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Sample records for dynamic compressive loading

  1. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-01

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The yield

  2. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  3. Strength of tensed and compressed concrete segments in crack spacing under short-term dynamic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyautdinov Zaur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of model describing dynamic straining of reinforced concrete requires taking into account the basic aspects influencing the stress-strain state of structures. Strength of concrete segments in crack spacing is one of the crucial aspects that affect general strain behavior of reinforced concrete. Experimental results demonstrate significant change in strength of tensed and compressed concrete segments in crack spacing both under static and under dynamic loading. In this case, strength depends on tensile strain level and the slope angle of rebars towards the cracks direction. Existing theoretical and experimental studies estimate strength of concrete segments in crack spacing under static loading. The present work presents results of experimental and theoretical studies of dynamic strength of plates between cracks subjected to compression-tension. Experimental data was analyzed statistically; the dependences were suggested to describe dynamic strength of concrete segments depending on tensile strain level and slope angle of rebars to cracks direction.

  4. Dynamic characterization and modeling of magneto-rheological elastomers under compressive loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Khan, Fazeel; Jang, Dong-Doo; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of the research reported in this paper has been to characterize and model the compression properties of magneto-rheological elastomers (MREs). MRE samples were fabricated by curing a two-component elastomer resin with 30% content of 10 µm sized iron particles by volume. In order to vary the magnetic field during compressive testing, a test fixture was designed and fabricated in which two permanent magnets could be variably positioned on either side of the specimen. Changing the distance between the magnets of the fixture allowed the strength of the magnetic field passing uniformly through the sample to be varied. Using this test setup and a dynamic test frame, a series of compression tests of MRE samples were performed, by varying the magnetic field and the frequency of loading. The results show that the MR effect (per cent increase in the material 'stiffness') increases as the magnetic field increases and the loading frequency increases within the range of the magnetic field and input frequency considered in this study. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to capture the dynamic behaviors of the MREs under compression loadings. (technical note)

  5. Dynamic characterization and modeling of magneto-rheological elastomers under compressive loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J H; Khan, F; Jang, D D; Jung, H J

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to characterize and model the compression properties of Magneto-Rheological Elastomers (MREs). MRE samples were fabricated by curing a two component elastomer resin with 30% content of 10 μm sized iron particles by volume. In order to vary the magnetic field during compressive testing, a test fixture was designed and fabricated in which two permanent magnets could be variably positioned on either side of the specimen. By changing the distance between the magnets, the fixture allowed for varying the magnetic field that passes uniformly through the sample. Using this test setup and a dynamic test frame, a series of compression tests of MRE samples was performed by varying the magnetic field and frequency of loading. The results show the MR effect (percent increase in the materials 'stiffness') increases as the magnetic field increases and loading frequency increases within the range of the magnetic field and input frequency considered in this study. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to capture the dynamic behaviours of the MREs under compression loadings.

  6. Compressive Loads on the Lumbar Spine During Lifting: 4D WATBAK versus Inverse Dynamics Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Cole

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous two- and three-dimensional biomechanical models exist for the purpose of assessing the stresses placed on the lumbar spine during the performance of a manual material handling task. More recently, researchers have utilised their knowledge to develop specific computer-based models that can be applied in an occupational setting; an example of which is 4D WATBAK. The model used by 4D WATBAK bases its predications on static calculations and it is assumed that these static loads reasonably depict the actual dynamic loads acting on the lumbar spine. Consequently, it was the purpose of this research to assess the agreement between the static predictions made by 4D WATBAK and those from a comparable dynamic model. Six individuals were asked to perform a series of five lifting tasks, which ranged from lifting 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg and were designed to replicate the lifting component of the Work Capacity Assessment Test used within Australia. A single perpendicularly placed video camera was used to film each performance in the sagittal plane. The resultant two-dimensional kinematic data were input into the 4D WATBAK software and a dynamic biomechanical model to quantify the compression forces acting at the L4/L5 intervertebral joint. Results of this study indicated that as the mass of the load increased from 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg, the static compression forces calculated by 4D WATBAK became increasingly less than those calculated using the dynamic model (mean difference ranged from 22.0% for 2.5 kg to 42.9% for 22.5 kg. This study suggested that, for research purposes, a validated three-dimensional dynamic model should be employed when a task becomes complex and when a more accurate indication of spinal compression or shear force is required. Additionally, although it is clear that 4D WATBAK is particularly suited to industrial applications, it is suggested that the limitations of such modelling tools be carefully considered when task-risk and employee

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Aluminum Honeycombs Subjected to Dynamic Indentation and Compression Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.M. Ayman Ashab

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of aluminum hexagonal honeycombs subjected to out-of-plane dynamic indentation and compression loads has been investigated numerically using ANSYS/LS-DYNA in this paper. The finite element (FE models have been verified by previous experimental results in terms of deformation pattern, stress-strain curve, and energy dissipation. The verified FE models have then been used in comprehensive numerical analysis of different aluminum honeycombs. Plateau stress, σpl, and dissipated energy (EI for indentation and EC for compression have been calculated at different strain rates ranging from 102 to 104 s−1. The effects of strain rate and t/l ratio on the plateau stress, dissipated energy, and tearing energy have been discussed. An empirical formula is proposed to describe the relationship between the tearing energy per unit fracture area, relative density, and strain rate for honeycombs. Moreover, it has been found that a generic formula can be used to describe the relationship between tearing energy per unit fracture area and relative density for both aluminum honeycombs and foams.

  8. Dynamic Behavior of AA2519-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under High Strain Rate Loading in Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasumboye, A. T.; Owolabi, G. M.; Odeshi, A. G.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effects of strain rate on the dynamic behavior, microstructure evolution and hence, failure of the AA2519-T8 aluminum alloy were investigated under compression at strain rates ranging from 1000 to 3500 s-1. Cylindrical specimens of dimensions 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm (L/D = 1) were tested using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar integrated with a digital image correlation system. The microstructure of the alloy was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results showed that the dynamic yield strength of the alloy is strain rate dependent, with the maximum yield strength attained by the material being 500 MPa. The peak flow stress of 562 MPa was attained by the material at 3500 s-1. The alloy also showed a significant rate of strain hardening that is typical of other Al-Cu alloys; the rate of strain hardening, however, decreased with increase in strain rate. It was determined that the strain rate sensitivity coefficient of the alloy within the range of high strain rates used in this study is approximately 0.05 at 0.12 plastic strain; a more significant value than what was reported in literature under quasi-static loading. Micrographs obtained showed potential sites for the evolution of adiabatic shear band at 3500 s-1, with a characteristic circular-shaped surface profile comprising partially dissolved second phase particles in the continuous phase across the incident plane of the deformed specimen. The regions surrounding the site showed little or no change in the size of particles. However, the constituent coarse particles were observed as agglomerations of fractured pieces, thus having a shape factor different from those contained in the as-received alloy. Since the investigated alloy is a choice material for military application where it can be exposed to massive deformation at high strain rates, this study provides information on its microstructural and mechanical responses to such extreme loading condition.

  9. Influence of dynamic compressive loading on the in vitro degradation behavior of pure PLA and Mg/PLA composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Qi, Chenxi; Han, Linyuan; Chu, Chenglin; Bai, Jing; Guo, Chao; Xue, Feng; Shen, Baolong; Chu, Paul K

    2017-12-01

    The effects of dynamic compressive loading on the in vitro degradation behavior of pure poly-lactic acid (PLA) and PLA-based composite unidirectionally reinforced with micro-arc oxidized magnesium alloy wires (Mg/PLA) are investigated. Dynamic compressive loading is shown to accelerate degradation of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. As the applied stress is increased from 0.1MPa to 0.9MPa or frequency from 0.5Hz to 2.5Hz, the overall degradation rate goes up. After immersion for 21days at 0.9MPa and 2.5Hz, the bending strength retention of the composite and pure PLA is 60.1% and 50%, respectively. Dynamic loading enhances diffusion of small acidic molecules resulting in significant pH decrease in the immersion solution. The synergistic reaction between magnesium alloy wires and PLA in the composite is further clarified by electrochemical tests. The degradation behavior of the pure PLA and PLA matrix in the composite under dynamic conditions obey the first order degradation kinetics and a numerical model is postulated to elucidate the relationship of the bending strength, stress, frequency, and immersion time under dynamic conditions. We systematically study the influence of dynamic loading on the degradation behavior of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. Dynamic compressive loading is shown to accelerate degradation of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. The synergistic reaction between magnesium alloy wires and PLA in the composite is firstly clarified by electrochemical tests. The degradation behavior of the pure PLA and PLA matrix in the composite under dynamic conditions obey the first order degradation kinetics. Then, a numerical model is postulated to elucidate the relationship of the bending strength, stress, frequency, and immersion time under dynamic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic loads on human and animal surrogates at different test locations in compressed-gas-driven shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alay, E.; Skotak, M.; Misistia, A.; Chandra, N.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic loads on specimens in live-fire conditions as well as at different locations within and outside compressed-gas-driven shock tubes are determined by both static and total blast overpressure-time pressure pulses. The biomechanical loading on the specimen is determined by surface pressures that combine the effects of static, dynamic, and reflected pressures and specimen geometry. Surface pressure is both space and time dependent; it varies as a function of size, shape, and external contour of the specimens. In this work, we used two sets of specimens: (1) anthropometric dummy head and (2) a surrogate rodent headform instrumented with pressure sensors and subjected them to blast waves in the interior and at the exit of the shock tube. We demonstrate in this work that while inside the shock tube the biomechanical loading as determined by various pressure measures closely aligns with live-fire data and shock wave theory, significant deviations are found when tests are performed outside.

  11. Microstructure and Deformation Response of TRIP-Steel Syntactic Foams to Quasi-Static and Dynamic Compressive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehinger, David; Weise, Jörg; Baumeister, Joachim; Funk, Alexander; Krüger, Lutz; Martin, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of hollow S60HS glass microspheres and Fillite 106 cenospheres in a martensitically transformable AISI 304L stainless steel matrix was realized by means of metal injection molding of feedstock with varying fractions of the filler material. The so-called TRIP-steel syntactic foams were studied with respect to their behavior under quasi-static compression and dynamic impact loading. The interplay between matrix material behavior and foam structure was discussed in relation to the findings of micro-structural investigations, electron back scatter diffraction EBSD phase analyses and magnetic measurements. During processing, the cenospheres remained relatively stable retaining their shape while the glass microspheres underwent disintegration associated with the formation of pre-cracked irregular inclusions. Consequently, the AISI 304L/Fillite 106 syntactic foams exhibited a higher compression stress level and energy absorption capability as compared to the S60HS-containing variants. The α′ -martensite kinetic of the steel matrix was significantly influenced by material composition, strain rate and arising deformation temperature. The highest ferromagnetic α′-martensite phase fraction was detected for the AISI 304L/S60HS batches and the lowest for the TRIP-steel bulk material. Quasi-adiabatic sample heating, a gradual decrease in strain rate and an enhanced degree of damage controlled the mechanical deformation response of the studied syntactic foams under dynamic impact loading. PMID:29695107

  12. Dynamic Evaluation of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Subjected to High-Strain-Rate Compressive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Riddick, J. C.; Hall, A. J.; Haile, M. A.; Von Wahlde, R.; Cole, D. P.; Biggs S. J. Effect of Manufacturing Parameters on Failure in Acrylonitrile...for Tensile Properties of Plastics Annu. Book ASTM Stand. 2004, 1–15. 17. Zukas, J. High Velocity Impact Dynamics; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: New York

  13. Moment measurements in dynamic and quasi-static spine segment testing using eccentric compression are susceptible to artifacts based on loading configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Carter, Jarrod W; Oxland, Thomas R; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    The tolerance of the spine to bending moments, used for evaluation of injury prevention devices, is often determined through eccentric axial compression experiments using segments of the cadaver spine. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory demonstrated that eccentric axial compression resulted in "unexpected" (artifact) moments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static and dynamic effects of test configuration on bending moments during eccentric axial compression typical in cadaver spine segment testing. Specific objectives were to create dynamic equilibrium equations for the loads measured inferior to the specimen, experimentally verify these equations, and compare moment responses from various test configurations using synthetic (rubber) and human cadaver specimens. The equilibrium equations were verified by performing quasi-static (5 mm/s) and dynamic experiments (0.4 m/s) on a rubber specimen and comparing calculated shear forces and bending moments to those measured using a six-axis load cell. Moment responses were compared for hinge joint, linear slider and hinge joint, and roller joint configurations tested at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Calculated shear force and bending moment curves had similar shapes to those measured. Calculated values in the first local minima differed from those measured by 3% and 15%, respectively, in the dynamic test, and these occurred within 1.5 ms of those measured. In the rubber specimen experiments, for the hinge joint (translation constrained), quasi-static and dynamic posterior eccentric compression resulted in flexion (unexpected) moments. For the slider and hinge joints and the roller joints (translation unconstrained), extension ("expected") moments were measured quasi-statically and initial flexion (unexpected) moments were measured dynamically. In the cadaver experiments with roller joints, anterior and posterior eccentricities resulted in extension moments, which were unexpected and expected, for those

  14. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load; Charakteristik und Modellierung von Fichtenholz unter dynamischer Druckbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-28

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The

  15. The Study of the Frequency Effect of Dynamic Compressive Loading on Primary Articular Chondrocyte Functions Using a Microcell Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Ying Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive stimulation can modulate articular chondrocyte functions. Nevertheless, the relevant studies are not comprehensive. This is primarily due to the lack of cell culture apparatuses capable of conducting the experiments in a high throughput, precise, and cost-effective manner. To address the issue, we demonstrated the use of a perfusion microcell culture system to investigate the stimulating frequency (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz effect of compressive loading (20% and 40% strain on the functions of articular chondrocytes. The system mainly integrates the functions of continuous culture medium perfusion and the generation of pneumatically-driven compressive stimulation in a high-throughput micro cell culture system. Results showed that the compressive stimulations explored did not have a significant impact on chondrocyte viability and proliferation. However, the metabolic activity of chondrocytes was significantly affected by the stimulating frequency at the higher compressive strain of 40% (2 Hz, 40% strain. Under the two compressive strains studied, the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs synthesis was upregulated when the stimulating frequency was set at 1 Hz and 2 Hz. However, the stimulating frequencies explored had no influence on the collagen production. The results of this study provide useful fundamental insights that will be helpful for cartilage tissue engineering and cartilage rehabilitation.

  16. Compressive Load Resistance Characteristics of Rice Grain

    OpenAIRE

    Sumpun Chaitep; Chaiy R. Metha Pathawee; Pipatpong Watanawanyoo

    2008-01-01

    Investigation was made to observe the compressive load property of rice gain both rough rice and brown grain. Six rice varieties (indica and japonica) were examined with the moisture content at 10-12%. A compressive load with reference to a principal axis normal to the thickness of the grain were conducted at selected inclined angles of 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 70°. The result showed the compressive load resistance of rice grain based on its characteristic of yield s...

  17. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  18. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  19. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A. [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France); Maysonnave, T. [International Technologies for High Pulsed Power, F-46500 Thégra (France); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or

  20. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  1. Effect of Cyclic Dynamic Compressive Loading on Chondrocytes and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Co-Cultured in Highly Elastic Cryogel Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first used gelatin/chondroitin-6-sulfate/hyaluronan/chitosan highly elastic cryogels, which showed total recovery from large strains during repeated compression cycles, as 3D scaffolds to study the effects of cyclic dynamic compressive loading on chondrocyte gene expression and extracellular matrix (ECM production. Dynamic culture of porcine chondrocytes was studied at 1 Hz, 10% to 40% strain and 1 to 9 h/day stimulation duration, in a mechanical-driven multi-chamber bioreactor for 14 days. From the experimental results, we could identify the optimum dynamic culture condition (20% and 3 h/day to enhance the chondrocytic phenotype of chondrocytes from the expression of marker (Col I, Col II, Col X, TNF-α, TGF-β1 and IGF-1 genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR and production of ECM (GAGs and Col II by biochemical analysis and immunofluorescence staining. With up-regulated growth factor (TGF-β1 and IGF-1 genes, co-culture of chondrocytes with porcine adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs was employed to facilitate chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs during dynamic culture in cryogel scaffolds. By replacing half of the chondrocytes with ASCs during co-culture, we could obtain similar production of ECM (GAGs and Col II and expression of Col II, but reduced expression of Col I, Col X and TNF-α. Subcutaneous implantation of cells/scaffold constructs in nude mice after mono-culture (chondrocytes or ASCs or co-culture (chondrocytes + ASCs and subject to static or dynamic culture condition in vitro for 14 days was tested for tissue-engineering applications. The constructs were retrieved 8 weeks post-implantation for histological analysis by Alcian blue, Safranin O and Col II immunohistochemical staining. The most abundant ectopic cartilage tissue was found for the chondrocytes and chondrocytes + ASCs groups using dynamic culture, which showed similar neo-cartilage formation capability with half of the

  2. Intradiscal pressure depends on recent loading and correlates with disc height and compressive stiffness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergroesen, P.P.A.; van der Veen, A.J.; van Royen, B.J.; Kingma, I.; Smit, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Intervertebral discs exhibit time-dependent deformation (creep), which could influence the relation between applied stress and intradiscal pressure. This study investigates the effect of prolonged dynamic loading on intradiscal pressure, disc height and compressive stiffness, and examines

  3. DYNAMIC LOAD DAMPER MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Aleksey Alekseevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present their findings associated with their modeling of a dynamic load damper. According to the authors, the damper is to be installed onto a structure or its element that may be exposed to impact, vibration or any other dynamic loading. The damper is composed of paralleled or consecutively connected viscous and elastic elements. The authors study the influence of viscosity and elasticity parameters of the damper produced onto the regular displacement of points of the structure to be protected and onto the regular acceleration transmitted immediately from the damper to the elements positioned below it.

  4. Compressed magnetic flux amplifier with capacitive load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1980-03-01

    A first-order analysis is presented for a compressed magnetic flux (CMF) current amplifier working into a load with a capacitive component. Since the purpose of the investigation was to gain a general understanding of the arrangement, a number of approximations and limitations were accepted. The inductance of the transducer varies with time; the inductance/resistance/capacitance (LRC) circuit therefore is parametric and solutions are different for the stable regime (high C), the oscillation regime (low C), and the transition case. Solutions and performance depend strongly on circuit boundary conditions, i.e., energization of the circuit by either an injected current or by an applied capacitor charge. The behavior of current and energy amplification for the various cases are discussed in detail. A number of experiments with small CMF devices showed that the first-order theory presented predicts transducer performance well in the linear regime

  5. Blind compressive sensing dynamic MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel blind compressive sensing (BCS) frame work to recover dynamic magnetic resonance images from undersampled measurements. This scheme models the dynamic signal as a sparse linear combination of temporal basis functions, chosen from a large dictionary. In contrast to classical compressed sensing, the BCS scheme simultaneously estimates the dictionary and the sparse coefficients from the undersampled measurements. Apart from the sparsity of the coefficients, the key difference of the BCS scheme with current low rank methods is the non-orthogonal nature of the dictionary basis functions. Since the number of degrees of freedom of the BCS model is smaller than that of the low-rank methods, it provides improved reconstructions at high acceleration rates. We formulate the reconstruction as a constrained optimization problem; the objective function is the linear combination of a data consistency term and sparsity promoting ℓ1 prior of the coefficients. The Frobenius norm dictionary constraint is used to avoid scale ambiguity. We introduce a simple and efficient majorize-minimize algorithm, which decouples the original criterion into three simpler sub problems. An alternating minimization strategy is used, where we cycle through the minimization of three simpler problems. This algorithm is seen to be considerably faster than approaches that alternates between sparse coding and dictionary estimation, as well as the extension of K-SVD dictionary learning scheme. The use of the ℓ1 penalty and Frobenius norm dictionary constraint enables the attenuation of insignificant basis functions compared to the ℓ0 norm and column norm constraint assumed in most dictionary learning algorithms; this is especially important since the number of basis functions that can be reliably estimated is restricted by the available measurements. We also observe that the proposed scheme is more robust to local minima compared to K-SVD method, which relies on greedy sparse coding

  6. Behaviour of soil-cement specimens in unconfined dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.; Fendukly, L. M.

    1994-06-01

    The response of the cement-stabilized red marl to dynamic loading in compression has been investigated over a range of cement contents and curing times. Specimens were subjected to different stress levels below unconfined compressive strength, at a frequency of 5 Hz, and a fatigue relationship for the material was developed. The value of resilient modulus was found to be greater than the modulus of elasticity for the same cement content and curing time.

  7. Deformation behaviour of body centered cubic Fe nanowires under tensile and compressive loading

    OpenAIRE

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to investigate the deformation behaviour of /{111} body centered cubic (BCC) Fe nanowires under tensile and compressive loading. An embedded atom method (EAM) potential was used to describe the interatomic interactions. The simulations were carried out at 10 K with a constant strain rate of $1\\times10^{8}$ $s^{-1}$. The results indicate a significant differences in deformation mechanisms under tensile and compressive loading. Under ten...

  8. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the Mechanical Behavior of Strongly Anisotropic Light-Weight Metallic Fiber Structures under Static and Dynamic Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Andersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rigid metallic fiber structures made from a variety of different metals and alloys have been investigated mainly with regard to their functional properties such as heat transfer, pressure drop, or filtration characteristics. With the recent advent of aluminum and magnesium-based fiber structures, the application of such structures in light-weight crash absorbers has become conceivable. The present paper therefore elucidates the mechanical behavior of rigid sintered fiber structures under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Special attention is paid to the strongly anisotropic properties observed for different directions of loading in relation to the main fiber orientation. Basically, the structures show an orthotropic behavior; however, a finite thickness of the fiber slabs results in moderate deviations from a purely orthotropic behavior. The morphology of the tested specimens is examined by computed tomography, and experimental results for different directions of loading as well as different relative densities are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using real structural data derived from the computed tomography data. Depending on the direction of loading, the fiber structures show a distinctively different deformation behavior both experimentally and numerically. Based on these results, the prevalent modes of deformation are discussed and a first comparison with an established polymer foam and an assessment of the applicability of aluminum fiber structures in crash protection devices is attempted.

  9. Dynamic compression and sound quality of music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, van R.A.J.M.; Wagenaars, W.M.; Houtsma, A.J.M.; Stikvoort, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Amplitude compression is often used to match the dynamic: range of music to a particular playback situation in order to ensure, e .g ., continuous audibility in a noisy environment or unobtrusiveness if the music is intended as a quiet background. Since amplitude compression is a nonlinear process,

  10. Subjective evaluation of dynamic compression in music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaars, W.M.; Houtsma, A.J.M.; Lieshout, van R.A.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Amplitude compression is often used to match the dynamic range of music to a particular playback situation so as to ensure continuous audibility in a noisy environment. Since amplitude compression is a nonlinear process, it is potentially very damaging to sound quality. Three physical parameters of

  11. Dynamic compressive constitutive relation and shearing instability of metallic neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huanran; Cai Canyuan; Chen Danian; Ma Dongfang; Hou Yanjun; Wu Shanxing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Dynamic constitutive relation of Nd was determined in first compression of SHPB. → Deformation of Nd in multi-compression of SHPB were recorded by high-speed camera. → Constitutive relation of Nd was adjusted in modeling large deformation of Nd. → Results of SDDM investigation of recovered Nd specimens showed shearing fracture. → Shearing instability of Nd was estimated with constitutive relation. - Abstract: Based on static tests on MTS and dynamic tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) during the first loading, this study determined the dynamic compressive constitutive relation of metallic Nd. Based on large deformations of metallic Nd specimens generated by the multi-compressive loadings during SHPB tests, and recorded by a high-speed camera, the results of numerical simulations for SHPB test processes were used to extend the determined constitutive relation from small strain to large strain. The shearing instability strain in dynamic compressive deformations of metallic Nd was estimated with the extended constitutive relation according to the criterion given by Batra and Wei, and was compared with the average strain of recovered specimens.

  12. Dynamic stability under sudden loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simitses, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of dynamic stability of elastic structures subjected to sudden (step) loads is discussed. The various criteria and related methodologies for estimating critical conditions are presented with the emphasis on their similarities and differences. These are demonstrated by employing a simple mechanical model. Several structural configurations are analyzed, for demonstration purposes, with the intention of comparing critical dynamic loads to critical static loads. These configurations include shallow arches and shallow spherical caps, two bar frames, and imperfect cylindrical shells of metallic as well as laminated composite construction. In the demonstration examples, the effect of static pre loading on the dynamic critical load is presented

  13. Internal loading of an inhomogeneous compressible Earth with phase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraigne, P.; Dehant, V.; Wahr, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The geoid and the boundary topography caused by mass loads inside the earth were estimated. It is shown that the estimates are affected by compressibility, by a radially varying density distribution, and by the presence of phase boundaries with density discontinuities. The geoid predicted in the chemical boundary case is 30 to 40 percent smaller than that predicted in the phase case. The effects of compressibility and radially varying density are likely to be small. The inner core-outer core topography for loading inside the mantle and for loading inside the inner core were computed.

  14. Dynamic Relative Compression, Dynamic Partial Sums, and Substring Concatenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Christiansen, Anders Roy; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    -repetitive massive data sets such as genomes and web-data. We initiate the study of relative compression in a dynamic setting where the compressed source string S is subject to edit operations. The goal is to maintain the compressed representation compactly, while supporting edits and allowing efficient random...... access to the (uncompressed) source string. We present new data structures that achieve optimal time for updates and queries while using space linear in the size of the optimal relative compression, for nearly all combinations of parameters. We also present solutions for restricted and extended sets......Given a static reference string R and a source string S, a relative compression of S with respect to R is an encoding of S as a sequence of references to substrings of R. Relative compression schemes are a classic model of compression and have recently proved very successful for compressing highly...

  15. Dynamic Relative Compression, Dynamic Partial Sums, and Substring Concatenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2016-01-01

    -repetitive massive data sets such as genomes and web-data. We initiate the study of relative compression in a dynamic setting where the compressed source string S is subject to edit operations. The goal is to maintain the compressed representation compactly, while supporting edits and allowing efficient random...... access to the (uncompressed) source string. We present new data structures that achieve optimal time for updates and queries while using space linear in the size of the optimal relative compression, for nearly all combinations of parameters. We also present solutions for restricted and extended sets......Given a static reference string R and a source string S, a relative compression of S with respect to R is an encoding of S as a sequence of references to substrings of R. Relative compression schemes are a classic model of compression and have recently proved very successful for compressing highly...

  16. Microdamage in polycrystalline ceramics under dynamic compression and tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.S.; Zhang, D.; Feng, R.; Wu, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In-grain microplasticity and intergranular microdamage in polycrystalline hexagonal-structure ceramics subjected to a sequence of dynamic compression and tension are studied computationally using the Voronoi polycrystal model, by which the topological heterogeneity and material anisotropy of the crystals are simulated explicitly. The constitutive modeling considers crystal plasticity by basal slip, intergranular shear damage during compression, and intergranular mode-I cracking during tension. The model parameters are calibrated with the available shock compression and spall strength data on polycrystalline α-6H silicon carbide. The numerical results show that microplasticity is a more plausible micromechanism for the inelastic response of the material under shock compression. On the other hand, the spallation behavior of the shocked material can be well predicted by intergranular mode-I microcracking during load reversal from dynamic compression to tension. The failure process and the resulting spall strength are, however, affected strongly by the intensity of local release heterogeneity induced by heterogeneous microplasticity, and by the grain-boundary shear damage during compression

  17. Analysis of axial compressive loaded beam under random support excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wensheng; Wang, Fengde; Liu, Jian

    2017-12-01

    An analytical procedure to investigate the response spectrum of a uniform Bernoulli-Euler beam with axial compressive load subjected to random support excitations is implemented based on the Mindlin-Goodman method and the mode superposition method in the frequency domain. The random response spectrum of the simply supported beam subjected to white noise excitation and to Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum excitation is investigated, and the characteristics of the response spectrum are further explored. Moreover, the effect of axial compressive load is studied and a method to determine the axial load is proposed. The research results show that the response spectrum mainly consists of the beam's additional displacement response spectrum when the excitation is white noise; however, the quasi-static displacement response spectrum is the main component when the excitation is the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum. Under white noise excitation, the amplitude of the power spectral density function decreased as the axial compressive load increased, while the frequency band of the vibration response spectrum increased with the increase of axial compressive load.

  18. Behavior of quenched and tempered steels under high strain rate compression loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.W.; Seifert, K.; Abdel-Malek, S.

    1997-01-01

    Two quenched and tempered steels were tested under compression loading at strain rates of ε = 2.10 2 s -1 and ε = 2.10 3 s -1 . By applying the thermal activation theory, the flow stress at very high strain rates of 10 5 to 10 6 s -1 is derived from low temperature and high strain rate tests. Dynamic true stress - true strain behaviour presents, that stress increases with increasing strain until a maximum, then it decreases. Because of the adiabatic process under dynamic loading the maximum flow stress will occur at a lower strain if the strain rate is increased. Considering strain rate, strain hardening, strain rate hardening and strain softening, a constitutive equation with different additive terms is successfully used to describe the behaviour of material under dynamic compression loading. Results are compared with other models of constitutive equations. (orig.)

  19. On the characterisation of the dynamic compressive behaviour of silicon carbides subjected to isentropic compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinszner Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic materials are commonly used as protective materials particularly due to their very high hardness and compressive strength. However, the microstructure of a ceramic has a great influence on its compressive strength and on its ballistic efficiency. To study the influence of microstructural parameters on the dynamic compressive behaviour of silicon carbides, isentropic compression experiments have been performed on two silicon carbide grades using a high pulsed power generator called GEPI. Contrary to plate impact experiments, the use of the GEPI device and of the lagrangian analysis allows determining the whole loading path. The two SiC grades studied present different Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL due to their different microstructures. For these materials, the experimental technique allowed evaluating the evolution of the equivalent stress during the dynamic compression. It has been observed that these two grades present a work hardening more or less pronounced after the HEL. The densification of the material seems to have more influence on the HEL than the grain size.

  20. strength properties of shea-butter nuts under compressive loading

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    Compression tests were performed on heat-treated Shea-butter nuts to study the effects of ... the only source of vegetable oil. It was also .... the longitudinal axis, while in the lateral loading position ... Multiple Range Test (DMRT) was used to.

  1. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is of interest to study compression-system surge to understand its dynamics in order ... Internal problems like compressor going into rotating stall, resulting in loss of ... of water column, was used for mass-flow measurement at the impeller entry.

  2. Dynamical Functional Theory for Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2017-01-01

    the Thouless Anderson-Palmer (TAP) equations corresponding to the ensemble. Using a dynamical functional approach we are able to derive an effective stochastic process for the marginal statistics of a single component of the dynamics. This allows us to design memory terms in the algorithm in such a way...... that the resulting fields become Gaussian random variables allowing for an explicit analysis. The asymptotic statistics of these fields are consistent with the replica ansatz of the compressed sensing problem....

  3. Dynamic mode decomposition for compressive system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhe; Kaiser, Eurika; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan; Brunton, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition has emerged as a leading technique to identify spatiotemporal coherent structures from high-dimensional data. In this work, we integrate and unify two recent innovations that extend DMD to systems with actuation and systems with heavily subsampled measurements. When combined, these methods yield a novel framework for compressive system identification, where it is possible to identify a low-order model from limited input-output data and reconstruct the associated full-state dynamic modes with compressed sensing, providing interpretability of the state of the reduced-order model. When full-state data is available, it is possible to dramatically accelerate downstream computations by first compressing the data. We demonstrate this unified framework on simulated data of fluid flow past a pitching airfoil, investigating the effects of sensor noise, different types of measurements (e.g., point sensors, Gaussian random projections, etc.), compression ratios, and different choices of actuation (e.g., localized, broadband, etc.). This example provides a challenging and realistic test-case for the proposed method, and results indicate that the dominant coherent structures and dynamics are well characterized even with heavily subsampled data.

  4. Buckling behavior of origami unit cell facets under compressive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshad, Mohamed Ali Emhmed; Naguib, Hani E.

    2018-03-01

    Origami structures as cores for sandwich structures are designed to withstand the compressive loads and to dissipate compressive energy. The deformation of the origami panels and the unit cell facets are the primary factors behind the compressive energy dissipation in origami structures. During the loading stage, the origami structures deform through the folding and unfolding process of the unit cell facets, and also through the plastic deformation of the facets. This work presents a numerical study of the buckling behavior of different origami unit cell elements under compressive loading. The studied origami configurations were Miura and Ron-Resch-like origami structures. Finite element package was used to model the origami structures. The study investigated the buckling behavior of the unit cell facets of two types of origami structures Miura origami and Ron-Resch-Like origami structures. The simulation was conducted using ANSYS finite element software, in which the model of the unit cell represented by shell elements, and the eigenvalues buckling solver was used to predict the theoretical buckling of the unit cell elements.

  5. Architecture for dynamically reconfigurable real-time lossless compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alison J.; Audsley, Neil C.

    2004-05-01

    Image compression is a computationally intensive task, which can be undertaken most efficiently by dedicated hardware. If a portable device is to carry out real-time compression on a variety of image types, then it may be useful to reconfigure the circuitry dynamically. Using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) chips, reconfiguration is usually implemented by a complete re-load from memory, but it is also possible to perform a partial reconfiguration. This work studies the use of programmable hardware devices to implement the lossless JPEG compression algorithm in real-time on a stream of independent image frames. The data rate is faster than can be compressed serially in hardware by a single processor, so the operation is split amongst several processors. These are implemented as programmable circuits, together with necessary buffering of input and output data. The timing of input and output, bearing in mind the different, and context-dependent amounts of data due to Huffman coding, is analyzed using storage-timing graphs. Because there may be differing parameters from one frame to the next, several different configurations are prepared and stored, ready to load as required. The scheduling of these reconfigurations, and the distribution/recombination of data streams is studied, giving an analysis of the real-time performance.

  6. Postbuckling Analysis Of A Rectangular Plate Loaded In Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havran Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability analysis of a thin rectangular plate loaded in compression is presented. The nonlinear FEM equations are derived from the minimum total potential energy principle. The peculiarities of the effects of the initial imperfections are investigated using the user program. Special attention is paid to the influence of imperfections on the post-critical buckling mode. The FEM computer program using a 48 DOF element has been used for analysis. Full Newton-Raphson procedure has been applied.

  7. Laser drive development for the APS Dynamic Compression Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Swift, Damian; Reed, Bryan; Bernier, Joel; Kumar, Mukul; Hawreliak, James; Eggert, Jon; Dixit, Sham; Collins, Gilbert

    2013-06-01

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the APS synchrotron offers unprecedented possibilities for x-ray diffraction and scattering measurements in-situ during dynamic loading, including single-shot data collection with x-ray energies high enough (tens of kV) to study high-Z samples in transmission as well as reflection. Dynamic loading induced by laser ablation is an important component of load generation, as the duration, strain rate, and pressure can be controlled via the energy, spot size, and pulse shape. Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, validated by experiments at several laser facilities, we have investigated the relationship between irradiance history and pressure for ablative loads designed to induce shock and ramp loading in the nanosecond to microsecond range, and including free ablation and also ablation confined by a transparent substrate. We have investigated the effects of lateral release, which constrains the minimum diameter of the focal spot for a given drive duration. In this way, we are able to relate the desired drive conditions to the total laser energy needed, which dictates the laser technologies suitable for a given type of experiment. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. A study of binder materials subjected to isentropic compression loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Clint Allen; Orler, E. Bruce; Sheffield, Steve A.; Gustavsen, Rick L.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Baer, Melvin R.; Hooks, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Binders such as Estane, Teflon, Kel F and HTPB are typically used in heterogeneous explosives to bond polycrystalline constituents together as an energetic composite. Combined theoretical and experimental studies are underway to unravel the mechanical response of these materials when subjected to isentropic compression loading. Key to this effort is the determination of appropriate constitutive and EOS property data at extremely high stress-strain states as required for detailed mesoscale modeling. The Sandia Z accelerator and associated diagnostics provides new insights into mechanical response of these nonreactive constituents via isentropic ramp-wave compression loading. Several thicknesses of samples, varied from 0.3 to 1.2 mm, were subjected to a ramp load of ∼42 Kbar over 500 ns duration using the Sandia Z-machine. Profiles of transmitted ramp waves were measured at window interfaces using conventional VISAR. Shock physics analysis is then used to determine the nonlinear material response of the binder materials. In this presentation we discuss experimental and modeling details of the ramp wave loading ICE experiments designed specifically for binder materials.

  9. Load transfer issues in the tensile and compressive behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, G.A.; Namilae, S.; Chandra, N.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are considered to be ultra strong and stiff reinforcements for structural composite applications. The load transfer between the inner and outer nanotubes in multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has to be clearly understood to realize their potential in not only composites, but also other applications such as nano-springs and nano-bearings. In this paper, we study the load transfer between the walls of multiwall nanotubes both in tension and compression using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that very minimal load is transferred to the inner nanotube during tension. The load transfer in compression of capped nanotubes is much greater than that in tension. In the case of uncapped nanotubes, the inner nanotube is deformed in bending, only after the outer nanotube is extensively deformed by buckling. It is found that the presence of a few interstitial atoms between the walls of multiwall nanotube can improve the stiffness and enhance the load transfer to the inner nanotubes both in tension and compression

  10. Dynamical instability of hot and compressed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.; Leray, S.; Spina, M.E.; Ngo, H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of a hot and compressed nucleus is described by means of an extended liquid-drop model. Using only the continuity equation and the energy conservation we show that the system expands after a while. The possible global instabilities of the drop are studied by applying the general conditions of stability of dynamical systems. We find that the nucleus is unstable if it can reach a low density configuration (≅0.07 nucleon/fm 3 ). Such a configuration is obtained if the initial compression of the nucleus is large enough. It is shown that the thermal excitation energy has much less influence than the compressional energy. These instability conditions are in good agreement with those obtained previously within the framework of lattice percolation and the same model for the dynamical expansion. Since local instabilities may also very likely be present, we propose to study them using a restructured aggregation model. They lead to a multifragmentation of the system, a mechanism which is known experimentally to exist. We find that local instabilities occur at smaller (but very close) density values than global ones. A moment analysis of the calculated multifragmentation events allows to extract a critical exponent in excellent agreement with the one deduced experimentally from Au-induced reactions. (orig.)

  11. Developing a dynamic control system for mine compressed air networks

    OpenAIRE

    Van Heerden, S.W.; Pelzer, R.; Marais, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Mines in general, make use of compressed air systems for daily operational activities. Compressed air on mines is traditionally distributed via compressed air ring networks where multiple shafts are supplied with compressed air from an integral system. These compressed air networks make use of a number of compressors feeding the ring from various locations in the network. While these mines have sophisticated control systems to control these compressors, they are not dynamic systems. Compresso...

  12. The failure of brittle materials under overall compression: Effects of loading rate and defect distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Bhasker

    The constitutive behaviors and failure processes of brittle materials under far-field compressive loading are studied in this work. Several approaches are used: experiments to study the compressive failure behavior of ceramics, design of experimental techniques by means of finite element simulations, and the development of micro-mechanical damage models to analyze and predict mechanical response of brittle materials under far-field compression. Experiments have been conducted on various ceramics, (primarily on a transparent polycrystalline ceramic, aluminum oxynitride or AlON) under loading rates ranging from quasi-static (˜ 5X10-6) to dynamic (˜ 200 MPa/mus), using a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine and a modified compression Kolsky bar (MKB) technique respectively. High-speed photography has also been used with exposure times as low as 20 ns to observe the dynamic activation, growth and coalescence of cracks and resulting damage zones in the specimen. The photographs were correlated in time with measurements of the stresses in the specimen. Further, by means of 3D finite element simulations, an experimental technique has been developed to impose a controlled, homogeneous, planar confinement in the specimen. The technique can be used in conjunction with a high-speed camera to study the in situ dynamic failure behavior of materials under confinement. AlON specimens are used for the study. The statically pre-compressed specimen is subjected to axial dynamic compressive loading using the MKB. Results suggest that confinement not only increases the load carrying capacity, it also results in a non-linear stress evolution in the material. High-speed photographs also suggest an inelastic deformation mechanism in AlON under confinement which evolves more slowly than the typical brittle-cracking type of damage in the unconfined case. Next, an interacting micro-crack damage model is developed that explicitly accounts for the interaction among the micro-cracks in

  13. Dynamical load factor of impact loaded shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamical loaded structures can be analysed by spectral representations, which usually lead to an enormous computational effort. If it is possible to find a fitting dynamical load factor, the dynamical problem can be reduced to a statical one. The computation of this statical problem is much simpler. The disadvantage is that the dynamical load factor usually leads to a very rough approximation. In this paper it will be shown, that by combination of these two methods, the approximation of the dynamical load factor can be improved and the consumption of computation time can be enormously reduced. (Auth.)

  14. Stress Distribution in Graded Cellular Materials Under Dynamic Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic compression behaviors of density-homogeneous and density-graded irregular honeycombs are investigated using cell-based finite element models under a constant-velocity impact scenario. A method based on the cross-sectional engineering stress is developed to obtain the one-dimensional stress distribution along the loading direction in a cellular specimen. The cross-sectional engineering stress is contributed by two parts: the node-transitive stress and the contact-induced stress, which are caused by the nodal force and the contact of cell walls, respectively. It is found that the contact-induced stress is dominant for the significantly enhanced stress behind the shock front. The stress enhancement and the compaction wave propagation can be observed through the stress distributions in honeycombs under high-velocity compression. The single and double compaction wave modes are observed directly from the stress distributions. Theoretical analysis of the compaction wave propagation in the density-graded honeycombs based on the R-PH (rigid-plastic hardening idealization is carried out and verified by the numerical simulations. It is found that stress distribution in cellular materials and the compaction wave propagation characteristics under dynamic compression can be approximately predicted by the R-PH shock model.

  15. Rapid freezing of water under dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Philip C.; Belof, Jonathan L.

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the behavior of materials at extreme pressures is a central issue in fields like aerodynamics, astronomy, and geology, as well as for advancing technological grand challenges such as inertial confinement fusion. Dynamic compression experiments to probe high-pressure states often encounter rapid phase transitions that may cause the materials to behave in unexpected ways, and understanding the kinetics of these phase transitions remains an area of great interest. In this review, we examine experimental and theoretical/computational efforts to study the freezing kinetics of water to a high-pressure solid phase known as ice VII. We first present a detailed analysis of dynamic compression experiments in which water has been observed to freeze on sub-microsecond time scales to ice VII. This is followed by a discussion of the limitations of currently available molecular and continuum simulation methods in modeling these experiments. We then describe how our phase transition kinetics models, which are based on classical nucleation theory, provide a more physics-based framework that overcomes some of these limitations. Finally, we give suggestions on future experimental and modeling work on the liquid–ice VII transition, including an outline of the development of a predictive multiscale model in which molecular and continuum simulations are intimately coupled.

  16. Two-way shape memory effect induced by repetitive compressive loading cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Yoo, Young-Ik; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2009-01-01

    The NiTi alloy can be trained by repetitive loading or heating cycles. As a result of the training, a two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) can be induced. Considerable research has been reported regarding the TWSME trained by tensile loading. However, the TWSME trained by compressive loading has not been investigated nearly as much. In this paper, the TWSME is induced by compressive loading cycles and the two-way shape memory strain is evaluated by using two types of specimen: a solid cylinder type and a tube type. The TWSME trained by compressive loading is different from that trained by tensile loading owing to the severe tension/compression asymmetry as described in previous research. After repetitive compressive loading cycles, strain variation upon cooling is observed, and this result proves that the TWSME is induced by compressive loading cycles. By performing compressive loading cycles, plastic deformation in NiTi alloy occurs more than for tensile loading cycles, which brings about the appearance of TWSME. It can be said that the TWSME is induced by compressive loading cycles more easily. The two-way shape memory strain increases linearly as the maximum strain of compressive loading cycles increases, regardless of the shape and the size of the NiTi alloy; this two-way shape memory strain then shows a tendency towards saturation after some repeated cycles

  17. Effects of Instantaneous Multiband Dynamic Compression on Speech Intelligibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzke Tobias

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment phenomenon, that is, the reduced dynamic range between threshold and uncomfortable level, is attributed to the loss of instantaneous dynamic compression on the basilar membrane. Despite this, hearing aids commonly use slow-acting dynamic compression for its compensation, because this was found to be the most successful strategy in terms of speech quality and intelligibility rehabilitation. Former attempts to use fast-acting compression gave ambiguous results, raising the question as to whether auditory-based recruitment compensation by instantaneous compression is in principle applicable in hearing aids. This study thus investigates instantaneous multiband dynamic compression based on an auditory filterbank. Instantaneous envelope compression is performed in each frequency band of a gammatone filterbank, which provides a combination of time and frequency resolution comparable to the normal healthy cochlea. The gain characteristics used for dynamic compression are deduced from categorical loudness scaling. In speech intelligibility tests, the instantaneous dynamic compression scheme was compared against a linear amplification scheme, which used the same filterbank for frequency analysis, but employed constant gain factors that restored the sound level for medium perceived loudness in each frequency band. In subjective comparisons, five of nine subjects preferred the linear amplification scheme and would not accept the instantaneous dynamic compression in hearing aids. Four of nine subjects did not perceive any quality differences. A sentence intelligibility test in noise (Oldenburg sentence test showed little to no negative effects of the instantaneous dynamic compression, compared to linear amplification. A word intelligibility test in quiet (one-syllable rhyme test showed that the subjects benefit from the larger amplification at low levels provided by instantaneous dynamic compression. Further analysis showed that the increase

  18. Analysis of biogas compression system dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Mirko; Pinelli, Michele; Venturini, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    The use of biogas for energy production has progressively increased in recent years, due to an increasing interest both in agricultural and energy policies of many industrialized countries. Biogas compression by means of natural gas infrastructure seems the most immediate solution, but could also lead to problems due to the different physical properties of the two gases. In this paper, a non-linear one-dimensional modular dynamic model is developed and used for the simulation of compression system transient behavior. The arrangement consists of a main line, where the compressor operates, and an anti-surge control, which consists of a recycle loop activated by a fast acting valve. Different maneuvers (start-up, normal operation, emergency shutdown and operating point variation) are simulated by using two different working fluids (methane and biogas). Simulations prove that the design of the surge protection system should consider the fluid to be elaborated. Moreover, system predisposition to surge increases as the ratio between system volumes and the inertia of the rotating masses increases.

  19. A dynamic model of a photovoltaic vapour compression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renno, C.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic simulation of a photovoltaic vapour compression system is presented in this paper. In particular, there are several options to convert solar energy into refrigeration effect such as the absorption cycle, the thermo-mechanical refrigeration systems, the regenerative desiccant process or the steam jet system. This effect can also be produced by a conventional vapor compression cycle in which the compressor is driven by an electric motor supplied by means of photovoltaic cells. It is also possible to produce the cooling effect adopting the thermoelectric refrigeration, with electricity supplied by means of photovoltaic cells. Absorption and solar mechanical systems are necessarily larger and require extensive plumbing and electrical connections. The dynamic model allows to obtain some characteristic temperatures of the photovoltaic system and the energy consumptions with and without load perturbations. This model results a useful tool to study the dynamic working, for example, of photovoltaic refrigerators used in rural areas and remote islands, for their simple structure and low costs, to preserve foodstuffs, vaccines and other life saving medicines. (author)

  20. Characterization of focal muscle compression under impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. J.; Sory, D. R.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern wars over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome of the extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions.

  1. Local Dynamic Stability Associated with Load Carrying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Current study confirmed the sensitivity of local dynamic stability measure in load carrying situation. It was concluded that load carrying tasks were associated with declined local dynamic stability, which may result in increased risk of fall accident. This finding has implications in preventing fall accidents associated with occupational load carrying.

  2. Tensile and compressive failure modes of laminated composites loaded by fatigue with different mean stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Assa

    1990-01-01

    Laminated composite materials tend to fail differently under tensile or compressive load. Under tension, the material accumulates cracks and fiber fractures, while under compression, the material delaminates and buckles. Tensile-compressive fatigue may cause either of these failure modes depending on the specific damage occurring in the laminate. This damage depends on the stress ratio of the fatigue loading. Analysis of the fatigue behavior of the composite laminate under tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension-compression had led to the development of a fatigue envelope presentation of the failure behavior. This envelope indicates the specific failure mode for any stress ratio and number of loading cycles. The construction of the fatigue envelope is based on the applied stress-cycles to failure (S-N) curves of both tensile-tensile and compressive-compressive fatigue. Test results are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  3. Dynamic loading of galvanized parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is divided into two parts: the theoretical part includes actual knowledge and points of view about degradation processes in construction materials, anticorrosion protection, zinc coat composition and high frequency fatigue. The laboratory part follow-up existing regulations contents Czech standards and formulate specifications for acquisition of objective information from acceleration la­bo­ra­to­ry tests in condensation chests, mechanical high frequency fatigue tests on pulsator machine and possibilities of evaluation of fatigue tests. Laboratory findings declare to fundamental types of damage of constructions with anticorrosion protection in real loading conditions with dynamic high frequency character. Laboratory tests were made in sulphide and chloride environments.

  4. Mechanical behaviour of selected bulk oilseeds under compression loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizera, Č.; Herák, D.; Hrabě, P.; Aleš, Z.; Pavlů, J.

    2017-09-01

    Pressing of vegetable oils plays an important role in modern agriculture. This study was focused on the linear pressing of soybean seeds (Glycine max L.), Jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas L.) and palm kernel (Elaeisguineensis). For pressing test the compressive device (ZDM, model 50, Germany) was used. The maximum pressing force of 100 kN with a compression speed of 1 mm s-1 was used to record the force-deformation characteristics. The pressing vessel with diameter 60 mm and initial height of seeds 80 mm were used. The specific energy per gram of oil of soybean, palm kernel and Jatropha was 158.92 ± 7.21, 128.78 ± 8.36 and 68.26 ± 5.94 J.goil-1, respectively. The oil content of soybean, palm kernel and Jatropha was 20.4 ± 1.23, 44.7 ± 2.27 and 34.2 ± 1.75 %, respectively. Water concentration, dynamic and kinematic viscosity of obtained oils was also determined.

  5. Deformation mechanisms in Ti/TiN multilayer under compressive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wei; Ayoub, Georges; Salehinia, Iman; Mansoor, Bilal; Zbib, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    The promising mechanical, physical and chemical properties of nano-scale metal/ceramic multilayers (MCMs) are of high interest for extreme environment applications. Understanding the plastic deformation mechanisms and the variables affecting those properties is therefore essential. The interface characteristics and the plastic deformation mechanisms under compressive loading in a Ti/TiN multilayer with a semi-coherent interface are numerically investigated. The interface structure of the Ti/TiN interface and the interface misfit dislocation were characterized using molecular dynamic simulations combined with atomically informed Frank-Bilby method. Three possible atomic stacking interface structures are identified according to the crystallographic analysis of the interface. Upon relaxation, large interface areas are occupied with the energetically stable configuration. Furthermore, the higher energy stacking are transformed into misfit dislocations or dislocation nodes. The molecular dynamic compressive stress strain response of the Ti/TiN multilayers exhibited three distinctive peaks. The first peak was generated by the dislocation dissociation of perfect dislocation into pairs of partials dislocation around extended nodes region at the interface. Upon further compression the second peak, identified as the first yielding, resulted from the activation of pyramidal slip planes in the Ti layer. Finally, a third peak identified as the second yielding, occurred when dislocation nucleated/transmitted in/into the TiN layer.

  6. Failure mode and dynamic behavior of nanophase iron under compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, D.; Ramesh, K.T.; Ma, E.

    1999-12-17

    Materials with ultra-fine grains down to the nanophase range (<100 nm) have been attracting considerable interest because of their unique properties compared with conventional materials. In general, the understanding of the deformation behavior of ultrafine- and nano-grained metals and alloys is still in the rudimentary stage. In this paper, the authors report on the compressive deformation behavior and failure mode of near full-density (99.2% of theoretical density) elemental Fe with an average grain size of 80 nm. Even less is known about the behavior of ultrafine- or nano-grained alloys under dynamic loading of high strain rates. Such response is relevant to possible applications of these alloys under impact conditions, such as for kinetic energy penetrators currently under investigation. The authors will present the results of high-strain-rate (Kolsky bar) tests for nano-Fe and compare them with those obtained in quasi-static compression tests of the same material. The authors demonstrate that little strain rate sensitivity is observable in the rate of 10{sup {minus}4} to 3 x 10{sup +3} s{sup {minus}1}, in sharp contrast to the strong rate sensitivity known for conventional coarse-grained bcc Fe. The weak rate dependence is correlated with shear banding as the dominant deformation and failure mechanism. This strain rate hardening behavior, together with the high strength, absence of strain hardening, and failure mechanism observed, are discussed in the context of potential applications for penetrator materials.

  7. Dynamic compressive properties obtained from a split Hopkinson pressure bar test of Boryeong shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minju; Cho, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang Gon; Park, Jaeyeong; Jeong, Myeong-Sik; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic compressive properties of a Boryeong shale were evaluated by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, and were compared with those of a Hwangdeung granite which is a typical hard rock. The results indicated that the dynamic compressive loading reduced the resistance to fracture. The dynamic compressive strength was lower in the shale than in the granite, and was raised with increasing strain rate by microcracking effect as well as strain rate strengthening effect. Since the number of microcracked fragments increased with increasing strain rate in the shale having laminated weakness planes, the shale showed the better fragmentation performance than the granite at high strain rates. The effect of transversely isotropic plane on compressive strength decreased with increasing strain rate, which was desirable for increasing the fragmentation performance. Thus, the shale can be more reliably applied to industrial areas requiring good fragmentation performance as the striking speed of drilling or hydraulic fracturing machines increased. The present dynamic compressive test effectively evaluated the fragmentation performance as well as compressive strength and strain energy density by controlling the air pressure, and provided an important idea on which rock was more readily fragmented under dynamically processing conditions such as high-speed drilling and blasting.

  8. Failure mechanisms of aluminium foams under compressive loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sáenz, E.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is the investigation of the major failure mechanisms of aluminium foams, which were obtained by powder metallurgy route, under compressive loads. The study was focused on two commonly aluminium alloys AlMg1Si or A 6061 and AlSi12. Due to the fact that the failure mechanisms strongly depend on the density and the macrostructural properties of the material, the mechanical properties always have to be correlated to the structural properties. Therefore, macrostructural investigations were used as a basis to establish the correlation between structural and mechanical properties. This was done with a commercially available image analysis system. The average cell size, the cell size distribution and the cell density (number of cells/area were obtained. In order to evaluate the influence of foaming direction on the cell morphology, some cross sections parallel to the foaming direction were prepared. For the characterization of the mechanical compression properties the compressive or upper yield strength (UYS, the densification strain (eD, the energy absorption (Ea and the efficiency (Eff were obtained. Furthermore, the failure behavior of the samples was in-situ observed with a digital video camera and continuously recorded during the test.

    El objetivo de este estudio es investigar los principales mecanismos de fallo de espumas de aluminio sometidas a cargas de compresión. Las espumas metálicas fueron obtenidas mediante el proceso pulvimetalúrgico, utilizándose como materia prima dos aleaciones comerciales AlMg1Si o A 6061 y AlSi12. Debido a que los mecanismos de fallo en este tipo de materiales depende fuertemente de la densidad y las características macroestructurales del material, en este estudio se busca correlacionar las propiedades mecánicas con estas características. La macroestructura se caracterizó mediante análisis de imagen. El tamaño de celda promedio, la distribución de tamaño y la densidad de

  9. Effect of loading rate on the compressive mechanics of the immature baboon cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Paul Z; Nuckley, David J; Ching, Randal P

    2006-02-01

    Thirty-four cervical spine segments were harvested from 12 juvenile male baboons and compressed to failure at displacement rates of 5, 50, 500, or 5000 mm/s. Compressive stiffness, failure load, and failure displacement were measured for comparison across loading rate groups. Stiffness showed a significant concomitant increase with loading rate, increasing by 62% between rates of 5 and 5000 mm/s. Failure load also demonstrated an increasing relationship with loading rate, while displacement at failure showed no rate dependence. These data may help in the development of improved pediatric automotive safety standards and more biofidelic physical and computational models.

  10. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Devon E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure-function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ , dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure-function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells derived from different

  11. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon E. Anderson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure–function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ, dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure–function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells

  12. Dynamic compressibility of air in porous structures at audible frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafarge, Denis; Lemarinier, Pavel; Allard, Jean F.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic compressibility of air-filled porous sound-absorbing materials are compared with predictions involving two parametere, the static thermal permeability k'_0 and the thermal characteristic dimension GAMMA'. Emphasis on the notion of dynamic and static thermal permeability...... of the viscous forces. Using both parameters, a simple model is constructed for the dynamic thermal permeability k', which is completely analogous to the Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. vol. 176, 379 (1987)] model of dynamic viscous permeability k. The resultant modeling of dynamic compressibility provides...... predictions which are closer to the experimental results than the previously used simpler model where the compressibility is the same as in identical circular cross-sectional shaped pores, or distributions of slits, related to a given GAMMA'....

  13. Use of loading-unloading compression curves in medical device design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciornei, M. C.; Alaci, S.; Ciornei, F. C.; Romanu, I. C.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a method and experimental results regarding mechanical testing of soft materials. In order to characterize the mechanical behaviour of technological materials used in prosthesis, a large number of material constants are required, as well as the comparison to the original. The present paper proposes as methodology the comparison between compression loading-unloading curves corresponding to a soft biological tissue and to a synthetic material. To this purpose, a device was designed based on the principle of the dynamic harness test. A moving load is considered and the force upon the indenter is controlled for loading-unloading phases. The load and specimen deformation are simultaneously recorded. A significant contribution of this paper is the interpolation of experimental data by power law functions, a difficult task because of the instability of the system of equations to be optimized. Finding the interpolation function was simplified, from solving a system of transcendental equations to solving a unique equation. The characteristic parameters of the experimentally curves must be compared to the ones corresponding to actual tissue. The tests were performed for two cases: first, using a spherical punch, and second, for a flat-ended cylindrical punch.

  14. Time of flight measurements of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphite under cyclic compressive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodel, W., E-mail: william.bodel@hotmail.com [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Atkin, C. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Buxton (United Kingdom); Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    The time-of-flight technique has been used to investigate the stiffness of nuclear graphite with respect to the grade and grain direction. A loading rig was developed to collect time-of-flight measurements during cycled compressive loading up to 80% of the material's compressive strength and subsequent unloading of specimens along the axis of the applied stress. The transmission velocity (related to Young's modulus), decreased with increasing applied stress; and depending on the graphite grade and orientation, the modulus then increased, decreased or remained constant upon unloading. These tests were repeated while observing the microstructure during the load/unload cycles. Initial decreases in transmission velocity with compressive load are attributed to microcrack formation within filler and binder phases. Three distinct types of behaviour occur on unloading, depending on the grade, irradiation, and loading direction. These different behaviours can be explained in terms of the material microstructure observed from the microscopy performed during loading.

  15. Strain-dependent dynamic compressive properties of magnetorheological elastomeric foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wereley, Norman M.; Perez, Colette; Choi, Young T.

    2018-05-01

    This paper addresses the strain-dependent dynamic compressive properties (i.e., so-called Payne effect) of magnetorheological elastomeric foams (MREFs). Isotropic MREF samples (i.e., no oriented particle chain structures), fabricated in flat square shapes (nominal size of 26.5 mm x 26.5 mm x 9.5 mm) were synthesized by randomly dispersing micron-sized iron oxide particles (Fe3O4) into a liquid silicone foam in the absence of magnetic field. Five different Fe3O4 particle concentrations of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10 percent by volume fraction (hereinafter denoted as vol%) were used to investigate the effect of particle concentration on the dynamic compressive properties of the MREFs. The MREFs were sandwiched between two multi-pole flexible plate magnets in order to activate the magnetorheological (MR) strengthening effect. Under two different pre-compression conditions (i.e., 35% and 50%), the dynamic compressive stresses of the MREFs with respect to dynamic strain amplitudes (i.e., 1%-10%) were measured by using a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The complex modulus (i.e., storage modulus and loss modulus) and loss factors of the MREFs with respect to dynamic strain amplitudes were presented as performance indices to evaluate their strain-dependent dynamic compressive behavior.

  16. Strain-dependent dynamic compressive properties of magnetorheological elastomeric foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman M. Wereley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the strain-dependent dynamic compressive properties (i.e., so-called Payne effect of magnetorheological elastomeric foams (MREFs. Isotropic MREF samples (i.e., no oriented particle chain structures, fabricated in flat square shapes (nominal size of 26.5 mm x 26.5 mm x 9.5 mm were synthesized by randomly dispersing micron-sized iron oxide particles (Fe3O4 into a liquid silicone foam in the absence of magnetic field. Five different Fe3O4 particle concentrations of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10 percent by volume fraction (hereinafter denoted as vol% were used to investigate the effect of particle concentration on the dynamic compressive properties of the MREFs. The MREFs were sandwiched between two multi-pole flexible plate magnets in order to activate the magnetorheological (MR strengthening effect. Under two different pre-compression conditions (i.e., 35% and 50%, the dynamic compressive stresses of the MREFs with respect to dynamic strain amplitudes (i.e., 1%-10% were measured by using a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The complex modulus (i.e., storage modulus and loss modulus and loss factors of the MREFs with respect to dynamic strain amplitudes were presented as performance indices to evaluate their strain-dependent dynamic compressive behavior.

  17. Behavior of Brittle Materials Under Dynamic Loading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kanel, G

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic loading of brittle materials is related to many applications, including explosive excavation of rocks, design of ceramic armor, meteor impact on spacecraft windows, particle damage to turbine blades, etc...

  18. Failure of uniformly compression loaded debond damaged sandwich panels — An experimental and numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the failure of compression-loaded sandwich panels with an implanted circular face/core debond. Uniform compression tests were conducted on intact sandwich panels with three different types of core material (H130, H250 and PMI) and on similar panels with circular face...

  19. Compressive Properties of PTFE/Al/Ni Composite Under Uniaxial Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-xi; Li, Yu-chun; Feng, Bin; Huang, Jun-yi; Zhang, Sheng; Fang, Xiang

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of pressed and sintered PTFE/Al/Ni (polytetrafluoroethylene/aluminum/nickel) composite, uniaxial quasi-static and dynamic compression experiments were conducted at strain rates from 10-2 to 3 × 103/s. The prepared samples were tested by an electrohydraulic press with 300 kN loading capacity and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device at room temperature. Experimental results show that PTFE/Al/Ni composite exhibits evident strain hardening and strain rate hardening. Additionally, a bilinear relationship between stress and {{log(}}\\dot{ɛ} ) is observed. The experimental data were fit to Johnson-Cook constitutive model, and the results are in well agreement with measured data.

  20. Response of notched AS4/PEEK laminates to tension/compression loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Robert A.; Stinchcomb, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue life, damage-initiation and propagation, and residual strength data are presently examined to ascertain the response of notched AS4/PEEK specimens to fully reversed tension/compression loading. Stiffness measurements made during the low-level fatigue history show that compression stiffness and tension stiffness degrade throughout the fatigue life. Damage to specimens fatigued at higher cyclic stresses developed primarily in the direction perpendicular to the loading. As in the case of specimens fatigued at lower stress levels, residual compressive stress decreased with damage development.

  1. Effect of Static-Dynamic Coupling Loading on Fracture Toughness and Failure Characteristics in Marble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Yin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fracture experiments in a notched semi-circular bend configuration were conducted to test the dynamic fracture toughness of a marble under static-dynamic coupling load using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar. The fracture process of the specimen was monitored using a high speed (HS camera. Based on digital image correlation (DIC and strain gauges, the full-field strain fields and time-to-fracture of the marble were measured under static-dynamic coupling load. Experimental results show that dynamic fracture toughness was well determined, and the HS-DIC technique provides reliable full-field strain fields in the specimens under static-dynamic coupling loads. The failure characteristics of the marble under external impact were affected obviously by pre-compression stress. Increase of axial pre-compression stress was helpful to improve the crack propagation velocity, and dynamic crack initiation toughness was decreased.

  2. Dynamical Functional Theory for Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2017-01-01

    the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) equations corresponding to the ensemble. Using a dynamical functional approach we are able to derive an effective stochastic process for the marginal statistics of a single component of the dynamics. This allows us to design memory terms in the algorithm in such a way...

  3. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  4. Damage assessment of compression loaded debond damaged sandwich panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar

    2010-01-01

    with an implanted circular face/core debond. Compression tests were conducted on intact sandwich panels and panels with an implanted circular face/core debond with three different types of foam core materials (PVC H130, PVC H250 and PMI 51-IG). The strains and out-of-plane displacements of the debonded region were...

  5. Dynamic control of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Mehresh, Parag [Peoria, IL; Schuh, David [Peoria, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL

    2008-06-03

    A homogenous charge compression ignition engine is operated by compressing a charge mixture of air, exhaust and fuel in a combustion chamber to an autoignition condition of the fuel. The engine may facilitate a transition from a first combination of speed and load to a second combination of speed and load by changing the charge mixture and compression ratio. This may be accomplished in a consecutive engine cycle by adjusting both a fuel injector control signal and a variable valve control signal away from a nominal variable valve control signal. Thereafter in one or more subsequent engine cycles, more sluggish adjustments are made to at least one of a geometric compression ratio control signal and an exhaust gas recirculation control signal to allow the variable valve control signal to be readjusted back toward its nominal variable valve control signal setting. By readjusting the variable valve control signal back toward its nominal setting, the engine will be ready for another transition to a new combination of engine speed and load.

  6. Apparatus for measuring static coefficient of friction under compressive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haehner, C. L.; Tarpley, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Device includes load cell attached to rigid structure. Crosshead directly beneath cell is connected to constant-speed electrical motor. Crossarm supported by crosshead serves as platform on which bodies are tested. Test data are recorded on X-Y recorder which is connected to load cell and motor.

  7. Optimum design of laminated composite under axial compressive load

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study optimal design of composite laminates, with and without rectangular cut-out, is carried out for maximizing the buckling load. Optimization study is carried out for obtaining the maximum buckling load with design variables as ply thickness, cut-out size and orientation of cut-out with respect to laminate.

  8. The influence of void and porosity on deformation behaviour of nanocrystalline Ni under tensile followed by compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraj, Md.; Nayak, Shradha; Krishanjeet, Kumar; Pal, Snehanshu

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present a lucid understanding about the deformation behaviour of nanocrystalline (NC) Ni with and without defects subjected to tensile followed by compressive loading using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The embedded atom method (EAM) potential have been incorporated in the simulation for three kinds of samples-i.e. for NC Ni (without any defect), porous NC Ni and NC Ni containing a centrally located void. All the three samples, which have been prepared by implementing the Voronoi method and using Atom Eye software, consist of 16 uniform grains. The total number of atoms present in NC Ni, porous NC Ni and NC Ni containing a void are 107021, 105968 and 107012 respectively. The stress-strain response of NC Ni under tensile followed by compressive loading are simulated at a high strain rate of 107 s-1 and at a constant temperature of 300K. The stress-strain curves for the NC Ni with and without defects have been plotted for three different types of loading: (a) tensile loading (b) compressive loading (c) forward tensile loading followed by reverse compressive loading. Prominent change in yield strength of the NC Ni is observed due to the introduction of defects. For tensile followed by compressive loading (during forward loading), the yield point for NC Ni with void is lesser than the yield point of NC Ni and porous NC Ni. The saw tooth shape or serration portion of the stress-strain curve is mainly due to three characteristic phenomena, dislocation generation and its movement, dislocation pile-up at the junctions, and dislocation annihilation. Both twins and stacking faults are observed due to plastic deformation as the deformation mechanism progresses. The dislocation density, number of clusters and number of vacancy of the NC sample with and without defects are plotted against the strain developed in the sample. It is seen that introduction of defects brings about change in mechanical properties of the NC Ni. The crystalline nature of NC Ni

  9. Disruptions, loads, and dynamic response of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.; Riemer, B.; Sayer, R.; Strickler, D.; Barabaschi, P.; Ioki, K.; Johnson, G.; Shimizu, K.; Williamson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma disruptions and the resulting electromagnetic loads are critical to the design of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the status of plasma disruption simulations and related analysis, including the dynamic response of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, stresses and deflections in the vacuum vessel, and reaction loads in the support structures

  10. Lagrangian particle method for compressible fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulyak, Roman; Wang, Xingyu; Chen, Hsin-Chiang

    2018-06-01

    A new Lagrangian particle method for solving Euler equations for compressible inviscid fluid or gas flows is proposed. Similar to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), the method represents fluid cells with Lagrangian particles and is suitable for the simulation of complex free surface/multiphase flows. The main contributions of our method, which is different from SPH in all other aspects, are (a) significant improvement of approximation of differential operators based on a polynomial fit via weighted least squares approximation and the convergence of prescribed order, (b) a second-order particle-based algorithm that reduces to the first-order upwind method at local extremal points, providing accuracy and long term stability, and (c) more accurate resolution of entropy discontinuities and states at free interfaces. While the method is consistent and convergent to a prescribed order, the conservation of momentum and energy is not exact and depends on the convergence order. The method is generalizable to coupled hyperbolic-elliptic systems. Numerical verification tests demonstrating the convergence order are presented as well as examples of complex multiphase flows.

  11. The Pneumatic Actuators As Vertical Dynamic Load Simulators On Medium Weighted Wheel Suspension Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'ka, Simon; Himran, Syukri; Renreng, Ilyas; Sutresman, Onny

    2018-02-01

    Almost all of road damage can be caused by dynamic loads of vehicles that fluctuate according to the type of vehicle that passes through. This study aims to calculate the vertical dynamic load of the vehicle actually occurs on road construction by the mechanism of vehicle wheel suspension. Pneumatic cylinders driven by pressurized air directly load the spring and shock absorber installed on the wheels of the vehicle. The load fluctuations of the medium weight categorized vehicles are determined by the regulation of the amount of pressurized air that enters into the pneumatic cylinder chamber, pushing the piston and connecting rods. The displacement that occurs during compression on the spring and shock absorber, is substituted into the equation of vehicle dynamic load while taking into account the spring stiffness constant, and the fluid or damper gas coefficient. The results show that the magnitude of the displacement when the compression force works has significant influences to the amount of vertical dynamic load of the vehicle that overlies the road construction. The presence of dynamic load of vehicles that fluctuates and repeats, also affects on the reduction of road ability to receive the load. Experimental results using pneumatic actuators instead of real dynamic vehicle loads illustrate the characteristics of the relationship between work pressure and dynamic load. If the working pressure of P2 (bar) is greater, the vertical dynamic load Ft (N) that overloads the road structure is also greater. The associate graphs show that the shock absorber has a greater ability to reduce dynamic load vertically that burden the road structure when compared with the ability of screw spring.

  12. Excellent plasticity of a new Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite upon dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.F. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiao, Z.M. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Y.S.; Wang, Z. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Ma, S.G. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiao, J.W., E-mail: qiaojunwei@gmail.com [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-11-20

    Quasi-static and dynamic compressive properties of in-situ Ti{sub 60}Zr{sub 14}V{sub 12}Cu{sub 4}Be{sub 10} bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing ductile dendrites were investigated. Upon quasi-static compressive loading, the composite exhibits a high fracture strength of ~2,600 MPa, combined with a considerable plasticity of ~40% at room temperature. However, upon dynamic loading, an excellent plasticity of ~16% can be obtained due to the abundant dislocations and severe lattice distortions within dendrites and multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix analyzed by transmission-electron microscopy. A constitutive relationship is obtained by Johnson-Cook plasticity model, which is employed to model the dynamic flow stress behavior. In addition, under dynamic compression, the adiabatic temperature rise increases with increasing strain rates, resulting in that the softening effect within the glass matrix is obviously enhanced during deformation.

  13. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in ...

  14. A dynamic counterpart of Lamb vector in viscous compressible aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L Q; Wu, J Z; Shi, Y P; Zhu, J Y

    2014-01-01

    The Lamb vector is known to play a key role in incompressible fluid dynamics and vortex dynamics. In particular, in low-speed steady aerodynamics it is solely responsible for the total force acting on a moving body, known as the vortex force, with the classic two-dimensional (exact) Kutta–Joukowski theorem and three-dimensional (linearized) lifting-line theory as the most famous special applications. In this paper we identify an innovative dynamic counterpart of the Lamb vector in viscous compressible aerodynamics, which we call the compressible Lamb vector. Mathematically, we present a theorem on the dynamic far-field decay law of the vorticity and dilatation fields, and thereby prove that the generalized Lamb vector enjoys exactly the same integral properties as the Lamb vector does in incompressible flow, and hence the vortex-force theory can be generalized to compressible flow with exactly the same general formulation. Moreover, for steady flow of polytropic gas, we show that physically the force exerted on a moving body by the gas consists of a transverse force produced by the original Lamb vector and a new longitudinal force that reflects the effects of compression and irreversible thermodynamics. (paper)

  15. Dynamic model including piping acoustics of a centrifugal compression system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoirt, van J.; Jager, de A.G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with low frequency pulsation phenomena in full-scale centrifugal compression systems associated with compressor surge. The Greitzer lumped parameter model is applied to describe the dynamic behavior of an industrial compressor test rig and experimental evidence is provided for the

  16. Mechanical behavior and dynamic failure of high-strength ultrafine grained tungsten under uniaxial compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Q.; Jiao, T.; Ramesh, K.T.; Ma, E.; Kecskes, L.J.; Magness, L.; Dowding, R.; Kazykhanov, V.U.; Valiev, R.Z.

    2006-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior (especially dynamic failure) of ultra-fine grained (UFG) tungsten (W) under uniaxial compression. The starting material is of commercial purity and large grain size. We utilized severe plastic deformation to achieve the ultrafine microstructure characterized by grains and subgrains with sizes of ∼500 nm, as identified by transmission electron microscopy. Results of quasi-static compression show that the UFG W behaves in an elastic-nearly perfect plastic manner (i.e., vanishing strain hardening), with its flow stress approaching 2 GPa, close to twice that of conventional coarse grain W. Post-mortem examinations of the quasi-statically loaded samples show no evidence of cracking, in sharp contrast to the behavior of conventional W (where axial cracking is usually observed). Under uniaxial dynamic compression (strain rate ∼10 3 s -1 ), the true stress-true strain curves of the UFG W exhibit significant flow softening, and the peak stress is ∼3 GPa. Furthermore, the strain rate sensitivity of the UFG W is reduced to half the value of the conventional W. Both in situ high-speed photography and post-mortem examinations reveal shear localization and as a consequence, cracking of the UFG W under dynamic uniaxial compression. These observations are consistent with recent observations on other body-centered cubic metals with nanocrystalline or ultrafine microstructures. The experimental results are discussed using existing models for adiabatic shear localization in metals

  17. Design and construction of a strain gage compression load cell to measure rolling forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeffer, L.; Borchardt, I.G.; Carvalho, L.F.A.

    1978-05-01

    A complete detailed mechanical desion of a strain gauge compression load cell is presented. This cell was specialy designed to measure rolling forces at conventional duo or trio industrial roughing stands. The stands, in general, have little space (height) to adjust to the cells. Moreover the contact stands surfaces are very rough. Do to this facts, load cells of elastic cilindrical geometries are not recommended for accuracies better than 8%. This work describes the complete design and the construction of a circular (membrane) steel plate load cell. A prototype of 300 KN (approximately 30t) capacity, with 2% accuracies and with a height of 6 cm was constructed and tested. The design proposed is a general one and permits the construction of small load cells to measure any compression load [pt

  18. Lagrangian investigations of vorticity dynamics in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Nishant; Sinha, Sawan Suman; Danish, Mohammad; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of compressibility on vorticity-strain rate dynamics. Well-resolved direct numerical simulations of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence performed over a cubical domain of 10243 are employed for this study. To clearly identify the influence of compressibility on the time-dependent dynamics (rather than on the one-time flow field), we employ a well-validated Lagrangian particle tracker. The tracker is used to obtain time correlations between the instantaneous vorticity vector and the strain-rate eigenvector system of an appropriately chosen reference time. In this work, compressibility is parameterized in terms of both global (turbulent Mach number) and local parameters (normalized dilatation-rate and flow field topology). Our investigations reveal that the local dilatation rate significantly influences these statistics. In turn, this observed influence of the dilatation rate is predominantly associated with rotation dominated topologies (unstable-focus-compressing, stable-focus-stretching). We find that an enhanced dilatation rate (in both contracting and expanding fluid elements) significantly enhances the tendency of the vorticity vector to align with the largest eigenvector of the strain-rate. Further, in fluid particles where the vorticity vector is maximally misaligned (perpendicular) at the reference time, vorticity does show a substantial tendency to align with the intermediate eigenvector as well. The authors make an attempt to provide physical explanations of these observations (in terms of moment of inertia and angular momentum) by performing detailed calculations following tetrads {approach of Chertkov et al. ["Lagrangian tetrad dynamics and the phenomenology of turbulence," Phys. Fluids 11(8), 2394-2410 (1999)] and Xu et al. ["The pirouette effect in turbulent flows," Nat. Phys. 7(9), 709-712 (2011)]} in a compressible flow field.

  19. Stress State Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Masonry Columns Reinforced with FRP under Concentric Compressive Load

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Witzany; Radek Zigler

    2016-01-01

    The strengthening and stabilization of damaged compressed masonry columns with composites based on fabrics of high-strength fibers and epoxy resin, or polymer-modified cement mixtures, belongs to novel, partially non-invasive and reversible progressive methods. The stabilizing and reinforcing effect of these fabrics significantly applies to masonry structures under concentric compressive loading whose failure mechanism is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cra...

  20. Dynamic Gust Load Analysis for Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic load of helicopter rotors due to gust directly affects the structural stress and flight performance for helicopters. Based on a large deflection beam theory, an aeroelastic model for isolated helicopter rotors in the time domain is constructed. The dynamic response and structural load for a rotor under the impulse gust and slope-shape gust are calculated, respectively. First, a nonlinear Euler beam model with 36 degrees-of-freedoms per element is applied to depict the structural dynamics for an isolated rotor. The generalized dynamic wake model and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model are applied to calculate the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic forces on rotors. Then, we transformed the differential aeroelastic governing equation to an algebraic one. Hence, the widely used Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is employed to simulate the dynamic gust load. An isolated helicopter rotor with four blades is studied to validate the structural model and the aeroelastic model. The modal frequencies based on the Euler beam model agree well with published ones by CAMRAD. The flap deflection due to impulse gust with the speed of 2m/s increases twice to the one without gust. In this numerical example, results indicate that the bending moment at the blade root is alleviated due to elastic effect.

  1. Dynamic compression of chondrocyte-agarose constructs reveals new candidate mechanosensitive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Bougault

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is physiologically exposed to repeated loads. The mechanical properties of cartilage are due to its extracellular matrix, and homeostasis is maintained by the sole cell type found in cartilage, the chondrocyte. Although mechanical forces clearly control the functions of articular chondrocytes, the biochemical pathways that mediate cellular responses to mechanical stress have not been fully characterised. The aim of our study was to examine early molecular events triggered by dynamic compression in chondrocytes. We used an experimental system consisting of primary mouse chondrocytes embedded within an agarose hydrogel; embedded cells were pre-cultured for one week and subjected to short-term compression experiments. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that chondrocytes maintain a differentiated phenotype in this model system and reproduce typical chondrocyte-cartilage matrix interactions. We investigated the impact of dynamic compression on the phosphorylation state of signalling molecules and genome-wide gene expression. After 15 min of dynamic compression, we observed transient activation of ERK1/2 and p38 (members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and Smad2/3 (members of the canonical transforming growth factor (TGF-β pathways. A microarray analysis performed on chondrocytes compressed for 30 min revealed that only 20 transcripts were modulated more than 2-fold. A less conservative list of 325 modulated genes included genes related to the MAPK and TGF-β pathways and/or known to be mechanosensitive in other biological contexts. Of these candidate mechanosensitive genes, 85% were down-regulated. Down-regulation may therefore represent a general control mechanism for a rapid response to dynamic compression. Furthermore, modulation of transcripts corresponding to different aspects of cellular physiology was observed, such as non-coding RNAs or primary cilium. This study provides new insight into how

  2. Effect of the loading rate on compressive properties of goose eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedomová, Š; Kumbár, V; Trnka, J; Buchar, J

    2016-03-01

    The resistance of goose (Anser anser f. domestica) eggs to damage was determined by measuring the average rupture force, specific deformation and rupture energy during their compression at different compression speeds (0.0167, 0.167, 0.334, 1.67, 6.68 and 13.36 mm/s). Eggs have been loaded between their poles (along X axis) and in the equator plane (Z axis). The greatest amount of force required to break the eggs was required when eggs were loaded along the X axis and the least compression force was required along the Z axis. This effect of the loading orientation can be described in terms of the eggshell contour curvature. The rate sensitivity of the eggshell rupture force is higher than that observed for the Japanese quail's eggs.

  3. Final Report 02-ERD-033: Rapid Resolidification of Metals using Dynamic Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitz, F H; Nguyen, J H; Orlikowski, D; Minich, R; Moriarty, J A; Holmes, N C

    2005-01-01

    microseconds and makes accessible states beyond the principal Hugoniot and isentrope. The strain rate in these quasi-isentropic compression experiments vary from 10 4 - 10 6 s -1 , effectively bridging the gap between static compression and previous quasi-isentropic compression techniques [4, 7]. The primary deliverable associated with this LDRD-ER is the creation a new experimental capability for the lab: the ability to control pressure and temperature loading rates in a dynamic compression experiment by using functionally graded impactors in the light gas gun facility. The new capability will enable dynamic experiments exploring a broader area of pressure and temperature phase space, ultimately enabling further experiments on the kinetics of phase transitions at high temperature and pressure. Using our unique arbitrary-density graded impactors, scientists can now investigate various aspects of the solidification phase transition including (a) time scale, (b) loading rate dependence and (c) sample size effects

  4. Shaft Center Orbit in Dynamically Loaded Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coe±cients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 [1]and described further in 1972 [2]. Several authors have re¯ned this metho...

  5. Loading dynamics of a sliding DNA clamp.

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jergic, Slobodan; Kim, Daehyung; Dixon, Nicholas E; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-01-01

    8° during clamp closure. The single-molecule polarization and FRET studies thus revealed the real-time dynamics of the ATP-hydrolysis-dependent 3D conformational change of the β clamp during loading at a ss/dsDNA junction.

  6. Material properties under intensive dynamic loading

    CERN Document Server

    Cherne, Frank J; Zhernokletov, Mikhail V; Glushak, B L; Zocher, Marvin A

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the physical and thermomechanical response of materials subjected to intensive dynamic loading is a challenge of great significance in engineering today. This volume assumes the task of gathering both experimental and diagnostic methods in one place, since not much information has been previously disseminated in the scientific literature.

  7. Cure behavior, compression set and dynamic mechanical properties of EPDM/NBR blend vulcanizates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.Y. [Pukyong National Univeristy, Pusan (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    The ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) blends with acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) were prepared by mechanical mixing method. Mooney viscosity, cure behaviors, compression set and dynamic mechanical properties were subsequently examined. Dynamic characteristics of the entire blends determined from a Rheovibron generally showed two glass transitions (T{sub g}'s), -43 deg. C and -4 deg. C for NBR and EPDM, respectively. The tan {delta} peak monotonically shifted toward the higher temperature with increasing NBR content. It was also found that the optimum cure time was significantly decreased with loading of NBR. (author). 13 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs.

  8. Longitudinal Weld Land Buckling in Compression-Loaded Orthogrid Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Large stiffened cylinders used in launch vehicles (LV), such as the Space Shuttle External Tank, are manufactured by welding multiple curved panel sections into complete cylinders. The effects of the axial weld lands between the panel sections on the buckling load were studied, along with the interaction between the acreage stiffener arrangement and the weld land geometry. This document contains the results of the studies.

  9. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  10. Stress relaxation in vanadium under shock and shockless dynamic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutions of elastic-plastic waves have been recorded in three series of plate impact experiments with annealed vanadium samples under conditions of shockless and combined ramp and shock dynamic compression. The shaping of incident wave profiles was realized using intermediate base plates made of different silicate glasses through which the compression waves were entered into the samples. Measurements of the free surface velocity histories revealed an apparent growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with decreasing average rate of compression. The growth was explained by “freezing” of the elastic precursor decay in the area of interaction of the incident and reflected waves. A set of obtained data show that the current value of the Hugoniot elastic limit and plastic strain rate is rather associated with the rate of the elastic precursor decay than with the local rate of compression. The study has revealed the contributions of dislocation multiplications in elastic waves. It has been shown that independently of the compression history the material arrives at the minimum point between the elastic and plastic waves with the same density of mobile dislocations

  11. First application of the 3D-MHB on dynamic compressive behavior of UHPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadoni Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the dynamic behaviour of material in confined conditions a new machine was conceived and called 3D-Modified Hopkinson Bar (3D-MHB. It is a Modified Hopkinson Bar apparatus designed to apply dynamic loading in materials having a tri-axial stress state. It consists of a pulse generator system (with pre-tensioned bar and brittle joint, 1 input bar, and 5 output bars. The first results obtained on Ultra High Performance Concrete in compression with three different mono-axial compression states are presented. The results show how the pre-stress states minimize the boundary condition and a more uniform response is obtained.

  12. The impact of ergonomics intervention on trunk posture and cumulative compression load among carpet weavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Davood; Motamedzade, Majid; Salehi, Reza; Soltanian, Alir Raze

    2015-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders of back among weavers are prevalent. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between poor working postures and back disorders among carpet weavers. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of the traditional (A) and ergonomically designed (B) workstations on trunk posture and cumulative compression load in carpet weavers. In this study, subtasks were identified in terms of stressful postures and carpet weaving process. Postural data were collected during knotting and compacting subtasks using inclinometer during four hours for each workstation. Postural data, weight and height of the weavers were entered into the University of Michigan three-dimensional static biomechanical model for estimation of the compression load and cumulative load were estimated from the resultant load and exposure time. Thirteen healthy carpet weavers (four males and nine females) participated in the study. Median trunk flexion angle was reduced with workstation B during knotting subtask (18° versus 8.5°, pergonomically designed workstation.

  13. Field Measurement of Dynamic Compressive Stress Response of Pavement-Subgrade Induced by Moving Heavy-Duty Trucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingshi An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the dynamic compressive stress response of pavement-subgrade induced by moving heavy-duty trucks. In order to study the distribution characteristic of dynamic pressure of pavement-subgrade in more detail, truck loadings, truck speeds, and dynamic pressure distributions at different depths were monitored under twenty-five working conditions on the section of Qiqihar-Nenjiang Highway in Heilongjiang Province, China. The effects of truck loading, truck speed, and depth on dynamic compressive stress response can be concluded as follows: (1 increasing truck loading will increase the dynamic pressure amplitude of subgrade-pavement and dominant frequencies are close to the characteristic frequencies caused by heavy-duty trucks at the speed of 70 km/h; (2 as truck speed increases, the dynamic pressure amplitudes of measuring points have an increasing tendency; the dynamic pressure spectrums are also significantly influenced by truck speed: the higher the truck speed, the wider the spectrum and the higher the dominant frequencies; (3 as depth increases, the dynamic pressure amplitudes of measuring points decrease rapidly. The influence of the front axle decreases gradually until disappearing and the compressive stress superposition phenomenon caused by rear double axles can be found with increasing depth.

  14. Experimental Characteristics of Dry Stack Masonry under Compression and Shear Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of dry stack masonry (DSM is influenced by the interaction of the infill with the frame (especially the joints between bricks, which requires further research. This study investigates the compression and shear behaviors of DSM. First, a series of compression tests were carried out on both masonry prism with mortar (MP_m and DSM prism (MP_ds. The failure mode of each prism was determined. Different from the MP_m, the stress-strain relationship of the MP_ds was characterized by an upward concavity at the initial stage. The compression strength of the MP_ds was slightly reduced by 15%, while the elastic modulus was reduced by over 62%. In addition, 36 shear-compression tests were carried out under cyclic loads to emphasize the influence of various loads on the shear-compression behavior of DSM. The results showed that the Mohr-Coulomb friction law adequately represents the failure of dry joints at moderate stress levels, and the varying friction coefficients under different load amplitudes cannot be neglected. The experimental setup and results are valuable for further research.

  15. Experimental Characteristics of Dry Stack Masonry under Compression and Shear Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; Totoev, Yuri Zarevich; Liu, Hongjun; Wei, Chunli

    2015-12-12

    The behavior of dry stack masonry (DSM) is influenced by the interaction of the infill with the frame (especially the joints between bricks), which requires further research. This study investigates the compression and shear behaviors of DSM. First, a series of compression tests were carried out on both masonry prism with mortar (MP_m) and DSM prism (MP_ds). The failure mode of each prism was determined. Different from the MP_m, the stress-strain relationship of the MP_ds was characterized by an upward concavity at the initial stage. The compression strength of the MP_ds was slightly reduced by 15%, while the elastic modulus was reduced by over 62%. In addition, 36 shear-compression tests were carried out under cyclic loads to emphasize the influence of various loads on the shear-compression behavior of DSM. The results showed that the Mohr-Coulomb friction law adequately represents the failure of dry joints at moderate stress levels, and the varying friction coefficients under different load amplitudes cannot be neglected. The experimental setup and results are valuable for further research.

  16. Insights into the effects of tensile and compressive loadings on human femur bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaldar, Raviraj; Pilli, S C; Putti, B B

    2014-01-01

    Fragile fractures are most likely manifestations of fatigue damage that develop under repetitive loading conditions. Numerous microcracks disperse throughout the bone with the tensile and compressive loads. In this study, tensile and compressive load tests are performed on specimens of both the genders within 19 to 83 years of age and the failure strength is estimated. Fifty five human femur cortical samples are tested. They are divided into various age groups ranging from 19-83 years. Mechanical tests are performed on an Instron 3366 universal testing machine, according to American Society for Testing and Materials International (ASTM) standards. The results show that stress induced in the bone tissue depends on age and gender. It is observed that both tensile and compression strengths reduces as age advances. Compressive strength is more than tensile strength in both the genders. The compression and tensile strength of human femur cortical bone is estimated for both male and female subjecting in the age group of 19-83 years. The fracture toughness increases till 35 years in male and 30 years in female and reduces there after. Mechanical properties of bone are age and gender dependent.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Steel-FRP Composite Bars under Tensile and Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The factory-produced steel-fiber reinforced polymer composite bar (SFCB is a new kind of reinforcement for concrete structures. The manufacturing technology of SFCB is presented based on a large number of handmade specimens. The calculated stress-strain curves of ordinary steel bar and SFCB under repeated tensile loading agree well with the corresponding experimental results. The energy-dissipation capacity and residual strain of both steel bar and SFCB were analyzed. Based on the good simulation results of ordinary steel bar and FRP bar under compressive loading, the compressive behavior of SFCB under monotonic loading was studied using the principle of equivalent flexural rigidity. There are three failure modes of SFCB under compressive loading: elastic buckling, postyield buckling, and no buckling (ultimate compressive strength is reached. The increase in the postyield stiffness of SFCB rsf can delay the postyield buckling of SFCB with a large length-to-diameter ratio, and an empirical equation for the relationship between the postbuckling stress and rsf is suggested, which can be used for the design of concrete structures reinforced by SFCB to consider the effect of reinforcement buckling.

  18. Chloride transport under compressive load in bacteria-based self-healing concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binti Md Yunus, B.; Schlangen, E.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in this study to investigate the effect of compressive load on chloride penetration in self-healing concrete containing bacterial-based healing agent. Bacteria-based healing agent with the fraction of 2 mm – 4 mm of particles sizes were used in this contribution. ESEM

  19. Dynamic fracture initiation in brittle materials under combined mode I/II loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Kishida, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Sogabe, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A new test method has been developed to measure the resistance of dynamic fracture initiation in brittle materials under combined mode I/II loadings. The Brazilian disks with center-cracks have been fractured under oblique impact loadings in diametral-compression. The dynamic stress intensity factors of mode I and II are evaluated from the superposition integrals of the step response functions for the cracked disk. The experimental results are presented to elucidate the influence of loading rate on the combined mode fracture toughness for ceramics and glasses. (orig.)

  20. Dynamic loads on the primary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, J.

    1980-01-01

    As a result of pipe breaks f.ex. in the primary system of a PWR-plant dynamic forces act on the components of the system as well as on their support-structures and internals. The design basis must guarantee that LOCA or system-transient generated loads cannot produce deformations or fractures that endanger the coolability of the reactor, the emergency feedwater supply to the core-region and a safe shut-down of the reactor. In this lecture the first part of a LOCA will be discussed, where the highest dynamic loads on the primary system are expected. In this connection comments are given on the main assumptions and boundary conditions, the related regulations and guide-lines, as well as the possible consequences of an accident. Next, a review is presented of the analytical methods being used for the determination of thermohydraulic generated loads. The stress-calculations on the basis of these load-functions are discussed in the following lectures. The application of the analytical methods, i.e. the different computer codes, and the verification on the basis of the experimental results are described together with a discussion of the theoretical results. In addition a survey will be given of the research work done in connection with the problems of the dynamic loads under accident conditions. Finally, the problems of the fluid-structure interaction will be explained and comments made on computer code development now under way regarding this problem. A short film will be presented to provide a better understanding of fast transient phenomena. (orig./RW)

  1. Rat disc torsional mechanics: effect of lumbar and caudal levels and axial compression load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Malhotra, Neil R; Elliott, Dawn M

    2009-03-01

    Rat models with altered loading are used to study disc degeneration and mechano-transduction. Given the prominent role of mechanics in disc function and degeneration, it is critical to measure mechanical behavior to evaluate changes after model interventions. Axial compression mechanics of the rat disc are representative of the human disc when normalized by geometry, and differences between the lumbar and caudal disc have been quantified in axial compression. No study has quantified rat disc torsional mechanics. Compare the torsional mechanical behavior of rat lumbar and caudal discs, determine the contribution of combined axial load on torsional mechanics, and compare the torsional properties of rat discs to human lumbar discs. Cadaveric biomechanical study. Cyclic torsion without compressive load followed by cyclic torsion with a fixed compressive load was applied to rat lumbar and caudal disc levels. The apparent torsional modulus was higher in the lumbar region than in the caudal region: 0.081+/-0.026 (MPa/degrees, mean+/-SD) for lumbar axially loaded; 0.066+/-0.028 for caudal axially loaded; 0.091+/-0.033 for lumbar in pure torsion; and 0.056+/-0.035 for caudal in pure torsion. These values were similar to human disc properties reported in the literature ranging from 0.024 to 0.21 MPa/degrees. Use of the caudal disc as a model may be appropriate if the mechanical focus is within the linear region of the loading regime. These results provide support for use of this animal model in basic science studies with respect to torsional mechanics.

  2. Optimization of composite sandwich cover panels subjected to compressive loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Juan R.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis and design method is presented for the design of composite sandwich cover panels that include the transverse shear effects and damage tolerance considerations. This method is incorporated into a sandwich optimization computer program entitled SANDOP. As a demonstration of its capabilities, SANDOP is used in the present study to design optimized composite sandwich cover panels for for transport aircraft wing applications. The results of this design study indicate that optimized composite sandwich cover panels have approximately the same structural efficiency as stiffened composite cover panels designed to satisfy individual constraints. The results also indicate that inplane stiffness requirements have a large effect on the weight of these composite sandwich cover panels at higher load levels. Increasing the maximum allowable strain and the upper percentage limit of the 0 degree and +/- 45 degree plies can yield significant weight savings. The results show that the structural efficiency of these optimized composite sandwich cover panels is relatively insensitive to changes in core density. Thus, core density should be chosen by criteria other than minimum weight (e.g., damage tolerance, ease of manufacture, etc.).

  3. Compressible dynamic stall control using high momentum microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beahan, James J.; Shih, Chiang; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu; Kumar, Rajan; Chandrasekhara, Muguru S.

    2014-09-01

    Control of the dynamic stall process of a NACA 0015 airfoil undergoing periodic pitching motion is investigated experimentally at the NASA Ames compressible dynamic stall facility. Multiple microjet nozzles distributed uniformly in the first 12 % chord from the airfoil's leading edge are used for the dynamic stall control. Point diffraction interferometry technique is used to characterize the control effectiveness, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The microjet control has been found to be very effective in suppressing both the emergence of the dynamic stall vortex and the associated massive flow separation at the entire operating range of angles of attack. At the high Mach number ( M = 0.4), the use of microjets appears to eliminate the shock structures that are responsible for triggering the shock-induced separation, establishing the fact that the use of microjets is effective in controlling dynamic stall with a strong compressibility effect. In general, microjet control has an overall positive effect in terms of maintaining leading edge suction pressure and preventing flow separation.

  4. Role of Inelastic Transverse Compressive Behavior and Multiaxial Loading on the Transverse Impact of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Sockalingam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity transverse impact of ballistic fabrics and yarns by projectiles subject individual fibers to multi-axial dynamic loading. Single-fiber transverse impact experiments with the current state-of-the-art experimental capabilities are challenging due to the associated micron length-scale. Kevlar® KM2 fibers exhibit a nonlinear inelastic behavior in transverse compression with an elastic limit less than 1.5% strain. The effect of this transverse behavior on a single KM2 fiber subjected to a cylindrical and a fragment-simulating projectile (FSP transverse impact is studied with a 3D finite element model. The inelastic behavior results in a significant reduction of fiber bounce velocity and projectile-fiber contact forces up to 38% compared to an elastic impact response. The multiaxial stress states during impact including transverse compression, axial tension, axial compression and interlaminar shear are presented at the location of failure. In addition, the models show a strain concentration over a small length in the fiber under the projectile-fiber contact. A failure criterion, based on maximum axial tensile strain accounting for the gage length, strain rate and multiaxial loading degradation effects are applied to predict the single-fiber breaking speed. Results are compared to the elastic response to assess the importance of inelastic material behavior on failure during a transverse impact.

  5. Normal dynamic deformation characteristics of non-consecutive jointed rock masses under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sheng; Jiang, Bowei; Sun, Bing

    2017-08-01

    In order to study deformation characteristics of non-consecutive single jointed rock masses under impact loads, we used the cement mortar materials to make simulative jointed rock mass samples, and tested the samples under impact loads by the drop hammer. Through analyzing the time-history signal of the force and the displacement, first we find that the dynamic compression displacement of the jointed rock mass is significantly larger than that of the intact jointless rock mass, the compression displacement is positively correlated with the joint length and the impact height. Secondly, the vertical compressive displacement of the jointed rock mass is mainly due to the closure of opening joints under small impact loads. Finally, the peak intensity of the intact rock mass is larger than that of the non-consecutive jointed rock mass and negatively correlated with the joint length under the same impact energy.

  6. Binaural model-based dynamic-range compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Stephan M A; Kortlang, Steffen; Grimm, Giso; Bisitz, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2018-01-26

    Binaural cues such as interaural level differences (ILDs) are used to organise auditory perception and to segregate sound sources in complex acoustical environments. In bilaterally fitted hearing aids, dynamic-range compression operating independently at each ear potentially alters these ILDs, thus distorting binaural perception and sound source segregation. A binaurally-linked model-based fast-acting dynamic compression algorithm designed to approximate the normal-hearing basilar membrane (BM) input-output function in hearing-impaired listeners is suggested. A multi-center evaluation in comparison with an alternative binaural and two bilateral fittings was performed to assess the effect of binaural synchronisation on (a) speech intelligibility and (b) perceived quality in realistic conditions. 30 and 12 hearing impaired (HI) listeners were aided individually with the algorithms for both experimental parts, respectively. A small preference towards the proposed model-based algorithm in the direct quality comparison was found. However, no benefit of binaural-synchronisation regarding speech intelligibility was found, suggesting a dominant role of the better ear in all experimental conditions. The suggested binaural synchronisation of compression algorithms showed a limited effect on the tested outcome measures, however, linking could be situationally beneficial to preserve a natural binaural perception of the acoustical environment.

  7. Triaxial extensometer for volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Bo; Xu, Ming-long; Zhao, Tian-fei; Zhang, Zhi-jun; Lu, Tian-jian

    2010-01-01

    A new strain gauge-based triaxial extensometer (radial extensometers x, y and axial extensometer z) is presented to improve the volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials. By the triaxial extensometer, triaxial deformations of the foam specimen can be measured directly, from which the volumetric strain is determined. Sensitivities of the triaxial extensometer are predicted using a finite-element model, and verified through experimental calibrations. The axial extensometer is validated by conducting a uniaxial compression test in aluminium foam and comparing deformation measured by the axial extensometer to that by the advanced optical 3D deformation analysis system ARAMIS; the result from the axial extensometer agrees well with that from ARAMIS. A new modus of two-wire measurement and transmission in a hydrostatic environment is developed to avoid the punching and lead sealing techniques on the pressure vessel for the hydro-compression test. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the triaxial extensometer is determined through an experimental test. An application in an aluminium foam hydrostatic compression test shows that the triaxial extensometer is effective for volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials

  8. Dynamic Loading of Carrara Marble in a Heated State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Li, Zhihuan; Kang, Hyeong Min; Teh, Cee Ing

    2017-06-01

    Useable land is a finite space, and with a growing global population, countries have been exploring the use of underground space as a strategic resource to sustain the growth of their society and economy. However, the effects of impact loading on rocks that have been heated, and hence the integrity of the underground structure, are still not fully understood and has not been included in current design standards. Such scenarios include traffic accidents and explosions during an underground fire. This study aims to provide a better understanding of the dynamic load capacity of Carrara marble at elevated temperatures. Dynamic uniaxial compression tests are performed on Carrara marble held at various temperatures using a split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) setup with varying input force. A customized oven is included in the SHPB setup to allow for testing of the marble specimens in a heated state. After the loading test, a three-wave analysis is performed to obtain the dynamic stress-strain curve of the specimen under loading. The fragments of the failed specimens were also collected and dry-sieved to obtain the particle size distribution. The results reveal that the peak stress of specimens that have been heated is negatively correlated with the heating temperature. However, the energy absorbed by the specimens at peak stress at all temperatures is similar, indicating that a significant amount of energy is dissipated via plastic deformation. Generally, fragment size is also found to show a negative correlation with heating temperature and loading pressure. However, in some cases this relationship does not hold true, probably due to the occurrence of stress shadowing. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics has been found to be generally applicable to specimens tested at low temperatures; but at higher temperatures, Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics will give a more accurate prediction. Another contribution of this study is to show that other than the peak stress of the

  9. Peak load-impulse characterization of critical pulse loads in structural dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, G.R.; Lindberg, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    In presenting the characterization scheme, some general features are described first. A detailed analysis is given for the rigid-plastic system of one degree of freedom to illustrate the calculation of critical load curves in terms of peak load and impulse. This is followed by the presentation of critical load curves for uniformly loaded rigid-plastic beams and plates and for dynamic buckling of cylindrical shells under uniform lateral loads. The peak load-impulse characterization of critical pulse loads is compared with the dynamic load factor characterization, and some aspects of the history of the peak load-pulse scheme are presented. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Red Sandstone under Incremental Uniaxial Cyclical Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial experiments were carried out on red sandstone specimens to investigate their short-term and creep mechanical behavior under incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading. First, based on the results of short-term uniaxial incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading experiments, deformation characteristics and energy dissipation were analyzed. The results show that the stress-strain curve of red sandstone has an obvious memory effect in the compressive and tensile loading stages. The strains at peak stresses and residual strains increase with the cycle number. Energy dissipation, defined as the area of the hysteresis loop in the stress-strain curves, increases nearly in a power function with the cycle number. Creep test of the red sandstone was also conducted. Results show that the creep curve under each compressive or tensile stress level can be divided into decay and steady stages, which cannot be described by the conventional Burgers model. Therefore, an improved Burgers creep model of rock material is constructed through viscoplastic mechanics, which agrees very well with the experimental results and can describe the creep behavior of red sandstone better than the Burgers creep model.

  11. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Some of the challenges that hearing-aid listeners experience with speech perception in complex acoustic environments may originate from limitations in the temporal processing of sounds. To systematically investigate the influence of hearing impairment and hearing-aid signal processing on temporal...... processing, temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) and “supra-threshold” modulation-depth discrimination (MDD) thresholds were obtained in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with and without wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC). The TMTFs were obtained using tonal carriers of 1...... with the physical compression of the modulation depth due to the WDRC. Indications of reduced temporal resolution in the HI listeners were observed in the TMTF patterns for the 5 kHz carrier. Significantly higher MDD thresholds were found for the HI group relative to the NH group. No relationship was found between...

  12. Analysis of pile foundations under dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waas, G.; Hartmann, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the analysis of pile foundations which are subjected to horizontal dynamic loads from earthquakes, airplane impact, gas explosion or other sources. The motion of the pile cap and the pile forces are computed. - The loads may be applied to the pile cap or directly to the piles (e.g. by earthquake wave motion). The soil may be stratified and is considered to be an elastic or visco-elastic medium. The piles are assumed vertical. The method makes use of an approximate fundamental solution for displacements caused by a dynamic point load in a layered visco-elastic medium. The approximation involves a discretization of the medium in the vertical direction. In horizontal directions the medium is treated by continuum theory. The soil medium supports each pile at about 10 to 20 nodes. A dynamic flexiblity matrix for the soil is derived which relates the elastic, damping and inertial forces of the soil to the displacements at each node. It includes effects of radiation damping. All piles are coupled through the soil flexibility matrix. The piles are modelled by beam elements. Transient response is computed using fast discrete Fourier transforms. The arrangement of the piles is arbitrary. However, simple and double symmetry can be accounted for by the computer program. When the pile arrangement is axisymmetric, the degrees of freedom can be reduced to only those of two piles per ring. The influence of the number of piles and the influence of the pile spacing on group stiffness and on pile forces is presented for two soil profiles. Dynamic effects on pile forces of a foundation for a reactor building are studied. They are significant when soils are soft. (orig.)

  13. Static, Dynamic, and Thermal Properties of Compressible Fluid Film Journal Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Bo Terp; Morosi, Stefano; Santos, Ilmar

    2011-01-01

    fluid film journal bearing, in order to identify when this type of analysis should be of concern. Load capacity, stiffness, and damping coefficients are determined by the solution of the standard Reynolds equation coupled to the energy equation. Numerical investigations show how bearing geometry......, and work great efficiency. A great deal of literature has concentrated on the analysis and prediction of the static and dynamic performance of gas bearings, assuming isothermal conditions. The present contribution presents a detailed mathematical modeling for nonisothermal lubrication of a compressible...

  14. A comparison of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) strategies at high load, low speed conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuri, Chaitanya; Paz, Jordan; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Targeting high load-low speed, optimizations of RCCI and GCI strategies were performed. • The two strategies were compared in terms of performance, controllability and stability. • The optimum cases had high gross indicated efficiency (∼47%) and low NOx emissions. • RCCI strategy showed better combustion control but had higher soot emissions. • GCI strategy was relatively more sensitive to fluctuations in charge conditions. - Abstract: Past research has shown that Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) combustion are promising approaches to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions. However, the benefits have generally been confined to mid-load operating conditions. To enable practical application, these approaches must be able to operate over the entire engine map. A particularly challenging area is high load, low speed operation. Accordingly, the present work uses detailed CFD modeling and engine experiments to compare RCCI and GCI combustion strategies at a high load, low speed condition. Computational optimizations of RCCI and GCI combustion were performed at 20 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and 1300 rev/min. The optimum points from the two combustion strategies were verified using engine experiments and were used to make the comparisons between RCCI and GCI combustion. The comparison showed that both the strategies had very similar combustion characteristics with a near top dead center injection initiating combustion. A parametric study was performed to identify the key input parameters that control combustion for the RCCI and GCI strategies. For both strategies, the combustion phasing could be controlled by the start of injection (SOI) timing of the near TDC injection. The short ignition delay of diesel fuel gave the RCCI strategy better control over combustion than the GCI strategy, but also had a simultaneous tradeoff with soot emissions. With the GCI

  15. Retention Strength after Compressive Cyclic Loading of Five Luting Agents Used in Implant-Supported Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Alvarez-Arenal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the retention strength of five cement types commonly used in implant-retained fixed partial dentures, before and after compressive cyclic loading. In five solid abutments screwed to 5 implant analogs, 50 metal Cr-Ni alloy copings were cemented with five luting agents: resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI, resin composite (RC, glass ionomer (GI, resin urethane-based (RUB, and compomer cement (CC. Two tensile tests were conducted with a universal testing machine, one after the first luting of the copings and the other after 100,000 cycles of 100 N loading at 0.72 Hz. The one way ANOVA test was applied for the statistical analysis using the post hoc Tukey test when required. Before and after applying the compressive load, RmGI and RC cement types showed the greatest retention strength. After compressive loading, RUB cement showed the highest percentage loss of retention (64.45%. GI cement recorded the lowest retention strength (50.35 N and the resin composite cement recorded the highest (352.02 N. The type of cement influences the retention loss. The clinician should give preference to lower retention strength cement (RUB, CC, and GI if he envisages any complications and a high retention strength one (RmGI, RC for a specific clinical situation.

  16. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    systems, such as a wind turbine, are prevented from ever entering dynamic stall, essentially disregarding potential ... future generations of such systems, an overwhelming need has developed to avail this benefit safely. ... approach must diffuse the vorticity prior to its coalescence, but keep the vorticity over the airfoil up to ...

  17. Dynamic load effects on gate valve operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, R. Jr.; MacDonald, P.E.; Arendts, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) participated in an internationally sponsored seismic research program conducted at the decommissioned Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) located in the Federal Republic of Germany. An existing piping system was modified by installation of an 8-in., naturally aged, motor-operated gate valve from a US nuclear power plant and a piping support system of US design. Six other piping support systems of varying flexibility from stiff to flexible were also installed at various times during the tests. Additional valve loadings included internal hydraulic loads and, during one block of tests, elevated temperature. The operability and integrity of the aged gate valve and the dynamic response of the various piping support system were measured during 25 representative seismic events

  18. Dynamic compressive properties and failure mechanism of glass fiber reinforced silica hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jie; Li Shukui; Yan Lili; Huo Dongmei; Wang Fuchi

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic compressive properties of glass fiber reinforced silica (GFRS) hydrogel were investigated using a spilt Hopkinson pressure bar. Failure mechanism of GFRS hydrogel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Result showed that dynamic compressive stresses were much higher than the quasi-static compressive stresses at the same strain. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the strain rate with same sample dimensions. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the sample basal area at same strain rate. Dynamic compressive failure strain was small. At high strain rates, glass fibers broke down and separated from the matrix, pores shrank rapidly. Failure resulted from the increase of lateral tensile stress in hydrogel under dynamic compression.

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion as an Extreme Example of Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.

    2013-06-01

    Initiating and controlling thermonuclear burn at the national ignition facility (NIF) will require the manipulation of matter to extreme energy densities. We will discuss recent advances in both controlling the dynamic compression of ignition targets and our understanding of the physical states and processes leading to ignition. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Mechanical behaviour of Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) beans under loading compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalingging, R.; Herak, D.; Kabutey, A.; Sigalingging, C.

    2018-02-01

    The uniformity of the product of the grinding process depends on various factors including the brittleness of the roasted coffee bean and it affects the extraction of soluble solids to obtain the coffee brew. Therefore, the reaching of a certain degree of brittleness is very important for the grinding to which coffee beans have to be subjected to before brewing. The aims of this study to show the mechanical behaviour of Arabica coffee beans from Tobasa (Indonesia) with roasted using different roasting time (40, 60 and 80 minutes at temperature 174 °C) under loading compression 225 kN. Universal compression testing machine was used with pressing vessel diameter 60 mm and compression speed 10 mm min-1 with different initial pressing height ranging from 20 to 60 mm. The results showed that significant correlation between roasting time and the brittleness.

  1. STUDY ON HEAT DYNAMIC LOADING OF RUBBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Igumenova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies on heat buildup in tire rubber surface scan method samples using a thermal imaging camera. Investigated the exothermic chemical reaction mechanical destruction rubber when loading designs permanent cyclic stretching with deformation of the working zone 50%. Percentage of deformation of the working zone was chosen on the basis of the actual data on the stretch-compression zone "Rusk" tires, which is the maximum level difference of deformation during run-in. Experiment plan provided for periodic relaxation samples of at least 72 hours for more accurate simulation of operation process of structural products. Created and processed data on temperature changes in samples for bar and line profile for rubber compounds with the introduction of nanomodifiers (fulleren technical carbon in comparison with the control sample without him. The data obtained reflect the nature of heat depending on the composition of the compound. Identified common patterns of thermal nature of physico-chemical process mechanical destruction rubbers. For rubber with nanomodifikatorom there has been an increase in the temperature interval reaction from a minimum to a maximum 2 degrees that is also linked to the rise in the average temperature of the reaction on the histogram also at 2-3 degrees of deformation under the same conditions and the level of cyclic loading. However, the temperature in the control sample that is associated with the beginning of the formation of hardened rubber structures, economies of Mallinz-Petrikeev, occurs with delay twice compared with modified Fullerenes. Measurement of physic-mechanical indicators selected in the course of testing of samples showed the beginning of formation of structure with increased strength of samples in the sample temperature zone that corresponds to the thermal effect of èndotermičeskomu recombination reactions of macromolecules.

  2. MA-core loaded untuned RF compression cavity for HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Lirong; Xu Zhe; Yuan Youjin; Jin Peng; Bian Zhibin; Zhao Hongwei; Xia Jiawen

    2012-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high energy density physics and plasma physics research at HIRFL-CSR the goal of achieving a higher accelerating gap voltage was proposed. Therefore, a magnetic alloy (MA)-core loaded radio frequency (RF) cavity that can provide a higher accelerating gap voltage compared to standard ferrite loaded cavities has been studied at IMP. In order to select the proper magnetic alloy material to load the RF compression cavity, measurements of four different kinds of sample MA-cores have been carried out. By testing the small cores, the core composition was selected to obtain the desired performance. According to the theoretical calculation and simulation, which show reasonable consistency for the MA-core loaded cavity, the desired performance can be achieved. Finally about 1000 kW power will be needed to meet the requirements of 50 kV accelerating gap voltage by calculation.

  3. Loading dynamics of a sliding DNA clamp.

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Won-Ki

    2014-05-22

    Sliding DNA clamps are loaded at a ss/dsDNA junction by a clamp loader that depends on ATP binding for clamp opening. Sequential ATP hydrolysis results in closure of the clamp so that it completely encircles and diffuses on dsDNA. We followed events during loading of an E. coli β clamp in real time by using single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Three successive FRET states were retained for 0.3 s, 0.7 s, and 9 min: Hydrolysis of the first ATP molecule by the γ clamp loader resulted in closure of the clamp in 0.3 s, and after 0.7 s in the closed conformation, the clamp was released to diffuse on the dsDNA for at least 9 min. An additional single-molecule polarization study revealed that the interfacial domain of the clamp rotated in plane by approximately 8° during clamp closure. The single-molecule polarization and FRET studies thus revealed the real-time dynamics of the ATP-hydrolysis-dependent 3D conformational change of the β clamp during loading at a ss/dsDNA junction.

  4. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kirchberger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings.

  5. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings. PMID:26868955

  6. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-02-10

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  8. Femtosecond visualization of lattice dynamics in shock-compressed matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milathianaki, D; Boutet, S; Williams, G J; Higginbotham, A; Ratner, D; Gleason, A E; Messerschmidt, M; Seibert, M M; Swift, D C; Hering, P; Robinson, J; White, W E; Wark, J S

    2013-10-11

    The ultrafast evolution of microstructure is key to understanding high-pressure and strain-rate phenomena. However, the visualization of lattice dynamics at scales commensurate with those of atomistic simulations has been challenging. Here, we report femtosecond x-ray diffraction measurements unveiling the response of copper to laser shock-compression at peak normal elastic stresses of ~73 gigapascals (GPa) and strain rates of 10(9) per second. We capture the evolution of the lattice from a one-dimensional (1D) elastic to a 3D plastically relaxed state within a few tens of picoseconds, after reaching shear stresses of 18 GPa. Our in situ high-precision measurement of material strength at spatial (<1 micrometer) and temporal (<50 picoseconds) scales provides a direct comparison with multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Dynamical local field, compressibility, and frequency sum rules for quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawetz, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The finite temperature dynamical response function including the dynamical local field is derived within a quasiparticle picture for interacting one-, two-, and three-dimensional Fermi systems. The correlations are assumed to be given by a density-dependent effective mass, quasiparticle energy shift, and relaxation time. The latter one describes disorder or collisional effects. This parametrization of correlations includes local-density functionals as a special case and is therefore applicable for density-functional theories. With a single static local field, the third-order frequency sum rule can be fulfilled simultaneously with the compressibility sum rule by relating the effective mass and quasiparticle energy shift to the structure function or pair-correlation function. Consequently, solely local-density functionals without taking into account effective masses cannot fulfill both sum rules simultaneously with a static local field. The comparison to the Monte Carlo data seems to support such a quasiparticle picture

  10. Performance of composite I-beams under axial compression and bending load modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Y.A.; Ali, F.A.; Sahari, B.B.; Saad, E.M.A.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental and finite-element analyses for glass/epoxy composite I-beams have been carried out. Four, six, eight and 10 layers of woven fabric glass/epoxy composite I-beams were fabricated by a hand lay-up (molding) process. Quasi-static axial crushing and bending loading modes were used for this investigation. The load-displacement response was obtained and the energy absorption values were calculated for all the composite I-beams. Three tests were done for each composite I-beams type and each loading case for the results conformation. The second part of this study includes the elastic behavior of composite I-beams of the same dimensions and materials using finite-element analysis. The woven fabric glass/epoxy composite I-beams mechanical properties have been obtained from tensile tests. Results from this investigation show that the load required and the specific energy absorption for composite I-beams under axial compression load were higher than those for three and four point bending. On the other hand, the loads required for composite I-beams under four point bending were higher than those for three point bending, while the specific energy absorption for composite I-beams under three point bending were higher than those for four point bending. The first crushing loads difference between the experimental and finite-element results fell in the 3.6-10.92% range for axial compression tests, while fell in the 1.44-12.99% and 4.94-22.0% range for three and four point bending, respectively

  11. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  12. Mechanical properties of the human spinal cord under the compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Shojaei, Ahmad; Tehrani, Pedram

    2017-12-01

    The spinal cord as the most complex and critical part of the human body is responsible for the transmission of both motor and sensory impulses between the body and the brain. Due to its pivotal role any types of physical injury in that disrupts its function following by shortfalls, including the minor motor and sensory malfunctions as well as complicate quadriplegia and lifelong ventilator dependency. In order to shed light on the injuries to the spinal cord, the application of the computational models to simulate the trauma impact loading to that are deemed required. Nonetheless, it has not been fulfilled since there is a paucity of knowledge about the mechanical properties of the spinal cord, especially the cervical one, under the compressive loading on the grounds of the difficulty in obtaining this tissue from the human body. This study was aimed at experimentally measuring the mechanical properties of the human cervical spinal cord of 24 isolated fresh samples under the unconfined compressive loading at a relatively low strain rate. The stress-strain data revealed the elastic modulus and maximum/failure stress of 40.12±6.90 and 62.26±5.02kPa, respectively. Owing to the nonlinear response of the spinal cord, the Yeoh, Ogden, and Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material models have also been employed. The results may have implications not only for understanding the linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties of the cervical spinal cord under the compressive loading, but also for providing a raw data for investigating the injury as a result of the trauma thru the numerical simulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fracture Behaviours in Compression-loaded Triangular Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid N.Z.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure modes occurring in sandwich panels based on the corrugations of aluminium alloy, carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP and glass fibre-reinforced plastic (GFRP are analysed in this work. The fracture behaviour of these sandwich panels under compressive stresses is determined through a series of uniform lateral compression performed on samples with different cell wall thicknesses. Compression test on the corrugated-core sandwich panels were conducted using an Instron series 4505 testing machine. The post-failure examinations of the corrugated-core in different cell wall thickness were conducted using optical microscope. Load-displacement graphs of aluminium alloy, GFRP and CFRP specimens were plotted to show progressive damage development with five unit cells. Four modes of failure were described in the results: buckling, hinges, delamination and debonding. Each of these failure modes may dominate under different cell wall thickness or loading condition, and they may act in combination. The results indicate that thicker composites corrugated-core panels tend can recover more stress and retain more stiffness. This analysis provides a valuable insight into the mechanical behaviour of corrugated-core sandwich panels for use in lightweight engineering applications.

  14. Rate-independent dissipation and loading direction effects in compressed carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raney, J R; Fraternali, F; Daraio, C

    2013-01-01

    Arrays of nominally-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under compression deform locally via buckling, exhibit a foam-like, dissipative response, and can often recover most of their original height. We synthesize millimeter-scale CNT arrays and report the results of compression experiments at different strain rates, from 10 −4 to 10 −1 s −1 , and for multiple compressive cycles to different strains. We observe that the stress–strain response proceeds independently of the strain rate for all tests, but that it is highly dependent on loading history. Additionally, we examine the effect of loading direction on the mechanical response of the system. The mechanical behavior is modeled using a multiscale series of bistable springs. This model captures the rate independence of the constitutive response, the local deformation, and the history-dependent effects. We develop here a macroscopic formulation of the model to represent a continuum limit of the mesoscale elements developed previously. Utilizing the model and our experimental observations we discuss various possible physical mechanisms contributing to the system’s dissipative response. (paper)

  15. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of shock compression in porous silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Keith; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2017-06-01

    The shock response of porous amorphous silica is investigated using classical molecular dynamics, over a range of porosity ranging from fully dense (2.21 g/cc) down to 0.14 g/cc. We observe an enhanced densification in the Hugoniot response at initial porosities above 50 %, and the effect increases with increasing porosity. In the lowest initial densities, after an initial compression response, the systems expand with increased pressure. These results show good agreement with experiments. Mechanisms leading to enhanced densification will be explored, which appear to differ from mechanisms observed in similar studies in silicon. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Dynamic range compression in a liquid argon calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, W.E.; Lissauer, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.

    1996-01-01

    The anticipated range of particle energies at the LHC, coupled with the need for precision, low noise calorimetry makes severe demands on the dynamic range of the calorimeter readout. A common approach to this problem is to use shapers with two or more gain scales. In this paper, the authors describe their experience with a new approach in which a preamplifier with dynamic gain compression is used. An unavoidable consequence of dynamic gain adjustment is that the peaking time of the shaper output signal becomes amplitude dependent. The authors have carried out a test of such a readout system in the RD3 calorimeter, a liquid argon device with accordion geometry. The calibration system is used to determine both the gain of the individual channels as well as to map the shape of the waveform as a function of signal amplitude. A new procedure for waveform analysis, in which the fitted parameters describe the impulse response of the system, permits a straightforward translation of the calibration waveform to the waveform generated by a particle crossing the ionization gap. They find that the linearity and resolution of the calorimeter is equivalent to that obtained with linear preamplifiers, up to an energy of 200 GeV

  18. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  19. Inverse problem and uncertainty quantification: application to compressible gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birolleau, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with uncertainty propagation and the resolution of inverse problems together with their respective acceleration via Polynomial Chaos. The object of this work is to present a state of the art and a numerical analysis of this stochastic spectral method, in order to understand its pros and cons when tackling the probabilistic study of hydrodynamical instabilities in Richtmyer-Meshkov shock tube experiments. The first chapter is introductory and allows understanding the stakes of being able to accurately take into account uncertainties in compressible gas dynamics simulations. The second chapter is both an illustrative state of the art on generalized Polynomial Chaos and a full numerical analysis of the method keeping in mind the final application on hydrodynamical problems developing shocks and discontinuous solutions. In this chapter, we introduce a new method, naming iterative generalized Polynomial Chaos, which ensures a gain with respect to generalized Polynomial Chaos, especially with non smooth solutions. Chapter three is closely related to an accepted publication in Communication in Computational Physics. It deals with stochastic inverse problems and introduces bayesian inference. It also emphasizes the possibility of accelerating the bayesian inference thanks to iterative generalized Polynomial Chaos described in the previous chapter. Theoretical convergence is established and illustrated on several test-cases. The last chapter consists in the application of the above materials to a complex and ambitious compressible gas dynamics problem (Richtmyer-Meshkov shock tube configuration) together with a deepened study of the physico-numerical phenomenon at stake. Finally, in the appendix, we also present some interesting research paths we quickly tackled during this thesis. (author) [fr

  20. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  1. Stress State Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Masonry Columns Reinforced with FRP under Concentric Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Witzany

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strengthening and stabilization of damaged compressed masonry columns with composites based on fabrics of high-strength fibers and epoxy resin, or polymer-modified cement mixtures, belongs to novel, partially non-invasive and reversible progressive methods. The stabilizing and reinforcing effect of these fabrics significantly applies to masonry structures under concentric compressive loading whose failure mechanism is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cracks accompanied by an increase in horizontal masonry strain. During the appearance of micro and hairline cracks (10−3 to 10−1 mm, the effect of non-pre-stressed wrapping composite is very small. The favorable effect of passive wrapping is only intensively manifested after the appearance of cracks (10−1 mm and bigger at higher loading levels. In the case of “optimum” reinforcement of a masonry column, the experimental research showed an increase in vertical displacements δy (up to 247%, horizontal displacements δx (up to 742% and ultimate load-bearing capacity (up to 136% compared to the values reached in unreinforced masonry columns. In the case of masonry structures in which no intensive “bed joint filler–masonry unit” interaction occurs, e.g., in regular coursed masonry with little differences in the mechanical characteristics of masonry units and the binder, the reinforcing effect of the fabric applies only partially.

  2. The Behaviour of Palm Oil Fibre Block Masonry Prism under Eccentric Compressive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Mardiha; Kolop, Roslan; Baizura Hamid, Nor; Kaamin, Masiri; Farhan Rosdi, Mohd; Ngadiman, Norhayati; Sahat, Suhaila

    2017-08-01

    Dry-stacked masonry offers great benefits in constructing masonry buildings. Several examples from previous research show that dry masonry is reasonable alternative to the traditional building system. By addition of fibre, the ductility and the propagation of cracking will be improved. This study investigates the dry stack oil palm fibre block prisms which were subjected to eccentricity compression loads. These concrete blocks were cast using a single mould with suitable fibre-cement composition namely 1:4 (cement: sand) and 0.40 water to the cement ratio based on cement weight. Prisms test using 400 (length) × 150 (width) × 510 (height) mm specimen was carried under eccentric load. There were forty eight (48) prisms built with different configurations based on their volume of fibre. In this study, one types of grout were used namely the fine grout of mix 1:3:2 (cement: sand: aggregate (5mm maximum). Based on the test performed, the failure mechanism and influencing parameters were discussed. From compressive strength test result, it shows that the strength of concrete block decreased with the increase of fibre used. Although the control sample has the higher strength compared to concrete with EFB, it can be seen from mode failure of masonry prism that fibre could extend the cracking time. These results show that the oil palm fibre blocks can improve the failure behaviour and suitable to be used as load bearing wall construction in Malaysia.

  3. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, C.C.; Song, Y.T.; Peng, X.B.; Wei, Y.P.; Mao, X.; Li, W.X.; Qian, X.Y.

    2016-01-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads. - Graphical abstract: From the comparison between the experimental curves and the predicted curves calculated by adopting the corrected m, it is very clear that the new model is of great capability to explain the deformation behavior of the tungsten material under dynamic compression at high temperatures. (EC, PC and PCM refers to experimental curve, predicted curve and predicted curve with a corrected m. Different colors represent different scenarios.). - Highlights: • Test research on dynamic properties of tungsten at working temperature range and strain rate range of divertors. • Constitutive equation descrbing strain hardening, strain rate hardening and temperature softening. • A guidance to estimate dynamical response and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under impact.

  4. Long-term dynamic loading improves the mechanical properties of chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cell-laden hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Huang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive cell source for cartilage tissue engineering given their ability to undergo chondrogenesis in 3D culture systems. Mechanical forces play an important role in regulating both cartilage development and MSC chondrogenic gene expression, however, mechanical stimulation has yet to enhance the mechanical properties of engineered constructs. In this study, we applied long-term dynamic compression to MSC-seeded constructs and assessed whether varying pre-culture duration, loading regimens and inclusion of TGF-beta3 during loading would influence functional outcomes and these phenotypic transitions. Loading initiated before chondrogenesis decreased functional maturation, although chondrogenic gene expression increased. In contrast, loading initiated after chondrogenesis and matrix elaboration further improved the mechanical properties of MSC-based constructs, but only when TGF-beta3 levels were maintained and under specific loading parameters. Although matrix quantity was not affected by dynamic compression, matrix distribution, assessed histologically and by FT-IRIS analysis, was significantly improved on the micro- (pericellular and macro- (construct expanse scales. Further, whole genome expression profiling revealed marked shifts in the molecular topography with dynamic loading. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dynamic compressive loading initiated after a sufficient period of chondro-induction and with sustained TGF-beta exposure enhances matrix distribution and the mechanical properties of MSC-seeded constructs.

  5. Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Aluminum Foams Subjected to Compression Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H. M.; Carvalho, C. D.; Peixinho, N. R.

    2017-05-01

    The non-linear behavior of uniform-size cellular foams made of aluminum is investigated when subjected to compressive loads while comparing numerical results obtained in the Finite Element Method software (FEM) ANSYS workbench and ANSYS Mechanical APDL (ANSYS Parametric Design Language). The numerical model is built on AUTODESK INVENTOR, being imported into ANSYS and solved by the Newton-Raphson iterative method. The most similar conditions were used in ANSYS mechanical and ANSYS workbench, as possible. The obtained numerical results and the differences between the two programs are presented and discussed

  6. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruszka Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1 and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  7. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Moćko, Wojciech; Fenu, Luigi; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1) and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  8. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Red Sandstone Specimens Under Uniaxial Cyclic Loading and Unloading Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingbin; Zhang, Mingwei; Han, Lijun; Pu, Hai; Chen, Yanlong

    2018-04-01

    To explore the acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of rock materials during the deformation and failure process under periodic loads, a uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression experiment was conducted based on an MTS 815 rock mechanics test system and an AE21C acoustic emissions test system. The relationships among stress, strain, AE activity, accumulated AE activity and duration for 180 rock specimens under 36 loading and unloading rates were established. The cyclic AE evolutionary laws with rock stress-strain variation at loading and unloading stages were analyzed. The Kaiser and Felicity effects of rock AE activity were disclosed, and the impact of the significant increase in the scale of AE events on the Felicity effect was discussed. It was observed that the AE characteristics are closely related to the stress-strain properties of rock materials and that they are affected by the developmental state and degree of internal microcracks. AE events occur in either the loading or unloading stages if the strain is greater than zero. Evolutionary laws of AE activity agree with changes in rock strain. Strain deformation is accompanied by AE activity, and the density and intensity of AE events directly reflect the damage degree of the rock mass. The Kaiser effect exists in the linear elastic stage of rock material, and the Felicity effect is effective in the plastic yield and post-peak failure stages, which are divided by the elastic yield strength. This study suggests that the stress level needed to determine a significant increase in AE activity was 70% of the i + 1 peak stress. The Felicity ratio of rock specimens decreases with the growth of loading-unloading cycles. The cycle magnitude and variation of the Felicity effect, in which loading and unloading rates play a weak role, are almost consistent.

  9. Response of Rubble Foundation to Dynamic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1993-01-01

    The soil beneath vertical monolithic structures is subjected to a combination of static load due to the submerged weight of the structure and stochastic non-stationary loads as a result of the wave loads on the vertical wall. The stress conditions in the soil below a foundation exposed to both...

  10. Response of Rubble Foundation to Dynamic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1994-01-01

    The soil beneath vertical monolithic structures is subjected to a combination of static load due to the submerged weight of the structure and stochastic non-stationary loads as a result of the wave loads on the vertical wall. The stress conditions in the soil below a foundation exposed to both...

  11. An efficient dynamic load balancing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagaros, Nikos D.

    2014-01-01

    In engineering problems, randomness and uncertainties are inherent. Robust design procedures, formulated in the framework of multi-objective optimization, have been proposed in order to take into account sources of randomness and uncertainty. These design procedures require orders of magnitude more computational effort than conventional analysis or optimum design processes since a very large number of finite element analyses is required to be dealt. It is therefore an imperative need to exploit the capabilities of computing resources in order to deal with this kind of problems. In particular, parallel computing can be implemented at the level of metaheuristic optimization, by exploiting the physical parallelization feature of the nondominated sorting evolution strategies method, as well as at the level of repeated structural analyses required for assessing the behavioural constraints and for calculating the objective functions. In this study an efficient dynamic load balancing algorithm for optimum exploitation of available computing resources is proposed and, without loss of generality, is applied for computing the desired Pareto front. In such problems the computation of the complete Pareto front with feasible designs only, constitutes a very challenging task. The proposed algorithm achieves linear speedup factors and almost 100% speedup factor values with reference to the sequential procedure.

  12. Model for field-induced reorientation strain in magnetic shape memory alloy with tensile and compressive loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yuping; Dui Guansuo

    2008-01-01

    A model based on the micromechanical and the thermodynamic theory is presented for field-induced martensite reorientation in magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) single crystals. The influence of variants morphology and the material property to constitutive behavior is considered. The nonlinear and hysteretic strain and magnetization response of MSMA are investigated for two main loading cases, namely the magnetic field-induced reorientation of variants under constant compressive stress and tensile stress. The predicted results have shown that increasing tensile loading reduces the required field for actuation, while increasing compressive loads result in the required magnetic field growing considerably. It is helpful to design the intelligent composite with MSMA fibers

  13. The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1 which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device.

  14. Cryotherapy with dynamic intermittent compression for analgesia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgier, J; Cassard, X

    2014-05-01

    Cryotherapy is a useful adjunctive analgesic measure in patients with postoperative pain following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Either static permanent compression or dynamic intermittent compression can be added to increase the analgesic effect of cryotherapy. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of these two compression modalities combined with cryotherapy in relieving postoperative pain and restoring range of knee motion after ligament reconstruction surgery. When combined with cryotherapy, a dynamic and intermittent compression is associated with decreased analgesic drug requirements, less postoperative pain, and better range of knee motion compared to static compression. We conducted a case-control study of consecutive patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at a single institution over a 3-month period. Both groups received the same analgesic drug protocol. One group was managed with cryotherapy and dynamic intermittent compression (Game Ready(®)) and the other with cryotherapy and static compression (IceBand(®)). Of 39 patients, 20 received dynamic and 19 static compression. In the post-anaesthesia recovery unit, the mean visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was 2.4 (range, 0-6) with dynamic compression and 2.7 (0-7) with static compression (P=0.3); corresponding values were 1.85 (0-9) vs. 3 (0-8) (P=0.16) after 6 hours and 0.6 (0-3) vs. 1.14 (0-3) (P=0.12) at discharge. The cumulative mean tramadol dose per patient was 57.5mg (0-200mg) with dynamic compression and 128.6 mg (0-250 mg) with static compression (P=0.023); corresponding values for morphine were 0mg vs. 1.14 mg (0-8 mg) (Pcryotherapy decreases analgesic drug requirements after ACL reconstruction and improves the postoperative recovery of range of knee motion. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermo-fluid dynamic analysis of wet compression process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Abhay; Kim, Heuy Dong; Chidambaram, Palani Kumar; Suryan, Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Wet compression systems increase the useful power output of a gas turbine by reducing the compressor work through the reduction of air temperature inside the compressor. The actual wet compression process differs from the conventional single phase compression process due to the presence of latent heat component being absorbed by the evaporating water droplets. Thus the wet compression process cannot be assumed isentropic. In the current investigation, the gas-liquid two phase has been modeled as air containing dispersed water droplets inside a simple cylinder-piston system. The piston moves in the axial direction inside the cylinder to achieve wet compression. Effects on the thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure and relative humidity are investigated in detail for different parameters such as compression speeds and overspray. An analytical model is derived and the requisite thermodynamic curves are generated. The deviations of generated thermodynamic curves from the dry isentropic curves (PV γ = constant) are analyzed

  16. Thermo-fluid dynamic analysis of wet compression process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Abhay; Kim, Heuy Dong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chidambaram, Palani Kumar [FMTRC, Daejoo Machinery Co. Ltd., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Suryan, Abhilash [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2016-12-15

    Wet compression systems increase the useful power output of a gas turbine by reducing the compressor work through the reduction of air temperature inside the compressor. The actual wet compression process differs from the conventional single phase compression process due to the presence of latent heat component being absorbed by the evaporating water droplets. Thus the wet compression process cannot be assumed isentropic. In the current investigation, the gas-liquid two phase has been modeled as air containing dispersed water droplets inside a simple cylinder-piston system. The piston moves in the axial direction inside the cylinder to achieve wet compression. Effects on the thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure and relative humidity are investigated in detail for different parameters such as compression speeds and overspray. An analytical model is derived and the requisite thermodynamic curves are generated. The deviations of generated thermodynamic curves from the dry isentropic curves (PV{sup γ} = constant) are analyzed.

  17. Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2018-04-03

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI is not widely expanded, as the auto-ignition of fuel at low load condition is difficult. The present study aims to extend the low load operational limit for GCI using negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy. The engine used for the current experimentation is a single cylinder diesel engine that runs at an idle speed of 800 rpm with a compression ratio of 17.3. The engine is operated at homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and partially premixed combustion (PPC) combustion modes with the corresponding start of injection (SOI) at 180 CAD (aTDC) and 30 CAD (aTDC), respectively. In the presented work, intake air temperature is used as control parameter to maintain combustion stability at idle and low load condition, while the intake air pressure is maintained at 1 bar (ambient). The engine is equipped with variable valve cam phasers that can phase both inlet and exhaust valves from the original timing. For the maximum cam phasing range (56 CAD) at a valve lift of 0.3 mm, the maximum allowable positive valve overlap was 20 CAD. In the present study, the exhaust cam is phased to 26 CAD and 6 CAD and the corresponding NVO is noted to be 10 CAD and 30 CAD, respectively. With exhaust cam phasing adjustment, the exhaust valve is closed early to retain hot residual gases inside the cylinder. As such, the in-cylinder temperature is increased and a reduction in the required intake air temperature to control combustion phasing is possible. For a constant combustion phasing of 3 CAD (aTDC), a minimum load of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) = 1 bar is attained for gasoline (RON = 91) at HCCI and PPC modes. The coefficient of variance was observed to below 5% at these idle and low load conditions. At the minimum load point, the

  18. Dynamics of heavy ion beams during longitudinal compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Brandon, S.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    Heavy ion beams with initially uniform line charge density can be compressed longitudinally by an order of magnitude in such a way that the compressed beam has uniform line charge density and velocity-tilt profiles. There are no envelope mismatch oscillations during compression. Although the transverse temperature varies along the beam and also varies with time, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth has been observed. Scaling laws for beam radius and transport system parameters are given

  19. An Investigation of dynamic characteristics of structures subjected to dynamic load from the viewpoint of design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Ah; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Gyung Jin; Kang, Byung Soo; Kim, Joo Sung

    2006-01-01

    All the loads in the real world are dynamic loads and structural optimization under dynamic loads is very difficult. Thus the dynamic loads are often transformed to static loads by dynamic factors, which are believed equivalent to the dynamic loads. However, due to the difference of load characteristics, there can be considerable differences between the results from static and dynamic analyses. When the natural frequency of a structure is high, the dynamic analysis result is similar to that of static analysis due to the small inertia effect on the behavior of the structure. However, if the natural frequency of the structure is low, the inertia effect should not be ignored. then, the behavior of the dynamic system is different from that of the static system. The difference of the two cases can be explained from the relationship between the homogeneous and the particular solutions of the differential equation that governs the behavior of the structure. Through various examples, the difference between the dynamic analysis and the static analysis are shown. Also dynamic response optimization results are compared with the results with static loads transformed from dynamic loads by dynamic factors, which show the necessity of the design considering dynamic loads

  20. Dynamic Uniaxial Compression of HSLA-65 Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dike, Shweta; Wang, Tianxue; Zuanetti, Bryan; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, the dynamic response of a high-strength, low alloy Grade 65 (HSLA-65) steel, used by the United States Navy for ship hull construction, is investigated under dynamic uniaxial compression at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1000 °C using a novel elevated temperature split-Hopkinson pressure bar. These experiments are designed to probe the dynamic response of HSLA-65 steel in its single α-ferrite phase, mixed α + γ-austenite phase, and the single γ-austenite phase, as a function of temperature. The investigation is conducted at two different average strain rates—1450 and 2100/s. The experimental results indicate that at test temperatures in the range from room temperature to lower than 600 °C, i.e. prior to the development of the mixed α + γ phase, a net softening in flow strength is observed at all levels of plastic strain with increase in test temperatures. As the test temperatures are increased, the rate of this strain softening with temperature is observed to decrease, and at 600 °C the trend reverses itself resulting in an increase in flow stress at all strains tested. This increase in flow stress is understood be due to dynamic strain aging, where solute atoms play a distinctive role in hindering dislocation motion. At 800 °C, a (sharp) drop in the flow stress, equivalent to one-half of its value at room temperature, is observed. As the test temperature are increased to 900 and 1000 °C, further drop in flow stress are observed at all plastic strain levels. In addition, strain hardening in flow stress is observed at all test temperatures up to 600 °C; beyond 800 °C the rate of strain hardening is observed to decrease, with strain softening becoming dominant at temperatures of 900 °C and higher. Moreover, comparing the high strain rate stress versus strain data gathered on HSLA 65 in the current investigation with those available in the literature at quasi-static strain rates, strain-rate hardening can be

  1. An Approach Toward Synthesis of Bridgmanite in Dynamic Compression Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppart, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Bridgmanite occurs in heavily shocked meteorites and provides a useful constraint on pressure-temperature conditions during shock-metamorphism. Its occurrence also provides constraints on the shock release path. Shock-release and shock duration are important parameters in estimating the size of impactors that generate the observed shock metamorphic record. Thus, it is timely to examine if bridgmanite can be synthesized in dynamic compression experiments with the goal of establishing a correlation between shock duration and grainsize. Up to now only one high pressure polymorph of an Mg-silicate has been synthesized AND recovered in a shock experiment (wadsleyite). Therefore, it is not given that shock synthesis of bridgmanite is possible. This project started recently, so we present an outline of shock experiment designs and potentially results from the first experiments. FUNDING ACKNOWLEDGMENT UNLV HiPSEC: This research was sponsored (or sponsored in part) by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement #DE-NA0001982. HPCAT: "[Portions of this work were]/[This work was] performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award No. DE-FG02-99ER45775, with partial instrumentation funding by NSF. APS is supported by DOE-BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357."

  2. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Methods to Predict Lower Bound Buckling Loads of Cylinders Under Axial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Waddy T.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of two different orthogrid stiffened circular cylindrical shells with initial imperfections and subjected to axial compression are used to compare three different lower bound buckling load prediction techniques. These lower bound prediction techniques assume different imperfection types and include an imperfection based on a mode shape from an eigenvalue analysis, an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, and an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple. The STAGS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for ranges of imperfection amplitudes are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. Similar behavior was observed for shells that include a lateral perturbation load and a single dimple imperfection, and the results indicate that the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding results for the cylinders with the mode shape imperfection considered herein. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the single dimple imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via testing.

  4. Experimental investigation of dynamic compression and spallation of Cerium at pressures up to 6 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubareva, A. N.; Kolesnikov, S. A.; Utkin, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this study the experiments on one-dimensional dynamic compression of Cerium (Ce) samples to pressures of 0.5 to 6 GPa using various types of explosively driven generators were conducted. VISAR laser velocimeter was used to obtain Ce free surface velocity profiles. The isentropic compression wave was registered for γ-phase of Ce at pressures lower than 0.76 GPa that corresponds to γ-α phase transition pressure in Ce. Shock rarefaction waves were also registered in several experiments. Both observations were the result of the anomalous compressibility of γ-phase of Ce. On the basis of our experimental results the compression isentrope of Ce γ-phase was constructed. Its comparison with volumetric compression curves allowed to estimate the magnitude of shear stress at dynamic compression conditions for Ce. Spall strength measurements were also conducted for several samples. They showed a strong dependence of the spall strength of Ce on the strain rate.

  5. Experimental investigation of dynamic compression and spallation of cerium at pressures up to 6 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubareva, A N; Kolesnikov, S A; Utkin, A V

    2014-01-01

    In this study the experiments on one-dimensional dynamic compression of Cerium (Ce) samples to pressures of 0.5 to 6 GPa using various types of explosively driven generators were conducted. VISAR laser velocimeter was used to obtain Ce free surface velocity profiles. The isentropic compression wave was registered for γ-phase of Ce at pressures lower than 0.76 GPa that corresponds to γ-α phase transition pressure in Ce. Shock rarefaction waves were also registered in several experiments. Both observations were the result of the anomalous compressibility of γ-phase of Ce. On the basis of our experimental results the compression isentrope of Ce γ-phase was constructed. Its comparison with volumetric compression curves allowed to estimate the magnitude of shear stress at dynamic compression conditions for Ce. Spall strength measurements were also conducted for several samples. They showed a strong dependence of the spall strength of Ce on the strain rate.

  6. Damage propagation in a masonry arch subjected to slow cyclic and dynamic loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the damage propagation of a masonry arch induced by slow cyclic and dynamic loadings is studied. A two-dimensional model of the arch is proposed. A nonlocal damage-plastic constitutive law is adopted to reproduce the hysteretic characteristics of the masonry material, subjected to cyclic static loadings or to harmonic dynamic excitations. In particular, the adopted cohesive model is able to take into account different softening laws in tension and in compression, plastic strains, stiffness recovery and loss due to crack closure and reopening. The latter effect is an unavoidable feature for realistically reproducing hysteretic cycles. In the studied case, an inverse procedure is used to calibrate the model parameters. Then, nonlinear static and dynamic responses of the masonry arch are described together with damage propagation paths.

  7. Dynamic Load Balancing of Parallel Monte Carlo Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M; Taylor, J; Procassini, R

    2004-01-01

    The performance of parallel Monte Carlo transport calculations which use both spatial and particle parallelism is increased by dynamically assigning processors to the most worked domains. Since the particle work load varies over the course of the simulation, this algorithm determines each cycle if dynamic load balancing would speed up the calculation. If load balancing is required, a small number of particle communications are initiated in order to achieve load balance. This method has decreased the parallel run time by more than a factor of three for certain criticality calculations

  8. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Effect of Axial and Transverse Compression on the Residual Tensile Properties of Ballistic Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib C. Chowdhury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic impact induces multiaxial loading on Kevlar® and polyethylene fibers used in protective armor systems. The influence of multiaxial loading on fiber failure is not well understood. Experiments show reduction in the tensile strength of these fibers after axial and transverse compression. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD simulations to explain and develop a fundamental understanding of this experimental observation since the property reduction mechanism evolves from the atomistic level. An all-atom MD method is used where bonded and non-bonded atomic interactions are described through a state-of-the-art reactive force field. Monotonic tension simulations in three principal directions of the models are conducted to determine the anisotropic elastic and strength properties. Then the models are subjected to multi-axial loads—axial compression, followed by axial tension and transverse compression, followed by axial tension. MD simulation results indicate that pre-compression distorts the crystal structure, inducing preloading of the covalent bonds and resulting in lower tensile properties.

  9. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at ∼1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of ∼50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  10. Effect of orientation and loading rate on compression behavior of small-scale Mo pillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, A.S.; Clark, B.G.; Frick, C.P.; Gruber, P.A.; Arzt, E.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, much work has focused on the size effect in face centered cubic (fcc) structures, however few pillar studies have focused on body centered cubic (bcc) metals. This paper explores the role of bcc crystal structure on the size effect, through compression testing of [001] and [235] Molybdenum (Mo) small-scale pillars manufactured by focused ion beam (FIB). The pillar diameters ranged from 200 nm to 5 μm. Results show that the relationship between yield stress and diameter exhibits an inverse relationship (σ y ∝ d -0.22 for [001] Mo and σ y ∝ d -0.34 for [235] Mo) weaker than that observed for face centered cubic (fcc) metals (σ y ∝ d -0.6to-1.0 ). Additional tests at various loading rates revealed that small-scale Mo pillars exhibit a strain rate sensitivity similar to bulk Mo.

  11. A compression and shear loading test of concrete filled steel bearing wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sekimoto, Hisashi; Fukihara, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Hara, Kiyoshi.

    1991-01-01

    Concrete-filled steel bearing walls called SC structure which are the composite structure of concrete and steel plates have larger load-carrying capacity and higher ductility as compared with conventional RC structures, and their construction method enables the rationalization of construction procedures at sites and the shortening of construction period. Accordingly, the SC structures have become to be applied to the inner concrete structures of PWR nuclear power plants, and subsequently, it is planned to apply them to the auxiliary buildings of nuclear power plants. The purpose of this study is to establish a rational design method for the SC structures which can be applied to the auxiliary buildings of nuclear power plants. In this study, the buckling strength of surface plates and the ultimate strength of the SC structure were evaluated with the results of the compression and shear tests which have been carried out. The outline of the study and the tests, the results of the compression test and the shear test and their evaluation are reported. Stud bolts were effective for preventing the buckling of surface plates. The occurrence of buckling can be predicted analytically. (K.I.)

  12. Dynamic CT perfusion image data compression for efficient parallel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Renan Sales; Olabarriaga, Silvia Delgado; Borst, Jordi; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Posthuma, Jorrit S; Streekstra, Geert J; van Herk, Marcel; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing size of medical imaging data, in particular time series such as CT perfusion (CTP), requires new and fast approaches to deliver timely results for acute care. Cloud architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide the processing capacity required for delivering fast results. However, the size of CTP datasets makes transfers to cloud infrastructures time-consuming and therefore not suitable in acute situations. To reduce this transfer time, this work proposes a fast and lossless compression algorithm for CTP data. The algorithm exploits redundancies in the temporal dimension and keeps random read-only access to the image elements directly from the compressed data on the GPU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to present a GPU-ready method for medical image compression with random access to the image elements from the compressed data.

  13. Dynamical Model of Rocket Propellant Loading with Liquid Hydrogen

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A dynamical model describing the multi-stage process of rocket propellant loading has been developed. It accounts for both the nominal and faulty regimes of...

  14. Features wear nodes mechanization wing aircraft operating under dynamic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.М. Хімко

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available  The conducted researches of titanic alloy ВТ-22 at dynamic loading with cycled sliding and dynamic loading in conditions of rolling with slipping. It is established that roller jamming in the carriage increases wear of rod of mechanization of a wing to twenty times. The optimum covering for strengthening wearied sites and restoration of working surfaces of wing’s mechanization rod is defined.

  15. A combination of shear and dynamic compression leads to mechanically induced chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Schätti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ere is great interest in how bone marrow derived stem cells make fate decisions. Numerous studies have investigated the role of individual growth factors on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, leading to protocols for cartilage, bone and adipose tissue. However, these protocols overlook the role of biomechanics on stem cell differentiation. There have been various studies that have applied mechanical stimulation to constructs containing mesenchymal stem cells, with varying degrees of success. One critical fate decision is that between cartilage and bone. Articular motion is a combination of compressive, tensile and shear deformations; therefore, one can presume that compression alone is unlikely to be a sufficient mechanical signal to generate a cartilage-like tissue in vitro. Within this study, we aimed to determine the role of shear on the fate of stem cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigated the potential enhancing effect of surface shear, superimposed on cyclic axial compression, on chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stem cells. Using a custom built loading device we applied compression, shear or a combination of both stimuli onto fibrin/polyurethane composites in which human mesenchymal stem cells were embedded, while no exogenous growth-factors were added to the culture medium. Both compression or shear alone was insufficient for the chondrogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells. However, the application of shear superimposed upon dynamic compression led to significant increases in chondrogenic gene expression. Histological analysis detected sulphated glycosaminoglycan and collagen II only in the compression and shear group. The results obtained may provide insight into post-operative care after cell therapy involving mesenchymal stromal cells.

  16. Comparison of the load-sharing characteristics between pedicle-based dynamic and rigid rod devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoon-Ho; Chen, W-M; Lee, Kwon-Yong; Park, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2008-01-01

    Recently, numerous types of posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) devices have been introduced as an alternative to the fusion devices for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine. It is hypothesized that the use of 'compliant' materials such as Nitinol (Ni-Ti alloy, elastic modulus = 75 GPa) or polyether-etherketone (PEEK, elastic modulus = 3.2 GPa) in PDS can restore stability of the lumbar spine without adverse stress-shielding effects that have often been found with 'rigid' fusion devices made of 'rigid' Ti alloys (elastic modulus = 114 GPa). Previous studies have shown that suitably designed PDS devices made of more compliant material may be able to help retain kinematic behavior of the normal spine with optimal load sharing between the anterior and posterior spinal elements. However, only a few studies on their biomechanical efficacies are available. In this study, we conducted a finite-element (FE) study to investigate changes in load-sharing characteristics of PDS devices. The implanted models were constructed after modifying the previously validated intact model of L3-4 spine. Posterior lumbar fusion with three different types of pedicle screw systems was simulated: a conventional rigid fixation system (Ti6Al4V, Φ = 6.0 mm) and two kinds of PDS devices (one with Nitinol rod with a three-coiled turn manner, Φ = 4.0 mm; the other with PEEK rod with a uniform cylindrical shape, Φ = 6.0 mm). To simulate the load on the lumbar spine in a neutral posture, an axial compressive load (400 N) was applied. Subsequently, the changes in load-sharing characteristics and stresses were investigated. When the compressive load was applied on the implanted models (Nitinol rod, PEEK rod, Ti-alloy rod), the predicted axial compressive loads transmitted through the devices were 141.8 N, 109.8 N and 266.8 N, respectively. Axial forces across the PDS devices (Nitinol rod, PEEK rod) and rigid system (Ti-alloy rod) with facet joints were predicted to take over 41%, 33

  17. The dependence of the Taylor-Quinney coefficient on the dynamic loading mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittel, D.; Zhang, L. H.; Osovski, S.

    2017-10-01

    The efficiency of the thermomechanical conversion, expressed as the Taylor-Quinney coefficient (TQC) is seldom reported in the literature and generally assumed to be equal to 0.9. Moreover, an eventual dependence of this coefficient on the dynamic loading mode has not been investigated so far. This work presents a systematic characterization of the TQC for seven different metals and alloys loaded in dynamic tension, compression and dominant shear. The results show that the TQC varies greatly with the investigated material, instead of its assumed constant value of 0.9. Likewise, until final collapse of the specimen, the overall temperature rise remains quite modest. Moreover, we clearly observe that for commercially pure Titanium, which exhibits an asymmetric mechanical response in tension and compression, the measured TQC values are mode dependent too. Microstructural characterization reveals profuse twinning in compression and shear, as opposed to tension. Twinning is related to heat generation in accord with previous studies. In addition to reporting a wide database of TQC values, this study reveals a new correlation between the thermomechanical characteristics of a material and its deformation micromechanisms, that should find its way into constitutive models.

  18. Effects of dynamic range compression on spatial selective auditory attention in normal-hearing listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew H; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G

    2013-04-01

    Many hearing aids introduce compressive gain to accommodate the reduced dynamic range that often accompanies hearing loss. However, natural sounds produce complicated temporal dynamics in hearing aid compression, as gain is driven by whichever source dominates at a given moment. Moreover, independent compression at the two ears can introduce fluctuations in interaural level differences (ILDs) important for spatial perception. While independent compression can interfere with spatial perception of sound, it does not always interfere with localization accuracy or speech identification. Here, normal-hearing listeners reported a target message played simultaneously with two spatially separated masker messages. We measured the amount of spatial separation required between the target and maskers for subjects to perform at threshold in this task. Fast, syllabic compression that was independent at the two ears increased the required spatial separation, but linking the compressors to provide identical gain to both ears (preserving ILDs) restored much of the deficit caused by fast, independent compression. Effects were less clear for slower compression. Percent-correct performance was lower with independent compression, but only for small spatial separations. These results may help explain differences in previous reports of the effect of compression on spatial perception of sound.

  19. Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries (HLL) Technology for Audio Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, A.; Lomuscio, A.; Nunzio, L. Di

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we apply hardware acceleration to embedded systems running audio applications. We present a new framework, Dynamically-Loaded Hardware Libraries or HLL, to dynamically load hardware libraries on reconfigurable platforms (FPGAs). Provided a library of application-specific processors......, we load on-the-fly the specific processor in the FPGA, and we transfer the execution from the CPU to the FPGA-based accelerator. The proposed architecture provides excellent flexibility with respect to the different audio applications implemented, high quality audio, and an energy efficient solution....

  20. Incorporating moving dynamic tyre loads in pavement design and analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available at the University of Pretoria. 4 REAL LIFE TYRE LOADS Characterisation Pavement loading has been shown by various authors to be a dynamic (time-dependent) phenomenon (Divine, 1997; Cebon, 1999). A pavement experiences a vehicle as a moving, time-varying set... frequencies. Body bounce generally dominates the dynamic loading, and is mainly caused by the response of the sprung mass of the vehicle to the pavement roughness. Axle hop becomes more significant at higher vehicle speeds and higher pavement roughnesses...

  1. High Precision Motion Control System for the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun at the Dynamic Compression Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, E.; Guarino, V.; Konrad, C.; Williams, B.; Capatina, D.; D'Amico, K.; Arganbright, N.; Zimmerman, K.; Turneaure, S.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has a diverse set of dynamic compression drivers to obtain time resolved x-ray data in single event, dynamic compression experiments. Because the APS x-ray beam direction is fixed, each driver at DCS must have the capability to move through a large range of linear and angular motions with high precision to accommodate a wide variety of scientific needs. Particularly challenging was the design and implementation of the motion control system for the two-stage light gas gun, which rests on a 26' long structure and weighs over 2 tons. The target must be precisely positioned in the x-ray beam while remaining perpendicular to the gun barrel axis to ensure one-dimensional loading of samples. To accommodate these requirements, the entire structure can pivot through 60° of angular motion and move 10's of inches along four independent linear directions with 0.01° and 10 μm resolution, respectively. This presentation will provide details of how this system was constructed, how it is controlled, and provide examples of the wide range of x-ray/sample geometries that can be accommodated. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  2. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Carly W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Goto, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  3. Damage Behaviors and Compressive Strength of Toughened CFRP Laminates with Thin Plies Subjected to Transverse Impact Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Aoki, Yuichiro; Ogasawara, Toshio

    It has been recognized that damage resistance and strength properties of CFRP laminates can be improved by using thin-ply prepregs. This study investigates the damage behaviors and compressive strength of CFRP laminates using thin-ply and standard prepregs subjected to out-of-plane impact loadings. CFRP laminates used for the evaluation are prepared using the standard prepregs, thin-ply prepregs, and combinations of the both. Weight-drop impact test and post-impact compression test of quasi-isotropic laminates are performed. It is shown that the damage behaviors are different between the thin-ply and the standard laminates, and the compression-after-impact strength is improved by using thin-ply prepregs. Effects of the use of thin-ply prepregs and the layout of thin-ply layers on the damage behaviors and compression-after-impact properties are discussed based on the experimental results.

  4. Configuring and Characterizing X-Rays for Laser-Driven Compression Experiments at the Dynamic Compression Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Capatina, D.; D'Amico, K.; Eng, P.; Hawreliak, J.; Graber, T.; Rickerson, D.; Klug, J.; Rigg, P. A.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Coupling laser-driven compression experiments to the x-ray beam at the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory requires state-of-the-art x-ray focusing, pulse isolation, and diagnostics capabilities. The 100J UV pulsed laser system can be fired once every 20 minutes so precise alignment and focusing of the x-rays on each new sample must be fast and reproducible. Multiple Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors are used to achieve a focal spot size as small as 50 μm at the target, while the strategic placement of scintillating screens, cameras, and detectors allows for fast diagnosis of the beam shape, intensity, and alignment of the sample to the x-ray beam. In addition, a series of x-ray choppers and shutters are used to ensure that the sample is exposed to only a single x-ray pulse ( 80ps) during the dynamic compression event and require highly precise synchronization. Details of the technical requirements, layout, and performance of these instruments will be presented. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  5. Characterization of dynamic loads on the LMFBR rotating shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.

    1979-01-01

    The rotating shields structure is a potential weak point of some current designs of primary containment against postulated whole core explosions. The calculation of the effect of transient loads on this structure, resulting from such an explosion, is therefore important in developing a safety case. The transient loads are usually calculated by computer codes such as ASTARTE, SEURBNUK, REXCO or ICECO and the effect of these loads on the structure by a suitable finite element code. Such procedure can be lengthly and costly. The present paper proposed a procedure which allows the consequences of changes in the transient loads, resulting from design changes for example, to be quickly and simply gauged. The load-impulse method of characterizing dynamic response of a structural system is well established. Provided loads with a similar temporal variation are compared, it can be shown that the dynamic response depends on only two features of the load, an average load and a time intregrated load or impulse. The scope of this approach has been extended by Youngdahl who has shown, for structures which deform in a rigid-plastic manner, that complex laoding histories can be equated to a rectangular form of loading, in a precise manner for simple structures and in an approximate manner for more complicated structures. This paper proposes that the failure characteristics of the rotating shields for which extensive plastic deformation is involved, be calculated for rectangular type loadings. The complex transient loadings calculated for various explosions and various changes in the primary vessel design can then be reduced to an equivalent rectangular form and the consequencial response of the shields structure deduced. (orig.)

  6. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system: system load following capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, R.D.; Blecher, W.A.; Merrick, D.

    1981-09-01

    The load-following capability of fluidized bed combustion-augmented compressed air energy storage systems was evaluated. The results are presented in two parts. The first part is an Executive Summary which provides a concise overview of all major elements of the study including the conclusions, and, second, a detailed technical report describing the part-load and load following capability of both the pressurized fluid bed combustor and the entire pressurized fluid bed combustor/compressed air energy storage system. The specific tasks in this investigation were to: define the steady-state, part-load operation of the CAES open-bed PFBC; estimate the steady-state, part-load performance of the PFBC/CAES system and evaluate any possible operational constraints; simulate the performance of the PFBC/CAES system during transient operation and assess the load following capability of the system; and establish a start-up procedure for the open-bed PFBC and evaluate the impact of this procedure. The conclusions are encouraging and indicate that the open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant should provide good part-load and transient performance, and should have no major equipment-related constraints, specifically, no major problems associated with the performance or design of either the open-end PFBC or the PFBC/CAES power plant in steady-state, part-load operation are envisioned. The open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant would have a load following capability which would be responsive to electric utility requirements for a peak-load power plant. The open-bed PFBC could be brought to full operating conditions within 15 min after routine shutdown, by employing a hot-start mode of operation. The PFBC/CAES system would be capable of rapid changes in output power (12% of design load per minute) over a wide output power range (25% to 100% of design output). (LCL)

  7. Purinergic responses of chondrogenic stem cells to dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gađanski Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In habitually loaded tissues, dynamic loading can trigger ATP (adenosine 5’- triphosphate release to extracellular environment, and result in calcium signaling via ATP binding to purine P2 receptors1. In the current study we have compared purinergic responses (ATP release of two types of cells: bovine chondrocytes (bCHs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC that were encapsulated in agarose and subjected to dynamic loading. Both cell types were cultured under chondrogenic conditions, and their responses to loading were evaluated by ATP release assay in combination with connexin (Cx-sensitive fluorescent dye (Lucifer Yellow - LY and a Cx-hemichannel blocker (Flufenamic acid - FFA. In response to dynamic loading, chondrogenic hMSCs released significantly higher amounts of ATP (5-fold in comparison to the bCHs early in culture (day 2. Triggering of LY uptake in the bCHs and hMSCs by dynamic loading implies opening of the Cx-hemichannels. However, the number of LY-positive cells in hMSC-constructs was 2.5-fold lower compared to the loaded bCH-constructs, suggesting utilization of additional mechanisms of ATP release. Cx-reactive sites were detected in both bCHs and hMSCs-constructs. FFA application led to reduced ATP release both in bCHs and hMSCs, which confirms the involvement of connexin hemichannels, with more prominent effects in bCHs than in hMSCs, further implying the existence of additional mechanism of ATP release in chondrogenic hMSCs. Taken together, these results indicate stronger purinergic response to dynamic loading of chondrogenic hMSCs than primary chondrocytes, by activation of connexin hemichannels and additional mechanisms of ATP release. [Projekat Ministrastva nauke Republike Srbije, ON174028 i br. III41007

  8. Thermal buckling behavior of defective CNTs under pre-load: A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Kiani, Yaser

    2017-05-01

    Current study is concentrated on the extraordinary properties of defective carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The role of vacancy defects in thermal buckling response of precompressed CNTs is explored via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Defective CNTs are initially compressed at a certain ratio of their critical buckling strain and then undergo a uniform temperature rise. Comprehensive study is implemented on both armchair and zigzag CNTs with different vacancy defects including monovacancy, symmetric bivacancy and asymmetric bivacancy. The results reveal that defects have a pronounced impact on the buckling behavior of CNTs; interestingly, defective CNTs under compressive pre-load show higher resistance to thermal buckling than pristine ones. In the following, the buckling response of defective CNTs is shown to be dependent on the vacancy defects, location of defects and chirality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Transverse Compressive Loads on Superconducting Nb3Sn Wires Containing Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hauthuille, Luc; Zhai, Yuhu; Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Collaboration; University of Geneva Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    High field superconductors play an important role in many large-scale physics experiments, particularly particle colliders and fusion devices such as the LHC and ITER. The two most common superconductors used are NbTi and Nb3Sn. Nb3Sn wires are favored because of their significantly higher Jc, allowing them to produce much higher magnetic fields. The main disadvantage is that the superconducting performance of Nb3Sn is highly strain-sensitive and it is very brittle. The strain-sensitivity is strongly influenced by two factors: plasticity and cracked filaments. Cracks are induced by large stress concentrators due to the presence of voids. We will attempt to understand the correlation between Nb3Sn's irreversible strain limit and the void-induced stress concentrations around the voids. We will develop accurate 2D and 3D finite element models containing detailed filaments and possible distributions of voids in a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire. We will apply a compressive transverse load for the various cases to simulate the stress response of a Nb3Sn wire from the Lorentz force. Doing this will further improve our understanding of the effect voids have on the wire's mechanical properties, and thus, the connection between the shape & distribution of voids and performance degradation.

  10. Thoracolumbar spine model with articulated ribcage for the prediction of dynamic spinal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Dominika; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal modeling offers an invaluable insight into the spine biomechanics. A better understanding of thoracic spine kinetics is essential for understanding disease processes and developing new prevention and treatment methods. Current models of the thoracic region are not designed for segmental load estimation, or do not include the complex construct of the ribcage, despite its potentially important role in load transmission. In this paper, we describe a numerical musculoskeletal model of the thoracolumbar spine with articulated ribcage, modeled as a system of individual vertebral segments, elastic elements and thoracic muscles, based on a previously established lumbar spine model and data from the literature. The inverse dynamics simulations of the model allow the prediction of spinal loading as well as costal joints kinetics and kinematics. The intradiscal pressure predicted by the model correlated well (R(2)=0.89) with reported intradiscal pressure measurements, providing a first validation of the model. The inclusion of the ribcage did not affect segmental force predictions when the thoracic spine did not perform motion. During thoracic motion tasks, the ribcage had an important influence on the predicted compressive forces and muscle activation patterns. The compressive forces were reduced by up to 32%, or distributed more evenly between thoracic vertebrae, when compared to the predictions of the model without ribcage, for mild thoracic flexion and hyperextension tasks, respectively. The presented musculoskeletal model provides a tool for investigating thoracic spine loading and load sharing between vertebral column and ribcage during dynamic activities. Further validation for specific applications is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Mechanical Properties of Intermittently Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression with Different Loading Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Dong, Lu; Xu, Nuwen; Feng, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intermittently jointed rocks, widely existing in many mining and civil engineering structures, are quite susceptible to cyclic loading. Understanding the fatigue mechanism of jointed rocks is vital to the rational design and the long-term stability analysis of rock structures. In this study, the fatigue mechanical properties of synthetic jointed rock models under different cyclic conditions are systematically investigated in the laboratory, including four loading frequencies, four maximum stresses, and four amplitudes. Our experimental results reveal the influence of the three cyclic loading parameters on the mechanical properties of jointed rock models, regarding the fatigue deformation characteristics, the fatigue energy and damage evolution, and the fatigue failure and progressive failure behavior. Under lower loading frequency or higher maximum stress and amplitude, the jointed specimen is characterized by higher fatigue deformation moduli and higher dissipated hysteresis energy, resulting in higher cumulative damage and lower fatigue life. However, the fatigue failure modes of jointed specimens are independent of cyclic loading parameters; all tested jointed specimens exhibit a prominent tensile splitting failure mode. Three different crack coalescence patterns are classified between two adjacent joints. Furthermore, different from the progressive failure under static monotonic loading, the jointed rock specimens under cyclic compression fail more abruptly without evident preceding signs. The tensile cracks on the front surface of jointed specimens always initiate from the joint tips and then propagate at a certain angle with the joints toward the direction of maximum compression.

  12. Ultimate compression after impact load prediction in graphite/epoxy coupons using neural network and multivariate statistical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Alexandre David

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this research was to accurately predict the ultimate compressive load of impact damaged graphite/epoxy coupons using a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) neural network and multivariate statistical regression analysis (MSRA). An optimized use of these data treatment tools allowed the generation of a simple, physically understandable equation that predicts the ultimate failure load of an impacted damaged coupon based uniquely on the acoustic emissions it emits at low proof loads. Acoustic emission (AE) data were collected using two 150 kHz resonant transducers which detected and recorded the AE activity given off during compression to failure of thirty-four impacted 24-ply bidirectional woven cloth laminate graphite/epoxy coupons. The AE quantification parameters duration, energy and amplitude for each AE hit were input to the Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) neural network to accurately classify the material failure mechanisms present in the low proof load data. The number of failure mechanisms from the first 30% of the loading for twenty-four coupons were used to generate a linear prediction equation which yielded a worst case ultimate load prediction error of 16.17%, just outside of the +/-15% B-basis allowables, which was the goal for this research. Particular emphasis was placed upon the noise removal process which was largely responsible for the accuracy of the results.

  13. Dynamic Response of Coarse Granular Material to Wave Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1998-01-01

    The soil beneath vertical breakwaters is subjected to a combination of forces induced by the waves. The forces acting on the soil can be characterized as 1) static load due to submerged weight of the structure, 2) quasi-static forces induced by cyclic wave loading, and 3) wave impact from breaking...... waves. The stress conditions in the soil below a foundation exposed to these types of loading are very complex. The key to explain and quantify the soil response beneath a vertical breakwater is to understand the role of the volume changes and to be able to model these correctly. It is shown...... that the volume changes in soil subjected to static and dynamic loading are controlled by the characteristic line. Experiments have been performed to study the factors that influence the location of the characteristic line in drained and undrained tests for various types of sand and various types of loading...

  14. Quantitative analysis of impact measurements using dynamic load cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent J. Maranzano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is used to estimate material properties from a short duration transient impact force measured by dropping spheres onto rectangular coupons fixed to a dynamic load cell. The contact stress between the dynamic load cell surface and the projectile are modeled using Hertzian contact mechanics. Due to the short impact time relative to the load cell dynamics, an additional Kelvin–Voigt element is included in the model to account for the finite response time of the piezoelectric crystal. Calculations with and without the Kelvin–Voigt element are compared to experimental data collected from combinations of polymeric spheres and polymeric and metallic surfaces. The results illustrate that the inclusion of the Kelvin–Voigt element qualitatively captures the post impact resonance and non-linear behavior of the load cell signal and quantitatively improves the estimation of the Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. Mathematically, the additional KV element couples one additional differential equation to the Hertzian spring-dashpot equation. The model can be numerically integrated in seconds using standard numerical techniques allowing for its use as a rapid technique for the estimation of material properties. Keywords: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Dynamic load cell

  15. Response of Buried Vertically Oriented Cylinders to Dynamic Loading,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    BALSARA • , . / ,, _,-, -. 1i S ,LESPONSE OF BURIED VERTICALLY 9RIENTED CYLINDERS 𔃺 .-TO DINAMIC LOADING_ 9AYLE E. LRTOrwW&-N JIIMY P./BALSARA Nk...1.7, 2,8, and 4.0 inches). The end caps for the cylinders consisted of a steel shell filled with high- strength concrete; however, the end caps were...not designed to be test articles. The average concrete compressive strength of the cylinders on test day was 44.0 MPa (6,380 psi). The three DEOT

  16. A Dynamic Model for Load Balancing in Cloud Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Bhagwandas Bhatia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysis various challenges faced in optimizing computing resource utilization via load balancing and presents a platform-independent model for load balancing which targets high availability of resources, low SLA (Service Level agreement violations and saves power. To achieve this, incoming requests are monitored for sudden burst, a prediction model is employed to maintain high availability and a power-aware algorithm is applied for choosing a suitable physical node for a virtual host. The proposed dynamic load balancing model provides a way to conflicting goals of saving power and maintaining high resource availability.For anyone building a private, public or hybrid IaaS cloud infrastructure, load balancing of virtual hosts on a limited number of physical nodes, becomes a crucial aspect. This paper analysis various challenges faced in optimizing computing resource utilization via load balancing and presents a platform independent model for load balancing which targets high availability of resources, low SLA (Service Level agreement violations and saves power. To achieve this, incoming requests are monitored for sudden burst, prediction model is employed to maintain high availability and power aware algorithm is applied for choosing a suitable physical node for virtual host. The proposed dynamic load balancing model provides a way to conflicting goals of saving power and maintaining high resource availability.

  17. The effect of tensile and compressive loading on the hierarchical strength of idealized tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite biomaterials as a function of the chemical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, Devendra K; Tomar, Vikas

    2009-01-01

    Hard biomaterials such as bone, dentin and nacre have primarily a polypeptide phase (e.g. tropocollagen (TC)) and a mineral phase (e.g. hydroxyapatite (HAP) or aragonite) arranged in a staggered manner. It has been observed that the mechanical behaviour of such materials changes with the chemical environment and the direction of applied loading. In the presented investigation, explicit three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based analyses are performed on idealized TC-HAP composite biomaterial systems to understand the effects of tensile and compressive loadings in three different chemical environments: (1) unsolvated, (2) solvated with water and (3) calcinated and solvated with water. The MD analyses are performed on two interfacial supercells corresponding to the lowest structural level (level n) of TC-HAP interactions and on two other supercells with HAP supercells arranged in a staggered manner (level n+1) in a TC matrix. The supercells at level n+1 are formed by arranging level n interfacial supercells in a staggered manner. Analyses show that at level n, the presence of water molecules results in greater stability of TC molecules and TC-HAP interfaces during mechanical deformation. In addition, water also acts as a lubricant between adjacent TC molecules. Under the application of shear stress dominated loading, water molecules act to strengthen the TC-HAP interfacial strength in a manner similar to the action of glue. An overall effect of the observed mechanisms is that, in a staggered arrangement, tensile strength increases in the presence of water and calcinated water environments. On the other hand, corresponding compressive strength decreases under similar circumstances. Fundamentally, supercells with primarily normal load transfer at the TC-HAP interfaces are stronger in tensile shear loading. On the other hand, supercells with primarily tangential or shear load transfer at the TC-HAP interfaces are stronger in compressive shear loading. A

  18. Finsler-Geometric Continuum Dynamics and Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    version of Finsler theory is newly applied to shock compression of this ceramic. An order parameter is linked simultaneously to densification and...set of algebraic equations that may be solved simultaneously (albeit, not in closed form) for the shock stress, order param- eter, entropy, and shock...δxa ⊗ dX A = ∂ϕ a(X, D, t) ∂X A δ δxa ⊗ dX A = ∂x(X, D, t) ∂X , FaA = ∂Aϕa = ∂Axa . (2.28) The inverse tangent mapping from spatial to referential

  19. Feasibility of Applying Controllable Lubrication to Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estupinan, Edgar Alberto; Santos, Ilmar

    2009-01-01

    A multibody dynamic model of the main mechanical components of a hermetic reciprocating compressor is presented in this work. Considering that some of the mechanical elements are interconnected via thin fluid films, the multibody dynamic model is coupled to the equations from the dynamics...... of the fluid films, based on fluid film theory. For a dynamically loaded journal bearing, the fluid film pressure distribution can be computed by numerically solving the Reynolds equation, by means of finite-difference method. Particularly, in this study the main focus is on the lubrication behavior...... and reaction forces in a reciprocating compressor have a cyclic behavior, periodic oil pressure injection rules based on the instantaneous crank angle and load bearing condition can be established. In this paper, several bearing configurations working under different oil pressure injection rules conditions...

  20. Effect Of Compression Ratio On The Performance Of Diesel Engine At Different Loads.

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Reddy G; Nirmal Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    Variable compression ratio (VCR) technology has long been recognized as a method for improving the automobile engine performance, efficiency, fuel economy with reduced emission. The main feature of the VCR engine is to operate at different compression ratio, by changing the combustion chamber volume, depending on the vehicle performance needs .The need to improve the performance characteristics of the IC Engine has necessitated the present research. Increasing the compression rati...

  1. Online remote control systems for static and dynamic compression and decompression using diamond anvil cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Smith, Jesse S.; Rod, Eric; Lin, Chuanlong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    The ability to remotely control pressure in diamond anvil cells (DACs) in accurate and consistent manner at room temperature, as well as at cryogenic and elevated temperatures, is crucial for effective and reliable operation of a high-pressure synchrotron facility such as High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT). Over the last several years, a considerable effort has been made to develop instrumentation for remote and automated pressure control in DACs during synchrotron experiments. We have designed and implemented an array of modular pneumatic (double-diaphragm), mechanical (gearboxes), and piezoelectric devices and their combinations for controlling pressure and compression/decompression rate at various temperature conditions from 4 K in cryostats to several thousand Kelvin in laser-heated DACs. Because HPCAT is a user facility and diamond cells for user experiments are typically provided by users, our development effort has been focused on creating different loading mechanisms and frames for a variety of existing and commonly used diamond cells rather than designing specialized or dedicated diamond cells with various drives. In this paper, we review the available instrumentation for remote static and dynamic pressure control in DACs and show some examples of their applications to high pressure research

  2. Modelling and analysis of a novel compressed air energy storage system for trigeneration based on electrical energy peak load shifting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Song; He, Wei; Zhang, Aifeng; Li, Guiqiang; Luo, Bingqing; Liu, Xianghua

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new CAES system for trigeneration based on electrical peak load shifting is proposed. • The theoretical models and the thermodynamics process are established and analyzed. • The relevant parameters influencing its performance have been discussed and optimized. • A novel energy and economic evaluation methods is proposed to evaluate the performance of the system. - Abstract: The compressed air energy storage (CAES) has made great contribution to both electricity and renewable energy. In the pursuit of reduced energy consumption and relieving power utility pressure effectively, a novel trigeneration system based on CAES for cooling, heating and electricity generation by electrical energy peak load shifting is proposed in this paper. The cooling power is generated by the direct expansion of compressed air, and the heating power is recovered in the process of compression and storage. Based on the working principle of the typical CAES, the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic system models are established and the characteristics of the system are analyzed. A novel method used to evaluate energy and economic performance is proposed. A case study is conducted, and the economic-social and technical feasibility of the proposed system are discussed. The results show that the trigeneration system works efficiently at relatively low pressure, and the efficiency is expected to reach about 76.3% when air is compressed and released by 15 bar. The annual monetary cost saving annually is about 53.9%. Moreover, general considerations about the proposed system are also presented.

  3. Effect of Dynamic Culture and Periodic Compression on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Yu, Li; Lim, Casey G; Goodley, Addison S; Xiao, Xuan; Placone, Jesse K; Ferlin, Kimberly M; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Hsieh, Adam H; Fisher, John P

    2016-07-01

    We have recently developed a bioreactor that can apply both shear and compressive forces to engineered tissues in dynamic culture. In our system, alginate hydrogel beads with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured under different dynamic conditions while subjected to periodic, compressive force. A customized pressure sensor was developed to track the pressure fluctuations when shear forces and compressive forces were applied. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture can maintain a higher cell population throughout the study. With the application of only shear stress, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed that hMSCs experienced less chondrogenic differentiation than the static group. The second study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was enhanced by additional mechanical compression. After 14 days, alcian blue staining showed more extracellular matrix formed in the compression group. The upregulation of the positive chondrogenic markers such as Sox 9, aggrecan, and type II collagen were demonstrated by qPCR. Our bioreactor provides a novel approach to apply mechanical forces to engineered cartilage. Results suggest that a combination of dynamic culture with proper mechanical stimulation may promote efficient progenitor cell expansion in vitro, thereby allowing the culture of clinically relevant articular chondrocytes for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

  4. Impact of the variation in dynamic vehicle load on flexible pavement responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanuzzaman, Md

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the dynamic variation in asphalt pavement critical responses due to dynamic tire load variations. An attempt was also made to develop generalized regression equations to predict the dynamic response variation in flexible pavement under various dynamic load conditions. The study used an extensive database of computed pavement response histories for five different types of sites (smooth, rough, medium rough, very rough and severely rough), two different asphalt pavement structures (thin and thick) at two temperatures (70 °F and 104 °F), subjected to a tandem axle dual tire at three speeds 25, 37 and 50 mph (40, 60 and 80 km/h). All pavement responses were determined using the 3D-Move Analysis program (Version 1.2) developed by University of Nevada, Reno. A new term called Dynamic Response Coefficient (DRC) was introduced in this study to address the variation in critical pavement responses due to dynamic loads as traditionally measured by the Dynamic Load Coefficient (DLC). While DLC represents the additional varying component of the tire load, DRC represents the additional varying component of the response value (standard deviation divided by mean response). In this study, DRC was compared with DLC for five different sites based on the roughness condition of the sites. Previous studies showed that DLC varies with vehicle speed and suspension types, and assumes a constant value for the whole pavement structure (lateral and vertical directions). On the other hand, in this study, DRC was found to be significantly varied with the asphalt pavement and function of pavement structure, road roughness conditions, temperatures, vehicle speeds, suspension types, and locations of the point of interest in the pavement. A major contribution of the study is that the variation of pavement responses due to dynamic load in a flexible pavement system can be predicted with generalized regression equations. Fitting parameters (R2) in the

  5. Dynamic loads during failure risk assessment of bridge crane structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynin, A. D.; Antsev, V. Yu; Shaforost, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the method of failure risk assessment associated with a bridge crane metal structure at the design stage. It also justifies the necessity of taking into account dynamic loads with regard to the operational cycle of a bridge crane during failure risk assessment of its metal structure.

  6. Shaft centre orbit for dynamically loaded radial bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coefficients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 Booker1 and described further in 1972 Booker2. Several authors have refine...

  7. 46 CFR 154.409 - Dynamic loads from vessel motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in length and is an analysis by the following formulae that corresponds to a 10−8 probability level... EC02FE91.086 (d) If a cargo tank is designed to avoid fatigue, the dynamic loads determined under paragraph...

  8. Dynamic modelling of heavy metals - time scales and target loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch, M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade steady-state methods have been developed to assess critical loads of metals avoiding long-term risks in view of food quality and eco-toxicological effects on organisms in soils and surface waters. However, dynamic models are needed to estimate the times involved in attaining a

  9. Dynamic analysis of reactor containment subjected to aircraft impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaotian; He Shuyan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, dynamic character of reactor containment subjected to aircraft impact loading is analyzed with MSC.DYTRAN program. The displacement of concrete and velocity curve of airplane is obtained. The results of the different material model are compared with empirical formula. It is concluded that reasonable result can be obtained using cap model for concrete

  10. Dynamic Regression Intervention Modeling for the Malaysian Daily Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhilah Abdrazak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a unique country due to having both fixed and moving holidays.  These moving holidays may overlap with other fixed holidays and therefore, increase the complexity of the load forecasting activities. The errors due to holidays’ effects in the load forecasting are known to be higher than other factors.  If these effects can be estimated and removed, the behavior of the series could be better viewed.  Thus, the aim of this paper is to improve the forecasting errors by using a dynamic regression model with intervention analysis.   Based on the linear transfer function method, a daily load model consists of either peak or average is developed.  The developed model outperformed the seasonal ARIMA model in estimating the fixed and moving holidays’ effects and achieved a smaller Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE in load forecast.

  11. A constitutive model for concrete under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suaris, W.; Shah, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    A continuous damage theory for the quasistatic and dynamic behaviour of concrete is presented. The continuous damage theory is rational choice for use in predicing the dynamic behaviour of concrete as the strain-rate effects that have been observed for concrete can to a large extent be attributed to the rate-sensitivity of the microcracking process. A vectorial representation is adopted for the damage to account for the planar nature of the microcracks in concrete. Damage is treated as an internal state variable influencing the free energy of the material and the constitutive equations and the damage evolution equations are derived consistently using thermodynamic considerations. The developed constitutive model is then calibrated by using test results in flexure and compression over a range of strain-rates. The constitutive model is also shown to be capable of predicting certain other experimentally observed characteristics of the dynamic response of concrete. (orig./HP)

  12. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauthle, Ruben; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber; Mulier, Michiel; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants. - Highlights: • The mechanical properties of CP Ti grade 1 porous structures are studied. • The results are compared with identical structures in Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. • Ti6Al4V ELI structures are about two times stronger under a static compressive load. • CP Ti structures deform continuously without fracture while loaded statically. • CP Ti structures have a higher fatigue life compared to Ti6Al4V ELI structures

  13. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wauthle, Ruben, E-mail: ruben.wauthle@3dsystems.com [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); 3D Systems - LayerWise NV, Grauwmeer 14, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Mulier, Michiel [KU Leuven, Department of Orthopaedics, Weligerveld 1, 3212 Pellenberg (Belgium); Zadpoor, Amir Abbas [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Weinans, Harrie [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics & department of Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Humbeeck, Jan [KU Leuven, Department of Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, PB 2450, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kruth, Jean-Pierre [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan [KU Leuven, Department of Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, PB 2450, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Prometheus, Division of Skeletal Tissue Engineering, PB 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants. - Highlights: • The mechanical properties of CP Ti grade 1 porous structures are studied. • The results are compared with identical structures in Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. • Ti6Al4V ELI structures are about two times stronger under a static compressive load. • CP Ti structures deform continuously without fracture while loaded statically. • CP Ti structures have a higher fatigue life compared to Ti6Al4V ELI structures.

  14. Dynamic queuing transmission model for dynamic network loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    and allowing for the representation of multiple vehicle classes, queue spillbacks and shock waves. The model assumes that a link is split into a moving part plus a queuing part, and p that traffic dynamics are given by a triangular fundamental diagram. A case-study is investigated and the DQTM is compared...

  15. Reduction of Dynamic Loads in Mine Lifting Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. K.; Eliseev, S. V.; Perelygina, A. Yu

    2018-01-01

    Article is devoted to a problem of decrease in the dynamic loadings arising in transitional operating modes of the mine lifting installations leading to heavy oscillating motions of lifting vessels and decrease in efficiency and reliability of work. The known methods and means of decrease in dynamic loadings and oscillating motions of the similar equipment are analysed. It is shown that an approach based on the concept of the inverse problems of dynamics can be effective method of the solution of this problem. The article describes the design model of a one-ended lifting installation in the form of a two-mass oscillation system, in which the inertial elements are the mass of the lifting vessel and the reduced mass of the engine, reducer, drum and pulley. The simplified mathematical model of this system and results of an efficiency research of an active way of reduction of dynamic loadings of lifting installation on the basis of the concept of the inverse problems of dynamics are given.

  16. Comparative study of incompressible and isothermal compressible flow solvers for cavitating flow dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Ho [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Shin Hyung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Incompressible flow solvers are generally used for numerical analysis of cavitating flows, but with limitations in handling compressibility effects on vapor phase. To study compressibility effects on vapor phase and cavity interface, pressure-based incompressible and isothermal compressible flow solvers based on a cell-centered finite volume method were developed using the OpenFOAM libraries. To validate the solvers, cavitating flow around a hemispherical head-form body was simulated and validated against the experimental data. The cavity shedding behavior, length of a re-entrant jet, drag history, and the Strouhal number were compared between the two solvers. The results confirmed that computations of the cavitating flow including compressibility effects improved the reproduction of cavitation dynamics.

  17. PPOOLEX experiments on dynamic loading with pressure feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the dynamic loading experiments (DYN series) carried out with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiments was to study dynamic loads caused by different condensation modes. Particularly, the effect of counterpressure on loads due to pressure oscillations induced by chugging was of interest. Before the experiments the condensation pool was filled with isothermal water so that the blowdown pipe outlet was submerged by 1.03-1.11 m. The initial temperature of the pool water varied from 11 deg. C to 63 deg. C, the steam flow rate from 290 g/s to 1220 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 132 deg. C to 182 deg. C. Non-condensables were pushed from the dry well into the gas space of the wet well with a short discharge of steam before the recorded period of the experiments. As a result of this procedure, the system pressure was at an elevated level in the beginning of the actual experiments. An increased counterpressure was used in the last experiment of the series. The diminishing effect of increased system pressure on chugging intensity and on measured loads is evident from the results of the last experiment. The highest pressure pulses both inside the blowdown pipe and in the condensation pool were about half of those measured with a lower system pressure but otherwise with similar test parameters. The experiments on dynamic loading gave expected results. The loads experienced by pool structures depended strongly on the steam mass flow rate, pool water temperature and system pressure. The DYN experiments indicated that chugging and condensation within the blowdown pipe cause significant dynamic loads in case of strongly sub-cooled pool water. The level of pool water temperature is decisive

  18. PPOOLEX experiments on dynamic loading with pressure feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2011-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the dynamic loading experiments (DYN series) carried out with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiments was to study dynamic loads caused by different condensation modes. Particularly, the effect of counterpressure on loads due to pressure oscillations induced by chugging was of interest. Before the experiments the condensation pool was filled with isothermal water so that the blowdown pipe outlet was submerged by 1.03-1.11 m. The initial temperature of the pool water varied from 11 deg. C to 63 deg. C, the steam flow rate from 290 g/s to 1220 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 132 deg. C to 182 deg. C. Non-condensables were pushed from the dry well into the gas space of the wet well with a short discharge of steam before the recorded period of the experiments. As a result of this procedure, the system pressure was at an elevated level in the beginning of the actual experiments. An increased counterpressure was used in the last experiment of the series. The diminishing effect of increased system pressure on chugging intensity and on measured loads is evident from the results of the last experiment. The highest pressure pulses both inside the blowdown pipe and in the condensation pool were about half of those measured with a lower system pressure but otherwise with similar test parameters. The experiments on dynamic loading gave expected results. The loads experienced by pool structures depended strongly on the steam mass flow rate, pool water temperature and system pressure. The DYN experiments indicated that chugging and condensation within the blowdown pipe cause significant dynamic loads in case of strongly sub-cooled pool water. The level of pool water temperature is decisive

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, and glycated hemoglobin under compression and shear exhibit an anisotropic mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudasan, Sumith; Wang, Xianqiao; Averett, Rodney D

    2018-05-01

    We developed a new mechanical model for determining the compression and shear mechanical behavior of four different hemoglobin structures. Previous studies on hemoglobin structures have focused primarily on overall mechanical behavior; however, this study investigates the mechanical behavior of hemoglobin, a major constituent of red blood cells, using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to obtain anisotropic mechanical behavior under compression and shear loading conditions. Four different configurations of hemoglobin molecules were considered: deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO 2 ), carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1C ). The SMD simulations were performed on the hemoglobin variants to estimate their unidirectional stiffness and shear stiffness. Although hemoglobin is structurally denoted as a globular protein due to its spherical shape and secondary structure, our simulation results show a significant variation in the mechanical strength in different directions (anisotropy) and also a strength variation among the four different hemoglobin configurations studied. The glycated hemoglobin molecule possesses an overall higher compressive mechanical stiffness and shear stiffness when compared to deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and carboxyhemoglobin molecules. Further results from the models indicate that the hemoglobin structures studied possess a soft outer shell and a stiff core based on stiffness.

  20. Effects of static pre-loading on the dynamic stability of a column on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents, from strictly analytical consideration, the dynamic analysis of a finite column stressed by a step load but in the presence of a previously imposed static load. The results show that (a) the dynamic buckling load for this type of loading is relatively higher than that of a similar column stressed by a step load ...

  1. Design of dynamic loading support on high temperature pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitandung, Y.B.; Bandriyana, B.

    2002-01-01

    As a follow up to pipe stress analysis result caused by high temperature operation loading, a design of dynamic loading support was made. The type of variable and constant support as acceptable choosing are applicated for reduce of over stress and over load on piping system. Analysis line schedule of AP600 as an example with apply three dynamic loading support (two type variable and one type constant support). The pre-design of the third support above are based on analysis result with follow the support catalog and field condition wherein its supports are installed. To guarantee the performance and accurate of the support, checking is performed for spring working rate tolerance, support variability and swing angle. The design results of variable spring are loads, size, working rate, type tolerance, spring rate, variability, long and sway angle with each values 5000; 15; 1,25; VM; 0.655; 1080; 0.114; 114,5; 0,48 for S1 and 2045; 12; 0,583; VS; 0,237; 900; 0,132; 130; 0,34 for S3

  2. Dynamic compressive mechanical response of a soft polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical behaviour of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) was studied using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Mechanical properties have been determined at moderate to high strain rates. Real time deformation and fracture were recorded using a high-speed camera.

  3. Ill-posedness of Dynamic Equations of Compressible Granular Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Michael; Gray, Nico

    2017-11-01

    We introduce models for 2-dimensional time-dependent compressible flow of granular materials and suspensions, based on the rheology of Pouliquen and Forterre. The models include density dependence through a constitutive equation in which the density or volume fraction of solid particles with material density ρ* is taken as a function of an inertial number I: ρ = ρ * Φ(I), in which Φ(I) is a decreasing function of I. This modelling has different implications from models relying on critical state soil mechanics, in which ρ is treated as a variable in the equations, contributing to a flow rule. The analysis of the system of equations builds on recent work of Barker et al in the incompressible case. The main result is the identification of a criterion for well-posedness of the equations. We additionally analyze a modification that applies to suspensions, for which the rheology takes a different form and the inertial number reflects the role of the fluid viscosity.

  4. Loading technique for dynamic response studies of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, R.I.; Forrestal, M.J.

    1979-04-01

    A loading technique to study the dynamic response of tuff was explored. Loading is provided by electrically exploding etched copper mesh patterns with current from a capacitor discharge. Pressure pulses with peak pressures up to 1.25 kbar and 0.10 to 0.20 ms durations were measured with a pressure bar. The upper value of peak pressure was limited by the strength of the experimental apparatus, and higher pressure generation is possible with a redesign of test hardware. 6 figures, 2 tables

  5. Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; AlRamadan, Abdullah S.; Vedharaj, S; An, Yanzhao; Sim, Jaeheon; Chang, Junseok; Johansson, Bengt

    2018-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI

  6. Dynamic compressive response of wrought and additive manufactured 304L stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Erik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM technology has been developed to fabricate metal components that include complex prototype fabrication, small lot production, precision repair or feature addition, and tooling. However, the mechanical response of the AM materials is a concern to meet requirements for specific applications. Differences between AM materials as compared to wrought materials might be expected, due to possible differences in porosity (voids, grain size, and residual stress levels. When the AM materials are designed for impact applications, the dynamic mechanical properties in both compression and tension need to be fully characterized and understood for reliable designs. In this study, a 304L stainless steel was manufactured with AM technology. For comparison purposes, both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels were dynamically characterized in compression Kolsky bar techniques. They dynamic compressive stress-strain curves were obtained and the strain rate effects were determined for both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels. A comprehensive comparison of dynamic compressive response between the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels was performed. SAND2015-0993 C.

  7. Low Complexity Connectivity Driven Dynamic Geometry Compression for 3D Tele-Immersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Mekuria (Rufael); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractGeometry based 3D Tele-Immersion is a novel emerging media application that involves on the fly reconstructed 3D mesh geometry. To enable real-time communication of such live reconstructed mesh geometry over a bandwidth limited link, fast dynamic geometry compression is needed. However,

  8. Simulating coupled dynamics of a rigid-flexible multibody system and compressible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Tian, Qiang; Hu, HaiYan

    2018-04-01

    As a subsequent work of previous studies of authors, a new parallel computation approach is proposed to simulate the coupled dynamics of a rigid-flexible multibody system and compressible fluid. In this approach, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to model the compressible fluid, the natural coordinate formulation (NCF) and absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) are used to model the rigid and flexible bodies, respectively. In order to model the compressible fluid properly and efficiently via SPH method, three measures are taken as follows. The first is to use the Riemann solver to cope with the fluid compressibility, the second is to define virtual particles of SPH to model the dynamic interaction between the fluid and the multibody system, and the third is to impose the boundary conditions of periodical inflow and outflow to reduce the number of SPH particles involved in the computation process. Afterwards, a parallel computation strategy is proposed based on the graphics processing unit (GPU) to detect the neighboring SPH particles and to solve the dynamic equations of SPH particles in order to improve the computation efficiency. Meanwhile, the generalized-alpha algorithm is used to solve the dynamic equations of the multibody system. Finally, four case studies are given to validate the proposed parallel computation approach.

  9. Spherical time dependent Thomas-Fermi calculation of the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.; Barranco, M.; Ngo, C.; Tomasi, E.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a self-consistent time dependent Thomas-Fermi model at finite temperature to calculate the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei. It has been found that nuclei can accomodate more thermal energy than compressional energy before they break. (orig.)

  10. DGFEM for dynamical systems describing interaction of compressible fluid and structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feistauer, M.; Hasnedlová, J.; Horáček, Jaromír; Kosík, A.; Kučera, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 254, December 2013 (2013), s. 17-30 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : compressible Navier–Stokes equations * dynamic elasticity equations * newmark method * flow-induced vibrations of vocal folds Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.077, year: 2013

  11. Strain-rate effect on initial crush stress of irregular honeycomb under dynamic loading and its deformation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zheng, Zhijun; Liao, Shenfei; Yu, Jilin

    2018-02-01

    The seemingly contradictory understandings of the initial crush stress of cellular materials under dynamic loadings exist in the literature, and a comprehensive analysis of this issue is carried out with using direct information of local stress and strain. Local stress/strain calculation methods are applied to determine the initial crush stresses and the strain rates at initial crush from a cell-based finite element model of irregular honeycomb under dynamic loadings. The initial crush stress under constant-velocity compression is identical to the quasi-static one, but less than the one under direct impact, i.e. the initial crush stresses under different dynamic loadings could be very different even though there is no strain-rate effect of matrix material. A power-law relation between the initial crush stress and the strain rate is explored to describe the strain-rate effect on the initial crush stress of irregular honeycomb when the local strain rate exceeds a critical value, below which there is no strain-rate effect of irregular honeycomb. Deformation mechanisms of the initial crush behavior under dynamic loadings are also explored. The deformation modes of the initial crush region in the front of plastic compaction wave are different under different dynamic loadings.

  12. DYNAMIC TIME HISTORY ANALYSIS OF BLAST RESISTANT DOOR USING BLAST LOAD MODELED AS IMPACT LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Pranata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A blast resistant single door was designed to withstand a 0.91 bar blast pressure and 44 ms blast duration. The analysis was done using Dynamic Time History Analysis using Blast Load modeled as Impact Load for given duration. The material properties used have been modified to accommodate dynamic effects. The analysis was done using dynamic finite element method (fem for time of the blast duration, and the maximum/minimum internal forces and displacement were taken from the time history output, in order to know the behavior under blast load and estimate the safety margin of the door. Results obtained from this research indicated that the maximum z-displacement is 1.709 mm, while in the term of serviceability, the permitted is 25 mm. The maximum reaction force is 73,960 N, while the maximum anchor capacity is 82,069 N. On blast condition, the maximum frame stress is 71.71 MPa, the maximum hinge shear stress is 45.28 MPa. While on rebound condition, the maximum frame stress is 172.11 MPa, the maximum hinge shear stress is 29.46 MPa. The maximum door edge rotation is 0.44 degree, which is not exceed the permitted boundary (1.2 degree. Keywords: Dynamic time history, blast resistant door, single door, finite element method.

  13. Collapse mechanisms of metal foam matrix composites under static and dynamic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linul, Emanoil, E-mail: emanoil.linul@upt.ro [Department of Mechanics and Strength of Materials, Politehnica University of Timisoara, 1 Mihai Viteazu Avenue, 300 222 Timisoara (Romania); Marsavina, Liviu [Department of Mechanics and Strength of Materials, Politehnica University of Timisoara, 1 Mihai Viteazu Avenue, 300 222 Timisoara (Romania); Kováčik, Jaroslav [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 13 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-04-06

    The collapse mechanisms of metal foam matrix composites under static and dynamic loading conditions were experimentally and analytically investigated. Closed-cell aluminium foam AlSi10 with 325±10 kg/m{sup 3} density was used as core material, while stainless-steel-mesh is the faces materials. Prior to characterizing the composite sandwich structure, the stainless steel mesh face material and closed-cell aluminium foam were characterized by tensile testing and compression testing, respectively. Experimental tests were performed on sandwich beams using both High Speed Camera and Digital Image Correlation system for strain distribution. All experimental tests were performed at room temperature with constant crosshead speed of 1.67×10{sup −4} m/s for static tests and 2 m/s impact loading speed for dynamic tests. Two main deformation behaviours of investigated metal foam matrix composites were observed following post-failure collapse: face failure and core shear. It was showed that the initiation, propagation and interaction of failure modes depend on the type of loading, constituent material properties and geometrical parameters.

  14. Structural transitions and hysteresis in clump- and stripe-forming systems under dynamic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Danielle; Reichhardt, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In using numerical simulations, we study the dynamical evolution of particles interacting via competing long-range repulsion and short-range attraction in two dimensions. The particles are compressed using a time-dependent quasi-one dimensional trough potential that controls the local density, causing the system to undergo a series of structural phase transitions from a low density clump lattice to stripes, voids, and a high density uniform state. The compression proceeds via slow elastic motion that is interrupted with avalanche-like bursts of activity as the system collapses to progressively higher densities via plastic rearrangements. The plastic events vary in magnitude from small rearrangements of particles, including the formation of quadrupole-like defects, to large-scale vorticity and structural phase transitions. In the dense uniform phase, the system compresses through row reduction transitions mediated by a disorder-order process. We also characterize the rearrangement events by measuring changes in the potential energy, the fraction of sixfold coordinated particles, the local density, and the velocity distribution. At high confinements, we find power law scaling of the velocity distribution during row reduction transitions. We observe hysteresis under a reversal of the compression when relatively few plastic rearrangements occur. The decompressing system exhibits distinct phase morphologies, and the phase transitions occur at lower compression forces as the system expands compared to when it is compressed.

  15. ClC-3 Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation in MC3T3-E1 Cell After Dynamic Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Wang, Hao; Gao, Feng; Wang, Kun; Dong, Fusheng

    2017-06-01

    ClC-3 chloride channel has been proved to have a relationship with the expression of osteogenic markers during osteogenesis, persistent static compression can upregulate the expression of ClC-3 and regulate osteodifferentiation in osteoblasts. However, there was no study about the relationship between the expression of ClC-3 and osteodifferentiation after dynamic compression. In this study, we applied dynamic compression on MC3T3-E1 cells to detect the expression of ClC-3, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), osteopontin (OPN), nuclear-associated antigen Ki67 (Ki67), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in biopress system, then we investigated the expression of these genes after dynamic compression with Chlorotoxin (specific ClC-3 chloride channel inhibitor) added. Under transmission electron microscopy, there were more cell surface protrusions, rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, abundant glycogen, and lysosomes scattered in the cytoplasm in MC3T3-E1 cells after dynamic compression. The nucleolus was more obvious. We found that ClC-3 was significantly up-regulated after dynamic compression. The compressive force also up-regulated Runx2, BMP-2, and OPN after dynamic compression for 2, 4 and 8 h. The proliferation gene Ki67 and PCNA did not show significantly change after dynamic compression for 8 h. Chlorotoxin did not change the expression of ClC-3 but reduced the expression of Runx2, BMP-2, and OPN after dynamic compression compared with the group without Cltx added. The data from the current study suggested that ClC-3 may promotes osteogenic differentiation in MC3T3-E1 cell after dynamic compression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1606-1613, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The dynamic behavior of mortar under impact-loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuaki; Inoue, Kenji; Misawa, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kyoji; Hayashi, Shizuo; Kondo, Ken-Ichi; Riedel, Werner

    2007-06-01

    Concrete and mortar are the most fundamental structural material. Therefore, considerable interest in characterizing the dynamic behavior of them under impact-loading exists. In this study, plate impact experiments have been performed to determine the dynamic behavior of mortar. Longitudinal and lateral stresses have been directly measured by means of embedded polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) gauges up to 1 GPa. A 200 mm-cal. powder gun enable us to measure longitudinal and lateral stresses at several point from the impact surface, simultaneously. The shear strength under impact-loading has been obtained from measured longitudinal and lateral stresses. The longitudinal stress profile shows a two-wave structure. It is indicated that this structure is associated with the onset of pore compaction and failure of mortar by comparing with hydrocode simulations using an elastic-plastic damage model for concrete.

  17. Response of porous beryllium to static and dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbell, W.M.; Walton, O.R.; Ree, F.H.

    1977-07-01

    Previous investigstions of the mechanical response of porous materials to dynamic loading have been extended to include the shock wave response of a brittle metal. The complex response of berylliums of 85 to 90 percent porosity in two initial conditions has been examined in a theoretical and experimental program to be described. The study has resulted in the development of constitutive relations placed in hydrocodes which are capable of accurately predicting wave propagation in the berylliums. A comprehensive set of static (0 to 4 Gpa) and dynamic (0 to 35 Gpa) experiments was performed to measure the behavior of these brittle, porous materials to imposed loads. The results of the experiments guided a modeling effort which added several new features to previous models, including deviatoric stresses, porosity-dependent relaxation time of pore closure, elastic-plastic reopening of pores, and improved compaction functions.

  18. Response of porous beryllium to static and dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isbell, W.M.; Walton, O.R.; Ree, F.H.

    1977-07-01

    Previous investigstions of the mechanical response of porous materials to dynamic loading have been extended to include the shock wave response of a brittle metal. The complex response of berylliums of 85 to 90 percent porosity in two initial conditions has been examined in a theoretical and experimental program to be described. The study has resulted in the development of constitutive relations placed in hydrocodes which are capable of accurately predicting wave propagation in the berylliums. A comprehensive set of static (0 to 4 Gpa) and dynamic (0 to 35 Gpa) experiments was performed to measure the behavior of these brittle, porous materials to imposed loads. The results of the experiments guided a modeling effort which added several new features to previous models, including deviatoric stresses, porosity-dependent relaxation time of pore closure, elastic-plastic reopening of pores, and improved compaction functions

  19. Discontinuity effects in dynamically loaded tilting pad journal bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two discontinuity effects that can occur when modelling radial tilting pad bearings subjected to high dynamic loads. The first effect to be treated is a pressure build-up discontinuity effect. The second effect is a contact-related discontinuity that disappears when a contact...... force is included in the theoretical model. Methods for avoiding the pressure build-up discontinuity effect are proposed....

  20. Numerical evaluation of cracked pipes under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.; Jamet, P.

    1989-01-01

    In order to apply the leak-before-break concept to piping systems, the behavior of cracked pipes under dynamic, and especially seismic, loadings must be studied. A simple finite element model of a cracked pipe has been developed and implemented in the general purpose computer code CASTEM 2000. The model is a generalization of the approach proposed by Paris and Tada (1). Considered loads are bending moment and axial force (representing thermal expansion and internal pressure.) The elastic characteristics of the model are determined using the Zahoor formulae for the geometry-dependent factors. Owing to the material behabior plasticity must be taken into account. To represent the crack growth, the material is defined by two characteristic values: J 1c which is the level of energy corresponding to crack initiation and the tearing modulus, T, which governs the length of propagation of the crack. For dynamic loads, unilateral conditions are imposed to represent crack closure. The model has been used for the design of dynamic tests to be conducted on shaking tables. Test principle is briefly described and numerical results are presented. Finally evaluation of margin, due to plasticity, in comparison with the standard design procedure is made

  1. Dynamic intelligent cleaning model of dirty electric load data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoxing; Sun Caixin

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of dirty data in the load database derived from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. Thus, the data must be carefully and reasonably adjusted before it is used for electric load forecasting or power system analysis. This paper proposes a dynamic and intelligent data cleaning model based on data mining theory. Firstly, on the basis of fuzzy soft clustering, the Kohonen clustering network is improved to fulfill the parallel calculation of fuzzy c-means soft clustering. Then, the proposed dynamic algorithm can automatically find the new clustering center (the characteristic curve of the data) with the updated sample data; At last, it is composed with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and then, an intelligent adjusting model is proposed to identify the dirty data. The rapid and dynamic performance of the model makes it suitable for real time calculation, and the efficiency and accuracy of the model is proved by test results of electrical load data analysis in Chongqing

  2. Compressibility Effects in the Dynamics of the Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2008-01-01

    We study the reversed-field pinch through the numerical solution of the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. Two cases are investigated: In the first case the pressure is derived from an adiabatic condition, and in the second case the pressure equation includes heating terms due to resistivity and viscosity. In the adiabatic case a single helicity state is observed, and the reversed-field pinch configuration is formed for short time intervals and is finally lost. In the nonadiabatic case the system reaches a multiple helicity state, and the reversal parameter remains negative for a longer time. The results show the importance of compressibility in determining the large scale dynamics of the system

  3. Analysis of Dynamic Properties of Piezoelectric Structure under Impact Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model of the dynamic properties is established for a piezoelectric structure under impact load, without considering noise and perturbations in this paper. Based on the general theory of piezo-elasticity and impact mechanics, the theoretical solutions of the mechanical and electrical fields of the smart structure are obtained with the standing and traveling wave methods, respectively. The comparisons between the two methods have shown that the standing wave method is better for studying long-time response after an impact load. In addition, good agreements are found between the theoretical and the numerical results. To simulate the impact load, both triangle and step pulse loads are used and comparisons are given. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters is discussed so as to provide some advices for practical use. It can be seen that the proposed analytical model would benefit, to some extent, the design and application (especially the airport runway of the related smart devices by taking into account their impact load performance.

  4. Study of Lysozyme-Loaded Poly-L-Lactide (PLLA Porous Microparticles in a Compressed CO2 Antisolvent Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qian Su

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme (LSZ-loaded poly-L-lactide (PLLA porous microparticles (PMs were successfully prepared by a compressed CO2 antisolvent process in combination with a water-in-oil emulsion process using LSZ as a drug model and ammonium bicarbonate as a porogen. The effects of different drug loads (5.0%, 7.5% and 10.0% on the surface morphology, particle size, porosity, tapped density and drug release profile of the harvested PMs were investigated. The results show that an increase in the amount of LSZ added led to an increase in drug load (DL but a decrease in encapsulation efficiency. The resulting LSZ-loaded PLLA PMs (LSZ-PLLA PMs exhibited a porous and uneven morphology, with a density less than 0.1 g·cm−3, a geometric mean diameter of 16.9–18.8 μm, an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.8 μm, a fine particle fraction (FPF of 59.2%–66.8%, and a porosity of 78.2%–86.3%. According to the results of differential scanning calorimetry, the addition of LSZ improved the thermal stability of PLLA. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurement reveal that no significant changes occurred in the molecular structures of LSZ during the fabrication process, which was further confirmed by the evaluation of enzyme activity of LSZ. It is demonstrated that the emulsion-combined precipitation with compressed antisolvent (PCA process could be a promising technology to develop biomacromolecular drug-loaded inhalable carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

  5. Fast and robust wavelet-based dynamic range compression and contrast enhancement model with color restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unaldi, Numan; Asari, Vijayan K.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2009-05-01

    Recently we proposed a wavelet-based dynamic range compression algorithm to improve the visual quality of digital images captured from high dynamic range scenes with non-uniform lighting conditions. The fast image enhancement algorithm that provides dynamic range compression, while preserving the local contrast and tonal rendition, is also a good candidate for real time video processing applications. Although the colors of the enhanced images produced by the proposed algorithm are consistent with the colors of the original image, the proposed algorithm fails to produce color constant results for some "pathological" scenes that have very strong spectral characteristics in a single band. The linear color restoration process is the main reason for this drawback. Hence, a different approach is required for the final color restoration process. In this paper the latest version of the proposed algorithm, which deals with this issue is presented. The results obtained by applying the algorithm to numerous natural images show strong robustness and high image quality.

  6. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  7. Investigation of switch designs for the dynamic load current multiplier scheme on the SPHYNX microsecond linear transformer driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maysonnave, T.; Bayol, F.; Demol, G.; Almeida, T. d'; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Chuvatin, A.S.; Pecastaing, L.; De Ferron, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    SPHINX is a microsecond linear transformer driver LTD, used essentially for implosion of Z-pinch loads in direct drive mode. It can deliver a 6-MA current pulse within 800 ns into a Z-pinch load. The dynamic load current multiplier concept enables the current pulse to be modified by increasing its amplitude while reducing its rise time before being delivered to the load. This compact system is made up of concentric electrodes (auto transformer), a dynamic flux extruder (cylindrical wire array), a vacuum convolute (eight post-holes), and a vacuum closing switch, which is the key component of the system. Several different schemes are investigated for designing a vacuum switch suitable for operating the dynamic load current multiplier on the SPHINX generator for various applications, including isentropic compression experiments and Z-pinch radiation effects studies. In particular, the design of a compact vacuum surface switch and a multichannel vacuum switch, located upstream of the load are studied. Electrostatic simulations supporting the switch designs are presented along with test bed experiments. Initial results from shots on the SPHINX driver are also presented. (authors)

  8. Volume digital image correlation to assess displacement field in compression loaded bread crumb under X-ray microtomography

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present an original approach to assess structural changes during bread crumb compression using a mechanical testing bench coupled to 3D X-ray microtomography. X-ray images taken at different levels of compression of the bread crumb are processed using image analysis. A subset-based digital volume correlation method is used to achieve the 3D displacement field. Within the limit of the approach, deterministic search strategy is implemented for solving subset displacement in each deformed image with regards to the undeformed one. The predicted displacement field in the transverse directions shows differences that depend on local cell arrangement as confirmed by finite element analysis. The displacement component in the loading direction is affected by the magnitude of imposed displacement and shows more regular change. Large displacement levels in the compression direction are in good agreement with the imposed experimental displacement. The results presented here are promising in a sense of possible identification of local foam properties. New insights are expected to achieve better understanding of structural heterogeneities in the overall perception of the product. Industrial relevance: Texture evaluation of cereal product is an important aspect for testing consumer acceptability of new designed products. Mechanical evaluation of backed products is a systemic route for determining texture of cereal based product. From the industrial viewpoint, mechanical evaluation allows saving both time and cost compared to panel evaluation. We demonstrate that better understanding of structural changes during texture evaluation can be achieved in addition to texture evaluation. Sensing structural changes during bread crumb compression is achievable by combining novel imaging technique and processing based on image analysis. We present thus an efficient way to predict displacements during compression of freshly baked product. This method can be used in different

  9. Generalization of the Bogoliubov-Zubarev Theorem for Dynamic Pressure to the Case of Compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoi, Yu. G.

    2018-01-01

    We present the motivation, formulation, and modified proof of the Bogoliubov-Zubarev theorem connecting the pressure of a dynamical object with its energy within the framework of a classical description and obtain a generalization of this theorem to the case of dynamical compressibility. In both cases, we introduce the volume of the object into consideration using a singular addition to the Hamiltonian function of the physical object, which allows using the concept of the Bogoliubov quasiaverage explicitly already on a dynamical level of description. We also discuss the relation to the same result known as the Hellmann-Feynman theorem in the framework of the quantum description of a physical object.

  10. Dynamic control of a bistable wing under aerodynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgen, Onur; Arrieta, Andres F; Friswell, Michael I; Hagedorn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic evaluation of a dynamic control technique applied to a bistable unsymmetrical cross-ply composite plate with surface bonded piezoelectric actuators is presented. The plate is clamped on one end to form a low-aspect-ratio wing. A previously proposed dynamic control method, utilizing bending resonance in different stable equilibrium positions, is used to induce snap-through between the two equilibrium states. Compared to quasi-static actuation, driving the bistable plate near resonance using surface bonded piezoelectric materials requires, theoretically, a lower peak excitation voltage to achieve snap-through. First, a set of extensive wind tunnel experiments are conducted on the passive bistable wing to understand the change in the dynamic behavior under various aerodynamic conditions. The passive wing demonstrated sufficient bending stiffness to sustain its shape under aerodynamic loading while preserving the desired bistable behavior. Next, by the use of the resonant control technique, the plate is turned into an effectively monostable structure, or alternatively, both stable equilibrium positions can be reached actively from the other stable equilibrium. Dynamic forward and reverse snap-through is demonstrated in the wind tunnel which shows both the effectiveness of the piezoelectric actuation as well as the load carrying capability of both states of the bistable wing. (paper)

  11. Constitutive Relations of Randomly Oriented Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete under Multiaxial Compressive Loadings,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    xe yz Tzy + ay* Tzx Txz + Oz y 1; ryxIL 335 Pa = atmospheric pressure (positive) in the same (5.46) units as the stresses (Compression Positiv e...straight * "Fibercon" fibers. Quantitative values of the strengths with percentage improvements over the same plain concrete mix properties are given

  12. Dynamic alteration of regional cerebral blood flow during carotid compression and proof of reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Kouichi; Hori, M; Hamasaki, N; Sato, S; Nakanishi, H; Kuwatsuru, R; Sasai, K; Aoki, S

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to non-invasively visualize changes in regional cerebral blood flow caused by manual compression of the carotid artery. To visualize dynamic changes in regional cerebral blood flow during and after manual compression of the carotid artery. Two healthy volunteers were recruited. Anatomic features and flow directions in the circle of Willis were evaluated with time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and two-dimensional phase-contrast (2DPC) MRA, respectively. Regional cerebral blood flow was visualized with territorial arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (TASL-MRI). TASL-MRI and 2DPC-MRA were performed in three states: at rest, during manual compression of the right carotid artery, and after decompression. In one volunteer, time-space labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) MRA was performed to confirm collateral flow. During manual carotid compression, in one volunteer, the right thalamus changed to be fed only by the vertebrobasilar system, and the right basal ganglia changed to be fed by the left internal carotid artery. In the other volunteer, the right basal ganglia changed to be fed by the vertebrobasilar system. 2DPC-MRA showed that the flow direction changed in the right A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery and the right posterior communicating artery. Perfusion patterns and flow directions recovered after decompression. Time-SLIP MRA showed pial vessels and dural collateral circulation when the right carotid artery was manually compressed. Use of TASL-MRI and 2DPC-MRA was successful for non-invasive visualization of the dynamic changes in regional cerebral blood flow during and after manual carotid compression

  13. Shock compression parameters for a boron-loaded, silicone-rubber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gust, W.H.; Van Thiel, M.; Gathers, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    Hugoniot parameters under uniaxial-shock-wave-loading from 0.03 to 0.6 Mbar are presented for a composite with 70 wt percent boron loaded in a silicone-rubber matrix. The plot of shock velocity vs particle velocity was found to be nonlinear. Equations that describe fits of the data are presented. (U.S.)

  14. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  15. Decrease of dynamic loads in mobile energy means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivaev, O. I.; Gorban, L. K.; Vorohobin, A. V.; Vedrinsky, O. S.

    2018-03-01

    The increase in the productivity of machine and tractor units is possible due to the increase in operating speeds, this leads to the emergence of increased dynamic loads in the system “engine-transmission-propulsion unit-soil”, which worsens the performance of machine-tractor aggregates. To reduce fluctuations in the “engine-transmission” system, special vibration dampers are used, which installed in close proximity to the engine and protect well the transmission from uneven engine operation; however, such dampers practically do not eliminate the oscillations of external loads. Reducing dynamic loads on the transmission and the mobile power engine (MPE) is an important issue directly related to improving the performance, reliability and durability of the tractor, as well as reducing the slippage of the drive wheels. In order to reduce effectively dynamic loads on the transmission and on the MPE, it is necessary to introduce resilient damping elements closer to the sources of oscillations, namely, to the driving wheels. At the same time, the elastic-damping element should provide accumulation of vibration energy caused by external influences and have a large energy capacity. The installation of an elastic-damping element in the final link of the tractor transmission ensures a reduction in the magnitude of external influences, thereby protecting the engine and transmission from large dynamic loads, and allows one to reduce the slippage of the propellers, which has a positive effect on the traction and energy characteristics of the tractor. Traction tests of the LTP-55 tractor on a concrete road showed that the use of an elasto-damping drive makes it possible to increase the maximum tractive power from 33.5 to 35.3 kW and to reduce the slipping of propellers by 12-30%, the specific fuel consumption by 6-10%. When driving on stubble, the use of an elastic-damping drive increases the maximum tractive power from 25 to 26 kW, reduces the skidding of propellers by

  16. BAGHEERA: A new experimental facility at CEA / Valduc for actinides studies under high dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Lanier, G.; Lamalle, S.; Beaulieu, J.; Antoine, P.; Martinuzzi, P.

    2006-08-01

    This paper is a technical presentation about a new experimental facility recently developed at CEA/Valduc, BAGHEERA, a French acronym for “Hopkinson And High Speed Experiments Glove Box”. This facility is used since mid-2003 to characterize the physical and mechanical behaviour of actinides under high dynamic loadings. For this purpose, four basic experimental devices are confined inside a single glove box: a 50 mm bore diameter single stage light gas gun, two compression and torsion split Hopkinson bars (SHPB and TSHB respectively) and a Taylor test device (TTD). Design and technical data on the experimental equipment are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the gas gun specific features due to actinide applications.

  17. Integrating dynamic and distributed compressive sensing techniques to enhance image quality of the compressive line sensing system for unmanned aerial vehicles application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Bing; Hou, Weilin; Caimi, Frank M.; Dalgleish, Fraser R.; Vuorenkoski, Anni K.; Gong, Cuiling

    2017-07-01

    The compressive line sensing imaging system adopts distributed compressive sensing (CS) to acquire data and reconstruct images. Dynamic CS uses Bayesian inference to capture the correlated nature of the adjacent lines. An image reconstruction technique that incorporates dynamic CS in the distributed CS framework was developed to improve the quality of reconstructed images. The effectiveness of the technique was validated using experimental data acquired in an underwater imaging test facility. Results that demonstrate contrast and resolution improvements will be presented. The improved efficiency is desirable for unmanned aerial vehicles conducting long-duration missions.

  18. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  19. A dynamic 3D biomechanical evaluation of the load on the low back during different patient-handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotte, J H; Essendrop, M; Hansen, A F; Schibye, B

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the low-back loading during common patient-handling tasks. Ten female health care workers without formal training in patient handling performed nine patient-handling tasks including turning, lifting and repositioning a male stroke patient. The low-back loading was quantified by net moment, compression, and shear forces at the L4/L5 joint, measured muscle activity (EMG) in erector spinae muscles and rate of perceived exertion (RPE; Borg scale). The experiments were videotaped with a 50Hz video system using five cameras, and the ground and bedside reaction forces of the health care worker were recorded by means of force platforms and force transducers on the bed. The biomechanical load was calculated using a dynamic 3D seven-segment model of the lower part of the body, and the forces at the L4/L5 joint were estimated by a 14 muscles cross-sectional model of the low back (optimisation procedure). Compression force and torque showed high task dependency whereas the EMG data and the RPE values were more dependent on the subject. The peak compression during two tasks involving lifting the patient (4132/4433N) was significantly higher than all other tasks. Four tasks involving repositioning the patient in the bed (3179/3091/2932/3094N) did not differ, but showed higher peak compression than two tasks turning the patient in the bed (1618/2197N). Thus, in this study the patient-handling tasks could be classified into three groups-characterised by lifting, repositioning or turning-with different levels of peak net torque and compression at the L4/L5 joint.

  20. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-01-01

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays

  1. Compressive damage mechanism of GFRP composites under off-axis loading: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H.W.; Li, H.Y.; Gui, L.L.

    2013-01-01

    the angle between the fiber direction and the loading vector goes from 0° to 45° (by 2.3–2.6 times), and then slightly increases (when the angle approaches 80–90°). At the low angles between the fiber and the loading vector, fiber buckling and kinking are the main mechanisms of fiber failure....... With increasing the angle between the fiber and applied loading, failure of glass fibers is mainly controlled by shear cracking. For the computational analysis of the damage mechanisms, 3D multifiber unit cell models of GFRP composites and X-FEM approach to the fracture modeling were used. The computational...

  2. Dynamic load-balancing-extended gradient mechanism: Graphic representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Francisco J., E-mail: muniz@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Load-balancing methods are quite well described in the open literature (hundreds of articles can be found about this subject). In particularly, about the Dynamic Load-balancing mechanism Extended Gradient (EG), several articles of the author are available. Even though, there are some overlap, each one of them is focused on a particular aspect of the mechanism, in a complementary way. In this article, a graphic representation of the Extended Gradient mechanism is done: this representation way had not yet been explored. However, for an in-depth knowledge of the Extended Gradient mechanism, at least, some other articles should to be read. In the CDTN, Clusters are used, mainly, in deterministic methods (CFD) and non-deterministic methods (Monte Carlo). (author)

  3. Dynamic load-balancing-extended gradient mechanism: Graphic representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Load-balancing methods are quite well described in the open literature (hundreds of articles can be found about this subject). In particularly, about the Dynamic Load-balancing mechanism Extended Gradient (EG), several articles of the author are available. Even though, there are some overlap, each one of them is focused on a particular aspect of the mechanism, in a complementary way. In this article, a graphic representation of the Extended Gradient mechanism is done: this representation way had not yet been explored. However, for an in-depth knowledge of the Extended Gradient mechanism, at least, some other articles should to be read. In the CDTN, Clusters are used, mainly, in deterministic methods (CFD) and non-deterministic methods (Monte Carlo). (author)

  4. Failure Behavior of Unidirectional Composites under Compression Loading: Effect of Fiber Waviness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroop Narayanan Nair

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The key objective of this work is to highlight the effect of manufacturing-induced fiber waviness defects on the compressive failure of glass fiber-reinforced unidirectional specimens. For this purpose, in-plane, through-thickness waviness defects (with different waviness severities are induced during the manufacturing of the laminate. Numerical and experimental results show that the compressive strength of the composites decreases as the severity of the waviness defects increases. A reduction of up to 75% is noted with a wave severity of 0.075. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of the failed specimens reveal that kink-bands are created in the wavy regions and lead to failure.

  5. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthle, Ruben; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber; Mulier, Michiel; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic load balancing algorithm for molecular dynamics based on Voronoi cells domain decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattebert, J.-L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glosli, J.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for automatic parallel load balancing in classical molecular dynamics. It assumes a spatial domain decomposition of particles into Voronoi cells. It is a gradient method which attempts to minimize a cost function by displacing Voronoi sites associated with each processor/sub-domain along steepest descent directions. Excellent load balance has been obtained for quasi-2D and 3D practical applications, with up to 440·106 particles on 65,536 MPI tasks.

  7. Compressive and swelling behavior of cuttlebone derived hydroxyapatite loaded PVA hydrogel implants for articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Y. Santosh; Kumar, G. C. Mohan; Isloor, Arun M.

    2018-04-01

    Developing a novel antibacterial, nontoxic and biocompatible hydrogel with superior physio mechanical properties is still becoming a challenge. Herein, we synthesize hydroxyapatite (HA) powder from cuttlefish bone and prepare a series of stiff, tough, high strength, biocompatible hydrogel reinforced with HA by integrating glutaraldehyde into PVA/HA. Powder was characterized by SEM and XRD. Compressive strength and swelling properties are studied and compare the results with the properties of healthy natural articular cartilage.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics in experimental devices with compressed/expanded surfactant monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuera, M; Perales, J M; Vega, J M

    2014-01-01

    A theory is provided for a common experimental set up that is used to measure surface properties in surfactant monolayers. The set up consists of a surfactant monolayer (over a shallow liquid layer) that is compressed/expanded in a periodic fashion by moving in counter-phase two parallel, slightly immersed solid barriers, which vary the free surface area and thus the surfactant concentration. The simplest theory ignores the fluid dynamics in the bulk fluid, assuming spatially uniform surfactant concentration, which requires quite small forcing frequencies and provides reversible dynamics in the compression/expansion cycles. In this paper, we present a long-wave theory for not so slow oscillations that assumes local equilibrium but takes the fluid dynamics into account. This simple theory uncovers the physical mechanisms involved in the surfactant behavior and allows for extracting more information from each experimental run. The conclusion is that the fluid dynamics cannot be ignored, and that some irreversible dynamics could well have a fluid dynamic origin. (paper)

  9. Mechanical Stresses Induced by Compression in Castings of the Load-carrying Grate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słowik J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the compression-induced state of stress arising in castings of the guide grates during operation in pusher-type furnaces for heat treatment. The effect of grate compression is caused by its forced movement in the furnace. The introduction of flexible segments to the grate structure changes in a significant way the stress distribution, mainly by decreasing its value, and consequently considerably extends the lifetime of the grates. The stress distribution was examined in the grates with flexible segments arranged crosswise (normal to the direction of the grate compression and lengthwise (following the direction of force. A regression equation was derived to describe the relationship between the stress level in a row of ribs in the grate and the number of flexible segments of a lengthwise orientation placed in this row. It was found that, regardless of the distribution of the flexible segments in a row, the stress values were similar in all the ribs included in this row, and in a given row of the ribs/flexible segments a similar state of stress prevailed, irrespective of the position of this row in the whole structure of the grate and of the number of the ribs/flexible segments introduced therein. Parts of the grate responsible for the stress transfer were indicated and also parts which play the role of an element bonding the structure.

  10. Failure mechanism and coupled static-dynamic loading theory in deep hard rock mining: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibing Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rock failure phenomena, such as rockburst, slabbing (or spalling and zonal disintegration, related to deep underground excavation of hard rocks are frequently reported and pose a great threat to deep mining. Currently, the explanation for these failure phenomena using existing dynamic or static rock mechanics theory is not straightforward. In this study, new theory and testing method for deep underground rock mass under coupled static-dynamic loading are introduced. Two types of coupled loading modes, i.e. “critical static stress + slight disturbance” and “elastic static stress + impact disturbance”, are proposed, and associated test devices are developed. Rockburst phenomena of hard rocks under coupled static-dynamic loading are successfully reproduced in the laboratory, and the rockburst mechanism and related criteria are demonstrated. The results of true triaxial unloading compression tests on granite and red sandstone indicate that the unloading can induce slabbing when the confining pressure exceeds a certain threshold, and the slabbing failure strength is lower than the shear failure strength according to the conventional Mohr-Column criterion. Numerical results indicate that the rock unloading failure response under different in situ stresses and unloading rates can be characterized by an equivalent strain energy density. In addition, we present a new microseismic source location method without premeasuring the sound wave velocity in rock mass, which can efficiently and accurately locate the rock failure in hard rock mines. Also, a new idea for deep hard rock mining using a non-explosive continuous mining method is briefly introduced.

  11. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...... to 700 sec-1. The results are compared with the CEB Model Code and the Spilt Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique is briefly de-scribed....

  12. Dynamic Range Enhancement of High-Speed Electrical Signal Data via Non-Linear Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, Matthew C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for high-speed compression of dynamic electrical signal waveforms to extend the measuring capabilities of conventional measuring devices such as oscilloscopes and high-speed data acquisition systems are discussed. Transfer function components and algorithmic transfer functions can be used to accurately measure signals that are within the frequency bandwidth but beyond the voltage range and voltage resolution capabilities of the measuring device.

  13. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D 3 He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D 3 He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R cm ) from the downshift of the shock-produced D 3 He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR

  14. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  15. Analysis of compressible light dynamic stall flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, R.D. Van; Ekaterinaris, John A.; Chandrasekhara, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results of steady and light dynamic stall flow over an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil at a freestream Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 0.54 x 10(6) are compared, The experimental observation that dynamic stall is induced from the bursting of a laminar separation...... point is specified suitably and a simple transition length model is incorporated to determine the extent of the laminar separation bubble. The thin-layer approximations of compressible, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes equations are used for the numerical solution, with an implicit, upwind-biased, third...

  16. Dynamic-range reduction by peak clipping or compression and its effects on phoneme perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, differences between dynamic-range reduction by peak clipping and single-channel compression for phoneme perception through conventional hearing aids have been investigated. The results from 16 hearing-impaired listeners show that compression limiting yields significantly better

  17. Loads from Compressive Strain Caused by Mining Activity Illustrated with the Example of Two Buildings in Silesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadela, Marta; Chomacki, Leszek

    2017-10-01

    The soil’s load on retention walls or underground elements of engineering structures consists of three basic types of pressure: active pressure (p a ), passive pressure (p b ) and at-rest pressure (p 0 ). In undisturbed areas without any mining, due to lack of activity in the soil, specific forces from the soil are stable and unchanging throughout the structure’s life. Mining activity performed at a certain depth activates the soil. Displacements take place in the surface layer of the rock mass, which begins to act on the structure embedded in it, significantly changing the original stress distribution. Deformation of the subgrade, mainly horizontal strains, becomes a source of significant additional actions in the contact zone between the structure and the soil, constituting an additional load for the structure. In order to monitor the mining influence in the form of compressive load on building walls, an observation line was set up in front of two buildings located in Silesia (in Mysłowice). In 2013, some mining activity took place directly under those buildings, with expected horizontal strains of εx = -5.8 mm/m. The measurement results discussed in this paper showed that, as predicted, the buildings were subjected only to horizontal compressive strains with the values parallel to the analysed wall being less than -4.0 ‰ for first building and -1.5‰ for second building, and values perpendicular to the analysed wall being less than -6.0‰ for first building and -4.0‰ for second building (the only exception was the measurement in line 8-13, where εx = -17.04‰ for first building and -4.57‰ for second building). The horizontal displacement indicate that the impact of mining activity was greater on first building. This is also confirmed by inspections of the damage.

  18. Study on heat under dynamic loading of rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Igumenova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies on heat buildup in tire rubber surface scan method samples using a thermal imaging camera. Investigated the exothermic chemical reaction mechanical destruction rubber when loading designs permanent cyclic stretching with deformation of the working zone 50%. Percentage of deformation of the working zone was chosen on the basis of the actual data on the stretch-compression zone "Rusk" tires, which is the maximum level difference of deformation during run-in. Experiment plan provided for periodic relaxation samples of at least 72 hours for more accurate simulation of operation process of structural products. Created and processed data on temperature changes in samples for bar and line profile for rubber compounds with the introduction of nanomodificator (fullerene-containing technical carbon in comparison with the control sample without him. The data obtained reflect the nature of heat depending on the composition of the compound. Identified common patterns of thermal nature of physicochemical process mechanical destruction rubbers. For rubber with nanomodifikatorom there has been an increase in the temperature interval reaction from a minimum to a maximum 2 degrees that is also linked to the rise in the average temperature of the reaction on the histogram also at 2-3 degrees of deformation under the same conditions and the level of cyclic loading. However, the temperature in the control sample that is associated with the beginning of the formation of hardened rubber structures, economies of Mallinza-Petrikeeva, occurs with delay twice compared with modified Fullerenes. Measurement of physic-mechanical indicators selected in the course of testing of samples showed the beginning of formation of structure with increased strength of samples in the sample temperature zone that corresponds to the thermal effect of èndotermičeskomu recombination reactions of macromolecules.

  19. Structural Dynamic Response Compressing Technique in Bridges using a Cochlea-inspired Artificial Filter Bank (CAFB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, G; Jeon, J; Son, B; Kim, C; Jeon, S; Lee, C

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a cochlea-inspired artificial filter bank (CAFB) was developed to efficiently obtain dynamic response of a structure, and a dynamic response measurement of a cable-stayed bridge model was also carried out to evaluate the performance of the developed CAFB. The developed CAFB used a band-pass filter optimizing algorithm (BOA) and peakpicking algorithm (PPA) to select and compress dynamic response signal containing the modal information which was significant enough. The CAFB was then optimized about the El-Centro earthquake wave which was often used in the construction research, and the software implementation of CAFB was finally embedded in the unified structural management system (USMS). For the evaluation of the developed CAFB, a real time dynamic response experiment was performed on a cable-stayed bridge model, and the response of the cable-stayed bridge model was measured using both the traditional wired system and the developed CAFB-based USMS. The experiment results showed that the compressed dynamic response acquired by the CAFB-based USMS matched significantly with that of the traditional wired system while still carrying sufficient modal information of the cable-stayed bridge. (paper)

  20. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fushing

    Full Text Available High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS, and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors.

  1. Effect of support conditions on structural response under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, T.; Memon, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    In design practice, dynamic structural analysis is carried out with base of structure considered as fixed; this means that foundation is placed on rock like soil material. While conducting this type of analyses the role of foundation and soil behaviour is totally neglected. The actions in members and loads transferred at foundation level obtained in this manner do not depict the true structural behaviour. FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis where both superstructure and foundation soil are coupled together is quite complicated and expensive for design environments. A simplified model is required to depict dynamic response of structures with foundations based on flexible soils. The primary purpose of this research is to compare the superstructure dynamic responses of structural systems with fixed base to that of simple soil model base. The selected simple soil model is to be suitable for use in a design environment to give more realistic results. For this purpose building models are idealized with various heights and structural systems in both 2D (Two Dimensional) and 3D (Three Dimensional) space. These models are then provided with visco-elastic supports representing three soil bearing capacities and the analysis results are compared to that of fixed supports models. The results indicate that fixed support system underestimates natural time period of the structures. Dynamic behavior and force response of visco-elastic support is different from fixed support model. Fixed support models result in over designed base columns and under designed beams. (author)

  2. Dynamic loads on reactor vessel components by low pressure waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkert, J.; Mika, C.; Stegemann, D.; Valero, M.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the conservation theorems for mass and impulses the code DRUWE has been developed enabling the calculation of dynamic loads of the reactor shell on the basis of simplified assumptions for the first period shortly after rupture. According to the RSK-guidelines it can be assumed that the whole weld size is opened within 15 msec. This time-dependent opening of the fractured plane can be taken into account in the computer program. The calculation is composed in a way that for a reactor shell devided into cross and angle sections the local, chronological pressure and strength curves, the total dynamic load as well as the moments acting on the fastenings of the reactor shell can be calculated. As input data only geometrical details concerning the concept of the pressure vessel and its components as well as the effective subcooling of the fluid are needed. By means of several parameters the program can be operated in a way that the results are available in form of listings or diagrams, respectively, but also as card pile for further examinations, e.g. strength analysis. (orig./RW) [de

  3. Dynamic Compression Experiments on Hydrogen and Deuterium in the Warm Dense Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjarlais, Michael; McCoy, Chad; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas; Knudson, Marcus; Redmer, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Recently a shock-ramp platform has been developed on the Z Accelerator to access off-Hugoniot states in liquids. The accelerator delivers a two-step current pulse; the first accelerates the electrode to a constant velocity, which upon impact with the sample cell creates a well-defined shock, the subsequent current rise produces ramp compression from the initially shocked state producing relatively cool (1-2 kK), high pressure (>300 GPa), high compression (10 to 15-fold compression) states. This technique allows experimental access to the region of phase space where hydrogen is predicted to undergo a first-order phase transition from an insulating molecular-like to a conducting atomic-like liquid. Here we discuss the experimental platform, survey various theoretical predictions for the liquid-liquid, insulator-to-metal transition in hydrogen, and present results of experiments on both deuterium and hydrogen that clearly show an abrupt transition to a metallic state. We also present results from recent experiments at higher temperatures (3-4 kK) and compare the observations to both first-principles theory and previous step-wise loading experiments that exhibited a minimum metallic conductivity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. The dynamics of pulse compression in synchronously pumped fiber Raman lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Heller, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamical equations describing the amplification and propagation of an initial Stokes seed pulse in a synchronously pumped fiber Raman laser configuration are formulated and analytic solutions are derived. A train of Stokes shifted pulses are produced, whose individual characteristics eventually evolve on successive round-trips through the fiber into subpicosecond pulses having constant fluence and decreasing temporal duration. Raman pulse compression stops when it is counterbalanced by the effects of group velocity dispersion and phase modulation in the normal dispersion regime. Pulse breakup due to soliton formation can occur in the anomalous dispersion regime. Simple expressions for the rate of pulse compression, steady-state pulse fluence, and for the minimum steady-state pulse duration are obtained

  5. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C. C.; Song, Y. T.; Peng, X. B.; Wei, Y. P.; Mao, X.; Li, W. X.; Qian, X. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads.

  6. Loading Rate Effects on the One-Dimensional Compressibility of Four Partially Saturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    representations are referred to as constitutive models. Numerous constitutive models incorporating loading rate effects have been developed ( Baladi and Rohani...and probably more indicative of the true values of applied pressure and average strain produced during the test. A technique developed by Baladi and...Sand," Technical Report No. AFWL-TR-66-146, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June, 1967. 4. Baladi , George Y., and

  7. Study of the dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-loaded metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoute, E.

    2010-01-01

    The irradiation of a metallic target by a high power laser pulse induces a shock wave in the material. Under some conditions, it leads to the production of high velocity ejecta which can damage the optical environment (lenses, mirrors, windows, etc.). With the ongoing development of high energy laser facilities designed to achieve inertial confinement fusion, such as the Laser MegaJoule in France or the National Ignition Facility in the USA, the question of debris ejection from metallic samples subjected to intense laser irradiation has become a key issue. It is necessary to understand fragmentation processes induced by laser shock, and to anticipate and quantify generated fragments, in order to design suitable protections and experiments, and to preserve laser facilities. The main fragmentation processes which can occur in a laser-shock-loaded metallic target and generate high velocity ejecta are: (i) micro-jetting, which occurs upon reflection of the incident compressive front from the free surface, (ii) spallation, which is due to the later interaction of the release wave reflected from that surface with the incident unloading wave and (iii) dynamic punching of thin targets. Experimental campaigns have been performed on high energy laser facilities in the Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d'Aquitaine (CESTA, CEA, Alise facility) and in the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, LULI 2000 facility). Gold and aluminium have been mainly studied because they are the two main metallic components of the target which will be used to achieved the inertial confinement fusion. Specific diagnostics have been developed and used during these experiments to study the dynamic fragmentation: transverse shadowgraphy, free surface velocity measurement and recovery of generated fragments. Experimental results have been compared with numerical predictions obtained with a bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code, where a specific numerical

  8. A computationally efficient OMP-based compressed sensing reconstruction for dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, M; Prieto, C; Schaeffter, T; Batchelor, P G; Odille, F; Atkinson, D

    2011-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) methods in MRI are computationally intensive. Thus, designing novel CS algorithms that can perform faster reconstructions is crucial for everyday applications. We propose a computationally efficient orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP)-based reconstruction, specifically suited to cardiac MR data. According to the energy distribution of a y-f space obtained from a sliding window reconstruction, we label the y-f space as static or dynamic. For static y-f space images, a computationally efficient masked OMP reconstruction is performed, whereas for dynamic y-f space images, standard OMP reconstruction is used. The proposed method was tested on a dynamic numerical phantom and two cardiac MR datasets. Depending on the field of view composition of the imaging data, compared to the standard OMP method, reconstruction speedup factors ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 are achieved. (note)

  9. Robustly Fitting and Forecasting Dynamical Data With Electromagnetically Coupled Artificial Neural Network: A Data Compression Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyin; Liu, Mandan; Cheng, Yicheng; Wang, Rubin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a dynamical recurrent artificial neural network (ANN) is proposed and studied. Inspired from a recent research in neuroscience, we introduced nonsynaptic coupling to form a dynamical component of the network. We mathematically proved that, with adequate neurons provided, this dynamical ANN model is capable of approximating any continuous dynamic system with an arbitrarily small error in a limited time interval. Its extreme concise Jacobian matrix makes the local stability easy to control. We designed this ANN for fitting and forecasting dynamic data and obtained satisfied results in simulation. The fitting performance is also compared with those of both the classic dynamic ANN and the state-of-the-art models. Sufficient trials and the statistical results indicated that our model is superior to those have been compared. Moreover, we proposed a robust approximation problem, which asking the ANN to approximate a cluster of input-output data pairs in large ranges and to forecast the output of the system under previously unseen input. Our model and learning scheme proposed in this paper have successfully solved this problem, and through this, the approximation becomes much more robust and adaptive to noise, perturbation, and low-order harmonic wave. This approach is actually an efficient method for compressing massive external data of a dynamic system into the weight of the ANN.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  11. Aggregated Residential Load Modeling Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai

    2014-09-28

    Abstract—It is already obvious that the future power grid will have to address higher demand for power and energy, and to incorporate renewable resources of different energy generation patterns. Demand response (DR) schemes could successfully be used to manage and balance power supply and demand under operating conditions of the future power grid. To achieve that, more advanced tools for DR management of operations and planning are necessary that can estimate the available capacity from DR resources. In this research, a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is derived, trained, and tested that can model aggregated load of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems. DBNs can provide flexible and powerful tools for both operations and planing, due to their unique analytical capabilities. The DBN model accuracy and flexibility of use is demonstrated by testing the model under different operational scenarios.

  12. Prediction-based dynamic load-sharing heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Kumar K.; Devarakonda, Murthy; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present dynamic load-sharing heuristics that use predicted resource requirements of processes to manage workloads in a distributed system. A previously developed statistical pattern-recognition method is employed for resource prediction. While nonprediction-based heuristics depend on a rapidly changing system status, the new heuristics depend on slowly changing program resource usage patterns. Furthermore, prediction-based heuristics can be more effective since they use future requirements rather than just the current system state. Four prediction-based heuristics, two centralized and two distributed, are presented. Using trace driven simulations, they are compared against random scheduling and two effective nonprediction based heuristics. Results show that the prediction-based centralized heuristics achieve up to 30 percent better response times than the nonprediction centralized heuristic, and that the prediction-based distributed heuristics achieve up to 50 percent improvements relative to their nonprediction counterpart.

  13. Dynamic Stability of Columns Subjected to Follower Loads: a Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LANGTHJEM, M. A.; SUGIYAMA, Y.

    2000-12-01

    This paper offers a survey of simple, flexible structural elements subjected to non-conservative follower loads, such as those caused by the thrust of rocket- and jet engines, and by dry friction in automotive disk- and drum-brake systems. Emphasis is on the “canonical problems”, Beck's, Reut's, Leipholz's, and Hauger's columns. Beck's and Reut's columns have been realized experimentally, and very good agreement between theory and experiments has been found. Leipholz's column is basically realized in an automobile brake system, where noise due to dynamic or parametric instability (brake squeal) is a well-known environmental problem. It is attempted to give a broad overview, with emphasis on experimental works and the associated theoretical problems. Structural optimization is also included in the review, as many studies in that area have served an important purpose in the development of optimization techniques for practical, large-scale optimization problems with non-conservative forces, such as in aeroelasticity.

  14. Planar dynamics of large-deformation rods under moving loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X. W.; van der Heijden, G. H. M.

    2018-01-01

    We formulate the problem of a slender structure (a rod) undergoing large deformation under the action of a moving mass or load motivated by inspection robots crawling along bridge cables or high-voltage power lines. The rod is described by means of geometrically exact Cosserat theory which allows for arbitrary planar flexural, extensional and shear deformations. The equations of motion are discretised using the generalised-α method. The formulation is shown to handle the discontinuities of the problem well. Application of the method to a cable and an arch problem reveals interesting nonlinear phenomena. For the cable problem we find that large deformations have a resonance detuning effect on cable dynamics. The problem also offers a compelling illustration of the Timoshenko paradox. For the arch problem we find a stabilising (delay) effect on the in-plane collapse of the arch, with failure suppressed entirely at sufficiently high speed.

  15. Prediction of dynamic blade loading of the Francis-99 turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolle, J; Cupillard, S

    2015-01-01

    CFD simulations focusing on capturing dynamic fluctuations of the flow for three operating points were performed for a scale model of a high head Francis turbine. A mesh sensitivity study showed an influence of the near wall resolution, consequently a low Reynolds mesh with a SST turbulence model was used. Rotor/stator fluctuations are well reproduced with the full turbine simulation at all operating points. Velocity contours and average velocity profiles from LDV measurements in the draft tube confirm that the flow physics is generally well reproduced. Simplified approaches such as profile transform and Fourier transform underestimated the measured fluctuations. As full turbine simulations were time-consuming, a simulation with only the draft tube was performed at part load to predict the fluctuations in the draft tube cone. The SAS-SST turbulence model was able to capture the vortex rope behavior

  16. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  17. DECREASING OF MECHANISMS DYNAMIC LOADING AT THE TRANSIENT STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Loveikin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is necessary to select modes of motion to reduce the dynamic loads in the mechanisms. This choice should be made on optimization basis. The purpose of research is to study methods of synthesis regimes of mechanisms and machines motion that provide optimal modes of movement for terminal and integral criteria. Methodology. For research the one-mass dynamic model of the mechanism has been used. As optimization criteria the terminal and comprehensive integral criteria were used. The stated optimization problem has been solved using dynamic programming and variational calculation. The direct variation method, which allowed finding only approximate solution of the original problem of optimal control, has been used as well. Findings. The ways of ensuring the absolute minimum of terminal criterion have been set for each method of problem solving. The stated characteristics show softness changes of kinematic functions during braking of mechanism. They point to the absolute minimum of adopted terminal criterion in the calculation. Originality. It is necessary to introduce new variables in the system equations during the solving of optimal control problems using dynamic programming to achieve an absolute minimum of terminal criteria. In general, to achieve a minimum of n-order terminal criterion an optimization problem should find relatively (n+1-th order function. When optimization problems is solving by variational calculation in order to ensure a minimization of n-th order terminal criterion by selecting the appropriate boundary conditions, it is necessary to solve the Euler-Poisson 2(n+1-th order equation (subject to symmetric setting boundary conditions. It is a necessary condition for an extremum of the functional with the (n+1-th order integrant. Practical value. Minimizing of adopted terminal criterion in the calculation allows eliminate the brunt in kinematic gearing of mechanisms, which increases their operational life. In addition

  18. Effect of the loading rate on compressive properties of goose eggs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedomová, Š.; Kumbár, V.; Trnka, Jan; Buchar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2016), s. 223-233 ISSN 0092-0606 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : goose egg * compression * rupture force * deformation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2016 http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/770/art%253A10.1007%252Fs10867-015-9403-2.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.springer.com%2Farticle%2F10.1007%2Fs10867-015-9403-2&token2=exp=1460539397~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F770%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs10867-015-9403-2.pdf%3ForiginUrl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Flink.springer.com%252Farticle%252F10.1007%252Fs10867-015-9403-2*~hmac=fd2b9956908d60e519ce45c412eaf5c228f6f96333e62a06285950a2123f7739

  19. INFLUENCE OF UTILIZED LOAD OF DRIVE OF COMPRESSING STATION UPON PARAMETERS OF GTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abrazovski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today it is required to use secondary energy resources (STR, which we have in gas-transport system of the country, more efficiently. In this system (STR smoke gases of gas transforming aggregates with turbogas drive installations are presented primarily.For using STR of turbogas drives it is necessary to forecast heat exchange equipment installation, this causes the growth of aerodynamic resistance of exhaust channel. This influences on all plant’s work. It was experimentally proved that the usage of utilized equipment influences upon increasing  of power efficiency. For this reason the perturbation method was used, which allow to determine rate of influence. Convenience of this method is that the solution can be obtained in the form of evident analytical dependence and it does not depend on formulated problem, number of variable and definite relations between them.Using the perturbation method influence efficiency was obtained, which influences on exhaust channel resistance changes and as a result changes power efficiency and in the whole plant’s efficiency. Besides, in this article the dependence of influence efficiency from stating parameters of cycle was presented in graphs: temperature of burning products before turbine and air compression.

  20. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  1. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Fojtášek, Kamil

    2015-05-01

    Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  2. Thermophysical properties of liquid carbon dioxide under shock compressions: quantum molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping

    2010-10-07

    Quantum molecular dynamics were used to calculate the equation of state, electrical, and optical properties of liquid carbon dioxide along the Hugoniot at shock pressures up to 74 GPa. The principal Hugoniot derived from the calculated equation of state is in good agreement with experimental results. Molecular dissociation and recombination are investigated through pair correlation functions and decomposition of carbon dioxide is found to be between 40 and 50 GPa along the Hugoniot, where nonmetal-metal transition is observed. In addition, the optical properties of shock compressed carbon dioxide are also theoretically predicted along the Hugoniot.

  3. EURDYN, Nonlinear Transient Analysis of Structure with Dynamic Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donea, J.; Giuliani, S.; Halleux, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The EURDYN computer codes are under development at JRC-Ispra since 1973 for the simulation of non- linear dynamic response of fast-reactor components submitted to impulsive loading due to abnormal working conditions. They are thus mainly used in reactor safety analysis but can apply to other fields. Indeed the codes compute the elasto-plastic transient response of 2-D and thin 3-D structures submitted to fast dynamic loading generated by explosions, impacts... and represented by time dependent pressures, concentrated loads and prescribed displacements, or by initial speeds. Two releases of the structural computer codes EURDYN 01 (2-D beams and triangles and axisymmetric conical shells and triangular tori), 02 (axisymmetric and 2-D quadratic iso-parametric elements) and 03 (triangular plate elements) have already been produced in 1976(1) and 1980(2). They include material (elasto-plasticity using the classical flow theory approach) and geometrical (large displacements and rotations treated by a co-rotational technique) nonlinearities. The present version (Release 3) has been completed mid-1982 and is documented in EUR 8357 EN. The new features of Release 3, as compared to the former ones, roughly consist in: - full large strain capability for 9-node iso-parametric elements (EURDYN 02), - generalized array dimensions, - introduction of the radial return algorithm for elasto-plastic material modelling, - extension of the energy check facility to the case of prescribed displacements, - possible interface to a post-processing package including time plot facilities (TPLOT). The theoretical aspects can be found in refs. 2,4,5,6,7,8. 2 - Method of solution: - Finite element space discretization. - Explicit time integration. - Lumped masses. - EURDYN 01: 2-D co-rotational formulation including constant strain triangles (plane or axisymmetric), beams and conical shells, this last element being particularly useful for the study of thin

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of tension–compression asymmetry in nanocrystalline copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kai, E-mail: kaizhou@aliyun.com; Liu, Bin; Shao, Shaofeng; Yao, Yijun

    2017-04-04

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate uniaxial tension and compression of nanocrystalline copper with mean grain sizes of 3.8–11.9 nm. The simulation results show an apparent asymmetry in the flow stress, with nanocrystalline copper stronger in compression than in tension. The asymmetry exhibits a maximum at the mean grain size of about 10 nm. The dominant mechanism of the asymmetry depends on the mean grain size. At small grain sizes, grain-boundary based plasticity dominates the asymmetry, while for large grain sizes the asymmetry mainly arises from the pressure dependent dislocation emission from grain boundaries. - Highlights: • The tension–compression asymmetry in strength exhibits a maximum at the mean grain size of about 10 nm. • The main mechanisms govern the asymmetry are grain-boundary mediated plasticity and dislocation based plasticity. • The above-mentioned mechanisms are both grain size and pressure dependent. • The transition of the asymmetry with the mean grain size is not influenced by strain rate.

  5. Combustion and emission characteristics of Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) fuelled with naphtha and gasoline in wide load range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Buyu; Wang, Zhi; Shuai, Shijin; Yang, Hongqiang; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Naphtha MPCI can operate stably in wide load range from 0.4 MPa to 1.4 MPa of IMEP. • Naphtha MPCI can achieve high thermal efficiency due to low exhaust loss. • Gasoline MPCI has low heat transfer loss than CDC and naphtha MPCI. • MPCI can produce low NO x emissions (<0.4 g/kW h) with the EGR ratio less than 30%. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of naphtha (RON = 65.6) and commercial gasoline (RON = 94.0) on Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) mode. The experiment is conducted on a single cylinder research diesel engine with compression ratio of 16.7. The engine is operated at an engine speed of 1600 rpm for the IMEP from 0.4 to 1.4 MPa. Commercial diesel (CN = 56.5) is also tested in Conventional Diesel Combustion (CDC) mode as a baseline. At each operating point, the injection strategy and intake conditions are adjusted to meet with the criteria (NO x < 0.4 g/kW h, soot < 0.06 m −1 , MPRR < 1 MPa/deg and CA50 < 20 CAD ATDC). The typical two-stage combustion characteristics of MPCI are obtained in both naphtha and gasoline. Stable combustion is achieved by naphtha in wide load range, while the engine fuelled with gasoline cannot operate stably at 0.4 MPa IMEP. The COV of IMEP of gasoline MPCI is higher than that of naphtha and diesel. However, gasoline has the low MPRR and the retarded CA50 at medium and high loads due to its longest ignition delay. As a result of low exhaust loss for naphtha and low heat transfer loss for gasoline, the thermal efficiencies are higher for both naphtha and gasoline in MPCI mode than diesel in CDC mode, even though diesel has the highest combustion efficiency. The separated combustion in MPCI leads to low cylinder temperature, and moderate EGR ratio (less than 30%) is needed to control NO x emissions under the limit of EURO VI

  6. A study on the secondary consolidation of Boom Clay at Essen site under loading and unloading compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Y.F.; Cui, Y.J.; Tang, A.M.; Li, X.L.; Sillen, X.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom clay formation, a thick deposit of over-consolidated marine clay has been selected as a possible host material of nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. For this purpose, its deformation behaviour, especially its long-term deformation behaviour (secondary consolidation) is essential for the safety of the whole storage system and therefore needs to be investigated deeply. In the present work, odometer consolidation tests were performed on Boom clay taken from the Essen site. The loading and unloading were run in steps and the secondary consolidation coefficient C α (C α = de/dlogt) was determined for each step. This allows the secondary consolidation behaviour to be analysed. Four soil cores of Boom clay were taken from the site of Essen, Belgium, at the depths of 220-248 m. The geotechnical identification characteristics of these cores are similar: specific gravity, γ s = 2.64-2.68; liquid limit, w L = 68-78%; plastic limit, w P = 29-33%; and plastic index, I P 36-45. The soil water content (w) is between 26.5 and 29.7% and the void ratio (e) between 0.700 and 0.785. The blue methylene values (VBS) are equally similar, VBS = 6.20-6.67 (g/100 g). The clay fraction (< 2 μm) is relatively high (more than 50%). An example of the results obtained is presented (void ratio versus vertical stress and secondary consolidation coefficient versus vertical stress, determined in the e/log t plot) for the core taken at 227 m depth. After the installation of specimen in the odometer cell, an initial loading to the in-situ stress gave rise to a decrease of the void ratio from 0.730 to 0.651. The drainage system was then saturated for the subsequent loading/unloading paths in steps. The results show that the void ratio decreased to 0.270 when the vertical stress reached σ v = 32 MPa. A compression index Cc of about 0.31 can be estimated and the swelling index is estimated at 0.14. C α > 0 during loading and C α < 0 during

  7. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for unidirectional (0, 10)(sub s) and (90,10)(sub s) plates, ((0/90)(sub 5)(sub s)) plates, and for aluminum plates. Results are also presented for ((+/- theta)(sub 6)(sub s)) angle-ply plates for values of theta = 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The results indicate that the change in axial stiffness of a plate at buckling is strongly dependent upon cutout size and plate orthotropy. The presence of a cutout gives rise to an internal load distribution that changes, sometimes dramatically, as a function of cutout size coupled with the plate orthotropy. In the buckled state, the role of orthotropy becomes more significant since bending in addition to membrane orthotropy is present. Most of the plates with cutouts exhibited less postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout, and the postbuckling stiffness decreased with increasing cutout size. However, some of the highly orthotropic plates with cutouts exhibited more postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout. These results suggest the possibility of tailoring the cutout size and the stacking sequence of a composite plate to optimize postbuckling stiffness. It was found that plates with large radius cutouts do exhibit some postbuckling strength. The results also indicate that a cutout can influence modal interaction in a plate. Specifically, results are presented that show a plate with a relatively small cutout buckling at a higher load than the corresponding plate without a cutout, due to modal interaction. Other results are presented that indicate the presence of nonlinear prebuckling deformations, due to material nonlinearity, in the angle-ply plates with theta = 45 and 60 degrees. The nonlinear prebuckling deformations are more pronounced in the plates with theta = 45 degrees and become even more pronounced as the cutout size increases. Results are also presented that show how load-path eccentricity due to improper machining of the test specimens

  8. Investigation of Dynamic Friction Induced by Shock Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanicotena, A.; Szarzynski, S.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the frictional sliding of one surface against another under high pressure is often required to correctly describe the response of complex systems to shock loading. In order to provide data for direct code and model comparison, a new friction experiment investigating dry sliding characteristics of metal on metal at normal pressures up to 10 GPa and sliding velocities up to 400 m/s has been developed. The test consists of a specifically designed target made of two materials. A plane shock wave generated by plate impact results in one material sliding against the other. The material velocity of the rear surface of the target is recorded versus time by Doppler Laser Interferometry. The dynamic friction coefficient μ is then indirectly determined by comparison with results of numerical simulations involving the conventional Coulomb law. Using this new experimental configuration, three dynamic friction experiments were performed on AA 5083-Al (H111) / AISI 321 stainless steel tribo-pair. Results suggest a decrease in the friction coefficient with increasing sliding velocity

  9. The Response of Simple Polymer Structures Under Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, William; Ellison, Kay; Yapp, Su; Cole, Cloe; Galimberti, Stefano; Institute of Shock Physics Team

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic response of polymeric materials has been widely studied with the effects of degree of crystallinity, strain rate, temperature and sample size being commonly reported. This study uses a simple PMMA structure, a right cylindrical sample, with structural features such as holes. The features are added an varied in a systematic fashion. Samples were dynamically loaded using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar up to failure. The resulting stress-strain curves are presented showing the change in sample response. The strain to failure is shown to increase initially with the presence of holes, while failure stress is relatively unaffected. The fracture patterns seen in the failed samples change, with tensile cracks, Hertzian cones, shear effects being dominant for different holes sizes and geometries. The sample were prepared by laser cutting and checked for residual stress before experiment. The data is used to validate predictive model predictions where material, structure and damage are included.. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the support of Imperial College London and the Atomic Weapons Establishment.

  10. Numerical analysis of two pile caps with sockets embedded, subject the eccentric compression load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Delalibera

    Full Text Available The structural behavior of pile caps with sockets embedded is influenced by interface of column-socket, which can be smooth or rough. With intent to analyze the behavior of two pile caps with embedded socket, considering the friction between the column and the socket, with eccentric normal load, the numerical simulations were carried out, using a program based on the Finite Element Methods (FEM. In the numerical analysis the non-linear behavior of materials was considered, also the friction between the column and the socket. It was considered perfect bond between the reinforcement and the concrete around. It was observed that the embedded length is preponderant factor in the structural behavior of the analyzed element.

  11. Development of High Speed Imaging and Analysis Techniques Compressible Dynamics Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Wilder, M. C.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic stall has limited the flight envelope of helicopters for many years. The problem has been studied in the laboratory as well as in flight, but most research, even in the laboratory, has been restricted to surface measurement techniques such as pressure transducers or skin friction gauges, except at low speed. From this research, it became apparent that flow visualization tests performed at Mach numbers representing actual flight conditions were needed if the complex physics associated with dynamic stall was to be properly understood. However, visualization of the flow field during compressible conditions required carefully aligned and meticulously reconstructed holographic interferometry. As part of a long-range effort focused on exposing of the physics of compressible dynamic stall, a research wind tunnel was developed at NASA Ames Research Center which permits visual access to the full flow field surrounding an oscillating airfoil during compressible dynamic stall. Initially, a stroboscopic schlieren technique was used for visualization of the stall process, but the primary research tool has been point diffraction interferometry(PDI), a technique carefully optimized for use in th is project. A review of the process of development of PDI will be presented in the full paper. One of the most valuable aspects of PDI is the fact that interferograms are produced in real time on a continuous basis. The use of a rapidly-pulsed laser makes this practical; a discussion of this approach will be presented in the full paper. This rapid pulsing(up to 40,000 pulses/sec) produces interferograms of the rapidly developing dynamic stall field in sufficient resolution(both in space and time) that the fluid physics of the compressible dynamic stall flowfield can be quantitatively determined, including the gradients of pressure in space and time. This permits analysis of the influence of the effect of pitch rate, Mach number, Reynolds number, amplitude of oscillation, and other

  12. Observation of a New High-Pressure Solid Phase in Dynamically Compressed Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsin, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Aluminum is ideal for testing theoretical first-principles calculations because of the relative simplicity of its atomic structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that Al transforms from an ambient-pressure, face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal to the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and body-centered-cubic (bcc) structures as it is compressed. Laser-driven experiments performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) ramp compressed Al samples to pressures up to 540 GPa without melting. Nanosecond in-situ x-ray diffraction was used to directly measure the crystal structure at pressures where the solid-solid phase transformations of Al are predicted to occur. Laser velocimetry provided the pressure in the Al. Our results show clear evidence of the fcc-hcp and hpc-bcc transformations at 216 +/- 9 GPa and 321 +/- 12 GPa, respectively. This is the first experimental in-situ observation of the bcc phase in compressed Al and a confirmation of the fcc-hcp transition previously observed under static compression at 217 GPa. The observations indicate these solid-solid phase transitions occur on the order of tens of nanoseconds time scales. In the fcc-hcp transition we find the original texture of the sample is preserved; however, the hcp-bcc transition diminishes that texture producing a structure that is more polycrystalline. The importance of this dynamic is discussed. The NIF results are the first demonstration of x-ray diffraction measurements at two different pressures in a single laser shot. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. In Situ Test Study of Characteristics of Coal Mining Dynamic Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of coal mining dynamic load and high static stress can easily induce such dynamic disasters as rock burst, coal and gas outburst, roof fall, and water inrush. In order to obtain the characteristic parameters of mining dynamic load and dynamic mechanism of coal and rock, the stress wave theory is applied to derive the relation of mining dynamic load strain rate and stress wave parameters. The in situ test was applied to study the stress wave propagation law of coal mine dynamic load by using the SOS microseismic monitoring system. An evaluation method for mining dynamic load strain rate was proposed, and the statistical evaluation was carried out for the range of strain rate. The research results show that the loading strain rate of mining dynamic load is in direct proportion to the seismic frequency of coal-rock mass and particle peak vibration velocity and is in inverse proportion to wave velocity. The high-frequency component damps faster than the low-frequency component in the shockwave propagating process; and the peak particle vibration velocity has a power functional relationship with the transmitting distance. The loading strain rate of mining dynamic load is generally less than class 10−1/s.

  14. Delay-active damage versus non-local enhancement for anisotropic damage dynamics computations with alternated loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmorat, R.; Chambart, M.; Gatuingt, F.; Guilbaud, D.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic damage thermodynamics framework allows to model the concrete-like materials behavior and in particular their dissymmetric tension/compression response. To deal with dynamics applications such as impact, it is furthermore necessary to take into account the strain rate effect observed experimentally. This is done in the present work by means of anisotropic visco-damage, by introducing a material strain rate effect in the cases of positive hydrostatic stresses only. The proposed delay-damage law assumes no viscous effect in compression as the consideration of inertia effects proves sufficient to model the apparent material strength increase. High-rate dynamics applications imply to deal with wave propagation and reflection which can generate alternated loading in the impacted structure. In order to do so, the key concept of active damage is defined and introduced within both the damage criterion and the delay-damage evolution law. At the structural level, strain localization often leads to spurious mesh dependency. Three-dimensional Finite Element computations of dynamic tensile tests by spalling are presented, with visco-damage and either without or with non-local enhancement. Delay-damage, as introduced, regularizes the solution in fast dynamics. The location of the macro-crack initiated is found influenced by non-local regularization. The strain rate range in which each enhancement, delay-damage or non-local enhancement, has a regularizing effect is studied. (authors)

  15. Experimental study of dynamic diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord of goats under persistent compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jicun; Liu Huaijun; He Dan; Huang Boyuan; Cui Caixia; Wang Zhihong; Xu Yingjin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in spinal cord of goats with persistent compression injury. Methods: Eighteen goats weighted 20-25 kg were divided into three groups with completely random design: A, B and C. A balloon catheter was inserted into the epidural space at C3-4 level via intervertabral foramen for each goat. The balloon was inflated by injection of variable volumes of saline in group A and B 10 days following operation. The volume of saline was 0.3 ml in group A and 0.2 ml in group B, respectively. The compression sustained for 40 days. Group C served as uncompressed control without injection of saline. The locomotor rating score was applied to each group. Conventional MRI and DTI were performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)and fractional anisotropy(FA) values were measured. Histopathological assessments of the compressed spinal cord were performed 50 days following operation with light microscope and transmission electron microscopy. Results: Before operation, the locomotor rating score was 5, the ADC value was (1.23 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and the FA value was (0.72 ± 0.05) each group. Of six goats in Group A, the locomotor rating score severely decreased and reached (1.5 ± 0.4)on the 40 th day after compression. The ADC value at compression site decreased soon and reached the minimum (0.75 ± 0.04) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 5 th day after compression. Then the ADC value increased gradually, restored normal on the 10 th day or so, then became markedly higher than normal and reached (1.61±0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 40 th day. The FA value at compression site decreased soon, reached (0.54±0.04)on the 1st day, then decreased gradually and reached (0.43± 0.05) on the 40 th day. It appeared high signal intensity on T 2 WI on the 10 th day. In Group B, the locomotor rating score was moderately decreased and reached (3.4 ± 0.5) on the 40 th day. The ADC value at compression site decreased slightly

  16. Context-dependent colonization dynamics: Regional reward contagion drives local compression in aquatic beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Matthew R; Resetarits, William J

    2017-09-01

    Habitat selection by colonizing organisms is an important factor in determining species abundance and community dynamics at multiple spatial scales. Many organisms select habitat patches based on intrinsic patch quality, but patches exist in complex landscapes linked by dispersal and colonization, forming metapopulations and metacommunities. Perceived patch quality can be influenced by neighbouring patches through spatial contagion, wherein perceived quality of one patch can extend beyond its borders and either increase or decrease the colonization of neighbouring patches and localities. These spatially explicit colonization dynamics can result in habitat compression, wherein more colonists occupy a patch or locality than in the absence of spatial context dependence. Previous work on contagion/compression focused primarily on the role of predators in driving colonization patterns. Our goal was to determine whether resource abundance can drive multi-scale colonization dynamics of aquatic beetles through the processes of contagion and compression in naturally colonized experimental pools. We established two levels (high/low quality) of within-patch resource abundances (leaf litter) using an experimental landscape of mesocosms, and assayed colonization by 35 species of aquatic beetles. Patches were arranged in localities (sets of two patches), which consisted of a combination of two patch-level resource levels in a 2 × 2 factorial design, allowing us to assay colonization at both locality and patch levels. We demonstrate that patterns of species abundance and richness of colonizing aquatic beetles are determined by patch quality and context-dependent processes at multiple spatial scales. Localities that consisted of at least one high-quality patch were colonized at equivalent rates that were higher than localities containing only low-quality patches, displaying regional reward contagion. In localities that consisted of one high- and one low-quality patch, reward

  17. Dynamic strength of rock with single planar joint under various loading rates at various angles of loads applied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yun Shu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Intact rock-like specimens and specimens that include a single, smooth planar joint at various angles are prepared for split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB testing. A buffer pad between the striker bar and the incident bar of an SHPB apparatus is used to absorb some of the shock energy. This can generate loading rates of 20.2–4627.3 GPa/s, enabling dynamic peak stresses/strengths and associated failure patterns of the specimens to be investigated. The effects of the loading rate and angle of load applied on the dynamic peak stresses/strengths of the specimens are examined. Relevant experimental results demonstrate that the failure pattern of each specimen can be classified as four types: Type A, integrated with or without tiny flake-off; Type B, slide failure; Type C, fracture failure; and Type D, crushing failure. The dynamic peak stresses/strengths of the specimens that have similar failure patterns increase linearly with the loading rate, yielding high correlations that are evident on semi-logarithmic plots. The slope of the failure envelope is the smallest for slide failure, followed by crushing failure, and that of fracture failure is the largest. The magnitude of the plot slope of the dynamic peak stress against the loading rate for the specimens that are still integrated after testing is between that of slide failure and crushing failure. The angle of application has a limited effect on the dynamic peak stresses/strengths of the specimens regardless of the failure pattern, but it affects the bounds of the loading rates that yield each failure pattern, and thus influences the dynamic responses of the single jointed specimen. Slide failure occurs at the lowest loading rate of any failure, but can only occur in single jointed specimen that allows sliding. Crushing failure is typically associated with the largest loading rate, and fracture failure may occur when the loading rate is between the boundaries for slide failure and crushing

  18. Compression dynamics of quasi-spherical wire arrays with different linear mass profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanov, K. N.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Laukhin, Ya. N.; Oleinik, G. M.; Ol’khovskaya, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the implosion of quasi-spherical wire (or metalized fiber) arrays are presented. The goal of the experiments was to achieve synchronous three-dimensional compression of the plasma produced in different regions of a quasi-spherical array into its geometrical center. To search for optimal synchronization conditions, quasi-spherical arrays with different initial profiles of the linear mass were used. The following dependences of the linear mass on the poloidal angle were used: m_l(θ) ∝ sin"–"1θ and m_l(θ) ∝ sin"–"2θ. The compression dynamics of such arrays was compared with that of quasi-spherical arrays without linear mass profiling, m_l(θ) = const. To verify the experimental data, the spatiotemporal dynamics of plasma compression in quasi-spherical arrays was studied using various diagnostics. The experiments on three-dimensional implosion of quasi-spherical arrays made it possible to study how the frozen-in magnetic field of the discharge current penetrates into the array. By measuring the magnetic field in the plasma of a quasi-spherical array, information is obtained on the processes of plasma production and formation of plasma flows from the wire/fiber regions with and without an additionally deposited mass. It is found that penetration of the magnetic flux depends on the initial linear mass profile m_l(θ) of the quasi-spherical array. From space-resolved spectral measurements and frame imaging of plasma X-ray emission, information is obtained on the dimensions and shape of the X-ray source formed during the implosion of a quasi-spherical array. The intensity of this source is estimated and compared with that of the Z-pinch formed during the implosion of a cylindrical array.

  19. Bayesian model calibration of computational models in velocimetry diagnosed dynamic compression experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hund, Lauren [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are being performed on complicated materials using increasingly complex drivers. The data produced in these experiments are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down; requiring the solution of an inverse problem. A common measurement in dynamic experiments is an interface velocity as a function of time, and often this functional output can be simulated using a hydrodynamics code. Bayesian model calibration is a statistical framework to estimate inputs into a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to measurements of this type. In this article, we apply Bayesian model calibration to high pressure (250 GPa) ramp compression measurements in tantalum. We address several issues speci c to this calibration including the functional nature of the output as well as parameter and model discrepancy identi ability. Speci cally, we propose scaling the likelihood function by an e ective sample size rather than modeling the autocorrelation function to accommodate the functional output and propose sensitivity analyses using the notion of `modularization' to assess the impact of experiment-speci c nuisance input parameters on estimates of material properties. We conclude that the proposed Bayesian model calibration procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences on the equation of state parameters for tantalum.

  20. Reconstruction of tissue dynamics in the compressed breast using multiplexed measurements and temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, S. A.; Selb, J. J.; Boas, David A.

    2007-02-01

    In the course of our experiments imaging the compressed breast in conjunction with digital tomosynthesis, we have noted that significant changes in tissue optical properties, on the order of 5%, occur during our imaging protocol. These changes seem to consistent with changes both in total Hemoglobin concentration as well as in oxygen saturation, as was the case for our standalone breast compression study, which made use of reflectance measurements. Simulation experiments show the importance of taking into account the temporal dynamics in the image reconstruction, and demonstrate the possibility of imaging the spatio-temporal dynamics of oxygen saturation and total Hemoglobin in the breast. In the image reconstruction, we make use of spatio-temporal basis functions, specifically a voxel basis for spatial imaging, and a cubic spline basis in time, and we reconstruct the spatio-temporal images using the entire data set simultaneously, making use of both absolute and relative measurements in the cost function. We have modified the sequence of sources used in our imaging acquisition protocol to improve our temporal resolution, and preliminary results are shown for normal subjects.

  1. High-dynamic range compressive spectral imaging by grayscale coded aperture adaptive filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Eduardo Diaz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging system (CASSI is an imaging architecture which senses the three dimensional informa-tion of a scene with two dimensional (2D focal plane array (FPA coded projection measurements. A reconstruction algorithm takes advantage of the compressive measurements sparsity to recover the underlying 3D data cube. Traditionally, CASSI uses block-un-block coded apertures (BCA to spatially modulate the light. In CASSI the quality of the reconstructed images depends on the design of these coded apertures and the FPA dynamic range. This work presents a new CASSI architecture based on grayscaled coded apertu-res (GCA which reduce the FPA saturation and increase the dynamic range of the reconstructed images. The set of GCA is calculated in a real-time adaptive manner exploiting the information from the FPA compressive measurements. Extensive simulations show the attained improvement in the quality of the reconstructed images when GCA are employed.  In addition, a comparison between traditional coded apertures and GCA is realized with respect to noise tolerance.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Helical Pile-Soil Interaction under Compressive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, A. I.; Maksimov, F. A.

    2017-11-01

    The results of the field tests of full-scale steel helical piles in clay soils intended for prefabricated temporary buildings foundations are presented in this article. The finite element modeling was used for the evaluation of stress distribution of the clay soil around helical piles. An approach of modeling of the screw-pile geometry has been proposed through the Finite Element Analysis. Steel helical piles with a length of 2.0 m, shaft diameter of 0.108 m and a blade diameter of 0.3 m were used in the experiments. The experiments have shown the efficiency of double-bladed helical piles in the clay soils compared to single-bladed piles. It has been experimentally established that the introduction of the second blade into the pile shaft provides an increase of the bearing capacity in clay soil up to 30% compared to a single-bladed helical pile with similar geometrical dimensions. The numerical results are compared with the measurements obtained by a large scale test and the bearing capacity has been estimated. It has been found that the model results fit the field results. For a double-bladed helical pile it was revealed that shear stresses upon pile loading are formed along the lateral surface forming a cylindrical failure surface.

  3. Seismicity as dynamic load of pipes and fittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejent, B.

    1984-01-01

    The load is discussed of pipe systems and fittings for nuclear power plants which may result from earthquakes, etc. Modifications of the equation of motion are discussed which may be solved using the response spectrum method or the method of direct numerical integration. A mathematical description of both methods is given. The seismic resistance of fittings, pumps, etc., is experimentally determined by loking for their eigenfrequencies and monitoring the response of equipment to resonance oscillations. The principle is described of uniaxial hydraulic and mechanical shock absorbers and a viscous damper. The presented computation method was used for evaluating the primary circuit (Sigma Modrany) and rods for the remote control of fittings (Sigma Hodonin) supplied for the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Variants were compared of seismic protection of the primary circuit by hydraulic and mechanical shock absorbers with viscous dampers and of circuits without any protection. The unprotected system oscillates in the first harmonic, the system with shock absorbers keeps the deflections within the range of the shock absorber function (to 2 mm), and the system using viscous dampers oscillates approximately according to the first waveform with a deflection of around 11 mm. A diagram and a dynamic model are presented of a rod for the remote control of fittings. Figure shows the computation model and the response of this rod in individual time moments, both affected and not affected by play in the dilatation joint. Table shows the effect of play in the dilatation joint on deformation maxima and on rod bend stress from a symmetric load of 8g. (E.S.)

  4. Dynamics of layered reinforced concrete beam on visco-elastic foundation with different resistances of concrete and reinforcement to tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Y. V.; Tikhonov, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Originally, fundamentals of the theory of limit equilibrium and dynamic deformation of building metal and reinforced concrete structures were created by A. A. Gvozdev [1] and developed by his followers [4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12]. Forming the basis for the calculation, the model of an ideal rigid-plastic material has enabled to determine in many cases the ultimate load bearing capacity and upper (kinematically possible) or lower (statically valid) values for a wide class of different structures with quite simple methods. At the same time, applied to concrete structures the most important property of concrete to significantly differently resist tension and compression was not taken into account [10]. This circumstance was considered in [3] for reinforced concrete beams under conditions of quasistatic loading. The deformation is often accompanied by resistance of the environment in construction practice [8, 9]. In [2], the dynamics of multi-layered concrete beams on visco-elastic foundation under the loadings of explosive type is considered. In this work we consider the case which is often encountered in practical applications when the loadings weakly change in time.

  5. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  6. Web buckling behavior under in-plane compression and shear loads for web reinforced composite sandwich core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubia, Elias Anis

    Sandwich construction is one of the most functional forms of composite structures developed by the composite industry. Due to the increasing demand of web-reinforced core for composite sandwich construction, a research study is needed to investigate the web plate instability under shear, compression, and combined loading. If the web, which is an integral part of the three dimensional web core sandwich structure, happens to be slender with respect to one or two of its spatial dimensions, then buckling phenomena become an issue in that it must be quantified as part of a comprehensive strength model for a fiber reinforced core. In order to understand the thresholds of thickness, web weight, foam type, and whether buckling will occur before material yielding, a thorough investigation needs to be conducted, and buckling design equations need to be developed. Often in conducting a parametric study, a special purpose analysis is preferred over a general purpose analysis code, such as a finite element code, due to the cost and effort usually involved in generating a large number of results. A suitable methodology based on an energy method is presented to solve the stability of symmetrical and specially orthotropic laminated plates on an elastic foundation. Design buckling equations were developed for the web modeled as a laminated plate resting on elastic foundations. The proposed equations allow for parametric studies without limitation regarding foam stiffness, geometric dimensions, or mechanical properties. General behavioral trends of orthotropic and symmetrical anisotropic plates show pronounced contribution of the elastic foundation and fiber orientations on the buckling resistance of the plate. The effects of flexural anisotropy on the buckling behavior of long rectangular plates when subjected to pure shear loading are well represented in the model. The reliability of the buckling equations as a design tool is confirmed by comparison with experimental results

  7. An Experimental Study of Circular Cutout Hole Effect of Kevlar/epoxy-Al2O3 Composite under Subjected to Quasi-Static Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad Abed Ramadhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper has presented an experimental study of quasi-static compressive and tensile loading of cutout hole specimens of Kevlar-29/epoxy-Al2O3 laminated composite. The experimental procedure hasbeen developed to study the performance of (50%, 55% and 60% volume fraction (vf and (0o/90o and +45o/-45o fiber orientation angle effects of these composites under quasi-static tensile and compressiveload using a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The study was concluded that the ultimate load capacity increases as volume fraction increases in tensile test. While, the maximum load bearing capacity increaseswith the decrease of volume fraction in compression test. Hence, from the results obtained it can have considered the 55% volume fraction of composite panels is a good value for tensile and compressionapplications.

  8. Dynamic behaviors of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass under ramp wave and shock wave loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binqiang Luo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behaviors of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 bulk metallic glass were investigated using electric gun and magnetically driven isentropic compression device which provide shock and ramp wave loading respectively. Double-wave structure was observed under shock compression while three-wave structure was observed under ramp compression in 0 ∼ 18GPa. The HEL of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 is 8.97 ± 0.61GPa and IEL is 8.8 ± 0.3GPa, respectively. Strength of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 estimated from HEL is 5.0 ± 0.3GPa while the strength estimated from IEL is 3.6 ± 0.1GPa. Shock wave velocity versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under shock compression appears to be bilinear and a kink appears at about 18GPa. The Lagrangian sound speed versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under ramp wave compression exhibits two discontinuances and are divided to three regions: elastic, plastic-I and plastic-II. The first jump-down occurs at elastic-plastic transition and the second appears at about 17GPa. In elastic and plastic-I regions, Lagrangian sound speed increases linearly with particle velocity, respectively. Characteristic response of sound speed in plastic-I region disagree with shock result in the same pressure region(7GPa ∼ 18GPa, but is consistent with shock result at higher pressure(18-110GPa.

  9. Cooperation of axisymmetric connection elements under dynamic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołodziej Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method for determining the parameters that define the cooperation of the elements in the axisymmetic connection. The connection, which constitutes a shaft cooperating with a sleeve, has been tested for reaction forces in the connection during shaft rotation in the static sleeve. The shaft was characterized by deliberately modelled roundness deviations in the form of ovality, triangularity and quadrangularity. In addition, the research programme has taken into account the determination of the impact of tolerance of the outside diameter of the shaft. Determination of reaction forces has been carried out using the FEM software. The shaft has been modelled as a rigid element that rotates with a given rotational speed in the deformable sleeve. The conclusions present the impact of roundness deviation types and the tolerance value on reaction forces in the connection restraint. The method presented in the article can be used to predict the behaviour of the elements of axisymmetic connections under dynamic load, which can contribute to forecasting the durability of the connection.

  10. Response of borehole extensometers to explosively generated dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, W.C.; Brough, W.G.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially available, hydraulically anchored, multiple-point borehole extensometers (MPBX) were evaluated with respect to response to dynamic loads produced by explosions. This study is part of the DOE-funded Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C), currently being conducted in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. The SFT-C is an investigation of the feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel assemblies at a plausible repository depth in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies are stored at a depth of 420 m for three to five years, and will then be retrieved. MPBX units are used in the SFT-C to measure both excavation-induced and thermally induced rock displacements. Long-term reliability of extensometers in this hostile environment is essential in order to obtain valid data during the course of this test. Research to date shows conclusively that extensometers of this type continue to function reliably even though subjected to accelerations of 1.8 g; research also implies that they function well though subjected to accelerations in excess of 100 g. MPBX survivability during the first four months of testing at ambient temperatures was about 90 percent

  11. Effects of moving dynamic tyre loads on tyre-pavement contact stresses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to indicate the effect that moving dynamic tyre loads has on the tyre-pavement contact stresses used in pavement analysis. Traditionally tyre loads (in pavement analysis) are modelled as constant loads applied through...

  12. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capatina, D., E-mail: capatina@aps.anl.gov; D’Amico, K., E-mail: kdamico@aps.anl.gov; Nudell, J., E-mail: jnudell@aps.anl.gov; Collins, J., E-mail: collins@aps.anl.gov; Schmidt, O., E-mail: oschmidt@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm{sup 2}. A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm{sup 2}. A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  13. Electric-gun studies of conductors in high magnetic fields and experiments in dynamic flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osher, J.E.; Chau, H.H.; Lee, R.S.; Tipton, R.E.; Weingart, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Electric guns operate by discharging a fast capacitor bank through a thin, metallic bridge-foil load. The explosion of the foil and the accompanying magnetic forces acting on the bridge-foil plasma accelerate a thin flyer plate of dielectric material initially placed on top of the bridge foil. In hypervelocity impact studies with the linear electric gun, a thin, flat flyer is punched out of a cover sheet of dielectric (or dielectric/metallic composite) material by the explosion of the bridge foil and accelerated down a short barrel to impact on a target. In the coaxial gun, a cylindrical bridge foil is used to implode a cylindrical dielectric or dielectric/metallic composite (liner) flyer to produce a high peak compression through axial convergence. In this paper the authors discuss the range of currents, their rate of rise, and the magnetic fields attained by their fast capacitor banks, which supply power to the electric gun to explode the bridge foil. Also included is a study of the change of resistance of the bridge-foil element as a function of time for various flyer mass loadings for the linear geometry of the gun

  14. Fracto-mechanoluminescent light emission of EuD4TEA-PDMS composites subjected to high strain-rate compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Kimberley, Jamie

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to understand light emission characteristics of fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) europium tetrakis(dibenzoylmethide)-triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. As a sensing material that can play a pivotal role for the self-powered impact sensor technology, it is important to understand transformative light emission characteristics of the FML EuD4TEA crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. First, EuD4TEA crystals were synthesized and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to fabricate EuD4TEA-PDMS composite test specimens. Second, the prepared EuD4TEA-PDMS composites were tested using the modified Kolsky bar setup equipped with a high-speed camera. Third, FML light emission was captured to yield 12 bit grayscale video footage, which was processed to quantify the FML light emission. Finally, quantitative parameters were generated by taking into account pixel values and population of pixels of the 12 bit grayscale images to represent FML light intensity. The FML light intensity was correlated with high strain-rate compressive strain and strain rate to understand the FML light emission characteristics under high strain-rate compressive loading that can result from impact occurrences.

  15. Experimental evaluation of the effect of compression ratio on performance and emission of SI engine fuelled with gasoline and n-butanol blend at different loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinu Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Never ending demand for efficient and less polluting engines have always inspired newer technologies. Extensive study has been done on variable compression ratio, a promising in-cylinder technology, in the recent past. The present work is an experimental investigation to examine the variation of different parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, exhaust gas temperature and emissions with respect to change in compression ratio in a single-cylinder carbureted SI engine at different loads with two different fuels. Experiments were conducted at three different compression ratios (CR = 7:1, 8.5:1 and 10:1. The fuels used in this study are pure gasoline and 20% n-butanol blend (B20 in gasoline. The results showed that brake thermal efficiency increases with CR at all loads. Further, the experimental results showed the scope of improving the part-load efficiency of SI engine by adopting the concept of variable compression ratio (VCR technology, especially when fuels with better anti-knock characteristics are used. The uncertainty analysis of the experiments based on the specifications of the equipment used is also tabulated.

  16. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Sook; Shin, Soo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at ...

  17. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  18. Transport in aluminized RDX under shock compression explored using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losada, M; Chaudhuri, S

    2014-01-01

    Shock response of energetic materials is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal, transport, and chemical properties. How these properties interplay in condensed-phase energetic materials is of fundamental interest for improving predictive capabilities. Due to unknown nature of chemistry during the evolution and growth of high-temperature regions within the energetic material (so called hot spots), the connection between reactive and unreactive equations of state contain a high degree of empiricism. In particular, chemistry in materials with high degree of heterogeneity such as aluminized HE is of interest. In order to identify shock compression states and transport properties in high-pressure/temperature (HP-HT) conditions, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction with the multi-scale shock technique (MSST). Mean square displacement calculations enabled us to track the diffusivity of stable gas products. Among decomposition products, H 2 O and CO 2 are found to be the dominant diffusing species under compression conditions. Heat transport and diffusion rates in decomposed RDX are compared and the comparison shows that around 2000 K, transport can be a major contribution during propagation of the reaction front.

  19. Compression and release dynamics of an active matter system of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Amy; Tsang, Alan C. H.; Ouellette, Nicholas; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    Active matter, defined as ensembles of self-propelled particles, encompasses a large variety of systems at all scales, from nanoparticles to bird flocks. Though various models and simulations have been created to describe the dynamics of these systems, experimental verification has been difficult to obtain. This is frequently due to the complex interaction rules which govern the particle behavior, in turn making systematic varying of parameters impossible. Here, we propose a model for predicting the system evolution of compression and release of an active system based on experiments and simulations. In particular, we consider ensembles of the unicellular, photo-responsive algae, Euglena gracilis, under light stimulation. By varying the spatiotemporal light patterns, we are able to finely adjust cell densities and achieve arbitrary non-homogeneous distributions, including compression into high-density aggregates of varying geometries. We observe the formation of depletion zones after the release of the confining stimulus and investigate the effects of the density distribution and particle rotational noise on the depletion. These results provide implications for defining state parameters which determine system evolution.

  20. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-03-22

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete.

  1. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete. PMID:29565830

  2. Anisotropic deformation behavior of as-extruded 6063-T4 alloy under dynamic impact loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Tuo [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Luoxing, E-mail: luoxing_li@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Joint Center for Intelligent New Energy Vehicle, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Liu, Xiao; Liu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of High Temperature Wear Resistant Materials Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Guo, Pengcheng; Tang, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-06-01

    The deformation behavior of 6063-T4 aluminum alloy bar was investigated by compression tests conducted at a wide strain rate range of 10{sup −4} to 9×10{sup 3} s{sup −1} with loading directions at 0°, 45° and 90° to the axis of the extruded bar. It is found that the flow stresses of 0° specimens are always the highest and those of the 45° specimens are the lowest at the same conditions. The flow stress exhibits obvious strain rate sensitivity (SRS), which differs from static to dynamic deformation. The Schmid factors (SFs) for each type of texture components were calculated. For the {112}<111> texture component, the max Schmid factors are 0.27, 0.49 and 0.41 for 0°, 45° and 90° specimens. For the {110}<111> texture component, they are 0.27, 0.43 and 0.41 for the three directions. The initial texture changes significantly with increasing strain, the strain rate has slight influence on the texture evolution. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations indicate that as the strain rate increases, the density of the dislocation increases and its distribution becomes more homogeneous. It is necessary to consider the anisotropic deformation behavior and microstructure evolution in material selection and structure design for the impact components.

  3. Bagheera: A new experimental facility at Cea / Valduc for actinides studies under high dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Lanier, G.; Lamalle, S.; Beaulieu, J.; Antoine, P.; Martinuzzi, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a technical presentation about a new experimental facility recently developed at CEA/Valduc, BAGHEERA, a French acronym for 'Hopkinson And High Speed Experiments Glove Box'. This facility is used since mid-2003 to characterize the physical and mechanical behaviour of actinides under high dynamic loadings. For this purpose, four basic experimental devices are confined inside a single 10 m long, 3 m high and 1.5 m large glove box: a 50 mm bore diameter single stage light gas gun, two compression and torsion split Hopkinson bars (SHPB and TSHB respectively) and a Taylor test device (TTD). A unique highly automated system drives all devices. The overall architecture of the facility takes into account the useful ability to carry out symmetrical and reverse experiments with the gas gun, that is actinide to actinide impact and actinide to inert material impact. Design and technical data on the experimental equipment are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the gas gun specific features due to actinide applications

  4. Using Gait Dynamics to Estimate Load from a Body-Worn Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-05

    dynamics, ambulation, correlation structure, musculoskeletal injury I. INTRODUCTION ilitary personnel commonly engage in training and operational...according to their load estimation accuracy, which is defined by the Pearson correlation , r, of its load estimates with the true loads (see Tables...method. In Table IV are shown the mean absolute error, MAE, and Pearson correlation , r, of the load estimates using estimates from GS alone, PLS alone

  5. High-speed photographic methods for compression dynamics investigation of laser irradiated shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Kologrivov, A.A.; Krokhin, O.N.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Three methods are described for a high-speed diagnostics of compression dynamics of shell targets being spherically laser-heated on the installation ''Kal'mar''. The first method is based on the direct investigation of the space-time evolution of the critical-density region for Nd-laser emission (N sub(e) asymptotically equals 10 21 I/cm 3 ) by means of the streak photography of plasma image in the second-harmonic light. The second method involves investigation of time evolution of the second-harmonic spectral distribution by means of a spectrograph coupled with a streak camera. The use of a special laser pulse with two time-distributed intensity maxima for the irradiation of shell targets, and the analysis of the obtained X-ray pin-hole pictures constitute the basis of the third method. (author)

  6. Theoretical analysis of the dynamic interactions of vapor compression heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, J W

    1984-01-01

    A detailed mathematical model of vapor compression heat pumps is described. Model derivations of the various heat pump components are given. The component models include the condenser, evaporator, accumulator, expansion device, and compressor. Details of the modeling techniques are presented, as is the solution methodology. Preliminary simulation results are also illustrated. The model developed predicts the spatial values of temperature and enthalpy as functions of time for the two heat exchangers. The temperatures and enthalpies in the accumulator, compressor and expansion device are modeled in lumped-parameter fashion. Pressure responses are determined by using continuity satisfying models for both the condenser and evaporator. The discussion of the solution methodology describes the combined implicit/explicit integration formulation that is used to solve the governing equations. The summary provides a list of future work anticipated in the area of dynamic heat pump modeling.

  7. Temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of commercially pure titanium by the compression test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su Min; Seo, Song Won; Park, Kyoung Joon; Min, Oak Key

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Commercially Pure Titanium (CP-Ti) is investigated at high temperature Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) compression test with high strain-rate. Tests are performed over a temperature range from room temperature to 1000 .deg. C with interval of 200 deg. C and a strain-rate range of 1900∼2000/sec. The true flow stress-true strain relations depending on temperature are achieved in these tests. For construction of constitutive equation from the true flow stress-true strain relation, parameters for the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is determined. And the modified Johnson-Cook equation is used for investigation of behavior of flow stress in vicinity of recrystallization temperature. The modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is more suitable in expressing the dynamic behavior of a CP-Ti at high temperature, i.e. about recrystallization temperature

  8. Effects of applied stress ratio on the fatigue behavior of additively manufactured porous biomaterials under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Krijger, Joep; Rans, Calvin; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Lietaert, Karel; Pouran, Behdad; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2017-06-01

    Additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials are considered promising candidates for bone substitution. In particular, AM porous titanium can be designed to exhibit mechanical properties similar to bone. There is some experimental data available in the literature regarding the fatigue behavior of AM porous titanium, but the effect of stress ratio on the fatigue behavior of those materials has not been studied before. In this paper, we study the effect of applied stress ratio on the compression-compression fatigue behavior of selective laser melted porous titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) based on the diamond unit cell. The porous titanium biomaterial is treated as a meta-material in the context of this work, meaning that R-ratios are calculated based on the applied stresses acting on a homogenized volume. After morphological characterization using micro computed tomography and quasi-static mechanical testing, the porous structures were tested under cyclic loading using five different stress ratios, i.e. R = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.8, to determine their S-N curves. Feature tracking algorithms were used for full-field deformation measurements during the fatigue tests. It was observed that the S-N curves of the porous structures shift upwards as the stress ratio increases. The stress amplitude was the most important factor determining the fatigue life. Constant fatigue life diagrams were constructed and compared with similar diagrams for bulk Ti-6Al-4V. Contrary to the bulk material, there was limited dependency of the constant life diagrams to mean stress. The notches present in the AM biomaterials were the sites of crack initiation. This observation and other evidence suggest that the notches created by the AM process cause the insensitivity of the fatigue life diagrams to mean stress. Feature tracking algorithms visualized the deformation during fatigue tests and demonstrated the root cause of inclined (45°) planes of specimen failure. In conclusion, the R

  9. Dynamic restoration mechanism and physically based constitutive model of 2050 Al–Li alloy during hot compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruihua; Liu, Qing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Jinfeng, E-mail: lijinfeng@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiang, Sheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Yonglai; Zhang, Xuhu [Aerospace Research Institute of Materials and Processing Technology, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2015-11-25

    Dynamic restoration mechanism of 2050 Al–Li alloy and its constitutive model were investigated by means of hot compression simulation in the deformation temperature ranging from 340 to 500 °C and at strain rates of 0.001–10 s{sup −1}. The microstructures of the compressed samples were observed using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. On the base of dislocation density theory and Avrami kinetics, a physically based constitutive model was established. The results show that dynamic recovery (DRV) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) are co-responsible for the dynamic restoration during the hot compression process under all compression conditions. The dynamic precipitation (DPN) of T1 and σ phases was observed after the deformation at 340 °C. This is the first experimental evidence for the DPN of σ phase in Al–Cu–Li alloys. The particle stimulated nucleation of DRX (PSN-DRX) due to the large Al–Cu–Mn particle was also observed. The error analysis suggests that the established constitutive model can adequately describe the flow stress dependence on strain rate, temperature and strain during the hot deformation process. - Highlights: • The experimental evidence for the DPN of σ phase in Al–Cu–Li alloys was found. • The PSN-DRX due to the large Al–Cu–Mn particle was observed. • A novel method was proposed to calculated the stress multiplier α.

  10. Dynamic compression of human and ovine meniscal tissue compared with a potential thermoplastic elastomer hydrogel replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M; Boncella, Katie; Lewis, Jackson T; Bailey, Travis S; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how human meniscal tissue responds to loading regimes mimetic of daily life as well as how it compares to larger animal models is critical in the development of a functionally accurate synthetic surrogate. Seven human and eight ovine cadaveric meniscal specimens were regionally sectioned into cylinders 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick along with 10 polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide block copolymer-based thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) hydrogels. Samples were compressed to 12% strain at 1 Hz for 5000 cycles, unloaded for 24 h, and then retested. No differences were found within each group between test one and test two. Human and ovine tissue exhibited no regional dependency (p Human samples relaxed quicker than ovine tissue or the TPE hydrogel with modulus values at cycle 50 not significantly different from cycle 5000. Ovine menisci were found to be similar to human menisci in relaxation profile but had significantly higher modulus values (3.44 MPa instantaneous and 0.61 MPa after 5000 cycles compared with 1.97 and 0.11 MPa found for human tissue) and significantly different power law fit coefficients. The TPE hydrogel had an initial modulus of 0.58 MPa and experienced less than a 20% total relaxation over the 5000. Significant differences in the magnitude of compressive modulus between human and ovine menisci were observed, however the relaxation profiles were similar. Although statistically different than the native tissues, modulus values of the TPE hydrogel material were similar to those of the human and ovine menisci, making it a material worth further investigation for use as a synthetic replacement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2722-2728, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of dynamic loading of motor-operated valve actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, P.S.; Daubresse, S.; Wolfe, K.J.; Dogan, T.; Gleeson, J.

    1994-01-01

    Experience has shown that valves with rising, nonrotating stems that are operated using electro-motor driven actuators can be susceptible to changes in output thrust at a constant torque switch setting as a result of changes in stem load time history. This effect is a concern because tests on these types of valves to verify thrust achieved at torque switch trip are often performed in situ under load conditions different from the required performance conditions. As part of a motor-operated valve research program being carried out by the Electric Power Research Institute, tests of typical electric motor actuators used with nuclear services valves have been performed. The test results show that changes in output thrust with load time history occur o varying degrees on different stem and stem nut combinations. When the effect exists, there is generally an increase in thrust at torque switch trip when load is developed rapidly from low initial loads, compared to when load is developed slowly. The effect is mainly a result of changes in the coefficient of friction at the stem-stem nut interface. The coefficient of friction is temporarily reduced under rapid loading conditions from low initial load, leading to increased thrust. The root cause is hypothesized to be a open-quotes squeeze-filmclose quotes effect, whereby mixed-mode lubrication (hydrodynamic plus boundary) temporarily replaces boundary lubrication. This paper describes the results of tests performed to better understand the phenomenon

  12. Damage evolution analysis in mortar, during compressive loading using acoustic emission and X-ray tomography: Effects of the sand/cement ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaqra, H.; Godin, N.; Peix, G.; R'Mili, M.; Fantozzi, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the use of acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray tomography to identify the mechanisms of damage and the fracture process during compressive loading on concrete specimens. Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomography image analysis was used to observe defects of virgin mortar specimen under different compressive loads. Cumulative AE events were used to evaluate damage process in real time according to the sand/cement ratio. This work shows that AE and X-ray tomography are complementary nondestructive methods to measure, characterise and locate damage sites in mortar. The effect of the sand proportion on damage and fracture behaviour is studied, in relation with the microstructure of the material

  13. An Applied Method for Predicting the Load-Carrying Capacity in Compression of Thin-Wall Composite Structures with Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, O.; Pavelko, I.; Varickis, S.; Vagele, A.

    2018-03-01

    The necessity for considering both strength criteria and postbuckling effects in calculating the load-carrying capacity in compression of thin-wall composite structures with impact damage is substantiated. An original applied method ensuring solution of these problems with an accuracy sufficient for practical design tasks is developed. The main advantage of the method is its applicability in terms of computing resources and the set of initial data required. The results of application of the method to solution of the problem of compression of fragments of thin-wall honeycomb panel damaged by impacts of various energies are presented. After a comparison of calculation results with experimental data, a working algorithm for calculating the reduction in the load-carrying capacity of a composite object with impact damage is adopted.

  14. Dynamic Axle Load of an Automotive Vehicle When Driven on a Mobile Measurement Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiełowicz-Ryznar C.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamic axle load of an automotive vehicle (AV) when it is driven on a mobile measurement platform is presented in this paper. During the ride, the time characteristic of the dynamic force N(t), acting on the axle, was recorded. The effect of the vehicle axle mass on the maximum dynamic force value and the dynamic coefficient were studied. On this basis it was attempted to calculate the total vehicle’s weight. Conclusions concerning the dynamic loads of the vehicle axles in...

  15. Hysteresis model of shape memory alloy wire-based laminated rubber bearing under compression and unidirectional shear loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F; Alam, M Shahria

    2015-01-01

    Smart lead rubber bearings (LRBs), in which a shape memory alloy (SMA) is used in the form of wires, are a new generation of elastomeric isolators with improved performance in terms of recentering capability and energy dissipation capacity. It is of great interest to implement SMA wire-based lead rubber bearings (SMA-LRBs) in bridges; however, currently there is no appropriate hysteresis model for accurately simulating the behavior of such isolators. A constitutive model for SMA-LRBs is proposed in this study. An LRB is equipped with a double cross configuration of SMA wires (DC-SMAW) and subjected to compression and unidirectional shear loadings. Due to the complexity of the shear behavior of the SMA-LRB, a hysteresis model is developed for the DC-SMAWs and then combined with the bilinear kinematic hardening model, which is assumed for the LRB. Comparing the hysteretic response of decoupled systems with that of the SMA-LRB shows that the high recentering capability of the DC-SMAW model with zero residual deformation could noticeably reduce the residual deformation of the LRB. The developed constitutive model for DC-SMAWs is characterized by three stiffnesses when the shear strain exceeds a starting limit at which the SMA wires are activated due to phase transformation. An important point is that the shear hysteresis of the DC-SMAW model looks different from the flag-shaped hysteresis of the SMA because of the specific arrangement of wires and its effect on the resultant forces transferred from the wires to the rubber bearing. (paper)

  16. Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering using Elitism based Random Immigrant Genetic Approach for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohaideen Pitchai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN consists of a large number of small sensors with restricted energy. Prolonged network lifespan, scalability, node mobility and load balancing are important needs for several WSN applications. Clustering the sensor nodes is an efficient technique to reach these goals. WSN have the characteristics of topology dynamics because of factors like energy conservation and node movement that leads to Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering Problem (DLBCP. In this paper, Elitism based Random Immigrant Genetic Approach (ERIGA is proposed to solve DLBCP which adapts to topology dynamics. ERIGA uses the dynamic Genetic Algorithm (GA components for solving the DLBCP. The performance of load balanced clustering process is enhanced with the help of this dynamic GA. As a result, the ERIGA achieves to elect suitable cluster heads which balances the network load and increases the lifespan of the network.

  17. Effect of loading rate on dynamic fracture of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Wedge-loaded, modified tapered double cantilever beam (WL-MTDCB) specimens under impact loading were used to determine the room temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). The crack extension history, with the exception of the terminal phase, was similar to that obtained under static loading. Like its static counterpart, a distinct crack acceleration phase, which was not observed in dynamic fracture of steel and brittle polymers, was noted. Unlike its static counterpart, the crack continued to propagate at nearly its terminal velocity under a low dynamic stress intensity factor during the terminal phase of crack propagation. These and previously obtained results for glass and RBSN show that dynamic crack arrest under a positive dynamic stress intensity factor is unlikely in static and impact loaded structural ceramics.

  18. Intelligibility and Clarity of Reverberant Speech: Effects of Wide Dynamic Range Compression Release Time and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Paul N.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of varying wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) release time on intelligibility and clarity of reverberant speech. The study also considered the role of individual working memory. Method: Thirty older listeners with mild to moderately-severe sloping sensorineural hearing loss…

  19. Dynamic backcalculation with different load-time histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Stine Skov; Levenberg, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    This paper focused attention to the falling weight deflectometer (FWD) load-time history. For a commonly used device, it studied the pulse generation mechanism and the influence of different load histories on backcalculation results. In this connection, a semi-analytic impact theory was first...... for an experimental dataset that resulted from operating an FWD with different loading configurations. It was found that backcalculated parameters are sensitive to the FWD pulse features. Consequently, it is recommended that, whenever advanced pavement characterisation is sought, experimental attention should...

  20. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Iverson, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  1. Static and dynamic balance performance in patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Yi; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Huang, Yu-Chi; Lau, Yiu-Chung; Leong, Chau-Peng; Pong, Ya-Ping; Chen, Chia-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF) have postural changes and increased risk of falling. The aim of this study is to compare balance characteristics between patients with OVCF and healthy control subjects. Patients with severe OVCF and control subjects underwent computerised dynamic posturography (CDP) in this case-control study. Forty-seven OVCF patients and 45 controls were recruited. Compared with the control group, the OVCF group had significantly decreased average stability; maximal stability under the `eye open with swayed support surface' (CDP subtest 4) and 'eye closed with swayed support surface' conditions (subtest 5); and decreased ankle strategy during subtests 4 and 5 and under the `swayed vision with swayed support surface' condition (subtest 6). The OVCF group fell more frequently during subtests 5 and 6 and had longer overall reaction time and longer reaction time when moving backward during the directional control test. OVCF patients had poorer static and dynamic balance performance compared with normal control. They had decreased postural stability and ankle strategy with increased fall frequency on a swayed surface; they also had longer reaction times overall and in the backward direction. Therefore, we suggest balance rehabilitation for patients with OVCF to prevent fall.

  2. Simultaneous broadband laser ranging and photonic Doppler velocimetry for dynamic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Marshall, B. R.; Miller, E. K.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Veeser, L. R. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    A diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure both the distance and velocity of rapidly moving surfaces in dynamic compression experiments, specifically non-planar experiments where integrating the velocity in one direction does not always give the material position accurately. The diagnostic is constructed mainly from fiber-optic telecommunications components. The distance measurement is based on a technique described by Xia and Zhang [Opt. Express 18, 4118 (2010)], which determines the target distance every 20 ns and is independent of the target speed. We have extended the full range of the diagnostic to several centimeters to allow its use in dynamic experiments, and we multiplexed it with a photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) system so that distance and velocity histories can be measured simultaneously using one fiber-optic probe. The diagnostic was demonstrated on a spinning square cylinder to show how integrating a PDV record can give an incorrect surface position and how the ranging diagnostic described here obtains it directly. The diagnostic was also tested on an explosive experiment where copper fragments and surface ejecta were identified in both the distance and velocity signals. We show how the distance measurements complement the velocity data. Potential applications are discussed.

  3. Shock absorbing properties of toroidal shells under compression, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    The author has previously presented the static load-deflection relations of a toroidal shell subjected to axisymmetric compression between rigid plates and those of its outer half when subjected to lateral compression. In both these cases, the analytical method was based on the incremental Rayleigh-Ritz method. In this paper, the effects of compression angle and strain rate on the load-deflection relations of the toroidal shell are investigated for its use as a shock absorber for the radioactive material shipping cask which must keep its structural integrity even after accidental falls at any angle. Static compression tests have been carried out at four angles of compression, 10 0 , 20 0 , 50 0 , 90 0 and the applications of the preceding analytical method have been discussed. Dynamic compression tests have also been performed using the free-falling drop hammer. The results are compared with those in the static compression tests. (author)

  4. Numerical Analysis of Joule Heating Behavior and Residual Compressive Stress around Crack Tip under High Electric Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jin-Chee Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the Joule heating effect and residual compressive stress near the crack tip under the electro-thermo-structural coupling state. For the crack tip field, the compressive condition is important for retarding or stopping the crack growth.

  5. Dynamic modeling and analysis of load sharing characteristics of wind turbine gearbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxing Yi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A coupled dynamic model, which contains helical gears-shafts-bearings for a wind turbine gearbox transmission system, was built considering nonlinear factors of the time-varying mesh stiffness, the external varying load, and the dynamic transmission error at first. The model is confirmed to be right after comparing the theoretical data with the experimental load sharing values, and also it is found that the static load sharing is conservative to evaluate the non-equilibrium effect of a planetary gear system. Besides, the analyzing results of the influence of average error and amplitude error on the load sharing show that the load sharing could be decreased if the error goes up a little. Then, by means of treating the static tracing point as the dynamic initial values, we analyzed the initial position’s influence on the load sharing of transmission system to provide a theoretical basis of load sharing control. Furthermore, we explored the influence of high-speed shaft position angle on the load sharing and the dynamic load factor of gears fixed on the parallel shafts. The results provide useful theoretical guidelines for the design of parallel shaft gear system in the wind turbines.

  6. Testing for time-varying loadings in dynamic factor models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jakob Guldbæk

    Abstract: In this paper we develop a test for time-varying factor loadings in factor models. The test is simple to compute and is constructed from estimated factors and residuals using the principal components estimator. The hypothesis is tested by regressing the squared residuals on the squared...... there is evidence of time-varying loadings on the risk factors underlying portfolio returns for around 80% of the portfolios....

  7. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    on the magnitude of the resulting response. A frequency representation of vertical pedestrian load is developed, and a compact explicit formula is developed for the magnitude of the resulting response, in terms of the damping ratio of the structure, the bandwidth of the pedestrian load, and the mean footfall...... frequency. The accuracy of the formula is verified by a statistical moment analysis using the Lyapunov equations....

  8. Dynamic MR cholangiography after fatty meal loading. Cystic contractility and dynamic evaluation of biliary stasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omata, Takayuki; Saito, Kazuhiro; Kotake, Fumio; Mizokami, Yuji; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Abe, Kimihiko

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic MR cholangiography was conducted on patients with cholelithiasis or choledocholithiasis who had consumed a fatty test meal (Molyork) and the cystic contractility and dynamics of biliary stasis was evaluated. The subjects were 25 with intracystic cholelithiasis, 10 with choledocholithiasis and 10 normal controls. For an imaging sequence, the rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) method was employed and imaging was conducted for 40 min (every 30 s following Molyork administration) without breath-holding. The gallbladder contraction ratio was computed and the contractile ratio for the common bile duct was calculated. To determine the bile flow to the duodenum, the high-intensity signal, indicating the flow from the lower common bile duct, and perfusion of the duodenum were observed in dynamic mode on the monitor with the naked eye and interpreted as positive bile flow. The frequency of this flow was visually monitored. The gallbladder contractile ratio was significantly reduced in patients with cholelithiasis or choledocholithiasis compared with the controls. In a comparison with the normal controls, no sequential changes were noted in the mean contractile ratio of the common bile duct of the patients with cholelithiasis or choledocholithiasis. The mean frequency of bile flow observed for each 40 min period was 13±2.4, 6±2.2, and 4±1.3 times for the controls, those with intracystic cholelithiasis, and those with choledocholithiasis, respectively. Compared with the controls, the latter two patient groups showed evident reductions in the frequency of bile flow to the duodenum (p<0.001). Dynamic MRC combined with Molyork loading makes it possible to compute cystic contractile ratios and perform a dynamic examination of bile flow under non-invasive, near-physiological conditions. (author)

  9. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners’ spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes—independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and “spatially ideal......” compression operating solely on the dry source signal—were considered using virtualized speech and noise bursts. Listeners indicated the location and extent of their perceived sound images on the horizontal plane. Linear processing was considered as the reference condition. The results showed that both...... independent and linked compression resulted in more diffuse and broader sound images as well as internalization and image splits, whereby more image splits were reported for the noise bursts than for speech. Only the spatially ideal compression provided the listeners with a spatial percept similar...

  10. DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING SUBHASISH MOHANTY*, ADITI CHATTOPADHYAY, JOHN N. RAJADAS, AND CLYDE...

  11. Testing of tunnel support: dynamic load testing of rock support containment systems (eg wire mesh).

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ortlepp, WD

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project was to determine the performance characteristics of containment elements of tunnel support in common use in South African mines under dynamic loading. The magnitude of the energy levels in this testing had...

  12. Quality of computerized blast load simulation for non-linear dynamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of computerized blast load simulation for non-linear dynamic response ... commercial software system and a special-purpose, blast-specific software product to ... depend both on the analysis model of choice and the stand-off distances.

  13. Dynamic analysis of scraper conveyor operation with external loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świder Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A load to an armoured face conveyor (AFC during coal mining is changeable and very difficult or even impossible to be predicted. Changes of the load to the upper scraper chain affect the load of the driving motor and generate changes in a scraper chain tension. Impact of increasing the external load to the upper scraper chain on the operation of electric motors and on the scraper chain tension is presented. The developed numerical model of the Rybnik 850 conveyor enabled identifying the places of the scraper chain high tension or places of its loosening. An impact of changing frequency of driving motor voltage on AFC’s operational conditions was tested and analysed using the AFC’s numerical model. During tests, tension of the scraper chain on the discharge end and the return end was recorded. High tension of the scraper chain and its loosening during the changeable load were also recorded on upward and downward transportation of run-of-mine material.

  14. Dynamic axle and wheel loads identification: laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. Q.; Law, S. S.

    2003-12-01

    Two methods have been reported by Zhu and Law to identify moving loads on the top of a bridge deck. One is based on the exact solution (ESM) and the other is based on the finite element formulation (FEM). Simulation studies on the effect of different influencing factors have been reported previously. This paper comparatively studies the performances of these two methods with experimental measurements obtained from a bridge/vehicle system in the laboratory. The strains of the bridge deck are measured when a model car moves across the bridge deck along different paths. The moving loads on the bridge deck are identified from the measured strains using these two methods, and the responses are reconstructed from the identified loads for comparison with the measured responses to verify the performances of these methods. Studies on the identification accuracy due to the effect of the number of vibration mode used, the number of measuring points and eccentricities of travelling paths are performed. Results show that the ESM could identify the moving loads individually or as axle loads when they are travelling at an eccentricity with the sensors located close to the travelling path of the forces. And the accuracy of the FEM is dependent on the amount of measured information used in the identification.

  15. The dynamic response and perturbation of magnetic field vector of orthotropic cylinders under various shock loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, H.L.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical method is introduced to solve the problem for the dynamic stress-focusing and centred-effect of perturbation of the magnetic field vector in orthotropic cylinders under thermal and mechanical shock loads. Analytical expressions for the dynamic stresses and the perturbation of the magnetic field vector are obtained by means of finite Hankel transforms and Laplace transforms. The response histories of dynamic stresses and the perturbation of the field vector are also obtained. In practical examples, the dynamic focusing effect on both magnetoelastic stress and perturbation of the axial magnetic field vector in an orthotropic cylinder subjected to various shock loads is presented and discussed

  16. The Influence of External Load on Quadriceps Muscle and Tendon Dynamics during Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2017-11-01

    Tendons possess both viscous (rate-dependent) and elastic (rate-independent) properties that determine tendon function. During high-speed movements external loading increases both the magnitude (FT) and rate (RFDT) of tendon loading. The influence of external loading on muscle and tendon dynamics during maximal vertical jumping was explored. Ten resistance-trained men performed parallel-depth, countermovement vertical jumps with and without additional load (0%, 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum squat lift strength), while joint kinetics and kinematics, quadriceps tendon length (LT) and patellar tendon FT and RFDT were estimated using integrated ultrasound, motion analysis and force platform data and muscle tendon modelling. Estimated FT and RFDT, but not peak LT, increased with external loading. Temporal comparisons between 0% and 90% loads revealed that FT was greater with 90% loading throughout the majority of the movement (11%-81% and 87%-95% movement duration). However, RFDT was greater with 90% load only during the early movement initiation phase (8%-15% movement duration) but was greater in the 0% load condition later in the eccentric phase (27%-38% movement duration). LT was longer during the early movement (12%-23% movement duration) but shorter in the late eccentric and early concentric phases (48%-55% movement duration) with 90% load. External loading positively influenced peak FT and RFDT but tendon strain appeared unaffected, suggesting no additive effect of external loading on patellar tendon lengthening during human jumping. Temporal analysis revealed that external loading resulted in a large initial RFDT that may have caused dynamic stiffening of the tendon and attenuated tendon strain throughout the movement. These results suggest that external loading influences tendon lengthening in both a load- and movement-dependent manner.

  17. Evaluation of muscle activity for loaded and unloaded dynamic squats during vertical whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Tom J; Kenno, Kenji A; Jakobi, Jennifer M

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine if the addition of a light external load would enhance whole-body vibration (WBV)-induced increases in muscle activity during dynamic squatting in 4 leg muscles. Thirteen recreationally active male university students performed a series of dynamic squats (unloaded with no WBV, unloaded with WBV, loaded with no WBV, and loaded with WBV). The load was set to 30% of body mass and WBV included 25-, 35-, and 45-Hz frequencies with 4-mm amplitude. Muscle activity was recorded with surface electromyography (EMG) on the vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and gastrocnemius (GC) and is reported as EMGrms (root mean square) normalized to %maximal voluntary exertion. During unloaded dynamic squats, exposure to WBV (45 Hz) significantly (p squat exercise in all muscles but decreased the TA. This loaded level of muscle activity was further increased with WBV (45 Hz) in all muscles. The WBV-induced increases in muscle activity in the loaded condition (approximately 3.5%) were of a similar magnitude to the WBV-induced increases during the unloaded condition (approximately 2.5%) demonstrating the addition of WBV to unloaded or loaded dynamic squatting results in an increase in muscle activity. These results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of using external loads with exposure to WBV.

  18. Dynamic Load Balancing for PIC code using Eulerian/Lagrangian partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Sauget, Marc; Latu, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    This document presents an analysis of different load balance strategies for a Plasma physics code that models high energy particle beams with PIC method. A comparison of different load balancing algorithms is given: static or dynamic ones. Lagrangian and Eulerian partitioning techniques have been investigated.

  19. Loading Processes Dynamics Modelling Taking into Account the Bucket-Soil Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Debeleac

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The author propose three dynamic models specialized for the vibrations and resistive forces analysis that appear at the loading process with different construction equipment like frontal loaders and excavators.The models used putting into evidence the components of digging: penetration, cutting, and loading.The conclusions of this study consist by evidentiate the dynamic overloads that appear on the working state and that induced the self-oscillations into the equipment structure.

  20. A Reduced-Order Model for Evaluating the Dynamic Response of Multilayer Plates to Impulsive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-12

    A REDUCED-ORDER MODEL FOR EVALUATING THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF MULTILAYER PLATES TO IMPULSIVE LOADS Weiran Jiang, Alyssa Bennett, Nickolas...innovative multilayer materials or structures to optimize the dynamic performance as a mechanism to absorb and spread energy from an impulsive load...models. • Optimizing the structural weight and levels of protection of the multilayer plates with a good combination of materials. Technical Approach 2016

  1. Ensuring dynamic load smoothness in problem of controlling Atomic Electric Power Stations exclusive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumilov, V.F.

    2003-01-01

    New methods for the investigation of automatic systems based on the inverse tasks of dynamics with the use of rational, trigonometric and polynomial spline functions are discussed. By means of SH function the technological regimes: start-up, steadiness, racing, braking, reverse, stop were determined. Procedure for the provision of dynamic load smoothness is suggested, and example of control over the transport systems for fuel load is considered [ru

  2. Safety margins associated with containment structures under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    A technical basis for assessing the true safety margins of containment structures involved with MARK I boiling water reactor reevaluation activities is presented. It is based on the results of a plane-strain, large displacement, elasto-plastic, finite-element analysis of a thin cylindrical shell subjected to external and internal pressure pulses. An analytical procedure is presented for estimating the ultimate load capacity of the thin shell structure, and subsequently, for quantifying the design margins of safety for the type of loads under consideration. For defining failure of structures, a finite strain failure criterion is derived that accounts for multiaxiality effects

  3. Data Mining of Historical Human Data to Assess the Risk of Injury due to Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jesica; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Newby, N.; Gernhardt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Occupant Protection Group is charged with ensuring crewmembers are protected during all dynamic phases of spaceflight. Previous work with outside experts has led to the development of a definition of acceptable risk (DAR) for space capsule vehicles. The DAR defines allowable probability rates for various categories of injuries. An important question is how to validate these probabilities for a given vehicle. One approach is to impact test human volunteers under projected nominal landing loads. The main drawback is the large number of subject tests required to attain a reasonable level of confidence that the injury probability rates would meet those outlined in the DAR. An alternative is to mine existing databases containing human responses to impact. Testing an anthropomorphic test device (ATD) at the same human-exposure levels could yield a range of ATD responses that would meet DAR. As one aspect of future vehicle validation, the ATD could be tested in the vehicle's seat and suit configuration at nominal landing loads and compared with the ATD responses supported by the human data set. This approach could reduce the number of human-volunteer tests NASA would need to conduct to validate that a vehicle meets occupant protection standards. METHODS: The U.S. Air Force has recorded hundreds of human responses to frontal, lateral, and spinal impacts at many acceleration levels and pulse durations. All of this data are stored on the Collaborative Biomechanics Data Network (CBDN), which is maintained by the Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). The test device for human occupant restraint (THOR) ATD was impact tested on WPAFB's horizontal impulse accelerator (HIA) matching human-volunteer exposures on the HIA to 5 frontal and 3 spinal loading conditions. No human injuries occurred as a result of these impact conditions. Peak THOR response variables for neck axial tension and compression, and thoracic-spine axial compression were collected. Maximal chest

  4. Effect of stainless steel and titanium low-contact dynamic compression plate application on the vascularity and mechanical properties of cortical bone after fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R; Podworny, N; Hearn, T; Anderson, G I; Schemitsch, E H

    1997-10-01

    Comparison of the effect of stainless steel and titanium low-contact dynamic compression plate application on the vascularity and mechanical properties of cortical bone after fracture. Randomized, prospective. Orthopaedic research laboratory. Ten large (greater than twenty-five kilogram) adult dogs. A short, midshaft spiral tibial fracture was created, followed by lag screw fixation and neutralization with an eight-hole, 3.5-millimeter, low-contact dynamic compression plate (LCDCP) made of either 316L stainless steel (n = five) or commercially pure titanium (n = five). After surgery, animals were kept with unrestricted weight-bearing in individual stalls for ten weeks. Cortical bone blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry using a standard metalshafted probe (Periflux Pf303, Perimed, Jarfalla, Sweden) applied through holes in the custom-made LCDCPs at five sites. Bone blood flow was determined at four times: (a) prefracture, (b) postfracture, (c) postplating, and (d) ten weeks postplating. After the dogs were killed, the implant was removed and both the treated tibia and contralateral tibia were tested for bending stiffness and load to failure. Fracture creation decreased cortical perfusion in both groups at the fracture site (p = 0.02). The application of neither stainless steel nor titanium LCDCPs further decreased cortical bone blood flow after fracture creation. However, at ten weeks postplating, cortical perfusion significantly increased compared with acute postplating levels in the stainless steel (p = 0.003) and titanium (p = 0.001) groups. Cortical bone blood flow ten weeks postplating was not significantly different between the titanium group and the stainless steel group. Biomechanical tests performed on the tibiae with the plates removed did not reveal any differences in bending stiffness nor load required to cause failure between the two groups. Both titanium and stainless steel LCDCPs were equally effective in allowing revascularization, and

  5. Comparative performance of locally made and the foreign made dynamic compression plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, M.; Gul, R.M.; Mujahid, M.; Askar, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Bone implants are widely used to treat patients due to trauma in different causalities. The major types of bone implants are plates known as Dynamic Compression Plates (DCP) and nails, both made of stainless steel (AISI 316L Grade). In Pakistan both local made and foreign made (DCP) are available. The unit price of foreign made DCP is about 8 to 10 times that of the local made, however, no comprehensive study has been done on the comparison of these plates. An in-depth analysis was performed to compare the essential properties of six different brands of DCP including two foreign, two local and two unknown brands. These properties included mechanical properties, such as bending stiffness, yield strength, modulus of elasticity and hardness. Compositional analysis and various dimensions of plate important for bone healing process were also compared. The results show that all plates have similar mechanical properties. The compositional analysis showed some variations from the ASTM standards for most of the plates. The dimensional analysis of plates showed that Slot Width and Land were within range for most of the plates but the Spherical Radius was out of range for all the plates. Generally, all plates have no major differences in their properties, material and shape. (author)

  6. Quantitative Evaluation of Temporal Regularizers in Compressed Sensing Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is used in cancer imaging to probe tumor vascular properties. Compressed sensing (CS theory makes it possible to recover MR images from randomly undersampled k-space data using nonlinear recovery schemes. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively evaluate common temporal sparsity-promoting regularizers for CS DCE-MRI of the breast. Methods. We considered five ubiquitous temporal regularizers on 4.5x retrospectively undersampled Cartesian in vivo breast DCE-MRI data: Fourier transform (FT, Haar wavelet transform (WT, total variation (TV, second-order total generalized variation (TGVα2, and nuclear norm (NN. We measured the signal-to-error ratio (SER of the reconstructed images, the error in tumor mean, and concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters Ktrans (volume transfer constant and ve (extravascular-extracellular volume fraction across a population of random sampling schemes. Results. NN produced the lowest image error (SER: 29.1, while TV/TGVα2 produced the most accurate Ktrans (CCC: 0.974/0.974 and ve (CCC: 0.916/0.917. WT produced the highest image error (SER: 21.8, while FT produced the least accurate Ktrans (CCC: 0.842 and ve (CCC: 0.799. Conclusion. TV/TGVα2 should be used as temporal constraints for CS DCE-MRI of the breast.

  7. Critical behaviour of the randomly stirred dynamical Potts model: novel universality class and effects of compressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N V; Kapustin, A S

    2012-01-01

    Critical behaviour of the dynamical Potts model, subjected to vivid turbulent mixing, is studied by means of the renormalization group. The advecting velocity field is modelled by Kraichnan’s rapid-change ensemble: Gaussian statistics with a given pair correlator 〈vv〉∝δ(t − t′) k −d−ξ , where k is the wave number, d is the dimension of space and 0 < ξ < 2 is an arbitrary exponent. The system exhibits different types of infrared scaling behaviour, associated with four infrared attractors of the renormalization group equations. In addition to the known asymptotic regimes (equilibrium Potts model and passive scalar field), the existence of a new, strongly non-equilibrium type of critical behaviour (universality class) is established, where the self-interaction of the order parameter and the turbulent mixing are equally important. The corresponding critical dimensions and the regions of stability for all the regimes are calculated in the leading order of the double expansion in ξ and ε = 6 − d. Special attention is paid to the effects of compressibility of the fluid, because they lead to interesting crossover phenomena. (paper)

  8. Toward an MRI-based method to measure non-uniform cartilage deformation: an MRI-cyclic loading apparatus system and steady-state cyclic displacement of articular cartilage under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, C P; Hull, M L

    2003-04-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential for measuring non-uniform deformations throughout the volume (i.e. three-dimensional (3D) deformations) in small orthopedic tissues such as articular cartilage. However, to analyze cartilage deformation using MRI techniques, a system is required which can construct images from multiple acquisitions of MRI signals from the cartilage in both the underformed and deformed states. The objectives of the work reported in this article were to 1) design an apparatus that could apply highly repeatable cyclic compressive loads of 400 N and operate in the bore of an MRI scanner, 2) demonstrate that the apparatus and MRI scanner can be successfully integrated to observe 3D deformations in a phantom material, 3) use the apparatus to determine the load cycle necessary to achieve a steady-state deformation response in normal bovine articular cartilage samples using a flat-surfaced and nonporous indentor in unconfined compression. Composed of electronic and pneumatic components, the apparatus regulated pressure to a double-acting pneumatic cylinder so that (1) load-controlled compression cycles were applied to cartilage samples immersed in a saline bath, (2) loading and recovery periods within a cycle varied in time duration, and (3) load magnitude varied so that the stress applied to cartilage samples was within typical physiological ranges. In addition the apparatus allowed gating for MR image acquisition, and operation within the bore of an MRI scanner without creating image artifacts. The apparatus demonstrated high repeatability in load application with a standard deviation of 1.8% of the mean 400 N load applied. When the apparatus was integrated with an MRI scanner programmed with appropriate pulse sequences, images of a phantom material in both the underformed and deformed states were constructed by assembling data acquired through multiple signal acquisitions. Additionally, the number of cycles to reach

  9. Load bearing and deformation behaviour of dynamically loaded wide plate specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julisch, P.; Haedrich, H.J.; Stadtmueller, W.; Sturm, D.

    1989-01-01

    For the testing of large-scale specimens, a 12 MN-High Loading Rate Tensile Testing Machine was designed and built at MPA Stuttgart. The aim was to determine the influence of high loading rates on the stress and strain behaviour of unwelded and welded components of ferritic and austenitic materials. This new generation of testing machines is driven by a propellant charge, and generates a maximum tensile force of 12 MN with a piston velocity of 25 m/s after a stroke of 20 mm, or a maximum velocity of 60 m/s after a stroke of 400 mm. In a first test programme, welded and unwelded wide plate specimens made of material X 6 CrNi 18 11 were tested at room temperature with different strain rates from 10 -3 /s to 63/s. In addition to a description of the 12 MN-High Loading Rate Tensile Testing Machine, the results of the high loading rate tensile tests performed will be presented and compared with quasistatically tested wide plate specimens. (orig.)

  10. Dynamic load balance scheme for the DSMC algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jin; Geng, Xiangren; Jiang, Dingwu; Chen, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) algorithm, devised by Bird, has been used over a wide range of various rarified flow problems in the past 40 years. While the DSMC is suitable for the parallel implementation on powerful multi-processor architecture, it also introduces a large load imbalance across the processor array, even for small examples. The load imposed on a processor by a DSMC calculation is determined to a large extent by the total of simulator particles upon it. Since most flows are impulsively started with initial distribution of particles which is surely quite different from the steady state, the total of simulator particles will change dramatically. The load balance based upon an initial distribution of particles will break down as the steady state of flow is reached. The load imbalance and huge computational cost of DSMC has limited its application to rarefied or simple transitional flows. In this paper, by taking advantage of METIS, a software for partitioning unstructured graphs, and taking the total of simulator particles in each cell as a weight information, the repartitioning based upon the principle that each processor handles approximately the equal total of simulator particles has been achieved. The computation must pause several times to renew the total of simulator particles in each processor and repartition the whole domain again. Thus the load balance across the processors array holds in the duration of computation. The parallel efficiency can be improved effectively. The benchmark solution of a cylinder submerged in hypersonic flow has been simulated numerically. Besides, hypersonic flow past around a complex wing-body configuration has also been simulated. The results have displayed that, for both of cases, the computational time can be reduced by about 50%

  11. A STUDY ON DYNAMIC LOAD HISTORY RECONSTRUCTION USING PSEUDO-INVERSE METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Ariane Rebelato Silva dos; Marczak, Rogério José

    2017-01-01

    Considering that the vibratory forces generally cannot be measured directly at the interface of two bodies, an inverse method is studied in the present work to recover the load history in such cases. The proposed technique attempts to reconstruct the dynamic loads history by using a frequency domain analysis and Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverses of the frequency response function (FRF) of the system. The methodology consists in applying discrete dynamic loads on a finite element model in the time...

  12. Dynamic behaviour of a typical PHWR under earthquake load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Brandt, K.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper deals with dynamic calculations for a PHWR reactor building founded on rock and on a base isolation system. The zero period accelerations, displacements, mode shapes and the floor response spectra of both calculations are compared. (Author) [pt

  13. Aircraft dynamic loads generated in wake vortex encounters

    OpenAIRE

    Suñer Perucho, Carles

    2014-01-01

    The study illustrated in these pages was developed in the Structural Dynamics and Aeroelasticity Department of the Military Aircraft division of Airbus Defence and Space in Getafe, Madrid (Spain). That department is a multidisciplinary one involving several categories. Some of its competences are the analysis of impacts, acoustics and vibrations for the aircraft and all their systems. Also, the dynamic response of the aircraft to different events is part of the tasks for that department. It i...

  14. Strength and behavior in shear of reinforced concrete deep beams under dynamic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Satadru Das [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Li, Bing, E-mail: cbli@ntu.edu.sg [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Fujikake, Kazunori [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National Defense Academy, Yokosuka 239 8686 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Effects of wider range of loading rates on dynamic shear behavior of RC deep beams. ► Experimental investigation of RC deep beam with and without shear reinforcements. ► Verification of experimental results with truss model and FE simulation results. ► Empirical equations are proposed to predict the dynamic increase factor of maximum resistance. -- Abstract: Research on reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams has seen considerable headway over the past three decades; however, information on the dynamic shear strength and behavior of RC deep beams under varying rates of loads remains limited. This paper describes the experimental results of 24 RC deep beams with and without shear reinforcements under varying rates of concentrated loading. Results obtained serve as useful data on shear resistance, failure patterns and strain rates corresponding to varying loading rates. An analytical truss model approach proves its efficacy in predicting the dynamic shear resistance under varying loading rates. Furthermore, three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) model is described and the simulation results are verified with the experimental results. A parametric study is then conducted to investigate the influence of longitudinal reinforcement ratio, transverse reinforcement ratio and shear span to effective depth ratio on shear behavior. Subsequently, two empirical equations were proposed by integrating the various parameters to assess the dynamic increase factor (DIF) of maximum resistance under varying rates of concentrated loading.

  15. Changes of the uniaxial compressive strength of rocks under the dynamic load with different frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Žůrek

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Článek přináší výsledky měření série horninových vzorků na testovacím zařízení MTS 816 systém. Jednoosá tlaková pevnost při dynamickém namáhání byla zjišťována s frekvencí v rozsahu 0-100 Hz. Tyto dynamické pevnostní charakteristiky jsou srovnávány s pevnostními charakteristikami při statickém namáhání. Laboratorní výzkum při dynamickém namáhání by měl co nejvíce odpovídat charakteru namáhání hornin při seismických jevech v horském masivu. Z tohoto důvodu jsou v článku nejprve rozebrány seismické vlnové parametry při důlních otřesech a jiných seismických jevech v horském masivu.

  16. Vibration mitigation by the reversible fcc/hcp martensitic transformation during cyclic tension-compression loading of an Fe-Mn-Si-based shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaguchi, Takahiro; Sahu, Puspendu; Kikuchi, Takehiko; Ogawa, Kazuyuki; Kajiwara, Setsuo; Kushibe, Atsumichi; Higashino, Masahiko; Ogawa, Takatoshi

    2006-01-01

    The present work concerns the damping behavior of an Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr-0.5NbC (mass%) shape memory alloy determined by low cycle fatigue tests, and the corresponding deformation mechanism under cyclic tension-compression loading. The specific damping capacity increases with increasing strain amplitude and reaches saturation at ∼80%, above the strain amplitude of 0.4%. Quantitative X-ray diffraction analyses and microstructural observations using atomic force microscopy revealed that a significant amount of the tensile stress-induced ε martensite is reversely transformed into the austenite by subsequent compression; in other words, the stress-induced 'reverse' martensitic transformation takes place in the alloy

  17. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  18. Osmosis and viscoelasticity both contribute to time-dependent behaviour of the intervertebral disc under compressive load: A caprine in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Kaj S; van der Veen, Albert J; Rustenburg, Christine M E; Smit, Theodoor H; Kingma, Idsart

    2018-03-21

    The mechanical behaviour of the intervertebral disc highly depends on the content and transport of interstitial fluid. It is unknown, however, to what extent the time-dependent behaviour can be attributed to osmosis. Here we investigate the effect of both mechanical and osmotic loading on water content, nucleus pressure and disc height. Eight goat intervertebral discs, immersed in physiological saline, were subjected to a compressive force with a pressure needle inserted in the nucleus. The loading protocol was: 10 N (6 h); 150 N (42 h); 10 N (24 h). Half-way the 150 N-phase (24 h), we eliminated the osmotic gradient by adding 26% poly-ethylene glycol to the surrounding fluid. For 62 additional discs, we determined the water content of both nucleus and annulus after 6, 24, 48, or 72 h. The compressive load was initially counterbalanced by the hydrostatic pressure in the nucleus. The load forced 4.3% of the water out of the nucleus, which reduced nucleus pressure by 44(±6)%. Reduction of the osmotic gradient disturbed the equilibrium disc height, and a significant loss of annulus water content was found. Remarkably, pressure and water content of the nucleus pulposus remained unchanged. This shows that annulus water content is important in the response to axial loading. After unloading, in the absence of an osmotic gradient, there was substantial viscoelastic recovery of 53(±11)% of the disc height, without a change in water content. However, for restoration of the nucleus pressure and for full restoration of disc height, restoration of the osmotic gradient was needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low cycle fatigue of 2.25Cr1Mo steel with tensile and compressed hold loading at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Yu, Dunji; Zhao, Zizhen; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xu, E-mail: xchen@tju.edu.cn

    2016-06-14

    A series of uniaxial strain-controlled fatigue and creep-fatigue tests of the bainitic 2.25Cr1Mo steel forging were performed at 455 °C in air. Three different hold periods (30 s, 120 s, 300 s) were employed at maximum tensile strain and compressive strain under fully reversed strain cycling. Both tensile and compressive holds significantly reduce the fatigue life. Fatigue life with tensile hold is shorter than that with compressive hold. A close relationship is found between the reduction of fatigue life and the amount of stress relaxation. Microstructural examination by scanning electron microscope reveals that strain hold introduces more crack sources, which can be probably ascribed to the intensified oxidation and the peeling-off of oxide layers. A modified plastic strain energy approach considering stress relaxation effect is proposed to predict the creep-fatigue life, and the predicted lives are in superior agreement with the experimental results.

  20. The effects of heating temperatures and time on deformation energy and oil yield of sunflower bulk seeds in compression loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabutey, A.; Herak, D.; Sigalingging, R.; Demirel, C.

    2018-02-01

    The deformation energy (J) and percentage oil yield (%) of sunflower bulk seeds under the influence of heat treatment temperatures and heating time were examined in compression test using the universal compression testing machine and vessel diameter of 60 mm with a plunger. The heat treatment temperatures were between 40 and 100 °C and the heating time at specific temperatures of 40 and 100 °C ranged from 15 to 75 minutes. The bulk sunflower seeds were measured at a pressing height of 60 mm and pressed at a maximum force of 100 kN and speed of 5 mm/min. Based on the compression results, the deformation energy and oil yield increased along with increasing heat treatment temperatures. The results were statistically significant (p 0.05).

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Helical Planetary Gear Sets under Combined Force and Moment Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of a single-stage planetary gear set with helical gears of multishaft automotive automatic transmissions has been studied, in which one component of the planetary gear set is imposed by additional external vertical and axial loading from countershaft gear pair in addition to the moment. Under these combined loading conditions, the contributions of the deflections of the ring gear and the carrier cannot be neglected. A three-dimensional nonlinear time-variant dynamic model considering not only the transverse, torsional, axial, and rotational motions of the gears but also the elasticity of the mounted shafts has been developed by combining the lumped parameter method with finite element method. The natural modes and the forced vibration responses due to static transmission errors have been obtained. The proposed dynamic model is employed to describe the effects of the combined external loading condition and positioning on the dynamic behavior of a four-planet system.

  2. Dynamic analysis of a pumped-storage hydropower plant with random power load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Chen, Diyi; Xu, Beibei; Patelli, Edoardo; Tolo, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamic response of a pumped-storage hydropower plant in generating mode. Considering the elastic water column effects in the penstock, a linearized reduced order dynamic model of the pumped-storage hydropower plant is used in this paper. As the power load is always random, a set of random generator electric power output is introduced to research the dynamic behaviors of the pumped-storage hydropower plant. Then, the influences of the PI gains on the dynamic characteristics of the pumped-storage hydropower plant with the random power load are analyzed. In addition, the effects of initial power load and PI parameters on the stability of the pumped-storage hydropower plant are studied in depth. All of the above results will provide theoretical guidance for the study and analysis of the pumped-storage hydropower plant.

  3. Novel method to dynamically load cells in 3D-hydrogels culture for blast injury studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sory, David R.; Areias, Anabela C.; Overby, Darryl R.; Proud, William G.

    2017-01-01

    For at least a century explosive devices have been one of the most important causes of injuries in military conflicts as well as in terrorist attacks. Although significant experimental and modelling efforts have been focussed on blast injuries at the organ or tissue level, few studies have investigated the mechanisms of blast injuries at the cellular level. This paper introduces an in vitro method compatible with living cells to examine the effects of high stress and short-duration pulses relevant to blast loadings and blunt trauma. The experimental phase involves high strain-rate axial compression of cylindrical specimens within an hermetically sealed chamber made of biocompatible polymer. Numerical simulations were performed in order to verify the experimental loading conditions and to characterize the loading path within the sample. A proof of concept is presented so as to establish a new window to address fundamental questions regarding blast injury at the cellular level.

  4. Study on the Flare Load Estimation of the Deethanizer using Dynamic Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyungtae; Won, Wangyun [GS EC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongil [Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A flare system is a very important system that crucially affects on the process safety in chemical plants. If a flare system is designed too small, it cannot prevent catastrophic accidents of a chemical plant. On the other hand, if a flare system is designed too large, it will waste resources. Therefore, reasonable relief load estimation has been a crucial issue in the industry. American Petroleum Institute (API) suggests basic guidelines for relief load estimation, and a lot of engineering companies have developed their own relief load estimation methods that use an unbalanced heat and material method. However, these methods have to involve lots of conservative assumptions that lead to an overestimation of relief loads. In this study, the new design procedure for a flare system based on dynamic simulation was proposed in order to avoid the overestimation of relief loads. The relief load of a deethanizer process was tested to verify the performance of the proposed design procedure.

  5. Dynamic supplier selection problem considering full truck load in probabilistic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Wicaksono, Purnawan Adi

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a mathematical model in a probabilistic dynamic optimization to solve a dynamic supplier selection problem considering full truck load in probabilistic environment where some parameters are uncertain. We determine the optimal strategy for this problem by using stochastic dynamic programming. We give some numerical experiments to evaluate and analyze the model. From the results, the optimal supplier and the optimal product volume from the optimal supplier were determined for each time period.

  6. Stiffness compatibility of coralline hydroxyapatite bone substitute under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When hydroxyapatite bone substitutes are implanted in human bodies,bone tissues will grow into their porous structure,which will reinforce their strength and stiffness.The concept of mechanical com-patibility of bone substitutes implies that their mechanical properties are similar to the bone tissues around,as if they were part of the bone.The mechanical compatibility of bone substitutes includes both static and dynamic behavior,due to the mechanical properties of bone depending on the strain rate.In this study,split Hopkinson pressure bar technique(SHPB) was employed to determine the dy-namic mechanical properties of coralline hydroxyapatite,bones with and bones without organic com-ponents,and their dynamic stress-strain curves of the three materials were obtained.The mechanical effects of collagens in bone were assessed,by comparing the difference between the Young’s moduli of the three materials.As the implanted bone substitute becomes a part of bone,it can be regarded as an inclusion composite.The effective modulus of the composite was also evaluated in order to estimate its mechanical compatibility on stiffness.The evaluated result shows that the suitable porosity of HA is 0.8,which is in favor of both static and dynamic stiffness compatibility.

  7. Stiffness compatibility of coralline hydroxyapatite bone substitute under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN ChaoFeng; HOU ZhenDe; ZHAO Wei

    2009-01-01

    When hydroxyapatite bone substitutes are implanted in human bodies, bone tissues will grow into their porous structure, which will reinforce their strength and stiffness. The concept of mechanical com-patibility of bone substitutes implies that their mechanical properties are similar to the bone tissues around, as if they were part of the bone. The mechanical compatibility of bone substitutes includes both static and dynamic behavior, due to the mechanical properties of bone depending on the strain rate. In this study, split Hopkinson pressure bar technique (SHPB) was employed to determine the dy-namic mechanical properties of coralline hydroxyapatite, bones with and bones without organic com-ponents, and their dynamic stress-strain curves of the three materials were obtained. The mechanical effects of collagens in bone were assessed, by comparing the difference between the Young's moduli of the three materials. As the implanted bone substitute becomes a part of bone, it can be regarded as an inclusion composite. The effective modulus of the composite was also evaluated in order to estimate its mechanical compatibility on stiffness. The evaluated result shows that the suitable porosity of HA is0.8, which is in favor of both static and dynamic stiffness compatibility.

  8. Wideband impedance measurements of DC motors under dynamic load conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diouf, F.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Duval, Fabrice; Bensetti, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    One of the principal conducted EMI(electromagnetic interferences) sources of low voltage DC (direct current) motors is the commutation occurring during rotation. In this paper the small-signal impedance of low voltage DC motors under different functioning modes, including the dynamic one is studied

  9. An unstructured-mesh finite-volume MPDATA for compressible atmospheric dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2017-01-01

    An advancement of the unstructured-mesh finite-volume MPDATA (Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm) is presented that formulates the error-compensative pseudo-velocity of the scheme to rely only on face-normal advective fluxes to the dual cells, in contrast to the full vector employed in previous implementations. This is essentially achieved by expressing the temporal truncation error underlying the pseudo-velocity in a form consistent with the flux-divergence of the governing conservation law. The development is especially important for integrating fluid dynamics equations on non-rectilinear meshes whenever face-normal advective mass fluxes are employed for transport compatible with mass continuity—the latter being essential for flux-form schemes. In particular, the proposed formulation enables large-time-step semi-implicit finite-volume integration of the compressible Euler equations using MPDATA on arbitrary hybrid computational meshes. Furthermore, it facilitates multiple error-compensative iterations of the finite-volume MPDATA and improved overall accuracy. The advancement combines straightforwardly with earlier developments, such as the nonoscillatory option, the infinite-gauge variant, and moving curvilinear meshes. A comprehensive description of the scheme is provided for a hybrid horizontally-unstructured vertically-structured computational mesh for efficient global atmospheric flow modelling. The proposed finite-volume MPDATA is verified using selected 3D global atmospheric benchmark simulations, representative of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic flow regimes. Besides the added capabilities, the scheme retains fully the efficacy of established finite-volume MPDATA formulations.

  10. Age-related changes in dynamic compressive properties of trochanteric soft tissues over the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, W J; Russell, C M; Tsai, C M; Arzanpour, S; Robinovitch, S N

    2015-02-26

    Hip fracture risk increases dramatically with age, and 90% of fractures are due to falls. During a fall on the hip, the soft tissues overlying the hip region (skin, fat, and muscle) act as shock absorbers to absorb energy and reduce the peak force applied to the underlying bone. We conducted dynamic indentation experiments with young women (aged 19-30; n=17) and older women (aged 65-81; n=17) to test the hypothesis that changes occur with age in the stiffness and damping properties of these tissues. Tissue stiffness and damping were derived from experiments where subjects lay sideways on a bed with the greater trochanter contacting a 3.8cm diameter indenter, which applied sinusoidal compression between 5 to 30Hz with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 1mm. Soft tissue thickness was measured using ultrasound. On average, stiffness was 2.9-fold smaller in older than young women (5.7 versus 16.8kN/m, p=0.0005) and damping was 3.5-fold smaller in older than young women (81 versus 282Ns/m, p=0.001). Neither parameter associated with soft tissue thickness. Our results indicate substantial age-related reductions in the stiffness and damping of soft tissues over the hip region, which likely reduce their capacity to absorb and dissipate energy (before "bottoming out") during a fall. Strategies such as wearable hip protectors or compliant flooringmay compensate for age-related reductions in the shock-absorbing properties of soft tissues and decrease the injury potential of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An unstructured-mesh finite-volume MPDATA for compressible atmospheric dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnlein, Christian, E-mail: christian.kuehnlein@ecmwf.int; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K., E-mail: piotr.smolarkiewicz@ecmwf.int

    2017-04-01

    An advancement of the unstructured-mesh finite-volume MPDATA (Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm) is presented that formulates the error-compensative pseudo-velocity of the scheme to rely only on face-normal advective fluxes to the dual cells, in contrast to the full vector employed in previous implementations. This is essentially achieved by expressing the temporal truncation error underlying the pseudo-velocity in a form consistent with the flux-divergence of the governing conservation law. The development is especially important for integrating fluid dynamics equations on non-rectilinear meshes whenever face-normal advective mass fluxes are employed for transport compatible with mass continuity—the latter being essential for flux-form schemes. In particular, the proposed formulation enables large-time-step semi-implicit finite-volume integration of the compressible Euler equations using MPDATA on arbitrary hybrid computational meshes. Furthermore, it facilitates multiple error-compensative iterations of the finite-volume MPDATA and improved overall accuracy. The advancement combines straightforwardly with earlier developments, such as the nonoscillatory option, the infinite-gauge variant, and moving curvilinear meshes. A comprehensive description of the scheme is provided for a hybrid horizontally-unstructured vertically-structured computational mesh for efficient global atmospheric flow modelling. The proposed finite-volume MPDATA is verified using selected 3D global atmospheric benchmark simulations, representative of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic flow regimes. Besides the added capabilities, the scheme retains fully the efficacy of established finite-volume MPDATA formulations.

  12. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of WEB-treated aneurysms: Can CFD predict WEB "compression" during follow-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, Jildaz; Mihalea, Cristian; Da Ros, Valerio; Yagi, Takanobu; Iacobucci, Marta; Ikka, Léon; Moret, Jacques; Spelle, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Recent reports have revealed a worsening of aneurysm occlusion between WEB treatment baseline and angiographic follow-up due to "compression" of the device. We utilized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to determine whether the underlying mechanism of this worsening is flow related. We included data from all consecutive patients treated in our institution with a WEB for unruptured aneurysms located either at the middle cerebral artery or basilar tip. The CFD study was performed using pre-operative 3D rotational angiography. From digital subtraction follow-up angiographies patients were dichotomized into two groups: one with WEB "compression" and one without. We performed statistical analyses to determine a potential correlation between WEB compression and CFD inflow ratio. Between July 2012 and June 2015, a total of 22 unruptured middle cerebral artery or basilar tip aneurysms were treated with a WEB device in our department. Three patients were excluded from the analysis and the mean follow-up period was 17months. Eleven WEBs presented "compression" during follow-up. Interestingly, device "compression" was statistically correlated to the CFD inflow ratio (P=0.018), although not to aneurysm volume, aspect ratio or neck size. The mechanisms underlying the worsening of aneurysm occlusion in WEB-treated patients due to device compression are most likely complex as well as multifactorial. However, it is apparent from our pilot study that a high arterial inflow is, at least, partially involved. Further theoretical and animal research studies are needed to increase our understanding of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic behavior of reinforced concrete beam subjected to impact load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chihiro; Ohnuma, Hiroshi; Sato, Koichi; Takano, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to find out the impact behavior of reinforced concrete beams by means of experiment. The reinforced concrete is widely used for such an important structure as the building facilities of the nuclear power plant, and so the impact behavior of the reinforced concrete structures must be examined to estimate the resistance of concrete containment against impact load and to develope the reasonable and reliable design procedure. The impact test on reinforced concrete beam which is one of the most basic elements in the structure was conducted. Main results are summarized as follows. 1) Bending failure occured on static test. On the other hand, shear failure occured in the case of high impact velocity on impact test. 2) Penetration depth and residual deflection are approximately proportional to V 2 (V: velocity at impact). 3) Flexural wave propagates about at the speed of 2000 m/s. 4) The resistance of reinforced concrete beam against the impact load is fairly good. (author)

  14. Mechanical Model for Dynamic Behavior of Concrete Under Impact Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanxiang

    Concrete is a geo-material which is used substantively in the civil building and military safeguard. One coupled model of damage and plasticity to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loading is proposed in this research work. The concrete is assumed as homogeneous continuum with pre-existing micro-cracks and micro-voids. Damage to concrete is caused due to micro-crack nucleation, growth and coalescence, and defined as the probability of fracture at a given crack density. It induces a decrease of strength and stiffness of concrete. Compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material voids. It produces the plastic strain in the concrete and, at the same time, an increase of the bulk modulus. In terms of crack growth model, micro-cracks are activated, and begin to propagate gradually. When crack density reaches a critical value, concrete takes place the smashing destroy. The model parameters for mortar are determined using plate impact experiment with uni-axial strain state. Comparison with the test results shows that the proposed model can give consistent prediction of the impact behavior of concrete. The proposed model may be used to design and analysis of concrete structures under impact and shock loading. This work is supported by State Key Laboratory of Explosion science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology (YBKT14-02).

  15. A simplified model of dynamic interior cooling load evaluation for office buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yan; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Min; He, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The core interior disturbance was determined by principle component analysis. • Influences of occupants on cooling load should be described using time series. • A simplified model was built to evaluate dynamic interior building cooling load. - Abstract: Predicted cooling load is a valuable tool for assessing the operation of air-conditioning systems. Compared with exterior cooling load, interior cooling load is more unpredictable. According to principle components analysis, occupancy was proved to be a typical factor influencing interior cooling loads in buildings. By exploring the regularity of interior disturbances in an office building, a simplified evaluation model for interior cooling load was established in this paper. The stochastic occupancy rate was represented by a Markov transition model. Equipment power, lighting power and fresh air were all related to occupancy rate based on time sequence. The superposition of different types of interior cooling loads was also considered in the evaluation model. The error between the evaluation results and measurement results was found to be lower than 10%. In reference to the cooling loads calculated by the traditional design method and area-based method in case study office rooms, the evaluated cooling loads were suitable for operation regulation.

  16. Using Maximal Isometric Force to Determine the Optimal Load for Measuring Dynamic Muscle Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Barry A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bentley, Jason R.; Nash, Roxanne E.; Sinka, Joseph; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Maximal power output occurs when subjects perform ballistic exercises using loads of 30-50% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM). However, performing 1-RM testing prior to power measurement requires considerable time, especially when testing involves multiple exercises. Maximal isometric force (MIF), which requires substantially less time to measure than 1-RM, might be an acceptable alternative for determining the optimal load for power testing. PURPOSE: To determine the optimal load based on MIF for maximizing dynamic power output during leg press and bench press exercises. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (12 men and 8 women; mean +/- SD age: 31+/-6 y; body mass: 72 +/- 15 kg) performed isometric leg press and bench press movements, during which MIF was measured using force plates. Subsequently, subjects performed ballistic leg press and bench press exercises using loads corresponding to 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of MIF presented in randomized order. Maximal instantaneous power was calculated during the ballistic exercise tests using force plates and position transducers. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher LSD post hoc tests were used to determine the load(s) that elicited maximal power output. RESULTS: For the leg press power test, six subjects were unable to be tested at 20% and 30% MIF because these loads were less than the lightest possible load (i.e., the weight of the unloaded leg press sled assembly [31.4 kg]). For the bench press power test, five subjects were unable to be tested at 20% MIF because these loads were less than the weight of the unloaded aluminum bar (i.e., 11.4 kg). Therefore, these loads were excluded from analysis. A trend (p = 0.07) for a main effect of load existed for the leg press exercise, indicating that the 40% MIF load tended to elicit greater power output than the 60% MIF load (effect size = 0.38). A significant (p . 0.05) main effect of load existed for the bench press exercise; post hoc analysis indicated that the effect of

  17. Pipe rupture and steam/water hammer design loads for dynamic analysis of piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, B.R. Jr.; Baschiere, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The design of restraints and protection devices for nuclear Class I and Class II piping systems must consider severe pipe rupture and steam/water hammer loadings. Limited stress margins require that an accurate prediction of these loads be obtained with a minimum of conservatism in the loads. Methods are available currently for such fluid transient load development, but each method is severely restricted as to the complexity and/or the range of fluid state excursions which can be simulated. This paper presents a general technique for generation of pipe rupture and steam/water hammer design loads for dynamic analysis of nuclear piping systems which does not have the limitations of existing methods. Blowdown thrust loadings and unbalanced piping acceleration loads for restraint design of all nuclear piping systems may be found using this method. The technique allows the effects of two-phase distributed friction, liquid flashing and condensation, and the surrounding thermal and mechanical equipment to be modeled. A new form of the fluid momentum equation is presented which incorporates computer generated fluid acceleration histories by inclusion of a geometry integral termed the 'force equivalent area' (FEA). The FEA values permit the coupling of versatile thermal-hydraulic programs to piping dynamics programs. Typical applications of the method to pipe rupture problems are presented and the resultant load histories compared with existing techniques. (Auth.)

  18. Lagrangian fluid description with simple applications in compressible plasma and gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schamel, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The Lagrangian fluid description, in which the dynamics of fluids is formulated in terms of trajectories of fluid elements, not only presents an alternative to the more common Eulerian description but has its own merits and advantages. This aspect, which seems to be not fully explored yet, is getting increasing attention in fluid dynamics and related areas as Lagrangian codes and experimental techniques are developed utilizing the Lagrangian point of view with the ultimate goal of a deeper understanding of flow dynamics. In this tutorial review we report on recent progress made in the analysis of compressible, more or less perfect flows such as plasmas and dilute gases. The equations of motion are exploited to get further insight into the formation and evolution of coherent structures, which often exhibit a singular or collapse type behavior occurring in finite time. It is argued that this technique of solution has a broad applicability due to the simplicity and generality of equations used. The focus is on four different topics, the physics of which being governed by simple fluid equations subject to initial and/or boundary conditions. Whenever possible also experimental results are mentioned. In the expansion of a semi-infinite plasma into a vacuum the energetic ion peak propagating supersonically towards the vacuum--as seen in laboratory experiments--is interpreted by means of the Lagrangian fluid description as a relic of a wave breaking scenario of the corresponding inviscid ion dynamics. The inclusion of viscosity is shown numerically to stabilize the associated density collapse giving rise to a well defined fast ion peak reminiscent of adhesive matter. In purely convection driven flows the Lagrangian flow velocity is given by its initial value and hence the Lagrangian velocity gradient tensor can be evaluated accurately to find out the appearance of singularities in density and vorticity and the emergence of new structures such as wavelets in one

  19. Lagrangian fluid description with simple applications in compressible plasma and gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Hans

    2004-03-01

    The Lagrangian fluid description, in which the dynamics of fluids is formulated in terms of trajectories of fluid elements, not only presents an alternative to the more common Eulerian description but has its own merits and advantages. This aspect, which seems to be not fully explored yet, is getting increasing attention in fluid dynamics and related areas as Lagrangian codes and experimental techniques are developed utilizing the Lagrangian point of view with the ultimate goal of a deeper understanding of flow dynamics. In this tutorial review we report on recent progress made in the analysis of compressible, more or less perfect flows such as plasmas and dilute gases. The equations of motion are exploited to get further insight into the formation and evolution of coherent structures, which often exhibit a singular or collapse type behavior occurring in finite time. It is argued that this technique of solution has a broad applicability due to the simplicity and generality of equations used. The focus is on four different topics, the physics of which being governed by simple fluid equations subject to initial and/or boundary conditions. Whenever possible also experimental results are mentioned. In the expansion of a semi-infinite plasma into a vacuum the energetic ion peak propagating supersonically towards the vacuum-as seen in laboratory experiments-is interpreted by means of the Lagrangian fluid description as a relic of a wave breaking scenario of the corresponding inviscid ion dynamics. The inclusion of viscosity is shown numerically to stabilize the associated density collapse giving rise to a well defined fast ion peak reminiscent of adhesive matter. In purely convection driven flows the Lagrangian flow velocity is given by its initial value and hence the Lagrangian velocity gradient tensor can be evaluated accurately to find out the appearance of singularities in density and vorticity and the emergence of new structures such as wavelets in one-dimension (1D

  20. Body drop into a fluid tank and dynamic loads calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarov Aleksandr Andreevich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The theory of a body striking a fluid began intensively developing due to the tasks of hydroplanes landing. For the recent years the study of a stroke and submersion of bodies into fluid became even more current. We face them in the process of strength calculation of ship hulls and other structures in modern technology. These tasks solution represents great mathematical difficulty even in case of the mentioned simplifications. These difficulties emerge due to the unsteady character of fluid motion in case of body submersion, and also jet and spray phenomena, which lead to discontinuous motions. On the basis of G.V. Logvinovich’s concept the problem of loads determination with consideration for air gap is solved for both a body and reservoir enclosing structures when a body falls into a fluid. Numerical method is based on the decay of an arbitrary discontinuity.

  1. Modeling of dynamically loaded hydrodynamic bearings at low Sommerfeld numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim

    Current state of the art within the wind industry dictates the use of conventional rolling element bearings for main bearings. As wind turbine generators increase in size and output, so does the size of the main bearings and accordingly also the cost and potential risk of failure modes. The cost...... and failure risk of rolling element bearings do, however, grow exponentially with the size. Therefore hydrodynamic bearings can prove to be a competitive alternative to the current practice of rolling element bearings and ultimately help reducing the cost and carbon footprint of renewable energy generation....... The challenging main bearing operation conditions in a wind turbine pose a demanding development task for the design of a hydrodynamic bearing. In general these conditions include operation at low Reynolds numbers with frequent start and stop at high loads as well as difficult operating conditions dictated...

  2. Study of high load operation limit for premixed compression ignition engine; Yokongo asshuku chakka kikan no kofuka unten genkai ni kansuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, N. [Isuzu Advanced Engineering Center Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Akagawa, H. [Nissan Diesel Motor Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Miyamoto, T.

    2000-11-25

    NO{sub x} emission was remarkably reduced by PREDIC (PREmixed lean DIesel Combustion) system in which fuel was injected at very early stage of compression stroke and the major part of the fuel is considered to be burned with self-ignition of premixed charge around TDC. However PREDIC system had some problems, a restriction of a high load operation was one of these problems. In order to investigate the combustion characteristics of PREDIC at the richer operation limit, a test engine was operated with gaseous fuel-air mixture where less heterogeneous mixture can be formed than that of conventional diesel engines. A steep pressure rise or the abrupt increase in NO{sub x} emission determined the richer operation limit. This was at 2 to 2.4 of excess air ratio. Supercharging operation enabled the high load operation more than 2.4 of excess air ratio. (author)

  3. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Dynamic Compressive Properties of an Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    transient stress wave (Chen and Song 2011). A schematic of a modern SHPB is shown in Figure 2.3. On this SHPB, a compressed gas cannon is used to launch...1991. Compressive behaviour of concrete at high strain rates. Materials and Structures 24(6):425-450. Buzug, T. M. 2008. Computed tomography: From...SFRC. Journal of Materials Science 48(10):3745-3759. Empelmann, M., M. Teutsch, and G. Steven. 2008. Improvement of the post fracture behaviour of

  4. Dynamic Loads and Wake Prediction for Large Wind Turbines Based on Free Wake Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Jiufa; Wang Tongguang; Long Hui; Ke Shitang; Xu Bofeng

    2015-01-01

    With large scale wind turbines ,the issue of aerodynamic elastic response is even more significant on dy-namic behaviour of the system .Unsteady free vortex wake method is proposed to calculate the shape of wake and aerodynamic load .Considering the effect of aerodynamic load ,inertial load and gravity load ,the decoupling dy-namic equations are established by using finite element method in conjunction of the modal method and equations are solved numerically by Newmark approach .Finally ,the numerical simulation of a large scale wind turbine is performed through coupling the free vortex wake modelling with structural modelling .The results show that this coupling model can predict the flexible wind turbine dynamic characteristics effectively and efficiently .Under the influence of the gravitational force ,the dynamic response of flapwise direction contributes to the dynamic behavior of edgewise direction under the operational condition of steady wind speed .The difference in dynamic response be-tween the flexible and rigid wind turbines manifests when the aerodynamics/structure coupling effect is of signifi-cance in both wind turbine design and performance calculation .

  5. Investigation of Mild Steel Thin-Wall Tubes in Unfilled and Foam-Filled Triangle, Square, and Hexagonal Cross Sections Under Compression Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Dipen Kumar; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A.; Das, S.

    2018-02-01

    This study has examined proposed structures with mild steel-reinforced LM30 aluminum (Al) alloy having diversely unfilled and 10 wt.% SiCp composite foam-filled tubes for improving axial compression performance. This class of material has novel physical, mechanical, and electrical properties along with low density. In the present experiment, Al alloy foams were prepared by the melt route technique using metal hydride powder as a foaming agent. Crash energy phenomena for diverse unfilled and foam-filled in mild steel thin-wall tubes (triangular, square and hexagonal) were studied as well. Compression deformation investigation was conducted at strain rates of 0.001-0.1/s for evaluating specific energy absorption (SEA) under axial loading conditions. The results were examined to measure plateau stress, maximum densification strain, and deformation mechanism of the materials. Specific energy absorption and total energy absorption capacities of the unfilled and filled sections were determined from the compressive stress-strain curves, which were then compared with each other.

  6. Dynamic response of beams on elastic foundations to impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, B.B.; Sinha, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    The beam considered is a Timoshenko beam in which the effects of rotatory inertia and shear deformations are included and the foundation model consists of Winkler-Zimmermann type having Hookean linear elastic springs. The analysis is very useful for predicting the dynamic response of structural components of aircraft or nuclear reactors or even runways if that component may be mathematically idealized as a beam on elastic foundation. The effect of rotatory inertia and shear deformation is very much pronounced and hence should not be neglected in solving such impact problems. In general the effect of foundation modulus is to further increase the values of frequencies of vibrations. (orig./HP)

  7. Dynamic analysis of elastic rubber tired car wheel breaking under variable normal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, A. I.; Zedgenizov, V. G.; Ovchinnikova, N. I.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze the dynamics of the braking of the wheel under normal load variations. The paper uses a mathematical simulation method according to which the calculation model of an object as a mechanical system is associated with a dynamically equivalent schematic structure of the automatic control. Transfer function tool analyzing structural and technical characteristics of an object as well as force disturbances were used. It was proved that the analysis of dynamic characteristics of the wheel subjected to external force disturbances has to take into account amplitude and phase-frequency characteristics. Normal load variations impact car wheel braking subjected to disturbances. The closer slip to the critical point is, the higher the impact is. In the super-critical area, load variations cause fast wheel blocking.

  8. Bitshuffle: Filter for improving compression of typed binary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Kiyoshi

    2017-12-01

    Bitshuffle rearranges typed, binary data for improving compression; the algorithm is implemented in a python/C package within the Numpy framework. The library can be used alongside HDF5 to compress and decompress datasets and is integrated through the dynamically loaded filters framework. Algorithmically, Bitshuffle is closely related to HDF5's Shuffle filter except it operates at the bit level instead of the byte level. Arranging a typed data array in to a matrix with the elements as the rows and the bits within the elements as the columns, Bitshuffle "transposes" the matrix, such that all the least-significant-bits are in a row, etc. This transposition is performed within blocks of data roughly 8kB long; this does not in itself compress data, but rearranges it for more efficient compression. A compression library is necessary to perform the actual compression. This scheme has been used for compression of radio data in high performance computing.

  9. The Effect of the Loading on Dynamic Stability and Scapular Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Azarsa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scapular stabilization and neuromuscular control provide an important parameter to characterize shoulder function during dynamic activities. Many studies have confirmed the effect of the loading on scapular position and scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, the evaluation of stabilizer muscles involvement in scapular asymmetry may assist in the development of clinical examination and rehabilitation program. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of loading on dynamic stability and scapular asymmetry in basketball players. Methods: Thirty healthy male basketball players aged between 20 to 31 years old were tested. The linear distance between scapular inferior angle and T7 spinous process was measured using a caliper in 90 degrees of unloaded scaption and with 1, 2 and 4 kg loading. The difference of distances of two sides in the above 4 positions was analyzed. Results: The amount of distances difference in two sides with 1 kg loading was minimal (9.36 mm. This difference increased to 10.19 mm and 12.22 mm, with increasing the loading to 2 and 4 kg respectively; although the 4 positions of the test did not show significant differences in distances difference (P>0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that dynamic stability of the scapula is dependent on the role of muscles, so that with increasing load on the muscles, the scapular asymmetry is more pronounced.

  10. Effect of compression ratio, nozzle opening pressure, engine load, and butanol addition on nanoparticle emissions from a non-road diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Saxena, Mohit Raj; Rai, Piyush; Bhardwaj, Aashish

    2018-05-01

    Currently, diesel engines are more preferred over gasoline engines due to their higher torque output and fuel economy. However, diesel engines confront major challenge of meeting the future stringent emission norms (especially soot particle emissions) while maintaining the same fuel economy. In this study, nanosize range soot particle emission characteristics of a stationary (non-road) diesel engine have been experimentally investigated. Experiments are conducted at a constant speed of 1500 rpm for three compression ratios and nozzle opening pressures at different engine loads. In-cylinder pressure history for 2000 consecutive engine cycles is recorded and averaged data is used for analysis of combustion characteristics. An electrical mobility-based fast particle sizer is used for analyzing particle size and mass distributions of engine exhaust particles at different test conditions. Soot particle distribution from 5 to 1000 nm was recorded. Results show that total particle concentration decreases with an increase in engine operating loads. Moreover, the addition of butanol in the diesel fuel leads to the reduction in soot particle concentration. Regression analysis was also conducted to derive a correlation between combustion parameters and particle number emissions for different compression ratios. Regression analysis shows a strong correlation between cylinder pressure-based combustion parameters and particle number emission.

  11. Two Stage Secure Dynamic Load Balancing Architecture for SIP Server Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vennila

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Session Initiation Protocol (SIP is a signaling protocol emerged with an aim to enhance the IP network capabilities in terms of complex service provision. SIP server scalability with load balancing has a greater concern due to the dramatic increase in SIP service demand. Load balancing of session method (request/response and security measures optimizes the SIP server to regulate of network traffic in Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP. Establishing a honeywall prior to the load balancer significantly reduces SIP traffic and drops inbound malicious load. In this paper, we propose Active Least Call in SIP Server (ALC_Server algorithm fulfills objectives like congestion avoidance, improved response times, throughput, resource utilization, reducing server faults, scalability and protection of SIP call from DoS attacks. From the test bed, the proposed two-tier architecture demonstrates that the ALC_Server method dynamically controls the overload and provides robust security, uniform load distribution for SIP servers.

  12. An improved model for considering strain rate effects on reinforced concrete elements behavior under dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, J.; Soroushian, P.

    1989-01-01

    An improved model for predicting the reinforced concrete element behavior under dynamic strain rates was developed using the layer modeling technique. The developed strain rate sensitive model for axial/flexural analysis of reinforced concrete elements was used to predict the test results, performed at different loading rates, and the predictions were reasonable. The developed analysis technique was used to study the loading rate sensitivity of reinforced concrete beams and columns with different geometry and material properties. Two design formulas for computing the loading rate dependent axial and flexural strengths of reinforced concrete sections are suggested

  13. Non-invasive imaging of myocardial bridge by coronary computed tomography angiography: the value of transluminal attenuation gradient to predict significant dynamic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuehua; Yu, Mengmeng; Zhang, Jiayin; Li, Minghua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai (China); Lu, Zhigang; Wei, Meng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-05-15

    To study the diagnostic value of transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG) measured by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) for identifying relevant dynamic compression of myocardial bridge (MB). Patients with confirmed MB who underwent both CCTA and ICA within one month were retrospectively included. TAG was defined as the linear regression coefficient between luminal attenuation and distance. The TAG of MB vessel, length and depth of MB were measured and correlated with the presence and degree of dynamic compression observed at ICA. Systolic compression ≥50 % was considered significant. 302 patients with confirmed MB lesions were included. TAG was lowest (-17.4 ± 6.7 HU/10 mm) in patients with significant dynamic compression and highest in patients without MB compression (-9.5 ± 4.3 HU/10 mm, p < 0.001). Linear correlation revealed relation between the percentage of systolic compression and TAG (Pearson correlation, r = -0.52, p < 0.001) and no significant relation between the percentage of systolic compression and MB depth or length. ROC curve analysis determined the best cut-off value of TAG as -14.8HU/10 mm (area under curve = 0.813, 95 % confidence interval = 0.764-0.855, p < 0.001), which yielded high diagnostic accuracy (82.1 %, 248/302). The degree of ICA-assessed systolic compression of MB significantly correlates with TAG but not MB depth or length. (orig.)

  14. The effects of dynamic compression on the development of cartilage grafts engineered using bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; Thorpe, Stephen D; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-21

    Bioreactors that subject cell seeded scaffolds or hydrogels to biophysical stimulation have been used to improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage and to explore how such constructs might respond to the application of joint specific mechanical loading. Whether a particular cell type responds appropriately to physiological levels of biophysical stimulation could be considered a key determinant of its suitability for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic compression on chondrogenesis of stem cells isolated from different tissue sources. Porcine bone marrow (BM) and infrapatellar fat pad (FP) derived stem cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium in free swelling (FS) conditions for 21 d, after which samples were subjected to dynamic compression (DC) of 10% strain (1 Hz, 1 h d(-1)) for a further 21 d. Both BM derived stem cells (BMSCs) and FP derived stem cells (FPSCs) were capable of generating cartilaginous tissues with near native levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, although the spatial development of the engineered grafts strongly depended on the stem cell source. The mechanical properties of cartilage grafts generated from both stem cell sources also approached that observed in skeletally immature animals. Depending on the stem cell source and the donor, the application of DC either enhanced or had no significant effect on the functional development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using either BMSCs or FPSCs. BMSC seeded constructs subjected to DC stained less intensely for collagen type I. Furthermore, histological and micro-computed tomography analysis showed mineral deposition within BMSC seeded constructs was suppressed by the application of DC. Therefore, while the application of DC in vitro may only lead to modest improvements in the mechanical functionality of cartilaginous grafts, it may play an important

  15. The effects of dynamic compression on the development of cartilage grafts engineered using bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Lu; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J; Thorpe, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors that subject cell seeded scaffolds or hydrogels to biophysical stimulation have been used to improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage and to explore how such constructs might respond to the application of joint specific mechanical loading. Whether a particular cell type responds appropriately to physiological levels of biophysical stimulation could be considered a key determinant of its suitability for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic compression on chondrogenesis of stem cells isolated from different tissue sources. Porcine bone marrow (BM) and infrapatellar fat pad (FP) derived stem cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium in free swelling (FS) conditions for 21 d, after which samples were subjected to dynamic compression (DC) of 10% strain (1 Hz, 1 h d −1 ) for a further 21 d. Both BM derived stem cells (BMSCs) and FP derived stem cells (FPSCs) were capable of generating cartilaginous tissues with near native levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, although the spatial development of the engineered grafts strongly depended on the stem cell source. The mechanical properties of cartilage grafts generated from both stem cell sources also approached that observed in skeletally immature animals. Depending on the stem cell source and the donor, the application of DC either enhanced or had no significant effect on the functional development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using either BMSCs or FPSCs. BMSC seeded constructs subjected to DC stained less intensely for collagen type I. Furthermore, histological and micro-computed tomography analysis showed mineral deposition within BMSC seeded constructs was suppressed by the application of DC. Therefore, while the application of DC in vitro may only lead to modest improvements in the mechanical functionality of cartilaginous grafts, it may play an important

  16. Infrared Thermographic Diagnosis Mechanism for Fault Detection of Ball Bearing under Dynamic Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jin Ju; Yoon, Hanvit; Kim, Dong Yeon; Hong, Dong Pyo; Kim, Won Tae

    2011-01-01

    Fault detection for dynamic loading conditions of rotational machineries was considered from the contactless, non-destructive infrared thermographic method, rather than the traditional diagnosis method. In this paper, by applying a rotating deep-grooved ball bearing, passive thermographic experiment was performed as an alternative way proceeding the traditional fault monitoring. In addition, the thermographic experiments were compared with the vibration spectrum analysis to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method. Based on the results, it was concluded the temperature characteristics of the ball bearing under dynamic loading conditions were analyzed thoroughly

  17. Dynamic cervicomedullary cord compression and alterations in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in children with achondroplasia: review of an 11-year surgical case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debraj; Pressman, Barry D; Krakow, Deborah; Rimoin, David L; Danielpour, Moise

    2014-09-01

    Achondroplasia may be associated with compression at the cervicomedullary junction. Determining which patients are at greatest risk for neurological complications of cervicomedullary compression can be difficult. In the current study the authors reviewed their records to determine the incidence and clinical significance of dynamic cervicomedullary stenosis and obstruction of CSF flow along with surgical outcomes following posterior fossa decompression. The authors reviewed 34 consecutive cases involving symptomatic children with achondroplasia undergoing cervicomedullary decompression performed by a single surgeon over 11 years. Of these patients, 29 had undergone preoperative dynamic MRI of the cervicomedullary junction with cine (cinema) CSF flow studies; 13 of these patients underwent postoperative dynamic MRI studies. Clinical outcomes included changes in polysomnography, head circumference percentile, and fontanel characteristics. Radiographic outcomes included changes in dynamic spinal cord diameter, improvement in CSF flow at the foramen magnum, and change in the Evans ratio. Patients were predominantly female, with a mean age at presentation of 6.6 years and mean follow-up of 3.7 years (range 1-10 years). All patients had moderate to excellent improvement in postoperative polysomnography, slight decrease in average head circumference percentile (from 46.9th percentile to 45.7th percentile), and no subjective worsening of fontanel characteristics. The Evans ratio decreased by 2%, spinal cord diameter increased an average of 3.1 mm, 5.2 mm, and 0.2 mm in the neutral, flexed, and extended positions, respectively, and CSF flow improved qualitatively in all 3 positions. There were no postoperative infections, CSF leaks, or other major complications. None of the patients undergoing initial foramen magnum decompression performed at our medical center required reoperation. Patients with achondroplasia and symptomatic cervicomedullary compression have increased risk

  18. Rating of Power Cables for Dynamic Load Situations

    OpenAIRE

    Kitimbo, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Huvudsyftet med detta projekt var att utvärdera möjligheten att använda metoder för ”dynamic rating” för att dimensionera (trekärniga) strömkablar som ansluter havsbaserade vindkraftparker. Flera publikationer från kabelindustrin visar att de metoder för att beräkna armeringsförluster som föreslås av IEC för (trekärniga) strömkablar är väldigt konservativa. Målet med projektet var att utveckla mer precisa modeller för att uppskatta armeringsförluster på ett mindre konservativt sätt. Kabelmode...

  19. Dynamic load-sharing characteristic analysis of face gear power-split gear system based on tooth contact characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hao; Hu, Yahui

    2018-04-01

    The bend-torsion coupling dynamics load-sharing model of the helicopter face gear split torque transmission system is established by using concentrated quality standard, to analyzing the dynamic load-sharing characteristic. The mathematical models include nonlinear support stiffness, time-varying meshing stiffness, damping, gear backlash. The results showed that the errors collectively influenced the load sharing characteristics, only reduce a certain error, it is never fully reached the perfect loading sharing characteristics. The system load-sharing performance can be improved through floating shaft support. The above-method will provide a theoretical basis and data support for its dynamic performance optimization design.

  20. Dynamic relaxation processes in compressible multiphase flows. Application to evaporation phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Métayer O.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase changes and heat exchanges are examples of physical processes appearing in many industrial applications involving multiphase compressible flows. Their knowledge is of fundamental importance to reproduce correctly the resulting effects in simulation tools. A fine description of the flow topology is thus required to obtain the interfacial area between phases. This one is responsible for the dynamics and the kinetics of heat and mass transfer when evaporation or condensation occurs. Unfortunately this exchange area cannot be obtained easily and accurately especially when complex mixtures (drops, bubbles, pockets of very different sizes appear inside the transient medium. The natural way to solve this specific trouble consists in using a thin grid to capture interfaces at all spatial scales. But this possibility needs huge computing resources and can be hardly used when considering physical systems of large dimensions. A realistic method is to consider instantaneous exchanges between phases by the way of additional source terms in a full non-equilibrium multiphase flow model [2,15,17]. In this one each phase obeys its own equation of state and has its own set of equations and variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, energy, entropy,.... When enabling the relaxation source terms the multiphase mixture instantaneously tends towards a mechanical or thermodynamic equilibrium state at each point of the flow. This strategy allows to mark the boundaries of the real flow behavior and to magnify the dominant physical effects (heat exchanges, evaporation, drag,... inside the medium. A description of the various relaxation processes is given in the paper. Les changements de phase et les transferts de chaleur sont des exemples de phénomènes physiques présents dans de nombreuses applications industrielles faisant intervenir des écoulements compressibles multiphasiques. La connaissance des mécanismes associés est primordiale afin de reproduire

  1. Fatigue behaviour of core-spun yarns containing filament by means of cyclic dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, S.; Osman, B.

    2017-10-01

    The behaviour of yarns under dynamic loading is important that leads to understand the growth characteristics which is exposed to repetitive loadings during usage of fabric made from these yarns. Fabric growth is undesirable property that originated from low resilience characteristics of fabric. In this study, the effects of the filament fineness and yarn linear density on fatigue behaviour of rigid-core spun yarns were determined. Cotton covered yarns containing different filament fineness of polyester (PET) draw textured yarns (DTY) (100d/36f, 100d/96f, 100d/144f, 100d/192f and 100d/333f) and yarn linear densities (37 tex, 30 tex, 25 tex and 21 tex) were manufactured by using a modified ring spinning system at the same spinning parameters. Repetitive loads were applied for 25 cycles at levels between 0.1 and 3 N. Dynamic modulus and dynamic strain of yarn samples were analyzed statistically. Results showed that filament fineness and yarn linear density have significance effect on dynamic modulus and dynamic strain after cyclic loading.

  2. Influence of foundation mass and surface roughness on dynamic response of beam on dynamic foundation subjected to the moving load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Quoc, Tinh; Khong Trong, Toan; Luong Van, Hai

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, Improved Moving Element Method (IMEM) is used to analyze the dynamic response of Euler-Bernoulli beam structures on the dynamic foundation model subjected to the moving load. The effects of characteristic foundation model parameters such as Winkler stiffness, shear layer based on the Pasternak model, viscoelastic dashpot and characteristic parameter of mass on foundation. Beams are modeled by moving elements while the load is fixed. Based on the principle of the publicly virtual balancing and the theory of moving element method, the motion differential equation of the system is established and solved by means of the numerical integration based on the Newmark algorithm. The influence of mass on foundation and the roughness of the beam surface on the dynamic response of beam are examined in details.

  3. Prediction of dynamic loads and induced vibrations in stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirstrup Petersen, J.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Bjoerck, A. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden (Sweden); Enevoldsen, P. [Bonus Energy A/S (Denmark); Oeye, S. [The Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Ganander, H. [Teknikgruppen AB (Sweden); Winkelaar, D. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    Results from research in an EC Joule-III project and from national projects are presented. The objectives are improvement of design methods for stall regulated wind turbines with emphasis on stall induced vibrations and dynamic stall. The primary concern is limitation of the edgewise vibrations in the fundamental blade natural mode shape, which have caused trouble on modern wind turbines of approximate size 500 kW nominal power and 40 m rotor diameter. A theoretical study of quasi-steady aerodynamics confirms that the vibrations are driven basically by energy supplied from the aerodynamic forces during stalled operation. This energy exchange is equivalent to negative aerodynamic damping. The theoretical approach identifies the main parameters controlling the phenomenon. These parameters describe the steady and the dynamic airfoil characteristics, the overall aerodynamic layout of the blade, e.g. chord length and twist, the structural properties of the blade, e.g. structural damping and properties controlling the resulting vibration direction. Furthermore, full aeroelastic calculations and comparison with measurements show that the properties of the supporting structure, i.e. the main shaft, the nacelle and the tower, are important, as the global vibration of the rotor on its support may exchange energy with the blade vibration, when the blade natural frequency is close to one of the frequencies of the coupled rotor tilt-yaw mode shapes, usually denoted the global rotor whirl frequencies. It is confirmed that the influence of changing the primary design parameters can be determined by use of qualified aeroelastic calculations. Presented design guidelines therefore build on both the simple quasi-steady models, which can be used for the preliminary choice of the design variables mentioned above, and on full aeroelastic calculations. The aeroelastic calculations refine the design basis and should be used for choosing the final design variables and for final

  4. Modeling the dynamic stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under low-amplitude vibration loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengfei; Castel, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a model, initially developed to calculate the stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under static loading, is used to assess the dynamic stiffness. The model allows calculating the average inertia of cracked beams by taking into account the effect of bending cracks (primary cracks) and steel-concrete bond damage (i.e. interfacial microcracks). Free and forced vibration experiments are used to assess the performance of the model. The respective influence of bending cracks and steel-concrete bond damage on both static and dynamic responses is analyzed. The comparison between experimental and simulated deflections confirms that the effects of both bending cracks and steel-concrete bond loss should be taken into account to assess reinforced concrete stiffness under service static loading. On the contrary, comparison of experimental and calculated dynamic responses reveals that localized steel-concrete bond damages do not influence significantly the dynamic stiffness and the fundamental frequency.

  5. On the dynamic stability of shear deformable beams under a tensile load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddemi, S.; Caliò, I.; Cannizzaro, F.

    2016-07-01

    Loss of stability of beams in a linear static context due to the action of tensile loads has been disclosed only recently in the scientific literature. However, tensile instability in the dynamic regime has been only marginally covered. Several aspects concerning the role of shear deformation on the tensile dynamic instability on continuous and discontinuous beams are still to be addressed. It may appear as a paradox, but also for the case of the universally studied Timoshenko beam model, despite its old origin, frequency-axial load diagrams in the range of negative values of the load (i.e. tensile load) has never been brought to light. In this paper, for the first time, the influence of a conservative tensile axial loads on the dynamic behaviour of the Timoshenko model, according to the Haringx theory, is assessed. It is shown that, under increasing tensile loads, regions of positive/negative fundamental frequency variations can be distinguished. In addition, the beam undergoes eigen-mode changes, from symmetric to anti-symmetric shapes, until tensile instability of divergence type is reached. As a further original contribution on the subject, taking advantage of a new closed form solution, it is shown that the same peculiarities are recovered for an axially loaded Euler-Bernoulli vibrating beam with multiple elastic sliders. This latter model can be considered as the discrete counterpart of the Timoshenko beam-column in which the internal sliders concentrate the shear deformation that in the Timoshenko model is continuously distributed. Original aspects regarding the evolution of the vibration frequencies and the relevant mode shapes with the tensile load value are highlighted.

  6. DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF SHOCK LOADED THIN URANIUM FOILS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.L.; Kelly, A.M.; Alexander, D.J.; Hanrahan, R.J.; Snow, R.C.; Gehr, R.J.; Rupp, Ted Dean; Sheffield, S.A.; Stahl, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    A series of spall experiments has been completed with thin depleted uranium targets, nominally 0.1 mm thick. The first set of uranium spall targets was cut and ground to final thickness from electro-refined, high-purity, cast uranium. The second set was rolled to final thickness from low purity uranium. The impactors for these experiments were laser-launched 0.05-mm thick copper flyers, 3 mm in diameter. Laser energies were varied to yield a range of flyer impact velocities. This resulted in varying degrees of damage to the uranium spall targets, from deformation to complete spall or separation at the higher velocities. Dynamic measurements of the uranium target free surface velocities were obtained with dual velocity interferometers. Uranium targets were recovered and sectioned after testing. Free surface velocity profiles were similar for the two types of uranium, but spall strengths (estimated from the magnitude of the pull-back signal) are higher for the high-purity cast uranium. Velocity profiles and microstructural evidence of spall from the sectioned uranium targets are presented.

  7. Dynamic Responses of Continuous Girder Bridges with Uniform Cross-Section under Moving Vehicular Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Qingfei; Wang, Zonglin; Jia, Hongyu; Liu, Chenguang; Li, Jun; Guo, Binqiang; Zhong, Junfei

    2015-01-01

    To address the drawback of traditional method of investigating dynamic responses of the continuous girder bridge with uniform cross-section under moving vehicular loads, the orthogonal experimental design method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, some empirical formulas of natural frequencies are obtained by theoretical derivation and numerical simulation. The effects of different parameters on dynamic responses of the vehicle-bridge coupled vibration system are discussed using our own progr...

  8. Feasibility of Applying Active Lubrication to Dynamically Loaded Fluid Film Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estupinan, Edgar Alberto; Santos, Ilmar

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of modifying the dynamics of the thin fluid films of dynamically loaded journal bearings, using different strategies of active lubrication is studied in this work. A significant reduction in the vibration levels, wear and power friction losses, is expected. Particularly, the focus...... of this study is on the analysis of main crankshaft bearings, where the conventional hydrodynamic lubrication is modified by injecting oil at actively controllable pressures, through orifices circumferentially located along the bearing surface....

  9. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations to determine core barrel loads during blowdown (EV 3,000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Schlechtendahl, E.G.

    1977-01-01

    To begin with, the main physical phenomena in connection with blowdown loads on the care barrel and the computer models used are briefly described. These models have also been used in the design of the HTR test care barrel. The fluid dynamics part of the calculations was carried out using the WHAMMOD and DAPSY codes; for the structural dynamics part, the STRUDL/Dynal code was employed. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Self-organized dynamics in local load-sharing fiber bundle models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Soumyajyoti; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

    2013-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a local load-sharing fiber bundle model in two dimensions under an external load (which increases with time at a fixed slow rate) applied at a single point. Due to the local load-sharing nature, the redistributed load remains localized along the boundary of the broken patch. The system then goes to a self-organized state with a stationary average value of load per fiber along the (increasing) boundary of the broken patch (damaged region) and a scale-free distribution of avalanche sizes and other related quantities are observed. In particular, when the load redistribution is only among nearest surviving fiber(s), the numerical estimates of the exponent values are comparable with those of the Manna model. When the load redistribution is uniform along the patch boundary, the model shows a simple mean-field limit of this self-organizing critical behavior, for which we give analytical estimates of the saturation load per fiber values and avalanche size distribution exponent. These are in good agreement with numerical simulation results.

  11. Dynamic analysis of solid propellant grains subjected to ignition pressurization loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyuan, Shiang-Woei

    2003-11-01

    Traditionally, the transient analysis of solid propellant grains subjected to ignition pressurization loading was not considered, and quasi-elastic-static analysis was widely adopted for structural integrity because the analytical task gets simplified. But it does not mean that the dynamic effect is not useful and could be neglected arbitrarily, and this effect usually plays a very important role for some critical design. In order to simulate the dynamic response for solid rocket motor, a transient finite element model, accompanied by concepts of time-temperature shift principle, reduced integration and thermorheologically simple material assumption, was used. For studying the dynamic response, diverse ignition pressurization loading cases were used and investigated in the present paper. Results show that the dynamic effect is important for structural integrity of solid propellant grains under ignition pressurization loading. Comparing the effective stress of transient analysis and of quasi-elastic-static analysis, one can see that there is an obvious difference between them because of the dynamic effect. From the work of quasi-elastic-static and transient analyses, the dynamic analysis highlighted several areas of interest and a more accurate and reasonable result could be obtained for the engineer.

  12. Dynamical prediction and pattern mapping in short-term load forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio; Rodrigues, Daniela D.; Lima, Silvio T. [Departamento de Engenharia Eletronica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martinez, Carlos Barreira [Departamento de Engenharia Hidraulica e Recursos Hidricos, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    This work will not put forward yet another scheme for short-term load forecasting but rather will provide evidences that may improve our understanding about fundamental issues which underlay load forecasting problems. In particular, load forecasting will be decomposed into two main problems, namely dynamical prediction and pattern mapping. It is argued that whereas the latter is essentially static and becomes nonlinear when weekly features in the data are taken into account, the former might not be deterministic at all. In such cases there is no determinism (serial correlations) in the data apart from the average cycle and the best a model can do is to perform pattern mapping. Moreover, when there is determinism in addition to the average cycle, the underlying dynamics are sometimes linear, in which case there is no need to resort to nonlinear models to perform dynamical prediction. Such conclusions were confirmed using real load data and surrogate data analysis. In a sense, the paper details and organizes some general beliefs found in the literature on load forecasting. This sheds some light on real model-building and forecasting problems and helps understand some apparently conflicting results reported in the literature. (author)

  13. Mechanical behavior of ultrafine-grained materials under combined static and dynamic loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Y.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine-grained (UFG materials have extensive prospects for engineering application due to their excellent mechanical properties. However, the grain size decrease reduces their strain hardening ability and makes UFG materials more susceptible to deformation instability such as shear localization. In most cases, critical shear strain is taken as the criterion for formation of shear localization under impact loading or adiabatic shear band (ASB. Recently, some researchers found that the formation of ASB was determined only by the dynamic loading process and had nothing to do with its static loading history. They proposed for coarse-grained metals a dynamic stored energy-based criterion for ASB and verified it by some experiments. In this study, we will focus on the shear localization behavior of UFG metals such as UFG titanium and magnesium alloy AZ31. Quasi-static loading and dynamic loading will be applied on the same specimen alternately. The shear localization behavior will be analyzed and the criterion of its formation will be evaluated.

  14. Dynamic Aftershock Triggering Correlated with Cyclic Loading in the Slip Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, J.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic stress changes have been shown to contribute to aftershock triggering, but the physical triggering mechanisms are not fully understood. Some proposed mechanisms are based on dynamic stress loading of the target fault in a direction that encourages earthquake slip (e.g. dynamic Coulomb stress triggering), while other mechanisms are based on fault weakening due to shaking. If dynamic stress loading in the fault slip direction plays a role in aftershock triggering, we would expect to see a relationship between the dynamic stress orientations and the aftershock focal mechanisms. Alternatively, if dynamic stress change triggering functions only through a fault weakening mechanism that is independent of the slip direction of the target fault, no such relationship is expected. I study aftershock sequences of 4 M≥6.7 mainshocks in southern California, and find a small but significant relationship between modeled dynamic stress direction and aftershock focal mechanisms. The mainshock dynamic stress changes have two observed impacts: changing the focal mechanisms in a given location to favor those aligned with the dynamic stress change, and changing the spatial distribution of seismicity to favor locations where the dynamic stress change aligns with the background stress. The aftershock focal mechanisms are significantly more aligned with the dynamic stress changes than the preshock mechanisms for only the first 0.5-1 year following most mainshocks, although for at least 10 years following Hector Mine. Dynamic stress effects on focal mechanisms are best observed at long periods (30-60 sec). Dynamic stress effects are only observed when using metrics based on repeated stress cycling in the same direction, for example considering the dominant stress orientation over the full time series, and not for the peak dynamic stress. These results imply that dynamic aftershock triggering operates at least in part through cyclic loading in the direction of fault slip, although

  15. Dynamics and stability of transverse vibrations of nonlocal nanobeams with a variable axial load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C; Yu, J L; Lim, C W

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the natural frequency, steady-state resonance and stability for the transverse vibrations of a nanobeam subjected to a variable initial axial force, including axial tension and axial compression, based on nonlocal elasticity theory. It is reported that the nonlocal nanoscale has significant effects on vibration behavior, which results in a new effective nonlocal bending moment different to but dependent on the corresponding nonlocal bending moment. The effects of nonlocal nanoscale and the variation of initial axial force on the natural frequency as well as the instability regions are analyzed by the perturbation method. It concludes that both the nonlocal nanoscale and the initial tension, including static and dynamic tensions, cause an increase in natural frequency, while an initial compression causes the natural frequency to decrease. Instability regions are also greatly influenced by the nonlocal nanoscale and initial tension and they become smaller with stronger nonlocal effects or larger initial tension

  16. Dynamic response of single crystalline copper subjected to quasi-isentropic, gas-gun driven loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarmakani, H.; McNaney, J.M.; Kad, B.; Orlikowski, D.; Nguyen, J.H.; Meyers, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of quasi-isentropic gas-gun loading (peak pressures between 18 and 52 GPa) of [0 0 1] monocrystalline copper was carried out. The defect substructures at these different pressures were analyzed. Current experimental evidence suggests a deformation substructure that transitions from slip to twinning, where twinning occurs at the higher pressures (∼52 GPa), and heavily dislocated laths and dislocation cells take place at the intermediate and lower pressures. Evidence of stacking faults at the intermediate pressures was also found. Dislocation cell sizes decreased with increasing pressure and increased with distance away from the surface of impact. The results from the quasi-isentropic experiments are compared with those for flyer-plate and laser shock experiments reported in the literature. The Preston-Tonks-Wallace constitutive description is used to model both quasi-isentropic and shock compression experiments and predict the pressure at which the slip-twinning transition occurs in both cases. The model predicts a higher twinning transition pressure for isentropic than for shock experiments, and that twinning should not take place in the quasi-isentropic compression experiments given the loading paths investigated

  17. Estimation of dynamic load of mercury in a river with BASINS-HSPF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; John Higman; Jeff Hatten

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element and a pervasive toxic pollutant. This study investigated the dynamic loads of Hg from the Cedar-Ortega Rivers watershed into the Lower St. Johns River (LSJR), Florida, USA, using the better assessment science integrating point and nonpoint sources (BASINS)-hydrologic simulation program - FORTRAN (HSPF) model....

  18. A novel reformulation of the Theory of Critical Distances to design notched metals against dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, T.; Tyas, A.; Plekhov, O.; Terekhina, A.; Susmel, L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The proposed method is successful in estimating dynamic strength of metals. • The critical distance varies as the loading/strain/displacement rate increases. • The reference strength varies as the loading/strain/displacement rate increases. • This method is recommended to be used with safety factors larger than 1.25. - Abstract: In the present study the linear-elastic Theory of Critical Distances (TCD) is reformulated to make it suitable for predicting the strength of notched metallic materials subjected to dynamic loading. The accuracy and reliability of the proposed reformulation of the TCD was checked against a number of experimental results generated by testing, under different loading/strain rates, notched cylindrical samples of aluminium alloy 6063-T5, titanium alloy Ti–6Al–4V, aluminium alloy AlMg6, and an AlMn alloy. To further validate the proposed design method also different data sets taken from the literature were considered. Such an extensive validation exercise allowed us to prove that the proposed reformulation of the TCD is successful in predicting the dynamic strength of notched metallic materials, this approach proving to be capable of estimates falling within an error interval of ±20%. Such a high level of accuracy is certainly remarkable, especially in light of the fact that it was reached without the need for explicitly modelling the stress vs. strain dynamic behaviour of the investigated ductile metals

  19. Relation between coordinate systems describing the dynamics of a loaded Stewart platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, V. I.

    2018-05-01

    The paper puts forward formulae for transformation of coordinates in three coordinate frames used for the study of motion of a loaded Stewart platform, which is the central mechanism of the dynamic bench. A new method for finding the law of variation of coordinates is proposed. This method depends on solving the problem-specific system of differential equations.

  20. Wake Influence on Dynamic Load Characteristics of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Minu; Lee, Soogab; Kim, Taeseong

    2016-01-01

    Because the flow conditions of an offshore floating wind turbine and onshore fixed wind turbine differ, it is debatable whether the aerodynamic load predictions of an offshore floating wind turbine using the conventional blade-element momentum theory, which does not consider the dynamic wake effe...

  1. HOLD MODE BASED DYNAMIC PRIORITY LOAD ADAPTIVE INTERPICONET SCHEDULING FOR BLUETOOTH SCATTERNETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Mahalakshmi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling in piconets has emerged as a challenging research area. Interpiconet scheduling focuses on when a bridge is switched among various piconets and how a bridge node communicates with the masters in different piconets. This paper proposes an interpiconet scheduling algorithm named, hold mode based dynamic traffic priority load adaptive scheduling. The bridges are adaptively switched between the piconets according to various traffic loads. The main goal is to maximize the utilization of the bridge by reducing the bridge switch wastes, utilize intelligent decision making algorithm, resolve conflict between the masters, and allow negotiation for bridge utilization in HDPLIS using bridge failure-bridge repair procedure . The Hold mode - dynamic traffic - priority based - load adaptive scheduling reduces the number of bridge switch wastes and hence increases the efficiency of the bridge which results in increased performance of the system.

  2. Applicability of laboratory data to large scale tests under dynamic loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Klenk, A.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of dynamic loading and subsequent fracture must be based on reliable data for loading and deformation history. This paper describes an investigation to examine the applicability of parameters which are determined by means of small-scale laboratory tests to large-scale tests. The following steps were carried out: (1) Determination of crack initiation by means of strain gauges applied in the crack tip field of compact tension specimens. (2) Determination of dynamic crack resistance curves of CT-specimens using a modified key-curve technique. The key curves are determined by dynamic finite element analyses. (3) Determination of strain-rate-dependent stress-strain relationships for the finite element simulation of small-scale and large-scale tests. (4) Analysis of the loading history for small-scale tests with the aid of experimental data and finite element calculations. (5) Testing of dynamically loaded tensile specimens taken as strips from ferritic steel pipes with a thickness of 13 mm resp. 18 mm. The strips contained slits and surface cracks. (6) Fracture mechanics analyses of the above mentioned tests and of wide plate tests. The wide plates (960x608x40 mm 3 ) had been tested in a propellant-driven 12 MN dynamic testing facility. For calculating the fracture mechanics parameters of both tests, a dynamic finite element simulation considering the dynamic material behaviour was employed. The finite element analyses showed a good agreement with the simulated tests. This prerequisite allowed to gain critical J-integral values. Generally the results of the large-scale tests were conservative. 19 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  3. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A.; Stearne, Sarah M.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  4. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A McDonald

    Full Text Available Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert, and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption and the arch (energy production during recoil. This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  5. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  6. Dynamic Compression Promotes the Matrix Synthesis of Nucleus Pulposus Cells Through Up-Regulating N-CDH Expression in a Perfusion Bioreactor Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichun; Yao, Hui; Li, Pei; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Junbin; Lv, Lulu; Teng, Haijun; Guo, Zhiliang; Zhao, Huiqing; Hou, Gang

    2018-01-01

    An adequate matrix production of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells is an important tissue engineering-based strategy to regenerate degenerative discs. Here, we mainly aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of mechanical compression (i.e., static compression vs. dynamic compression) on the matrix synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) cultured NP cells in vitro. Rat NP cells seeded on small intestinal submucosa (SIS) cryogel scaffolds were cultured in the chambers of a self-developed, mechanically active bioreactor for 10 days. Meanwhile, the NP cells were subjected to compression (static compression or dynamic compression at a 10% scaffold deformation) for 6 hours once per day. Unloaded NP cells were used as controls. The cellular phenotype and matrix biosynthesis of NP cells were investigated by real-time PCR and Western blotting assays. Lentivirus-mediated N-cadherin (N-CDH) knockdown and an inhibitor, LY294002, were used to further investigate the role of N-CDH and the PI3K/Akt pathway in this process. Dynamic compression better maintained the expression of cell-specific markers (keratin-19, FOXF1 and PAX1) and matrix macromolecules (aggrecan and collagen II), as well as N-CDH expression and the activity of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in the 3D-cultured NP cells compared with those expression levels and activity in the cells grown under static compression. Further analysis showed that the N-CDH knockdown significantly down-regulated the expression of NP cell-specific markers and matrix macromolecules and inhibited the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway under dynamic compression. However, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway had no effects on N-CDH expression but down-regulated the expression of NP cell-specific markers and matrix macromolecules under dynamic compression. Dynamic compression increases the matrix synthesis of 3D-cultured NP cells compared with that of the cells under static compression, and the N-CDH-PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in this regulatory process

  7. Dynamic response of the high flux isotope reactor structure caused by nearby heavy load drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Shih-Jung.

    1995-01-01

    A heavy load of 50,000 lb is assumed to drop from 10 ft above the bottom of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pool at the loading station. The consequences of the dynamic impact to the bottom slab of the pool and to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel are analyzed by applying the ABAQUS computer code The results show that both the BM vessel structure and its supporting legs are subjected to elastic disturbances only and, therefore, will not be damaged. The bottom slab of the pool, however, will be damaged to about half of the slab thickness. The velocity response spectrum at the concrete floor next to the HFIR vessel as a result of the vibration caused by the impact is obtained. It is concluded, that the damage caused by heavy load drop at the loading station is controlled by the slab damage and the nearby HFIR vessel and the supporting legs will not be damaged

  8. Optimization of structures subjected to dynamic load: deterministic and probabilistic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élcio Cassimiro Alves

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper deals with the deterministic and probabilistic optimization of structures against bending when submitted to dynamic loads. The deterministic optimization problem considers the plate submitted to a time varying load while the probabilistic one takes into account a random loading defined by a power spectral density function. The correlation between the two problems is made by one Fourier Transformed. The finite element method is used to model the structures. The sensitivity analysis is performed through the analytical method and the optimization problem is dealt with by the method of interior points. A comparison between the deterministic optimisation and the probabilistic one with a power spectral density function compatible with the time varying load shows very good results.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of bun baking process under different oven load conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, A; Chhanwal, N; Indrani, D; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2014-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to study the temperature profile of the bun during baking process. Evaporation-condensation mechanism and effect of the latent heat during phase change of water was incorporated in this model to represent actual bun baking process. Simulation results were validated with experimental measurements of bun temperature at two different positions. Baking process is completed within 20 min, after the temperature of crumb become stable at 98 °C. Further, this study was extended to investigate the effect of partially (two baking trays) loaded and fully loaded (eight baking trays) oven on temperature profile of bun. Velocity and temperature profile differs in partially loaded and fully loaded oven. Bun placed in top rack showed rapid baking while bun placed in bottom rack showed slower baking due to uneven temperature distribution in the oven. Hence, placement of bun inside the oven affects temperature of bun and consequently, the quality of the product.

  10. STAMINA OF A GASKETED BOLTED FLANGED PIPE JOINT UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gasketed bolted flange joints are the most critical components in pipelines for their sealing and strength under operating conditions. Most of the work available in literature is under static loading, whereas in industry, cyclic loads are applied due to the vibrating machinery such as motors, pumps, sloshing in offshore applications and in the ships etc. In this study a three dimensional finite element analysis of a gasketed joint is carried out using a spiral wound gasket under bolt up and dynamic operating conditions (internal pressure, axial and bending singly and in combination. The cyclic axial loads are concluded relatively more challenging for both the sealing and strength of the joint. Higher magnitudes of loads and frequencies are also observed more challenging to the joints performance.

  11. Mechanical properties of stanene under uniaxial and biaxial loading: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojumder, Satyajit [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Amin, Abdullah Al [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case western Reverse University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Islam, Md Mahbubul, E-mail: mmi122@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Stanene, a graphene like two dimensional honeycomb structure of tin has attractive features in electronics application. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using modified embedded atom method potential to investigate mechanical properties of stanene. We studied the effect of temperature and strain rate on mechanical properties of α-stanene for both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. Our study suggests that with the increasing temperature, both the fracture strength and strain of the stanene decrease. Uniaxial loading in zigzag direction shows higher fracture strength and strain compared to the armchair direction, while no noticeable variation in the mechanical properties is observed for biaxial loading. We also found at a higher loading rate, material exhibits higher fracture strength and strain. These results will aid further investigation of stanene as a potential nano-electronics substitute.

  12. Dynamic Load Balancing Based on Constrained K-D Tree Decomposition for Parallel Particle Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiang; Guo, Hanqi; Yuan, Xiaoru; Hong, Fan; Peterka, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Particle tracing is a fundamental technique in flow field data visualization. In this work, we present a novel dynamic load balancing method for parallel particle tracing. Specifically, we employ a constrained k-d tree decomposition approach to dynamically redistribute tasks among processes. Each process is initially assigned a regularly partitioned block along with duplicated ghost layer under the memory limit. During particle tracing, the k-d tree decomposition is dynamically performed by constraining the cutting planes in the overlap range of duplicated data. This ensures that each process is reassigned particles as even as possible, and on the other hand the new assigned particles for a process always locate in its block. Result shows good load balance and high efficiency of our method.

  13. Dynamic Load on a Pipe Caused by Acetylene Detonations – Experiments and Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Sperber

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The load acting on the wall of a pipe by a detonation, which is travelling through, is not yet well characterized. The main reasons are the limited amount of sufficiently accurate pressure time history data and the requirement of considering the dynamics of the system. Laser vibrometry measurements were performed to determine the dynamic response of the pipe wall on a detonation. Different modelling approaches were used to quantify, theoretically, the radial displacements of the pipe wall. There is good agreement between measured and predicted values of vibration frequencies and the propagation velocities of transverse waves. Discrepancies mainly due to wave propagation effects were found in the amplitudes of the radial velocities. They might be overcome by the use of a dynamic load factor or improved modelling methods.

  14. Nonlinear dynamic response of electro-thermo-mechanically loaded piezoelectric cylindrical shell reinforced with BNNTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J H; Yang, J; Kitipornchai, S

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the nonlinear dynamic response of piezoelectric cylindrical shells reinforced with boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under a combined axisymmetric electro-thermo-mechanical loading. By employing the classical Donnell shell theory, the von Kármán–Donnell kinematic relationship, and a piezo-elastic constitutive law including thermal effects, the nonlinear governing equations of motion of the shell are derived through the Reissner variational principle. The finite difference method and a time-integration scheme are used to obtain the nonlinear dynamic response of the BNNT-reinforced piezoelectric shell. A parametric study is conducted, showing the effects of geometrically nonlinear deformation, applied voltage, temperature change, mechanical load, BNNT volume fraction and boundary conditions on the nonlinear dynamic response. (paper)

  15. Research on dynamic creep strain and settlement prediction under the subway vibration loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhui; Miao, Linchang

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore the dynamic characteristics and settlement prediction of soft soil. Accordingly, the dynamic shear modulus formula considering the vibration frequency was utilized and the dynamic triaxial test conducted to verify the validity of the formula. Subsequently, the formula was applied to the dynamic creep strain function, with the factors influencing the improved dynamic creep strain curve of soft soil being analyzed. Meanwhile, the variation law of dynamic stress with sampling depth was obtained through the finite element simulation of subway foundation. Furthermore, the improved dynamic creep strain curve of soil layer was determined based on the dynamic stress. Thereafter, it could to estimate the long-term settlement under subway vibration loading by norms. The results revealed that the dynamic shear modulus formula is straightforward and practical in terms of its application to the vibration frequency. The values predicted using the improved dynamic creep strain formula closed to the experimental values, whilst the estimating settlement closed to the measured values obtained in the field test.

  16. Retrofit device to improve vapor compression cooling system performance by dynamic blower speed modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert Paul; Hahn, David C.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    2015-12-08

    A device and method are provided to improve performance of a vapor compression system using a retrofittable control board to start up the vapor compression system with the evaporator blower initially set to a high speed. A baseline evaporator operating temperature with the evaporator blower operating at the high speed is recorded, and then the device detects if a predetermined acceptable change in evaporator temperature has occurred. The evaporator blower speed is reduced from the initially set high speed as long as there is only a negligible change in the measured evaporator temperature and therefore a negligible difference in the compressor's power consumption so as to obtain a net increase in the Coefficient of Performance.

  17. Efficient graph-based dynamic load-balancing for parallel large-scale agent-based traffic simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.; Cai, W.; Aydt, H.; Lees, M.; Tolk, A.; Diallo, S.Y.; Ryzhov, I.O.; Yilmaz, L.; Buckley, S.; Miller, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the issues of parallelizing large-scale agent-based traffic simulations is partitioning and load-balancing. Traffic simulations are dynamic applications where the distribution of workload in the spatial domain constantly changes. Dynamic load-balancing at run-time has shown better efficiency

  18. On the crack propagation analysis of rock like Brazilian disc specimens containing cracks under compressive line loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Haeri

    Full Text Available The pre-existing cracks in the brittle substances seem to be the main cause of their failure under various loading conditions. In this study, a simultaneous analytical, experimental and numerical analysis of crack propagation, cracks coalescence and failure process of brittle materials has been performed. Brazilian disc tests are being carried out to evaluate the cracks propagation paths in rock-like Brazilian disc specimens containing single and double cracks (using rock-like specimens which are specially prepared from Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, fine sands and water in a rock mechanics laboratory. The failure load of the pre-cracked disc specimens are measured showing the decreasing effects of the cracks and their orientation on the final failure load. The same specimens are numerically simulated by a higher order indirect boundary element method known as displacement discontinuity method. These numerical results are compared with the existing analytical and experimental results proving the accuracy and validity of the proposed numerical method. The numerical and experimental results obtained from the tested specimens are in good agreement and demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. Effect of engine load and biogas flow rate to the performance of a compression ignition engine run in dual-fuel (dieselbiogas) mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.

    2018-02-01

    The Government of Indonesia (GoI) has released a target on reduction Green Houses Gases emissions (GHG) by 26% from level business-as-usual by 2020, and the target can be up to 41% by international supports. In the energy sector, this target can be reached effectively by promoting fossil fuel replacement or blending with biofuel. One of the potential solutions is operating compression ignition (CI) engine in dual-fuel (diesel-biogas) mode. In this study effects of engine load and biogas flow rate on the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a compression ignition engine run in dual-fuel mode are investigated. In the present study, the used biogas is refined with methane content 70% of volume. The objectives are to explore the optimum operating condition of the CI engine run in dual-fuel mode. The experiments are performed on a four-strokes CI engine with rated output power of 4.41 kW. The engine is tested at constant speed 1500 rpm. The engine load varied from 600W to 1500W and biogas flow rate varied from 0 L/min to 6 L/min. The results show brake thermal efficiency of the engine run in dual-fuel mode is better than pure diesel mode if the biogas flow rates are 2 L/min and 4 L/min. It is recommended to operate the present engine in a dual-fuel mode with biogas flow rate of 4 L/min. The consumption of diesel fuel can be replaced up to 50%.

  20. Dynamic stresses in a Francis model turbine at deep part load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Wilhelm; von Locquenghien, Florian; Conrad, Philipp; Koutnik, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    A comparison between numerically obtained dynamic stresses in a Francis model turbine at deep part load with experimental ones is presented. Due to the change in the electrical power mix to more content of new renewable energy sources, Francis turbines are forced to operate at deep part load in order to compensate stochastic nature of wind and solar power and to ensure grid stability. For the extension of the operating range towards deep part load improved understanding of the harsh flow conditions and their impact on material fatigue of hydraulic components is required in order to ensure long life time of the power unit. In this paper pressure loads on a model turbine runner from unsteady two-phase computational fluid dynamics simulation at deep part load are used for calculation of mechanical stresses by finite element analysis. Therewith, stress distribution over time is determined. Since only few runner rotations are simulated due to enormous numerical cost, more effort has to be spent to evaluation procedure in order to obtain objective results. By comparing the numerical results with measured strains accuracy of the whole simulation procedure is verified.