern design, hydraulic fracturing, etc.) of the abovementioned rock types. Average PFC parallel bond contact model micro properties for the trona and interbeds were determined within this study so that future researchers can use them to avoid the rigorous PFC calibration procedure. It was observed that PFC overestimates the tensile strength of the rocks by a factor that ranges from 22 to 106.

  20. Halovest dynamic loads: full crossover comparison of three vest types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yasuyuki; Krag, Martin; Huston, Dryver; Ambrose, Tim; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2002-02-01

    Ten cervical spine trauma subjects were studied during halovest treatment. Each subject wore each of three different vests. To compare the effect of vest design on loads between halo and vest during various activities. Complications during halovest use may be related to vest design, a variety of which are available. Loads between halo and vest have been shown to vary with activity type, but no comparison between vest types has been reported previously. Loads between the halo and the vest were measured during performance of activities of daily living and during load application to the halo, using custom-built four-channel transducers and a PC-based data acquisition system. Substantial variations between subjects exist in loads between the halo and the vest. At rest, neck distraction loads were significantly greater for the supine posture than for either the sitting or standing postures. Loads applied to the halo by the investigators are carried by the neck and not by the structure connecting the halo to the vest. During activities of daily living all four measured load components are generally nonzero. During activities of daily living substantial differences in loads occurred between vest types. For all activities of daily living combined, the relative neck distraction load values were as follows: 4PAD 100%, Bremer 159%, and PMT 180%. Previous evidence supports a connection between certain complications of halovest wear (such as pin loosening) and loads on the pins. This study shows that different halovests are associated with quite different loads between the vest and the halo (and thus loads on the pins and the neck). This is encouraging for prospective, clinical comparison of different halovests and for improvements in clinical performance through halovest design improvements.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics and load sharing of double-mesh helical gear train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchun Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behaviours and load sharing of double-mesh helical gear trains have been studied in this paper. A nonlinear dynamic model of double-mesh helical gear train was established, including torsional vibration, axial vibration, timevarying mesh stiffness and backlashes. The governing equations were solved by Runge-Kutta method. Frequency responses and influences of main parameters to frequency responses were analyzed to determine the vibration characteristics of the system. The dynamic factor and load sharing in two mesh pairs were studied in two configuration cases and the result shows that case II has better dynamic response and load sharing.

  2. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  3. Low-Beta MHD Reconnection As a Showcase of Compressible Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, S.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar corona, in the magnetosphere, and in other astrophysical settings, magnetic reconnection often occurs in a low-beta plasma. Unfortunately, less is known about low-beta reconnection, partially due to lack of attention and partially due to numerical difficulties. Recent MHD simulations revealed several new features of low-beta reconnection; For example, Zenitani et al.(2010,2011) [1,2] discovered a normal shock which is perpendicular to the Petschek shock and a repeated shock-reflection in front of a magnetic island. In this contribution, we extend earlier works with improved MHD codes and organize the results from the perspective of compressible fluid dynamics. In fluid dynamics, once a flow speed becomes comparable with the local sound speed, various compressible effects take place. This is the case for low-beta reconnection, because an Alfvenic reconnection jet becomes supersonic. Many phenomena can be understood as compressible fluid effects: the normal shock is equivalent to a recompression shock on a transonic airfoil, the shock-reflection corresponds to shock-diamonds in an over-expanded supersonic flow, the adiabatic acceleration similarly takes place as the Laval nozzle, and so on. They appear regardless of Sweet-Parker, plasmoid-mediated, or Petschek reconnections. We further discover another shock-diamonds in extreme cases. A critical condition for these hidden shocks is derived. All these issues can be applied to more extreme cases of relativistic reconnection, in which the sound speed is ``relatively'' slow. We will also address the relevance to the physics of extragalactic jets. References:[1] Zenitani, Hesse, & Klimas, ApJ, 716, L214 (2010).[2] Zenitani and Miyoshi, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 022105 (2011).

  4. Slow Dynamics Model of Compressed Air Energy Storage and Battery Storage Technologies for Automatic Generation Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Das, Trishna

    2016-05-01

    Increasing variable generation penetration and the consequent increase in short-term variability makes energy storage technologies look attractive, especially in the ancillary market for providing frequency regulation services. This paper presents slow dynamics model for compressed air energy storage and battery storage technologies that can be used in automatic generation control studies to assess the system frequency response and quantify the benefits from storage technologies in providing regulation service. The paper also represents the slow dynamics model of the power system integrated with storage technologies in a complete state space form. The storage technologies have been integrated to the IEEE 24 bus system with single area, and a comparative study of various solution strategies including transmission enhancement and combustion turbine have been performed in terms of generation cycling and frequency response performance metrics.

  5. A Dynamically Reconfigurable Video Compression Scheme Using FPGAs with Coarse-grain Parallelism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramachandran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamically reconfigurable scheme for video encoder to switch among many different applications is presented. The scheme is suitable for FPGA implementation and conforms to JPEG, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and H.263 standards. The scheme has emerged as an efficient and cost-effective solution for video compression as a result of innovative design using well-partitioned algorithms, highly pipelined architecture and coarse-grain parallelism. The reconfiguration time of the video encoder is less than 320 μs while switching from one standard to another. Although the dynamic reconfiguration scheme is presented for a video encoder, the same design methodology may be applied effectively for any other application.

  6. A Dynamic Model of a Vapor Compression Refrigeration Cycle using Zeotropic Refrigerant Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unezaki, Fumitake; Matsuoka, Fumio

    In order to prove the effectiveness of the developed model, reported in the first report, about dynamics of a vapor compression refrigeration cycle with zeotropic refrigerant mixtures, simulation results are compared with the experimental results obtained for R-407C (R-32/R-125/R-134a=23/25/52wt%).The simulation results are consistent well with the experimental results. As a result of the numerical analysis of dynamic characteristics of composition changing, the variation of compositions in the refrigeration cycle is caused by the variation of the existing compositions of accumulator. The time constant of the composition is approximately equal to the time constant of the pressure and the mass distribution.

  7. Spatially resolved streaming potentials of human intervertebral disk motion segments under dynamic axial compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatridis, James C; Furukawa, Masaru; Stokes, Ian A F; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Laible, Jeffrey P

    2009-03-01

    Intervertebral disk degeneration results in alterations in the mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties of the disk tissue. The purpose of this study is to record spatially resolved streaming potential measurements across intervertebral disks exposed to cyclic compressive loading. We hypothesize that the streaming potential profile across the disk will vary with radial position and frequency and is proportional to applied load amplitude, according to the presumed fluid-solid relative velocity and measured glycosaminoglycan content. Needle electrodes were fabricated using a linear array of AgAgCl micro-electrodes and inserted into human motion segments in the midline from anterior to posterior. They were connected to an amplifier to measure electrode potentials relative to the saline bath ground. Motion segments were loaded in axial compression under a preload of 500 N, sinusoidal amplitudes of +/-200 N and +/-400 N, and frequencies of 0.01 Hz, 0.1 Hz, and 1 Hz. Streaming potential data were normalized by applied force amplitude, and also compared with paired experimental measurements of glycosaminoglycans in each disk. Normalized streaming potentials varied significantly with sagittal position and there was a significant location difference at the different frequencies. Normalized streaming potential was largest in the central nucleus region at frequencies of 0.1 Hz and 1.0 Hz with values of approximately 3.5 microVN. Under 0.01 Hz loading, normalized streaming potential was largest in the outer annulus regions with a maximum value of 3.0 microVN. Correlations between streaming potential and glycosaminoglycan content were significant, with R(2) ranging from 0.5 to 0.8. Phasic relationships between applied force and electrical potential did not differ significantly by disk region or frequency, although the largest phase angles were observed at the outermost electrodes. Normalized streaming potentials were associated with glycosaminoglycan content, fluid, and

  8. High-dynamic range compressive spectral imaging by grayscale coded aperture adaptive filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Eduardo Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging system (CASSI is an imaging architecture which senses the three dimensional informa-tion of a scene with two dimensional (2D focal plane array (FPA coded projection measurements. A reconstruction algorithm takes advantage of the compressive measurements sparsity to recover the underlying 3D data cube. Traditionally, CASSI uses block-un-block coded apertures (BCA to spatially modulate the light. In CASSI the quality of the reconstructed images depends on the design of these coded apertures and the FPA dynamic range. This work presents a new CASSI architecture based on grayscaled coded apertu-res (GCA which reduce the FPA saturation and increase the dynamic range of the reconstructed images. The set of GCA is calculated in a real-time adaptive manner exploiting the information from the FPA compressive measurements. Extensive simulations show the attained improvement in the quality of the reconstructed images when GCA are employed.  In addition, a comparison between traditional coded apertures and GCA is realized with respect to noise tolerance.

  9. The role of fluid dynamics on compressed/expanded surfactant monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera, Maria; Perales, Jose M.; Vega, Jose M.

    2016-06-01

    A typical experiment to measure monolayer surface rheological properties consists of two parallel, slightly immersed, moving solid barriers that compress and expand a shallow liquid layer that contains the surfactant monolayer in its free surface. The area between the barriers controls the surfactant concentration, which is frequently assumed as spatially constant. In order to minimize the fluid dynamics and other non-equilibrium effects, the barriers motion is very slow. Nevertheless, the surfactant concentration dynamics exhibit some unexpected features such as irreversibility, suggesting that the motion is not slow enough. We present a long wave theory that takes into account the fluid dynamics in the bulk phase coupled to the free surface elevation. In addition, apparent irreversibility is also discussed that may result from artifacts associated with the menisci dynamics when surface tension is measured using a Wilhelmy plate. Instead, additional, purely chemical, non-equilibrium effects are ignored. Results from this theory are discussed for varying values of the parameters, which permit establishing specific predictions on experiments. On the other hand, these results compare fairly well with the available experimental observations, at least qualitatively. The overall conclusion is that the fluid dynamics should not be ignored in the analysis of these experimental devices.

  10. Structure, compressibility factor, and dynamics of highly size-asymmetric binary hard-disk liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2012-09-14

    By using event-driven molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate effects of varying the area fraction of the smaller component on structure, compressibility factor, and dynamics of the highly size-asymmetric binary hard-disk liquids. We find that the static pair correlations of the large disks are only weakly perturbed by adding small disks. The higher-order static correlations of the large disks, by contrast, can be strongly affected. Accordingly, the static correlation length deduced from the bond-orientation correlation functions first decreases significantly and then tends to reach a plateau as the area fraction of the small disks increases. The compressibility factor of the system first decreases and then increases upon increasing the area fraction of the small disks and separating different contributions to it allows to rationalize this non-monotonic phenomenon. Furthermore, adding small disks can influence dynamics of the system in quantitative and qualitative ways. For the large disks, the structural relaxation time increases monotonically with increasing the area fraction of the small disks at low and moderate area fractions of the large disks. In particular, "reentrant" behavior appears at sufficiently high area fractions of the large disks, strongly resembling the reentrant glass transition in short-ranged attractive colloids and the inverted glass transition in binary hard spheres with large size disparity. By tuning the area fraction of the small disks, relaxation process for the small disks shows concave-to-convex crossover and logarithmic decay behavior, as found in other binary mixtures with large size disparity. Moreover, diffusion of both species is suppressed by adding small disks. Long-time diffusion for the small disks shows power-law-like behavior at sufficiently high area fractions of the small disks, which implies precursors of a glass transition for the large disks and a localization transition for the small disks. Therefore, our results

  11. Strength properties of the jointed rock mass medium under dynamic cyclic loading *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The dynamic strength properties of the intermittently jointed mediums are studied using model test to investigate the jointed rock mass behavior under dynamic cyclic load. The model test results demonstrate that (i) the dynamic strength of the jointed samples increases with the loading frequency and decreases with the loading loops; (ii) the dynamic residual strength will not be zero like the static residual strength under one-axle loading condition; (iii) the dynamic strength changes greatly with the joint density and joint angle, and it differs from that of the static strength which reaches the lowest at an angle of 45° + ψ/2, while in the dynamic case, the lowest strength is at the angle of 45°.

  12. A 1-channel 3-band wide dynamic range compression chip for vibration transducer of implantable hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwook; Seong, Kiwoong; Kim, Myoungnam; Cho, Jinho; Lee, Jyunghyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a digital audio processing chip which uses a wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) algorithm is designed and implemented for implantable hearing aids system. The designed chip operates at a single voltage of 3.3V and drives a 16 bit parallel input and output at 32 kHz sample. The designed chip has 1-channel 3-band WDRC composed of a FIR filter bank, a level detector, and a compression part. To verify the performance of the designed chip, we measured the frequency separations of bands and compression gain control to reflect the hearing threshold level.

  13. A Compression & Encryption Algorithm on DNA Sequences Using Dynamic Look up Table and Modified Huffman Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mahamud Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Storing, transmitting and security of DNA sequences are well known research challenge. The problem has got magnified with increasing discovery and availability of DNA sequences. We have represent DNA sequence compression algorithm based on Dynamic Look Up Table (DLUT and modified Huffman technique. DLUT consists of 43(64 bases that are 64 sub-stings, each sub-string is of 3 bases long. Each sub-string are individually coded by single ASCII code from 33(! to 96(` and vice versa. Encode depends on encryption key choose by user from four base pair {a,t.g and c}and decode also require decryption key provide by the encoded user. Decoding must require authenticate input for encode the data. The sub-strings are combined into a Dynamic Look up Table based pre-coding routine. This algorithm is tested on reverse; complement & reverse complement the DNA sequences and also test on artificial DNA sequences of equivalent length. Speed of encryption and security levels are two important measurements for evaluating any encryption system. Due to proliferate of ubiquitous computing system, where digital contents are accessible through resource constraint biological database security concern is very important issue. A lot of research has been made to find an encryption system which can be run effectively in those biological databases. Information security is the most challenging question to protect the data from unauthorized user. The proposed method may protect the data from hackers. It can provide the three tier security, in tier one is ASCII code, in tier two is nucleotide (a,t,g and c choice by user and tier three is change of label or change of node position in Huffman Tree. Compression of the genome sequences will help to increase the efficiency of their use. The greatest advantage of this algorithm is fast execution, small memory occupation and easy implementation. Since the program to implement the technique have been written originally in the C language

  14. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated by the h......Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated...

  15. Dynamics of Non-Uniformity Loads of Afc Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolipski, Marian; Remiorz, Eryk; Sobota, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    The length of armoured face conveyors currently used in hard coal mines most often ranges between 200 m and 300 m. The machines are equipped with a main and auxiliary drive. Asynchronous motors mounted in conveyor drives feature the capacity of several hundreds of kilowatts. The non-uniform distribution of loads onto individual drives is observed in practice. The numerical value of loads distribution onto the individual armoured face conveyor drives is represented by a drive load distribution factor. It is defined as a ratio between the load of an electric motor installed in a given drive and the total conveyor load. The article presents a physical armoured face conveyor model intended for examining dynamic phenomena influencing the load non-uniformity of drives. Motion in this physical model is described with the system of (4 · j + 5) non-linear ordinary differential quotations of the second order. A mathematical model is obtained by adding functions describing the interwork of sprocket drums with chains and functions approximating the mechanical characteristics of asynchronous motors powered by means of frequency inverters. A large number of computer simulations was performed using this model enabling to study the impact on the load non-uniformity of drives of such parameters as motor slip, motor supply voltage drop, variations in supply voltage frequency, differences in the gear ratio of transmissions and differentiation in the pitch of scraper chain links along the chain contour. Długość przenośników zgrzebłowych ścianowych stosowanych obecnie w kopalniach węgla kamiennego najczęściej mieści się w przedziale od 200 m do 300 m. Maszyny te wyposażone są zawsze w napęd główny i pomocniczy, przy czym pierwszy z nich wyniesiony jest do chodnika podścianowego. Silniki napędowe o mocy kilkuset kilowatów napędzają bęben łańcuchowy przez sprzęgło i przekładnię zębatą. Z kolei bębny łańcuchowe poruszają łańcuch zgrzebłowy, kt

  16. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Behavior of RC Slabs Under Blast Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Hao; LI Zhongxian

    2009-01-01

    In Order to reduce economic and life losses due to terrorism or accidental explosion threats,reinforced concrete(RC)slabs of buildings need to be designed or retrofitted to resist blast loading.In this paper the dynamic behavior Of RC slabs under blast loading and its influencing factors are studied.The numerical model of an RC slab subjected to blast loading is established using the explicit dynamic analysis software.Both the strain rate effect and the damage accumulation are taken into account in the material model.The dynamic responses of the RC slab subiected to blast loading are analyzed,and the influence of concrete strength,thickness and reinforcement ratio on the behavior of the RC slab under blast loading iS numerically investigated.Based on the numerical results.some principles for blast-resistant design and retrofitting are proposed to improve the behavior of the RC slab subjected to blast loading.

  17. INFLUENCE OF LOADING RATE ON DYNAMIC FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kezhuang Gong; Zheng Li; Weizhong Qin

    2008-01-01

    The effect of loading rate on the dynamic fracture properties and the failure mechanisms of glass fiber-reinforced composite materials under mode I fracture is studied.Dynamic reflective caustic experiments are carried out for two loading rates.By measuring the characteristic dimensions of the shadow spots during the caustic experiments,the dynamic SIFs are calculated for different loading rates.The experimental results indicate that the dynamic fracture toughness KId increases remarkably with increasing loading rate,and the crack grows faster under the high-velocity impact.Moreover,by examining the crack growth routes and the fracture surfaces,it is shown that the loading rate also greatly affects the failure mechanisms at micro-scale.

  18. Prediction onset and dynamic behaviour of liquid loading gas wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Schiferli, W.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Veeken, C.A.M.; Biezen, E.

    2008-01-01

    As reservoir pressures decrease in maturing gas wells, liquid drop-out forms an increasing restriction on gas production. Even though virtually all of the world's gas wells are either at risk of or suffering from liquid loading, the modeling of liquid loading behavior is still quite immature and the

  19. Dynamic Response of Coarse Granular Material to Wave Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1998-01-01

    The soil beneath vertical breakwaters is subjected to a combination of forces induced by the waves. The forces acting on the soil can be characterized as 1) static load due to submerged weight of the structure, 2) quasi-static forces induced by cyclic wave loading, and 3) wave impact from breakin...

  20. Lumbar spine disc height and curvature responses to an axial load generated by a compression device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S.; Steinbach, G. C.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Axial load-dependent changes in the lumbar spine of supine healthy volunteers were examined using a compression device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging. OBJECTIVE: To test two hypotheses: Axial loading of 50% body weight from shoulder to feet in supine posture 1) simulates the upright lumbar spine alignment and 2) decreases disc height significantly. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Axial compression on the lumbar spine has significantly narrowed the lumbar dural sac in patients with sciatica, neurogenic claudication or both. METHODS: Using a device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging, the lumbar spine of eight young volunteers, ages 22 to 36 years, was axially compressed with a force equivalent to 50% of body weight, approximating the normal load on the lumbar spine in upright posture. Sagittal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed to measure intervertebral angle and disc height before and during compression. RESULTS: Each intervertebral angle before and during compression was as follows: T12-L1 (-0.8 degrees +/- 2.5 degrees and -1.5 degrees +/- 2.6 degrees ), L1-L2 (0.7 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees and 3.3 degrees +/- 2.9 degrees ), L2-L3 (4.7 degrees +/- 3.5 degrees and 7.3 degrees +/- 6 degrees ), L3-L4 (7.9 degrees +/- 2.4 degrees and 11.1 degrees +/- 4.6 degrees ), L4-L5 (14.3 degrees +/- 3.3 degrees and 14.9 degrees +/- 1.7 degrees ), L5-S1 (25.8 degrees +/- 5.2 degrees and 20.8 degrees +/- 6 degrees ), and L1-S1 (53.4 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees and 57.3 degrees +/- 16.7 degrees ). Negative values reflect kyphosis, and positive values reflect lordosis. A significant difference between values before and during compression was obtained at L3-L4 and L5-S1. There was a significant decrease in disc height only at L4-L5 during compression. CONCLUSIONS: The axial force of 50% body weight in supine posture simulates the upright lumbar spine morphologically. No change in intervertebral angle occurred at L4-L5. However, disc height at L4-L

  1. Network dynamics for optimal compressive-sensing input-signal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranca, Victor J; Kovačič, Gregor; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-10-01

    By using compressive sensing (CS) theory, a broad class of static signals can be reconstructed through a sequence of very few measurements in the framework of a linear system. For networks with nonlinear and time-evolving dynamics, is it similarly possible to recover an unknown input signal from only a small number of network output measurements? We address this question for pulse-coupled networks and investigate the network dynamics necessary for successful input signal recovery. Determining the specific network characteristics that correspond to a minimal input reconstruction error, we are able to achieve high-quality signal reconstructions with few measurements of network output. Using various measures to characterize dynamical properties of network output, we determine that networks with highly variable and aperiodic output can successfully encode network input information with high fidelity and achieve the most accurate CS input reconstructions. For time-varying inputs, we also find that high-quality reconstructions are achievable by measuring network output over a relatively short time window. Even when network inputs change with time, the same optimal choice of network characteristics and corresponding dynamics apply as in the case of static inputs.

  2. Dynamic Response of Offshore Wind Turbines subjected to Joint Wave and Wind Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Weiliang; Chen, Jianbing; Liu, Wenfeng;

    2013-01-01

    into consideration. Wind and wave loads are generated by the physical random models. The aerodynamic loads on blades are calculated by the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory, and the wave loads are calculated by the linear theory of wave. The dynamic response of the NREL-5MW wind turbine system is carried out......This paper investigates the dynamic response of offshore wind turbine systems subjected joint wind and wave loads. Relying on the finite element model, Kane’s equation is adopted to consider the rotation of blades. Besides, the generator-torque control and blade-pitch control are taken...

  3. DCS - A High Flux Beamline for Time Resolved Dynamic Compression Science – Design Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); D' Amico, Kevin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nudell, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Collins, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schmidt, Oliver [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm2. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm2. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  4. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov; D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov; Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov; Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov; Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm{sup 2}. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm{sup 2}. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE LOCALIZATION OF DAMAGE AND THE COMPLETE STRESS-STRAIN RELATION FOR MESOSCOPIC HETEROGENEOUS BRITTLE ROCK SUBJECTED TO COMPRESSIVE LOADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小平; 张永兴; 哈秋聆; 王建华

    2004-01-01

    A micromechanics-based model is established. The model takes the interaction among sliding cracks into account, and it is able to quantify the effect of various parameters on the localization condition of damage and deformation for brittle rock subjected to compressive loads. The closed-form explicit expression for the complete stress-strain relation of rock containing microcracks subjected to compressive loads was obtained. It is showed that the complete stress-strain relation includes linear elasticity,nonlinear hardening,rapid stress drop and strain softening.The behavior of rapid stress drop and strain softening is due to localization of deformation and damage. Theoretical predictions have shown to be consistent with the experimental results.

  6. Study of compression-loaded and impact-damaged structurally efficient graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semisandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1992-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semisandwich composite panels is studied to determine their weight savings potential. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them and semisandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight designs for critical compressive load levels ranging from 3000 to 24,000 lb/in. Graphite-thermoplastic panels based on the optimal minimum weight designs were fabricated and tested. A finite element analysis of several test specimens was also conducted. The results of the optimization study, the finite element analysis, and the experiments are presented. The results of testing impact damage panels are also discussed.

  7. Effects of fundamental structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel under hydrodynamic loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Long; Fei Ge; Lei Wang; Youshi Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel (SFT) under hydrodynamic loads. The structure parameters includes buoyancy-weight ratio (BWR), stiffness coefficients of the cable systems, tunnel net buoyancy and tunnel length. First, the importance of structural damp in relation to the dynamic responses of SFT is demonstrated and the mechanism of structural damp effect is discussed. Thereafter, the fundamental structure parameters are investi-gated through the analysis of SFT dynamic responses under hydrodynamic loads. The results indicate that the BWR of SFT is a key structure parameter. When BWR is 1.2, there is a remarkable trend change in the vertical dynamic response of SFT under hydrodynamic loads. The results also indicate that the ratio of the tunnel net buoyancy to the cable stiffness coefficient is not a characteristic factor affecting the dynamic responses of SFT under hydrodynamic loads.

  8. Constitutive model of rock under static-dynamic coupling loading and experimental investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi-bing; ZUO Yu-jun; WANG Wei-hua; MA Chun-de; ZHOU Zi-long

    2006-01-01

    The importance of study on constitutive model of statically loaded rock experiencing dynamic load is set forth, and the studying methods on dynamic constitutive model are classified according to the current studying status. By way of combining statistic damage model and viscoelastic model, uni-axial and multi-axial constitutive models of statically loaded rock experiencing dynamic load (static-dynamic coupling constitutive model) under intermediate strain rate are established. The verification experiment on 2D constitutive model under different static stress and dynamic stress with different frequencies is designed and performed. It is found that there is a good agreement between the experimental stress-strain curves and the theoretical stress-strain curves.

  9. Características de frutos de café sob compressão Characteristics of coffee fruits under compression load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Couto

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available As condições necessárias para a realização de ensaios de compressão em frutos de café visando à obtenção de resultados confiáveis das forças envolvidas no colapso do produto, foram investigadas neste trabalho e determinados os requerimentos de forças, deformações e energias para o colapso do material sob compressão. As variáveis independentes investigadas foram: presença do pedúnculo no fruto, velocidade de compressão, grau de maturação dos frutos e posição do produto durante a compressão. Os frutos testados encontravam-se em três estádios de maturação: 'cereja', 'verdoengo' e 'verde'. As análises dos resultados mostraram que, para se ter um erro menor ou igual a 10% na estimativa das forças de colapso do produto, são necessárias amostras de, pelo menos, cinqüenta frutos. Os valores das forças, deformações específicas e energias, para o colapso de frutos 'cereja', não foram afetados pela presença do pedúnculo no produto. A velocidade de compressão parece não influenciar nos valores das grandezas investigadas; já a posição do produto, ao ser comprimido, e o estádio de maturação do fruto, mostraram ser variáveis significativas.Basic conditions required to obtain accuracy on the values of forces for collapse of coffee fruits under compression tests were investigated. The requirements of force, strain and energy up to the collapse point of the material were also determined. The independent variables investigated were: presence of peduncle; compression velocity; product maturation stage and fruit orientation during the compression. The fruits tested were at three maturation stages (classified by color: 'cherry', 'green' and one named 'verdoengo' (stage somewhere between cherry and green. Analysis of the results showed a sample size requirement of, at least, fifty fruits to estimate the collapse forces with an error less than 10%. The values of forces, strains and energies up to the collapse of 'cherry

  10. Investigating the tension load of rubber composites by impact dynamic testing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L AMBRIŠKO; D MARASOVÁ; M CEHLÁR

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with establishing the tension load by impact dynamic testing of rubber composite conveyor belts. The value of tension load affects the shape of the used impactor and use of a support system as well as the weight of the ram and the impact height. An increase in the allowable stress when the belt is tensioned was examined during the test, to determine the effect of impact on the tension load. The obtained values of tension load are assessed using basic mathematical and statistical methods. Using the Design of Experiments method, factors that significantly affect the value of the tension load are identified.

  11. Comparison of limited-contact dynamic compression plate and locking compression plate constructs for proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocconi, Richard A; Carmalt, James L; Sampson, Sarah N; Elder, Steve H; Gilbert, Eric E

    2015-06-01

    This study compared in vitro monotonic and cyclic mechanical properties of equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodeses stabilized using an open or closed technique combined with axial 4.5 mm narrow limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) or 4.5 mm narrow locking compression plate (LCP). Ten forelimb pairs were randomly assigned to LCP or LC-DCP groups. One limb in each pair was assigned to either open or closed technique. Limbs were tested for cyclic fatigue at 20 000 cycles and then single-cycle to failure under 3-point dorsopalmar bending. There was no significant difference in stiffness of constructs during cyclic fatigue testing or on force or stiffness at failure in single cycle to failure testing between open and closed techniques or between plate types. Both implants, surgical technique, or combinations thereof are suitable for clinical use. More work is necessary to define the interaction between implant type and surgical technique.

  12. Dynamical response of hyper-elastic cylindrical shells under periodic load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Jiu-sheng

    2008-01-01

    Dynamical responses, such as motion and destruction of hyper-elastic cylindricai shells subject to periodic or suddenly applied constant load on the inner surface,are studied within a framework of finite elasto-dynamics. By numerical computation and dynamic qualitative analysis of the nonlinear differential equation, it is shown that there exists a certain critical value for the internal load describing motion of the inner surface of the shell. Motion of the shell is nonlinear periodic or quasi-periodic oscillation when the average load of the periodic load or the constant load is less than its critical value.However, the shell will be destroyed when the load exceeds the critical value. Solution to the static equilibrium problem is a fixed point for the dynamical response of the corresponding system under a suddenly applied constant load. The property of fixed point is related to the property of the dynamical solution and motion of the shell. The effects of thickness and load parameters on the critical value and oscillation of the shell are discussed.

  13. Analysis of Comparison between Unconfined and Confined Condition of Foamed Concrete Under Uni-Axial Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zairul A. Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Foamed concrete has become most commercial material in construction industry. People in industries were come out with the new mix design of foamed concrete to meet the specification and the requirements needed. Approach: This is because foamed concrete has the possibility as alternative of lightweight concrete for producing intermediate strength capabilities with excellent thermal insulation, freeze-thaw resistance, high-impact resistance and good shock absorption. Results: Currently Standard test to measure the compressive strength of foamed concrete is using standard unconfined compressive test. Several research has been conduct but the compressive strength using standard unconfined compressive test not capture true behavior of foamed concrete because it just achieved only low compressive strength and sample under compression failed due to brittle collapse of the sample. This paper was analyses the comparison between standard compressive test and confined compressive test. The confinement test introduced to prevent sample from brittle collapse. Foamed concrete cylindrical sample has been investigated under the standard compressive test for hard concrete (ASTM-C39. Based on the research, samples are produced under unconfined and confined condition. Analysis has been done and the result show that under standard compressive test, the sample failed due to early crack initiation and failed. Confinement condition was increase the compressive strength but this condition influence the result. Conclusion/Recommendations: Standard test is not suitable to capture the true behavior of foamed concrete, and to prevent the sample from brittle collapse during the test, new testing method was introduced to capture the true behavior of foamed concrete which is using Quasi Static Indentation Test. This test can be used to study about the behaviour of foamed concrete before it can be implemented to its final application.

  14. Phenomenological study of a cellular material behaviour under dynamic loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouix, R.; Viot, Ph.; Lataillade, J.-L.

    2006-08-01

    Polypropylene foams are cellular materials, which are often use to fill structures subjected to crash or violent impacts. Therefore, it is necessary to know and to characterise in experiments their mechanical behaviour in compression at high strain rates. So, several apparatus have been used in order to highlight the influence of strain rate, material density and also temperature. A split Hopkinson Pressure Bar has been used for impact tests, a fly wheel to test theses materials at medium strain rate and an electro-mechanical testing machine associated to a climatic chamber for temperature tests. Then, a rheological model has been used in order to describe the material behaviour. The mechanical response to compression of these foams presents three typical domains: a linear elastic step, a wide collapse plateau stress, which leads to a densification, which are related to a standard rheological model.

  15. Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensor for ISS (EDLS-ISS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) propose to develop a stand-alone 6-DOF load sensing system that collects biomechanical...

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF LOCKING VERSUS DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATES FOR DIAPHYSEAL HUMERUS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penugonda Ravi Shankar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of locking compression plate (LCP over dynamic compression plate (DCP in the management of diaphyseal fractures of the humerus. 38 patients with diaphyseal fracture of the shaft of the humerus were randomized prospectively and treated by open reduction and internal fixation with LCP or DCP. 11 patients underwent internal fixation by LCP and 27 by DCP. Fixation was done through an anterolateral or posterior approach. The outcome was assessed in terms of the union time, union rate, functional outcome, ROM and the incidence of complications. Functional outcome was assessed using the Romen’s et al series grading system . On comparing the results by tests of significance like Chi - sqare test, there was no significant difference in Romen’s et al scores between the two groups ( P >0.05. Though the average union time and recovery of ROM was found to be better for LCP as compared to DCP, it is not statistically significant. Complications such as infection were found to be higher with DCP as compared to LCP. This study proves that LCP can be considered a better surgical option for the management of diaphyseal fractures of the humerus as it offers a short union time and lower incidence of serious complications like infection. However, there appears to be no difference between the two groups in terms of the rate of union and functional outcome

  17. Formation and Collapse of Quiescent Cloud Cores Induced by Dynamic Compressions

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Gilberto C; Shadmehri, Mohsen; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of the formation, evolution and gravitational collapse of isothermal molecular cloud cores induced by generic turbulent compressions in spherical geometry. A compressive wave is set up in a constant sub-Jeans density distribution. As the wave travels through the simulation grid, a shock-bounded layer is formed. The inner shock of this layer reaches and bounces off the center, leaving behind a central core with an initial almost uniform density distribution, surrounded by an envelope consisting of the material in the shock-bounded shell, with a power-law density profile with index close to -2 even in non-collapsing cases. The resulting density structure resembles a quiescent core of radius < 0.1 pc, with a Bonnor-Ebert-like (BE-like) profile, although it has significant dynamical differences: it is initially non-self-gravitating and confined by the ram pressure of the infalling material, and consequently, growing continuously in mass and size. With the appropi...

  18. EFFECT OF GEAR WIDTH AND HELIX ANGLE ON FACTOR OF DYNAMIC LOAD OF DOUBLE CIRCULAR ARC HELICAL GEARING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Baolin

    2004-01-01

    Based on theory of mechanical dynamics, meshing characteristic as well as the dynamic model of double circular arc helical gearing, an analysis approach and a computer program have been developed for studying the state of dynamic load and factor of dynamic load of the gearing, the changing situation of dynamic load and dynamic load factor vs some affecting factors such as gear width, helix angle and accuracy grade etc are investigated. A series of conclusions are obtained: ①With the increasing in the values of gear width, the dynamic load factor appears slow decreasing tendency in most region of gear width. ② When the accuracy grades of the gearing are improved, the values of dynamic load factor decrease. ③ The value of dynamic load factor appears a decreasing tendency with the increasing of value of helix angle at the same ratio of critical rotational speed.

  19. Incorporating moving dynamic tyre loads in pavement design and analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available and AT VISSER* CSIR Transportek, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 00011 *Department of Civil Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria INTRODUCTION Current mechanistic pavement design and analysis techniques use several simplifications to enable... the process to be practical and cost-effective. These include equivalent vehicle loads, linear elastic analysis and static vehicle load and pavement response analysis. These simplifications allow the process of pavement design and analysis to be applied...

  20. Testing for time-varying loadings in dynamic factor models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jakob Guldbæk

    factors. The squared correlation coefficient times the sample size has a limiting chi-squared distribution. The test can be made robust to serial correlation in the idiosyncratic errors. We find evidence for factor loadings variance in over half of the variables in a dataset for the US economy, while...... there is evidence of time-varying loadings on the risk factors underlying portfolio returns for around 80% of the portfolios....