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Sample records for dust related sinonasal

  1. Wood-related occupations, wood dust exposure, and sinonasal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R B; Gerin, M; Raatgever, J W; de Bruyn, A

    1986-10-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine the relations between type of woodworking and the extent of wood dust exposure to the risks for specific histologic types of sinonasal cancer. In cooperation with the major treatment centers in the Netherlands, 116 male patients newly diagnosed between 1978 and 1981 with primary malignancies of epithelial origin of this site were identified for study. Living controls were selected from the municipal registries, and deceased controls were selected from the national death registry. Interviews were completed for 91 (78%) cases and 195 (75%) controls. Job histories were coded by industry and occupation. An index of exposure was developed to classify the extent of occupational exposure to wood dust. When necessary, adjustment was made for age and usual cigarette use. The risk for nasal adenocarcinoma was elevated by industry for the wood and paper industry (odds ratio (OR) = 11.9) and by occupation for those employed in furniture and cabinet making (OR = 139.8), in factory joinery and carpentry work (OR = 16.3), and in association with high-level wood dust exposure (OR = 26.3). Other types of nasal cancer were not found to be associated with wood-related industries or occupations. A moderate excess in risk for squamous cell cancer (OR = 2.5) was associated with low-level wood dust exposure; however, no dose-response relation was evident. The association between wood dust and adenocarcinoma was strongest for those employed in wood dust-related occupations between 1930 and 1941. The risk of adenocarcinoma did not appear to decrease for at least 15 years after termination of exposure to wood dust. No cases of nasal adenocarcinoma were observed in men whose first exposure to wood dust occurred after 1941.

  2. Mutations in TP53 tumor suppressor gene in wood dust-related sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Heikkilä, Pirjo

    2010-01-01

    The causal role of work-related exposure to wood dust in the development of sinonasal cancer has long been established by numerous epidemiologic studies. To study molecular changes in these tumors, we analyzed TP53 gene mutations in 358 sinonasal cancer cases with or without occupational exposure...... affected the ORs only slightly. Smoking did not influence the occurrence of TP53 mutation; however, it was associated with multiple mutations (p = 0.03). As far as we are aware, this is the first study to demonstrate a high prevalence of TP53 mutation-positive cases in a large collection of sinonasal...... cancers with data on occupational exposure. Our results indicate that mutational mechanisms, in particular TP53 mutations, are associated with work-related exposure to wood dust in sinonasal cancer....

  3. K-ras mutations in sinonasal cancers in relation to wood dust exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Vogel, Ulla; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Wallin, Håkan; Hansen, Johnni; Steiniche, Torben; Dictor, Michael; Antonsen, Annemarie; Wolff, Henrik; Schlünssen, Vivi; Holmila, Reetta; Luce, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    Cancer in the sinonasal tract is rare, but persons who have been occupationally exposed to wood dust have a substantially increased risk. It has been estimated that approximately 3.6 million workers are exposed to inhalable wood dust in EU. In previous small studies of this cancer, ras mutations were suggested to be related to wood dust exposure, but these studies were too limited to detect statistically significant associations. We examined 174 cases of sinonasal cancer diagnosed in Denmark in the period from 1991 to 2001. To ensure uniformity, all histological diagnoses were carefully reviewed pathologically before inclusion. Paraffin embedded tumour samples from 58 adenocarcinomas, 109 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 other carcinomas were analysed for K-ras codon 12, 13 and 61 point mutations by restriction fragment length polymorphisms and direct sequencing. Information on occupational exposure to wood dust and to potential confounders was obtained from telephone interviews and from registry data. Among the patients in this study, exposure to wood dust was associated with a 21-fold increased risk of having an adenocarcinoma than a squamous cell carcinoma compared to unexposed [OR = 21.0, CI = 8.0–55.0]. K-ras was mutated in 13% of the adenocarcinomas (seven patients) and in 1% of squamous cell carcinomas (one patient). Of these eight mutations, five mutations were located in the codon 12. The exact sequence change of remaining three could not be identified unambiguously. Among the five identified mutations, the G→A transition was the most common, and it was present in tumour tissue from two wood dust exposed adenocarcinoma patients and one patient with unknown exposure. Previously published studies of sinonasal cancer also identify the GGT → GAT transition as the most common and often related to wood dust exposure. Patients exposed to wood dust seemed more likely to develop adenocarcinoma compared to squamous cell carcinomas. K-ras mutations were detected

  4. HPV-related Multiphenotypic Sinonasal Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bishop, Justin A; Andreasen, Simon; Hang, Jen-Fan

    2017-01-01

    . Immunohistochemistry for p16, c-kit, and myoepithelial cell markers (S100, actin, calponin, p63, and/or p40) was performed along with RNA in situ hybridization for HPV (type 33-specific as well as a high-risk cocktail). Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies for fusions of MYB, NFIB, and MYBL1 was performed...... gene fusions were positive. In the 38 cases with follow-up data, (mean follow-up, 42 mo) 14 recurred locally and 2 metastasized (lung, finger). There were no regional lymph node metastases, and no tumor-related deaths. HMSC is a distinct sinonasal neoplasm characterized by myoepithelial differentiation...

  5. House dust mite allergen Der p 1 effects on sinonasal epithelial tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Oswaldo A; Den Beste, Kyle; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma; Wise, Sarah K

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial permeability is highly dependent upon the integrity of tight junctions, which are cell-cell adhesion complexes located at the apical aspect of the lateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We hypothesize that sinonasal epithelial exposure to Der p 1 house dust mite antigen decreases expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs), representing a potential mechanism for increased permeability and presentation of antigens across the sinonasal epithelial layer. Confluent cultured primary human sinonasal epithelial cells were exposed to recombinant Der p 1 antigen vs control, and transepithelial resistance measurements were performed over 24 hours. Antibody staining for a panel of TJPs was examined with immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Tissue for these experiments was obtained from 4 patients total. Der p 1 exposed sinonasal cells showed a marked decrease in transepithelial resistance when compared to control cells. In addition, results of Western immunoblot and immunofluorescent labeling demonstrated decreased expression of TJPs claudin-1 and junction adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) in Der p 1-exposed cultured sinonasal cells vs controls. Der p 1 antigen exposure decreases sinonasal epithelium TJP expression, most notably seen in JAM-A and claudin-1 in these preliminary experiments. This decreased TJP expression likely contributes to increased epithelial permeability and represents a potential mechanism for transepithelial antigen exposure in allergic rhinitis. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  6. House Dust Mite Der p 1 Effects on Sinonasal Epithelial Tight Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Oswaldo A.; Beste, Kyle Den; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma; Wise, Sarah K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial permeability is highly dependent upon the integrity of tight junctions, cell-cell adhesion complexes located at the apical aspect of the lateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We hypothesize that sinonasal epithelial exposure to Der p 1 house dust mite antigen decreases expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs), representing a potential mechanism for increased permeability and presentation of antigens across the sinonasal epithelial layer. Methods Confluent cultured primary human sinonasal epithelial cells were exposed to recombinant Der p 1 antigen versus control, and transepithelial resistance measurements were performed over 24 hours. Antibody staining for a panel of tight junction proteins was examined with immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Tissue for these experiments was obtained from 4 patients total. Results Der p 1 exposed sinonasal cells showed a marked decrease in transepithelial resistance when compared to control cells. In addition, results of Western immunoblot and immunofluorescent labeling demonstrated decreased expression of TJPs claudin-1 and junction adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) in Der p 1 exposed cultured sinonasal cells versus controls. Conclusion Der p 1 antigen exposure decreases sinonasal epithelium TJP expression, most notably seen in JAM-A and claudin-1 in these preliminary experiments. This decreased TJP expression likely contributes to increased epithelial permeability and represents a potential mechanism for transepithelial antigen exposure in allergic rhinitis. PMID:23592402

  7. [Sinonasal carcinoma and exposure to wood and leather dust: analysis of 36 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, M; Mariotti, L; Staffolani, S; Strafella, E; Carlucci, C; Pasquini, E; Tarchini, P; Re, M; Santarelli, L

    2012-01-01

    In order to define the best strategies of prevention and diagnosis of sinonasal cancer, the aim of our study was the investigation of the etiological and prognostic factors related to 36 cases. The enrolled cases were composed mostly of men working in the footwear industry, with a mean age of 63.7 years and mean exposure of 34.6 years. The period between the start of exposure and the appearance of the neoplasm was of 44.6 years, the time between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis was of 10.8 months. Our results suggest that a diagnosis within 6 months after the onset of symptoms is associated with a lower tumor stage, a better survival and to a lower rate of recurrence. Nasal obstruction (58.3%) and epistaxis (52.7%) are the main initial symptoms. In order to obtain an early diagnosis, in addition to periodic clinical controls, a proper information of workers is required.

  8. Sinonasal inflammation in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Konge, L; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    In this review we demonstrate that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently report sinonasal symptoms. Furthermore, we present evidence that smoking on its own can cause nasal disease, and that in COPD patients, nasal inflammation mimics that of the bronchi. All...... this evidence suggests that COPD related sinonasal disease does exist and that smoking on its own rather than systemic inflammation triggers the condition. However, COPD related sinonasal disease remains to be characterized in terms of symptoms and endoscopic findings. In addition, more studies are needed...... to quantify the negative impact of sinonasal symptoms on the quality of life in COPD patients....

  9. IgG4-related disease with sinonasal involvement: A case series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Yadav, Vikas; Irodi, Aparna; Mani, Sunithi; Varghese, Ajoy Mathew

    2014-01-01

    We present the imaging findings in two cases of IgG4-related disease involving the sinonasal region in the pediatric age group. Imaging findings in IgG4-related disease affecting the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses have been rarely reported in literature. The diagnosis is made by a combination of clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings. Radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings of this condition to ensure early diagnosis and treatment

  10. Sinonasal quality of life outcomes following laser treatment of epistaxis related to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Edward C; Peng, Kevin A; Thompson, Christopher F; Suh, Jeffrey D; Wang, Marilene B

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited vascular disorder which manifests as recurrent, episodic, and potentially debilitating epistaxis. In this study, we aim to (1) characterize baseline sinonasal symptoms for HHT patients and to (2) analyze changes in sinonasal symptoms before and after laser surgical treatment for HHT. We performed a retrospective chart review of sinonasal outcome test-22 (SNOT-22) scores before and after one or more laser surgical treatments for HHT-related epistaxis between January 1, 2010 and December 1, 2015 at a tertiary academic medical center with an HHT Foundation-approved Center of Excellence. Preoperative and all subsequent postoperative SNOT-22 scores (short-term, epistaxis. Mean preoperative, short-term postoperative, and long-term postoperative SNOT-22 scores were 34.6 ± 5.4, 33.9 ± 5.5, and 18.8 ± 4.6, respectively. When analyzing subcategory scores, there was a significant improvement in the rhinologic domain from short-term to long-term postoperatively (13.5 vs. 7.3; p = 0.004), in the non-rhinologic otolaryngic domain from short-term to long-term postoperatively (2.8 vs. 1.7; p = 0.014), and in the psychological domain from preoperative and short-term postoperative to long-term postoperatively (12.2 and 10.0 vs. 6.0; p = 0.015 and 0.01, respectively). Following laser surgery for HHT-related epistaxis, patients' rhinologic symptoms worsened on the short run postoperatively but improved over time. The main benefit of laser treatment appears to be long-term improvement in psychological factors. This study once again underscores the important role of the otolaryngologist in managing sinonasal manifestations of HHT.

  11. Contemporary management of sinonasal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbins, K.T.; Ferlito, A.; Silver, C.E.; Takes, R.P.; Strojan, P.; Snyderman, C.H.; Bree, R. de; Haigentz Jr., M.; Langendijk, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Shaha, A.R.; Hanna, E.Y.; Werner, J.A.; Suarez, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sinonasal cancer is a relatively uncommon entity encountered by head and neck oncologists, rhinologists, and skull base surgeons. Recent innovations in surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic modalities raise the question of whether there has been any measurable improvement for treatment

  12. CONTEMPORARY MANAGEMENT OF SINONASAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbins, K. Thomas; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Strojan, Primoz; Snyderman, Carl H.; de Bree, Remco; Haigentz, Missak; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Shaha, Ashok R.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Werner, Jochen A.; Suarez, Carlos

    Background. Sinonasal cancer is a relatively uncommon entity encountered by head and neck oncologists, rhinologists, and skull base surgeons. Recent innovations in surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic modalities raise the question of whether there has been any measurable improvement for treatment

  13. Association between septal deviation and sinonasal papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Takenori; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Honkura, Yohei; Oshima, Hidetoshi; Arakawa, Kazuya; Oshima, Takeshi; Katori, Yukio

    2013-12-01

    Sinonasal papilloma is a common benign epithelial tumor of the sinonasal tract and accounts for 0.5% to 4% of all nasal tumors. The etiology of sinonasal papilloma remains unclear, although human papilloma virus has been proposed as a major risk factor. Other etiological factors, such as anatomical variations of the nasal cavity, may be related to the pathogenesis of sinonasal papilloma, because deviated nasal septum is seen in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. We, therefore, investigated the involvement of deviated nasal septum in the development of sinonasal papilloma. Preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging findings of 83 patients with sinonasal papilloma were evaluated retrospectively. The side of papilloma and the direction of septal deviation showed a significant correlation. Septum deviated to the intact side in 51 of 83 patients (61.4%) and to the affected side in 18 of 83 patients (21.7%). Straight or S-shaped septum was observed in 14 of 83 patients (16.9%). Even after excluding 27 patients who underwent revision surgery and 15 patients in whom the papilloma touched the concave portion of the nasal septum, the concave side of septal deviation was associated with the development of sinonasal papilloma (p = 0.040). The high incidence of sinonasal papilloma in the concave side may reflect the consequences of the traumatic effects caused by wall shear stress of the high-velocity airflow and the increased chance of inhaling viruses and pollutants. The present study supports the causative role of human papilloma virus and toxic chemicals in the occurrence of sinonasal papilloma.

  14. Nasal and sinonasal cancer. Connection with occupational exposures in Denmark, Finland and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernberg, S; Westerholm, P; Schultz-Larsen, K

    1983-01-01

    A joint Danish-Finnish-Swedish case-referent investigation was initiated in 1977 in order to study the connection between nasal and sinonasal cancer and various occupational exposures. All new cases of nasal and sinonasal cancer were collected from the national cancer registers (Finland and Sweden...... carcinomas. No associations were found for a number of exposures, including agricultural chemicals, textile dust, asbestos, quartz dust, organic solvents and leather work. Possible exposure to formaldehyde was evenly distributed between the cases and referents....

  15. Human Papillomavirus-related Carcinoma with Adenoid Cystic-like Features of the Sinonasal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Simon; Bishop, J; Hansen, T V O

    2017-01-01

    with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), a rare and aggressive carcinoma originating in the minor salivary glands. Termed HPV-related carcinoma with ACC-like features, only 9 cases have been reported. To clarify the occurrence of these tumours we screened a large material for presence of HPV-related ACC....... For the distinction between ACC and HPV-related ACC-like carcinoma, p16, MYB immunohistochemistry, or investigation of MYB, MYBL1, and NFIB gene status are valuable. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Carbohydrate and protein contents of grain dusts in relation to dust morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashek, W V; Olenchock, S A; Mayfield, J E; Wirtz, G H; Wolz, D E; Young, C A

    1986-01-01

    Grain dusts contain a variety of materials which are potentially hazardous to the health of workers in the grain industry. Because the characterization of grain dusts is incomplete, we are defining the botanical, chemical, and microbial contents of several grain dusts collected from grain elevators in the Duluth-Superior regions of the U.S. Here, we report certain of the carbohydrate and protein contents of dusts in relation to dust morphology. Examination of the gross morphologies of the dusts revealed that, except for corn, each dust contained either husk or pericarp (seed coat in the case of flax) fragments in addition to respirable particles. When viewed with the light microscope, the fragments appeared as elongated, pointed structures. The possibility that certain of the fragments within corn, settled, and spring wheat were derived from cell walls was suggested by the detection of pentoses following colorimetric assay of neutralized 2 N trifluoroacetic acid hydrolyzates of these dusts. The presence of pentoses together with the occurrence of proteins within water washings of grain dusts suggests that glycoproteins may be present within the dusts. With scanning electron microscopy, each dust was found to consist of a distinct assortment of particles in addition to respirable particles. Small husk fragments and "trichome-like" objects were common to all but corn dust. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:3709476

  17. A rotating dust cloud in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnor, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    An axially symmetric, stationary exact solution of Einstein's equations for dust is studied. It is asymptotically flat, and represents a rotating dust cloud extending tenuously to infinity, containing a singularity at the centre. An explanation is given as to why there exists no corresponding solution in Newtonian theory. (author)

  18. SINONASAL MYOPERICYTOMA: A CASE REPORT

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    K. M. Surendran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Myopericytoma is a rare vascular neoplasm. It is extremely rare in sinonasal region. We report such a case which was treated by medial maxillectomy via lateral rhinotomy approach.

  19. Externalities from lignite mining-related dust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannis, A.; Roussos, D.; Menegaki, M.; Damigos, D.

    2014-01-01

    During the last three decades, several studies have been conducted in order to assess the external costs of electricity production from fossil fuels, especially coal and lignite. Nevertheless, these studies usually ignore the impacts generated by the upstream mining works. This paper contributes to existing literature and attempts to fill this gap by exploring the externalities of lignite mining owing to the emission of suspended particulate matter. To this end, a ‘bottom-up’ approach is implemented, using as case study the largest operational lignite surface mine at the Lignite Center of Western Macedonia (Greece). The results indicate that annual air pollution externalities of lignite mining are of the order of 3€/ton of lignite, which corresponds to around 5.0 €/MW h. The estimated costs are significantly lower, i.e. up to 80%, when dust deposition is considered in air dispersion models. In any case, these findings should be seen as a starting point for discussion owing to the lack of specific emission rates for Greek lignite mines. - Highlights: • Externalities from lignite mining-related dust emissions are 3 €/t of lignite. • Externalities of mining correspond to around 5.0 €/MW h. • Externalities are significantly lower, up to 80%, if dust deposition is considered. • There is lack of specific dust emission rates for lignite mining. • There are high discrepancies in existing dust emission rates for lignite mining

  20. COX-2 and p53 in human sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Cyr, Diane; Luce, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    The causal role of wood-dust exposure in sinonasal cancer (SNC) has been established in epidemiological studies, but the mechanisms of SNC carcinogenesis are still largely unknown. Increased amounts of COX-2 are found in both premalignant and malignant tissues, and experimental evidence link COX-2...... to development of cancer. Many signals that activate COX-2 also induce tumor suppressor p53, a transcription factor central in cellular stress response. We investigated COX-2 and p53 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 50 SNCs (23 adenocarcinomas, and 27 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); 48 analyzed for COX-2...... displayed adenocarcinoma. COX-2 was expressed at higher levels in adenocarcinoma as compared to SSC (p COX-2 expression showed significant association with occupational exposure to wood dust (p = 0.024), and with nonsmoking status (p = 0.001). No statistically significant associations between...

  1. Coal Mine Dust Desquamative Chronic Interstitial Pneumonia: A Precursor of Dust-Related Diffuse Fibrosis and of Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav M Jelic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diseases associated with coal mine dust continue to affect coal miners. Elucidation of initial pathological changes as a precursor of coal dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema, may have a role in treatment and prevention. Objective: To identify the precursor of dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. Methods: Birefringent silica/silicate particles were counted by standard microscope under polarized light in the alveolar macrophages and fibrous tissue in 25 consecutive autopsy cases of complicated coal worker's pneumoconiosis and in 21 patients with tobacco-related respiratory bronchiolitis. Results: Coal miners had 331 birefringent particles/high power field while smokers had 4 (p<0.001. Every coal miner had intra-alveolar macrophages with silica/silicate particles and interstitial fibrosis ranging from minimal to extreme. All coal miners, including those who never smoked, had emphysema. Fibrotic septa of centrilobular emphysema contained numerous silica/silicate particles while only a few were present in adjacent normal lung tissue. In coal miners who smoked, tobacco-associated interstitial fibrosis was replaced by fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Conclusion: The presence of silica/silicate particles and anthracotic pigment-laden macrophages inside the alveoli with various degrees of interstitial fibrosis indicated a new disease: coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, a precursor of both dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. In studied coal miners, fibrosis caused by smoking is insignificant in comparison with fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Counting birefringent particles in the macrophages from bronchioalveolar lavage may help detect coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, and may initiate early therapy and preventive measures.

  2. Coal Mine Dust Desquamative Chronic Interstitial Pneumonia: A Precursor of Dust-Related Diffuse Fibrosis and of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Estalilla, Oscar C; Sawyer-Kaplan, Phyllis R; Plata, Milton J; Powers, Jeremy T; Emmett, Mary; Kuenstner, John T

    2017-07-01

    Diseases associated with coal mine dust continue to affect coal miners. Elucidation of initial pathological changes as a precursor of coal dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema, may have a role in treatment and prevention. To identify the precursor of dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. Birefringent silica/silicate particles were counted by standard microscope under polarized light in the alveolar macrophages and fibrous tissue in 25 consecutive autopsy cases of complicated coal worker's pneumoconiosis and in 21 patients with tobacco-related respiratory bronchiolitis. Coal miners had 331 birefringent particles/high power field while smokers had 4 (pcoal miner had intra-alveolar macrophages with silica/silicate particles and interstitial fibrosis ranging from minimal to extreme. All coal miners, including those who never smoked, had emphysema. Fibrotic septa of centrilobular emphysema contained numerous silica/silicate particles while only a few were present in adjacent normal lung tissue. In coal miners who smoked, tobacco-associated interstitial fibrosis was replaced by fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. The presence of silica/silicate particles and anthracotic pigment-laden macrophages inside the alveoli with various degrees of interstitial fibrosis indicated a new disease: coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, a precursor of both dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. In studied coal miners, fibrosis caused by smoking is insignificant in comparison with fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Counting birefringent particles in the macrophages from bronchioalveolar lavage may help detect coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, and may initiate early therapy and preventive measures.

  3. Sinonasal polyposis: investigation by direct coronal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drutman, J.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Babbel, R.W.; Sonkens, J.W.; Braby, D.

    1994-01-01

    To demonstrate the typical clinical and CT features of sinonasal polyposis, we reviewed the clinical records and preoperative direct coronal CT scans of 35 patients with surgically proven disease. Symptoms included progressive nasal stuffiness (100 %), rhinorrhea (69 %), facial pain (60 %), headache (43 %) and anosmia (17 %). We found associations with rhinitis (46 %), asthma (29 %) and aspirin sensitivity (9 %). Coronal CT features included polypoid masses in the nasal cavity (91 %), partial or complete pansinus opacification (90 %), enlargement of infundibula (89 %), bony attenuation of the ethmoid trabeculae (63 %) and nasal septum (37 %), opacified ethmoid sinuses with convex lateral walls (51 %) and air-fluid levels (43 %). The latter feature correlated with symptoms and signs of acute sinusitis in only 40 % of patients. Recognition of sinonasal polyposis is important to the endoscopic surgeon since it can be the most troubling sinonasal inflammatory disease to manage due to its aggressive nature and tendency to recur despite appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  4. Maksilektomi Total Dengan Eksenterasi Orbita Pada Karsinoma Mukoepidermoid Sinonasal

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    Bestari J. Budiman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Karsinoma mukoepidermoid sinonasal merupakan salah satu tumor ganas pada saluran nafas atas. Gejalanya pada stadium dini tidak khas, sehingga jarang terdiagnosis. Histopatologi merupakan diagnosis pasti dan salah satu faktor yang menentukan pilihan terapi dan prognosis. Prinsip penatalaksanaan karsinoma sinonasal adalah multimodalitas dengan pembedahan sebagai pilihan utama. Maksilektomi merupakan suatu tindakan bedah pada tumor sinonasal. Terdapat beberapa jenis maksilektomi berdasarkan lokasi dan perluasan tumor. Dilaporkan sebuah kasus pasien laki-laki usia 33 th yang telah dilakukan maksilektomi total dengan eksenterasi orbita atas indikasi karsinoma mukoepidermoid sinonasal dengan infiltrasi ke orbita. Kata kunci: karsinoma sinonasal, maksilektomi, eksenterasi orbita, mukoepidermoid. Abstract Sinonasal carcinoma is one of malignant upper aerodigestive tract tumor. Low grade of sinonasal tumor is not specific, so is it rare to be early diagnosis. Histopathology is true diagnoses and one of factors to determine the choice of therapy and prognosis. The principal management of sinonasal carcinoma is multimodality which surgery as main choice. Maxillectomy is surgical approach of malignant sinonasal tumor. There are many kinds of maxillectomy based on location and tumor invasion. Has been reported one of patient, male 33 years old which had performed total maxillectomy with orbital exenteration by indicated sinonasal mucoepidermoid carcinoma with orbital infiltration. Keywords: sinonasal carcinoma, maxillectomy, orbital exenteration, mucoepidermoid.

  5. Bibliographic review on sinonasal inverted papilloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides Vilchez, Juan Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Surgical management recommendations, the index of recurrence and malignancy of the sinonasal inverted papilloma were identified through a bibliographic review of publications from 2002 to 2012. In the literature reviewed several aspects were determined: the risk of recurrences and the possibility of malignization of the inverted papilloma is diminished by complete surgical resection. The actual extent of the injury must be determined in an appropriate manner. The open approaches are recommended for a better visualization of the tumor, allowing the complete resection of the lesion. Endoscopic resection is considered a posterior surgical option, to evaluate the extension of the lesion without requiring incisions in the skin, it is recommended for the treatment of lesions in early stages and as a therapeutic option for some lesions in advanced stages. The recurrence rate is lower through endoscopy in relation to traditional approaches. The unilateral nasal obstruction and the presence of a mass in the nasal cavity are clinical manifestations of the inverted papilloma, whose highest incidence occurs in men and women, between 50 and 70 years of age. By means of clinical, radiological and biopsy suspicion this pathology is confirmed. The recurrence rate is 22% in a period of time from eight to 48 months after the initial surgery. The rate of malignization is 10%, which usually occurs between six and 60 months from the diagnosis of papilloma until the appearance of carcinoma [es

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

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    Mohammed A. Gomaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to computed tomography (CT and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases, followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases. While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity.

  7. Solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma of the sinonasal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Produl; Balakrishnan, R; Singh, Rohit; Pujary, Kailesh; Aziz, Benazim

    2011-07-01

    Less than 10% of the patients with plasma cell neoplasms present with a solitary plasmacytoma. Though the nasal cavity is a common extramedullary site, the occurrence is extremely rare. Two cases of solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma of the sinonasal region are reported. The first of which is sinonasal plasmacytoma with concomitant HIV, an association that has been reported rarely in literature to date and is matter of much debate. In the second case report, we present an instance of surgical excision of the tumor using KTP 532 laser. The diagnosis was established using immunohistochemical techniques and multiple myeloma workups were negative in all cases.

  8. Effect of wind speed and relative humidity on atmospheric dust concentrations in semi-arid climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Félix, Omar; Corral-Avitia, Alba Y; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2014-07-15

    Atmospheric particulate have deleterious impacts on human health. Predicting dust and aerosol emission and transport would be helpful to reduce harmful impacts but, despite numerous studies, prediction of dust events and contaminant transport in dust remains challenging. In this work, we show that relative humidity and wind speed are both determinants in atmospheric dust concentration. Observations of atmospheric dust concentrations in Green Valley, AZ, USA, and Juárez, Chihuahua, México, show that PM10 concentrations are not directly correlated with wind speed or relative humidity separately. However, selecting the data for high wind speeds (>4m/s at 10 m elevation), a definite trend is observed between dust concentration and relative humidity: dust concentration increases with relative humidity, reaching a maximum around 25% and it subsequently decreases with relative humidity. Models for dust storm forecasting may be improved by utilizing atmospheric humidity and wind speed as main drivers for dust generation and transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Guilt by Association: The 13 micron Dust Feature in Circumstellar Shells and Related Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, K. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Price, S. D.

    A study of spectra from the SWS on ISO of optically thin oxygen-rich dust shells shows that the strength of the 13 micron dust emission feature is correlated with the CO2 bands (13--17 microns) and dust emission features at 19.8 and 28.1 microns. SRb variables tend to show stronger 13 micron features than Mira variables, suggesting that the presence of the 13 micron and related features depends on pulsation mode and mass-loss rate. The absence of any correlation to dust emission features at 16.8 and 32 microns makes spinel an unlikely carrier. The most plausible carrier of the 13 micron feature remains crystalline alumina, and we suggest that the related dust features may be crystalline silicates. When dust forms in regions of low density, it may condense into crystalline grain structures.

  10. Tilted Bianchi type I dust fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tilted Bianchi type I dust fluid cosmological model in general relativity ... In this paper, we have investigated a tilted Bianchi type I cosmological model filled with dust of perfect fluid in general relativity. ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News ...

  11. Unification of Sinonasal Anatomical Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voegels, Richard Louis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent of endoscopy and computed tomography at the beginning of the 1980s brought to rhinology a revival of anatomy and physiology study. In 1994, the International Conference of Sinus Disease was conceived because the official “Terminologia Anatomica”[1] had little information on the detailed sinonasal anatomy. In addition, there was a lack of uniformity of terminology and definitions. After 20 years, a new conference has been held. The need to use the same terminology led to the publication by the European Society of Rhinology of the “European Position Paper on the Anatomical Terminology of the Internal Nose and Paranasal Sinuses,” that can be accessed freely at www.rhinologyjournal.com. Professor Valerie Lund et al[2] wrote this document reviewing the anatomical terms, comparing to the “Terminology Anatomica” official order to define the structures without eponyms, while respecting the embryological development and especially universalizing and simplifying the terms. A must-read! The text's purpose lies beyond the review of anatomical terminology to universalize the language used to refer to structures of the nasal and paranasal cavities. Information about the anatomy, based on extensive review of the current literature, is arranged in just over 50 pages, which are direct and to the point. The publication may be pleasant reading for learners and teachers of rhinology. This text can be a starting point and enables searching the universal terminology used in Brazil, seeking to converge with this new European proposal for a nomenclature to help us communicate with our peers in Brazil and the rest of the world. The original text of the European Society of Rhinology provides English terms that avoided the use of Latin, and thus fall beyond several national personal translations. It would be admirable if we created our own cross-cultural adaptation of this new suggested anatomical terminology.

  12. In Situ Sampling of Relative Dust Devil Particle Loads and Their Vertical Grain Size Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, Jan; Reiss, Dennis; Balme, Matthew R; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Ori, Gian Gabriele

    2017-04-19

    During a field campaign in the Sahara Desert in southern Morocco, spring 2012, we sampled the vertical grain size distribution of two active dust devils that exhibited different dimensions and intensities. With these in situ samples of grains in the vortices, it was possible to derive detailed vertical grain size distributions and measurements of the lifted relative particle load. Measurements of the two dust devils show that the majority of all lifted particles were only lifted within the first meter (∼46.5% and ∼61% of all particles; ∼76.5 wt % and ∼89 wt % of the relative particle load). Furthermore, ∼69% and ∼82% of all lifted sand grains occurred in the first meter of the dust devils, indicating the occurrence of "sand skirts." Both sampled dust devils were relatively small (∼15 m and ∼4-5 m in diameter) compared to dust devils in surrounding regions; nevertheless, measurements show that ∼58.5% to 73.5% of all lifted particles were small enough to go into suspension (grain size classification). This relatively high amount represents only ∼0.05 to 0.15 wt % of the lifted particle load. Larger dust devils probably entrain larger amounts of fine-grained material into the atmosphere, which can have an influence on the climate. Furthermore, our results indicate that the composition of the surface, on which the dust devils evolved, also had an influence on the particle load composition of the dust devil vortices. The internal particle load structure of both sampled dust devils was comparable related to their vertical grain size distribution and relative particle load, although both dust devils differed in their dimensions and intensities. A general trend of decreasing grain sizes with height was also detected. Key Words: Mars-Dust devils-Planetary science-Desert soils-Atmosphere-Grain sizes. Astrobiology 17, xxx-xxx.

  13. Building-related symptoms and inflammatory potency of dust from office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allermann, Leila; Pejtersen, Jan; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to investigate the association between building-related symptoms (BRS) in office buildings and the inflammatory potency of dust (PD). Furthermore, the association between dust potency and various building characteristics was investigated. Occupants of 22 office buildings...... received a retrospective questionnaire about BRS (2301 respondents). Dust was collected from groups of offices and building characteristics were recorded. The potency of a dust sample to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from the lung epithelial cell line A549 was measured as the slope of the initial...... linear part of the concentration- response curve. Symptoms of the central nervous system (CNS) were associated with the potency of surface dust (OR ¼ 1.4). This association may be due to an association between an index of CNS symptoms and dust potency in offices of 1-6 occupants (OR ¼ 1.5). No single...

  14. Building-related symptoms and inflammatory potency of dust from office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allermann, L; Pejtersen, J; Gunnarsen, L

    2007-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The aim was to investigate the association between building-related symptoms (BRS) in office buildings and the inflammatory potency of dust (PD). Furthermore, the association between dust potency and various building characteristics was investigated. Occupants of 22 office buildings...... received a retrospective questionnaire about BRS (2301 respondents). Dust was collected from groups of offices and building characteristics were recorded. The potency of a dust sample to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from the lung epithelial cell line A549 was measured as the slope of the initial...... linear part of the concentration-response curve. Symptoms of the central nervous system (CNS) were associated with the potency of surface dust (OR = 1.4). This association may be due to an association between an index of CNS symptoms and dust potency in offices of 1-6 occupants (OR = 1.5). No single...

  15. The association between airline flight and sinonasal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargorodsky, Josef; Zheng, Laura; Stillman, Frances; Soong, Andrea; Navas-Acien, Ana; Reh, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Airplane cabin supply air has been shown to contain multiple possible respiratory irritants. In addition, changes in barometric pressure in flight may contribute to specific respiratory conditions. Therefore, there may be an association between commercial airline flight and sinus disease. Participants of the Secondhand-Smoke, Air Quality and Respiratory Health Among Flight Attendants Study were administered an online questionnaire pertaining to their flight experience and respiratory health. Working years, working days per month, and number of trips per month were quantified, as well as smoking exposure and self-reported physician diagnoses of sinusitis, asthma, and rhinitis. The sinonasal outcomes were quantified using a Respiratory Questionnaire Survey (RQS) score. Multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the associations between flight time and sinus disease. A total of 579 participants met the inclusion criteria for this study, with cohort prevalence of sinusitis, asthma, and rhinitis of 25.3%, 14.4%, and 20.5%, respectively. Tertiles 2 and 3 of working days per month were associated with higher RQS scores compared to tertile 1 (p for trend <0.01). Individual symptoms significantly associated with increasing number of working days per month included "need to blow nose," "sneezing," and "thick nasal discharge," and the number of international trips per month was significantly associated with "coughing" and "facial pain and pressure," among other symptoms. This is the largest study to analyze the relations between airline flight time and sinonasal disease. The results suggest a possible association between sinusitis diagnosis, symptom scores, and specific sinonasal symptoms, and airline flight time. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Tilted Bianchi type I dust fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 3. Tilted Bianchi type I dust fluid cosmological model in general ... In this paper, we have investigated a tilted Bianchi type I cosmological model filled with dust of perfect fluid in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition  ...

  17. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using ∼150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses 10 M ☉ . There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10 10 M ☉ . At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10 10 M ☉ is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  18. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Yates, R. M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  19. Examination of Mechanisms Responsible for Organic Dust-related Diseases: Mediator Release induced by Microorgansims. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Svend; Clementsen, Paul; Kristensen, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores......Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores...

  20. Cost-effectiveness assessment in outpatient sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuaire, G; Theis, D; Fackeure, R; Chevalier, D; Gengler, I

    2018-02-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of outpatient sinonasal surgery in terms of clinical efficacy and control of expenses. A retrospective study was conducted from January 2014 to January 2016. Patients scheduled for outpatient sinonasal surgery were systematically included. Clinical data were extracted from surgical and anesthesiology computer files. The cost accounting methods applied in our institution were used to evaluate logistic and technical costs. The standardized hospital fees rating system based on hospital stay and severity in diagnosis-related groups (Groupes homogènes de séjours: GHS) was used to estimate institutional revenue. Over 2years, 927 outpatient surgical procedures were performed. The crossover rate to conventional hospital admission was 2.9%. In a day-1 telephone interview, 85% of patients were very satisfied with the procedure. All outpatient cases showed significantly lower costs than estimated for conventional management with overnight admission, while hospital revenue did not differ between the two. This study confirmed the efficacy of outpatient surgery in this indication. Lower costs could allow savings for the health system by readjusting the rating for the procedure. More precise assessment of cost-effectiveness will require more fine-grained studies based on micro costing at hospital level and assessment of impact on conventional surgical activity and post-discharge community care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Trichothecene mycotoxins and their determinants in settled dust related to grain production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Karl-Christian; Halstensen, Anne Straumfors; Elen, Oleif; Clasen, Per-Erik; Langseth, Wenche; Kristensen, Petter; Eduard, Wijnand

    2004-01-01

    We hypothesise that inhalant exposure to mycotoxins causes developmental outcomes and certain hormone-related cancers that are associated with grain farming in an epidemiological study. The aim of the present study was to identify and validate determinants of measured trichothecene mycotoxins in grain dust as work environmental trichothecene exposure indicators. Settled grain dust was collected in 92 Norwegian farms during seasons of 1999 and 2000. Production characteristics and climatic data were studied as determinants of trichothecenes in settled dust samples obtained during the production of barley (N = 59), oats (N = 32), and spring wheat (N = 13). Median concentrations of trichothecenes in grain dust were grain dust in this study. Differences in cereal species, production properties and districts contributed less to explain mycotoxin concentrations. Fungal forecasts are validated as indicators of mycotoxin exposure of grain farmers and their use in epidemiological studies may be warranted.

  2. INCIDENCE OF FUNGAL ELEMENTS IN SINONASAL POLYPOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh G. S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nasal polyposis is a disease entity characterised by formation of pseudoedema of sinonasal mucus membrane progressing to form polyps. It presents clinically with nasal obstruction and fleshy masses in the nasal cavity. The nasal mucosa reacts to formation of polypi in allergic fungal sinusitis also. The present study is an attempt to demonstrate possible fungal elements from the polypi removed during surgery by KOH study and HPE study. The aim of the study is to find out the incidence of fungal elements in sinonasal polyposis. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients attending the ENT OPD for nasal obstruction and showing polypi on anterior rhinoscopy were selected. All the patients were subjected to surgery and specimens collected were subjected to KOH study and histopathology to demonstrate fungal elements. RESULTS Among 50 patients, the age range was from 9-57 years; mean age- 36.46 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1.5:1. Deviated nasal septum was found in 38% of patients. Among the unilateral cases, 47% were antrochoanal polyps and 53% were ethmoid polyps. Out of 50 patients, only 3 specimens were positive for fungal elements with KOH study and only 2 cases with fungal culture. Thus, the incidence of fungal elements in sinonasal polyposis was 6%. CONCLUSION The incidence of fungal elements in sinonasal polyposis was 6%. Histopathological examination of polypectomy specimen was negative for invasive fungal disease and showed inflammatory changes only. There is no difference in the detection of the presence of fungal by two methods.

  3. Chapter 12: Surgery for sinonasal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Thomas S; Lane, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis is an effective complement to a well-designed medical regimen. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is among the most common surgeries performed for sinonasal disease refractory to maximal medical therapy. Nasal surgery techniques, such as septoplasty and inferior turbinate surgery, may assist in both relieving the symptom of nasal obstruction and providing access for sinus surgery. Although rare, open sinus techniques are occasionally required.

  4. Management of sinonasal complications after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antisdel, Jastin L; Gumber, Divya; Holmes, Janalee; Sindwani, Raj

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic orbital decompression (EnOD) has proven to be safe and effective for the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy; however, complications do occur. Although the literature focuses on orbital complications, sinonasal complications including postobstructive sinusitis, hemorrhage, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak can also be challenging to manage. This study examines the incidence and management of sinonasal complications in these patients. Retrospective review. Clinical data, surgical findings, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed of patients who underwent EnOD for Graves' disease between March 2004 and November 2010. The incidence and management of postoperative sinonasal complications requiring an intervention were examined. The study group consisted of 50 consecutive patients (86 decompression procedures): 11 males and 39 females with an average age of 48.6 years (SD = 12.9). Incidence of significant sinonasal complications was 3.5% (5/86): with one patient experiencing postoperative hemorrhage requiring operative management, three patients with postoperative obstructive sinusitis, and one patient with nasal obstruction secondary to nasal adhesions that required lysis. The maxillary sinus was the most commonly involved and was managed using the mega-antrostomy technique. In the case of frontal sinusitis, an endoscopic transaxillary approach was utilized to avoid injury to decompressed orbital contents. All complications were successfully managed without sequelae. Sinonasal complications following EnOD are uncommon. In the setting of a decompressed orbit, even routine types of postoperative issues can be challenging and require additional considerations. Successful management of postoperative sinusitis related to outflow obstruction may require more extensive approaches and novel techniques. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2011-01-01

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n d0 /n i0 )) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa (κ), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  6. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeba, F. [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n{sub d0}/n{sub i0})) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa ({kappa}), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  7. Primary Non-Hodgkin's Malignant Lymphoma of the Sinonasal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL of the sinonasal tract are rather uncommon entities. Morphologically and radiographically, sinonasal lymphomas are difficult to distinguish from other malignant neoplasms or non- neoplastic processes. They have a variable presentation from fulminant destructive manifestations to chronic indolent type of disease and may mimic as carcinomas and invasive fungal infection respectively. We report a case of primary NHL involving sinonasal tract in elderly female, which was clinically and radiologically mimicking as sinonasal malignany and was proven as NHL on histological examination and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high index of suspicion, appropriate histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry is necessary to differentiate sinonasal lymphomas from other possibilities. Failure to do so may miss the diagnosis and delay appropriate treatment

  8. Exposures Related to House Dust Microbiota in a U.S. Farming Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyeong; Carnes, Megan U; Butz, Natasha; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Richards, Marie; Umbach, David M; Thorne, Peter S; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Peddada, Shyamal D; London, Stephanie J

    2018-06-01

    Environmental factors can influence the house dust microbiota, which may impact health outcomes. Little is known about how farming exposures impact the indoor microbiota. We aimed to identify exposures related to bacterial communities in house dust in a U.S. farming population. We used 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to characterize bacterial communities in vacuumed dust samples from the bedrooms of a subset of 879 households of farmers and farmers' spouses enrolled in the Agricultural Lung Health Study (ALHS), a case-control study of asthma nested within the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) in North Carolina and Iowa. Information on current farming (past 12 mo), including both crop and animal farming, and other potential microbial sources was obtained via questionnaires. We used linear regression to evaluate associations between exposures and bacterial diversity within each sample, analysis of similarity (ANOSIM), and permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) to identify exposures related to diversity between samples, and analysis of composition of microbiome to examine whether exposures related to diversity were also related to differential abundance of specific operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Current farming was positively associated with bacterial diversity in house dust, with or without adjustment for nonfarm exposures related to diversity, including presence of indoor pets, home condition, and season of dust collection. Many taxa exhibited differential abundance related to farming. Some taxa in the phyla Chloroflexi and Verrucomicrobia were associated [false discovery rate (FDR)<0.05] with farming but not with other nonfarm factors. Many taxa correlated with the concentration of house dust of endotoxin, commonly studied as a general marker of exposure to the farming environment. In this farming population, house dust microbiota differed by current farming status. Understanding the determinants of the indoor microbiota is the first step

  9. Factors relating to windblown dust in associations between ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: In effect estimates of city-specific PM2.5-mortality associations across United States (US), there exists a substantial amount of spatial heterogeneity. Some of this heterogeneity may be due to mass distribution of PM; areas where PM2.5 is likely to be dominated by large size fractions (above 1 micron; e.g., the contribution of windblown dust), may have a weaker association with mortality. Methods: Log rate ratios (betas) for the PM2.5-mortality association—derived from a model adjusting for time, an interaction with age-group, day of week, and natural splines of current temperature, current dew point, and unconstrained temperature at lags 1, 2, and 3, for 313 core-based statistical areas (CBSA) and their metropolitan divisions (MD) over 1999-2005—were used as the outcome. Using inverse variance weighted linear regression, we examined change in log rate ratios in association with PM10-PM2.5 correlation as a marker of windblown dust/higher PM size fraction; linearity of associations was assessed in models using splines with knots at quintile values. Results: Weighted mean PM2.5 association (0.96 percent increase in total non-accidental mortality for a 10 ug/m3 increment in PM2.5) increased by 0.34 (95% confidence interval: 0.20, 0.48) per interquartile change (0.25) in the PM10-PM2.5 correlation, and explained approximately 8% of the observed heterogeneity; the association was linear based on spline analysis. Conclusions: Preliminary results pro

  10. Benign Lesions in Mucosa Adjacent to Intestinal-Type Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Vivanco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to wood dust is a strong risk factor for the development of intestinal-type sinonasal adenocarcinoma (ITAC; however, knowledge on possible precursor lesions or biomarkers is limited. Fifty-one samples of tumor-adjacent mucosa and 19 control samples of mucosa from the unaffected fossa of ITAC patients were evaluated for histological changes and p53 protein expression. Mild dysplasia was observed in 14%, cuboidal metaplasia in 57%, intestinal metaplasia in 8%, squamous metaplasia in 24%, and cylindrocellular hyperplasia in 53% of cases. P53 immunopositivity was generally weak occurring most frequently in squamous metaplasia. Wood dust etiology did not appear of influence on the histological changes, but p53 showed a tendency for higher positivity. Dysplasia adjacent to tumor was indicative of subsequent development of recurrence. In conclusion, precursor lesions do occur in mucosa adjacent to ITAC. This is clinically important, because it may justify the screening of high-risk individuals such as woodworkers.

  11. The management of sinonasal inverted papilloma: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzakis, Georgios; Vlachou, Stamatia; Kyrmizakis, Dionysios; Helidonis, Emmanuel

    2002-03-01

    The inverted papilloma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is a controversial disease. It invades surrounded structures, shows a high recurrence rate after surgical excision and may coexist with squamous cell carcinoma. The use of the optimal surgical approach and technique is of the utmost importance, as it is related to the possibility of recurrence. In cases of tumors of limited size a conservative local excision is sufficient, while, in larger tumors filling the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses a more aggressive strategy is needed, such as a medial maxillectomy after lateral rhinotomy. In this paper we present our experience from treating 42 sinonasal inverted papillomas, using a surgical technique which is based on the conservation of as much part of the healthy lateral nasal wall as possible. This modified medial maxillectomy allows us to create a limited in size and normally functioning nasal cavity, thus minimizing the disadvantages of the classical medial maxillectomy without jeopardizing the safety of the operation.

  12. Dust deposition in southern Nevada and California, 1984-1989: Relations to climate, source area, and source lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheis, Marith C.; Kihl, Rolf

    1995-05-01

    Dust samples collected annually for 5 years from 55 sites in southern Nevada and California provide the first regional source of information on modern rates of dust deposition, grain size, and mineralogical and chemical composition relative to climate and to type and lithology of dust source. The average silt and clay flux (rate of deposition) in southern Nevada and southeastern California ranges from 4.3 to 15.7 g/m2/yr, but in southwestern California the average silt and clay flux is as high as 30 g/m2/yr. The climatic factors that affect dust flux interact with each other and with the factors of source type (playas versus alluvium), source lithology, geographic area, and human disturbance. Average dust flux increases with mean annual temperature but is not correlated to decreases in mean annual precipitation because the regional winds bring dust to relatively wet areas. In contrast, annual dust flux mostly reflects changes in annual precipitation (relative drought) rather than temperature. Although playa and alluvial sources produce about the same amount of dust per unit area, the total volume of dust from the more extensive alluvial sources is much larger. In addition, playa and alluvial sources respond differently to annual changes in precipitation. Most playas produce dust that is richer in soluble salts and carbonate than that from alluvial sources (except carbonate-rich alluvium). Gypsum dust may be produced by the interaction of carbonate dust and anthropogenic or marine sulfates. The dust flux in an arid urbanizing area may be as much as twice that before disturbance but decreases when construction stops. The mineralogic and major-oxide composition of the dust samples indicates that sand and some silt is locally derived and deposited, whereas clay and some silt from different sources can be far-traveled. Dust deposited in the Transverse Ranges of California by the Santa Ana winds appears to be mainly derived from sources to the north and east.

  13. Unusual sinonasal foreign body: presentation of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Rodolfo; Cabrera, Natalia; Martelo, Grettel; Machiavello, Cecilia; Naser, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Sinonasal foreign bodies are rare clinical entities. Their presence in the sinuses can originate complications, so their removal is always indicated. We present 3 cases of sinonasal foreign body, indicating their symptoms, imaging findings and surgical removal. Each patient was assessed with computerized tomography of the sinuses, rigid endoscopy, and then surgical removal. We confirmed the presence of the foreign bodies in all 3 cases and then performed a successful surgical removal by transnasal endoscopy. Sinonasal foreign bodies are infrequent entities that require surgical removal to prevent complications, with transnasal endoscopic surgery being the most commonly used surgical approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Sinonasal Wegener's granulomatosis: CT characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoudiba, F.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Rabia, Hadj M.; Lasjaunias, P.; Cabanne, J.; Bobin, S.

    2003-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a severe and potentially lethal granulomatosis. Even though no specific radiological criteria exist, CT may suggest the correct diagnosis at an early stage. Recent improvement in the prognosis is related to earlier diagnosis, allowing the initiation of efficient and specific treatment before any severe complications occur. We reviewed a series of WG cases in order to establish the CT diagnostic criteria. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of dust related respiratory effects in Dutch and Canadian grain handling industries: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelen, S J; Heederik, D; Dimich-Ward, H D; Chan-Yeung, M; Kennedy, S M

    1996-08-01

    Four previously conducted epidemiological studies in more than 1200 grain workers were used to compare exposure-response relations between exposure to grain dust and respiratory health. The studies included Dutch workers from an animal feed mill and a transfer grain elevator and Canadian workers from a terminal grain elevator and the docks. Relations between forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and exposure were analysed with multiple regression analysis corrected for smoking, age, and height. Exposure variables examined included cumulative and current dust exposure and the numbers of years a subject was employed in the industry. Sampling efficiencies of the Dutch and Canadian measurement techniques were compared in a pilot study. Results of this study were used to correct slopes of exposure-response relations for differences in dust fractions sampled by Dutch and Canadian personal dust samplers. Negative exposure-response relations were shown for regressions of FEV1 on cumulative and current exposure and years employed. Slopes of the exposure-response relations differed by a factor of three to five between industries, apart from results for cumulative exposure. Here the variation in slopes differed by a factor of 100, from -1 to -0.009 ml/mg.y/m3. The variation in slopes between industries reduced to between twofold to fivefold when the Dutch transfer elevator workers were not considered. There was evidence that the small exposure-response slope found for this group is caused by misclassification of exposure and a strong healthy worker effect. Alternative, but less likely explanations for the variation in slopes were differences in exposure concentrations, composition of grain dust, exposure characteristics, and measurement techniques. In conclusion, this study showed moderately similar negative exposure-response relations for four different populations from different countries, despite differences in methods of exposure assessment and exposure estimation.

  16. Cement dust exposure-related emphysema in a construction worker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Karkhanis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although, smoking is considered the most important predisposing factor in development of emphysema; environmental exposures also play an important role. There have been several studies on work related respiratory symptoms and ventilatory disorders among employees of cement industry. We report a case of cement exposure related emphysema in 75 years old woman construction worker.

  17. Effects of wood dust:Inflammation, Genotoxicity and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jette Bornholdt

    cell line A549 measuring inflammatory and DNA damaging effects. The second part consists of a molecular analysis of the K-ras gene for mutations in the hotspots codons in human sinonasal cancers. Design, calibration and validation of the assays were performed. Cancer at the sinonasal cavities is rare...... with incidence rates between of 0.3 to 1.4 per 100,000 for men and 0.1 to 0.8 per 100,000 for women in Europe, depending on country. However, cancer at this site is associated with occupational exposures including wood dust. Especially the adenocarcinoma subtype is strongly associated with exposure to wood dust...... and their potential to cause DNA damage. Contrary to our hypothesis, we showed that pure wood dust is able to cause primary DNA damage, independent of inflammation as well as hardwoods had no higher inflammatory or genotoxic potential than softwoods. To investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the wood dust...

  18. Immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization to pine and beech dust in relation to wood dust exposure levels and respiratory symptoms in the furniture industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünssen, Vivi; Kespohl, Sabine; Jacobsen, Gitte; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Schaumburg, Inger; Sigsgaard, Torben

    2011-03-01

    Wood dust exposure may cause Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic diseases. Our objectives were to estimate pine and beech dust sensitization rates among woodworkers and a reference group, explore the association between exposure and sensitization and between sensitization and respiratory symptoms, and finally investigate the impact of proteinogenic specific IgE (sIgE) epitopes on respiratory symptoms. In a Danish study among 52 furniture factories and 2 reference factories, we evaluated the workers' asthma and rhinitis status using questionnaires and blood samples collected from 1506 woodworkers and 195 references. Workers with asthma symptoms (N=298), a random study sample (N=399) and a random rhinitis sample (N=100) were evaluated for IgE-mediated sensitization to pine and beech dust. The prevalence of pine and beech sensitization among current woodworkers was 1.7 and 3.1%, respectively. No differences in sensitization rates were found between woodworkers and references, but the prevalence of wood dust sensitization was dose-dependently associated with the current level of wood dust exposure. No relation was observed between wood dust sensitization per se and respiratory symptoms. Only symptomatic subjects had proteinogenic IgE epitopes to pine. Increased odds ratios for sIgE based on proteinogenic epitopes to beech and respiratory symptoms were found, although they were not statistically significant. Sensitization rates to pine and beech were the same for woodworkers and references but dependent on the current wood dust exposure level. The importance of beech and pine wood sensitization is limited, but may be of clinical significance for a few workers if the IgE epitopes are proteinogenic.

  19. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  20. Outcomes of Sinonasal Cancer Treated With Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagan, Roi, E-mail: rdagan@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Bryant, Curtis; Li, Zuofeng; Yeung, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Justice, Jeb; Dzieglewiski, Peter; Werning, John [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Fernandes, Rui; Pirgousis, Phil [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Lanza, Donald C. [Sinus & Nasal Institute of Florida, St. Petersburg, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To report disease outcomes after proton therapy (PT) for sinonasal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four adult patients without metastases received primary (13%) or adjuvant (87%) PT for sinonasal cancers (excluding melanoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma). Common histologies were olfactory neuroblastoma (23%), squamous cell carcinoma (22%), and adenoid cystic carcinoma (17%). Advanced stage (T3 in 25% and T4 in 69%) and high-grade histology (51%) were common. Surgical procedures included endoscopic resection alone (45%), endoscopic resection with craniotomy (12%), or open resection (30%). Gross residual disease was present in 26% of patients. Most patients received hyperfractionated PT (1.2 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] twice daily, 99%) and chemotherapy (75%). The median PT dose was 73.8 Gy (RBE), with 85% of patients receiving more than 70 Gy (RBE). Prognostic factors were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards regression for multiple regression. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated using logistic regression. Serious, late grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4. The median follow-up was 2.4 years for all patients and 2.7 years among living patients. Results: The local control (LC), neck control, freedom from distant metastasis, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 83%, 94%, 73%, 63%, 70%, and 68%, respectively, at 3 years. Gross total resection and PT resulted in a 90% 3-year LC rate. The 3-year LC rate was 61% for primary radiation therapy and 59% for patients with gross disease. Gross disease was the only significant factor for LC on multivariate analysis, whereas grade and continuous LC were prognostic for overall survival. Six of 12 local recurrences were marginal. Dural dissemination represented 26% of distant recurrences. Late toxicity occurred in 24% of patients (with

  1. Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Agarwal, Jessica; Cottin, Hervé; Engrand, Cécile; Flynn, George; Fulle, Marco; Gombosi, Tamas; Langevin, Yves; Lasue, Jérémie; Mannel, Thurid; Merouane, Sihane; Poch, Olivier; Thomas, Nicolas; Westphal, Andrew

    2018-04-01

    This review presents our understanding of cometary dust at the end of 2017. For decades, insight about the dust ejected by nuclei of comets had stemmed from remote observations from Earth or Earth's orbit, and from flybys, including the samples of dust returned to Earth for laboratory studies by the Stardust return capsule. The long-duration Rosetta mission has recently provided a huge and unique amount of data, obtained using numerous instruments, including innovative dust instruments, over a wide range of distances from the Sun and from the nucleus. The diverse approaches available to study dust in comets, together with the related theoretical and experimental studies, provide evidence of the composition and physical properties of dust particles, e.g., the presence of a large fraction of carbon in macromolecules, and of aggregates on a wide range of scales. The results have opened vivid discussions on the variety of dust-release processes and on the diversity of dust properties in comets, as well as on the formation of cometary dust, and on its presence in the near-Earth interplanetary medium. These discussions stress the significance of future explorations as a way to decipher the formation and evolution of our Solar System.

  2. Middle ear function in sinonasal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshaee, Mehdi; Ardakani, Hossein Payedar; Ghazizadeh, Amir Hossain; Movahed, Rahman; Jarahi, Lida; Rajati, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Nasal airway patency has long been considered a major factor in ear health. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sinonasal polyposis on middle ear and eustachian tube (ET) functionality. Forty-four individuals with polyposis, 23 with non-polyposis nasal obstruction, and 23 healthy controls were enrolled. Demographic, clinical and imaging data of all participants were collected and ET function tests and audiologic tests were performed. Hearing loss (p = 0.02), flat tympanogram (p = 0.02), disturbed Toynbee and Valsalva tests (p = 0.01), and the prevalence of allergy (p = 0.04) and purulent nasal discharge (p polyposis group than the other groups. Regression analysis revealed that infection and allergy have more important roles in ET function than the nasal obstruction. Polyposis could impede ET function; however, it is probably not because of its obstructive nature, but because of the associated increased risk of infection.

  3. Morganella morganii in sinonasal region: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haşmet Yazıcı

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Morganella morganii is a gram negative pathogen andmay cause potentially lethal disease especially in patientswith underlying or immunosuppressive disease. It is commonlyfound in long-term urinary catheter used and immunesystem deficiency patients as nosocomial disease.Involving other systems such as skin, skeletal systemand central nervous system can be seen too. Sporadicoccurrence is rare and can be seen in any system by variouscauses like AIDS, snake bites and poisoning. In thiscase we present sporadic Morganella morganii infectionon sinonasal region with the presence of sinusitis, sinocutaneousfistula, preseptal cellulitis and hard palate defecton 58 year old male diabetic patient. Microbiologicalassessment from open wound and sinuses were reportedas Morganella morganii. To our knowledge, this is the firstcase of sino-nasal Morganella morganii infection with sino-cutaneous fistula, preseptal cellulitis and maxillofacialbone destruction. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3: 383-386Key words: Morganella Morganii, sino-nasal fistula, preseptalcellulitis, bone destruction

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy in combined treatment of sinonasal malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. A.; Gribova, O. V.; Vasiljev, R. V.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Shtin, V. I.; Shiianova, A. A.; Surkova, P. V.; Starceva, Zh. A.; Shilova, O. G.

    2017-09-01

    Obvious advantage of IORT (intraoperative radiotherapy) is that the radiation source is delivered directly to the bed of the tumor during surgery, thus avoiding the negative impact on the skin, subcutaneous tissue and reducing the risk of fibrosis. Sinonasal tumors—a convenient object for intraoperative radiotherapy application (surface location, relatively small size tumors, good operational access). The surface location and comparatively small size of neoplasms, good operational access provide an efficient and accurate transfer of the electron beam to the postoperative cavity to increase the irradiation dose in the areas of the most probable recurrence, which makes the tumors of this localization a convenient object for the use of the intraoperative radiation therapy. The treatment was conducted using a mobile compact betatron (MIB-6E), 10-12 Gy single dose. IORT session extends surgery period by 30 min. There were no pathological clinical and laboratory reactions on IORT in the early postoperative period. Carrying out the procedure is possible in various standard operating rooms. It does not require special security measures for the patients and the staff. IORT with the help of electron beam allows avoiding post-radiation reactions and achieving a 5-year—disease-free survival of 66% of the patients. IORT session is possible through a minimal incision during organ preservation surgeries. Evident economic feasibility provides the prospects of applying IORT in the clinical practice.

  5. Sinonasal carcinoma presenting as chronic sinusitis and sequential bilateral visual loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yu Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma-related rhinogenic optic neuropathy is rare and may lead to visual loss. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bilateral sequential visual loss induced by this etiology. It is important to differentiate between chronic sinusitis and malignancy on the basis of specific findings on magnetic resonance images. Surgical decompression with multidisciplinary therapy, including steroids, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, is indicated. However, no visual improvement was noted in this case, emphasizing the rapid disease progression and importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Work-related asthma in a population exposed to grain, flour and other ingredient dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T A; Lumley, K P

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and causation of work-related asthmatic symptoms in a population exposed to grain, flour and other ingredient dusts. Where workers complained of asthmatic symptoms which were the result of dust exposure, follow-up aimed to identify whether the symptoms were the result of sensitisation or of non-specific irritation. A questionnaire was presented to 3,450 workers who had exposure to dust during the course of flour milling (528), bread baking (1,756), cake baking (209) and other activities in food preparation (957). Those with positive responses were followed-up by taking a formal history, examination, skin prick testing and serial peak flow measurement. The overall prevalence of work-related asthmatic symptoms was 4.4% (153 out of 3,450). In the group who were followed-up (128 out of 153), non-specific respiratory irritation was thought to be the cause in 90 (2.6%), whilst sensitisation was responsible for symptoms in 12 (0.3%). Of the 12 cases due to sensitisation, the agents responsible were: fungal amylase (10 cases, all associated with bread baking), flour (one case, associated with flour packing), and grain (one case, associated with flour milling). Non-specific irritation is considerably more common than sensitisation as the cause of work-related asthmatic symptoms in flour milling, baking and other flour-based industries. The prevalence of sensitisation to flour is very low (less than 1 in 1,000) in all these industries. The principal sensitiser encountered in modern plant bakeries appears to be fungal amylase. The most important source of exposure to fungal amylase is probably the debagging, sieving, weighing and mixing of bread improvers.

  7. An assessment of hopanes in settled dust and air as indicators of exposure to traffic-related air pollution in Windsor, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jason

    Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) has been linked with several adverse health effects. We investigated hopanes, markers of primary particle emissions from gasoline and diesel engines, in house dust as an alternative approach for assessing exposure to TRAP in Windsor, Ontario. Settled house dust was collected from the homes of 28 study participants (10 -- 13 yrs). The dust was then analyzed for a suite of hopanes by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We calculated correlations between dust hopane concentrations and estimates of annual average NO2 concentrations derived from an existing LUR model. Hopanes were consistently present in detectable quantities in house dust. Annual average outdoor NO2 estimated was moderately correlated with hopanes in house dust (r = 0.46; pefficiency or the presence of an attached garage. Hopanes measured in settled house dust show promise as an indicator of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Keywords: hopane; air pollution; traffic; dust; exposure; TRAP.

  8. Giant adenoid cystic carcinoma of the sinonasal cavity | Touati | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas, formerly known cylindromas, were originally described by Foote and Frozell 1953. These are epithelial malignancies that develop at the expense of salivary glands, other rare localizations have been described in particular in the oral cavity, the sinonasal tract, lacrimal glands or nasopharynx.

  9. Predictors, costs, and causes of readmission after surgery for sinonasal cancer: a national perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Alexander N; Yang, Jason Y; Wang, Marilene B; Lee, Jivianne T; St John, Maie A; Long, Jennifer L

    2018-05-02

    Hospital readmissions are an increasingly scrutinized marker of surgical care delivery and quality. There is a paucity of information in the literature regarding the rate, risk factors, and common causes of readmission after surgery for sinonasal cancer. We analyzed the Nationwide Readmissions Database for patients who underwent surgery for a diagnosis of sinonasal cancer between 2010 and 2014. Rates, causes, and patient-, procedure-, and hospital-level risk factors for 30-day readmission were determined. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of 30-day readmission. Among the 4173 cases, the 30-day readmission rate was 11.6%, with an average cost per readmission of $18,403. The most common readmission diagnoses were wound complications (15.3%) and infections (13.4%). On multivariate regression, significant risk factors for readmission were chronic renal failure (odds ratio [OR], 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-6.17), involvement of the skull base or orbit (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.11-2.51), nonelective initial surgical admission (OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.42-3.89), and length of stay ≥7 days (OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.14-3.05). Through the use of a large national database, we found that approximately 1 in 9 patients undergoing surgery for sinonasal cancer was readmitted within 30 days. Readmissions were most commonly associated with wound complications and infections. Factors related to procedural complexity were more important predictors of readmission than patients' demographics or comorbidities. © 2018 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. Effects of exposure to grain dust in Polish farmers: work-related symptoms and immunologic response to microbial antigens associated with dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skórska, C; Mackiewicz, B; Dutkiewicz, J; Krysińska-Traczyk, E; Milanowski, J; Feltovich, H; Lange, J; Thorne, P

    1998-01-01

    Medical examinations were performed in a group of 76 Polish farmers heavily exposed to grain dust during harvesting and threshing, and in a group of 63 healthy urban dwellers not exposed to organic dusts (controls). The examinations included: interview concerning the occurrence of respiratory disorders and work-related symptoms, physical examination, lung function tests, and allergological tests comprising skin prick test with 4 microbial antigens associated with grain dust and agar-gel precipitation test with 12 microbial antigens. As many as 34 farmers (44.7%) reported the occurrence of work-related symptoms during harvesting and threshing. The most common was dry cough reported by 20 individuals (26.3%). Dyspnoea was reported by 15 farmers (19.7%), tiredness by 12 (15.7%), chest tightness by 8 (10.5%), plugging of nose and hoarseness by 5 each (6. 5%). No control subjects reported these work-related symptoms. The mean spirometric values in the examined group of farmers were within the normal range, but a significant post-shift decrease of these values was observed after work with grain. The farmers showed a frequency of the positive early skin reactions to environmental allergens in the range of 10.8 - 45.5%, and a frequency of positive precipitin reactions in range of 3.9 - 40.8%. The control group responded to the majority of allergens with a significantly lower frequency of positive results compared to the farmers. The obtained results showed a high response of grain farmers to inhalant microbial allergens and indicate a potential risk of occupational respiratory diseases (such as allergic alveolitis, asthma, Organic Dust Toxic Syndrome) among this population

  11. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 206 (Australia); Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P. [Scottish Universities' Physics Alliance (SUPA), School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Liske, J. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baldry, I. K. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Bourne, N. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, The School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Brough, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dariush, A. [Physics Department, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); De Zotti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L., E-mail: meiert.grootes@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  12. Sensitivity of transatlantic dust transport to chemical aging and related atmospheric processes

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelkader, Mohamed

    2017-03-20

    We present a sensitivity study on transatlantic dust transport, a process which has many implications for the atmosphere, the ocean and the climate. We investigate the impact of key processes that control the dust outflow, i.e., the emission flux, convection schemes and the chemical aging of mineral dust, by using the EMAC model following Abdelkader et al. (2015). To characterize the dust outflow over the Atlantic Ocean, we distinguish two geographic zones: (i) dust interactions within the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), or the dust–ITCZ interaction zone (DIZ), and (ii) the adjacent dust transport over the Atlantic Ocean (DTA) zone. In the latter zone, the dust loading shows a steep and linear gradient westward over the Atlantic Ocean since particle sedimentation is the dominant removal process, whereas in the DIZ zone aerosol–cloud interactions, wet deposition and scavenging processes determine the extent of the dust outflow. Generally, the EMAC simulated dust compares well with CALIPSO observations; however, our reference model configuration tends to overestimate the dust extinction at a lower elevation and underestimates it at a higher elevation. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Caribbean responds to the dust emission flux only when the emitted dust mass is significantly increased over the source region in Africa by a factor of 10. These findings point to the dominant role of dust removal (especially wet deposition) in transatlantic dust transport. Experiments with different convection schemes have indeed revealed that the transatlantic dust transport is more sensitive to the convection scheme than to the dust emission flux parameterization. To study the impact of dust chemical aging, we focus on a major dust outflow in July 2009. We use the calcium cation as a proxy for the overall chemical reactive dust fraction and consider the uptake of major inorganic acids (i.e., H2SO4, HNO3 and HCl) and their anions, i.e., sulfate (SO42−), bisulfate

  13. THE RELATION BETWEEN GAS AND DUST IN THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, Jorge L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chapman, Nicholas; Li Di; Snell, Ronald L.; Cambresy, Laurent; Brunt, Chris

    2010-01-01

    We report a study of the relation between dust and gas over a 100 deg 2 area in the Taurus molecular cloud. We compare the H 2 column density derived from dust extinction with the CO column density derived from the 12 CO and 13 CO J = 1 → 0 lines. We derive the visual extinction from reddening determined from 2MASS data. The comparison is done at an angular size of 200'' corresponding to 0.14 pc at a distance of 140 pc. We find that the relation between visual extinction A V and N(CO) is linear between A V ≅ 3 and 10 mag in the region associated with the B213-L1495 filament. In other regions, the linear relation is flattened for A V ∼> 4 mag. We find that the presence of temperature gradients in the molecular gas affects the determination of N(CO) by ∼30%-70% with the largest difference occurring at large column densities. Adding a correction for this effect and accounting for the observed relation between the column density of CO and CO 2 ices and A V , we find a linear relationship between the column of carbon monoxide and dust for observed visual extinctions up to the maximum value in our data ≅23 mag. We have used these data to study a sample of dense cores in Taurus. Fitting an analytical column density profile to these cores we derive an average volume density of about 1.4 x 10 4 cm -3 and a CO depletion age of about 4.2 x 10 5 yr. At visual extinctions smaller than ∼3 mag, we find that the CO fractional abundance is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude. The data show a large scatter suggesting a range of physical conditions of the gas. We estimate the H 2 mass of Taurus to be about 1.5 x 10 4 M sun , independently derived from the A V and N(CO) maps. We derive a CO integrated intensity to H 2 conversion factor of about 2.1 x 10 20 cm -2 (K km s -1 ) -1 , which applies even in the region where the [CO]/[H 2 ] ratio is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude. The distribution of column densities in our Taurus maps resembles a log

  14. Chitin stimulates expression of acidic mammalian chitinase and eotaxin-3 by human sinonasal epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalaker, Ashley; Nkrumah, Louis; Lee, Won-Kyung; Ramanathan, Murugappan; Lane, Andrew P

    2009-01-01

    Sinonasal epithelial cells participate in host defense by initiating innate immune mechanisms against potential pathogens. Antimicrobial innate mechanisms have been shown to involve Th1-like inflammatory responses. Although epithelial cells can also be induced by Th2 cytokines to express proeosinophilic mediators, no environmental agents have been identified that promote this effect. Human sinonasal epithelial cells from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNPs) and controls were harvested and grown in primary culture. Cell cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of chitin for 24 hours, and mRNA for acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), eotaxin-3, and thymic stromal-derived lymphopoietin (TSLP) were assessed. Other cultures were exposed to interleukin 4 (IL- 4) alone and in combination with dust-mite antigen (DMA) for 36 hours. Extracted mRNA and cell culture supernatant were analyzed for expression of AMCase and eotaxin-3. Chitin induced a dose-dependent expression of AMCase and eotaxin-3 mRNA but not TSLP. Patients with recalcitrant CRSwNPs showed lower baseline expression of AMCase when compared with treatment-responsive CRSwNP and less induction of AMCase expression by chitin. DMA did not directly induce expression of AMCase or eotaxin-3. Expression of eotaxin-3 was stimulated by IL-4 and further enhanced with the addition of DMA. Levels of AMCase were not significantly affected by either IL-4 or DMA exposure. In some cases, the combination of IL-4 and DMA was able to induce AMCase expression in cell cultures not producing AMCase at baseline. The abundant biopolymer chitin appears to be recognized by a yet uncharacterized receptor on sinonasal epithelial cells. Chitin stimulates production of AMCase and eotaxin-3, two pro-Th2 effector proteins. This finding suggests the existence of a novel innate immune pathway for local defense against chitin-containing organisms in the sinonasal tract. Dysregulation of this function could

  15. A case of giant prolactinoma, initially misdiagnosed as sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Mohtasebi, M.D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant prolactinomas are defined as pituitary tumors greater than 4 cm, often associated with very high prolactin level (>1000 ng/mL. They are relatively rare tumors and can present differently from typical prolactinomas. They can be highly invasive, resulting in acute neurological complication at the time of presentation. We present a case of a young woman with giant prolactinoma initially misdiagnosed as sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma. The acute presentation of headache, ptosis and impending brain herniation, requiring emergent ventriculostomy and intubation, led to the clinical suspicion of a more sinister diagnosis. Transnasal biopsy of the mass was consistent with sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma, and chemotherapy was planned. Laboratory testing, however, revealed an elevated prolactin (27,400 ng/mL, after 1:100 dilution. Re-review of pathology with additional immunohistochemical staining was requested and confirmed the diagnosis of prolactinoma. After 5 months of cabergoline treatment, prolactin level has decreased to 118 ng/mL. There has been a marked reduction in tumor size and an almost complete resolution of neurological symptoms. Given their atypical presentation and potential for sharing common immunohistochemical stains with other neuroendocrine neoplasms, giant prolactinomas extending into the nasal cavity can be misdiagnosed as other neuroendocrine neoplasms which may develop at this site. Accurate diagnosis is imperative to prevent unnecessary surgery and/or radiation and to ensure implementation of dopamine agonist therapy.

  16. Measurements of the power spectrum and dispersion relation of self-excited dust acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosenko, V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Kim, S.-H.; Heinrich, J.; Merlino, R. L.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    The spectrum of spontaneously excited dust acoustic waves was measured. The waves were observed with high temporal resolution using a fast video camera operating at 1000 frames per second. The experimental system was a suspension of micron-size kaolin particles in the anode region of a dc discharge in argon. Wave activity was found at frequencies as high as 450 Hz. At high wave numbers, the wave dispersion relation was acoustic-like (frequency proportional to wave number). At low wave numbers, the wave frequency did not tend to zero, but reached a cutoff frequency instead. The cutoff value declined with distance from the anode. We ascribe the observed cutoff to the particle confinement in this region.

  17. Endoscopic Treatment of Ewing Sarcoma of the Sinonasal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepera, Davide; Volpi, Luca; Facco, Carla; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Bernasconi, Barbara; Piski, Zalán; Freguia, Stefania; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Bignami, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    The extra-skeletal form is an unusual type of Ewing sarcoma (ES) arising from soft tissue and in the literature there are reports of less than 50 patients describing the tumor in the paranasal sinuses and skull base. The histological diagnosis is crucial to plan the correct treatment and the molecular confirmation is mandatory in equivocal patients. A multimodality treatment with chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy improved the outcomes of these diseases during the last decades and a free-margin resection with the endoscopic transnasal technique is one of the most recent ways to manage these pathologies in selected patients, reducing the morbidities of the external approaches and preserving the quality of life of the patient.Here, the authors present the first patient of primary sinonasal ES free from disease after 5 years of follow-up and treated with an endoscopic endonasal approach and a second patient of sinonasal metastases of ES treated with and endoscopic transnasal approach.

  18. Role of gadolinium in MR imaging of sinonasal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzieri, C.F.; Shah, M.; Smith, A.S.; Tarr, R.; Van Dyke, C.; Kaufman, B.; Krauss, D.; Lavertu, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines whether additional clinically useful information can be obtained with the use of contrast-enhanced MR imaging, compared with nonenhanced MR imaging and enhanced CT, in the evaluation of patients with sinonasal masses. Twenty-one patients with CT evidence of a sinonasal mass were imaged at 1.5 T with T1 and T2 weighting and without and with gadolinium injection. The studies were interpreted independently and correlated with the surgical and pathologic findings. The contrast-enhanced MR images yielded additional clinically useful information in 13 of 21 cases. It was the only way to separate tumor from a mucocele in four of 13 cases. In two of 13 instances, it was the only modality that identified encephalocele as distinct from a tumor. In the remaining seven cases, more accurate delineation of the tumor margins was obtained

  19. Molecular characterisation of sinonasal carcinomas and their clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fernando; Llorente, José Luis; Costales, María; García-Inclán, Cristina; Pérez-Escuredo, Jhudit; Alvarez-Marcos, César; Hermsen, Mario; Suárez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Sinonasal carcinomas are rare tumours with an unfavourable prognosis whose management is difficult and complex, leading to high morbidity and mortality despite improvements in the field of surgery and radiotherapy. An elevated number of these tumours can be attributed to occupational exposure. In comparison with other head and neck malignancies, studies of molecular changes in these tumours are infrequent. This review was focused on findings about the epidemiology and molecular and phenotypic characterisation of sinonasal carcinomas, which can potentially be useful for diagnosis and treatment. The increasing knowledge about the molecular biology that underlies their carcinogenesis may help to identify precursor lesions, prognostic markers and markers that predict chemoradiotherapy response and, finally, to identify potential molecular targets that will expand treatment options. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Grain elevator workers show work-related pulmonary function changes and dose-effect relationships with dust exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, P; Hutcheon, M; Broder, I; Mintz, S

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether grain handlers underwent work-related changes in their pulmonary function and, if so, to examine the dose-effect relationships with dust exposure. The pulmonary function of grain handlers was measured at the beginning and end of work shifts over a period of one week, during which their exposure to dust was measured daily. The results showed changes indicative of a within-day obstructive change, in addition to a small restrictive defect occurring over the course of a week. Civic outside labourers who were examined as a control group showed a similar within-week obstructive change without any associated restriction of lung volume. The data on the grain handlers were also used to examine the dose-effect relationships of dust exposure, both on baseline pulmonary function and on within-day changes in these measurements. The baseline flow rates of workers who did not wear a mask were found to vary inversely with their average exposure to respirable dust. In addition, the flow rates underwent a within-day decrease that varied directly with their corresponding exposure to respirable dust and was unrelated to mask wearing. The median of the slopes for this relationship indicated that 50% of the subjects had a decrease of at least 923 ml/s in the value of their Vmax50%VC for each 1 mg/m3 increase in the concentration of respirable dust. Non-respirable dust did not have a measurable effect either on the baseline or the within-day changes in pulmonary function. The acute changes were unaffected by age, duration of employment, or extent of smoking. PMID:7138793

  1. Airborne Particulate Matter Induces Nonallergic Eosinophilic Sinonasal Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Murugappan; London, Nyall R; Tharakan, Anuj; Surya, Nitya; Sussan, Thomas E; Rao, Xiaoquan; Lin, Sandra Y; Toskala, Elina; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Biswal, Shyam

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) has been linked to aggravation of respiratory symptoms, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Although the health effects of PM on the lower pulmonary airway have been extensively studied, little is known regarding the impact of chronic PM exposure on the upper sinonasal airway. We sought to test the impact of chronic airborne PM exposure on the upper respiratory system in vivo. Mice were subjected, by inhalation, to concentrated fine (2.5 μm) PM 6 h/d, 5 d/wk, for 16 weeks. Mean airborne fine PM concentration was 60.92 μm/m 3 , a concentration of fine PM lower than that reported in some major global cities. Mice were then killed and analyzed for evidence of inflammation and barrier breakdown compared with control mice. Evidence of the destructive effects of chronic airborne PM on sinonasal health in vivo, including proinflammatory cytokine release, and macrophage and neutrophil inflammatory cell accumulation was observed. A significant increase in epithelial barrier dysfunction was observed, as assessed by serum albumin accumulation in nasal airway lavage fluid, as well as decreased expression of adhesion molecules, including claudin-1 and epithelial cadherin. A significant increase in eosinophilic inflammation, including increased IL-13, eotaxin-1, and eosinophil accumulation, was also observed. Collectively, although largely observational, these studies demonstrate the destructive effects of chronic airborne PM exposure on the sinonasal airway barrier disruption and nonallergic eosinophilic inflammation in mice.

  2. The orbital and sinonasal hemangiopericytoma, 2 case reports:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghbol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objective: Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon vascular tumor derived from the pericytes of Zimmermann. . The most common location of the tumor is pelvic retroperitoneum and musculoskeletal system of the lower extremities. It is rarely seen in the head and neck area. In addition, only 0.8% to 3% of all orbital tumors and less than 5 % of primary sinonasal tumors are primary hemangiopericytoma, which demonstrates that the orbital and sinonasal cavities are rare locations for this tumor. Case: 2 cases of primary orbital and sinonasal hemangiopericytoma that were successfully treated through surgery were reported. Conclusion: Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon vascular tumor which has a potentially malignant behavior. Histopathologic features alone do not predict the biologic behavior of the tumor but the increased cellularity, necrosis, hemorrhage and more than 4 mitotic figures per 10 high power field, may elicit a diagnosis of malignant hemangiopericytoma . The local recurrence and the distant metastasis might also occur with an incomplete excision.  The lung, bone and liver are the most common sites of distant metastasis. Thus, the long-term follow-up is recommended after the surgical removal of the tumor.

  3. Sensitivity of transatlantic dust transport to chemical aging and related atmospheric processes

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelkader, Mohamed; Metzger, Swen; Steil, Benedikt; Klingmü ller, Klaus; Tost, Holger; Pozzer, Andrea; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Barrie, Leonard; Lelieveld, Jos

    2017-01-01

    We present a sensitivity study on transatlantic dust transport, a process which has many implications for the atmosphere, the ocean and the climate. We investigate the impact of key processes that control the dust outflow, i.e., the emission flux

  4. Ochratoxin A in grain dust--estimated exposure and relations to agricultural practices in grain production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstensen, Anne Straumfors; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Elen, Oleif; Eduard, Wijnand

    2004-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephrotoxin frequently contaminating grains. OTA inhalation during grain handling may therefore represent a health risk to farmers, and was the subject of this study. Airborne and settled grain dust was collected during grain work on 84 Norwegian farms. Climate and agricultural practices on each farm were registered. Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp. and OTA in settled dust were measured. Settled dust contained median 4 microg OTA/kg dust (range 2-128), correlating with Penicillium spp. (median 40 cfu/mg; range 0-32000, rs =0.33; p grain species, districts and agricultural practices. Penicillium levels, but not OTA levels, were higher in storage than in threshing dust (p=0.003), and increased with storage time (rs =0.51, p dust during threshing and median 7 mg/m3 (range 1-110) dust during storage work, equalling median 3.7 pg/m3 (range 0.6-200) and median 40 pg/m3 (range 2-14000) OTA, respectively (p grain work was low, although varying by more than 1,000-fold. However, the farmers may occasionally be highly exposed, particularly during handling of stored grain.

  5. Impact of beta thalassemia on maxillary sinuses and sino-nasal passages: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Ahmed; Ragab, Seham Mohammed; Shawki, Mohammed

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal changes among beta (β) thalassemia children are well documented, but without available data regarding sino-nasal passages alterations. The authors investigated the maxillary sinuses and sino-nasal passages changes in β-thalassemia children and correlated such changes with the amount of transfused red cells and the erythroid marrow activity. Clinical analyses including otorhinolaryngical examination (ORL) were obtained in twenty β-thalassemia children and 20 matched healthy controls. Hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMD ls) were assayed. The two groups were analyzed for the CT image parameters: bone thickness, anterior and posterior choanae diameters, extramedullary hematopoiesis and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) RESULTS: Nasal congestion/obstruction was identified in 14 (70%) children. Eight patients (40%) had criteria of chronic rhinosinusitis. In comparison with the normal controls, the increase in the roof, floor, medial, anterior, lateral and posterior maxillary bony walls thickness was significantly higher (1.26, 2.46, 2.6, 2.9, 3.23 and 5.34-folds, respectively). The mean posterior choanae horizontal, vertical diameters and their surface area were significantly reduced in the patients compared to the controls. The mean anterior maxillary wall bone thickness directly correlated with sTfR (P=0.047) while that of the posterior wall correlated inversely with Hb level (P=0.013). The mean vertical posterior choanae diameter had positive correlation with the amount of transfused red cells (P=0.001) and negative correlation with sTfR (P=0.001). The Hounsfield unit of maxillary sinus wall had direct relation with BMDls (P=0.003) CONCLUSIONS: Thalassemia children are at risk of different folds increase of maxillary sinuses walls thicknesses utmost at posterior and lateral walls. Other sino-nasal morbidities include diminished posterior choanal diameter, nasal obstruction

  6. Environmental and traffic-related parameters affecting road dust composition: A multi-technique approach applied to Venice area (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotto, Gabrio; Rampazzo, Giancarlo; Visin, Flavia; Gonella, Francesco; Cattaruzza, Elti; Glisenti, Antonella; Formenton, Gianni; Tieppo, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    Road dust is a non-exhaust source of atmospheric particulate by re-suspension. It is composed of particles originating from natural sources as well as other non-exhaust source such as tire, brake and asphalt wear. The discrimination between atmospheric particles directly emitted from abrasion process and those related to re-suspension is therefore an open issue, as far as the percentage contribution of non-exhaust emissions is becoming more considerable due also to the recent policy actions and the technological upgrades in the automotive field, focused on the reduction of exhaust emissions. In this paper, road dust collected along the bridge that connects Venice (Italy) to the mainland is characterized with a multi-technique approach in order to determine its composition depending on environmental as well as traffic-related conditions. Six pollutant sources of road dust particles were identified by cluster analysis: brake, railway, tire, asphalt, soil + marine, and mixed combustions. Considering the lack of information on this matrix in this area, this study is intended to provide useful information for future identification of road dust re-suspension source in atmospheric particulate.

  7. Pulmonary function in relation to total dust exposure at a bauxite refinery and alumina-based chemical products plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, M C; Enterline, P E; Sussman, N B; Bonney, T B; Rippey, L L

    1985-12-01

    A cross-sectional study of 1,142 male employees at the Arkansas Operations of a large aluminum production company examined the effect on pulmonary function of chronic exposure to total dust produced in the mining and refining of bauxite and the production of alumina chemicals. Never smokers, ex-smokers, and current smokers were analyzed separately. Among never smokers, a pattern of decreasing FEV1 was observed in relation to increasing duration and cumulative total dust exposure. Among never smokers with cumulative total dust exposures of greater than or equal to 100 mg/m3 yr and greater than or equal to 20 yr of exposure, there was a mean reduction from the predicted FEV1 of 0.29 to 0.39 L, in addition to a 3- to 4-fold excess of observed/expected numbers of subjects with FEV1 less than 80% of predicted. These results were observed relative to an external and an internal comparison group. Among current smokers, the deviations from predicted and the excess numbers of subjects with FEV1 less than 80% of predicted were larger in all exposure groups than for the never smokers. However, the quality of the smoking data was inadequate to allow separation of the effects of smoking and dust exposure.

  8. Acute proptosis: Unusual initial presentation of sinonasal inverted papilloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norihan Ibrahim; Baharuddin Abdullah; Regunath Kandasamy; Nor Hayati Othman; Mohtar Ibrahim; Adil Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Inverted papilloma is an uncommon histopathological finding of maxillary sinus tumor. We reported here a rare case of inverted papilloma of maxillary sinus presented initially with ipsilateral proptosis. A middle-aged lady with history of having allergic rhinitis presented with progressive left eye proptosis. Assessment revealed presence of orbital mass arising from paranasal sinus, in which the histopathological examination was initially inconclusive, and later it turned up to be inverted papilloma, partly with malignant transformation. High index of suspicion is necessary especially in those patients with recurrent non-specific sinonasal symptoms, which may need repeated biopsy and histopathological examination. Ocular manifestation signifies a more advance disease.

  9. Ossifying fibroma in the sinonasal tract: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavarty, Shekhar; Datta, Debashish; Boro, Esha; Dutta, Bijita

    2014-08-01

    Ossifying fibroma involving the sinonasal tract is an extremely rare occurrence. We are reporting a case of ossifying fibroma in the left maxillary sinus in a 19-year-old female who presented with a mass in the left cheek and nasal obstruction. On examination, the swelling in the left cheek seemed to originate from the left maxilla and was smooth and bony hard. Patient underwent detailed radiological and image guided cytopathological investigations. Depending on the results of these tests complete surgical excision of the mass was done. Histopathological evaluation of the excised mass revealed it to be an Ossifying Fibroma.

  10. Recurrent PAX3-MAML3 Fusion in Biphenotypic Sinonasal Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoke; Bledsoe, Krista L.; Graham, Rondell P.; Asmann, Yan W.; Viswanatha, David S.; Lewis, Jean E.; Lewis, Jason T.; Chou, Margaret M.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Jen, Jin; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Oliveira, André M.

    2014-01-01

    Biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma (SNS) is a newly described tumor of the nasal and paranasal areas. Herein, we report the novel recurring chromosomal translocation t(2;4)(q35;q31.1) in SNS. The translocation results in the formation of the fusion protein PAX3-MAML3, which is a potent transcriptional activator of PAX3 response elements. The SNS phenotype is characterized by aberrant expression of genes involved in neuroectodermal and myogenic differentiation, which closely simulates the developmental roles of PAX3. PMID:24859338

  11. Organophosphate Flame Retardants in House Dust from South China and Related Human Exposure Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hongli; Peng, Changfeng; Guo, Ying; Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da

    2017-09-01

    House dust associated with organic pollutants is not only a potential source of pollutants to the outdoor environment, but also a source to human exposure. The present study investigated the occurrence and concentrations of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in house dust collected from South China dwellings (n = 20). The results revealed a universal presence of most target OPFRs in house dust, with concentrations of ΣOPFRs ranging from 2.06 to 19.95 μg/g. The median concentration of ΣOPFR (9.20 μg/g) was one order of magnitude greater than that of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (0.80 μg/g). The composition of OPFR chemicals in house dust was dominated by chlorinated OPFRs, such as tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP). This compositional pattern was different from what has been reported in indoor dust from many other countries, where tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) was generally dominant. The daily intake of OPFRs by adults was estimated to be 1.6 and 4.2 ng/kg body weight/day under average and high exposure scenarios, respectively, and 31.7 and 127 ng/kg body weight/day for toddlers.

  12. Sinonasal mucosal melanoma extended to nose bridge: A one-time reconstruction treatment report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Romano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sinonasal mucosal melanoma is a rare and highly aggressive tumour. This tumour often carries a poor prognosis because of local invasion and early distant metastasis. It's, in fact, an aggressive, fortunately rare, disease. It's more common among population in their seventies, with a prolonged course due to innocuous symptoms. We report a case of sinonasal mucosal melanoma in a 56-years old male who presented with a brownish sinonasal mass involving right nasal fossa, swelling and spontaneous epistaxis. We report this case for the one-time reconstruction treatment performed by our team.

  13. Leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.T.; Wang, Z.C.; Xian, J.F.; Hao, D.P.; Chen, Q.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity. Materials and methods: Six patients with histology-proven leiomyomas in the sinonasal cavity were retrospectively reviewed. All six patients underwent CT and three patients also underwent MRI. The following imaging features were reviewed: size, margin, CT attenuation, MRI signal intensity, and lesion extent. In addition, the time-intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were analysed in two patients. Results: All leiomyomas had well-defined margins. The mean size was 36 mm (range 20-51 mm). On unenhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to cerebral grey matter in four (67%) and slightly hypodense in two (33%) patients. Leiomyomas appeared isointense On T1-weighted imaging (WI) and slightly hyperintense on T2WI in three patients. The lesions showed moderate contrast enhancement. Two patients underwent DCE MRI, and the TIC showed a rapidly enhancing and slow washout pattern. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were 1.66 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and 1.78 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for the two lesions, respectively. Conclusions: Well-defined, homogeneous, expansile masses without bony erosion are typical features of leiomyoma. Althrough rare, this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign tumours in this region.

  14. Leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.T., E-mail: cjr.yangbentao@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Wang, Z.C.; Xian, J.F.; Hao, D.P.; Chen, Q.H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    Aim: To determine the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity. Materials and methods: Six patients with histology-proven leiomyomas in the sinonasal cavity were retrospectively reviewed. All six patients underwent CT and three patients also underwent MRI. The following imaging features were reviewed: size, margin, CT attenuation, MRI signal intensity, and lesion extent. In addition, the time-intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were analysed in two patients. Results: All leiomyomas had well-defined margins. The mean size was 36 mm (range 20-51 mm). On unenhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to cerebral grey matter in four (67%) and slightly hypodense in two (33%) patients. Leiomyomas appeared isointense On T1-weighted imaging (WI) and slightly hyperintense on T2WI in three patients. The lesions showed moderate contrast enhancement. Two patients underwent DCE MRI, and the TIC showed a rapidly enhancing and slow washout pattern. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were 1.66 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and 1.78 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for the two lesions, respectively. Conclusions: Well-defined, homogeneous, expansile masses without bony erosion are typical features of leiomyoma. Althrough rare, this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign tumours in this region.

  15. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jing [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Man, Fengyuan [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Deng, Kai [Department of Radiology, Qingdao No. 4 People' s Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Zheng, Yuanyuan [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Hao, Dapeng, E-mail: haodp_2009@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Xu, Wenjian, E-mail: cjr.xuwenjian@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China)

    2014-03-15

    Objective: To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. Methods: CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. Results: On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n = 8), defect or destruction (n = 7), and hyperostosis (n = 6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n = 10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n = 10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n = 7). Conclusions: CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP.

  16. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Jing; Man, Fengyuan; Deng, Kai; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Hao, Dapeng; Xu, Wenjian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. Methods: CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. Results: On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n = 8), defect or destruction (n = 7), and hyperostosis (n = 6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n = 10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n = 10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n = 7). Conclusions: CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP

  17. Sinonasal inverted papilloma associated with squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    But-Hadzic, Jasna; Jenko, Klemen; Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Bostjan J; Gale, Nina; Strojan, Primoz

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the study were to review single-institution experiences with sinonasal inverted papilloma associated with squamous cell carcinoma (IP/SCC), to analyze the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and to evaluate the role of radiotherapy. Five patients with IP/SCC were identified in the prospective institutional databases (1995–2005) and HPV status was determined in all five tumors. Four out of five patients had T3-4 tumors; no nodal involvement was seen in any of them. Four patients had curative surgery, supplemented in three of them with radiotherapy. Debulking surgery was performed in the patient with a non-resectable tumor followed by radical radiotherapy. Tumor was controlled locally in three patients at 8, 46 and 58 months post-surgery. Local failure occurred in two patients: after endoscopic resection of a T1 tumor (the recurrent tumor was successfully salvaged with additional surgery) and in a patient with an inoperable tumor. No regional or distant metastases occurred. HPV status was determined in all five tumors and three of them were found positive for HPV type 11. In operable sinonasal IP/SCC, upfront surgery and postoperative radiotherapy to the tumor bed with dose levels comparable to those used for invasive SCC are recommended. For non-resectable disease, radical radiotherapy to a dose of 66–70 Gy could be of benefit

  18. Diagnostic characteristics of sinonasal organizing hematomas: avoiding misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Arthur W; Ting, Jonathan Y; Borgie, Roderick C; Busaba, Nicolas Y; Sadow, Peter M; Juliano, Amy F; Gray, Stacey T; Holbrook, Eric H

    2013-07-01

    Organizing hematomas of the paranasal sinuses are diagnostic dilemmas clinically and radiographically, mimicking benign or malignant neoplastic processes and causing patients and clinicians undue worry regarding these diagnoses. Diagnostic criteria for correctly identifying these lesions are not well known. A retrospective case series of 7 patients with sinonasal organizing hematoma was studied. Radiographic imaging, clinical characteristics, and pathology were reviewed for new insights. Three patients presented with a primary complaint of epistaxis, 4 had masses visible on nasal endoscopy, and 2 had vascular malformations or small hemangiomas adjacent to the mass found on final pathology. Biopsy of these masses were consistently nondiagnostic prior to complete resection. The most diagnostic findings were "shells" of T2 hypointensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) surrounding the lobules of each of the masses. These correspond to rims of fibrosis at the periphery of the lobules on pathology. Areas of fresh hemorrhage are located at the center of these lobules. Sinonasal organizing hematomas are rare lesions of the paranasal sinuses whose clinical characteristics lead to misdiagnoses of benign or malignant neoplasms. Endoscopy, preoperative biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) imaging do not lend helpful information in differentiating these lesions from more worrisome neoplastic processes. However, MRI can lead to positive diagnosis by recognizing the distinct outer rims of T2 hypointensity typically seen in these lesions. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  19. Primary sinonasal tuberculosis in north-west Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, G.; Khan, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To record the frequency of primary involvement of nose and paranasal sinuses with tuberculosis in today's situation in the north-west region of Pakistan. Patients and Methods: A total of ten cases of primary sinonasal tuberculosis were included. The inclusion criteria were biopsy and acid-fast bacilli (AFB) examination after Ziel Neelsen (ZN) staining. Patients were put on anti-tuberculous chemotherapy. Response to the therapy and compliance of the patients were studied through follow up. Patients were admitted and offered surgical treatment wherever needed. Results: The primary sinonasal tuberculosis affected mainly young adults (18-60 years), both genders almost equally. Majority (80%) of the patients belonged to far-flung rural areas and all (100%) were poor. More frequent presenting features were granular lesion and mass in the nose (40%), epistaxis (30%), septal perforation (30%), external deformity (30%), palpable cervical lymph nodes (30%) and others. All the cases were diagnosed microscopically. Compliance to treatment was not good. Conclusion: The incidence of primary tuberculosis of nose and paranasal sinuses has risen in the recent past. The patients manifested no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. (author)

  20. SPECTRUM OF SINONASAL MASS AT A TERTIARY LEVEL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Bhardwaj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lesions of the sinonasal region are commonly encountered in clinical practice. These lesions are important from clinical and pathological view as they have a variety of histological spectrum with different managements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present study included 106 polypoidal lesions of the nasal cavity. The study period constituted from March 2003 to August 2014. All the tissues were fixed in 10% buffered formalin, processed and stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin and studied for various histopathological patterns. RESULTS Among 106 cases, 87 cases (82.07% were nonneoplastic and 19 cases (17.92% were neoplastic. Among the noninflammatory lesion, nasal polyp was found in 76 cases (87.7% and was the commonest lesion. Benign tumours were 11 in number (10.35% and were more frequent than malignant tumours, which were 8 in number (7.54%. Among benign neoplastic lesions, angiofibroma and haemangioma (each 4 in number (36.36% were the commonest lesion. All lesions were common in second and third decades with male predominance in benign, while malignant lesions were more common in female gender. Among the malignant lesions, squamous cell carcinoma and undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma were the most common malignant lesions, each were three in number. CONCLUSION Categorisation of the sinonasal mass according to their histopathological features and comparing them with the existing data guides the treatment and prognosis of the disease, so far every polypoidal lesions histological examination is advised.

  1. Star formation and its relation to free-free emission from ionized gas and far-infrared emission from dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezger, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    The author reviews the physical state of the galactic disk and especially of the thin layer of interstellar matter (ISM) out of which stars form today. The characteristics of OB stars and the HII regions which these stars form are summarized. Dust emission characteristics are also summarized. The author shows how the Lyc photon production rate of all O stars, and the total IR luminosity of all dust grains in the galactic disk can be estimated from radio and FIR surveys of the galactic plane. Star formation rates are derived for a constant initial mass function. The concept of bimodal star formation, where about equal fractions of O stars form in spiral arms and interarm region but low mass stars form only in the interarm region, is introduced. The relation between the 2.4 μm emission from M giants and supergiants is discussed qualitatively, lending support to the process of bimodal star formation. (Auth.)

  2. The molecular genetics of inflammatory, autoimmune, and infectious diseases of the sinonasal tract: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, Kathleen T

    2014-06-01

    The sinonasal tract is frequently affected by a variety of nonneoplastic inflammatory disease processes that are often multifactorial in their etiology but commonly have a molecular genetic component. To review the molecular genetics of a variety of nonneoplastic inflammatory diseases of the sinonasal tract. Inflammatory lesions of the sinonasal tract can be divided into 3 main categories: (1) chronic rhinosinusitis, (2) infectious diseases, and (3) autoimmune diseases/vasculitides. The molecular diagnosis and pathways of a variety of these inflammatory lesions are currently being elucidated and will shed light on disease pathogenesis and treatment. The sinonasal tract is frequently affected by inflammatory lesions that arise through complex interactions of environmental, infectious, and genetic factors. Because these lesions are all inflammatory in nature, the molecular pathology surrounding them is most commonly due to upregulation and down-regulation of genes that affect inflammatory responses and immune regulation.

  3. [Rhinitis and asthma related to cotton dust exposure in apprentices in the clothing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, N; Amri, C; Khalfallah, T; Alaya, A; Abdallah, B; Harzallah, L; Henchi, M-A; Bchir, N; Kamel, A; Akrout, M

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory allergies are the most common occupational diseases in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rhinitis and asthma among apprentices exposed to cotton dust in the clothing industry and to describe their epidemiologic and clinical profiles. We carried out a descriptive study of 600 apprentices in a textile and clothing vocational training centre in the Monastir area. The investigation comprised a questionnaire exploring risk factors and symptoms appearing during their training. Subjects who developed allergic respiratory symptoms at the work-place underwent a clinical examination, rhinomanometry and investigation of their allergic status and respiratory function. One hundred twenty apprentices (20%) developed allergic respiratory reactions due to exposure to textile dust (exclusively cotton) during their training, with a positive withdrawal-re-exposure test. Conjunctivitis (14.3%) and rhinitis (8.5%) were the most frequent allergic symptoms. Twenty eight apprentices (4.6%) presented symptoms of asthma. Rhinitis was associated with asthma in 45% of cases. Two cases of asthma were diagnosed clinically at the work-place following their exposure to textile dust. The prick test performed in 120 symptomatic apprentices was positive in 41.6% of cases. There was sensitization to pollens in 29 cases and to dermatophagoides in 13 cases. Cotton and wool allergy was noted in two cases. Allergic symptoms developing during the training were significantly more frequent in the atopic group, and they varied according to the intensity of textile dust exposure. In the textile and clothing industry the frequency of respiratory disorders caused by allergens remains high, especially in atopic apprentices who constitute a population at high risk.

  4. Sinonasal Fungal Infections and Complications: A Pictorial Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Gavito-Higuera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses can be categorized into invasive and non-invasive forms. The clinical presentation and course of the disease is primarily determined by the immune status of the host and can range from harmless or subtle presentations to life threatening complications. Invasive fungal infections are categorized into acute, chronic or chronic granulomatous entities. Immunocompromised patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, HIV and patients receiving chemotherapy or chronic oral corticosteroids are mostly affected. Mycetoma and Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis are considered non-invasive forms. Computer tomography is the gold-standard in sinonasal imaging and is complimented by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as it is superior in the evaluation of intraorbital and intracranial extensions. The knowledge and identification of the characteristic imaging patterns in invasive - and non- invasive fungal rhinosinusitis is crucial and the radiologist plays an important role in refining the diagnosis to prevent a possible fatal outcome.

  5. Deposition of 137Cs in Rokkasho, Japan and its relation to Asian dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akata, Naofumi; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Kawabata, Hitoshi; Chikuchi, Yuki; Sato, Tadahiro; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Kondo, Kunio; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2007-01-01

    Biweekly atmospheric depositions of 137 Cs were measured in Rokkasho, Aomori, Japan from March 2000 to March 2006 to study recent 137 Cs deposition. Although the deposition level was generally lower than the detectable limit, deposition samples collected in spring occasionally had measurable levels of 137 Cs. The annual 137 Cs deposition from 2001 to 2005 was 0.04-0.69 Bq m -2 with a mean value of 0.27 Bq m -2 . Depositions of insoluble Al, Fe and Ti were strongly correlated with the 137 Cs deposition, suggesting that suspension of soil particles was the main source of the recent 137 Cs deposition. Asian dust events were coincident with some of the significant 137 Cs depositions in spring. It was found that the ratios of 137 Cs/Al and Fe/Al could be used as indices for discriminating Asian dust from suspension of the local surface soil. Backward trajectory analysis suggested southern Mongolian and northeastern China regions as sources of the significant 137 Cs depositions

  6. Wood Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about wood dust, which can raise the risk of cancers of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. High amounts of wood dust are produced in sawmills, and in the furniture-making, cabinet-making, and carpentry industries.

  7. Establishing health standards for indoor foreign proteins related to asthma: Dust mite, cat and cockroach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platts-Mills, T.A.E.; Chapman, M.D.; Pollart, S.M.; Heymann, P.W.; Luczynska, C.M. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (United States))

    1990-01-01

    There is no doubt that a large number of individuals become allergic to foreign proteins that are predominantly or exclusively present indoors. In each case this immune response can be demonstrated either by immediate skin test responses or by measuring serum IgE antibodies. It has also been obvious for some time that patients presenting with asthma, perennial rhinitis and atopic dermatitis have an increased prevalence of IgE antibodies to these indoor allergens. More recently several epidemiological surveys have suggested that both mite exposure and IgE antibodies are important risk factors for asthma. The present situation is that assays have been developed capable of measuring the presence of mite, cockroach and cat allergens in house dust. Further clinical studies will be necessary to test the proposed standards for mite allergens and to define risk levels for other allergens.

  8. HPV Virus Transcriptional Status Assessment in a Case of Sinonasal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardi, Gennaro; Russo, Daniela; Varricchio, Silvia; Salzano, Giovanni; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni; Napolitano, Virginia; Di Crescenzo, Rosa Maria; Borzillo, Alessandra; Martino, Francesco; Merolla, Francesco; Mascolo, Massimo; Staibano, Stefania

    2018-03-16

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) can play a causative role in the development of sinonasal tract malignancies. In fact, HPV may be the most significant causative agent implicated in sinonasal tumorigenesis and is implicated in as many as 21% of sinonasal carcinomas. To date, there are no definitive, reliable and cost-effective, diagnostic tests approved by the FDA for the unequivocal determination of HPV status in head and neck cancers. We followed an exhaustive algorithm to correctly test HPV infection, including a sequential approach with p16INK4a IHC, viral DNA genotyping and in situ hybridization for E6/E7 mRNA. Here, we report a case of sinonasal carcinoma with discordant results using HPV test assays. The tumor we describe showed an irregular immunoreactivity for p16INK4a, and it tested positive for HPV DNA; nevertheless, it was negative for HR-HPV mRNA. We discuss the possible meaning of this discrepancy. It would be advisable to test HPV transcriptional status of sinonasal carcinoma on a diagnostic routine basis, not only by p16INK4a IHC assay, but also by HPV DNA genotyping and HR-HPV mRNA assessment.

  9. Positive airway pressure adherence and mask interface in the setting of sinonasal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Amy E; Soose, Ryan J

    2017-10-01

    Despite reports of lower positive pressure adherence rates with oronasal masks, patients with sinonasal problems are often prescribed this interface over a nasal interface. The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between mask type and therapy adherence in the setting of sinonasal symptoms. Retrospective case series with chart review. We reviewed 328 patients who underwent positive pressure titration between January 2012 and May 2015. Follow-up adherence data were available for 218 patients (66.5%). Multivariate analysis examined whether patients with sinonasal symptoms have improved adherence with oronasal masks compared to nasal or nasal pillow interfaces. At a median follow-up of 95 days, positive pressure adherence in patients with sinonasal symptoms was highest with the nasal pillow interface. When compared with oronasal interfaces, the odds of adequate therapy adherence were >5 times greater with nasal pillow interfaces (odds ratio [OR] = 5.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61-16.80, P = .006) and >3 times greater with nasal interfaces (OR = 3.67, 95% CI = 1.20-11.26, P = .02) in these symptomatic patients. The presence of nasal problems does not predict the need for an oronasal mask. Positive pressure adherence rates are higher with nasal and nasal pillow interfaces compared to oronasal masks, even in patients with sinonasal complaints. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2418-2422, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Incidence of abnormal retropharyngeal lymph nodes in sinonasal malignancies among adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sai, Asari; Shimono, Taro; Yamamoto, Akira; Takeshita, Toru; Miki, Yukio [Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Ohsawa, Masahiko; Wakasa, Kenichi [Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between abnormal retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RPLNs) and sinonasal malignancies among adults. Magnetic resonance and computed tomography images from 89 patients over 20 years old who were all histopathologically confirmed to have sinonasal malignancies from September 2001 to April 2014 were assessed retrospectively. Abnormal RPLNs were determined as those >5 mm in shortest axis or showing heterogeneous enhancement on axial images. Locations of sinonasal malignancies were categorized using the anterior border of the pterygopalatine fossa as a boundary: (a) anterior lesions, only present anterior to the boundary, or (b) posterior lesions, present or extending posterior to the boundary. Fisher's exact test was used for the analysis of the relationship between frequency of abnormal RPLNs and lesion location. Abnormal RPLNs were present in 13 of 89 patients (15 %), including 6 of 41 squamous cell carcinomas (15 %), 4 of 24 malignant lymphomas (17 %), 3 of 5 olfactory neuroblastomas (60 %), and 0 of 19 others (0 %). Four of the 39 patients (10 %) with anterior lesions showed abnormal RPLNs, compared to 9 of 50 patients (18 %) with posterior lesions. No significant difference in frequency of abnormal RPLNs was apparent between anterior and posterior lesions (P = 0.37). In primary sinonasal malignancies among adults, the highest incidence of abnormal RPLNs was seen with olfactory neuroblastoma. The frequency of abnormal RPLNs was unaffected by the location of sinonasal malignancies among adults. (orig.)

  11. Ice formation via deposition nucleation on mineral dust and organics: dependence of onset relative humidity on total particulate surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanji, Zamin A; Florea, Octavian; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2008-01-01

    We present ice nucleation results for Arizona test dust, kaolinite, montmorillonite, silica, silica coated with a hydrophobic octyl chain, oxalic acid dihydrate, Gascoyne leonardite (a humic material), and Aldrich humic acid (sodium salt). The focus was on deposition mode nucleation below water saturation at 233 K. Particles were deposited onto a hydrophobic cold stage by atomization of a slurry/solution and exposed to a constant partial pressure of water vapor. By lowering the temperature of the stage, the relative humidity with respect to ice (RH i ) was gradually increased until ice nucleation was observed using digital photography. Different numbers of particles were deposited onto the cold stage by varying the atomization solution concentration and deposition time. For the same total particulate surface area, mineral dust particles nucleated ice at lower supersaturations than all other materials. The most hydrophobic materials, i.e. Gascoyne leonardite and octyl silica, were the least active. For our limit of detection of one ice crystal, the ice onset RH i values were dependent on the total surface area of the particulates, indicating that no unique threshold RH i for ice nucleation prevails

  12. Ice nucleation onto Arizona test dust at cirrus temperatures: effect of temperature and aerosol size on onset relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z A; Abbatt, J P D

    2010-01-21

    The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (UT-CFDC) was used to study ice formation onto monodisperse Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. The onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(i)) was measured as a function of temperature in the range 251-223 K for 100 nm ATD particles. It was found that for 0.1% of the particles to freeze, water saturation was required at all temperatures except 223 K where particles activated at RH(i) below water saturation. At this temperature, where deposition mode freezing is occurring, we find that the larger the particle size, the lower the onset RH(i). We also demonstrate that the total number of particles present may influence the onset RH(i) observed. The surface area for ice activation, aerosol size, and temperature must all be considered when reporting onset values of ice formation onto ATD mineral dust particles. In addition, we calculate nucleation rates and contact angles of ice germs with ATD aerosols which indicate that there exists a range of active sites on the surface with different efficiencies for activating ice formation.

  13. Ice formation via deposition nucleation on mineral dust and organics: dependence of onset relative humidity on total particulate surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanji, Zamin A; Florea, Octavian; Abbatt, Jonathan P D [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)], E-mail: zkanji@chem.utoronto.ca

    2008-04-15

    We present ice nucleation results for Arizona test dust, kaolinite, montmorillonite, silica, silica coated with a hydrophobic octyl chain, oxalic acid dihydrate, Gascoyne leonardite (a humic material), and Aldrich humic acid (sodium salt). The focus was on deposition mode nucleation below water saturation at 233 K. Particles were deposited onto a hydrophobic cold stage by atomization of a slurry/solution and exposed to a constant partial pressure of water vapor. By lowering the temperature of the stage, the relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub i}) was gradually increased until ice nucleation was observed using digital photography. Different numbers of particles were deposited onto the cold stage by varying the atomization solution concentration and deposition time. For the same total particulate surface area, mineral dust particles nucleated ice at lower supersaturations than all other materials. The most hydrophobic materials, i.e. Gascoyne leonardite and octyl silica, were the least active. For our limit of detection of one ice crystal, the ice onset RH{sub i} values were dependent on the total surface area of the particulates, indicating that no unique threshold RH{sub i} for ice nucleation prevails.

  14. Bounded dust-acoustic waves in a cylindrically bounded collisional dusty plasma with dust charge variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Nanxia; Xue Jukui

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account the boundary, particle collisions, and dust charging effects, dust-acoustic waves in a uniform cylindrically bounded dusty plasma is investigated analytically, and the dispersion relation for the dust-acoustic wave is obtained. The effects of boundary, dust charge variation, particle collision, and dust size on the dust-acoustic wave are discussed in detail. Due to the bounded cylindrical boundary effects, the radial wave number is discrete, i.e., the spectrum is discrete. It is shown that the discrete spectrum, the adiabatic dust charge variation, dust grain size, and the particle collision have significant effects on the dust-acoustic wave

  15. Dust collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahourin, H.

    1988-03-22

    This invention relates to a dust collector or filter which may be used for large volume cleaning air for gases or for separating out industrial byproducts such as wood chips, sawdust, and shavings. It relies on filtration or separation using only a uniquely configured medium. A primary, but not exclusive, purpose of the invention is to enable very large throughput, capable of separating or filtering of gases containing up to three or more tons of byproduct with a minimum pressure-drop across the device. No preliminary cycloning, to remove major particulates is necessary. The collector generally comprises a continuous and integral filter medium which is suspended from a plurality of downwardly extending frames forming a series of separate elements having a triangular cross-section, each element being relatively wide at the top and narrow at the bottom to define, between adjacent elements, a divergent collecting space which is wide at the bottom. 11 figs.

  16. Diffusion kurtosis imaging for differentiating between the benign and malignant sinonasal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing Xuan; Tang, Zuo Hua; Zhong, Yu Feng; Qiang, Jin Wei

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to evaluate diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in the differentiation between benign and malignant sinonasal lesions, and to compare the diagnostic performance of DKI with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Eight-one patients with solid sinonasal lesions confirmed by surgery and pathology (46 malignant and 35 benign) underwent conventional MRI, DWI, and DKI. DKI was performed employing a 13 extended b-value ranging from 0 to 2500 s/mm 2 . Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DWI, kurtosis (K), and diffusion coefficient (D) from DKI were measured and compared between two groups. ADC and D values were significantly lower in the malignant sinonasal lesions than in the benign sinonasal lesions (1.11 ± 0.41 versus 1.58 ± 0.50 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s and 1.45 ± 0.36 versus 2.03 ± 0.49 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively, both P benign and malignant lesions, with a sensitivity of 69.6%, a specificity of 77.1% and an accuracy of 74.0%; a cutoff D value of 1.75 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, with a sensitivity of 82.6%, a specificity of 77.1% and an accuracy of 80.2%; a cutoff K value of 0.63 with a sensitivity of 95.7%, a specificity of 77.1% and an accuracy of 87.7%. The area under the curve of K value was significantly larger than that of ADC value (0.875 versus 0.762; P benign and malignant sinonasal lesions. DKI may be a noninvasive method to evaluate the sinonasal lesions. 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1446-1454. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Predictors of sinonasal quality of life and nasal morbidity after fully endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Andrew S; Kelly, Daniel; Milligan, John; Griffiths, Chester; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L; Rosseau, Gail; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Otto, Bradley A; Jahnke, Heidi; Chaloner, Charlene; Jelinek, Kathryn L; Chapple, Kristina; White, William L

    2015-06-01

    Despite the increasing application of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary lesions, the prognostic factors that are associated with sinonasal quality of life (QOL) and nasal morbidity are not well understood. The authors examine the predictors of sinonasal QOL and nasal morbidity in patients undergoing fully endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. An exploratory post hoc analysis was conducted of patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary surgery and were enrolled in a prospective multicenter QOL study. End points of the study included patient-reported sinonasal QOL and objective nasal endoscopy findings. Multivariate models were developed to determine the patient and surgical factors that correlated with QOL at 2 weeks through 6 months after surgery. This study is a retrospective review of a subgroup of patients studied in the clinical trial "Rhinological Outcomes in Endonasal Pituitary Surgery" (clinical trial no. NCT01504399, clinicaltrials.gov ). Data from 100 patients who underwent fully endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery were included. Predictors of a lower postoperative sinonasal QOL at 2 weeks were use of nasal splints (p = 0.039) and female sex at the trend level (p = 0.061); at 3 months, predictors of lower QOL were the presence of sinusitis (p = 0.025), advancing age (p = 0.044), and use of absorbable nasal packing (p = 0.014). Health status (multidimensional QOL) was also predictive at 2 weeks (p = 0.001) and 3 months (p surgery. The mean time (± SEM) to absence of nasal crusting was 16.3 ± 2.1 weeks, mucopurulence was 6.2 ± 1.1 weeks, and synechia was 4.4 ± 0.5 weeks. Use of absorbable nasal packing was associated with more severe mucopurulence. Sinonasal QOL following endoscopic pituitary surgery reaches a nadir at 2 weeks and recovers by 3 months postoperatively. Use of absorbable packing and nasal splints, while used in a minority of patients, negatively correlates with early sinonasal QOL. Sinonasal QOL and overall health status are

  18. Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Sinonasal Cavity in a Child: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeo Ju; Im, Soo Ah; Lim, Gye Yeon; Chun, Ho Jong; Park, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min Sik; Choi, Yeong Jin

    2007-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant tumors of cartilage that rarely involve the sinonasal region, and myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare histologic variant of chondrosarcoma that usually occurs in the soft tissue of extremities. Although several case reports and results of small series of chondrosarcomas in the sinonasal region in children are available, myxoid type chondrosarcoma is extremely rare. We recently experienced a case of low grade myxoid chondrosarcoma involving the sinonasal cavity in a 10-year-old boy, and here we report its radiologic-pathologic findings. In this case, chondroid calcification on CT and septal and marginal enhancement on MRI suggested a chondrosarcoma. Whole body PET-CT demonstrated no definite metastatic lesion and a low peak standardized uptake value primary tumor. However, no definite distinguishing imaging features were observed that distinguished low grade myxoid chondrosarcoma from conventional chondrosarcoma. hondrosarcomas are malignant mesenchymal tumors of cartilage, and usually involve the long bone and pelvis. Less than 10% of chondrosarcomas are found in the head and neck region. Chondrosarcomas can occur at any age, but the majority present between the 5th and 7th decades. Therefore, chondrosarcomas of the head and neck in children are rare; only about 13 cases of sinonasal chondrosarcoma in children have been reported. Myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare histologic variant of chondrosarcoma, and is characterized by abundant chondroid matrix and malignant chondroblastic cells arranged in cords resembling chordoma. Myxoid chondrosarcomas are typically located in the limbs in older patients, and only rarely originate in the head and neck in children. To the best of our knowledge, only one case report of myxoid type chondrosarcoma in the sinonasal region in a child is available. We report a case of myxoid chondrosarcoma involving the sinonasal cavity in a child and describe its computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

  19. Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Sinonasal Cavity in a Child: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Ju; Im, Soo Ah; Lim, Gye Yeon; Chun, Ho Jong; Park, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min Sik; Choi, Yeong Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant tumors of cartilage that rarely involve the sinonasal region, and myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare histologic variant of chondrosarcoma that usually occurs in the soft tissue of extremities. Although several case reports and results of small series of chondrosarcomas in the sinonasal region in children are available, myxoid type chondrosarcoma is extremely rare. We recently experienced a case of low grade myxoid chondrosarcoma involving the sinonasal cavity in a 10-year-old boy, and here we report its radiologic-pathologic findings. In this case, chondroid calcification on CT and septal and marginal enhancement on MRI suggested a chondrosarcoma. Whole body PET-CT demonstrated no definite metastatic lesion and a low peak standardized uptake value primary tumor. However, no definite distinguishing imaging features were observed that distinguished low grade myxoid chondrosarcoma from conventional chondrosarcoma. hondrosarcomas are malignant mesenchymal tumors of cartilage, and usually involve the long bone and pelvis. Less than 10% of chondrosarcomas are found in the head and neck region. Chondrosarcomas can occur at any age, but the majority present between the 5th and 7th decades. Therefore, chondrosarcomas of the head and neck in children are rare; only about 13 cases of sinonasal chondrosarcoma in children have been reported. Myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare histologic variant of chondrosarcoma, and is characterized by abundant chondroid matrix and malignant chondroblastic cells arranged in cords resembling chordoma. Myxoid chondrosarcomas are typically located in the limbs in older patients, and only rarely originate in the head and neck in children. To the best of our knowledge, only one case report of myxoid type chondrosarcoma in the sinonasal region in a child is available. We report a case of myxoid chondrosarcoma involving the sinonasal cavity in a child and describe its computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

  20. Effects of dust storm events on weekly clinic visits related to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in Minqin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Ruoyu; Ming, Jing; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Haixia; Zhen, Yunhe; Cheng, Guodong

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a major public health problem in China. Minqin, a Northwest county of China, has a very high number of annual PTB clinic visits and it is also known for its severe dust storms. The epidemic usually begins in February and ends in July, while the dust storms mainly occur throughout spring and early summer, thereby suggesting that there might be a close link between the causative agent of PTB and dust storms. We investigated the general impact of dust storms on PTB over time by analyzing the variation in weekly clinic visits in Minqin during 2005-2012. We used the Mann-Whitney-Pettitt test and a regression model to determine the seasonal periodicity of PTB and dust storms in a time series, as well as assessing the relationships between meteorological variables and weekly PTB clinic visits. After comparing the number of weekly PTB cases in Gansu province with dust storm events, we detected a clear link between the population dynamics of PTB and climate events, i.e., the onset of epidemics and dust storms (defined by an atmospheric index) occurred in almost the same mean week. Thus, particulate matter might be the cause of PTB outbreaks on dust storm days. It is highly likely that the significant decline in annual clinic visits was closely associated with improvements in the local environment, which prevented desertification and decreased the frequency of dust storm events. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to provide clear evidence that a PTB epidemic was affected by dust storms in China, which may give insights into the association between this environmental problem and the evolution of epidemic disease.

  1. Topical anti-infective sinonasal irrigations: update and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jivianne T; Chiu, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Sinonasal anti-infective irrigations have emerged as a promising therapeutic modality in the comprehensive management of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), particularly in the context of recalcitrant disease. The purpose of this article was to delineate the current spectrum of topical anti-infective therapies available and evaluate their role in the treatment of CRS. A systematic literature review was performed on all studies investigating the use of topical antimicrobial solutions in the medical therapy of CRS. Anti-infective irrigations were stratified into topical antibacterial, antifungal, and additive preparations according to their composition and respective microbicidal properties. The use of topical antibiotic irrigations has been supported by low-level studies in the treatment of refractory CRS, with optimal results achieved in patients who have undergone prior functional endoscopic sinus surgery and received culture-directed therapy. Multiple evidence-based reviews have not established any clinical benefit with the administration of topical antifungals, and their use is not currently recommended in the management of routine CRS. Topical additives including surfactants may be beneficial as adjunctive treatment for recalcitrant CRS, but additional research is needed to investigate their efficacy in comparison with other agents and establish safety profiles. Topical anti-infective solutions are not recommended as first-line therapy for routine CRS but may be considered as a potential option for patients with refractory CRS who have failed traditional medical and surgical intervention. Additional research is necessary to determine which patient populations would derive the most benefit from each respective irrigation regimen and identify potential toxicities associated with prolonged use.

  2. Paleo-dust insights onto dust-climate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust emissions are affected by changing climate conditions, and in turn dust impacts the atmospheric radiation budget, clouds and biogeochemical cycles. Climate and public health dust-related issues call for attention on the fate of the dust cycle in the future, and the representation of the dust cycle is now part of the strategy of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 4 and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 6 (PMIP4-CMIP6). Since mineral aerosols are one of the most important natural aerosols, understanding past dust responses to climate in the paleoclimate will allow us to better understand mineral aerosol feedbacks with climate and biogeochemistry in the Anthropocene. Modern observations and paleoclimate records offer the possibility of multiple, complementary views on the global dust cycle, and allow to validate and/or constrain the numerical representation of dust in climate and Earth system models. We present our results from a set of simulations with the Community Earth System Model for different climate states, including present and past climates such as the pre-industrial, the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum. A set of simulations including a prognostic dust cycle was thoroughly compared with a wide set of present day observations from different platforms and regions, in order to realistically constrain the magnitude of dust load, surface concentration, deposition, optical properties, and particle size distributions. The magnitude of emissions for past climate regimes was constrained based on compilations of paleodust mass accumulation rates and size distributions, as well as based on information on dust provenance. The comparison with a parallel set of simulations without dust allows estimating the impacts of dust on surface climate. We analyze impacts of dust on the mean and variability of surface temperature and precipitation in each climate state, as well as the impacts that changing dust emissions had

  3. A longitudinal study of sick building syndrome among pupils in relation to microbial components in dust in schools in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Zhuohui; Nordquist, Tobias; Larsson, Lennart; Sebastian, Aleksandra; Norback, Dan

    2011-01-01

    There are few longitudinal studies on sick building syndrome (SBS), which include ocular, nasal, throat, and dermal symptoms, headache, and fatigue. We studied the associations between selected microbial components, fungal DNA, furry pet allergens, and incidence and remission of SBS symptoms in schools in Taiyuan, China. The study was based on a two-year prospective analysis in pupils (N = 1143) in a random sample of schools in China. Settled dust in the classrooms was collected by vacuum cleaning and analyzed for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramic acid (MuA), and ergosterol (Erg). Airborne dust was collected in Petri dishes and analyzed for cat and dog allergens and fungal DNA. The relationship between the concentration of allergens and microbial compounds and new onset of SBS was analyzed by multi-level logistic regression. The prevalence of mucosal and general symptoms was 33% and 28%, respectively, at baseline, and increased during follow-up. At baseline, 27% reported at least one symptom that improved when away from school (school-related symptoms). New onset of mucosal symptoms was negatively associated with concentration of MuA, total LPS, and shorter lengths of 3-hydroxy fatty acids from LPS, C14, C16, and C18. Onset of general symptoms was negatively associated with C18 LPS. Onset of school-related symptoms was negatively associated with C16 LPS, but positively associated with total fungal DNA. In general, bacterial compounds (LPS and MuA) seem to protect against the development of mucosal and general symptoms, but fungal exposure measured as fungal DNA could increase the incidence of school-related symptoms. - Highlights: → SBS symptoms increased during the two-year follow-up period in school children in Taiyuan, China → We studied the associations between selected microbial components and incidence and remission of SBS symptoms. → Bacterial compounds (LPS and MuA) seem to protect against the development of mucosal and general symptoms. → Fungal

  4. A longitudinal study of sick building syndrome among pupils in relation to microbial components in dust in schools in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xinzhang0051@sxu.edu.cn [Research Center for Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanxi University, 030006 Taiyuan (China); Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala (Sweden); Zhao, Zhuohui [Department of Environmental Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, Fudan University, 030002 Shanghai (China); Nordquist, Tobias [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Lennart; Sebastian, Aleksandra [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Medial Microbiology, University of Lund, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Norback, Dan [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    There are few longitudinal studies on sick building syndrome (SBS), which include ocular, nasal, throat, and dermal symptoms, headache, and fatigue. We studied the associations between selected microbial components, fungal DNA, furry pet allergens, and incidence and remission of SBS symptoms in schools in Taiyuan, China. The study was based on a two-year prospective analysis in pupils (N = 1143) in a random sample of schools in China. Settled dust in the classrooms was collected by vacuum cleaning and analyzed for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramic acid (MuA), and ergosterol (Erg). Airborne dust was collected in Petri dishes and analyzed for cat and dog allergens and fungal DNA. The relationship between the concentration of allergens and microbial compounds and new onset of SBS was analyzed by multi-level logistic regression. The prevalence of mucosal and general symptoms was 33% and 28%, respectively, at baseline, and increased during follow-up. At baseline, 27% reported at least one symptom that improved when away from school (school-related symptoms). New onset of mucosal symptoms was negatively associated with concentration of MuA, total LPS, and shorter lengths of 3-hydroxy fatty acids from LPS, C14, C16, and C18. Onset of general symptoms was negatively associated with C18 LPS. Onset of school-related symptoms was negatively associated with C16 LPS, but positively associated with total fungal DNA. In general, bacterial compounds (LPS and MuA) seem to protect against the development of mucosal and general symptoms, but fungal exposure measured as fungal DNA could increase the incidence of school-related symptoms. - Highlights: {yields} SBS symptoms increased during the two-year follow-up period in school children in Taiyuan, China {yields} We studied the associations between selected microbial components and incidence and remission of SBS symptoms. {yields} Bacterial compounds (LPS and MuA) seem to protect against the development of mucosal and general symptoms

  5. Inflammatory potential in relation to the microbial content of settled dust samples collected from moisture domaged and reference schools: results of HITEA study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huttunen, K.; Tirkkonen, J.; Täubel, M.; Krop, E.; Mikkonen, S.; Pekkanen, J.; Heederik, D.; Zock, J.P.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hirvonen, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Aiming to identify factors causing the adverse health effects associated with moisture-damaged indoor environments, we analyzed immunotoxicological potential of settled dust from moisture-damaged and reference schools in relation to their microbiological composition. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were

  6. Improved planning of endoscopic sinonasal surgery from 3-dimensional images with Osirix® and stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Serafín; Herrero-Salado, Tomás F; Maza-Solano, Juan M; Ropero-Romero, Francisco; González-García, Jaime; Ambrosiani-Fernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The high variability of sinonasal anatomy requires the best knowledge of its three-dimensional (3D) conformation to perform surgery more safely and efficiently. The aim of the study was to validate the utility of Osirix® and stereolithography in improving endoscopic sinonasal surgery planning. Osirix® was used as a viewer and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) 3D imaging manager to improve planning for 114 sinonasal endoscopic operations with polyposis (86) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) (28). Stereolithography rapid prototyping was used for 7 frontoethmoidal mucoceles. Using Osirix® and stereolithography, a greater number of anatomical structures were identified and this was done faster, with a statistically-significant clinical-radiological correlation (Pvirtual reality, allows surgeons to perform endoscopic sinonasal surgery with greater confidence and in less time than using 2D images. Residents also achieve surgical competence faster, more safely and with fewer complications. This beneficial impact is increased when the surgical team has stereolithography rapid prototyping in more complex cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  7. The IRX-β dust attenuation relation in cosmological galaxy formation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Desika; Davé, Romeel; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Thompson, Robert; Conroy, Charlie; Geach, James

    2018-02-01

    We utilize a series of galaxy formation simulations to investigate the relationship between the ultraviolet (UV) slope, β, and the infrared excess (IRX) in the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. Our main goals are to understand the origin of and scatter in the IRX-β relation; to assess the efficacy of simplified stellar population synthesis screen models in capturing the essential physics in the IRX-β relation; and to understand systematic deviations from the canonical local IRX-β relations in particular populations of high-redshift galaxies. Our main results follow. Young galaxies with relatively cospatial UV and IR emitting regions and a Milky Way-like extinction curve fall on or near the standard Meurer relation. This behaviour is well captured by simplified screen models. Scatter in the IRX-β relation is dominated by three major effects: (i) older stellar populations drive galaxies below the relations defined for local starbursts due to a reddening of their intrinsic UV SEDs; (ii) complex geometries in high-z heavily star-forming galaxies drive galaxies towards blue UV slopes owing to optically thin UV sightlines; (iii) shallow extinction curves drive galaxies downwards in the IRX-β plane due to lowered near-ultraviolet/far-ultraviolet extinction ratios. We use these features of the UV slopes of galaxies to derive a fitting relation that reasonably collapses the scatter back towards the canonical local relation. Finally, we use these results to develop an understanding for the location of two particularly enigmatic populations of galaxies in the IRX-β plane: z ˜ 2-4 dusty star-forming galaxies and z > 5 star-forming galaxies.

  8. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  9. Planck intermediate results. XXXII. The relative orientation between the magnetic field and structures traced by interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of the magnetic field in the formation of the filamentary structures observed in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a debated topic owing to the paucity of relevant observations needed to test existing models. The Planck all-sky maps of linearly polarized emission from dust at 353 GHz provide the required combination of imaging and statistics to study the correlation between the structures of the Galactic magnetic field and of interstellar matter over the whole sky, both in the diffuse ISM and in molecular clouds. The data reveal that structures, or ridges, in the intensity map have counterparts in the Stokes Q and/or U maps. We focus our study on structures at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, which cover two orders of magnitude in column density, from 1020 to 1022 cm-2. We measure the magnetic field orientation on the plane ofthe sky from the polarization data, and present an algorithm to estimate the orientation of the ridges from the dust intensity map. We use analytical models to account for projection effects. Comparing polarization angles on and off the structures, we estimate the mean ratio between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the magnetic field to be between 0.6 and 1.0, with a preferred value of 0.8. We find that the ridges are usually aligned with the magnetic field measured on the structures. This statistical trend becomes more striking for increasing polarization fraction and decreasing column density. There is no alignment for the highest column density ridges. We interpret the increase in alignment with polarization fraction as a consequence of projection effects. We present maps to show that the decrease in alignment for high column density is not due to a loss of correlation between the distribution of matter and the geometry of the magnetic field. In molecular complexes, we also observe structures perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, statistically, cannot be accounted for by projection effects. This

  10. Planck intermediate results: XXXII. The relative orientation between the magnetic field and structures traced by interstellar dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the magnetic field in the formation of the filamentary structures observed in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a debated topic owing to the paucity of relevant observations needed to test existing models. The Planck all-sky maps of linearly polarized emission from dust at 353 GHz provide the required combination of imaging and statistics to study the correlation between the structures of the Galactic magnetic field and of interstellar matter over the whole sky, both in the diffuse ISM and in molecular clouds. The data reveal that structures, or ridges, in the intensity map have counterparts in the Stokes Q and/or U maps. In this paper, we focus our study on structures at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, which cover two orders of magnitude in column density, from 10"2"0 to 10"2"2 cm"-"2. We measure the magnetic field orientation on the plane ofthe sky from the polarization data, and present an algorithm to estimate the orientation of the ridges from the dust intensity map. We use analytical models to account for projection effects. Comparing polarization angles on and off the structures, we estimate the mean ratio between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the magnetic field to be between 0.6 and 1.0, with a preferred value of 0.8. We find that the ridges are usually aligned with the magnetic field measured on the structures. This statistical trend becomes more striking for increasing polarization fraction and decreasing column density. There is no alignment for the highest column density ridges. We interpret the increase in alignment with polarization fraction as a consequence of projection effects. We present maps to show that the decrease in alignment for high column density is not due to a loss of correlation between the distribution of matter and the geometry of the magnetic field. In molecular complexes, we also observe structures perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, statistically, cannot be accounted for by

  11. Smoking, not human papilloma virus infection, is a risk factor for recurrence of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hwan-Jung; Mun, Sue Jean; Cho, Kyu-Sup; Hong, Sung-Lyong

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence rate of sinonasal inverted papillomas (SNIP) is 15-20%. However, few studies have investigated patient-dependent factors related to recurrence of SNIPs. To analyze risk factors, including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and smoking, as well as other factors, for recurrence of SNIPs. Fifty-four patients who were diagnosed with SNIP and underwent surgery were enrolled: 39 men and 15 women, with the mean age of 54.0 years. Their mean follow-up was 40.6 months. Demographics and information about the history of smoking, previous surgery, tumor extent, follow-up, and recurrence were reviewed retrospectively. Those patients whose tumors were associated with malignant transformation were excluded in this study. HPV detection and genotyping in the tumor specimens were performed with the HPV DNA chip, a polymerase chain reaction-based DNA microarray system. Seven patients (13.0%) had recurrence, with a mean time to recurrence of 39.8 months. Recurrence rates in T1, T2, T3, and T4 of the Krouse staging system were 0% (0/4), 8.3% (2/24), 17.4% (4/23), and 33.3% (1/3), respectively (p > 0.5). Eight patients (14.8%) were positive for HPV DNA. All of these patients belonged to the group without recurrence (p > 0.5). However, recurrence rates according to HPV DNA positivity were not statistically different (0% versus 15.2%). Three (42.9%) in the group with recurrence and four (8.5%) in the group without recurrence were smokers (p < 0.5). Smoking was associated with recurrence of SNIP. However, HPV infection is not a recurrence of SNIP risk factor.

  12. Result of radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancers using partial attenuation filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Choi, Tae Jin [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    This study was to evaluate the survival and pattern of failure after radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancer using partial attenuation filer and wedged beams and to help radiotherapy planning of sino-nasal cancer. Between February 1992 and March 2003, 17 patients with sino-nasal cancers underwent radiation therapy using partial attenuation filter at Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung university. There were 9 male and 8 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 40 to 75 years (median 59 years). There were 10 patients of maxillary sinus cancer, 7 patients of nasal cancer. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 11, adenoid cystic carcinoma in 4 and olfactory neuroblastoma in 2. The distribution of clinical stage by the AJCC system was 3 for stage II, 7 for III and 6 for IV. The five patients were treated with radiation alone and 12 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. The range of total radiation dose delivered to the primary tumor was from 44 to 76 Gy (median 60 Gy). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 173 months with median of 78 months. The overall 2 year survival rate and disease free survival rate was 76.4%. The 5 year and 10 year survival rate were 76.4% and 45.6% and the 5 year and 10 year disease free survival rate was 70.6%. The 5 year disease free survival rate by treatment modality was 91.6% for postoperative radiation group and 20% for radiation alone group, statistical significance was found by treatment modality ({rho} = 0.006). There were no differences in survival by pathology and stage. There were local failure in 5 patients (29%) but no distant failure and no severe complication required surgical intervention. Radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancer using partial attenuation filter was safe and effective. Combined modality with conservative surgery and radiation therapy was more advisable to achieve loco-regional control in sino-nasal cancer. Also we considered high precision radiation therapy with

  13. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  14. Sinonasal Lymphoma Presenting as a Probable Sanctuary Site for Relapsed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Lim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinonasal lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL representing 1.5% of all lymphomas. It presents as an unremitting ulceration with progressive destruction of midline sinonasal and surrounding structures. Poor prognosis warrants early treatment although diagnosis is challenging and frequently delayed. It is usually primary in origin and to our knowledge the sinonasal region has never been reported as a sanctuary site in leukaemia/lymphoma relapse. We present a unique case of B-cell ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with late relapse to the nasal septum as a sinonasal lymphoblastic lymphoma and with genetic support for this as a sanctuary site.

  15. Sinonasal Lymphoma Presenting as a Probable Sanctuary Site for Relapsed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, W Y; Care, R; Lau, M; Chiruka, S; Dawes, P J D

    2015-01-01

    Sinonasal lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) representing 1.5% of all lymphomas. It presents as an unremitting ulceration with progressive destruction of midline sinonasal and surrounding structures. Poor prognosis warrants early treatment although diagnosis is challenging and frequently delayed. It is usually primary in origin and to our knowledge the sinonasal region has never been reported as a sanctuary site in leukaemia/lymphoma relapse. We present a unique case of B-cell ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) with late relapse to the nasal septum as a sinonasal lymphoblastic lymphoma and with genetic support for this as a sanctuary site.

  16. Oxygen isotopic ratios of quartz from wind-erosive soils of southwestern United States in relation to aerosol dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridhar, K.; Jackson, M.L.; Clayton, R.N.; Gillette, D.A.; Hawley, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic ratios (expressed as parts per thousand relative to mean ocean water, SMOW, delta/sup 18/O) of the quartz from 13 soils undergoing much wind erosion during the study period of 1972-1975 in four southwestern states and from comparison areas were determined. The delta/sup 18/O for quartz from eight Texas (TX) and Arizona (AZ) soils range from 13.0 to 15.9 /sup 0///sub 00/. The quartz of the sands and silts coarser than 20 ..mu..m from three of the soils had delta/sup 18/O values ranging from 13.1 to 15.1 /sup 0///sub 00/, characteristic of an ultimate igneous-metamorphic origin. The delta/sup 18/O values increase greatly with decreasing particle size of quartz from three soils ranging from loamy fine sand to loam to clay in texture. The delta/sup 18/O of the 1-10 ..mu..m quartz fraction (aerosol size) ranged from 19.2 to 20.2 /sup 0///sub 00/ (19.55 +- 0.28 /sup 0///sub 00/; +- sigma) for the thirteen soils most affected by dust storms. The oxygen isotopic ratios of 1-10 ..mu..m quartz from three Hawaiian soils and two sediments from Lake Waiau occurring at 3,970 m altitude on the Mauna Kea summit on the Island of Hawaii give a delta/sup 18/O mean of 18.3 +- 0.2 /sup 0///sub 00/.

  17. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  18. Heavy metal accumulation related to population density in road dust samples taken from urban sites under different land uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trujillo-González, Juan Manuel; Torres-Mora, Marco Aurelio; Keesstra, Saskia; Brevik, Eric C.; Jiménez-Ballesta, Raimundo

    2016-01-01

    Soil pollution is a key component of the land degradation process, but little is known about the impact of soil pollution on human health in the urban environment. The heavy metals Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd and Ni were analyzed by acid digestion (method EPA 3050B) and a total of 15 dust samples were

  19. Planck intermediate results XXXII. The relative orientation between the magnetic field and structures traced by interstellar dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the magnetic field in the formation of the filamentary structures observed in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a debated topic owing to the paucity of relevant observations needed to test existing models. The Planck all-sky maps of linearly polarized emission from dust at 353 GHz prov...

  20. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

  1. CT and MRI diagnosis of chondrosarcoma in sinonasal and orbital region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bentao; Wang Zhenchang; Xian Junfang; Zhang Zhengyu; Liu Zhonglin; Lan Baosen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT and MRI findings of chondrosarcoma in sinonasal and orbital region so as to promote the diagnostic accuracy. Methods: All 12 cases of chondrosarcoma were verified by pathology. CT and MRI findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The lesions occurred in sinonasal cavity in 9 cases and in orbit in 3 cases. Pathologically 8 cases were conventional chondrosarcoma, 2 dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma, and 2 mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. On CT, chondrosarcoma revealed oval shape in 2 cases, lobular shape in 6 cases and irregular shape in 4 cases. The lesion showed stippled, ring, nodular, patchy or amorphous calcification. Postcontrast CT showed mild inhomogeneous enhancement in 3 cases. Chondrosarcoma demonstrated well-defined margin in 9 cases and hazy margin in 3 cases. Sinonasal chondrosarcoma revealed bony destruction in 7 cases. Orbital chondrosarcoma showed bony erosion invading ipsilateral frontal region in one case. On MR T 1 WI, conventional and dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma showed hypointense signal compared to brain in 6 cases and isointense signal in 4 cases. On T 2 WI, the lesions showed heterogeneous hyperintense signal in 8 cases and isointense signal in 2 cases with marked hypointense foci. Postcontrast MR imaging demonstrated mild to moderate inhomogeneous enhancement in these cases, and showed peripheral and septal enhancement in 5 cases of conventional chondrosarcoma, showing variegated appearance in 3 cases and honeycomb-like appearance in 2 cases. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma showed isointense signal on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, with homogeneous and heterogeneous enhancement in one case, respectively. MRI showed the extent and the associated changes of the lesions more clearly compared to CT. Conclusion: CT is the first modality of choice in the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma in sinonasal and orbital region. The typically peripheral and septal contrast enhancement can also suggest the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma on

  2. Long-term outcome in dogs with sinonasal aspergillosis treated with intranasal infusions of enilconazole

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller, S.; Clercx, Cécile

    2007-01-01

    Long-term outcomes (mean 38+/-17 months) were evaluated in 27 dogs with sinonasal aspergillosis after successful medical treatment using intranasal infusions of 1% or 2% enilconazole (1%, n=15; 2%, n=12). Long-term outcomes with both treatment protocols were good, with half of the dogs being asymptomatic throughout the follow-up period. The remaining dogs showed mild clinical signs compatible with chronic rhinitis/sinusitis. These clinical signs were interpreted as chronic lymphoplasmacytic r...

  3. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 compromise the sinonasal epithelial barrier and perturb intercellular junction protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K; Laury, Adrienne M; Katz, Elizabeth H; Den Beste, Kyle A; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-05-01

    Altered expression of epithelial intercellular junction proteins has been observed in sinonasal biopsies from nasal polyps and epithelial layers cultured from nasal polyp patients. These alterations comprise a "leaky" epithelial barrier phenotype. We hypothesize that T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 modulate epithelial junction proteins, thereby contributing to the leaky epithelial barrier. Differentiated primary sinonasal epithelial layers cultured at the air-liquid interface were exposed to IL-4, IL-13, and controls for 24 hours at 37°C. Epithelial resistance measurements were taken every 4 hours during cytokine exposure. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining/confocal microscopy were used to assess changes in a panel of tight and adherens junction proteins. Western blot densitometry was quantified with image analysis. IL-4 and IL-13 exposure resulted in a mean decrease in transepithelial resistance at 24 hours to 51.6% (n = 6) and 68.6% (n = 8) of baseline, respectively. Tight junction protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) expression decreased 42.2% with IL-4 exposure (n = 9) and 37.5% with IL-13 exposure (n = 9). Adherens junction protein E-cadherin expression decreased 35.3% with IL-4 exposure (n = 9) and 32.9% with IL-13 exposure (n = 9). Tight junction protein claudin-2 showed more variability but had a trend toward higher expression with Th2 cytokine exposure. There were no appreciable changes in claudin-1, occludin, or zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) with IL-4 or IL-13 exposure. Sinonasal epithelial exposure to Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 results in alterations in intercellular junction proteins, reflecting increased epithelial permeability. Such changes may explain some of the phenotypic manifestations of Th2-mediated sinonasal disease, such as edema, nasal discharge, and environmental reactivity. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  4. IL-4 and IL-13 Compromise the Sinonasal Epithelial Barrier and Perturb Intercellular Junction Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K.; Laury, Adrienne M.; Katz, Elizabeth H.; Den Beste, Kyle A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Altered expression of epithelial intercellular junction proteins has been observed in sinonasal biopsies from nasal polyps and epithelial layers cultured from nasal polyp patients. These alterations comprise a “leaky” epithelial barrier phenotype. We hypothesize that Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 modulate epithelial junction proteins thereby contributing to the leaky epithelial barrier. Methods Differentiated primary sinonasal epithelial layers cultured at the air-liquid interface were exposed to IL-4, IL-13, and controls for 24 hours at 37°C. Epithelial resistance measurements were taken every 4 hours during cytokine exposure. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining/confocal microscopy were used to assess changes in a panel of tight and adherens junction proteins. Western blot densitometry was quantified with image analysis. Results IL-4 and IL-13 exposure resulted in a mean decrease in transepithelial resistance at 24 hours to 51.6% (n=6) and 68.6% (n=8) of baseline, respectively. Tight junction protein JAM-A expression decreased 42.2% with IL-4 exposure (n=9) and 37.5% with IL-13 exposure (n=9). Adherens junction protein E-cadherin expression decreased 35.3% with IL-4 exposure (n=9) and 32.9% with IL-13 exposure (n=9). Tight junction protein claudin-2 showed more variability but had a trend toward higher expression with Th2 cytokine exposure. There were no appreciable changes in claudin-1, occludin, or ZO-1 with IL-4 or IL-13 exposure. Conclusion Sinonasal epithelial exposure to Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 results in alterations in intercellular junction proteins, reflecting increased epithelial permeability. Such changes may explain some of the phenotypic manifestations of Th2-mediated sinonasal disease, such as edema, nasal discharge, and environmental reactivity. PMID:24510479

  5. Primary Sinonasal Malignant Melanoma: Effect of Clinical and Histopathologic Prognostic Factors on Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercan Göde

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucosal melanoma is a rare malignancy arising from melanocytes of the mucosal surfaces. The pattern and frequency of oncogenic mutations and histopathological biomarkers have a role on distinct tumour behaviour and survival. Aims: To assess the rate of C-KIT positivity and its effect on survival of surgically treated sinonasal malignant melanoma patients with other histopathological biomarkers and clinical features. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Seventeen sinonasal malignant melanoma patients with a mean age of 65.41 (39-86 years were included. Overall survival and disease-specific survival rates were calculated. The impact of age, gender, stage and extent of the disease, type of surgery, and adjuvant therapies were also taken into consideration. The effect of mitotic index, pigmentation, S100, HMB-45, Melan-A and C-KIT on survival were evaluated. Results: Median tumour size was 20 mm (interquartile range=27.5 mm. Pigmentation was present in 7 (41.2% cases. Median number of mitoses per millimetre squared was 11 (interquartile range=13. Melan A was positive in 7 (41.2% patients, ulceration was present in 6 cases (35.3%, and necrosis was present in (47.1% 8 cases. Six patients (35.3% were positive for S100, 14 (82.4% specimens stained positive for HMB-45 and C-KIT (CD117 was positive in 9 cases (52.9%. Three patients (16.7% developed distant metastasis. Five year overall and disease free survival rates were 61.4% and 43.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Although C-KIT positive sinonasal malignant melanoma patients (52.9% can be candidates for targeted tumour therapies, the studied clinical or histopathological features along with C-KIT seem to have no significant effect on survival in a small group of patients with sinonasal malignant melanoma

  6. Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Sinonasal Papilloma in Southern Iranian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Valibeigi, Behnaz; Ashraf, Mohamad Javad; Kerdegari, Narges; Safai, Akbar; Abedi, Elham; Khademi, Bijan; Azarpira, Negar

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Sinonasal papilloma (SNP) is a rare benign lesion characterized by high recurrence rate and malignant transformation. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in these lesions in South of Iran. Materials and Method: In this cross sectional retrospective study, a total of 41 patients, 38 SNP and 3 SNP/Squamous cell carcinoma cases, from 2007 to 2014 were studied. Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA detection w...

  7. Long-term sinonasal outcomes of aspirin desensitization in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Sup; Soudry, Ethan; Psaltis, Alkis J; Nadeau, Kari C; McGhee, Sean A; Nayak, Jayakar V; Hwang, Peter H

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to assess sinonasal outcomes in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) undergoing aspirin desensitization following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Case series with chart review. University hospital. A retrospective review of sinonasal outcomes was conducted for 30 AERD patients undergoing aspirin desensitization and maintenance therapy following ESS. Sinonasal outcomes were prospectively assessed by the Sinonasal Outcomes Test-22 (SNOT-22) and endoscopic polyp grading system. Data were collected preoperatively, 1 and 4 weeks postsurgery (before desensitization), and 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after aspirin desensitization. Twenty-eight of 30 patients (93.3%) successfully completed aspirin desensitization, whereas 2 of 30 (6.7%) were unable to complete desensitization due to respiratory intolerance. Of the 21 patients who successfully completed a minimum of 24 weeks of follow-up, 20 (95.2%) patients demonstrated sustained endoscopic and symptomatic improvement for a median follow-up period of 33 months. After surgical treatment but before desensitization, patients experienced significant reductions in SNOT-22 and polyp grade scores. In the first 6 months after aspirin desensitization, patients experienced further significant reductions in SNOT-22 scores, whereas polyp grade remained stable. The improvements in symptom endoscopic scores were preserved throughout the follow-up period after desensitization. No patients required additional sinus surgery. One patient had to discontinue aspirin therapy due to gastrointestinal side effects. No other adverse reactions to aspirin were noted. Aspirin desensitization following ESS appears to be a well-tolerated and effective adjunctive therapy for long-term control of nasal polyposis in patients with AERD. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  8. CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal sarcoma: Differentiation from squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Baek, Sora; Park, Min Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young Soo [Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) findings for the differentiation of sinonasal sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT results in 20 patients with pathologically proven sinonasal sarcoma (n = 7) and SCC (n = 13). Imaging characteristics of tumors, such as the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, local tumor invasion, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were analyzed and compared between sarcoma and SCC. The SUVmax of sarcomas (7.4 ± 2.1) was significantly lower than the SUVmax of the SCCs (14.3 ± 4.5) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, and local tumor invasion was observed between sarcoma and SCC. Although CT and MR imaging features are nonspecific, FDG PET/CT is useful in distinguishing between sinonasal sarcoma and SCC based on the SUVmax value.

  9. CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal sarcoma: Differentiation from squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Baek, Sora; Park, Min Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) findings for the differentiation of sinonasal sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT results in 20 patients with pathologically proven sinonasal sarcoma (n = 7) and SCC (n = 13). Imaging characteristics of tumors, such as the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, local tumor invasion, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were analyzed and compared between sarcoma and SCC. The SUVmax of sarcomas (7.4 ± 2.1) was significantly lower than the SUVmax of the SCCs (14.3 ± 4.5) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, and local tumor invasion was observed between sarcoma and SCC. Although CT and MR imaging features are nonspecific, FDG PET/CT is useful in distinguishing between sinonasal sarcoma and SCC based on the SUVmax value

  10. Treatment of refractory sino-nasal aspergillosis with posaconazole and terbinafine in 10 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J; Bianco, D

    2017-09-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of posaconazole and terbinafine for the treatment of naturally occurring sino-nasal aspergillosis in dogs refractory to conventional topical and systemic treatment. Ten client-owned dogs with sino-nasal aspergillosis and not responsive to conventional treatments were prospectively enrolled to receive a dose of 5 mg/kg posaconazole orally every 12 hours for six months. All dogs were concurrently treated with doses of 30 mg/kg terbinafine orally every 12 hours and 5 mg/kg doxycycline orally every 12 hours for 6 to 18 months. All 10 enrolled dogs completed the study. The treatment response was defined as complete clinical remission (n=7) or partial clinical remission (n=3). Two dogs relapsed after cessation of combination therapy. All dogs lived more than one year after starting combination therapy and eight dogs are alive at the time of writing. No clinically relevant adverse reactions or increases in hepatic enzyme activity occurred during the combination therapy. The results of this study suggest that this combination therapy appears safe and well-tolerated for the treatment of refractory sino-nasal aspergillosis in dogs. Long-term survival is possible with prolonged treatment, but relapse is possible. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further evaluate these preliminary findings. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  11. A case of chemotherapy-resistant intestinal-type sinonasal adenocarcinoma treated by gamma knife radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres M. Alvarez-Pinzon, M.D., Ph.D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal type sinonasal adenocarcinomas are a rare malignancy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses ascending in the nasal cavity are particularly unusual. We report an infrequent case of an Intestinal sinonasal adenocarcinoma from the left lateral nasal wall. A 60-year-old Hispanic male complained of complete progressive nasal obstruction and epistaxis for 8 months. A nasal endoscopic exam displayed a prominent enlargement, which remained in connection with the anterior part of left inferior turbinate. Computed tomography revealed a medium-defined, soft tissue dense lesion in the left anterior nasal cavity. Mass biopsy histology confirmed a low grade differentiate Intestinal type sinonasal adenocarcinomas. The patient underwent 8 cycles of chemotherapy including paclitaxel, platinol and fluorouracil. According to the medical records, the patient responded well to the chemotherapy treatment until about six cycles. When a follow up CT scan showed tumor growth, the patient was placed on Doxorubicin but developed toxicity. The main treatment modality is surgical resection with histological clear margins but concerning the low differentiation, low response of chemotherapy, and surgical risk we offered an option with gamma knife radiosurgery. In our case, the patient demonstrated satisfactory relief of symptoms and reported the ability to breathe through the nose. 80% of tumor resolution was observed in 1 month following the CT scan.

  12. Sinonasal imaging after Caldwell-Luc surgery: MDCT findings of an abandoned procedure in times of functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz; Peloschek, Philipp; Koelblinger, Claus; Mehrain, Sheida; Krestan, Christian Robert; Czerny, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Today, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is performed in most of the patients with sinonasal inflammatory disease. The postoperative imaging findings of FESS in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) considerably differ from those of historic Caldwell-Luc (CL) maxillary sinus surgery which is an uncommon procedure today. Thus, the postoperative CL imaging findings may lead to diagnostic confusion and misinterpretation. Therefore, this study explicitly presents the MDCT findings of post-CL patients which have not been described previously. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with clinically suspected sinusitis and documented history of CL-procedure underwent 16 row MDCT (MDCT Mx8000 IDT Philips) with multiplanar reconstructions of the paranasal sinuses in the axial plane. The following parameters were used: 140 kV, 50 mAs; 16 mm x 0.75 mm detector collimation; 1 mm reconstructed slice thickness; 0.5 mm increment. The studies were reconstructed with a bone algorithm (W3000/L600; 1 mm slice thickness) in axial plane and coronal plane (3 mm slice thickness). The images were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of normal surgery-related and pathological findings. Results: Surgery-related imaging characteristics presented as follows: an anterior and a medial bony wall defect and sclerosis and sinus wall thickening were observed in all 28/28 cases (100%). Collaps of the sinus cavity was seen in 26/28 cases (92.9%). Furthermore, inflammatory disease of the operated sinus(es) was found in 23/28 cases (82.1%): 14/28 patients (50%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening of the operated sinus(es) as well as of other sinonasal cavities and 9/28 patients (32.1%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening limited to the operated sinus(es). A postoperative mucocele was depicted in 3/28 cases (10.7%). 2/28 patients (7.1%) showed neither maxillary nor other mucosal swelling. Conclusion: MDCT with multiplanar reconstructions is a precise method to evaluate

  13. The influence of relative humidity on the dust measurement with the FH 62 I-N [1 m3.h-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasenbrink, A.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of relative humidity (rh) can be noticed evidently at continuous dust measurements if humidity increases rapidly up to more than 90%. This work investigated the possibilities to reduce the resulting error of taking up humidity by using two different types of glass fibre filters, the usual GF10 and its hydrophobic version GF10 HY. Compared with the results of the GF10 it could be shown that the GF10 HY takes up only 63% of humidity per time, yielding a concentration peak with an amount of 66% of the GF10 value. The total amount of absorbed humidity in mass units of the dust monitor differed between 30 μg and 50 μg for the GF10, and between 20 μg and 40 μg for the GF10 HY filter. (orig.) [de

  14. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  15. Sinonasal malignancies with neuroendocrine differentiation: Case series and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Santosh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sinonasal tumors with neuroendocrine differentiation (SCND are uncommon tumors with considerable overlap of histological features. Based on their neuroendocrine differentiation they can be sub categorized into sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC, sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma (SNEC, esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB and small cell carcinoma (SmCC. The natural history and biological behavior varies in this group of tumors. Hence the histo-morphological diagnosis coupled with grading/staging is important for the prognostication of these tumors. Aim : To study the clinicopathological characteristics of sinonasal neuroendocrine malignancies at our institute. Material and Methods : We searched our institute′s pathology database for the period from 2002 to 2007, for the four subcategories of sinonasal tumors with neuroendocrine differentiation. Morphological and immunohistochemical features were studied and, grading, staging was done in accordance with standard criteria. The clinical treatment and follow- up data were retrieved from the case files in available cases. Results : A total of 37 cases were retrieved from our database which include 14 cases of SNUC, 14 cases of ENB and nine cases of SNEC. The cases of SNUC were immunopositive for cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen and weakly for neuron-specific enolase. SNEC showed strong reactivity with epithelial and neuroendocrine markers whereas ENB demonstrated immunoreactivity to synaptophysisn and chromogranin strongly, with weak to negative expression of epithelial markers. All cases of SNUC and SNEC were of high grade and stage whereas 50% of ENB cases were of grade II but high stage tumors. Most of the SNUC and SNEC patients had been treated with multimodality treatment regimens including upfront chemotherapy followed by surgery and loco- regional radiation. In contrast, ENB patients had undergone surgical extirpation followed by radiation therapy in majority of cases. With

  16. Occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in wood dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, C K; Schuepfer, P; Boiteux, P

    2009-01-01

    Sino-nasal cancer (SNC) represents approximately 3% of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) cancers. Adenocarcinoma SNC is an acknowledged occupational disease affecting certain specialized workers such as joiners and cabinetmakers. The high proportion of woodworkers contracting a SNC, subjected to an estimated risk 50 to 100 times higher than that affecting the general population, has suggested various study paths to possible causes such as tannin in hardwood, formaldehyde in plywood and benzo(a)pyrene produced by wood when overheated by cutting tools. It is acknowledged that tannin does not cause cancer to workers exposed to tea dust. Apart from being an irritant, formaldehyde is also classified as carcinogenic. The path involving carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by overheated wood is attractive. In this study, we measured the particle size and PAHs content in dust emitted by the processing of wood in an experimental chamber, and in field situation. Quantification of 16 PAHs is carried out by capillary GC-ion trap Mass Spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The materials tested are rough fir tree, oak, impregnated polyurethane (PU) oak. The wood dust contains carcinogenic PAHs at the level of μg.g -1 or ppm. During sanding operations, the PU varnish-impregnated wood produces 100 times more PAHs in dust than the unfinished wood.

  17. Occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in wood dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, C K; Schuepfer, P; Boiteux, P, E-mail: chuynh@hospvd.c [Institute for Work and Health, rue du Bugnon 21, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-02-01

    Sino-nasal cancer (SNC) represents approximately 3% of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) cancers. Adenocarcinoma SNC is an acknowledged occupational disease affecting certain specialized workers such as joiners and cabinetmakers. The high proportion of woodworkers contracting a SNC, subjected to an estimated risk 50 to 100 times higher than that affecting the general population, has suggested various study paths to possible causes such as tannin in hardwood, formaldehyde in plywood and benzo(a)pyrene produced by wood when overheated by cutting tools. It is acknowledged that tannin does not cause cancer to workers exposed to tea dust. Apart from being an irritant, formaldehyde is also classified as carcinogenic. The path involving carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by overheated wood is attractive. In this study, we measured the particle size and PAHs content in dust emitted by the processing of wood in an experimental chamber, and in field situation. Quantification of 16 PAHs is carried out by capillary GC-ion trap Mass Spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The materials tested are rough fir tree, oak, impregnated polyurethane (PU) oak. The wood dust contains carcinogenic PAHs at the level of mug.g{sup -1} or ppm. During sanding operations, the PU varnish-impregnated wood produces 100 times more PAHs in dust than the unfinished wood.

  18. Evaporative Cooler Use Influences Temporal Indoor Relative Humidity but Not Dust Mite Allergen Levels in Homes in a Semi-Arid Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James D; Tuttle, Steven C; Nelson, Morgan C; Bradshaw, Rebecca K; Hoybjerg, Taylor G; Johnson, Julene B; Kruman, Bryce A; Orton, Taylor S; Cook, Ryan B; Eggett, Dennis L; Weber, K Scott

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy consumption and climate change make residential evaporative coolers a popular alternative to central air conditioning in arid and semi-arid climates. However, evaporative coolers have been shown to significantly increase indoor relative humidity and dust mite allergen levels in some studies, while showing no association in other studies. Improved measurement of temporal fluctuations in indoor relative humidity may help identify factors that promote mite growth in homes in dry climates. Dust samples and continuous indoor relative humidity measurements were collected from homes with central air conditioning and homes with evaporative coolers in Utah. Samples were collected over two seasons, winter/spring (Jan-Apr) and summer (July-Sept), 2014. Dust samples were analyzed for Der p 1 and Der f 1 using a two-site monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Housing characteristics including age of home, occupant density, and age of mattresses, furniture, and carpeting were also measured. Positive Der p 1 or Der f 1 samples were found in 25.0% of the homes and there was no difference in mean allergen levels by type of air conditioning. Indoor relative humidity was significantly higher in homes with evaporative coolers compared to those with central air conditioning during the summer. Homes with evaporative coolers also spent significantly more time during summer above 55.0% and 65.0% relative humidity compared to central air homes, but not above 75.0%. Findings from this study suggest that increased humidity from evaporative coolers may not be sufficient to exceed the critical equilibrium humidity or maintain humidity excursions for sufficient duration in relatively larger single-family homes in semi-arid climates to support mite growth and reproduction.

  19. Evaporative Cooler Use Influences Temporal Indoor Relative Humidity but Not Dust Mite Allergen Levels in Homes in a Semi-Arid Climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Johnston

    Full Text Available Concerns about energy consumption and climate change make residential evaporative coolers a popular alternative to central air conditioning in arid and semi-arid climates. However, evaporative coolers have been shown to significantly increase indoor relative humidity and dust mite allergen levels in some studies, while showing no association in other studies. Improved measurement of temporal fluctuations in indoor relative humidity may help identify factors that promote mite growth in homes in dry climates. Dust samples and continuous indoor relative humidity measurements were collected from homes with central air conditioning and homes with evaporative coolers in Utah. Samples were collected over two seasons, winter/spring (Jan-Apr and summer (July-Sept, 2014. Dust samples were analyzed for Der p 1 and Der f 1 using a two-site monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis. Housing characteristics including age of home, occupant density, and age of mattresses, furniture, and carpeting were also measured. Positive Der p 1 or Der f 1 samples were found in 25.0% of the homes and there was no difference in mean allergen levels by type of air conditioning. Indoor relative humidity was significantly higher in homes with evaporative coolers compared to those with central air conditioning during the summer. Homes with evaporative coolers also spent significantly more time during summer above 55.0% and 65.0% relative humidity compared to central air homes, but not above 75.0%. Findings from this study suggest that increased humidity from evaporative coolers may not be sufficient to exceed the critical equilibrium humidity or maintain humidity excursions for sufficient duration in relatively larger single-family homes in semi-arid climates to support mite growth and reproduction.

  20. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in relation to wood dust and monoterpene exposure in the wood pellet industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfstedt, Håkan; Hagström, Katja; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Holmström, Mats; Rask-Andersen, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Wood pellets are used as a source of renewable energy for heating purposes. Common exposures are wood dust and monoterpenes, which are known to be hazardous for the airways. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of occupational exposure on respiratory health in wood pellet workers. Thirty-nine men working with wood pellet production at six plants were investigated with a questionnaire, medical examination, allergy screening, spirometry, and nasal peak expiratory flow (nasal PEF). Exposure to wood dust and monoterpenes was measured. The wood pellet workers reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms, dry cough, and asthma medication compared to controls from the general population. There were no differences in nasal PEF between work and leisure time. A lower lung function than expected (vital capacity [VC], 95%; forced vital capacity in 1 second [FEV 1 ], 96% of predicted) was noted, but no changes were noted during shifts. There was no correlation between lung function and years working in pellet production. Personal measurements of wood dust at work showed high concentrations (0.16-19 mg/m 3 ), and exposure peaks when performing certain work tasks. Levels of monoterpenes were low (0.64-28 mg/m 3 ). There was no association between exposure and acute lung function effects. In this study of wood pellet workers, high levels of wood dust were observed, and that may have influenced the airways negatively as the study group reported upper airway symptoms and dry cough more frequently than expected. The wood pellet workers had both a lower VC and FEV 1 than expected. No cross-shift changes were found.

  1. Sinonasal Epithelial Wound Resealing in an In Vitro Model: Inhibition of Wound Closure with IL-4 Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K.; Den Beste, Kyle A.; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolonged healing and persistent inflammation following surgery for rhinosinusitis impacts patient satisfaction and healthcare resources. Cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, 5, and 13 are important mediators in Th2 inflammatory rhinosinusitis. Decreased wound healing has been demonstrated with Th2 cytokine exposure, but this has not been extensively studied in sinonasal epithelium. We hypothesized that in vitro exposure of primary sinonasal epithelial cell cultures to Th2 inflammatory cytokine IL-4 and IL-13 would impair wound resealing and decrease expression of annexin A2 at the wound edge. Methods Following 24-hour exposure to IL-4, 5, or 13 versus controls, sterile linear mechanical wounds were created in primary sinonasal epithelial cultures (n = 12 wounds per condition). Wounds were followed for 36 hours or until complete closure and residual wound areas were calculated by image analysis. Group differences in annexin A2 were assessed by immunofluorescence labeling, confocal microscopy, and Western blots. Results Significant wound closure differences were identified across cytokine exposure groups (pprotein levels were decreased in IL-4 treated wounds when compared to control wounds (p<0.01). Conclusions Th2 cytokine IL-4 decreases sinonasal epithelial wound closure in vitro. Annexin A2 is also diminished with IL-4 exposure. This supports the hypothesis that IL-4 exposure impairs sinonasal epithelial wound healing and may contribute to prolonged healing in Th2 inflammatory rhinosinusitis. PMID:23468432

  2. Evaluation of dust-related health hazards associated with air coring at G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; Ortiz, L.W.; Burton, D.J.; Isom, B.L.; Vigil, E.A.

    1991-03-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project was established to evaluate the potential for storing high-level radioactive wastes in geologic formations. Hydrologists recommended that drilling or coring in support of characterization tests be performed dry. Dry drilling, or air coring, presents a concern about health protection for the drilling personnel. The rock generally has a high silica content, and natural zeolites are abundant. Some zeolites are fibrous, leading to concerns that inhalation may result in asbestos-like lung diseases. An industrial hygiene study (IH) was conducted as part of an air coring technical feasibility test. The IH study found the potential for exposures to airborne silica and nuisance dusts to be within regulatory requirements and determined the commercial dust control equipment monitored to be effective when used in conjunction with a good area ventilation system and sound IH practices. Fibrous zeolites were not detected. Recommendations for the Yucca Mountain studies are (1) dust collection and control equipment equivalent or superior to that monitored must be used for any dry drilling activity and must be used with good general dilution ventilation and local exhaust ventilation provided on major emission sources; (2) good industrial hygiene work practices must be implemented, including monitoring any area where zeolitic fibers are suspect; and (3) a study should be conducted to determine the biological effects of the fibrous zeolite, mordenite. 25 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Exact solutions for rotating charged dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Earlier work by the author on rotating charged dust is summarized. An incomplete class of exact solutions for differentially rotating charged dust in Newton-Maxwell theory for the equal mass and charge case that was found earlier is completed. A new global exact solution for cylindrically symmetric differentially rotating charged dust in Newton-Maxwell theory is presented. Lastly, a new exact solution for cylindrically symmetric rigidly rotating charged dust in general relativity is given. (author)

  4. Stellar Absorption Line Analysis of Local Star-forming Galaxies: The Relation between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, Dust Attenuation, and Star Formation Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabran Zahid, H.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Ho, I-Ting; Conroy, Charlie; Andrews, Brett

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the optical continuum of star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by fitting stacked spectra with stellar population synthesis models to investigate the relation between stellar mass, stellar metallicity, dust attenuation, and star formation rate. We fit models calculated with star formation and chemical evolution histories that are derived empirically from multi-epoch observations of the stellar mass–star formation rate and the stellar mass–gas-phase metallicity relations, respectively. We also fit linear combinations of single-burst models with a range of metallicities and ages. Star formation and chemical evolution histories are unconstrained for these models. The stellar mass–stellar metallicity relations obtained from the two methods agree with the relation measured from individual supergiant stars in nearby galaxies. These relations are also consistent with the relation obtained from emission-line analysis of gas-phase metallicity after accounting for systematic offsets in the gas-phase metallicity. We measure dust attenuation of the stellar continuum and show that its dependence on stellar mass and star formation rate is consistent with previously reported results derived from nebular emission lines. However, stellar continuum attenuation is smaller than nebular emission line attenuation. The continuum-to-nebular attenuation ratio depends on stellar mass and is smaller in more massive galaxies. Our consistent analysis of stellar continuum and nebular emission lines paves the way for a comprehensive investigation of stellar metallicities of star-forming and quiescent galaxies.

  5. Stellar Absorption Line Analysis of Local Star-forming Galaxies: The Relation between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, Dust Attenuation, and Star Formation Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabran Zahid, H. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Ho, I-Ting [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Andrews, Brett, E-mail: zahid@cfa.harvard.edu [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    We analyze the optical continuum of star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by fitting stacked spectra with stellar population synthesis models to investigate the relation between stellar mass, stellar metallicity, dust attenuation, and star formation rate. We fit models calculated with star formation and chemical evolution histories that are derived empirically from multi-epoch observations of the stellar mass–star formation rate and the stellar mass–gas-phase metallicity relations, respectively. We also fit linear combinations of single-burst models with a range of metallicities and ages. Star formation and chemical evolution histories are unconstrained for these models. The stellar mass–stellar metallicity relations obtained from the two methods agree with the relation measured from individual supergiant stars in nearby galaxies. These relations are also consistent with the relation obtained from emission-line analysis of gas-phase metallicity after accounting for systematic offsets in the gas-phase metallicity. We measure dust attenuation of the stellar continuum and show that its dependence on stellar mass and star formation rate is consistent with previously reported results derived from nebular emission lines. However, stellar continuum attenuation is smaller than nebular emission line attenuation. The continuum-to-nebular attenuation ratio depends on stellar mass and is smaller in more massive galaxies. Our consistent analysis of stellar continuum and nebular emission lines paves the way for a comprehensive investigation of stellar metallicities of star-forming and quiescent galaxies.

  6. Differentially Regulated Host Proteins Associated with Chronic Rhinosinusitis Are Correlated with the Sinonasal Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Biswas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The chronic inflammatory nature of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS makes it a morbid condition for individuals with the disease and one whose pathogenesis is poorly understood. To date, proteomic approaches have been applied successfully in a handful of CRS studies. In this study we use a multifaceted approach, including proteomics (iTRAQ labeling and microbiome (bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing analyses of middle meatus swabs, as well as immune cell analysis of the underlying tissue, to investigate the host-microbe interaction in individuals with CRS (n = 10 and healthy controls (n = 9. Of the total 606 proteins identified in this study, seven were significantly (p < 0.05 more abundant and 104 were significantly lower in the CRS cohort compared with healthy controls. The majority of detected proteins (82% of proteins identified were not significantly correlated with disease status. Elevated levels of blood and immune cell proteins in the CRS cohort, together with significantly higher numbers of B-cells and macrophages in the underlying tissue, confirmed the inflammatory status of CRS individuals. Protein PRRC2C and Ras-related protein (RAB14 (two of the seven elevated proteins showed the biggest fold difference between the healthy and CRS groups. Validation of the elevated levels of these two proteins in CRS samples was provided by immunohistochemistry. Members of the bacterial community in the two study cohorts were not associated with PRRC2C, however members of the genus Moraxella did correlate with RAB14 (p < 0.0001, rho = −0.95, which is a protein involved in the development of basement membrane. In addition, significant correlations between certain members of the CRS bacterial community and 33 lower abundant proteins in the CRS cohort were identified. Members of the genera Streptococcus, Haemophilus and Veillonella were strongly correlated with CRS and were significantly associated with a number of proteins with varying functions. The

  7. A combination of modified transnasal endoscopic maxillectomy via transnasal prelacrimal recess approach with or without radiotherapy for selected sinonasal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuangba; Bakst, Richard L; Guo, Tao; Sun, Jingwu

    2015-10-01

    An external approach for resection of sinonasal tumors is associated with increased morbidity. Therefore, we employed a modified transnasal endoscopic maxillectomy combined with pre and/or postoperative radiotherapy for early stage maxillary carcinomas. It aims to evaluate our early experience with endoscopic resection of selected malignant sinonasal tumors. The medical and radiology records of patients who underwent endonasal endoscopic resection of malignant sinonasal tumors between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten cases of selected malignant tumor were performed to resect by modified transnasal endoscopic maxillectomy. All the patients were without evidence of disease at a mean follow-up of 26.8 months. No major complications were recorded. The mean hospitalization stay was 6.6 days. In very carefully selected cases of malignant tumors, modified transnasal endoscopic maxillectomy is acceptable. The postoperative complication rate is low, cosmetic outcome is excellent and patients do not require a long hospitalization.

  8. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer

  9. Radiographic abnormalities in relation to total dust exposure at a bauxite refinery and alumina-based chemical products plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, M.C.; Sussman, N.B.; Enterline, P.E.; Morgan, W.K.; Belk, H.D.; Dinman, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 788 male employees of an aluminum production company examined the relationship of radiographic abnormalities to smoking and dust exposure from the mining and refining of bauxite to alumina. Among the aluminas produced were low temperature range transitional forms. The present analyses were limited to nonsmokers and current smokers. Two National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified B readers interpreted the radiographs. The predominant radiographic abnormalities noted were scanty, small, irregular opacities in the lower zones of profusion 0/1 to 1/1. Rounded opacities were rare. Among nonsmokers with low dust exposures, the prevalence of opacities greater than or equal to 1/0 showed no trend with increasing age and duration of exposure, suggesting no relationship between age and prevalence of opacities of Category 1 or more in this cohort (p greater than 0.10). Nonsmokers who had accumulated higher dust exposures showed a trend of increasing prevalence of opacities with increasing duration, suggesting an effect of occupational exposure at higher cumulative exposure levels (p less than 0.05). In most exposure categories, smokers exceeded nonsmokers in their prevalence of opacities greater than or equal to 1/0; the overall prevalence among smokers being 12 and 11% according to Readers A and B, respectively, compared with 4% in nonsmokers (p less than 0.01). In conclusion, 7 to 8% of aluminum workers in this cohort had radiographic findings of scanty, small, irregular opacities, the prevalence of which was increased among smokers (p less than 0.01). There was a moderate increase in the prevalence of opacities with increasing tenure in nonsmokers with high cumulative exposures (p less than 0.05)

  10. Radiographic abnormalities in relation to total dust exposure at a bauxite refinery and alumina-based chemical products plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, M C; Sussman, N B; Enterline, P E; Morgan, W K; Belk, H D; Dinman, B D

    1988-07-01

    A cross-sectional study of 788 male employees of an aluminum production company examined the relationship of radiographic abnormalities to smoking and dust exposure from the mining and refining of bauxite to alumina. Among the aluminas produced were low temperature range transitional forms. The present analyses were limited to nonsmokers and current smokers. Two National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified "B" readers interpreted the radiographs. The predominant radiographic abnormalities noted were scanty, small, irregular opacities in the lower zones of profusion 0/1 to 1/1. Rounded opacities were rare. Among nonsmokers with low dust exposures, the prevalence of opacities greater than or equal to 1/0 showed no trend with increasing age and duration of exposure, suggesting no relationship between age and prevalence of opacities of Category 1 or more in this cohort (p greater than 0.10). Nonsmokers who had accumulated higher dust exposures showed a trend of increasing prevalence of opacities with increasing duration, suggesting an effect of occupational exposure at higher cumulative exposure levels (p less than 0.05). In most exposure categories, smokers exceeded nonsmokers in their prevalence of opacities greater than or equal to 1/0; the overall prevalence among smokers being 12 and 11% according to Readers A and B, respectively, compared with 4% in nonsmokers (p less than 0.01). In conclusion, 7 to 8% of aluminum workers in this cohort had radiographic findings of scanty, small, irregular opacities, the prevalence of which was increased among smokers (p less than 0.01). There was a moderate increase in the prevalence of opacities with increasing tenure in nonsmokers with high cumulative exposures (p less than 0.05).

  11. Sinonasal anatomical variations: their relationship with chronic rhinosinusitis and effect on the severity of disease-a computerized tomography assisted anatomical and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaygusuz, Ahmet; Haksever, Mehmet; Akduman, Davut; Aslan, Sündüs; Sayar, Zeynep

    2014-09-01

    The anatomy of the sinonasal area has a very wide rage of anatomical variations. The significance of these anatomical variations in pathogenesis of rhinosinusitis, which is the commonest disease in the region, is still unclear. The aims of the study were to compare the rate of sinonasal anatomical variations with development and severity of chronic rhinosinusitis patients. CT scan of paranasal sinuses images of 99 individuals were retrospectively reviewed. 65 cases of chronic rhinosinusitis (study group) who had undergone endoscopic sinus surgery were compared with 34 cases without chronic rhinosinusitis (control group). Also in study group Lund-Mackay score of the sinus disease were calculated and compared to the rate of related anatomical variations. There were 74 (74.7 %) males and 25 (25.2 %) females with ages ranging from 13 to 70 years (mean 32.2 years). The anatomical variations recorded were: Septal deviation 47 (72.3) in study and 25 (73.5 %) in control group, concha bullosa 27 (41.5 %) in study and 18 (52.9 %) in control group, overpneumatized ethmoid bulla 17 (26.1 %) in study and 14 (41.1 %) in control group, pneumatized uncinate 3 (4.6 %) in study and 3 (8.8 %) in control group, agger nasi 42 (64.6 %) in study and 19 (55.8 %) in control group, paradoxical middle turbinates 9 (13.8 %) in study and 4 (11.7 %) in control group, Onodi cell 6 (9.2 %) in study and 2 (5.8 %) in control group, Haller's cells (infraorbital ethmoid cell) 9 (13.8 %) in study and 7 (20.5 %) in control group. None of these results were statistically significant between study and control group (p > 0.05). Lund-Mackay score (which was assumed to show the severity of the disease) of the maxillary, ethmoid and frontal sinus were calculated and compared to rate of septal deviation, concha bullosa, agger nasi cells. No significant correlation was conducted (p > 0.05). The results of study showed no statistically significant correlation between sinonasal anatomical

  12. Effectiveness of 3 T PROPELLER DUO diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiating sinonasal lymphomas and carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, Q.; Li, J.; Xian, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the value of 3 T Periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) DUO diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in differentiating sinonasal lymphomas from carcinomas. Materials and methods: PROPELLER DUO DW-MRI was performed in 23 patients with sinonasal lymphomas and 28 patients with carcinomas histologically confirmed at 3 T MRI. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were obtained with two different b-values (b = 0 and 700 s/mm 2 , b = 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 ) and two different regions of interest (ROIs) sampling strategies [whole section (WS), partial section (PS)], respectively. Difference in ADCs between sinonasal lymphomas and carcinomas was evaluated using the independent samples t-test or Mann–Whitney U-test. The utility of ADC thresholds for discriminating between them was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: ADCs of sinonasal lymphomas (WS ADC b0,700 , 0.838 × 10 −3  mm 2 /s) were significantly (p < 0.001) lower than those of carcinomas (WS ADC b0,700 , 1.396 × 10 −3  mm 2 /s). Using a WS ADC b0,700 value of 1.040 × 10 −3  mm 2 /s as the threshold value effectively differentiated sinonasal lymphomas from carcinomas with 100% sensitivity, 82.1% specificity, and 82.1% positive and 100% negative predictive values and 90.2% accuracy (b = 0, 700 s/mm 2 ). There was no significant difference in diagnostic ability between different b-values settings (p > 0.05) and different sampling strategies of ROIs (p > 0.05), respectively. Additionally, there was significant differences in the ADCs between diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphomas (p < 0.05). Conclusion: PROPELLER DUO DW-MRI can effectively differentiate sinonasal lymphomas from carcinomas. - Highlights: • ADCs of sinonasal lymphomas were lower than those of carcinomas. • ADCs might effectively differentiate sinonasal lymphomas from carcinomas. • Diffuse large B

  13. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for sinonasal malignancies with a focus on optic pathway preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess if intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT can possibly lead to improved local control and lower incidence of vision impairment/blindness in comparison to non-IMRT techniques when treating sinonasal malignancies; what is the most optimal dose constraints for the optic pathway; and the impact of different IMRT strategies on optic pathway sparing in this setting. Methods and materials A literature search in the PubMed databases was conducted in July, 2012. Results Clinical studies on IMRT and 2D/3D (2 dimensional/3 dimensional RT for sinonasal malignancies suggest improved local control and lower incidence of severe vision impairment with IMRT in comparison to non-IMRT techniques. As observed in the non-IMRT studies, blindness due to disease progression may occur despite a lack of severe toxicity possibly due to the difficulty of controlling locally very advanced disease with a dose ≤ 70 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy’s influence on the the risk of severe optic toxicity after radiotherapy is unclear. A maximum dose of ≤ 54 Gy with conventional fractionation to the optic pathway may decrease the risk of blindness. Increased magnitude of intensity modulation through increasing the number of segments, beams, and using a combination of coplanar and non-coplanar arrangements may help increase dose conformality and optic pathway sparing when IMRT is used. Conclusion IMRT optimized with appropriate strategies may be the treatment of choice for the most optimal local control and optic pathway sparing when treating sinonasal malignancy.

  14. Definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy for sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas: a single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duru Birgi, Sumerya; Teo, Mark; Dyker, Karen E.; Sen, Mehmet; Prestwich, Robin J D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the disease outcomes of patients treated with definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in a single institution. Between 2007–2012 patients were retrospectively identified from electronic databases who had undergone surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy for sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas with curative intent. Fourty three patients with sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma were identified (22 nasal cavity, 21 paranasal sinuses). 31/43 (72 %) had T3 or T4 disease; nodal stage was N0 in 38, N1 in 4, Na/b in 0 and N2c in 1 patient. Median age was 67 years (range 41–86). 18 (42 %) received definitive and 25 (58 %) adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered using either conventional radiotherapy (n = 39) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (n = 4). Elective neck radiotherapy was delivered to two patients. Chemotherapy was delivered to 6/43 (14 %) of patients. Two-year local control, regional control, distant metastases free survival, progression free survival, cause specific survival and overall survival were 81 %, 90 %, 95 %, 71 %, 84 % and 80 % respectively. There was no significant difference in outcome comparing patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with patients receiving definitive radiotherapy (2 year locoregional disease free survival 75 % and 70 % respectively, p = 0.98). Pooly differentiated tumours were significantly associated with inferior disease outcomes. Local, regional, combined local and regional, and distant failure occurred in 7 (16 %), 3 (7 %), 1 (2 %) and 2 (5 %) of patients; all 3 regional recurrences were in patients with nasal cavity squamous cell carcinomas who had not undergone elective neck treatment. Definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy provides an effective treatment for sinonasal malignancies. The main pattern of failure remains local, suggesting the need for investigation of

  15. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  16. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprez, Fréderic; Madani, Indira; Morbée, Lieve; Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domján, Vilmos; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60–66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6–7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1–2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15–121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment (≥6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1–2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and

  17. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprez, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.duprez@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domjan, Vilmos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and survival

  18. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard; Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  19. Personal exposure to wood dust among workers in NekaChoob factory in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohammadyan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Inhalation of hardwood dust may produce a range of adverse health effects in the upper and lower respiratory system, including asthma, along with Sino-nasal cancer and nasopharyngeal cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate personal exposure to wood dust among workers in chipboard and furniture production saloons in Neka Choob factory, Iran. Materials and Methods: Gravimetric method No. 0500 recommended by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health was used to determine the wood dust concentrations in the workers’ breathing zone. The sampling air was drawn through a polyvinyl chloride filter within the breathing zone, using a calibrated personal sampling pump. Results: The mean workers’ personal exposure to wood dust in furniture production saloon (2.87 ± 1.95 mgm-3 was higher than mean exposure of workers whom were working in chipboard saloon (0.93 ± 0.35 mgm-3. The mean workers’ exposure to wood dust for both saloons was 1.70 ± 1.53 mgm-3. Conclusion: The mean workers’ personal exposure to wood dust in Neka Choob factory was higher than Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL recommended by national (Iranian Committee for Review and Collection of OEL and European ::union:: Scientific Committee on OEL committees. All workers in furniture production saloon and three workers in chipboard saloon have a mean exposure higher than OEL.

  20. Experimental Method for Measuring Dust Load on Surfaces in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, Philip; Nielsen, Peter V.; Moser, Alfred

    A new experimental setup to investigate the physical process of dust deposition and resuspension on and from surfaces is introduced. Dust deposition can reduce the airborne dust concentration considerably. As a basis for developing methods to eliminate dust-related problems in rooms, there is a n......A new experimental setup to investigate the physical process of dust deposition and resuspension on and from surfaces is introduced. Dust deposition can reduce the airborne dust concentration considerably. As a basis for developing methods to eliminate dust-related problems in rooms......, there is a need for better understanding of the mechanism of dust deposition and resuspension. With the presented experimental setup, the dust load on surfaces in a channel can be measured as a function of the environmental and surface conditions and the type of particles under controlled laboratory conditions....

  1. Cosmological simulation with dust formation and destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shohei; Hou, Kuan-Chou; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Nagamine, Kentaro; Shimizu, Ikkoh

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the evolution of dust in a cosmological volume, we perform hydrodynamic simulations, in which the enrichment of metals and dust is treated self-consistently with star formation and stellar feedback. We consider dust evolution driven by dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by sputtering, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering, and treat small and large grains separately to trace the grain size distribution. After confirming that our model nicely reproduces the observed relation between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity for nearby galaxies, we concentrate on the dust abundance over the cosmological volume in this paper. The comoving dust mass density has a peak at redshift z ˜ 1-2, coincident with the observationally suggested dustiest epoch in the Universe. In the local Universe, roughly 10 per cent of the dust is contained in the intergalactic medium (IGM), where only 1/3-1/4 of the dust survives against dust destruction by sputtering. We also show that the dust mass function is roughly reproduced at ≲ 108 M⊙, while the massive end still has a discrepancy, which indicates the necessity of stronger feedback in massive galaxies. In addition, our model broadly reproduces the observed radial profile of dust surface density in the circum-galactic medium (CGM). While our model satisfies the observational constraints for the dust extinction on cosmological scales, it predicts that the dust in the CGM and IGM is dominated by large (>0.03 μm) grains, which is in tension with the steep reddening curves observed in the CGM.

  2. Engineering-scale dust control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Jacobs, N.C.; Thompson, D.N.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the results of engineering scale dust-control experiments relating to contamination control during handling of transuranic waste. These experiments focused on controlling dust during retrieval operations of buried waste where waste and soil are intimately mixed. Sources of dust generation during retrieval operations include digging, dumping, and vehicle traffic. Because contaminants are expected to attach to soil particles and move with the generated dust, control of the dust spread may be the key to contamination control. Dust control techniques examined in these experiments include the use of misting systems, soil fixatives, and dust suppression agents. The Dryfog Ultrasonic Misting Head, manufactured by Sonics, Incorporated, and ENTAC, an organic resin derived from tree sap manufactured by ENTAC Corporation, were tested. The results of the experiments include product performance and recommended application methods. 19 figs., 7 refs., 6 tabs

  3. High-dose proton beam therapy for sinonasal mucosal malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Shusuke; Kasami, Masako; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Kashiwagi, Hiroya; Kiyohara, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    The significance of definitive radiotherapy for sinonasal mucosal melanoma (SMM) is sill controvertial. This study was to evaluate the role of high-dose proton beam therapy (PBT) in patients with SMM. The cases of 20 patients with SMM localized to the primary site who were treated by PBT between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The patterns of overall survival and morbidity were assessed. The median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 6–77 months). The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 51% and 38%, respectively. Four patients showed local failure, 2 showed regrowth of the primary tumor, and 2 showed new sinonasal tumors beyond the primary site. The 5-year local control rate after PBT was 62%. Nodal and distant failure was seen in 7 patients. Three grade 4 late toxicities were observed in tumor-involved optic nerve. Our findings suggested that high-dose PBT is an effective local treatment that is less invasive than surgery but with comparable outcomes

  4. Radiation dose of digital tomosynthesis for sinonasal examination: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yuhara, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Mieko; Numano, Tomokazu; Abe, Shinji; Sabol, John M; Suzuki, Shigeru; Ueno, Eiko

    2012-06-01

    Using an anthropomorphic phantom, we have investigated the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis (DT) of flat-panel detector (FPD) radiography to reduce radiation dose for sinonasal examination compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). A female Rando phantom was scanned covering frontal to maxillary sinus using the clinically routine protocol by both 64-detector CT (120 kV, 200 mAs, and 1.375-pitch) and DT radiography (80 kV, 1.0 mAs per projection, 60 projections, 40° sweep, and posterior-anterior projections). Glass dosimeters were used to measure the radiation dose to internal organs including the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, and the surface dose at various sites including the eyes during those scans. We compared the radiation dose to those anatomies between both modalities. In DT radiography, the doses of the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, skin, and eyes were 230 ± 90 μGy, 1770 ± 560 μGy, 1400 ± 80 μGy, 1160 ± 2100 μGy, and 112 ± 6 μGy, respectively. These doses were reduced to approximately 1/5, 1/8, 1/12, 1/17, and 1/290 of the respective MDCT dose. For sinonasal examinations, DT radiography enables dramatic reduction in radiation exposure and dose to the head and neck region, particularly to the lens of the eye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Solitary extra-skeletal sinonasal metastasis from a primary skeletal Ewing's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, S M; Jani, T N; Rahman, S M; Jogai, S; Harries, P G; Salib, R J

    2011-08-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare, malignant tumour predominantly affecting young adolescent males. We describe a unique case of an isolated extra-skeletal metastasis from a skeletal Ewing's sarcoma primary, arising in the right sinonasal cavity of a young man who presented with severe epistaxis and periorbital cellulitis. Histologically, the lesion comprised closely packed, slightly diffuse, atypical cells with round, hyperchromatic nuclei, scant cytoplasm and occasional mitotic figures, arranged in a sheet-like pattern. Immunohistochemical analysis showed positive staining only for cluster of differentiation 99 glycoprotein. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation identified the Ewing's sarcoma gene, confirming the diagnosis. Complete surgical resection was achieved via a minimally invasive endoscopic transnasal approach; post-operative radiotherapy. Ten months post-operatively, there were no endoscopic or radiological signs of disease. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma within the head and neck is incredibly rare and can pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. An awareness of different clinical presentations and distinct histopathological features is important to enable early diagnosis. This case illustrates one potential management strategy, and reinforces the evolving role of endoscopic transnasal approaches in managing sinonasal cavity and anterior skull base tumours.

  6. Sinonasal outcomes following endoscopic anterior skull base surgery with nasoseptal flap reconstruction: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M; Patel, P M; Betz, C; Olson, S; Panizza, B; Wallwork, B

    2015-07-01

    To assess nasal morbidity resulting from nasoseptal flap use in the repair of skull base defects in endoscopic anterior skull base surgery. Thirty-six patients awaiting endoscopic anterior skull base surgery were prospectively recruited. A nasoseptal flap was used for reconstruction in all cases. Patients were assessed pre-operatively and 90 days post-operatively via the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 questionnaire and visual analogue scales for nasal obstruction, pain, secretions and smell; endoscopic examination findings and mucociliary clearance times were also recorded. Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 questionnaire data and visual analogue scale scores for pain, smell and secretions showed no significant differences between pre- and post-operative outcomes, with visual analogue scale scores for nasal obstruction actually showing a significant improvement (p = 0.0007). A significant deterioration for both flap and non-flap sides was demonstrated post-operatively on endoscopic examination (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02 respectively). Whilst elevation of a nasoseptal flap in endoscopic surgery of the anterior skull base engendered significant clinical deterioration on examination post-operatively, quality of life outcomes showed that no such deterioration was subjectively experienced by the patient. In fact, there was significant nasal airway improvement following nasoseptal flap reconstruction.

  7. The role of three-dimensional imaging in evaluation of the sinonasal mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sue Yon; Sung, Ki Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Hong, In Soo; Kim, Myung Soon; Oh, Jin Hwan; Paik, Seog In [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the role of 3D imaging in the sinonasal mass. Twenty patients with sinonasal mass(squamous cell carcinoma[n=6], spindle cell carcinoma[n=1], angiomatous polyp[n=1], giant cell reparative granuloma[n=1], non-Hodgkin's lymphjoma[n=1], melanoma[n=1], angiofibroma[n=1], inverted papilloma[n=1]) were studied with spiral CT. Reconstruction of surface rendered 3D images and segmentations were performed and compared with the 2D image. The 3D images enabled easy understanding of the characteristics of the mass in 12 casese. The 3D images displayed pathway of tumor extension in 5 cases and were helpful in assessing the primary site of the mass in 3 cases. In two cases with encasement of ICA by the mass, assessment of relationship between the mass and vessels were possible through the segmentation. The 3D image, as an adjunct to the 2D image, can help to evaluate the virtual appearance of bony change, the degree of extension of mass, the spreading route, the evaluation of origin site. It also provides valuable 3-dimensional conception of the mass, especially for the surgeon.

  8. An Extremely Rare Case of Advanced Metastatic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Sinonasal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yu Thar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SNEC is a rare form of malignancy. It mainly presents as bronchogenic neoplasm, and the extrapulmonary form accounts for only 0.1% to 0.4% of all cancers. These extrapulmonary tumors have been described most frequently in the urinary bladder, prostate, esophagus, stomach, colon and rectum, gall bladder, head and neck, cervix, and skin. Primary SNEC of the sinonasal tract is extremely rare with only less than 100 cases reported in the literature. Because of extreme rarity and aggressiveness of the tumor, the management for this entity varies considerably mandating multimodality approach. In this paper, we report a patient presented with left-sided facial swelling, and the histopathologic examination confirmed primary SNEC of left sinonasal tract. The tumor involved multiple paranasal sinuses with invasion into the left orbit and left infratemporal fossa and metastasized to cervical lymph nodes and bone. The patient encountered devastating outcome in spite of optimal medical management and treatment with palliative chemotherapy highlighting the necessity for further research of primary SNEC of head and neck.

  9. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the sinonasal tract in adults: A challenging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Davide; Mattavelli, Davide; Redaelli De Zinis, Luca O; Accorona, Remo; Morassi, Maria L; Facchetti, Fabio; Ferrari, Vittorio; Farina, Davide; Bertulli, Rossella; Nicolai, Piero

    2017-03-01

    Sinonasal localization of Ewing's sarcoma in adults is an exceedingly rare event. The clinical records of 5 patients with primary sinonasal Ewing's sarcoma treated from 1992 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. All pathologic slides were reviewed by 2 experienced pathologists. All patients underwent multimodality treatments. Median age was 36 years (range, 25-52 years). At referral, 2 patients had the original diagnosis changed by review of the histologic slides. Tumors were classified as T4aN0M0 (4 patients) and T2N0M0 (1 patient). Median follow-up was 110 months (range, 70-139 months). Only 1 patient, who started treatment elsewhere based on an incorrect histologic diagnosis, experienced multiple recurrences and eventually died of widespread metastasis. Correct pathologic diagnosis can have a crucial impact on treatment planning and outcome. Multimodality therapy is the key for long-term successful results. Because of the rarity of the tumor, referral to highly experienced care centers is strongly recommended. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: E45-E50, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Collision-dominated dust sheaths and voids - observations in micro-gravity experiments and numerical investigation of the force balance relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V N; Morfill, G; Konopka, U; Thomas, H

    2003-01-01

    Numerical solutions of stationary force balance equations are used to investigate the possible dust configurations (dust structures) in complex plasmas between two floating potential plane electrodes. The distance between electrodes is assumed to be larger than the ion-neutral mean free path and the hydrodynamic description is used. It includes the known forces operating in this limit, the ionization source and the dust charge variations. The stationary balance equations are solved both in the case of the presence of one-size dust grains and for the case of a mixture of grains with two different sizes. Recent micro-gravity experiments with single-size dust grains and two-different-size dust grains show the formation of a system of dust sheaths and dust voids between the two plane electrodes. The observed configurations of dust structures depend strongly on the gas pressure and the degree of ionization used. The numerical investigations are able to show the necessary conditions for the types of structure to be created and give their size. The size of the structures observed is larger than the ion-neutral mean free path and is of the order of magnitude of that obtained numerically. The numerical investigations give details of the spatial distributions, the dust particles, the electron/ion densities, the ion drift velocity and dust charges inside and outside different dust structures. These details have not yet been investigated experimentally and can indicate directions for further experimental work to be performed. The single-dust-sheath structure with single-size dust particles surrounded by dust free regions (dust wall-voids) and floating potential electrodes is computed. Such a structure was observed recently and the computational results are in agreement with observations. It is shown that more often a dust void in the centre is observed. It is found that a dust void in the centre region between two electrodes is formed if the ionization rate is larger than the

  11. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-01-01

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 (micro)m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics

  12. Dust Dynamics Near Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua; Hughes, Anna; Grund, Chris

    streams observed by Apollo astronauts and potentially also by the Clementine spacecraft. In addition to the Surveyor images of lunar horizon glow and the high altitude streamer measurements, the Apollo 17 Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite surface package detected signals consistent with the impact of relatively slow-moving dust particles that may have been charged dust electrostatically levitated from the surface. There is renewed interest in this near-surface dust environment with plans to return robotic landers and astronauts to the lunar surface. No Apollo-era instruments were specifically designed to detect or measure dust levitated off the lunar surface. One new experiment under study is the Autonomous Lunar Dust Observer (ALDO). ALDO is a high-sensitivity scanning lidar (laser radar) that autonomously maps and records its 3-D dust environment. Flexibility of programmable scan pattern enables ALDO to characterize the dust context in and around experiment sites. Repeated shallow angle scans in a vertical plane enable high vertical resolution studies of dust levitation near the ground. Single elevation angle sector or full azimuth scans enable large-area statistical surveys of the frequency and size of ejecta plumes from micrometeoroid impacts, and vertical or fixed-angle stares enable very high sensitivity dust profiles to extended ranges. It is estimated that backscatter from dust concentrations as low as 1/cm3 can be measured. The concept is equally applicable to surface and atmospheric studies of other airless bodies.

  13. Factors contributing to poor management outcome of sinonasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common presentations were epistaxis, nasal obstruction and facial asymmetry and 96.7% patients with squamous cell carcinoma presented in advanced disease stage (Stage 3 & 4). Over 47% patients presented a year after onset of symptoms. Factors which included self-medication, wrong advice from relations/ ...

  14. The dust acoustic wave in a bounded dusty plasma with strong electrostatic interactions between dust grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Nitin; Shukla, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The dispersion relation for the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in an unmagnetized dusty plasma cylindrical waveguide is derived, accounting for strong electrostatic interactions between charged dust grains. It is found that the boundary effect limits the radial extent of the DAW. The present result should be helpful for understanding the frequency spectrum of the DAW in a dusty plasma waveguide with strongly coupled charged dust grains. - Highlights: → We study the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a bounded plasma. → We account for interactions between dust grains. → The boundary effect limits the radial extent of the DAW.

  15. Long-Term Outcomes After Proton Beam Therapy for Sinonasal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Andrea L.; Adams, Judith A.; Weyman, Elizabeth A.; Busse, Paul M.; Goldberg, Saveli I. [Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Varvares, Mark; Deschler, Daniel D.; Lin, Derrick T. [Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Delaney, Thomas F. [Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chan, Annie W., E-mail: awchan@partners.org [Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common sinonasal cancer and is associated with one of the poor outcomes. Proton therapy allows excellent target coverage with maximal sparing of adjacent normal tissues. We evaluated the long-term outcomes in patients with sinonasal SCC treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2008, 54 patients with Stage III and IV SCC of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus received proton beam therapy at our institution to a median dose of 72.8 Gy(RBE). Sixty-nine percent underwent prior surgical resection, and 74% received elective nodal radiation. Locoregional control and survival probabilities were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional-hazards model. Treatment toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: With a median follow-up time of 82 months in surviving patients, there were 10 local, 7 regional, and 11 distant failures. The 2-year and 5-year actuarial local control rate was 80%. The 2-year and 5-year rates of overall survival were 67% and 47%, respectively. Only smoking status was predictive for worse locoregional control, with current smokers having a 5-year rate of 23% compared with 83% for noncurrent smokers (P=.004). Karnofsky performance status ≤80 was the most significant factor predictive for worse overall survival in multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.6-12.5, P=.004). There were nine grade 3 and six grade 4 toxicities, and no grade 5 toxicity. Wound adverse events constituted the most common grade 3-4 toxicity. Conclusions: Our long-term results show that proton radiation therapy is well tolerated and yields good locoregional control for SCC of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus. Current smokers and patients with poor performance status had inferior outcomes. Prospective study is necessary to compare IMRT with proton

  16. Long-Term Outcomes After Proton Beam Therapy for Sinonasal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Andrea L.; Adams, Judith A.; Weyman, Elizabeth A.; Busse, Paul M.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Varvares, Mark; Deschler, Daniel D.; Lin, Derrick T.; Delaney, Thomas F.; Chan, Annie W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common sinonasal cancer and is associated with one of the poor outcomes. Proton therapy allows excellent target coverage with maximal sparing of adjacent normal tissues. We evaluated the long-term outcomes in patients with sinonasal SCC treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2008, 54 patients with Stage III and IV SCC of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus received proton beam therapy at our institution to a median dose of 72.8 Gy(RBE). Sixty-nine percent underwent prior surgical resection, and 74% received elective nodal radiation. Locoregional control and survival probabilities were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional-hazards model. Treatment toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: With a median follow-up time of 82 months in surviving patients, there were 10 local, 7 regional, and 11 distant failures. The 2-year and 5-year actuarial local control rate was 80%. The 2-year and 5-year rates of overall survival were 67% and 47%, respectively. Only smoking status was predictive for worse locoregional control, with current smokers having a 5-year rate of 23% compared with 83% for noncurrent smokers (P=.004). Karnofsky performance status ≤80 was the most significant factor predictive for worse overall survival in multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.6-12.5, P=.004). There were nine grade 3 and six grade 4 toxicities, and no grade 5 toxicity. Wound adverse events constituted the most common grade 3-4 toxicity. Conclusions: Our long-term results show that proton radiation therapy is well tolerated and yields good locoregional control for SCC of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus. Current smokers and patients with poor performance status had inferior outcomes. Prospective study is necessary to compare IMRT with proton

  17. Sinonasal Wegener's granulomatosis: CT characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoudiba, F.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Rabia, Hadj M.; Lasjaunias, P. [Neuroradiology Department, Bicetre Hospital, 78 rue du General Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Cabanne, J. [Department of Internal Medecine, Saint-Antoine Hospital, 184 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris (France); Bobin, S. [Head and Neck Department, Bicetre Hospital, 78, rue du General Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France)

    2003-02-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a severe and potentially lethal granulomatosis. Even though no specific radiological criteria exist, CT may suggest the correct diagnosis at an early stage. Recent improvement in the prognosis is related to earlier diagnosis, allowing the initiation of efficient and specific treatment before any severe complications occur. We reviewed a series of WG cases in order to establish the CT diagnostic criteria. (orig.)

  18. Trace metals in urban road dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randazzo, Loredana Antonella; Dongarra, Gaetano; Manno, Emanuela; Varrica, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Heavy metals associated with urban road dust is a matter for concern as they may have serious effects on biological systems. The bioavailability and potential toxicity of metals bound to urban dust is related to the specific chemical form of the element. In the present article are reported the determinations and chemical speciation of As, Ba, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn in six samples of road dust collected within the urban centre and the outskirts of Palermo [it

  19. Grain dust and the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Ashley, M. J.; Grzybowski, S.

    1978-01-01

    Grain dust is composed of a large number of materials, including various types of grain and their disintegration products, silica, fungi, insects and mites. The clinical syndromes described in relation to exposure to grain dust are chronic bronchitis, grain dust asthma, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, grain fever and silo-filler's lung. Rhinitis and conjunctivitis are also common in grain workers. While the concentration and the quality of dust influence the frequency and the type of clinical syndrome in grain workers, host factors are also important. Of the latter, smoking is the most important factor influencing the frequency of chronic bronchitis. The role of atopy and of bronchial hyperreactivity in grain dust asthma has yet to be assessed. Several well designed studies are currently being carried out in North America not only to delineate the frequency of the respiratory abnormalities, the pathogenetic mechanisms and the host factors, but also to establish a meaningful threshold limit concentration for grain dust. Images p1272-a PMID:348288

  20. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging in the Differentiation of Benign and Malignant Sinonasal Lesions: Comparison with Conventional Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Tang, Z; Qiang, J; Wang, S; Qian, W; Zhong, Y; Wang, R; Wang, J; Wu, L; Tang, W; Zhang, Z

    2018-01-25

    Intravoxel incoherent motion is a promising method for the differentiation of sinonasal lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the value of intravoxel incoherent motion in the differentiation of benign and malignant sinonasal lesions and to compare the diagnostic performance of intravoxel incoherent motion with that of conventional DWI. One hundred thirty-one patients with histologically proved solid sinonasal lesions (56 benign and 75 malignant) who underwent conventional DWI and intravoxel incoherent motion were recruited in this study. The diffusion coefficient ( D ), pseudodiffusion coefficient ( D *), and perfusion fraction ( f ) values derived from intravoxel incoherent motion and ADC values derived from conventional DWI were measured and compared between the 2 groups using the Student t test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, logistic regression analysis, and 10-fold cross-validation were performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of single-parametric and multiparametric models. The mean ADC and D values were significantly lower in malignant sinonasal lesions than in benign sinonasal lesions (both P benign and malignant sinonasal lesions. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Association of Krouse Classification for Sinonasal Inverted Papilloma With Recurrence: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisan, Quentin; Moya-Plana, Antoine; Bonfils, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    The risk factors for the recurrence of sinonasal inverted papilloma are still unclear. To investigate the potential association between the Krouse classification and the recurrence rates of sinonasal inverted papilloma. The EMBASE and MEDLINE databases were searched for the period January 1, 1964, through September 30, 2016, using the following search strategy: (paranasal sinuses [Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms] OR sinonasal [all fields]) AND (inverted papilloma [MeSH terms] OR (inverted [all fields] AND papilloma [all fields]). The inclusion criteria were (1) studies including sinonasal inverted papilloma only and no other forms of papillomas, such as oncocytic papilloma; (2) minimum follow-up of 1 year after the surgery; and (3) clear report of cases (recurrence) and controls according to the Krouse classification system or deducible from the full-text article. Literature search was performed by 2 reviewers. Of the 625 articles retrieved in the literature, 97 full-text articles were reviewed. Observational cohort studies or randomized controlled trials were included, and the following variables were extracted from full-text articles: authors of the study, publication year, follow-up data, and number of cases (recurrence) and controls (no recurrence) in each of the 4 stages of the Krouse classification system. The Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines were followed. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were estimated, and data of included studies were pooled using a random-effects model. The main outcome was recurrence after surgical removal of sinonasal inverted papilloma according to each stage of the Krouse classification system. Thirteen studies comprising 1787 patients were analyzed. A significant increased risk of recurrence (51%) was highlighted for Krouse stage T3 disease when compared with stage T2 (pooled OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.09-2.09). No significant difference in risk of recurrence was found between Krouse stages T1

  2. Rhinosporidiosis: A Rare Cause of Proptosis and an Imaging Dilemma for Sinonasal Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Dey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rhinosporidiosis is a common disease entity in tropical countries; however, it can be encountered in other parts of the world as well due to increasing medical tourism. It may mimic other more malignant and vigorous pathologies of the involved part. Case Report. We present a case of a 36-year-old male presenting with proptosis due to involvement of nasolacrimal duct which is rare. We will discuss typical CT and MRI features of the disease which were present in the case. Conclusion. For a surgeon and a radiologist, this is a necessary differential to be kept in mind for sinonasal masses. CT and MRI are invaluable investigations. However, FNAC is confirmatory. Both clinical and radiological aspects are required to reach correct diagnosis.

  3. Factors associated with a primary surgical approach for sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracchiolo, Jennifer R; Patel, Krupa; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Morris, Luc T; Ganly, Ian; Roman, Benjamin R; McBride, Sean M; Tabar, Viviane S; Cohen, Marc A

    2018-03-01

    Primary surgery is the preferred treatment of T1-T4a sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma (SNSCC). Patients with SNSCC in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) were analyzed. Factors that contributed to selecting primary surgical treatment were examined. Overall survival (OS) in surgical patients was analyzed. Four-thousand seven hundred and seventy patients with SNSCC were included. In T1-T4a tumors, lymph node metastases, maxillary sinus location, and treatment at high-volume centers were associated with selecting primary surgery. When primary surgery was utilized, tumor factors and positive margin guided worse OS. Adjuvant therapy improved OS in positive margin resection and advanced T stage cases. Tumor and non-tumor factors are associated with selecting surgery for the treatment of SNSCC. When surgery is selected, tumor factors drive OS. Negative margin resection should be the goal of a primary surgical approach. When a positive margin resection ensues, adjuvant therapy may improve OS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augment Sinonasal Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Chun-Quan; Li, Yong; Yang, Chen; Lin, Hai; Duan, Hong-Gang

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) transgenic mesenchymal stem cells (HGF-MSCs) on wound healing in the sinonasal mucosa and nasal epithelial cells (NECs). We also sought to determine whether HGF-MSCs and MSCs can migrate into the injured mucosa and differentiate into ciliated cells. Human HGF-overexpressing umbilical cord MSCs (hHGF-UCMSCs) were established, and upregulation of hHGF expression was confirmed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). To investigate the paracrine effect of human MSCs (hMSCs) on nasal epithelial repair, hMSC- and HGF-MSC-conditioned media (CM) were used in NEC proliferation assays and in an in vitro scratch-wound repair model. The in vivo sinonasal wound-healing model was established, and all enrolled rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: the GFP-MSC group, the HGF-MSC group, the Ad-HGF group, and the surgery control group. The average decreased diameter was recorded, and the medial wall of the maxillary sinus was removed for histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Collagen deposition in the wound tissue was detected via Masson trichrome (M&T) staining. The distribution of MSCs and HGF-MSCs was observed by immunofluorescence. MSCs improved nasal wound healing both in vivo and in vitro. HGF overexpression in MSCs augmented the curative effects. Reduced collagen deposition and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) expression were detected in the HGF-MSC group compared with the MSC-, Ad-HGF-, and phosphate-buffered saline-treated groups based on M&T staining and ELISA. The enhanced therapeutic effects of HGF-MSCs were accompanied by decreased level of the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1. In addition, both HGF-MSCs and MSCs can migrate to the injured mucosa and epithelial layer.

  5. Carbon ion therapy for advanced sinonasal malignancies: feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Ecker, Swantje; Ellerbrock, Malte; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility and toxicity of carbon ion therapy for treatment of sinonasal malignancies. First site of treatment failure in malignant tumours of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is mostly in-field, local control hence calls for dose escalation which has so far been hampered by accompanying acute and late toxicity. Raster-scanned carbon ion therapy offers the advantage of sharp dose gradients promising increased dose application without increase of side-effects. Twenty-nine patients with various sinonasal malignancies were treated from 11/2009 to 08/2010. Accompanying toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v.4.0. Tumor response was assessed according to RECIST. Seventeen patients received treatment as definitive RT, 9 for local relapse, 2 for re-irradiation. All patients had T4 tumours (median CTV1 129.5 cc, CTV2 395.8 cc), mostly originating from the maxillary sinus. Median dose was 73 GyE mostly in mixed beam technique as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. Median follow- up was 5.1 months [range: 2.4 - 10.1 months]. There were 7 cases with grade 3 toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia) but no other higher grade acute reactions; 6 patients developed grade 2 conjunctivits, no case of early visual impairment. Apart from alterations of taste, all symptoms had resolved at 8 weeks post RT. Overall radiological response rate was 50% (CR and PR). Carbon ion therapy is feasible; despite high doses, acute reactions were not increased and generally resolved within 8 weeks post radiotherapy. Treatment response is encouraging though follow-up is too short to estimate control rates or evaluate potential late effects. Controlled trials are warranted

  6. Temporal and spatial characteristics of dust devils and their contribution to the aerosol budget in East Asia-An analysis using a new parameterization scheme for dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaoguo; Han, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaohuan

    2018-06-01

    Dust aerosols are the main aerosol components of the atmosphere that affect climate change, but the contribution of dust devils to the atmospheric dust aerosol budget is uncertain. In this study, a new parameterization scheme for dust devils was established and coupled with WRF-Chem, and the diurnal and monthly variations and the contribution of dust devils to the atmospheric dust aerosol budget in East Asia was simulated. The results show that 1) both the diurnal and monthly variations in dust devil emissions in East Asia had unimodal distributions, with peaks in the afternoon and the summer that were similar to the observations; 2) the simulated dust devils occurred frequently in deserts, including the Gobi. The distributed area and the intensity center of the dust devil moved from east to west during the day; 3) the ratio between the availability of convective buoyancy relative to the frictional dissipation was the main factor that limited the presence of dust devils. The position of the dust devil formation, the surface temperature, and the boundary layer height determined the dust devil intensity; 4) the contribution of dust devils to atmospheric dust aerosols determined in East Asia was 30.4 ± 13%, thereby suggesting that dust devils contribute significantly to the total amount of atmospheric dust aerosols. Although the new parameterization scheme for dust devils was rough, it was helpful for understanding the distribution of dust devils and their contribution to the dust aerosol budget.

  7. Diagnostics of mobile dust in scrape-off layer plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratynskaia, S; Castaldo, C; Bergsaaker, H; Rudakov, D

    2011-01-01

    Dust production and accumulation pose serious safety and operational implications for the next generation fusion devices. Mobile dust particles can result in core plasma contamination with impurities, and those with high velocities can significantly contribute to the wall erosion. Diagnostics for monitoring dust in tokamaks during plasma discharges are hence important as they can provide information on dust velocity and size, and-in some cases-on dust composition. Such measurements are also valuable as an input for theoretical models of dust dynamics in scrape-off layer plasmas. Existing in situ dust diagnostics, focusing on the range of dust parameters they can detect, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the diagnostics which allow us to detect tails of the dust velocity and size distributions, e.g. small and very fast particles. Some of the techniques discussed have been adopted from space-related research and have been shown to be feasible and useful for tokamak applications as well.

  8. House dust in seven Danish offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jørgensen, O.

    estimated to be relatively low. The storage of the bulk dust during the experiment had little effect on the specific biological and chemical composition.

  9. The Relationship between Werner Syndrome and Sinonasal Malignant Melanoma: Two Sibling Cases of Werner Syndrome with Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kadowaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging. Malignant tumors such as thyroid carcinoma and malignant melanoma occur frequently in WS patients. We describe 2 siblings with WS who suffered from sinonasal malignant melanoma (MM. Both patients initially experienced nasal obstruction and recurrent nasal bleeding and died within 2 years of the diagnosis of MM. Otolaryngologists should recognize that WS patients have a high risk for head and neck malignant disease, particularly sinonasal MM, even if they are aged below the expected age range and undergo periodic examinations. Furthermore, it is important that WS patients are aware that a prompt nasal examination is indicated if they experience continuous nasal obstruction or recurrent nasal bleeding.

  10. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  11. LADEE LUNAR DUST EXPERIMENT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive bundle includes data taken by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) instrument aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft....

  12. Construction dust amelioration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Dust produced on seasonal road construction sites in Alaska is both a traffic safety and environmental concern. Dust emanating from : unpaved road surfaces during construction severely reduces visibility and impacts stopping sight distance, and contr...

  13. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  14. A simplified Suomi NPP VIIRS dust detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yikun; Sun, Lin; Zhu, Jinshan; Wei, Jing; Su, Qinghua; Sun, Wenxiao; Liu, Fangwei; Shu, Meiyan

    2017-11-01

    Due to the complex characteristics of dust and sparse ground-based monitoring stations, dust monitoring is facing severe challenges, especially in dust storm-prone areas. Aim at constructing a high-precision dust storm detection model, a pixel database, consisted of dusts over a variety of typical feature types such as cloud, vegetation, Gobi and ice/snow, was constructed, and their distributions of reflectance and Brightness Temperatures (BT) were analysed, based on which, a new Simplified Dust Detection Algorithm (SDDA) for the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible infrared Imaging Radiometer (NPP VIIRS) is proposed. NPP VIIRS images covering the northern China and Mongolian regions, where features serious dust storms, were selected to perform the dust detection experiments. The monitoring results were compared with the true colour composite images, and results showed that most of the dust areas can be accurately detected, except for fragmented thin dusts over bright surfaces. The dust ground-based measurements obtained from the Meteorological Information Comprehensive Analysis and Process System (MICAPS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index (OMI AI) products were selected for comparison purposes. Results showed that the dust monitoring results agreed well in the spatial distribution with OMI AI dust products and the MICAPS ground-measured data with an average high accuracy of 83.10%. The SDDA is relatively robust and can realize automatic monitoring for dust storms.

  15. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  16. Dust as a surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, A M; Schram, P P J M; Trigger, S A

    2003-01-01

    We argue that dust immersed in a plasma sheath acts as a surfactant. By considering the momentum balance in a plasma sheath, we evaluate the dependence of the plasma surface pressure on the dust density. It is shown that the dust may reduce the surface pressure, giving rise to a sufficiently strong tangential force. The latter is capable of confining the dust layer inside the sheath in the direction perpendicular to the ion flow

  17. Differentiating between benign and malignant sinonasal lesions using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and intravoxel incoherent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingxuan; Xiao, Zebin; Tang, Zuohua; Zhong, Yufeng; Qiang, Jinwei

    2018-01-01

    To explore the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for distinguishing between benign and malignant sinonasal lesions and investigate the correlations between the two methods. Patients with sinonasal lesions (42 benign and 31 malignant) who underwent DCE-MRI and IVIM before confirmation by histopathology were enrolled in this prospective study. Parameters derived from DCE-MRI and IVIM were measured, the optimal cut-off values for differential diagnosis were determined, and the correlations between the two methods were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and Spearman's rank correlation. Significantly higher K trans and K ep values but lower D and f values were found in malignant lesions than in benign lesions (all pbenign and malignant sinonasal lesions. IVIM findings correlate with DCE-MRI results and may represent an alternative to DCE-MRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-22: Translation, Cross-cultural Adaptation, and Validation in Hebrew-Speaking Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira Galitz, Yael; Halperin, Doron; Bavnik, Yosef; Warman, Meir

    2016-05-01

    To perform the translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22) questionnaire to the Hebrew language. A single-center prospective cross-sectional study. Seventy-three chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients and 73 patients without sinonasal disease filled the Hebrew version of the SNOT-22 questionnaire. Fifty-one CRS patients underwent endoscopic sinus surgery, out of which 28 filled a postoperative questionnaire. Seventy-three healthy volunteers without sinonasal disease also answered the questionnaire. Internal consistency, test-retest reproducibility, validity, and responsiveness of the questionnaire were evaluated. Questionnaire reliability was excellent, with a high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient, 0.91-0.936) and test-retest reproducibility (Spearman's coefficient, 0.962). Mean scores for the preoperative, postoperative, and control groups were 50.44, 29.64, and 13.15, respectively (P < .0001 for CRS vs controls, P < .001 for preoperative vs postoperative), showing validity and responsiveness of the questionnaire. The Hebrew version of SNOT-22 questionnaire is a valid outcome measure for patients with CRS with or without nasal polyps. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  19. Comparison of vectorial ion transport in primary murine airway and human sinonasal air-liquid interface cultures, models for studies of cystic fibrosis, and other airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoyan; Fortenberry, James A; Cohen, Noam A; Sorscher, Eric J; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vectorial ion transport within murine trachea, murine nasal septa, and human sinonasal cultured epithelium. Our hypothesis is that murine septal epithelium, rather than trachea, will more closely mimic the electrophysiology properties of human sinonasal epithelium. Epithelium from murine trachea, murine septa, and human sinonasal tissue were cultured at an air-liquid interface to confluence and full differentiation. A limited number of homozygous dF508 epithelia were also cultured. Monolayers were mounted in modified Ussing chambers to investigate pharmacologic manipulation of ion transport. The change in forskolin-stimulated current (delta-I(SC), expressed as micro-A/cm(2)) in murine septal (n = 19; 16.84 +/- 2.09) and human sinonasal (n = 18; 12.15 +/- 1.93) cultures was significantly increased over murine tracheal cultures (n = 15; 6.75 +/- 1.35; p = 0.035 and 0.0005, respectively). Forskolin-stimulated I(SC) was inhibited by the specific cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) inhibitor INH-172 (5 microM). No forskolin-stimulated I(SC) was shown in cultures of dF508 homozygous murine septal epithelium (n = 3). Murine septal I(SC) was largely inhibited by amiloride (12.03 +/- 0.66), whereas human sinonasal cultures had a very limited response (0.70 +/- 0.47; p < 0.0001). The contribution of CFTR to stimulated chloride current as measured by INH-172 was highly significantly different between all groups (murine septa, 19.51 +/- 1.28; human sinonasal, 11.12 +/- 1.58; murine trachea, 4.85 +/- 0.49; p < 0.0001). Human sinonasal and murine septal epithelial cultures represent a useful model for studying CFTR activity and may provide significant advantages over lower airway tissues for investigating upper and lower respiratory pathophysiology.

  20. The Spatial Variation of Dust Particulate Matter Concentrations during Two Icelandic Dust Storms in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavla Dagsson-Waldhauserova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 µg·m−3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 µg·m−3. The mean PM1 concentrations were 97–241 µg·m−3 with a maximum of 261 µg·m−3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34–0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  1. Control of dust production in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Ciattaglia, S.; Elbez-Uzan, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the last years dust has been observed in a number of fusion devices and is being studied more in detail for understanding in particular the physical phenomena related to its formation, its composition, physical and chemical characteristics, and the amount of produced dust. The extrapolation of dust formation to ITER predicts (with large error bars), a large mass of dust production with a scattered size distribution. To evaluate the impact of dust on safety, assumptions have also been made on radionuclide inventory, and mobility in off-normal events, as well as any postulated contributions the dust may make to effluents or accidental releases. Solid activation products in structures are generally not readily mobilisable in incidental and accidental situations, so that activated dust, tritium and activated corrosions products are the important in-vessel source terms in postulated scenarios that assume a mobilisation and release of some fraction of this inventory. Such a release would require the simultaneous leak or bypass of several robust confinement barriers. Further concerns for dust may be the potential for chemical reactions between dust and coolant in the event of an in-vessel leak, and the theoretical possibility of a dust explosion, either of which could in principle cause a pressure rise that challenges one or more of the confinement barriers. Although these hazards can - and will - be controlled by other measures in the ITER design, application of the principle of Defence in Depth dictates that the dust inventory should also be minimised and controlled to prevent the potential hazard. A well-coordinated R-and-D programme is required to support this dust production control. This document provides from the safety point of view, an overview of existing data given in '' Dossier d'Options de Surete '', the first safety report presented in 2001 to the French Safety Authorities, and ITER documents; it also gathers information on status of studies on activated

  2. The FMOS-COSMOS survey of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6. II. The mass-metallicity relation and the dependence on star formation rate and dust extinction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahid, H. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Chu, J.; Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kashino, D. [Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan); Silverman, J. D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Kewley, L. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Daddi, E. [CEA-Saclay, Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renzini, A. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Rodighiero, G. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università di Padova, vicolo dell Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Nagao, T. [The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Arimoto, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, 650 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kartaltepe, J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Maier, C. [Vienna University, Department of Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, 1180 Vienna (Austria); Geller, M. J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Capak, P. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ilbert, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, 13388, Marseille (France); Kajisawa, M., E-mail: jabran@ifa.hawaii.edu [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Collaboration: COSMOS Team; and others

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the relationships between stellar mass, gas-phase oxygen abundance (metallicity), star formation rate (SFR), and dust content of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 using Subaru/FMOS spectroscopy in the COSMOS field. The mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at z ∼ 1.6 is steeper than the relation observed in the local universe. The steeper MZ relation at z ∼ 1.6 is mainly due to evolution in the stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to turnover and flatten. This turnover mass is 1.2 dex larger at z ∼ 1.6. The most massive galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 (∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) are enriched to the level observed in massive galaxies in the local universe. The MZ relation we measure at z ∼ 1.6 supports the suggestion of an empirical upper metallicity limit that does not significantly evolve with redshift. We find an anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR for galaxies at a fixed stellar mass at z ∼ 1.6, which is similar to trends observed in the local universe. We do not find a relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR that is independent of redshift; rather, our data suggest that there is redshift evolution in this relation. We examine the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and dust extinction, and find that at a fixed stellar mass, dustier galaxies tend to be more metal rich. From examination of the stellar masses, metallicities, SFRs, and dust extinctions, we conclude that stellar mass is most closely related to dust extinction.

  3. Activation of mas-related G-protein-coupled receptors by the house dust mite cysteine protease Der p1 provides a new mechanism linking allergy and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vemuri B; Lerner, Ethan A

    2017-10-20

    Cysteine and serine proteases function via protease-activated and mas-related G-protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs) to contribute to allergy and inflammation. Der p1 is a cysteine protease and major allergen from the house dust mite and is associated with allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. Der p1 activates protease-activated receptor 2 and induces the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 from cells. However, the possibility that Der p1 acts on Mrgprs has not been considered. We report here that ratiometric calcium imaging reveals that Der p1 activates the human receptor MRGPRX1 and the mouse homolog MrgprC11, implicated previously in itch. Der p1 cleavage of N-terminal receptor peptides followed by site-directed mutagenesis of the cleavage sites links receptor activation to specific amino acid residues. Der p1 also induced the release of IL-6 from heterologous cells expressing MRGPRX1. In summary, activation of Mrgprs by the allergen Der p1 may contribute to inflammation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Prospective comparison of sinonasal outcomes after microscopic sublabial or endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, Carrie L; Elzoghby, Mohamed A; Oldfield, Edward H; Payne, Spencer C; Jane, John A

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Both endoscopic and microscopic transsphenoidal approaches are accepted techniques for the resection of pituitary adenomas. Although studies have explored patient outcomes for each technique individually, none have prospectively compared sinonasal and quality of life outcomes in a concurrent series of patients at the same institution, as has been done in the present study. METHODS Patients with nonfunctioning adenomas undergoing transsphenoidal surgery were assessed for sinonasal function, quality of life, and pain using the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-20 (SNOT-20), the short form of the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) instrument, the SF-36, and a headache scale. Eighty-two patients undergoing either endoscopic (47 patients) or microscopic (35 patients) surgery were surveyed preoperatively and at 24-48 hours, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 1 year after surgery. RESULTS Patients who underwent endoscopic and microscopic transsphenoidal surgery experienced a similar recovery pattern, showing an initial increase in symptoms during the first 2 weeks, followed by a return to baseline by 4 weeks and improvement beyond baseline functioning by 8 weeks. Patients who underwent endoscopic surgery experienced better sinonasal outcomes at 24-48 hours (SNOT total p = 0.015, SNOT rhinologic subscale [ssRhino] p surgery, no significant differences in sinonasal outcomes were observed between the 2 groups. Headache scales at 1 year improved in all dimensions except duration for both groups (total result 73%, p = 0.004; severity 46%, p surgery, both groups experienced significant improvements in mental health (13%, p = 0.005) and vitality (15%, p = 0.037). By 1 year after surgery, patients improved significantly in mental health (14%, p = 0.03), role physical (14%, p = 0.036), social functioning (16%, p = 0.009), vitality (22%, p = 0.002), and SF-36 total (10%, p = 0.024) as compared with preoperative measures. There were no significant differences at any time point

  5. Dust in Snow in the Colorado River Basin: Spatial Variability in Dust Concentrations, Radiative Forcing, and Snowmelt Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T.; Deems, J. S.; Landry, C.; Bryant, A.

    2012-12-01

    Since the disturbance of the western US that began with the Anglo settlement in the mid 19th century, the mountain snow cover of the Colorado River Basin (CRB) has been subject to five-fold greater dust loading. This dust deposition accelerates snowmelt through its direct reduction of albedo and its further reduction of albedo by accelerating the growth of snow effective grain size. We have previously quantified the impacts of dust in snow using a 6-year record of dust concentration and energy balance fluxes at the alpine and subalpine towers in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado, USA. Dust loading exhibited interannual variability, and end of year dust concentrations were not necessarily related to the number of dust deposition events. Radiative forcing enhanced springtime melt by 21 to 51 days with the magnitude of advanced loss being linearly related to total dust concentration at the end of snow cover. To expand our understanding of dust on snow deposition patterns we utilize collections of dust concentration at the Colorado Dust on Snow (CODOS) study sites, established in 2009 along the western side of the CRB, to assess spatial variability in dust loading. In situ sampling of dust stratigraphy and concentration occurs twice each season, once over peak snow water equivalent (15 April), and again during melt (15 May). Dust loading occurs at all sites; dust concentrations are always higher in May, vary between sites, and the highest and lowest dust years were 2009 and 2012, respectively. In the absence of regular sampling and energy balance instrumentation these sites do not allow us to quantify the advanced melt due to dust. To facilitate this a new energy balance site, Grand Mesa Study plot (GMSP), was established for water year 2010 in west central Colorado, 150 km north of SBBSA. Back trajectories indicate similar Colorado Plateau dust sources at both SBBSA and GMSP, yet GMSP exhibits slightly lower dust

  6. Dust-gas interaction deduced from Halley multicolour camera observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Delamere, W.A.; Keller, H.U.; Reitsema, H.J.; Schmidt, H.U.; Whipple, F.L.; Wilhelm, K.

    1986-01-01

    The dust and gas productions of Comet Halley were measured by the dust counter and the mass spectrometers on the Giotto spacecraft. These instruments give only little information about the spatial asymmetry of the activity. The asymmetry in the dust production is clearly evident from the dust jets seen in the Halley Multicolour Camera images. Since the dust is entrained by the gas, production must be similarly asymmetric. The intensity profiles along and across several dust jets are related to their source regions on the nucleus. Properties of the dust jets are investigated. A few compact, but highly active source regions on the nucleus produce most of the visible dust and can account for most of the gas produced by the comet. 2 refs

  7. Cytokine and transcription factor expression by Aspergillus fumigatus-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in dogs with sino-nasal aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherberghen, M; Bureau, F; Peters, I R; Day, M J; Lynch, A; Fievez, L; Billen, F; Clercx, C; Peeters, D

    2013-08-15

    The causal agent of sino-nasal aspergillosis is usually Aspergillus fumigatus, which is a saprophytic and ubiquitous fungus that causes a severe rhinosinusitis in apparent healthy dogs. Affected dogs do not have systemic immuno-suppression. It has been shown previously that dogs affected by this disease have local over-expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and Th1 cytokines in nasal mucosal tissue. The aim of the present study was to assess the response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from affected and unaffected dogs to antigen-specific stimulation with heat-inactivated Aspergillus spp. conidia, by quantifying gene expression for specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cytokines and their related transcription factors. Quantification of IL-4 and IFN-γ protein in culture supernatant was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PBMC from dogs with SNA produced adequate mRNA encoding IFN-γ and IFN-γ protein. The expression of IL-17A mRNA was significantly greater in PBMC of affected compared with unaffected dogs. The amount of IL-10 mRNA in PBMC from affected dogs decreased after antigen-specific challenge. These results suggest that the incapacity of affected dogs to clear these fungal infections is not related to a defect in Th1 immunity or to an overwhelming regulatory reaction, but rather to an uncontrolled pro-inflammatory reaction driven by Th17 cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Lunar Dust Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Jamey Robert

    Planetary bodies throughout the solar system are continually bombarded by dust particles, largely originating from cometary activities and asteroidal collisions. Surfaces of bodies with thick atmospheres, such as Venus, Earth, Mars and Titan are mostly protected from incoming dust impacts as these particles ablate in their atmospheres as 'shooting stars'. However, the majority of bodies in the solar system have no appreciable atmosphere and their surfaces are directly exposed to the flux of high speed dust grains. Impacts onto solid surfaces in space generate charged and neutral gas clouds, as well as solid secondary ejecta dust particles. Gravitationally bound ejecta clouds forming dust exospheres were recognized by in situ dust instruments around the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn, and had not yet been observed near bodies with refractory regolith surfaces before NASA's Lunar Dust and Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission. In this thesis, we first present the measurements taken by the Lunar Dust Explorer (LDEX), aboard LADEE, which discovered a permanently present, asymmetric dust cloud surrounding the Moon. The global characteristics of the lunar dust cloud are discussed as a function of a variety of variables such as altitude, solar longitude, local time, and lunar phase. These results are compared with models for lunar dust cloud generation. Second, we present an analysis of the groupings of impacts measured by LDEX, which represent detections of dense ejecta plumes above the lunar surface. These measurements are put in the context of understanding the response of the lunar surface to meteoroid bombardment and how to use other airless bodies in the solar system as detectors for their local meteoroid environment. Third, we present the first in-situ dust measurements taken over the lunar sunrise terminator. Having found no excess of small grains in this region, we discuss its implications for the putative population of electrostatically lofted dust.

  9. Role of dust in H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarazin, C.L.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to determine quantitatively the effects of U.V. absorbing dust on H II regions, and compare these effects with observations. Many observations indicate that dust grains are present within H II regions. An analytic theory is presented which describes all three of the effects of dust in H II regions. Although this model is relatively crude, it is useful in determining the approximate size of the modifications due to dust. In order to explore this problem more carefully, detailed numerical models of H II regions with dust were constructed. The ionization and thermal structure of these model H II regions is discussed. The observational consequences of the presence of dust are explored; the optical line intensities, radio continuum and line fluxes, and infrared emission of model H II regions with dust are given. These numerical models are compared with observations of diffuse nebulae. The optical line ratios are compared to several nearby bright H II regions, and it is found that the dust models may explain several anomalies in their spectrum

  10. Identifying sources of aeolian mineral dust: Present and past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R; Prospero, Joseph M; Baddock, Matthew C; Gill, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    glacial periods are likely due to greater production of glaciogenic dust particles from expanded ice sheets and mountain glaciers, but could also include dust inputs from exposed continental and insular shelves now submerged. Future dust sources are difficult to assess, but will likely differ from those of the present because of global warming. Global warming could bring about shifts in dust sources by changes in degree or type of vegetation cover, changes in wind strength, and increases or decreases in the size of water bodies. A major uncertainty in assessing dust sources of the future is related to changes inhuman land use, which could affect land surface cover, particularly due to increased agricultural endeavors and water usage.

  11. Histological findings and lung dust analysis as the basis for occupational disease compensation in asbestos-related lung cancer in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Inke Sabine; Theile, Anja; Tannapfel, Andrea

    2018-01-15

    This study has researched the significance of histologically raised findings and lung dust analyses in the context of claiming the recognition of and thus compensation for an asbestos-associated occupational disease. For this approach, all findings from the German Mesothelioma Register in 2015 that included lung dust analyses were evaluated and were compared with information on asbestos fiber exposure at work based on fiber years, and with the results of radiological findings. For 68 insured persons, recognition of an asbestos-induced lung disease according to Section 4104 of the German Ordinance on Occupational Diseases (Berufskrankheitenverordnung - BKV) could be recommended solely on the basis of the histological examinations of lung tissues and complementary lung dust analyses. Neither did the calculation of the cumulative asbestos dust exposure at work yield 25 fiber years, nor could bridge findings (e.g., plaques) be identified. In addition, the autopsies of 12 patients revealed plaques that had not been diagnosed during radiological examinations. These results show that - irrespective of the prescribed working techniques and radiological diagnosis - pathological/anatomical and histological diagnostics are often the only way for the insureds to demonstrate the causal connection between asbestos and their disease. Even after long intervals of up to 40 years post last exposure, the asbestos fibers would still be easily detectable in the lung tissues evaluated. Whenever suitable tissue is available, it should be examined for mild asbestosis with the aid of a lung dust analysis. Otherwise there is a risk that an occupational disease is wrongfully rejected. In the context of health insurance, the lung dust analysis and the resulting proof of the presence of asbestosis often constitute one option of providing evidence of an occupational disease. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018;31(3):293-305. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  13. Visual outcome of accelerated fractionated radiation for advanced sinonasal malignancies employing photons/protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C.; Chan, Annie W.; Lessell, Simmons; McIntyre, James F.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Fitzek, Markus M.; Thornton, Allan F.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the visual outcomes of patients with advanced sinonasal malignancies treated with proton/photon accelerated fractionated radiation (AFR). Patients and methods: Between 1991 and 2001, AFR was used to treat 36 patients with advanced stage primary (n = 33) or recurrent (n = 3) nasal or paranasal malignant tumors. Full ophthalmologic follow-up was documented. The median dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 69.6 CGE (range 60.8-77). Visual complications were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and the late effects of normal tissue (LENT) scoring systems. The median follow-up was 52.4 months (range 17-122.8). Results: Thirteen patients developed late visual/ocular toxicity. Cataracts were LENT grade 1 and 3 in 2 patients and 1 patient, respectively. One LENT grade 1 vascular retinopathy and 1 optic neuropathy were also observed. Three and five patients presented with nasolacrimal duct stenosis (CTC grade 2, 2 patients; CTC grade 3, 1 patient) and dry-eye syndrome (CTC grade 1, 1 patient; CTC grade 2, 4 patients), respectively. The 3- and 5-year probability of LENT/CTC grade ≥2 visual toxicity were 15.8 ± 6.7% and 20.7 ± 7.8%, respectively. Conclusions: AFR for locally advanced nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors enables delivery of 70 CGE to the tumor with acceptable ophthalmologic complications

  14. The effect of topical treatments for CRS on the sinonasal epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanpour, M; Rayan, A; Smith, J L P; Vreugde, S

    2017-06-01

    Several topical treatments are used in the management of Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS), some of which the safety and efficacy has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of commonly used topical treatments on the sinonasal epithelial barrier. Normal saline (0.9% Sodium Chloride), hypertonic saline (3% Sodium Chloride), FESS Sinu-Cleanse Hypertonic, FLO Sinus Care and Budesonide 1 mg/ 2 ml were applied to the apical side of air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) from CRS patients (n=3) and non-CRS controls (n=3) for 24 hours. Epithelial barrier structure and function was assessed using trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), measuring the passage of Fluorescein Isothiocyanate labelled Dextrans (FITC-Dextrans) and assessing the expression of the tight junction protein Zona Occludens-1 (ZO-1) using immunofluorescence. Toxicity was assessed using a Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Data was analysed using ANOVA, followed by Tukey HSD post hoc test. Hypertonic solution and budesonide significantly increased TEER values in CRS derived HNECs. In contrast, FESS Sinu-Cleanse Hypertonic significantly reduced TEER 5 minutes after application of the solution followed by an increase in paracellular permeability of FITC-Dextrans (30 minutes) and increased LDH levels 6 hours after application of the solution. Our findings confirm that isotonic and hypertonic saline solutions do not compromise epithelial barrier function in vitro but underscore the importance of examining safety and efficacy of over-the-counter wash solutions.

  15. Does human papilloma virus play a role in sinonasal inverted papilloma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Satish; Wang, Hailun

    2014-02-01

    Inverted papillomas are a benign sinonasal tumor with a propensity for recurrence and malignant transformation. Although many investigations have been made into the nature of this disease, its etiology and causes for malignant transformation have yet to be fully elucidated. It is the authors' objective to present a review on management of the disease and evaluate the present relationship between human papilloma virus (HPV) and inverted papilloma. A causal relationship between HPV and the pathogenesis and progression of inverted papilloma has been posited since the 1980s. Although widely varied HPV detection rates have been reported, recent studies have noted a substantial increase in both recurrence and malignant transformation in HPV-infected inverted papillomas. However, exact cellular mechanisms by which infection leads to subsequent recurrence and development of carcinoma have yet to be elucidated. Evidence exists suggesting that HPV infection plays a role in the progression of inverted papilloma and confers an increased risk for recurrence and malignant transformation. PCR is the preferred detection method, and fresh or frozen specimens are the ideal source of tissue for evaluation. Although multiple studies have detected an association between HPV and inverted papilloma (both recurrent and malignant transformation), further studies are necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular pathways before an association can be changed to causation.

  16. Roles of human papillomavirus infection and stathmin in the pathogenesis of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Lin, Dong; Xiong, Xi-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate roles of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and stathmin in sinonasal inverted papilloma (SNIP). HPV DNA detection was performed by the fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Stathmin protein expression was investigated by the immunohistochemistry method and mRNA expression of stathmin, Kif2a, and cyclin D1 were assessed by real-time PCR in SNIP and control subjects. The positive rate of HPV DNA detected in SNIP was about 53.6% (15 of 28). Recurrent cases showed a higher rate of HPV infection compared with initial cases and higher Krouse stage (T3 + T4) cases showed higher rate of HPV infection than lower Krouse stage (T1 + T2) cases. Stronger expression of stathmin, Kif2a, and cyclin D1 were observed in SNIP, especially HPV(+) SNIP. HPV infection was closely associated with recurrence and progression of SNIP. Stathmin is a valuable prognostic marker and could be considered as a therapeutic target in patients with SNIP. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Sinonasal Papilloma in Southern Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valibeigi, Behnaz; Ashraf, Mohamad Javad; Kerdegari, Narges; Safai, Akbar; Abedi, Elham; Khademi, Bijan; Azarpira, Negar

    2017-06-01

    Sinonasal papilloma (SNP) is a rare benign lesion characterized by high recurrence rate and malignant transformation. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in these lesions in South of Iran. In this cross sectional retrospective study, a total of 41 patients, 38 SNP and 3 SNP/Squamous cell carcinoma cases, from 2007 to 2014 were studied. Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA detection was performed by nested PCR method and positive cases were analyzed for high risk HPV-16 and HPV-18. HPV was detected in 31.7%; HPV- 16 in 4.9% and HPV 18 was not detected at all. Dysplastic epithelium was detected in 53% that was not associated with HPV. Three cases were accompanied with malignant transformation that HPV genome was detected in only one case and none of them were positive for HPV16 /18 genomic DNA. Current research suggests that HPV may be involved in the development of SNP. But the high risk HPV is not important in malignant transformation. More studies are needed to elucidate the possible etiologic mechanism between HPV, inverted papilloma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. The effects of the stem cell on ciliary regeneration of injured rabbit sinonasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuzlu, Ali; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Karagöz, Tuğba; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Tatar, İlkan; Bayır, Ömer; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2017-08-01

    Defects in mucosal healing after sinonasal surgery cause infection, scar formation causing obstruction, relapse of the disease within a shorter period and revision surgery. The present study aimed to create a functional ciliated epithelium using a stem cell and stem cell sheet of adipose tissue origin and to show such regeneration ultra-structurally on experimentally injured rabbit nasal epithelium. This was an experimental animal study and basic research. A total of 18 white New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. The medial wall of the maxillary sinus of the subjects was peeled off bilaterally. No additional procedure was applied to the subjects in Group 1. In Group 2, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell was implanted on the wound edges of the subjects. In Group 3, a stem cell sheet of three layers was laid onto the defect area. All subjects were killed after 3 weeks. The presence of the stem cell stained with bromo-deoxyuridine was assessed with a light microscope, whereas cilia density, ciliated orientation and cilia structure were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Ciliary densities in Group 2 and Group 3 were statistically superior compared to the control group (p stem cell increased the healing of the injured maxillary sinus mucosa of the rabbits in terms of cilia presence, density and morphology regardless of the implementation technique. Level of evidence NA.

  19. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 8 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 50.0 S and 17.7 W displays dust devil tracks on the surface. Most of the lighter portions of the image likely have a thin veneer of dust settled on the surface. As a dust devil passes over the surface, it acts as a vacuum and picks up the dust, leaving the darker substrate exposed. In this image there is a general trend of many of the tracks running from east to west or west to east, indicating the general wind direction. There is often no general trend present in dust devil tracks seen in other images. The track patterns are quite ephemeral and can completely change or even disappear over the course of a few months. Dust devils are one of the mechanisms that Mars uses to constantly pump dust into the ubiquitously dusty atmosphere. This atmospheric dust is one of the main driving forces of the present Martian climate. The Story Vrrrrooooooooom. Think of a tornado, the cartoon Tasmanian devil, or any number of vacuum commercials that powerfully suck up swirls of dust and dirt. That's pretty much what it's like on the surface of Mars a lot of the time. Whirlpools of wind called

  20. Head and neck region consolidation radiotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation with hippocampal avoidance delivered with helical tomotherapy after induction chemotherapy for non-sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma of the upper airways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; La Porta, Maria Rosa; Girelli, Giuseppe; Borca, Valeria Casanova; Pasquino, Massimo; Tofani, Santi; Ozzello, Franca; Ricardi, Umberto; Numico, Gianmauro; Migliaccio, Fernanda; Catuzzo, Paola; Cante, Domenico; Ceroni, Paola; Sciacero, Piera; Carassai, Pierpaolo; Canzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Non-sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinomas (NSNECs) of the head and neck are considered an unfrequent clinico-pathological entity. Combined modality treatment represents an established therapeutic option for undifferentiated forms where distant metastasis is a common pattern of failure. We report on a case of NSNEC treated with sequential chemo-radiation consisting of 6 cycles of cisplatin and etoposide followed by loco-regional radiation to the head and neck and simultaneous prophylactic cranial irradiation to prevent from intracranial spread, delivered with helical tomotherapy with the 'hippocampal avoidance' technique in order to reduce neuro-cognitive late effects. One year after the end of the whole combined modality approach, the patient achieved complete remission, with no treatment-related sub-acute and late effects. The present report highlights the importance of multidisciplinary management for NSNECs of the head and neck, as the possibility to achieve substantial cure rates with mild side effects with modern radiotherapy techniques

  1. Quantitative comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy plan quality in sino-nasal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Glegg, Martin; Smith, Suzanne; James, Allan; Rizwanullah, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare various dosimetric parameters of dynamic mlc intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for sino-nasal cancers, which are rare and complex tumors to treat with radiotherapy. IMRT using five fields, coplanar in the sagittal plane and VMAT employing two coplanar arc plans were created for five patients. The plans were assessed by comparing Conformity Index and Sigma Index (dose homogeneity) in the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and through comparison of dose-volume characteristics to the following organs at risk (OARs): Spinal cord, brainstem, eye, ipsilateral and contralateral optic nerve and the volume of brain receiving 10% of the prescribed dose (V 10% ). The total monitor units required to deliver the plan were also compared. Conformity Index was found to be superior in VMAT plans for three patients and in IMRT plans for two patients. Dose homogeneity within the PTV was better with VMAT plans for all five cases. The mean difference in Sigma Index was 0.68%. There was no significant difference in dose between IMRT and VMAT plans for any of the OARs assessed in these patients. The monitor units were significantly reduced in the VMAT plan in comparison to the IMRT plan for four out of five patients, with mean reduction of 66%. It was found in this study that for the treatment of sino-nasal cancer, VMAT produced minimal, and statistically insignificant improvement in dose homogeneity within the PTV when compared with IMRT. VMAT plans were delivered using significantly fewer monitor units. We conclude in this study that VMAT does not offer significant improvement of treatment for sino-nasal cancer over the existing IMRT techniques, but the findings may change with a larger sample of patients in this rare condition. (author)

  2. Resveratrol enhances airway surface liquid depth in sinonasal epithelium by increasing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator open probability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyan Zhang

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis engenders enormous morbidity in the general population, and is often refractory to medical intervention. Compounds that augment mucociliary clearance in airway epithelia represent a novel treatment strategy for diseases of mucus stasis. A dominant fluid and electrolyte secretory pathway in the nasal airways is governed by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The objectives of the present study were to test resveratrol, a strong potentiator of CFTR channel open probability, in preparation for a clinical trial of mucociliary activators in human sinus disease.Primary sinonasal epithelial cells, immortalized bronchoepithelial cells (wild type and F508del CFTR, and HEK293 cells expressing exogenous human CFTR were investigated by Ussing chamber as well as patch clamp technique under non-phosphorylating conditions. Effects on airway surface liquid depth were measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Impact on CFTR gene expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.Resveratrol is a robust CFTR channel potentiator in numerous mammalian species. The compound also activated temperature corrected F508del CFTR and enhanced CFTR-dependent chloride secretion in human sinus epithelium ex vivo to an extent comparable to the recently approved CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor. Using inside out patches from apical membranes of murine cells, resveratrol stimulated an ~8 picosiemens chloride channel consistent with CFTR. This observation was confirmed in HEK293 cells expressing exogenous CFTR. Treatment of sinonasal epithelium resulted in a significant increase in airway surface liquid depth (in µm: 8.08+/-1.68 vs. 6.11+/-0.47,control,p<0.05. There was no increase CFTR mRNA.Resveratrol is a potent chloride secretagogue from the mucosal surface of sinonasal epithelium, and hydrates airway surface liquid by increasing CFTR channel open probability. The foundation for a

  3. Whither Cometary Dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey M.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper I will discuss recent findings that have important implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of primitive solar system dust, including: - Nesvorny et al. (2010), following up on their dynamical analyses of the zodiacal dust bands as sourced by the breakup of the Karin (5Mya) and Veritas (8Mya) asteroid families, argue that over 90% of the interplanetary dust cloud at 1 AU comes from JFC comets with near-circularized, low inclination orbits. This implies that the noted IPD collections of anhydrous and hydrous dust particles are likely to be from Oort cloud and JFC comets, respectively, not from asteroids and comets as thought in the past. Hydrous dust particles from comets like 85P/Wild2 and 9P/Tempel 1 would be consistent with results from the STARDUST and Deep Impact experiments. - Estimates of the dust particle size distributions (PSDs) in the comae of 85P/Wild2 (Green et al. 2004, 2007) and 73P/SW-3 (Sitko et al. 2010, Vaubaillon & Reach 2010) and in the trails of comets (Reach et al. 2007) have broken power law structure, with a plateau enhancement of particles of 1 mm - 1 cm in size. This size is also the size of most chondritic inclusions, and the predicted size range of the "aggregational barrier", where collisions between dust particles become destructive. - Studies of the albedo and polarization properties of cometary dust (Kolokolova et al. 2007) suggest there are 2 major groupings, one with low scattering capability and one with high. While these families could possibly have been explained by systematics in the PSDs of the emitted dust, independent work by Lisse et al. (2008) on the mineralogy of a number of highly dusty comets has shown evidence for one family of comets with highly crystalline dust and another with highly amorphous dust.

  4. Environmentally dependent dust chemistry of a super Asian dust storm in March 2010: observation and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongzhen; Dong, Xinyi; Fu, Joshua S.; Xu, Jian; Deng, Congrui; Jiang, Yilun; Fu, Qingyan; Lin, Yanfen; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2018-03-01

    Near-surface and vertical in situ measurements of atmospheric particles were conducted in Shanghai during 19-23 March 2010 to explore the transport and chemical evolution of dust particles in a super dust storm. An air quality model with optimized physical dust emission scheme and newly implemented dust chemistry was utilized to study the impact of dust chemistry on regional air quality. Two discontinuous dust periods were observed with one traveling over northern China (DS1) and the other passing over the coastal regions of eastern China (DS2). Stronger mixing extents between dust and anthropogenic emissions were found in DS2, reflected by the higher SO2 / PM10 and NO2 / PM10 ratios as well as typical pollution elemental species such as As, Cd, Pb, and Zn. As a result, the concentrations of SO42- and NO3- and the ratio of Ca2+ / Ca were more elevated in DS2 than in DS1 but opposite for the [NH4+] / [SO42-+NO3-] ratio, suggesting the heterogeneous reactions between calcites and acid gases were significantly promoted in DS2 due to the higher level of relative humidity and gaseous pollution precursors. Lidar observation showed a columnar effect on the vertical structure of particle optical properties in DS1 that dust dominantly accounted for ˜ 80-90 % of the total particle extinction from near the ground to ˜ 700 m. In contrast, the dust plumes in DS2 were restrained within lower altitudes while the extinction from spherical particles exhibited a maximum at a high altitude of ˜ 800 m. The model simulation reproduced relatively consistent results with observations that strong impacts of dust heterogeneous reactions on secondary aerosol formation occurred in areas where the anthropogenic emissions were intensive. Compared to the sulfate simulation, the nitrate formation on dust is suggested to be improved in the future modeling efforts.

  5. Communication plan for windblown dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Windblown dust events occur in Arizona, and blowing dust has been considered a contributing factor to serious crashes on the : segment of Interstate 10 (I10) between Phoenix and Tucson, as well as on other Arizona roadways. Arizonas dust events...

  6. Simulation of dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Murillo, M.S.; Rosenberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    The authors use molecular dynamics (MD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation methods to investigate the dispersion relation of dust-acoustic waves in a one-dimensional, strongly coupled (Coulomb coupling parameter Λ = ratio of the Coulomb energy to the thermal energy = 120) dusty plasma. They study both cases where the dust is represented by a small number of simulation particles that form into a regular array structure (crystal limit) as well as where the dust is represented by a much larger number of particles (fluid limit)

  7. Long-range-transported bioaerosols captured in snow cover on Mount Tateyama, Japan: impacts of Asian-dust events on airborne bacterial dynamics relating to ice-nucleation activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maki

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The westerly wind travelling at high altitudes over eastern Asia transports aerosols from the Asian deserts and urban areas to downwind areas such as Japan. These long-range-transported aerosols include not only mineral particles but also microbial particles (bioaerosols, that impact the ice-cloud formation processes as ice nuclei. However, the detailed relations of airborne bacterial dynamics to ice nucleation in high-elevation aerosols have not been investigated. Here, we used the aerosol particles captured in the snow cover at altitudes of 2450 m on Mt Tateyama to investigate sequential changes in the ice-nucleation activities and bacterial communities in aerosols and elucidate the relationships between the two processes. After stratification of the snow layers formed on the walls of a snow pit on Mt Tateyama, snow samples, including aerosol particles, were collected from 70 layers at the lower (winter accumulation and upper (spring accumulation parts of the snow wall. The aerosols recorded in the lower parts mainly came from Siberia (Russia, northern Asia and the Sea of Japan, whereas those in the upper parts showed an increase in Asian dust particles originating from the desert regions and industrial coasts of Asia. The snow samples exhibited high levels of ice nucleation corresponding to the increase in Asian dust particles. Amplicon sequencing analysis using 16S rRNA genes revealed that the bacterial communities in the snow samples predominately included plant associated and marine bacteria (phyla Proteobacteria during winter, whereas during spring, when dust events arrived frequently, the majority were terrestrial bacteria of phyla Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The relative abundances of Firmicutes (Bacilli showed a significant positive relationship with the ice nucleation in snow samples. Presumably, Asian dust events change the airborne bacterial communities over Mt Tateyama and carry terrestrial bacterial populations, which

  8. Long-range-transported bioaerosols captured in snow cover on Mount Tateyama, Japan: impacts of Asian-dust events on airborne bacterial dynamics relating to ice-nucleation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Teruya; Furumoto, Shogo; Asahi, Yuya; Lee, Kevin C.; Watanabe, Koichi; Aoki, Kazuma; Murakami, Masataka; Tajiri, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Mashio, Asami; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2018-06-01

    The westerly wind travelling at high altitudes over eastern Asia transports aerosols from the Asian deserts and urban areas to downwind areas such as Japan. These long-range-transported aerosols include not only mineral particles but also microbial particles (bioaerosols), that impact the ice-cloud formation processes as ice nuclei. However, the detailed relations of airborne bacterial dynamics to ice nucleation in high-elevation aerosols have not been investigated. Here, we used the aerosol particles captured in the snow cover at altitudes of 2450 m on Mt Tateyama to investigate sequential changes in the ice-nucleation activities and bacterial communities in aerosols and elucidate the relationships between the two processes. After stratification of the snow layers formed on the walls of a snow pit on Mt Tateyama, snow samples, including aerosol particles, were collected from 70 layers at the lower (winter accumulation) and upper (spring accumulation) parts of the snow wall. The aerosols recorded in the lower parts mainly came from Siberia (Russia), northern Asia and the Sea of Japan, whereas those in the upper parts showed an increase in Asian dust particles originating from the desert regions and industrial coasts of Asia. The snow samples exhibited high levels of ice nucleation corresponding to the increase in Asian dust particles. Amplicon sequencing analysis using 16S rRNA genes revealed that the bacterial communities in the snow samples predominately included plant associated and marine bacteria (phyla Proteobacteria) during winter, whereas during spring, when dust events arrived frequently, the majority were terrestrial bacteria of phyla Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The relative abundances of Firmicutes (Bacilli) showed a significant positive relationship with the ice nucleation in snow samples. Presumably, Asian dust events change the airborne bacterial communities over Mt Tateyama and carry terrestrial bacterial populations, which possibly induce ice

  9. Dust in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The author's review concentrates on theoretical aspects of dust in planetary nebulae (PN). He considers the questions: how much dust is there is PN; what is its composition; what effects does it have on the ionization structure, on the dynamics of the nebula. (Auth.)

  10. Toxicity of lunar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnarsson, D.; Carpenter, J.; Fubini, B.; Gerde, P.; Loftus, D.; Prisk, K.; Staufer, U.; Tranfield, E.; van Westrenen, W.

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of

  11. Combustible dust tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  12. Dust Destruction in the ISM: A Re-Evaluation of Dust Lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2011-01-01

    There is a long-standing conundrum in interstellar dust studies relating to the discrepancy between the time-scales for dust formation from evolved stars and the apparently more rapid destruction in supernova-generated shock waves. Aims. We re-examine some of the key issues relating to dust evolution and processing in the interstellar medium. Methods. We use recent and new constraints from observations, experiments, modelling and theory to re-evaluate dust formation in the interstellar medium (ISM). Results. We find that the discrepancy between the dust formation and destruction time-scales may not be as significant as has previously been assumed because of the very large uncertainties involved. Conclusions. The derived silicate dust lifetime could be compatible with its injection time-scale, given the inherent uncertainties in the dust lifetime calculation. The apparent need to re-form significant quantities of silicate dust in the tenuous interstellar medium may therefore not be a strong requirement. Carbonaceous matter, on the other hand, appears to be rapidly recycled in the ISM and, in contrast to silicates, there are viable mechanisms for its re-formation in the ISM.

  13. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. II. Variability in the Gas and Dust Emission of the Herbig Fe Star SAO 206462

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Day, Amanda N.; Kimes, Robin L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Martus, Cameron; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Grady, Carol A.; Schneider, Glenn; Lisse, Carey M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present thirteen epochs of near-infrared (0.8-5 microns) spectroscopic observations of the pre-transitional, "gapped" disk system in SAO 206462 (=HD 135344B). In all, six gas emission lines (Br(alpha) , Br(gamma), Pa(beta), Pa(delta), Pa(epsilon), and the 0.8446 microns line of O I) along with continuum measurements made near the standard J, H, K, and L photometric bands were measured. A mass accretion rate of approximately 2 x 10(exp 8)Solar Mass/yr was derived from the Br(gamma) and Pa(beta) lines. However, the fluxes of these lines varied by a factor of over two during the course of a few months. The continuum also varied, but by only approx.30%, and even decreased at a time when the gas emission was increasing. The H I line at 1.083 microns was also found to vary in a manner inconsistent with that of either the hydrogen lines or the dust. Both the gas and dust variabilities indicate significant changes in the region of the inner gas and the inner dust belt that may be common to many young disk systems. If planets are responsible for defining the inner edge of the gap, they could interact with the material on time scales commensurate with what is observed for the variations in the dust, while other disk instabilities (thermal, magneto-rotational) would operate there on longer time scales than we observe for the inner dust belt. For SAO 206462, the orbital period would likely be 1-3 years. If the changes are being induced in the disk material closer to the star than the gap, a variety of mechanisms (disk instabilities, interactions via planets) might be responsible for the changes seen. The He I feature is most likely due to a wind whose orientation changes with respect to the observer on time scales of a day or less. To further constrain the origin of the gas and dust emission will require multiple spectroscopic and interferometric observations on both shorter and longer time scales that have been sampled so far.

  14. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  15. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  16. Hypervelocity Dust Injection for Plasma Diagnostic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticos, Catalin

    2005-10-01

    Hypervelocity micron-size dust grain injection was proposed for high-temperature magnetized plasma diagnosis. Multiple dust grains are launched simultaneously into high temperature plasmas at several km/s or more. The hypervelocity dust grains are ablated by the electron and ion fluxes. Fast imaging of the resulting luminous plumes attached to each grain is expected to yield local magnetic field vectors. Combination of multiple local magnetic field vectors reproduces 2D or even 3D maps of the internal magnetic field topology. Key features of HDI are: (1) a high spatial resolution, due to a relatively small transverse size of the elongated tail, and (2) a small perturbation level, as the dust grains introduce negligible number of particles compared to the plasma particle inventory. The latter advantage, however, could be seriously compromised if the gas load from the accelerator has an unobstructed access to the diagnosed plasma. Construction of a HDI diagnostic for National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which includes a coaxial plasma gun for dust grain acceleration, is underway. Hydrogen and deuterium gas discharges inside accelerator are created by a ˜ 1 mF capacitor bank pre-charged up to 10 kV. The diagnostic apparatus also comprises a dust dispenser for pre-loading the accelerator with dust grains, and an imaging system that has a high spatial and temporal resolution.

  17. Respiratory effects of borax dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabrant, D H; Bernstein, L; Peters, J M; Smith, T J; Wright, W E

    1985-12-01

    The relation of respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function, and abnormalities of chest radiographs to estimated exposures of borax dust has been investigated in a cross sectional study of 629 actively employed borax workers. Ninety three per cent of the eligible workers participated in the study and exposures ranged from 1.1 mg/m3 to 14.6 mg/m3. Symptoms of acute respiratory irritation such as dryness of the mouth, nose, or throat, dry cough, nose bleeds, sore throat, productive cough, shortness of breath, and chest tightness were related to exposures of 4.0 mg/m3 or more, and were infrequent at exposures of 1.1 mg/m3. Symptoms of persistent respiratory irritation meeting the definition of chronic simple bronchitis were related to exposure among non-smokers. Decrements in the FEV1 as a percentage of predicted were seen among smokers who had heavy cumulative borax exposures (greater than or equal to 80 mg/m3 years) but were not seen among less exposed smokers or among non-smokers. Radiographic abnormalities were uncommon and were not related to dust exposure. Borax dust appears to act as a simple respiratory irritant and perhaps causes small changes in the FEV1 among smokers who are heavily exposed.

  18. Sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma without clinical lymph node involvement : Which neck management is best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnau-Marchand, Pauline; Levy, Antonin; Moya-Plana, Antoine; Mirghani, Haïtham; Nguyen, France; Del Campo, Eleonor Rivin; Janot, François; Kolb, Frédéric; Ferrand, François-Régis; Temam, Stéphane; Blanchard, Pierre; Tao, Yungan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to report outcomes of patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma (SNSCC) and to discuss the impact of elective neck irradiation (ENI) and selective neck dissection (SND) in clinically negative lymph node (N0) patients. Data from 104 nonmetastatic SNSCC patients treated with curative intent were retrospectively analysed. Uni- and multivariate analyses were used to assess prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LRC). Median follow-up was 4.5 years. Eighty-five percent of tumours were stage III-IV. Treatments included induction chemotherapy (52.9 %), surgery (72 %) and radiotherapy (RT; 87 %). The 5‑year OS, progression-free survival, and LRC rates were 48, 44 and 57 %, respectively. Absence of surgery predicted a decrease of OS (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.4-4.7), and LRC (HR 3.5; 95 % CI 1.8-6.8). Regional relapse was observed in 13/104 (13 %) patients and most common sites were level II (n = 12; 70.6 %), level III (n = 5; 29.4 %) and level Ib (n = 4; 23.5 %). Management of the neck in N0 patients (n = 87) included 11 % SND alone, 32 % ENI alone, 20 % SND + ENI and 37 % no neck treatment. In this population, a better LRC was found according to the management of the neck in favour of SND (94 % vs. 47 %; p = 0.002) but not ENI. SND may detect occult cervical positive nodes, allowing selective postoperative RT. ENI (ipsilateral level II, ±Ib and III or bilateral) needs to be proposed in selected patients, especially when SND has not been performed.

  19. Human papillomavirus infection and the malignant transformation of sinonasal inverted papilloma: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ren-Wu; Guo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ru-Xin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to evaluate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the malignancy of sinonasal inverted papilloma (SNIP). However, the results remain inconclusive. Here, a meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively assess this association. Case-control studies investigating SNIP tissues for presence of HPV DNA were identified. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by the Mantel-Haenszel method. An assessment of publication bias and sensitivity analysis were also performed. We calculated a pooled OR of 2.16 (95% CI=1.46-3.21, P<0.001) without statistically significant heterogeneity or publication bias. Stratification by HPV type showed a stronger association for patients with high-risk HPV (hrHPV) types, HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-16/18 infection (OR=8.8 [95% CI: 4.73-16.38], 8.04 [95% CI: 3.34-19.39], 18.57 [95% CI: 4.56-75.70], and 26.24 [4.35-158.47], respectively). When only using PCR studies, pooled ORs for patients with hrHPV, HPV-16, and HPV18 infection still reached statistical significance. However, Egger's test reflected significant publication bias in the HPV-16 sub-analysis (P=0.06), and the adjusted OR was no longer statistically significant (OR=1.65, 95%CI: 0.58-4.63). These results suggest that HPV infection, especially hrHPV (HPV-18), is significantly associated with malignant SNIP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of tumour volume on prediction of progression-free survival in sinonasal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennersdorf, Florian; Mauz, Paul-Stefan; Adam, Patrick; Welz, Stefan; Sievert, Anne; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyse potential prognostic factors, with emphasis on tumour volume, in determining progression free survival (PFS) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses. Retrospective analysis of 106 patients with primary sinonasal malignancies treated and followed-up between March 2006 and October 2012. Possible predictive parameters for PFS were entered into univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis included age, sex, baseline tumour volume (based on MR imaging), histology type, TNM stage and prognostic groups according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis concerning the predictive value of tumour volume for recurrence was also conducted. The main histological subgroup consisted of epithelial tumours (77%). The majority of the patients (68%) showed advanced tumour burden (AJCC stage III–IV). Lymph node involvement was present in 18 cases. The mean tumour volume was 26.6 ± 21.2 cm 3 . The median PFS for all patients was 24.9 months (range: 2.5–84.5 months). The ROC curve analysis for the tumour volume showed 58.1% sensitivity and 75.4% specificity for predicting recurrence. Tumour volume, AJCC staging, T- and N- stage were significant predictors in the univariate analysis. Positive lymph node status and tumour volume remained significant and independent predictors in the multivariate analysis. Radiological tumour volume proofed to be a statistically reliable predictor of PFS. In the multivariate analysis, T-, N- and overall AJCC staging did not show significant prognostic value

  1. Characterization of atmospheric bioaerosols along the transport pathway of Asian dust during the Dust-Bioaerosol 2016 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kai; Huang, Zhongwei; Huang, Jianping; Maki, Teruya; Zhang, Shuang; Shimizu, Atsushi; Ma, Xiaojun; Shi, Jinsen; Bi, Jianrong; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Guoyin; Zhang, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that bioaerosols are injected into the atmosphere during dust events. These bioaerosols may affect leeward ecosystems, human health, and agricultural productivity and may even induce climate change. However, bioaerosol dynamics have rarely been investigated along the transport pathway of Asian dust, especially in China where dust events affect huge areas and massive numbers of people. Given this situation, the Dust-Bioaerosol (DuBi) Campaign was carried out over northern China, and the effects of dust events on the amount and diversity of bioaerosols were investigated. The results indicate that the number of bacteria showed remarkable increases during the dust events, and the diversity of the bacterial communities also increased significantly, as determined by means of microscopic observations with 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and MiSeq sequencing analysis. These results indicate that dust clouds can carry many bacteria of various types into downwind regions and may have potentially important impacts on ecological environments and climate change. The abundances of DAPI-stained bacteria in the dust samples were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than those in the non-dust samples and reached 105-106 particles m-3. Moreover, the concentration ratios of DAPI-stained bacteria to yellow fluorescent particles increased from 5.1 % ± 6.3 % (non-dust samples) to 9.8 % ± 6.3 % (dust samples). A beta diversity analysis of the bacterial communities demonstrated the distinct clustering of separate prokaryotic communities in the dust and non-dust samples. Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria remained the dominant phyla in all samples. As for Erenhot, the relative abundances of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi had a remarkable rise in dust events. In contrast, the relative abundances of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi in non-dust samples of R-DzToUb were greater than those in dust samples. Alphaproteobacteria made the major

  2. Measurement of the ion drag force on falling dust particles and its relation to the void formation in complex (dusty) plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafiu, C.; Melzer, A.; Piel, A.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on the quantitative determination of the weaker forces (ion drag, thermophoresis, and electric field force) on free-falling dust particles in a rf discharge tube are presented. The strongest force, gravity, is balanced by gas friction and the weaker forces are investigated in the radial (horizontal) plane. Under most discharge conditions, the particles are found to be expelled from the central plasma region. A transition to a situation where the falling particles are focused into the plasma center is observed at low gas pressures using small particles. These investigations allow a quantitative understanding of the mechanism of unwanted dust-free areas (so-called voids) in dusty plasmas under microgravity. Good quantitative agreement with standard models of the ion drag is found

  3. Imaging and Outcomes for a New Entity: Low-Grade Sinonasal Sarcoma with Neural and Myogenic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Richard B; Wiggins, Richard H; Witt, Benjamin L; Dundar, Yusuf; Johnston, Tawni M; Hunt, Jason P

    2017-01-01

    Objectives  Low-grade sinonasal sarcoma with neural and myogenic features (LGSSNMF) is a new, rare tumor. Our goal is to describe the imaging characteristics and surgical outcomes of this unique skull base malignancy. Design  Retrospective case series. Setting  Academic medical center. Participants  There were three patients who met inclusion criteria with a confirmed LGSSNMF. Main Outcome Measures  Imaging and histopathological characteristics, treatments, survival and recurrence outcomes, complications, morbidity, and mortality. Results  Patients presented with diplopia, facial discomfort, a supraorbital mass, and nasal obstruction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography imaging in all cases showed an enhancing sinonasal mass with associated hyperostotic bone formation that involved the frontal sinus, invaded the lamina papyracea and anterior skull base, and had intracranial extension. One patient underwent a purely endoscopic surgical resection and the second underwent a craniofacial resection, while the last is pending treatment. All patients recovered well, without morbidity or long-term complications, and are currently without evidence of disease (mean follow-up of 2.1 years). One patient recurred after 17 months and underwent a repeat endoscopic skull base and dural resection. Conclusions  The surgical outcomes and imaging of this unique, locally aggressive skull base tumor are characterized.

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the sino-nasal outcome test (SNOT-22) for Spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Santos, Gonzalo; Reyes, Pablo; del Castillo, Raúl; Fragola, Claudio; Royuela, Ana

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to perform translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the sino-nasal outcome test 22 (SNOT-22) to Spanish language. SNOT-22 was translated, back translated, and a pretest trial was performed. The study included 119 individuals divided into 60 cases, who met diagnostic criteria for chronic rhinosinusitis according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis 2012; and 59 controls, who reported no sino-nasal disease. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha test, reproducibility with Kappa coefficient, reliability with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), validity with Mann-Whitney U test and responsiveness with Wilcoxon test. In cases, Cronbach's alpha was 0.91 both before and after treatment, as for controls, it was 0.90 at their first test assessment and 0.88 at 3 weeks. Kappa coefficient was calculated for each item, with an average score of 0.69. ICC was also performed for each item, with a score of 0.87 in the overall score and an average among all items of 0.71. Median score for cases was 47, and 2 for controls, finding the difference to be highly significant (Mann-Whitney U test, p internal consistency, reliability, reproducibility, validity and responsiveness necessary to be a valid instrument to be used in clinical practice.

  5. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Schwehm, G.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Gruen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>∼2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  6. Variations between Dust and Gas in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium. III. Changes in Dust Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Heiles, Carl

    2017-12-01

    We study infrared emission of 17 isolated, diffuse clouds with masses of order {10}2 {M}ȯ to test the hypothesis that grain property variations cause the apparently low gas-to-dust ratios that have been measured in those clouds. Maps of the clouds were constructed from Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data and directly compared with the maps of dust optical depth from Planck. The mid-infrared emission per unit dust optical depth has a significant trend toward lower values at higher optical depths. The trend can be quantitatively explained by the extinction of starlight within the clouds. The relative amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and very small grains traced by WISE, compared with large grains tracked by Planck, are consistent with being constant. The temperature of the large grains significantly decreases for clouds with larger dust optical depth; this trend is partially due to dust property variations, but is primarily due to extinction of starlight. We updated the prediction for molecular hydrogen column density, taking into account variations in dust properties, and find it can explain the observed dust optical depth per unit gas column density. Thus, the low gas-to-dust ratios in the clouds are most likely due to “dark gas” that is molecular hydrogen.

  7. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, M.; Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Bianchi, S.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. With this aim, we have developed a new code, GRASH_Rev, that allows following the dynamics of dust grains in the shocked SN ejecta and computing the time evolution of the mass, composition, and size distribution of the grains. We considered four well-studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN 1987A, CasA, the Crab nebula, and N49. These sources have been observed with both Spitzer and Herschel, and the multiwavelength data allow a better assessment the mass of warm and cold dust associated with the ejecta. For each SN, we first identified the best explosion model, using the mass and metallicity of the progenitor star, the mass of 56Ni, the explosion energy, and the circumstellar medium density inferred from the data. We then ran a recently developed dust formation model to compute the properties of freshly formed dust. Starting from these input models, GRASH_Rev self-consistently follows the dynamics of the grains, considering the effects of the forward and reverse shock, and allows predicting the time evolution of the dust mass, composition, and size distribution in the shocked and unshocked regions of the ejecta. All the simulated models aagree well with observations. Our study suggests that SN 1987A is too young for the reverse shock to have affected the dust mass. Hence the observed dust mass of 0.7-0.9 M⊙ in this source can be safely considered as indicative of the mass of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta. Conversely, in the other three SNe, the reverse shock has already destroyed between 10-40% of the

  8. Quantifying Anthropogenic Dust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Pierre, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic land use and land cover change, including local environmental disturbances, moderate rates of wind-driven soil erosion and dust emission. These human-dust cycle interactions impact ecosystems and agricultural production, air quality, human health, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. While the impacts of land use activities and land management on aeolian processes can be profound, the interactions are often complex and assessments of anthropogenic dust loads at all scales remain highly uncertain. Here, we critically review the drivers of anthropogenic dust emission and current evaluation approaches. We then identify and describe opportunities to: (1) develop new conceptual frameworks and interdisciplinary approaches that draw on ecological state-and-transition models to improve the accuracy and relevance of assessments of anthropogenic dust emissions; (2) improve model fidelity and capacity for change detection to quantify anthropogenic impacts on aeolian processes; and (3) enhance field research and monitoring networks to support dust model applications to evaluate the impacts of disturbance processes on local to global-scale wind erosion and dust emissions.

  9. Excitation of collective plasma modes during collisions between dust grains and the formation of dust plasma crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goree, J.A.; Morfill, G.; Tsytovich, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    Dust plasma crystals have recently been produced in experiments in a number of laboratories. For dust crystallization to occur, there should exist an efficient mechanism for the cooling of the dust plasma component. It is shown that the excitation of collective plasma modes during collisions between the grains may serve as the required cooling mechanism. The excitation of dust sound waves is found to be most efficient. It is shown that the cooling of dust grains via the excitation of collective plasma modes can be even more efficient than that due to collisions with neutral particles, which was previously considered to be the only mechanism for cooling of the dust plasma component. At present, the first experiments are being carried out to study collisions between individual dust grains. High efficiency of the excitation of plasma modes caused by collisions between dust grains is attributed to the coherent displacement of the plasma particles that shield the grains. it is shown that the excitation efficiency is proportional to the fourth power of the charge of the dust grains and to a large power of their relative velocity, and is independent of their mass. The results obtained can be checked in experiments studying how the binary collisions between dust grains and the pressure of the neutral component influence the dust crystallization

  10. Non-monotonic spatial distribution of the interstellar dust in astrospheres: finite gyroradius effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Alexashov, D. B.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Gvaramadze, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution mid-infrared observations of astrospheres show that many of them have filamentary (cirrus-like) structure. Using numerical models of dust dynamics in astrospheres, we suggest that their filamentary structure might be related to specific spatial distribution of the interstellar dust around the stars, caused by a gyrorotation of charged dust grains in the interstellar magnetic field. Our numerical model describes the dust dynamics in astrospheres under an influence of the Lorentz force and assumption of a constant dust charge. Calculations are performed for the dust grains with different sizes separately. It is shown that non-monotonic spatial dust distribution (viewed as filaments) appears for dust grains with the period of gyromotion comparable with the characteristic time-scale of the dust motion in the astrosphere. Numerical modelling demonstrates that the number of filaments depends on charge-to-mass ratio of dust.

  11. Spirit Feels Dust Gust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    On sol 1149 (March 28, 2007) of its mission, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit caught a wind gust with its navigation camera. A series of navigation camera images were strung together to create this movie. The front of the gust is observable because it was strong enough to lift up dust. From assessing the trajectory of this gust, the atmospheric science team concludes that it is possible that it passed over the rover. There was, however, no noticeable increase in power associated with this gust. In the past, dust devils and gusts have wiped the solar panels of dust, making it easier for the solar panels to absorb sunlight.

  12. House dust mite control measures for asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite...... antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches Nov 2007), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in people with asthma known to be sensitive to house dust mites......), the standardised mean difference was 0.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10 to 0.10). There were no statistically significant differences either in number of patients improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardised mean difference -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0...

  13. Sinonasal inhalation of tobramycin vibrating aerosol in cystic fibrosis patients with upper airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainz, Jochen G; Schädlich, Katja; Schien, Claudia; Michl, Ruth; Schelhorn-Neise, Petra; Koitschev, Assen; Koitschev, Christiane; Keller, Peter M; Riethmüller, Joachim; Wiedemann, Baerbel; Beck, James F

    2014-01-01

    Rationale In cystic fibrosis (CF), the paranasal sinuses are sites of first and persistent colonization by pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pathogens subsequently descend to the lower airways, with P. aeruginosa remaining the primary cause of premature death in patients with the inherited disease. Unlike conventional aerosols, vibrating aerosols applied with the PARI Sinus™ nebulizer deposit drugs into the paranasal sinuses. This trial assessed the effects of vibrating sinonasal inhalation of the antibiotic tobramycin in CF patients positive for P. aeruginosa in nasal lavage. Objectives To evaluate the effects of sinonasal inhalation of tobramycin on P. aeruginosa quantification in nasal lavage; and on patient quality of life, measured with the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-20), and otologic and renal safety and tolerability. Methods Patients were randomized to inhalation of tobramycin (80 mg/2 mL) or placebo (2 mL isotonic saline) once daily (4 minutes/nostril) with the PARI Sinus™ nebulizer over 28 days, with all patients eligible for a subsequent course of open-label inhalation of tobramycin for 28 days. Nasal lavage was obtained before starting and 2 days after the end of each treatment period by rinsing each nostril with 10 mL of isotonic saline. Results Nine patients participated, six initially receiving tobramycin and three placebo. Sinonasal inhalation was well tolerated, with serum tobramycin <0.5 mg/L and stable creatinine. P. aeruginosa quantity decreased in four of six (67%) patients given tobramycin, compared with zero of three given placebo (non-significant). SNOT-20 scores were significantly lower in the tobramycin than in the placebo group (P=0.033). Conclusion Sinonasal inhalation of vibrating antibiotic aerosols appears promising for reducing pathogen colonization of paranasal sinuses and for control of symptoms in patients with CF. PMID:24596456

  14. The dissolution of natural and artificial dusts in glutamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zhang; Faqin, Dong; Xiaochun, He

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the characteristics of natural dusts, industrial dusts, and artificial dusts, such as mineral phases, chemical components, morphological observation and size. Quartz and calcite are the main phases of natural dusts and industrial dusts with high SiO2 and CaO and low K2O and Na2O in the chemical composition. The dissolution and electrochemical action of dusts in glutamic acid liquor at the simulated human body temperature (37 °C) in 32 h was investigated. The potential harm that the dust could lead to in body glutamic acid acidic environment, namely biological activity, is of great importance for revealing the human toxicological mechanism. The changes of pH values and electric conductivity of suspension of those dusts were similar, increased slowly in the first 8 h, and then the pH values increased rapidly. The total amount of dissolved ions of K, Ca, Na, and Mg was 35.4 to 429 mg/kg, particularly Ca was maximal of 20 to 334 mg/kg. The total amount of dissolved ions of Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Ba was 0.18 to 5.59 mg/kg and in Al and Si was 3.0 to 21.7 mg/kg. The relative solubility order of dusts in glutamic acid is wollastonite > serpentine > sepiolite, the cement plant industrial dusts > natural dusts > power plant industrial dusts. The wollastonite and cement plant industrial dusts have the highest solubility, which also have high content of CaO; this shows that there are a poorer corrosion-resisting ability and lower bio-resistibility. Sepiolite and power plant industrial dusts have lowest solubility, which also have high content of SiO2; this shows that there are a higher corrosion-resisting ability and stronger bio-resistibility.

  15. Long-term variability of dust-storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserová, Pavla; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Ólafur

    2013-04-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland are volcanic sandy deserts. Natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect not only regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze") but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean > 1000 km at times. The study places Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long term frequency of dust storm events in NE Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in NE Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the NE erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the NE deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust is not only a substantial source for regional air pollution, but may be considered to contribute to the Arctic haze phenomena and Arctic air pollution.

  16. The Dust Management Project: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting longterm operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, approach, accomplishments, summary of deliverables, and lessons learned are presented.

  17. Carbonaceous Components in the Comet Halley Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary grains containing large amounts of carbon and/or organic matter (CHON) were discovered by in situ measurements of comet Halley dust composition during VEGA and GIOTTO flyby missions. In this paper, we report the classification of these cometary, grains by means of cluster analysis, discuss the resulting compositional groups, and compare them with substances observed or hypothesized in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and the interstellar medium. Grains dominated by carbon and/or organic matter (CHON grains) represent approx. 22% of the total population of measured cometary dust particles. They, usually contain a minor abundance of rock-forming elements as well. Grains having organic material are relatively more abundant in the vicinity of the nucleus than in the outer regions of the coma, which suggests decomposition of the organics in the coma environment. The majority of comet Halley organic particles are multicomponent mixtures of carbon phases and organic compounds. Possibly, the cometary CHON grains may be related to kerogen material of an interstellar origin in carbonaceous meteorites. Pure carbon grains, hydrocarbons and polymers of cyanopolyynes, and multi-carbon monoxides are present in cometary dust as compositionally simple and distinctive components among a variety of others. There is no clear evidence of significant presence of pure formaldehyde or HCN polymers in Halley dust particles. The diversity of types of cometary organic compounds is consistent with the inter-stellar dust model of comets and probably reflects differences in composition of precursor dust. Preservation of this heterogeneity among submicron particles suggest the gentle formation of cometary, nucleus by aggregation of interstellar dust in the protosolar nebula without complete mixing or chemical homogenization at the submicron level.

  18. Galactic dust and extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyngaa, G.

    1979-01-01

    The ratio R between visual extinction and colour excess, is slightly larger than 3 and does not vary much throughout our part of the Galaxy. The distribution of dust in the galactic plane shows, on the large scale, a gradient with higher colour excesses towards l=50 0 than towards l=230 0 . On the smaller scale, much of the dust responsible for extinction is situated in clouds which tend to group together. The correlation between positions of interstellar dust clouds and positions of spiral tracers seems rather poor in our Galaxy. However, concentrated dark clouds as well as extended regions of dust show an inclined distribution similar to the Gould belt of bright stars. (Auth.)

  19. Radioisotope dust pollution monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepke, R.; Harasimczuk, J.; Dobrowiecki, J.

    1990-01-01

    Measuring principles and specification of two dust monitors: station-type AMIZ and portable-type PIK-10 for ambient air pollution are presented. The first one, a fully automatic instrument is destined for permanent monitoring of air pollution in preset sampling time from .25 to 24 hours. The second one was developed as a portable working model. Both instruments display their results in digital form in dust concentration units. (author)

  20. Coal dust symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    This paper gives a report of the paper presented at the symposium held in Hanover on 9 and 10 February 1981. The topics include: the behaviour of dust and coal dust on combustion and explosion; a report on the accidents which occurred at the Laegerdorf cement works' coal crushing and drying plant; current safety requirements at coal crushing and drying plant; and coal crushing and drying. Four papers are individually abstracted. (In German)

  1. Dust devil generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G Onishchenko, O; A Pokhotelov, O; Horton, W; Stenflo, L

    2014-01-01

    The equations describing axi-symmetric nonlinear internal gravity waves in an unstable atmosphere are derived. A hydrodynamic model of a dust devil generation mechanism in such an atmosphere is investigated. It is shown that in an unstably stratified atmosphere the convective plumes with poloidal motion can grow exponentially. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that these convective plumes in an atmosphere with weak large scale toroidal motion are unstable with respect to three-dimensional dust devil generation. (papers)

  2. The concentrations of phthalates in settled dust in Bulgarian homes in relation to building characteristic and cleaning habits in the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Naydenov, Kiril Georgiev

    2008-01-01

    . Dust samples from the child's bedroom were collected in 177 homes and analysed for the content of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP) and DEHP. Information on building characteristics and family...... spectra, and wood flooring. However, in a sub-group of homes with no use of polish, the concentration of DEHP was higher in homes with inspector-observed balatum compared with wood flooring but the difference was not significant may be due to a too small sample size....

  3. Mineralogy of dust deposited during the Harmattan season in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Changling; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Awadzi, Theodore W.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean. In this project, we studied samples of dust and topsoils in various agroecological zones, from the north to the south of Ghana, focussing mainly on the mineralogy of these materials. Some data about grain sizes and morphology of the samples are also presented. Feldspars, together with quartz......In Ghana, a dust-laden Harmattan wind blows from the Sahara in the period November to March. Some of the dust is trapped in the vegetation, in lakes and other inland waters, and a little on the bare land, whereas the rest of the dust is blown further away to the Ivory Coast or out into the Atlantic......, are the common minerals found in Harmattan dust, but the relative contents of K-feldspars and plagioclase vary markedly in the different zones. This variation is consistent with changes in the relative content of the feldspars in the topsoil, indicating a substantial local contribution to the Harmattan dust...

  4. Dust acoustic waves in a dc glow-discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, V.I.; Nefedov, A.P.; Torchinskii, V.M.; Fortov, V.E.; Khrapak, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    The spontaneous excitation of low-frequency oscillations of the macroparticle density in ordered dust structures levitating in standing striations of a dc glow discharge is discovered. It is concluded on the basis of a simplified linear model of an ideal collisionless plasma that the observed instability is caused by the drift motion of ions relative to the dust, which leads to the excitation of dust acoustic oscillations of the plasma

  5. Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 C and 2.0 kPa O 2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O 2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil(trademark) particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ∼ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure--possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O 2 . This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ∼ 0.03-0.04) of the flakes

  6. Thermo-oxidation of tokamak carbon dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Fitzpatrick, B.W.N.; Sharpe, J.P.; Haasz, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 deg. C and 2.0 kPa O 2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O 2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil TM particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ∼18% mass loss after 8 h; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure - possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped from DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 h exposure to O 2 . The oxidation of these flakes was much slower than that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces. This is thought to be related to structural differences.

  7. Modeling Respiratory Toxicity of Authentic Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Patricia A.; James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing

    2010-01-01

    The lunar expeditions of the Apollo operations from the 60 s and early 70 s have generated awareness about lunar dust exposures and their implication towards future lunar explorations. Critical analyses on the reports from the Apollo crew members suggest that lunar dust is a mild respiratory and ocular irritant. Currently, NASA s space toxicology group is functioning with the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to investigate and examine toxic effects to the respiratory system of rats in order to establish permissible exposure levels (PELs) for human exposure to lunar dust. In collaboration with the space toxicology group, LADTAG and NIOSH the goal of the present research is to analyze dose-response curves from rat exposures seven and twenty-eight days after intrapharyngeal instillations, and model the response using BenchMark Dose Software (BMDS) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Via this analysis, the relative toxicities of three types of Apollo 14 lunar dust samples and two control dust samples, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quartz will be determined. This will be executed for several toxicity endpoints such as cell counts and biochemical markers in bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from the rats.

  8. Application of Principal Component Analysis in Assessment of Relation Between the Parameters of Technological Quality of Wheat Grains Treated with Inert Dusts Against Rice Weevil (Sitophilus oryzae L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Bodroža-Solarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality parameters of several wheat grain lots (low vitreous and high vitreous grains,non-infested and infested with rice weevils, (Sitophilus oryzae L. treated with inert dusts(natural zeolite, two diatomaceous earths originating from Serbia and a commercial productProtect-It® were investigated. Principal component analysis (PCA was used to investigatethe classification of treated grain lots and to assess how attributes of technological qualitycontribute to this classification. This research showed that vitreousness (0.95 and test weight(0.93 contributed most to the first principal component whereas extensigraph area (-0.76contributed to the second component. The determined accountability of the total variabilityby the first component was around 55%, while with the second it was 18%, which meansthat those two dimensions together account for around 70% of total variability of the observedset of variables. Principal component analysis (PCA of data set was able to distinguishamong the various treatments of wheat lots. It was revealed that inert dust treatments producedifferent effects depending on the degree of endosperm vitreousness.

  9. Assessment of respirable dust exposures in an opencast coal mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, M; Yigit, E

    2009-05-01

    All major opencast mining activities produce dust. The major operations that produce dust are drilling, blasting, loading, unloading, and transporting. Dust not only deteriorates the environmental air quality in and around the mining site but also creates serious health hazards. Therefore, assessment of dust levels that arise from various opencast mining operations is required to prevent and minimize the health risks. To achieve this objective, an opencast coal mining area was selected to generate site-specific emission data and collect respirable dust measurement samples. The study covered various mining activities in different locations including overburden loading, stock yard, coal loading, drilling, and coal handling plant. The dust levels were examined to assess miners' exposure to respirable dust in each of the opencast mining areas from 1994 to 2005. The data obtained from the dust measurement studies were evaluated by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer procedure. The analyses were performed by using Minitab 14 statistical software. It was concluded that, drilling operations produce higher dust concentration levels and thus, drill operators may have higher incidence of respiratory disorders related to exposure to dust in their work environment.

  10. Maintaining the Background Dust Opacity During Northern Hemisphere Summer Mars Using Wind Stress Based Dust Lifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V.; Kahre, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Mars atmosphere has low levels of dust during Northern Hemisphere (NH) spring and summer (the non-dusty season) and increased levels during NH autumn and winter (the dusty season). In the absence of regional or global storms, dust devils and local storms maintain a background minimum dust loading during the non-dusty season. While observational surveys and Global Climate Model (GCM) studies suggest that dust devils are likely to be major contributors to the background haze during NH spring and summer, a complete understanding of the relative contribution of dust devils and local dust storms has not yet been achieved. We present preliminary results from an investigation that focuses on the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on dust lifting processes during these seasons. Water ice clouds are known to affect atmospheric temperatures directly by absorption and emission of thermal infrared radiation and indirectly through dynamical feedbacks. Our goal is to understand how clouds affect the contribution by local (wind stress) dust storms to the background dust haze during NH spring and summer. The primary tool for this work is the NASA Ames Mars GCM, which contains physical parameterizations for a fully interactive dust cycle. Three simulations that included wind stress dust lifting were executed for a period of 5 Martian years: a case that included no cloud formation, a case that included radiatively inert cloud formation and a case that included radiatively active cloud (RAC) formation. Results show that when radiatively active clouds are included, the clouds in the aphelion cloud belt radiatively heat the atmosphere aloft in the tropics (Figure 1). This heating produces a stronger overturning circulation, which in turn produces an enhanced low-level flow in the Hadley cell return branch. The stronger low-level flow drives higher surface stresses and increased dust lifting in those locations. We examine how realistic these simulated results are by

  11. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.; Peng, R. D.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ye, M. F.; Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  12. Short-term variability of mineral dust, metals and carbon emission from road dust resuspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Fulvio; Schaap, Martijn; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Pandolfi, Marco; Alastuey, Andrés; Keuken, Menno; Querol, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities has severe impact on morbidity and mortality of their population. In these cities, road dust resuspension contributes largely to PM and airborne heavy metals concentrations. However, the short-term variation of emission through resuspension is not well described in the air quality models, hampering a reliable description of air pollution and related health effects. In this study we experimentally show that the emission strength of resuspension varies widely among road dust components/sources. Our results offer the first experimental evidence of different emission rates for mineral dust, heavy metals and carbon fractions due to traffic-induced resuspension. Also, the same component (or source) recovers differently in a road in Barcelona (Spain) and a road in Utrecht (The Netherlands). This finding has important implications on atmospheric pollution modelling, mostly for mineral dust, heavy metals and carbon species. After rain events, recoveries were generally faster in Barcelona rather than in Utrecht. The largest difference was found for the mineral dust (Al, Si, Ca). Tyre wear particles (organic carbon and zinc) recovered faster than other road dust particles in both cities. The source apportionment of road dust mass provides useful information for air quality management.

  13. Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis in a South African pottery. 1. Study objectives and dust exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D; Cronje, R; du Toit, R S

    1992-07-01

    Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis were investigated in a South African pottery that manufactured wall tiles and bathroom fittings. This paper describes the objectives of the investigation and presents dust measurement data. x Ray diffraction showed that the clays used by the pottery had a high quartz content (range 58%-23%, mean 38%). Exposure to respirable dust was measured for 43 workers and was highest (6.6 mg/m3) in a bathroom fitting fettler. Quartz concentrations in excess of 0.1 mg/m3 were found in all sections of the manufacturing process from slip production to biscuit firing and sorting. The proportion of quartz in the respirable dust of these sections was 24% to 33%. This is higher than is usually reported in English potteries. Four hundred and six (80%) of the 509 workers employed at the pottery were potentially at risk of occupational lung disease. The finding of large numbers of pottery workers exposed to unacceptable dust concentrations is not surprising as poor dust control was found in all six wall tile and sanitary ware factories surveyed by the National Centre for Occupational Health between 1973 and 1989. Dust related occupational disease can be expected in potters for many years to come.

  14. Acute symptoms following exposure to grain dust in farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, J; Holford-Strevens, V; Cheang, M; Warren, C P

    1986-01-01

    History of acute symptoms (cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, fever, stuffy nose, and skin itching/rash) following exposure to grain dust was obtained from 661 male and 535 female current and former farmers. These symptoms were relatively common: 60% of male and 25% of female farmers reported at least one such symptom on exposure to grain dust. Association of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and stuffy nose with skin reactivity and capacity to form IgE is consistent with an allergic nature of these symptoms. Barley and oats dust were perceived as dust most often producing symptoms. On the other hand, grain fever showed a different pattern, i.e., it was not associated with either skin reactivity or total IgE. Smoking might modify the susceptibility to react to grain dust with symptoms. Only those who reported wheezing on exposure to grain dust may have an increased risk to develop chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:3709486

  15. Sahara Dust Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Particles Click on the image for Quicktime movie from 7/15-7/24 A continent-sized cloud of hot air and dust originating from the Sahara Desert crossed the Atlantic Ocean and headed towards Florida and the Caribbean. A Saharan Air Layer, or SAL, forms when dry air and dust rise from Africa's west coast and ride the trade winds above the Atlantic Ocean. These dust clouds are not uncommon, especially during the months of July and August. They start when weather patterns called tropical waves pick up dust from the desert in North Africa, carry it a couple of miles into the atmosphere and drift westward. In a sequence of images created by data acquired by the Earth-orbiting Atmospheric Infrared Sounder ranging from July 15 through July 24, we see the distribution of the cloud in the atmosphere as it swirls off of Africa and heads across the ocean to the west. Using the unique silicate spectral signatures of dust in the thermal infrared, AIRS can detect the presence of dust in the atmosphere day or night. This detection works best if there are no clouds present on top of the dust; when clouds are present, they can interfere with the signal, making it much harder to detect dust as in the case of July 24, 2005. In the Quicktime movie, the scale at the bottom of the images shows +1 for dust definitely detected, and ranges down to -1 for no dust detected. The plots are averaged over a number of AIRS observations falling within grid boxes, and so it is possible to obtain fractional numbers. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Total Water Vapor in the Atmosphere Around the Dust Cloud Click on the image for Quicktime movie The dust cloud is contained within a dry adiabatic layer which originates over the Sahara Desert. This Saharan Air Layer (SAL) advances Westward over the Atlantic Ocean, overriding the cool, moist air nearer the surface. This burst of very dry air is visible in the AIRS retrieved total water

  16. Comparison of sinonasal quality of life and health status in patients undergoing microscopic and endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary lesions: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Andrew S; Kelly, Daniel F; Milligan, John; Griffiths, Chester; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo L; Rosseau, Gail; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Jahnke, Heidi; Chaloner, Charlene; Jelinek, Kathryn L; Chapple, Kristina; White, William L

    2015-09-01

    Despite the widespread adoption of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas, the sinonasal quality of life (QOL) and health status in patients who have undergone this technique have not been compared with these findings in patients who have undergone the traditional direct uninostril microsurgical technique. In this study, the authors compared the sinonasal QOL and patient-reported health status after use of these 2 surgical techniques. The study design was a nonblinded prospective cohort study. Adult patients with sellar pathology and planned transsphenoidal surgery were screened at 4 pituitary centers in the US between October 2011 and August 2013. The primary end point of the study was postoperative patient-reported sinonasal QOL as measured by the Anterior Skull Base Nasal Inventory-12 (ASK Nasal-12). Supplementary end points included patient-reported health status estimated by the 8-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-8) and EuroQol (EQ)-5D-5L instruments, and sinonasal complications. Patients were followed for 6 months after surgery. A total of 301 patients were screened and 235 were enrolled in the study. Of these, 218 were analyzed (111 microsurgery patients, 107 endoscopic surgery patients). Demographic and tumor characteristics were similar between groups (p ≥ 0.12 for all comparisons). The most common complication in both groups was sinusitis (7% in the microsurgery group, 13% in the endoscopic surgery group; p = 0.15). Patients treated with the endoscopic technique were more likely to have postoperative nasal debridements (p surgery, but then returned to baseline at 3 months. At 3 months after surgery, patients treated with endoscopy reported statistically better sinonasal QOL compared with patients treated using the microscopic technique (p = 0.02), but there were no significant differences at any of the other postoperative time points. This is the first multicenter study to examine the effect of the transsphenoidal surgical technique

  17. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  18. Comparison of endoscopic and open resection of sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma: a propensity score-matched analysis of 652 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Suat; Kılıç, Sarah S; Baredes, Soly; Chan Woo Park, Richard; Mahmoud, Omar; Suh, Jeffrey D; Gray, Stacey T; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2018-03-01

    The use of endoscopic resection as an alternative to open surgery for sinonasal malignancies has increased in the past 20 years. The National Cancer Database was queried for cases of sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma (SNSCC) without cervical or distant metastases that were treated surgically between 2010 and 2014. They were split into 2 groups based on surgical approach: open or endoscopic. Demographics, facility and insurance type, stage, tumor characteristics, postoperative treatment, 30-day readmission rate, 30- and 90-day mortality, and overall survival (OS) were compared between the 2 groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to mimic a randomized, controlled trial. A total of 1,483 patients were identified: 353 (23.8%) received endoscopic and 1130 (76.2%) received open surgery. Age, gender, race, geographic region, tumor size, surgical margins, postoperative chemoradiation, and 30-day readmissions did not vary significantly between the 2 groups. Open surgery was more common in academic centers (62.8% vs 54.2%; p = 0.004), less common for tumors of the ethmoid and sphenoid sinus (p open: 5Y-OS, 56.5%; 95% confidence interval, 51.3% to 61.6%; endoscopic: 5Y-OS, 46.0%; 95% confidence interval, 33.2% to 58.8%). In the PSM cohort of 652 patients, there was also no significant difference in OS (p = 0.850). Endoscopic surgery is an effective alternative to open surgery, even after accounting for confounding factors that may favor its use over the open approach. It is also associated with a shorter hospital stay. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  19. Characteristics of mineral dust impacting the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; McQueen, Kenneth G.; Mirnejad, Hassan

    2018-02-01

    It is generally assumed that severe dust events in western Iran could be responsible for elevated levels of toxic and radioactive elements in the region. Over a period of 5 months, from January 2012 to May 2012, dust particles in the size range PM10 (i.e. chemical compositions of dust and aerosol samples collected during the non-dusty periods and during two severe dust events. Results of ICP-MS analysis of components indicate that during dust events the concentrations of major elements such as Ca, Mg, Al and K increase relative to ambient conditions when Fe and trace elements such as Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn are in higher proportions. Toxic trace elements that are generally ascribed to human activities, including industrial and urban pollution, are thus proportionately more abundant in the dust under calm conditions than during dust events, when their concentration is diluted by more abundant mineral particles of quartz, calcite and clay. The variability of chemical species during two dust events, noted by tracking the dust plumes in satellite images, was also assessed and the results relate to two different source areas, namely northern Iraq and northwestern Syria.

  20. Interstellar and ejecta dust in the cas a supernova remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Richard G. [CRESST, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Hwang, Una, E-mail: Richard.G.Arendt@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ∼9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is ≲ 0.1 M {sub ☉}. The mass of warmer dust is only ∼0.04 M {sub ☉}.

  1. 'Nuisance Dust' - a Case for Recalibration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datson, Hugh; Marker, Brian

    2013-04-01

    time). 'Custom and practice' acceptance criteria for dust samples obtained by mass or soiling techniques have been developed and are widely applied even though they were not necessarily calibrated thoroughly and have not been reviewed recently. Furthermore, as sampling techniques have evolved, criteria developed for one method have been adapted for another. Criteria and limit values have sometimes been based on an insufficient knowledge of sampler characteristics. Ideally, limit values should be calibrated for the locality to take differences in dust density and visibility into account. Work is needed on the definition of criteria and limit values, and sampling practices for coarse dust fractions, followed by discussion of good practices for securing effective monitoring that is proportionate and fit for purpose. With social changes and the evolution of environmental controls since the 1960s, the public perception of 'nuisance dust' has changed and needs to be addressed by reviewing existing thresholds in relation to the range of monitoring devices currently in use.

  2. Dust in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, S.

    1980-01-01

    A two-component dust model is suggested to explain the infrared emission from planetary nebulae. A cold dust component located in the extensive remnant of the red-giant envelope exterior to the visible nebula is responsible for the far-infrared emission. A ward dust component, which is condensed after the formation of the planetary nebula and confined within the ionized gas shell, emits most of the near- and mid-infrared radiation. The observations of NGC 7027 are shown to be consisten with such a model. The correlation of silicate emission in several planetary nebulae with an approximately +1 spectral index at low radio frequencies suggests that both the silicate and radio emissions originate from the remnant of the circumstellar envelope of th precursor star and are observable only while the planetary nebula is young. It is argued that oxygen-rich stars as well as carbon-rich stars can be progenitors of planetary nebulae

  3. Interstellar dust and extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    It is noted that the term interstellar dust refers to materials with rather different properties, and that the mean extinction law of Seaton (1979) or Savage and Mathis (1979) should be replaced by the expression given by Cardelli et al. (1989), using the appropriate value of total-to-selective extinction. The older laws were appropriate for the diffuse ISM but dust in clouds differs dramatically in its extinction law. Dust is heavily processed while in the ISM by being included within clouds and cycled back into the diffuse ISM many times during its lifetime. Hence, grains probably reflect only a trace of their origin, although meteoritic inclusions with isotopic anomalies demonstrate that some tiny particles survive intact from a supernova origin to the present. 186 refs

  4. Dust control for draglines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grad, P.

    2009-09-15

    Monitoring dust levels inside draglines reveals room for improvement in how filtration systems are used and maintained. The Australian firm BMT conducted a field test program to measure airflow parameters, dust fallout rates and dust concentrations, inside and outside the machine house, on four draglines and one shovel. The study involved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The article describes how the tests were made and gives results. It was not possible to say which of the two main filtration systems currently used on Australian draglines - Dynavane or Floseps - performs better. It would appear that more frequent maintenance and cleaning would increase the overall filtration performance and systems could be susceptible to repeat clogging in a short time. 2 figs., 1 photos.

  5. DustEM: Dust extinction and emission modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compiègne, M.; Verstraete, L.; Jones, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Boulanger, F.; Flagey, N.; Le Bourlot, J.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.

    2013-07-01

    DustEM computes the extinction and the emission of interstellar dust grains heated by photons. It is written in Fortran 95 and is jointly developed by IAS and CESR. The dust emission is calculated in the optically thin limit (no radiative transfer) and the default spectral range is 40 to 108 nm. The code is designed so dust properties can easily be changed and mixed and to allow for the inclusion of new grain physics.

  6. Adaptasi Budaya, Alih Bahasa Indonesia, dan Validasi Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichsan Juliansyah Juanda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Kuesioner untuk menilai kualitas hidup saat ini semakin meningkat penggunaannya dalam penelitian klinis hasil intervensi medis, baik operatif maupun medikamentosa. SNOT-22 dianggap sebagai alat ukur yang paling sesuai untuk menilai kualitas hidup pasien rinosinusitis kronik.Tujuan penelitian ini melakukan adaptasi budaya, alih bahasa, dan validasi SNOT-22 ke dalam bahasa Indonesia. Penelitian deskriptif analitik potong lintang pada 50 pasien rinosinusitis kronik di Poliklinik Rinologi Alergi Departemen Ilmu Kesehatan Telinga Hidung dan Tenggorok Bedah Kepala dan Leher (THT-KL Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Padjadjaran/Rumah Sakit Dr. Hasan Sadikin Bandung periode November 2015–Februari 2016. Diagnosis berdasar atas anamnesis, tingkat berat penyakit, nasoendoskopi berdasa Lund-Kennedy, dan penilaian kualitas hidup dengan SNOT-22. Validasi kuesioner dalam bahasa Indonesia dilakukan dengan menerjemahkan kuesioner SNOT-22 versi bahasa Inggris ke bahasa Indonesia oleh ahli bahasa Indonesia dan diterjemahkan kembali ke bahasa Inggris oleh ahli bahasa Inggris. Dilakukan uji reabilitas menggunakan Cronbach’s alpha dan uji validitas menggunakan Rank Spearman’s. Uji Cronbach’s alpha =0,936 (sangat andal, andal jika ≥0,7 menunjukkan konsistensi yang baik. Uji Rank Spearman’s: rs=0,961 dan rs=0,978 (valid; dan keandalan (korelasi skor genap dengan skor ganjil rs=0,900. Simpulan, hasil uji statistik menunjukkan bahwa kuesioner SNOT-22 versi bahasa Indonesia merupakan alat ukur yang valid dengan konsistensi yang baik untuk menilai kualitas hidup pasien dengan rinosinusitis kronik.  Kata kunci: Bahasa Indonesia, kualitas hidup, rinosinusitis kronik, SNOT-22, validasi Indonesian Cross-cultural Adaptation,  Translation, and Validation of Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22 Questionnaires for quality of life (QoL have been increasingly used in clinical trials to evaluate the impact of medical and surgical procedures. Among these, SNOT-22 was

  7. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawardena, Janaka, E-mail: j.gunawardena@qut.edu.au; Ziyath, Abdul M., E-mail: mohamed.ziyath@qut.edu.au; Bostrom, Thor E., E-mail: t.bostrom@qut.edu.au; Bekessy, Lambert K., E-mail: l.bekessy@qut.edu.au; Ayoko, Godwin A., E-mail: g.ayoko@qut.edu.au; Egodawatta, Prasanna, E-mail: p.egodawatta@qut.edu.au; Goonetilleke, Ashantha, E-mail: a.goonetilleke@qut.edu.au

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. - Highlights: • The dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to pollutant build-up. • The dust storm increased TSS, Al, Fe and Mn loads in build-up on ground surfaces. • Dust storm did not significantly increase TOC, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd loads in build-up. • Cr and Zn in dust storm deposition were contributed by local anthropogenic sources.

  8. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M.; Bostrom, Thor E.; Bekessy, Lambert K.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. - Highlights: • The dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to pollutant build-up. • The dust storm increased TSS, Al, Fe and Mn loads in build-up on ground surfaces. • Dust storm did not significantly increase TOC, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd loads in build-up. • Cr and Zn in dust storm deposition were contributed by local anthropogenic sources

  9. Urban particle size distributions during two contrasting dust events originating from Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye; Xia, Dunsheng; Yin, Daiying; He, Jianjun; Liu, Na; Li, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The dust origins of the two events were identified using HYSPLIT trajectory model and MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data to understand the particle size distribution during two contrasting dust events originated from Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. The supermicron particles significantly increased during the dust events. The dust event from Gobi desert affected significantly on the particles larger than 2.5 μm, while that from Taklimakan desert impacted obviously on the particles in 1.0–2.5 μm. It is found that the particle size distributions and their modal parameters such as VMD (volume median diameter) have significant difference for varying dust origins. The dust from Taklimakan desert was finer than that from Gobi desert also probably due to other influencing factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions. Our findings illustrated the capacity of combining in situ, satellite data and trajectory model to characterize large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters. - Highlights: • Dust particle size distributions had large differences for varying origins. • Dust originating from Taklimakan Desert was finer than that from Gobi Desert. • Effect of dust on the supermicron particles was obvious. • PM_1_0 concentrations increased by a factor of 3.4–25.6 during the dust event. - Dust particle size distributions had large differences for varying origins, which may be also related to other factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions.

  10. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  11. Effect of industrial dust on some test organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of industrial dust on the growth of Lepidium sativum Cress and on spore germination and germ-tube development of Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum was studied. Lepidium sativum was strongly inhibited and in most cases the fungi were stimulated. The effect was related to the species of trees and the district, where the dust-samples were collected.

  12. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.H. Skinner; A. Campos; H. Kugel; J. Leisure; A.L. Roquemore; S. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 (micro)m spacing is biased to 30-50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm 2 with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations

  13. Reducing dust and allergen exposure in bakeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard J Mason

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bakers have a continuing high incidence of occupational allergic asthma. In factory bakeries they are exposed not only to flour dust containing allergens, but also improvers whose ingredients enhance the strength and workability of the dough and its speed of rising. Improvers are flour-based but can contain added soya, fungal or bacterial enzymes that are also allergenic, as well as vegetable oil, calcium sulphate/silicate and organic esters. This study investigated the dustiness of the components used in factory bakeries and whether altering improver ingredients could reduce dust and allergen exposure. A standardised rotating drum test was employed on the individual components, as well as a representative improver and three practicable improver modifications by decreasing calcium sulphate, calcium silicate or increasing oil content. Levels of dust, the allergens wheat flour amylase inhibitor (WAAI and soya trypsin inhibitor (STI were measured in the generated inhalable, thoracic and respirable sized fractions. A “scooping and pouring” workplace simulation was also performed. Initial tests showed that dustiness of several wheat flours was relatively low, and even lower for soya flour, but increased in combination with some other improver components. All three improver modifications generally reduced levels of dust, STI and WAAI, but increasing oil content significantly decreased dust and STI in comparison to the standard improver and those improvers with reduced calcium silicate or sulphate. The simulation demonstrated that increased oil content reduced inhalable levels of gravimetric dust, STI and WAAI. Changing improver formulation, such as increasing oil content of flour by a small amount, may represent a simple, practical method of reducing bakery workers’ exposure to dust and allergens where improvers are used. It may be a useful adjunct to engineering control, changes to work practices and appropriate training in reducing the risk to

  14. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DUST IN GALAXIES: METHODS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the redshift (z) evolution of dust mass and abundance, their dependences on initial conditions of galaxy formation, and physical correlations between dust, gas, and stellar contents at different z based on our original chemodynamical simulations of galaxy formation with dust growth and destruction. In this preliminary investigation, we first determine the reasonable ranges of the most important two parameters for dust evolution, i.e., the timescales of dust growth and destruction, by comparing the observed and simulated dust mass and abundances and molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) content of the Galaxy. We then investigate the z-evolution of dust-to-gas ratios (D), H 2 gas fraction (f H 2 ), and gas-phase chemical abundances (e.g., A O = 12 + log (O/H)) in the simulated disk and dwarf galaxies. The principal results are as follows. Both D and f H 2 can rapidly increase during the early dissipative formation of galactic disks (z ∼ 2-3), and the z-evolution of these depends on initial mass densities, spin parameters, and masses of galaxies. The observed A O -D relation can be qualitatively reproduced, but the simulated dispersion of D at a given A O is smaller. The simulated galaxies with larger total dust masses show larger H 2 and stellar masses and higher f H 2 . Disk galaxies show negative radial gradients of D and the gradients are steeper for more massive galaxies. The observed evolution of dust masses and dust-to-stellar-mass ratios between z = 0 and 0.4 cannot be reproduced so well by the simulated disks. Very extended dusty gaseous halos can be formed during hierarchical buildup of disk galaxies. Dust-to-metal ratios (i.e., dust-depletion levels) are different within a single galaxy and between different galaxies at different z

  15. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DUST IN GALAXIES: METHODS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the redshift (z) evolution of dust mass and abundance, their dependences on initial conditions of galaxy formation, and physical correlations between dust, gas, and stellar contents at different z based on our original chemodynamical simulations of galaxy formation with dust growth and destruction. In this preliminary investigation, we first determine the reasonable ranges of the most important two parameters for dust evolution, i.e., the timescales of dust growth and destruction, by comparing the observed and simulated dust mass and abundances and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) content of the Galaxy. We then investigate the z-evolution of dust-to-gas ratios (D), H{sub 2} gas fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}), and gas-phase chemical abundances (e.g., A {sub O} = 12 + log (O/H)) in the simulated disk and dwarf galaxies. The principal results are as follows. Both D and f{sub H{sub 2}} can rapidly increase during the early dissipative formation of galactic disks (z ∼ 2-3), and the z-evolution of these depends on initial mass densities, spin parameters, and masses of galaxies. The observed A {sub O}-D relation can be qualitatively reproduced, but the simulated dispersion of D at a given A {sub O} is smaller. The simulated galaxies with larger total dust masses show larger H{sub 2} and stellar masses and higher f{sub H{sub 2}}. Disk galaxies show negative radial gradients of D and the gradients are steeper for more massive galaxies. The observed evolution of dust masses and dust-to-stellar-mass ratios between z = 0 and 0.4 cannot be reproduced so well by the simulated disks. Very extended dusty gaseous halos can be formed during hierarchical buildup of disk galaxies. Dust-to-metal ratios (i.e., dust-depletion levels) are different within a single galaxy and between different galaxies at different z.

  16. Control of harmful dust in coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, B; Bower, K; Mitchell, D

    1973-01-01

    This handbook consists of a series of short chapters devoted to: sources of airborne dust; dust standards and methods of sampling; dust prevention on mechanized faces; ventilation and dust extraction; distribution and use of water; dust control on mechanized faces; dust control in drivages and headings; drilling and shotfiring; dust control in transport; some outbye dust control techniques (hygroscopic salts, impingement curtains); water infusion; personal protective equipment. (CIS Abstr.)

  17. Dust evolution in protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez , Jean-François; Fouchet , Laure; T. Maddison , Sarah; Laibe , Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    6 pages, 5 figures, to appear in the Proceedings of IAU Symp. 249: Exoplanets: Detection, Formation and Dynamics (Suzhou, China); International audience; We investigate the behaviour of dust in protoplanetary disks under the action of gas drag using our 3D, two-fluid (gas+dust) SPH code. We present the evolution of the dust spatial distribution in global simulations of planetless disks as well as of disks containing an already formed planet. The resulting dust structures vary strongly with pa...

  18. Respirable versus inhalable dust sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    1987-01-01

    The ICRP uses a total inhalable dust figure as the basis of calculations on employee lung dose. This paper was written to look at one aspect of the Olympic Dam dust situation, namely, the inhalable versus respirable fraction of the dust cloud. The results of this study will determine whether it is possible to use respirable dust figures, as obtained during routine monitoring to help in the calculations of employee exposure to internal radioactive contaminants

  19. The Dust Management Project: Characterizing Lunar Environments and Dust, Developing Regolith Mitigation Technology and Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2010-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth?s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting long-term operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it?s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, plans, and accomplishments will be presented.

  20. Surface Winds and Dust Biases in Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, A. T.

    2018-01-01

    An analysis of North African dust from models participating in the Fifth Climate Models Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) suggested that, when forced by observed sea surface temperatures, these models were unable to reproduce any aspects of the observed year-to-year variability in dust from North Africa. Consequently, there would be little reason to have confidence in the models' projections of changes in dust over the 21st century. However, no subsequent study has elucidated the root causes of the disagreement between CMIP5 and observed dust. Here I develop an idealized model of dust emission and then use this model to show that, over North Africa, such biases in CMIP5 models are due to errors in the surface wind fields and not due to the representation of dust emission processes. These results also suggest that because the surface wind field over North Africa is highly spatially autocorrelated, intermodel differences in the spatial structure of dust emission have little effect on the relative change in year-to-year dust emission over the continent. I use these results to show that similar biases in North African dust from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) version 2 surface wind field biases but that these wind biases were not present in the first version of MERRA.

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal inverted papilloma with or without coexistent malignancy: comparison with MR imaging findings in eight patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Jeon, Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha; Byun, Hong Sik; Choi, Joon Young

    2009-01-01

    Sinonasal inverted papilloma (IP) is known for high rate of associated malignancy. The purpose of this study was to identify 18 F-FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal IPs. We also tried to compare the PET/CT findings with the MR imaging findings. We retrospectively reviewed PET/CT and MR images of eight patients with sinonasal IP with (n = 6) or without (n = 2) coexistent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Particular attention was paid to correlate the PET/CT findings with the MR imaging findings in terms of area distribution of standard uptake values (SUVs) and a convoluted cerebriform pattern (CCP). In two benign IPs, the maximum SUVs measured 8.2 and 7.8, respectively (mean, 8.0). In both tumors, MR images demonstrated a diffuse CCP. In six IPs with coexistent SCC, the maximum SUVs ranged from 13.3 to 31.9 (mean ± SD, 20.2 ± 6.6). In these tumors, MR images demonstrated a diffuse CCP in two, a partial CCP in three, and no CCP in one. A wide discrepancy was noted between MR imaging and PET/CT in terms of area distribution of a CCP and SUVs. In sinonasal lesions with MR imaging features of IP, 18 F-FDG PET/CT demonstrating avid FDG uptake does not necessarily imply the presence of coexistent malignancy. In our small series, although IPs containing foci of SCC had consistently higher SUVs than IPs without SCC, the limited literature on this subject suggests that PET cannot be used reliably to make the distinction. (orig.)

  2. Numerical investigation of dust pollution on a solar photovoltaic (PV) system mounted on an isolated building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hao; Lu, Lin; Wang, Yuanhao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of dust pollution on PV panels mounted on building roofs were investigated by CFD. • The dust deposition rates first increased and then decreased with the increase of dust size. • The gravity has different influences on dust deposition rates of large and small dusts. • The influence of released dust number on dust deposition rate is less than 8%. • A simple model was developed to estimate the PV efficiency reduction ratio by dust pollution. - Abstract: Dust deposition on a solar photovoltaic (PV) system mounted on the windward roof of an isolated building was investigated by CFD simulation. The SST k-ω turbulence model with UDF inlet profiles and the discrete particle model (DPM) were adopted to simulate the wind flow fields and the dust deposition behavior, respectively. The CFD wind flow velocity profiles around the building were in good agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The effects of various dust particle sizes, differing quantities of released dust particles, and the force of gravity on the rates of dust deposition upon the PV panels were investigated in detail. It was found that the dust deposition rate first rose and then declined with the increase of dust particle size. The maximum deposition rate was about 0.28% for 10 μm dust, and the minimum deposition rate was about 0.13% for 50 μm dust. Gravity also had a significant effect on the rate of dust deposition for large-particle dust (d_p > 5 μm), and the rate could reach 75% for 50 μm dust. However, the effect of gravity on dust deposition was less than 5% for small-particle dust (d_p < 5 μm). The effect of releasing differing quantities of dust particles on the dust deposition rate was less than 8%. Moreover, the mechanisms by which dust was deposited on the PV roof were analyzed and discussed. Finally, a simple empirical model was developed to estimate the PV efficiency reduction ratios in relation to exposure time, as based on this

  3. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple

  4. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Marelene

    2005-01-01

    Our theoretical research on dust-plasma interactions has concentrated on three main areas: (a)studies of grain charging and applications; (b) waves and instabilities in weakly correlated dusty plasma with applications to space and laboratory plasmas; (c) waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  5. From dust to life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    After initially challenging the dirty-ice theory of interstellar grains, Fred Hoyle and the present author proposed carbon (graphite) grains, mixtures of refractory grains, organic polymers, biochemicals and finally bacterial grains as models of interstellar dust. The present contribution summarizes this trend and reviews the main arguments supporting a modern version of panspermia.

  6. Environmentally dependent dust chemistry of a super Asian dust storm in March 2010: observation and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Near-surface and vertical in situ measurements of atmospheric particles were conducted in Shanghai during 19–23 March 2010 to explore the transport and chemical evolution of dust particles in a super dust storm. An air quality model with optimized physical dust emission scheme and newly implemented dust chemistry was utilized to study the impact of dust chemistry on regional air quality. Two discontinuous dust periods were observed with one traveling over northern China (DS1 and the other passing over the coastal regions of eastern China (DS2. Stronger mixing extents between dust and anthropogenic emissions were found in DS2, reflected by the higher SO2 ∕ PM10 and NO2 ∕ PM10 ratios as well as typical pollution elemental species such as As, Cd, Pb, and Zn. As a result, the concentrations of SO42− and NO3− and the ratio of Ca2+ ∕ Ca were more elevated in DS2 than in DS1 but opposite for the [NH4+] ∕ [SO42−+NO3−] ratio, suggesting the heterogeneous reactions between calcites and acid gases were significantly promoted in DS2 due to the higher level of relative humidity and gaseous pollution precursors. Lidar observation showed a columnar effect on the vertical structure of particle optical properties in DS1 that dust dominantly accounted for ∼ 80–90 % of the total particle extinction from near the ground to ∼ 700 m. In contrast, the dust plumes in DS2 were restrained within lower altitudes while the extinction from spherical particles exhibited a maximum at a high altitude of ∼ 800 m. The model simulation reproduced relatively consistent results with observations that strong impacts of dust heterogeneous reactions on secondary aerosol formation occurred in areas where the anthropogenic emissions were intensive. Compared to the sulfate simulation, the nitrate formation on dust is suggested to be improved in the future modeling efforts.

  7. The microphysics of the Saharan dust and its implications on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalu, A.E.

    1987-12-01

    A strong influence of Saharan dust plumes on the microphysics of cumulus clouds, especially along their long-distance transport trajectories into cloudy regions of the world, has been discussed and illustrated. This climate-related influence is primarily based on the observed anhydrous non-hygroscopic property of the Saharan dust, otherwise known as the Harmattan dust haze in Nigeria. An observational feature of the dust-cloud interaction which is strongly climate-related is the rapid clearance of cumulus clouds on arrival of a dust plume. This is because aeolian dust particles and water droplets cannot coexist comfortably. A useful practical application of this influence of the dust on clouds by means of atmospheric teleconnection principles for fine-weather prediction in cloudy remote regions seasonally affected by dust plumes from the Sahara, has therefore been suggested. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs, 3 plates

  8. Simulation of dust voids in complex plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedheer, W. J.; Land, V.

    2008-12-01

    In dusty radio-frequency (RF) discharges under micro-gravity conditions often a void is observed, a dust free region in the discharge center. This void is generated by the drag of the positive ions pulled out of the discharge by the electric field. We have developed a hydrodynamic model for dusty RF discharges in argon to study the behaviour of the void and the interaction between the dust and the plasma background. The model is based on a recently developed theory for the ion drag force and the charging of the dust. With this model, we studied the plasma inside the void and obtained an understanding of the way it is sustained by heat generated in the surrounding dust cloud. When this heating mechanism is suppressed by lowering the RF power, the plasma density inside the void decreases, even below the level where the void collapses, as was recently shown in experiments on board the International Space Station. In this paper we present results of simulations of this collapse. At reduced power levels the collapsed central cloud behaves as an electronegative plasma with corresponding low time-averaged electric fields. This enables the creation of relatively homogeneous Yukawa balls, containing more than 100 000 particles. On earth, thermophoresis can be used to balance gravity and obtain similar dust distributions.

  9. High temperature and dust load in mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, V V; Bolonova, L N; Donets, I K; Mukhina, K Sh

    1989-02-01

    Presents results of study of combined load on the human system of heat and dust as encountered in deep coal mines in the Donbass. Groups of coal miners were studied to ascertain the state of their lungs, particularly the presence of free silica, dust, collagen, etc. The sickness records for a number of Donbass mining associations for the past 25 years were analyzed. Multiple regression analysis of the data obtained led to curves relating the number of shifts worked to dust levels, pulmonary ventilation (0.01 and 0.04 m/sup 3//min) and maximum admissible dust concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 10 mg/m/sup 3/). In the 25-35 C temperature range a rise of 1 C is accompanied by increases of 9.9% in dust mass, 15.4% in silica content, 10.7% in mineral impurities and 2.3% in pathomorphological changes in the lungs. An adjustment to the maximum admissible concentration correction coefficient of 10% for every 1 C over 26 C is recommended. 1 ref.

  10. Seasonal provenance changes in present-day Saharan dust collected in and off Mauritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Friese

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Saharan dust has a crucial influence on the earth climate system and its emission, transport and deposition are intimately related to, e.g., wind speed, precipitation, temperature and vegetation cover. The alteration in the physical and chemical properties of Saharan dust due to environmental changes is often used to reconstruct the climate of the past. However, to better interpret possible climate changes the dust source regions need to be known. By analysing the mineralogical composition of transported or deposited dust, potential dust source areas can be inferred. Summer dust transport off northwest Africa occurs in the Saharan air layer (SAL. In continental dust source areas, dust is also transported in the SAL; however, the predominant dust input occurs from nearby dust sources with the low-level trade winds. Hence, the source regions and related mineralogical tracers differ with season and sampling location. To test this, dust collected in traps onshore and in oceanic sediment traps off Mauritania during 2013 to 2015 was analysed. Meteorological data, particle-size distributions, back-trajectory and mineralogical analyses were compared to derive the dust provenance and dispersal. For the onshore dust samples, the source regions varied according to the seasonal changes in trade-wind direction. Gibbsite and dolomite indicated a Western Saharan and local source during summer, while chlorite, serpentine and rutile indicated a source in Mauritania and Mali during winter. In contrast, for the samples that were collected offshore, dust sources varied according to the seasonal change in the dust transporting air layer. In summer, dust was transported in the SAL from Mauritania, Mali and Libya as indicated by ferroglaucophane and zeolite. In winter, dust was transported with the trades from Western Sahara as indicated by, e.g., fluellite.

  11. Modelling dust transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.D.; Martin, J.D.; Bacharis, M.; Coppins, M.; Counsell, G.F.; Allen, J.E.; Counsell, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The DTOKS code, which models dust transport through tokamak plasmas, is described. The floating potential and charge of a dust grain in a plasma and the fluxes of energy to and from it are calculated. From this model, the temperature of the dust grain can be estimated. A plasma background is supplied by a standard tokamak edge modelling code (B2SOLPS5.0), and dust transport through MAST (the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak) and ITER plasmas is presented. We conclude that micron-radius tungsten dust can reach the separatrix in ITER. (authors)

  12. FINDING WAYS OF RECYCLING DUST OF ARC STEEL FURNACES AT THE BELARUSIAN METALLURGIC PLANT. PART 3. EXPERIMENTS ON BRIQUETTING OF DUST OFARC STEEL FURNACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Rozhkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of the global experience of recycling dust by briquetting. The advantages and disadvantages of recycling dust with its preliminary briquetting are described. Information about experiments on briquetting of dust generated in different organizations of the Belarusian metallurgy plant with various binders is given. Economic calculations were performed on the basis of technical data obtained during the manufacture of prototypes of briquettes. The results of the calculations showedinexpediency of recycling dust briquetting method because of the low iron content in the dust, high cost of binder and a relatively small rate of ecological tax.

  13. Measuring Dust Emission from the Mojave Desert (USA) by Daily Remote-Camera Observations and Wind-Erosion Measurements: Bearing on "Unseen" Sources and Global Dust Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Urban, F.; Goldstein, H. L.; Fulton, R.

    2017-12-01

    A large gap in understanding the effects of atmospheric dust at all spatial scales is uncertainty about how much and whence dust is emitted annually. Digital recording of dust emission at high spatial and temporal resolution would, together with periodic flux measurements, support improved estimates of local-scale dust flux where infrastructure could support remote internet enabled cameras. Such recording would also elucidate wind-erosion dynamics when combined with meteorological data. Remote camera recording of dust-emitting settings on and around Soda Lake (Mojave Desert) was conducted every 15 minutes during daylight between 10 Nov. 2010 and 31 Dec. 2016 and images uploaded to a web server. Examination of 135,000 images revealed frequent dust events, termed "dust days" when plumes obscured mountains beyond source areas. Such days averaged 68 (sd=10) per year (2011 through 2016). We examined satellite retrievals (MODIS, GOES) for dust events during six cloudless days of highest and longest duration dust emission but none were observed. From Apr. 2000 through May 2013, aeolian sediments collected at three sites were sampled and weighed. Estimates of the emitted mass of silt- and clay-size fractions were made on the basis of measured horizontal mass flux, particle sizes of sediment in collectors, and roughly determined areas of dust generation. Over this period, nearly 4 Tg yr-1 of dust (as particulate matter flood in the basin in late Dec. 2010 that deposited flood sediment across the lake basin. Increased emission was likely related to the availability of fresh, unanchored flood sediment. Within the Mojave and Great Basin deserts of North America, many settings akin to those at Soda Lake similarly emit dust that is rarely detected in satellite retrievals. These findings strongly imply that local and regional dust emissions from western North America are far underestimated and that, by extension to relatively small dust-source areas across all drylands, global

  14. Geochemical evidence for diversity of dust sources in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheis, M.C.; Budahn, J.R.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential dust sources, including generic sources of sparsely vegetated alluvium, playa deposits, and anthropogenic emissions, as well as the area around Owens Lake, California, affect the composition of modern dust in the southwestern United States. A comparison of geochemical analyses of modern and old (a few thousand years) dust with samples of potential local sources suggests that dusts reflect four primary sources: (1) alluvial sediments (represented by Hf, K, Rb, Zr, and rare-earth elements, (2) playas, most of which produce calcareous dust (Sr, associated with Ca), (3) the area of Owens (dry) Lake, a human-induced playa (As, Ba, Li, Pb, Sb, and Sr), and (4) anthropogenic and/or volcanic emissions (As, Cr, Ni, and Sb). A comparison of dust and source samples with previous analyses shows that Owens (dry) Lake and mining wastes from the adjacent Cerro Gordo mining district are the primary sources of As, Ba, Li, and Pb in dusts from Owens Valley. Decreases in dust contents of As, Ba, and Sb with distance from Owens Valley suggest that dust from southern Owens Valley is being transported at least 400 km to the east. Samples of old dust that accumulated before European settlement are distinctly lower in As, Ba, and Sb abundances relative to modern dust, likely due to modern transport of dust from Owens Valley. Thus, southern Owens Valley appears to be an important, geochemically distinct, point source for regional dust in the southwestern United States. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. [Leather dust and systematic research on occupational tumors: the national and regional registry TUNS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensi, Carolina; Sieno, Claudia; Consonni, Dario; Riboldi, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The sinonasal cancer (SNC) are a rare tumors characterized by high occupational etiologic fraction. For this reason their incidence and etiology can be actively monitored by a dedicated cancer registry. The National Registry of these tumours is situated at the Italian Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL) and is based on Regional Operating Centres (ROCs). In Lombardy Region the ROC has been established at the end of 2007 with the purpose to make a systematic surveillance and therefore to support in the most suitable way the scientific research and the prevention actions in the high risk working sectors. The aims of this surveillance are: to estimate the regional incidence of SNC, to define different sources of occupational and environmental exposure both known (wood, leather, nickel, chromium) and unknown. The registry collects all the new incident cases of epithelial SNC occurring in residents in Lombardy Region since 01.01.2008. The regional Registry is managed according to National Guidelines. Until January 2010 we received 596 cases of suspected SNC; only 91 (15%) of these were actually incident cases according to the inclusion criteria of the Registry, and they were preferentially adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma. In 2008 the regional age-standardized incidence rate of SNC for males and females, respectively, is 0.8 and 0.5 per 100,000. Occupational or environmental exposure to wood or leather dust is ascertained in over the 50% of cases. The occupational exposure to leather dust was duo to work in shoe factories. Our preliminary findings confirm that occupational exposure to wood and leather dusts are the more relevant risk factors for SNC. The study of occupational sectors and job activity in cases without such exposure could suggest new etiologic hypothesis.

  16. Contribution of Asian dust to atmospheric deposition of radioactive cesium (137Cs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, Taijiro; Fujiwara, Hideshi

    2008-01-01

    Both Asian dust (kosa) transported from the East Asian continent and locally suspended dust near monitoring sites contribute to the observed atmospheric deposition of 137 Cs in Japan. To estimate the relative contribution of these dust phenomena to the total 137 Cs deposition, we monitored weekly deposition of mineral particles and 137 Cs in spring. Deposition of 137 Cs from a single Asian dust event was 62.3 mBq m -2 and accounted for 67% of the total 137 Cs deposition during the entire monitoring period. Furthermore, we found high 137 Cs specific activity in the Asian dust deposition sample. Although local dust events contributed to 137 Cs deposition, their contribution was considerably smaller than that of Asian dust. We conclude that the primary source of atmospheric 137 Cs in Japan is dust transported from the East Asian continent

  17. The value of the apparent diffusion coefficient in MR diffusion weighted imaging for the differential diagnosis of sinonasal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongzhe; Yang Bentao; Xian Junfang; Li Jing; Chen Guangli

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of apparent diffusion coefficient in the evaluation of sinonasal masses. Methods: Sixty-seven sinonasal solid masses over 1 cm in diameter confirmed by pathology were retrospectively analyzed, all patients underwent preoperative routine MRI with DWI, the ADC values were measured in ROI within the solid mass. The patients were divided into benign and malignant groups by the histopathology, according to pathological findings, the patients were further divided into the hematolymphoid tumors, the malignancy of epithelium and mesenchymal tissue, the benign tumors of epithelial and mesenchymal tissue, and vasogenic masses. ANOVA test and t test were used to compare the ADC values of different groups. The receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was constructed using various cut points of ADC for different parameters to confirm the diagnostic threshold value and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy. Results: All lesions were solitary. There were 22 malignant tumors, of which 6 lesions were hematolymphoid tumors and 16 lesions malignancy from epithelium and mesenchymal tissue. There were 45 benign tumors, of which 22 lesions were benign tumors from epithelium and mesenchymal tissue and 23 lesions vasogenic masses. The mean ADC value of malignant and benign masses was (0.88 ± 0.26) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s and (1.54 ± 0.41) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s respectively. There was statistically significant differences between them (t=6.897, P <0.01). The mean ADC value was(0.63 ± 0.10) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s in hematolymphoid tumors,(0.97 ±0.24) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s in malignancy from epithelium and mesenchymal tissue, (1.38 ± 0.23) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s in benign tumors from epithelium and mesenchymal tissue,(1.68 ± 0.49) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s in vasogenic masses respectively. There was statistically significant difference among all 4 groups(F=22.788, P<0.01), and the differences between any 2 groups were still statistically significant (P <0.05). The area under

  18. Predicting location of recurrence using FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET in canine sinonasal tumors treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, Tyler; Jeraj, Robert; Fu, Rau; Zhu, Jun; Bowen, Stephen; Forrest, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Dose painting relies on the ability of functional imaging to identify resistant tumor subvolumes to be targeted for additional boosting. This work assessed the ability of FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET imaging to predict the locations of residual FDG PET in canine tumors following radiotherapy. Nineteen canines with spontaneous sinonasal tumors underwent PET/CT imaging with radiotracers FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM prior to hypofractionated radiotherapy. Therapy consisted of 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy to the sinonasal cavity with or without an integrated boost of 0.8 Gy to the GTV. Patients had an additional FLT PET/CT scan after fraction 2, a Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan after fraction 3, and follow-up FDG PET/CT scans after radiotherapy. Following image registration, simple and multiple linear and logistic voxel regressions were performed to assess how well pre- and mid-treatment PET imaging predicted post-treatment FDG uptake. R 2 and pseudo R 2 were used to assess the goodness of fits. For simple linear regression models, regression coefficients for all pre- and mid-treatment PET images were significantly positive across the population (P < 0.05). However, there was large variability among patients in goodness of fits: R 2 ranged from 0.00 to 0.85, with a median of 0.12. Results for logistic regression models were similar. Multiple linear regression models resulted in better fits (median R 2 = 0.31), but there was still large variability between patients in R 2 . The R 2 from regression models for different predictor variables were highly correlated across patients (R ≈ 0.8), indicating tumors that were poorly predicted with one tracer were also poorly predicted by other tracers. In conclusion, the high inter-patient variability in goodness of fits indicates that PET was able to predict locations of residual tumor in some patients, but not others. This suggests not all patients would be good candidates for dose painting based on a single biological target. (paper)

  19. Dust storm, northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    This large dust storm along the left side of the photo, covers a large portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico (27.5N, 102.0E). The look angle of this oblique photo is from the south to the north. In the foreground is the Sierra Madre Oriental in the states Coahuila and Nuevo Leon with the Rio Grande River, Amistad Reservoir and Texas in the background.

  20. Influence of Air Humidity and Water Particles on Dust Control Using Ultrasonic Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Nishi, Kentaro; Shindo, Dai; Kawamura, Youhei

    2012-07-01

    The influence of air humidity and water particles on dust control was examined using ultrasonic atomization at 2.4 MHz, an acrylic box (61 L), and four types of ore dust samples: green tuff (4 µm), green tuff (6 µm), kaolin, and silica. It was clearly demonstrated that ultrasonic atomization was effective in raising humidity rapidly. However, at high relative air humidity, the water particles remained stable in the box without changing to water vapor. Ultrasonic atomization was applied to suppress dust dispersion and 40-95% dust reduction was achieved at 83% relative air humidity. Dust dispersion was more effective with ultrasonic atomization than without.

  1. The nature of interstellar dust as revealed by light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Williams

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interstellar dust was first identified through the extinction that it causes of optical starlight. Initially, observational and theoretical studies of extinction were made to identify simple ways of removing the effect of extinction. Over the last few decades it has become clear that dust has a number of very important roles in interstellar physics and chemistry, and that through these roles dust affects quite fundamentally the evolution of the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, our detailed knowledge of the actual material of dust remains relatively poor. The use of accurate models for the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with particles of arbitrary shape and composition remains vital, if our description of dust is to improve.

  2. Mineral dust transport toward Hurricane Helene (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendike, Juliane; Jones, Sarah C.; Vogel, Bernhard; Vogel, Heike

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the transport of mineral dust from its source regions in West Africa toward the developing tropical cyclone Helene (2006) and diagnoses the resulting properties of the air influencing the tropical cyclonegenesis. The model system COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) in which the emission and transport of mineral dust as well as the radiation feedback are taken into account, was used. The emission of mineral dust between 9 and 14 September 2006 occurred in association with the relatively strong monsoon flow and northeasterly trade winds, with gust fronts of convective systems over land, and with the Atlantic inflow. Additionally, increased surface wind speed was linked to orographical effects at the Algerian Mountains, Atlas Mountains, and the Hoggar. The dust, as part of the Saharan air layer, is transported at low levels by the monsoon flow, the Harmattan, the northeasterly trade winds, and the monsoon trough, and is transported upward in the convergence zone between Harmattan and monsoon flow, in the baroclinic zone along the West African coastline, and by convection. At around 700 hPa the dust is transported by the African easterly jet. Dry and dust-free air is found to the north-northwest of the developing tropical depression due to descent in an anticyclone. Based on the model data, it was possible to distinguish between dry (from the anticyclone), dry and dusty (from the Harmattan and northeasterly trade winds), and dusty and moist air (from the monsoon flow and in the tropical depression due to convection).

  3. The role of airborne mineral dusts in human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) is generally acknowledged to increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. However, particulate matter (PM) research has generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from geogenic PM (produced from the Earth by natural processes, e.g., volcanic ash, windborne ash from wildfires, and mineral dusts) or geoanthropogenic PM (produced from natural sources by processes that are modified or enhanced by human activities, e.g., dusts from lakebeds dried by human removal of water, dusts produced from areas that have undergone desertification as a result of human practices). Globally, public health concerns are mounting, related to potential increases in dust emission from climate related changes such as desertification and the associated long range as well as local health effects. Recent epidemiological studies have identified associations between far-traveled dusts from primary sources and increased morbidity and mortality in Europe and Asia. This paper provides an outline of public health research and history as it relates to naturally occurring inorganic mineral dusts. We summarize results of current public health research and describe some of the many challenges related to understanding health effects from exposures to dust aerosols.

  4. Dust acoustic shock wave at high dust density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Sarkar, Susmita; Khan, Manoranjan; Avinash, K.; Gupta, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Dust acoustic (DA) shock wave at high dust density, i.e., the dust electroacoustic (DEA) or dust Coulomb (DC) shock wave has been investigated incorporating the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The nonlinear DEA (DC) shock wave is seen to be governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation, in which the Burger term is proportional to the nonadiabaticity generated dissipation. It is seen that the shock strength decreases but after reaching minimum, it increases as the dust space charge density |q d n d | increases and the shock strength of DA wave is greater than that of DEA (DC) wave. Moreover the DEA (DC) shock width increases appreciably with increase mass m i of the ion component of the dusty plasma but for DA shock wave the effect is weak

  5. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  6. Dust from southern Africa: rates of emission and biogeochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Zobeck, T. M.; Okin, G. S.; Dintwe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The stabilized linear dunefields in the southern Kalahari show signs of reactivation due to reduced vegetation cover owing to drought and/or overgrazing. It has been demonstrated with a laboratory dust generator that the southern Kalahari soils are good emitters of dust and that large-scale dune reactivation can potentially make the region an important dust source in the relatively low-dust Southern Hemisphere. We show that emergence of the southern Kalahari as a new dust source may affect ocean biogeochemistry as the soils are rich in soluble iron and the dust from the southern Kalahari commonly reaches the Southern Ocean. We investigate the biogeochemical properties of the fine fraction of soil from the Kalahari dunes and compare them to those of currently active dust sources such as the Makgadikgadi and the Etosha pans as well as other smaller pans in the region. Using field measurements of sediment fluxes and satellite images, we calculate the rates of dust emission from the southern Kalahari under different land cover scenarios. To assess the reversibility of dune reactivation in the southern Kalahari, we investigate the resilience of dunefield vegetation by looking at changes in soil nutrients, fine soil fractions, and seed bank in areas affected by intense denudation.

  7. Dust Quantization and Effects on Agriculture Over Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    Dust plays a very important role in the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this communication, the effect of atmospheric dust on the yields of certain crops grown in Uttar Pradesh, India is assessed. Coherent physical and thermodynamic fingerprints of dust parameters such as from Satellite data- KALPANA-1, MODIS, OMI, CALIPSO; Model data- DREAM, HYSPLIT, ECMWF; have been considered to run the APSIM model to derive the impacts. This paper assesses dust as a physical atmospheric phenomenon including its Long Range Transport (LRT) and dispersion along with considerable variations of Aerosol Optical Depths (AODs) over the subcontinent of India. While AODs significantly increase by more dust concentration, the local dispersion of pollutants is a major concern with deposition of atmospheric dust such as sulphates and other chemical constituents that affect agricultural land. An approach in atmospheric physics is also taken to parameterize the model outputs. This communication indicates dust to be a positive factor for the cultivation of certain crops such as wheat, maize in the experimental location. Initial results suggest that LRT dust is a viable counterpart to decrease the concentration of soil acidity and related parameters thus enhancing the vitality of crops.

  8. Impact of Dust Radiative Forcing upon Climate. Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ronald L.; Knippertz, Peter; Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Perlwitz, Jan P.; Tegan, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Dust aerosols perturb the atmospheric radiative flux at both solar and thermal wavelengths, altering the energy and water cycles. The climate adjusts by redistributing energy and moisture, so that local temperature perturbations, for example, depend upon the forcing over the entire extent of the perturbed circulation. Within regions frequently mixed by deep convection, including the deep tropics, dust particles perturb the surface air temperature primarily through radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Many models predict that dust reduces global precipitation. This reduction is typically attributed to the decrease of surface evaporation in response to dimming of the surface. A counterexample is presented, where greater shortwave absorption by dust increases evaporation and precipitation despite greater dimming of the surface. This is attributed to the dependence of surface evaporation upon TOA forcing through its influence upon surface temperature and humidity. Perturbations by dust to the surface wind speed and vegetation (through precipitation anomalies) feed back upon the dust aerosol concentration. The current uncertainty of radiative forcing attributed to dust and the resulting range of climate perturbations calculated by models remain a useful test of our understanding of the mechanisms relating dust radiative forcing to the climate response.

  9. Using an Instrumented Drone to Sample Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian; Lorenz, Ralph; Davis, Karan; Lipple, Brock

    2017-10-01

    Dust devils are low-pressure, small (many to tens of meters) convective vortices powered by surface heating and rendered visible by lofted dust. Dust devils occur in arid climates on Earth, where they degrade air quality and pose a hazard to small aircraft. They also occur ubiquitously on Mars, where they may dominate the supply of atmospheric dust. Since dust contributes significantly to Mars’ atmospheric heat budget, dust devils probably play an important role in its climate. The dust-lifting capacity of a devil likely depends sensitively on its structure, particularly the wind and pressure profiles, but the exact dependencies are poorly constrained. Thus, the exact contribution to Mars’ atmosphere remains unresolved. Moreover, most previous studies of martian dust devils have relied on passive sampling of the profiles via meteorology packages on landed spacecraft, resulting in random encounter geometries which non-trivially skew the retrieved profiles. Analog studies of terrestrial devils have employed more active sampling (instrumented vehicles or manned aircraft) but have been limited to near-surface (few meters) or relatively high altitude (hundreds of meters) sampling. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones, combined with miniature, digital instrumentation, promise a novel and uniquely powerful platform from which to sample dust devils via (relatively) controlled geometries at a wide variety of altitudes. In this presentation, we will describe a pilot study using an instrumented quadcopter on an active field site in southeastern Oregon, which (to our knowledge) has not previously been surveyed for dust devils. We will present preliminary results from the resulting encounters, including stereo image analysis and encounter footage collected onboard the drone.

  10. On the theory of dynamics of dust grain in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, A. A.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of rotationally symmetric dust grains in plasma embedded in a magnetic field are of concern. The general expressions for forces and torques acting on dust are found. It is shown that dust spinning is determined by torques related to both the Lorentz force (dominant for relatively small grains) and the gyro-motion of plasma particles impinging the grain (which prevails for large grains). The stability of grain spinning is analyzed and it is shown that, for some cases (e.g., oblate spheroid), there is no stable dynamic equilibrium of grain spinning.

  11. Effects of dust size distribution on dust acoustic waves in magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zongming; Duan Wenshan; He Guangjun

    2008-01-01

    A Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, a modified ZK (mZK) equation, and a coupled ZK (cZK) equation for small but finite amplitude dust acoustic waves in a magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma with dust size distribution have been investigated in this paper. The variations of the linear dispersion relation and group velocity, nonlinear solitary wave amplitude, and width with an arbitrary dust size distribution function are studied numerically. We conclude that they all increase as the total number density of dust grains increases, and they are greater for unusual dusty plasma (the number density of larger dust grains is greater than that of smaller dust grains) than that of usual dusty plasma (the number density of smaller dust grains is greater than that of larger dust grains). It is noted that the frequency of the linear wave increases as the wave number along the magnetic direction increases. Furthermore, the width of the nonlinear waves increases but its amplitude decreases as the wave number along the magnetic direction increases

  12. Dust mobilization by high-speed vapor flow under LOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Ebara, S.; Yokomine, T.; Shimizu, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the safety analysis on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the ingress of coolant (ICE) event and the loss of vacuum (LOVA) event are considered as one of the most serious accident. On the assumption of LOVA occurring after ICE, it is inferable that activated dusts are under the wet condition. Transport behavior of in-vessel activated dusts under the wet condition is not well understood in comparison with the dry case. In this study, we experimentally investigated the entrainment behavior of dust under LOVA after ICE. We measured dust entrainment by high-speed humid airflow with phase change. Graphite dusts and glass beads are used as substitutions for mobile inventory. The relations among the relative humidity, the entrainment of particles in the exhaust gas flow and the adhesion rate of dust particles on the pipe wall have been made clear, as has the distribution profile of dust deposition on the pipe wall. The entrainment ratio decreased as the relative humidity increased and increased as the initial pressure difference increased

  13. Dust in H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, S.

    1977-01-01

    Several pieces of evidence indicate that H II regions may contain dust: 1) the continuum light scattered by dust grains (O'Dell and Hubbard, 1965), 2) thermal radiation from dust grains at infrared wavelengths (Ney and Allen, 1969), 3) the abnormal helium abundance in some H II regions (Peimbert and Costero, 1969), etc. Although observations of the scattered continuum suggest that the H II region cores may be dust-free, dust grains and gas must be well mixed in view of the infrared observations. This difficulty may be solved by introducing globules with sizes approximately 0.001 pc. These globules and the molecular clouds adjacent to H II regions are the main sources supplying dust to H II regions. (Auth.)

  14. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Hensley, R.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 v has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  15. Dental flat panel conebeam CT in the evaluation of patients with inflammatory sinonasal disease: Diagnostic efficacy and radiation dose savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Salinas, C; Flors, L; Gras, P; Más-Estellés, F; Lemercier, P; Patrie, J T; Wintermark, M; Martí-Bonmatí, L

    2014-01-01

    CT is the imaging modality of choice to study the paranasal sinuses; unfortunately, it involves significant radiation dose. Our aim was to assess the diagnostic validity, image quality, and radiation-dose savings of dental conebeam CT in the evaluation of patients with suspected inflammatory disorders of the paranasal sinuses. We prospectively studied 40 patients with suspected inflammatory disorders of the sinuses with dental conebeam CT and standard CT. Two radiologists analyzed the images independently, blinded to clinical information. The image quality of both techniques and the diagnostic validity of dental conebeam CT compared with the reference standard CT were assessed by using 3 different scoring systems. Image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated for both techniques. The absorbed radiation dose to the lenses and thyroid and parotid glands was measured by using a phantom and dosimeter chips. The effective radiation dose for CT was calculated. All dental conebeam CT scans were judged of diagnostic quality. Compared with CT, the conebeam CT image noise was 37.3% higher (P radiation dose to the lenses and parotid and thyroid glands with conebeam CT was 4%, 7.8%, and 7.3% of the dose delivered to the same organs by conventional CT (P Dental conebeam CT is a valid imaging procedure for the evaluation of patients with inflammatory sinonasal disorders. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Photoelectric charging of dust grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Photoemission from the surface of a dust grain in vacuum is considered. It is shown that the cutoff in the energy spectrum of emitted electrons leads to the formation of a steady-state electron cloud. The equation describing the distribution of the electric potential in the vicinity of a dust grain is solved numerically. The dust grain charge is found as a function of the grain size.

  17. Impact of mineral dust on nitrate, sulfate, and ozone in transpacific Asian pollution plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Fairlie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We use a 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem to interpret aircraft observations of nitrate and sulfate partitioning in transpacific dust plumes during the INTEX-B campaign of April–May 2006. The model includes explicit transport of size-resolved mineral dust and its alkalinity, nitrate, and sulfate content. The observations show that particulate nitrate is primarily associated with dust, sulfate is primarily associated with ammonium, and Asian dust remains alkaline across the Pacific. This can be reproduced in the model by using a reactive uptake coefficient for HNO3 on dust (γ(HNO3 ~10−3 much lower than commonly assumed in models and possibly reflecting limitation of uptake by dust dissolution. The model overestimates gas-phase HNO3 by a factor of 2–3, typical of previous model studies; we show that this cannot be corrected by uptake on dust. We find that the fraction of aerosol nitrate on dust in the model increases from ~30% in fresh Asian outflow to 80–90% over the Northeast Pacific, reflecting in part the volatilization of ammonium nitrate and the resulting transfer of nitrate to the dust. Consumption of dust alkalinity by uptake of acid gases in the model is slow relative to the lifetime of dust against deposition, so that dust does not acidify (at least not in the bulk. This limits the potential for dust iron released by acidification to become bio-available upon dust deposition. Observations in INTEX-B show no detectable ozone depletion in Asian dust plumes, consistent with the model. Uptake of HNO3 by dust, suppressing its recycling to NOx, reduces Asian pollution influence on US surface ozone in the model by 10–15% or up to 1 ppb.

  18. Dust in cosmic plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Cosmic dust is invariably immersed in a plasma and a radiative environment. Consequently, it is charged to some electrostatic potential which depends on the properties of the environment as well as the nature of the dust. This charging affects the physical and dynamical properties of the dust. In this paper the basic aspects of this dust-plasma interaction in several cosmic environments - including planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere and the interstellar medium - are discussed. The physical and dynamical consequences of the interaction, as well as the pertinent observational evidence, are reviewed. Finally, the importance of the surface charge during the condensation process in plasma environments is stressed. (Auth.)

  19. Using an Instrumented Drone to Probe Dust Devils on Oregon’s Alvord Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Jackson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust devils are low-pressure, small (many to tens of meters convective vortices powered by surface heating and rendered visible by lofted dust. Dust devils occur ubiquitously on Mars, where they may dominate the supply of atmospheric dust, and since dust contributes significantly to Mars’ atmospheric heat budget, dust devils probably play an important role in its climate. The dust-lifting capacity of a devil likely depends sensitively on its structure, particularly the wind and pressure profiles, but the exact dependencies are poorly constrained. Thus, the exact contribution to Mars’ atmosphere remains unresolved. Analog studies of terrestrial devils have provided some insights into dust devil dynamics and properties but have been limited to near-surface (few meters or relatively high altitude (hundreds of meters sampling. Automated aerial vehicles or drones, combined with miniature, digital instrumentation, promise a novel and uniquely powerful platform from which to sample dust devils at a wide variety of altitudes. In this article, we describe a pilot study using an instrumented quadcopter on an active field site in southeastern Oregon, which (to our knowledge has not previously been surveyed for dust devils. We present preliminary results from the encounters, including stereo image analysis and encounter footage collected onboard the drone. In spite of some technical difficulties, we show that a quadcopter can successfully navigate in an active dust devil, while collecting time-series data about the dust devil’s structure.

  20. Desert Dust and Health: A Central Asian Review and Steppe Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Sternberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Asian deserts environmental and anthropomorphic dust is a significant health risk to rural populations. Natural sources in dry landscapes are exacerbated by human activities that increase the vulnerability to dust and dust-borne disease vectors. Today in Central and Inner Asian drylands, agriculture, mining, and rapid development contribute to dust generation and community exposure. Thorough review of limited dust investigation in the region implies but does not quantify health risks. Anthropogenic sources, such as the drying of the Aral Sea, highlight the shifting dust dynamics across the Central EurAsian steppe. In the Gobi Desert, our case study in Khanbogd, Mongolia addressed large-scale mining’s potential dust risk to the health of the local population. Dust traps showed variable exposure to particulates among herder households and town residents; dust density distribution indicated that sources beyond the mine need to be considered when identifying particulate sources. Research suggests that atmospheric dust from multiple causes may enhance human particulate exposure. Greater awareness of dust in greater Central Asia reflects community concern about related health implications. Future human well-being in the region will require more thorough information on dust emissions in the changing environment.

  1. Desert Dust and Health: A Central Asian Review and Steppe Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Troy; Edwards, Mona

    2017-11-03

    In Asian deserts environmental and anthropomorphic dust is a significant health risk to rural populations. Natural sources in dry landscapes are exacerbated by human activities that increase the vulnerability to dust and dust-borne disease vectors. Today in Central and Inner Asian drylands, agriculture, mining, and rapid development contribute to dust generation and community exposure. Thorough review of limited dust investigation in the region implies but does not quantify health risks. Anthropogenic sources, such as the drying of the Aral Sea, highlight the shifting dust dynamics across the Central EurAsian steppe. In the Gobi Desert, our case study in Khanbogd, Mongolia addressed large-scale mining's potential dust risk to the health of the local population. Dust traps showed variable exposure to particulates among herder households and town residents; dust density distribution indicated that sources beyond the mine need to be considered when identifying particulate sources. Research suggests that atmospheric dust from multiple causes may enhance human particulate exposure. Greater awareness of dust in greater Central Asia reflects community concern about related health implications. Future human well-being in the region will require more thorough information on dust emissions in the changing environment.

  2. Filter penetration and breathing resistance evaluation of respirators and dust masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Joel; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the filter performance of a representative selection of uncertified dust masks relative to the filter performance of a set of NIOSH-approved N95 filtering face-piece respirators (FFRs). Five different models of commercially available dust masks were selected for this study. Filter penetration of new dust masks was evaluated against a sodium chloride aerosol. Breathing resistance (BR) of new dust masks and FFRs was then measured for 120 min while challenging the dust masks and FFRs with Arizona road dust (ARD) at 25°C and 30% relative humidity. Results demonstrated that a wide range of maximum filter penetration was observed among the dust masks tested in this study (3-75% at the most penetrating particle size (p masks did not vary greatly (8-13 mm H 2 O) but were significantly different (p mask. Microscopic analysis of the external layer of each dust mask and FFR suggests that different collection media in the external layer influences the development of the dust layer and therefore affects the increase in BR differently between the tested models. Two of the dust masks had penetration values masks, those with penetration > 15%, had quality factors ranging between 0.04-0.15 primarily because their initial BR remained relatively high. These results indicate that some dust masks analysed during this research did not have an expected very low BR to compensate for their high penetration.

  3. Physical characteristics of cometary dust from dynamical studies - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Progress made in the determination of the physical characteristics of cometary dust particles from studies of dust tail dynamics is reviewed. Applications of the combined dynamical photometric approach of Finson and Probstein (1968) to studies of cometary tails exhibiting continuous light intensity variations are discussed, with attention given to determinations of the particle-size-related distribution function of the solar radiation pressure exerted on the particles, the contribution of comets to the interplanetary dust, calculations of dust ejection rates and a Monte Carlo approach to the analysis of dust tails. Investigations of dust streamers and striae, which are believed to be related to comet outbursts entailing brief but sharp enhancements of dust production, are then reviewed, with particular attention given to observations of Comet West 1976 VI. Finally, the question of cometary particle type is addressed, and it is pointed out that the presence of submicron absorbing particles in the striae of Comet West is not incompatible with the presence of micron-size dielectric particles in the inner coma.

  4. Gravitational radiation from dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacson, R.A.; Welling, J.S.; Winicour, J.

    1985-01-01

    A dust cloud is examined within the framework of the general relativistic characteristic initial value problem. Unique gravitational initial data are obtained by requiring that the space-time be quasi-Newtonian. Explicit calculations of metric and matter fields are presented, which include all post-Newtonian corrections necessary to discuss the major physical properties of null infinity. These results establish a curved space version of the Einstein quadrupole formula, in the form ''news function equals third time derivative of transverse quadrupole moment,'' for this system. However, these results imply that some weakened notion of asymptotic flatness is necessary for the description of quasi-Newtonian systems

  5. Dust confinement and dust acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.

    2005-10-01

    Systematic laboratory experiments on dust acoustic waves require the confinement of dust particles. Here we report on new experiments in a magnetized plasma region in front of an additional positively biased disk electrode in a background plasma which is generated in argon at 27MHz between a disk and grid electrode. The plasma diffuses through the grid along the magnetic field. The three-dimensional dust distribution is measured with a horizontal sheet of laser light and a CCD camera, which are mounted on a vertical translation stage. Depending on magnetic field and discharge current, cigar or donut-shaped dust clouds are generated, which tend to rotate about the magnetic field direction. Measurements with emissive probes show that the axial confinement of dust particles with diameters between 0.7-2 μm is achieved by a balance of ion-drag force and electric field force. Dust levitation and radial confinement is due to a strong radial electric field. Dust acoustic waves are destabilized by the ion flow or can be stimulated by a periodic bias on the disk electrode. The observed wave dispersion is compared with fluid and kinetic models of the dust acoustic wave.

  6. Regional and climatic controls on seasonal dust deposition in the southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheis, M.C.; Urban, F.E.

    2011-01-01

    Vertical dust deposition rates (dust flux) are a complex response to the interaction of seasonal precipitation, wind, changes in plant cover and land use, dust source type, and local vs. distant dust emission in the southwestern U.S. Seasonal dust flux in the Mojave-southern Great Basin (MSGB) deserts, measured from 1999 to 2008, is similar in summer-fall and winter-spring, and antecedent precipitation tends to suppress dust flux in winter-spring. In contrast, dust flux in the eastern Colorado Plateau (ECP) region is much larger in summer-fall than in winter-spring, and twice as large as in the MSGB. ECP dust is related to wind speed, and in the winter-spring to antecedent moisture. Higher summer dust flux in the ECP is likely due to gustier winds and runoff during monsoonal storms when temperature is also higher. Source types in the MSGB and land use in the ECP have important effects on seasonal dust flux. In the MSGB, wet playas produce salt-rich dust during wetter seasons, whereas antecedent and current moisture suppress dust emission from alluvial and dry-playa sources during winter-spring. In the ECP under drought conditions, dust flux at a grazed-and-plowed site increased greatly, and also increased at three annualized, previously grazed sites. Dust fluxes remained relatively consistent at ungrazed and currently grazed sites that have maintained perennial vegetation cover. Under predicted scenarios of future climate change, these results suggest that an increase in summer storms may increase dust flux in both areas, but resultant effects will depend on source type, land use, and vegetation cover. ?? 2011.

  7. Meteorological aspects associated with dust storms in the Sistan region, southeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Rashki, A.; Houssos, E. E.; Mofidi, A.; Goto, D.; Bartzokas, A.; Francois, P.; Legrand, M.

    2015-07-01

    Dust storms are considered natural hazards that seriously affect atmospheric conditions, ecosystems and human health. A key requirement for investigating the dust life cycle is the analysis of the meteorological (synoptic and dynamic) processes that control dust emission, uplift and transport. The present work focuses on examining the synoptic and dynamic meteorological conditions associated with dust-storms in the Sistan region, southeastern Iran during the summer season (June-September) of the years 2001-2012. The dust-storm days (total number of 356) are related to visibility records below 1 km at Zabol meteorological station, located near to the dust source. RegCM4 model simulations indicate that the intense northern Levar wind, the high surface heating and the valley-like characteristics of the region strongly affect the meteorological dynamics and the formation of a low-level jet that are strongly linked with dust exposures. The intra-annual evolution of the dust storms does not seem to be significantly associated with El-Nino Southern Oscillation, despite the fact that most of the dust-storms are related to positive values of Oceanic Nino Index. National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis suggests that the dust storms are associated with low sea-level pressure conditions over the whole south Asia, while at 700 hPa level a trough of low geopotential heights over India along with a ridge over Arabia and central Iran is the common scenario. A significant finding is that the dust storms over Sistan are found to be associated with a pronounced increase of the anticyclone over the Caspian Sea, enhancing the west-to-east pressure gradient and, therefore, the blowing of Levar. Infrared Difference Dust Index values highlight the intensity of the Sistan dust storms, while the SPRINTARS model simulates the dust loading and concentration reasonably well, since the dust storms are usually associated with peaks in model

  8. Non-ideal dust acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konefka, F; Contreras, J P; Puerta, J; Castro, E; MartIn, P

    2008-01-01

    The dispersion relation for dust acoustic waves (DA waves) functionally depends on the state equation for the charged dust grains. The ideal gas equation is usually used for studying the effect of temperature on this dispersion relation. However, since the space occupied by the grains can be important in high-density plasmas, the non-ideal effects can be important in this case. This paper analyses the dispersion relation for DA waves, when more precise state equations are used as those described for Pade approximants. The correction to the usual wave equation has been determined and the break point in density, where the ideal gas-state equation has been found. The non-ideal effects are more important for short wavelength ones, and the limits where those effects become important are also studied. Since there are several experimental results for these kinds of waves, the importance of the non-ideal effects in these cases is analysed in detail.

  9. Quantifying dust plume formation and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-01-01

    Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth’s meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust--laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the equatorial North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface and likely suppresses hurricane activity. To understand the formation mechanisms of SAL, we combine model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM--I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. We employed the Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF--Chem) to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The experimental domain covers northwest Africa including the southern Sahara, Morocco and part of the Atlantic Ocean with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground--based observations show that WRF--Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane’s tracks. We evaluated several aerosol uplift processes and found that orographic lifting, aerosol transport through the land/sea interface with steep gradients of meteorological characteristics, and interaction of sea breezes with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface--detached aerosol plume over the ocean. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with airplane and ground--based observations are generally good, but suggest

  10. Optical and microphysical properties of natural mineral dust and anthropogenic soil dust near dust source regions over northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wen, Hui; Shi, Jinsen; Bi, Jianrong; Huang, Zhongwei; Zhang, Beidou; Zhou, Tian; Fu, Kaiqi; Chen, Quanliang; Xin, Jinyuan

    2018-02-01

    Mineral dust aerosols (MDs) not only influence the climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation but also modify cloud properties and change the ecosystem. From 3 April to 16 May 2014, a ground-based mobile laboratory was deployed to measure the optical and microphysical properties of MDs near dust source regions in Wuwei, Zhangye, and Dunhuang (in chronological order) along the Hexi Corridor over northwestern China. Throughout this dust campaign, the hourly averaged (±standard deviation) aerosol scattering coefficients (σsp, 550 nm) of the particulates with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) at these three sites were sequentially 101.5 ± 36.8, 182.2 ± 433.1, and 54.0 ± 32.0 Mm-1. Correspondingly, the absorption coefficients (σap, 637 nm) were 9.7 ± 6.1, 6.0 ± 4.6, and 2.3 ± 0.9 Mm-1; single-scattering albedos (ω, 637 nm) were 0.902 ± 0.025, 0.931 ± 0.037, and 0.949 ± 0.020; and scattering Ångström exponents (Åsp, 450-700 nm) of PM2.5 were 1.28 ± 0.27, 0.77 ± 0.51, and 0.52 ± 0.31. During a severe dust storm in Zhangye (i.e., from 23 to 25 April), the highest values of σsp2.5 ( ˜ 5074 Mm-1), backscattering coefficient (σbsp2.5, ˜ 522 Mm-1), and ω637 ( ˜ 0.993) and the lowest values of backscattering fraction (b2.5, ˜ 0.101) at 550 nm and Åsp2.5 ( ˜ -0.046) at 450-700 nm, with peak values of aerosol number size distribution (appearing at the particle diameter range of 1-3 µm), exhibited that the atmospheric aerosols were dominated by coarse-mode dust aerosols. It is hypothesized that the relatively higher values of mass scattering efficiency during floating dust episodes in Wuwei and Zhangye are attributed to the anthropogenic soil dust produced by agricultural cultivations.

  11. Effect of plasma absorption on dust lattice waves in hexagonal dust crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerong, HE; Hui, CHEN; Sanqiu, LIU

    2018-04-01

    In the present paper, the effect of plasma absorption on lattice waves in 2D hexagonal dust crystals is investigated. The dispersion relations with the effect of plasma absorption are derived. It is found that the temperature effect (electron-to-ion temperature ratio τ) enhances the frequency of the dust lattice waves, while the spatial effect (dimensionless Debye shielding parameter \\tilde{κ }) weakens the frequency of the dust lattice waves. In addition, the system stabilities under the conditions of plasma absorption are studied. It is found that the temperature effect narrows the range of instability, while the spatial effect extends this range. And the range of instability is calculated, i.e. the system will always in the stable state regardless of the value of \\tilde{κ } when τ > 3.5. However, the system will be unstable when τ = 1 and \\tilde{κ }> 4.1.

  12. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  13. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  14. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  15. Dust forecasting system in JMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, M; Tanaka, T Y; Maki, T

    2009-01-01

    JMAs dust forecasting information, which is based on a GCM dust model, is presented through the JMA website coupled with nowcast information. The website was updated recently and JMA and MOE joint 'KOSA' website was open from April 2008. Data assimilation technique will be introduced for improvement of the 'KOSA' information.

  16. The effect of metallothionein 2A core promoter region single-nucleotide polymorphism on accumulation of toxic metals in sinonasal inverted papilloma tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.starska@umed.lodz.pl [I Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Łódź, Kopcinskiego 22, 90-153 Łódź (Poland); Bryś, Magdalena; Forma, Ewa [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 142/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Olszewski, Jurek; Pietkiewicz, Piotr [II Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Łódź, Żeromskiego 113, 90-549 Łódź (Poland); Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; Danilewicz, Marian [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Łódź, Pomorska 251, 92-213 Łódź (Poland); Krześlak, Anna [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 142/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland)

    2015-06-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are intracellular thiol-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which join trace metal ions protecting cells against heavy metal toxicity and regulate metal distribution and donation to various enzymes and transcription factors. The goal of this study was to identify the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene, and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn, Cu and Ni content in sinonasal inverted papilloma tissue (IP), with non-cancerous sinonasal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 117 IP and 132 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The frequency of A allele carriage was 99.2% and 100% in IP and NCM, respectively. The G allele carriage was detected in 23.9% of IP and in 12.1% of the NCM samples. As a result, a significant association of − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups was determined. A significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. A highly significant association was detected between the rs28366003 genotype and Cd and Zn content in IP. Furthermore, significant differences were identified between A/A and A/G genotype with regard to the type of metal contaminant. The Spearman rank correlation results showed the MT2A gene expression and both Cd and Cu levels were negatively correlated. The results obtained in this study suggest that the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and toxic metal accumulation in sinonasal inverted papilloma. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in sinonasal inverted papilloma tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant

  17. The Making of a Skull Base Team and the Value of Multidisciplinary Approach in the Management of Sinonasal and Ventral Skull Base Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyderman, Carl H; Wang, Eric W; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Gardner, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    The management of sinonasal and ventral skull base malignancies is best performed by a team. Although the composition of the team may vary, it is important to have multidisciplinary representation. There are multiple obstacles, both individual and institutional, that must be overcome to develop a highly functioning team. Adequate training is an important part of team-building and can be fostered with surgical telementoring. A quality improvement program should be incorporated into the activities of a skull base team. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dust in flowing magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Birendra P.; Samarian, Alex A.; Vladimirov, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma flows occur in almost every laboratory device and interactions of flowing plasmas with near-wall impurities and/or dust significantly affects the efficiency and lifetime of such devices. The charged dust inside the magnetized flowing plasma moves primarily under the influence of the plasma drag and electric forces. Here, the charge on the dust, plasma potential, and plasma density are calculated self-consistently. The electrons are assumed non-Boltzmannian and the effect of electron magnetization and electron-atom collisions on the dust charge is calculated in a self-consistent fashion. For various plasma magnetization parameters viz. the ratio of the electron and ion cyclotron frequencies to their respective collision frequencies, plasma-atom and ionization frequencies, the evolution of the plasma potential and density in the flow region is investigated. The variation of the dust charge profile is shown to be a sensitive function of plasma parameters. (author)

  19. Utilization of ultrasonic atomization for dust control in underground mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Nishi, Kentaro; Kawamura, Youhei; Kato, Takahiro; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2017-07-01

    This study examined dust suppression using water particles generated by ultrasonic atomization (2.4 MHz) at low temperature (10 °C). Green tuff (4 µm), green tuff (6 µm), kaolin, and silica were used as dust samples. Even though ultrasonic atomization makes fine water particles, raising relative air humidity immediately was difficult at low temperature. However, remaining water particles that did not change to water vapor contributed to suppression of dust dispersion. Additionally, the effect of water vapor amount (absolute humidity) and water particles generated by ultrasonic atomization on the amount of dust dispersion was investigated using experimental data at temperatures of 10, 20, and 30 °C. Utilization of ultrasound atomization at low temperature has the advantages of low humidity increments in the working space and water particles remaining stable even with low relative air humidity.

  20. Results of evaluation of tailing dumps dust intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masloboev V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of most acceptable and well-known methods of dust intensity evaluation has been defined and tested (dependence of Westphal D. L. et al. and DEAD scheme based on the analysis of exiting approaches (deserts, tailing dumps, etc.. The description of the chosen methods has been given. The determination of dynamic velocity u* and velocity at the height of +10 m above the dusting surface u10 which are necessary to evaluate the dust intensity has been demonstrated. The method is based on two-dimensional numerical model of atmosphere aerodynamics in the area of "tailing dumps of ANOF-2 ‒ the town of Apatity". The study provides calculations of horizontal velocity at the height of +10 m above the dusting surface at the wind speed varying from 5 to 23 m/sec. The work also suggests the results of graphical data processing related to tailing grain size distribution from the surface of the firmly established surface of the tailing dumps of ANOF-2. Comparative analysis has been given and the peculiarities of interval (based on grains sizes dust intensity of the tailing dumps of ANOF-2 have been shown using the dependence of Westphal D. L. et al. and DEAD scheme within the wind speed range. The received values of dust intensity at the lower range limit are close to the "maximum specific dust off" value which is used by project specialists for documentation development

  1. Discoveries from Revisiting Apollo Direct Active Measurements of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Brian

    2010-05-01

    New missions to the moon being developed by China, Japan, India, USA, Russia and Europe and possibilities of human missions about 2020 face the reality that 6 Apollo expeditions did not totally manage or mitigate effects of easily-mobilised and very "sticky" lunar dust on humans and hardware. Laboratory and theoretical modelling cannot reliably simulate the complex lunar environments that affect dynamical movements of lunar dust. The only direct active measurements of lunar dust during Apollo were made by matchbox-sized minimalist Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) deployed to transmit some 30 million digital measurements from Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15. These were misplaced or relatively ignored until 2009, when a self-funded suite of discoveries (O'Brien Geophys. Research Letters FIX 6 May 2099) revealed unexpected properties of lunar dust, such as the adhesive force being stronger as illumination increased. We give the first reports of contrasting effects, contamination or cleansing, from rocket exhausts of Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15 Lunar Modules leaving the moon. We further strengthen the importance of collateral dust inadvertently splashed on Apollo hardware by human activities. Dust management designs and mission plans require optimum use of such in situ measurements, extended by laboratory simulations and theoretical modelling.

  2. COAL DUST EMISSION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article aims to develop 2D numerical models for the prediction of atmospheric pollution during transportation of coal in the railway car, as well as the ways to protect the environment and the areas near to the mainline from the dust emission due to the air injection installation. Methodology. To solve this problem there were developed numerical models based on the use of the equations of motion of an inviscid incompressible fluid and mass transfer. For the numerical integration of the transport equation of the pollutant the implicit alternating-triangular difference scheme was used. For numerical integration of the 2D equation for the velocity potential the method of total approximation was used. The developed numerical models are the basis of established software package. On the basis of the constructed numerical models it was carried out a computational experiment to assess the level of air pollution when transporting bulk cargo by rail when the railway car has the air injection. Findings. 2D numerical models that belong to the class «diagnostic models» were developed. These models take into account the main physical factors affecting the process of dispersion of dust pollution in the atmosphere during transportation of bulk cargo. The developed numerical models make it possible to calculate the dust loss process, taking into account the use of the air injection of the car. They require a small cost of the computer time during practical realization at the low and medium power machines. There were submitted computational calculations to determine pollutant concentrations and the formation of the zone of pollution near the train with bulk cargo in «microscale» scale taking into account the air curtains. Originality. 2D numerical models taking into account the relevant factors influencing the process of dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, and the formation of the zone of pollution during transportation of bulk cargo by

  3. Austrian emission inventory for dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiwarter, W.; Trenker, C.; Hoeflinger, W.

    2001-09-01

    For the first time, Austrian emissions of anthropogenic particulate matter emissions to the atmosphere have been estimated. Results have been reported as total suspended particles (TSP) as well as for the fractions of particles smaller than 10 μm or 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 , PM 2.5 ), respectively. Base years for the inventory were 1990, 1995 and 1999. Excluded from this assessment is wind blown dust, which has been considered a natural source here. National statistics have been applied, specifically those also used previously in the Austrian air pollution inventory (OLI). Emission factors have been taken from literature compilations, only for exceptional cases specific Austrian assessments were performed or original literature on emission measurements was consulted. Resuspension of dust by road traffic emerged as the most important source. For the size fraction of PM 10 this source contributed about half of the emissions, when applying the calculation scheme by the U.S. EPA. While this scheme is widely used and well documented, its validity is currently subject of intense scientific debate. As these results do not seem to coincide with ambient air measurements, resuspension of road dust is considered separately and not now included in the national total. The sum of all other sources increases from 75,000 t of TSP in 1990 and 1995 to 77,000 t in 1999, while both PM 10 and PM 2.5 exhibit decreasing tendency (at 45,000 t and 26,000 t in 1999, respectively). The increase in TSP derives from increasing traffic and friction related emissions (tire wear, break wear), decrease of the finer particulate matter is due to reductions in firewood consumption for domestic heating. Most important source sectors are fugitive emissions from material transfer in industry as well as the building industry and the tilling of agricultural land. Common to these sources is the high uncertainty of available data. Wood combustion is the most important of the non

  4. Early-Holocene greening of the Afro-Asian dust belt changed sources of mineral dust in West Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Arash; Murphy, Lisa N.; Pourmand, Ali; Clement, Amy C.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Naderi Beni, Abdolmajid; Lahijani, Hamid A. K.; Delanghe, Doriane; Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam

    2018-01-01

    Production, transport and deposition of mineral dust have significant impacts on different components of the Earth systems through time and space. In modern times, dust plumes are associated with their source region(s) using satellite and land-based measurements and trajectory analysis of air masses through time. Reconstruction of past changes in the sources of mineral dust as related to changes in climate, however, must rely on the knowledge of the geochemical and mineralogical composition of modern and paleo-dust, and that of their potential source origins. In this contribution, we present a 13,000-yr record of variations in radiogenic Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes and Rare Earth Element (REE) anomalies as well as dust grain size from an ombrotrophic (rain fed) peat core in NW Iran as proxies of past changes in the sources of dust over the interior of West Asia. Our data shows that although the grain size of dust varies in a narrow range through the entire record, the geochemical fingerprint of dust particles deposited during the low-flux, early Holocene period (11,700-6,000 yr BP) is distinctly different from aerosols deposited during high dust flux periods of the Younger Dryas and the mid-late Holocene (6,000-present). Our findings indicate that the composition of mineral dust deposited at the study site changed as a function of prevailing atmospheric circulation regimes and land exposure throughout the last deglacial period and the Holocene. Simulations of atmospheric circulation over the region show the Northern Hemisphere Summer Westerly Jet was displaced poleward across the study area during the early Holocene when Northern Hemisphere insolation was higher due to the Earth's orbital configuration. This shift, coupled with lower dust emissions simulated based on greening of the Afro-Asian Dust Belt during the early Holocene likely led to potential sources in Central Asia dominating dust export to West Asia during this period. In contrast, the dominant western and

  5. Dust plume formation in the free troposphere and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-11-27

    Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth’s meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust-laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface. To understand the formation mechanisms of a dust layer in the free troposphere, this study combines model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. The Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF-Chem) is employed to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The model domain covers northwest Africa and adjacent water with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of the most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground-based observations show that WRF-Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane’s tracks. Several mechanisms that cause aerosol entrainment into the free troposphere are evaluated and it is found that orographic lifting, and interaction of sea breeze with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface-detached aerosol plume over the ocean. The model dust emission scheme is tuned to simultaneously fit the observed total optical depth and the ratio of aerosol optical depths generated by fine and coarse dust modes. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with

  6. Dust plume formation in the free troposphere and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basit Khan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth's meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust-laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface. To understand the formation mechanisms of a dust layer in the free troposphere, this study combines model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-I, which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. The Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF-Chem is employed to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The model domain covers northwest Africa and adjacent water with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of the most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground-based observations show that WRF-Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane's tracks. Several mechanisms that cause aerosol entrainment into the free troposphere are evaluated and it is found that orographic lifting, and interaction of sea breeze with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface-detached aerosol plume over the ocean. The model dust emission scheme is tuned to simultaneously fit the observed total optical depth and the ratio of aerosol optical depths generated by fine and coarse dust modes. Comparisons of simulated dust size

  7. Role of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human papillomavirus-associated nasal and sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongliang; Duan, Lihua; Tian, Jie; Song, Daoliang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Shenlin; Yin, Zhaofu; Xiang, Xinxin; Li, Xuezhong

    2017-12-01

    Nasal and sinonasal inverted papilloma (NSIP) is a benign tumor in which surface epithelial cells grow downward into the underlying supportive tissue with varying degrees of metaplasia. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been proposed as the causal agent in the pathogenesis of this disease. Many studies have shown that HPV can activate the Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, but the role of this pathway in HPV-associated NSIP is largely unknown. In this study, we enrolled 40 control tissue samples and 80 NSIP tissue samples. HPV genotyping showed that 47 of the 80 examined cases of NSIP were HPV-positive (58.8%), and the most common subtype was HPV11 (20/53, 37.7%). The immunohistochemistry showed statistically significant differences in phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein staining among control samples, HPV-positive NSIP and HPV-negative NSIP. The HPV11 L1-L2 plasmid increased the proliferation of normal human nasopharyngeal epithelial NP69-SV40T cells and human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE1 cells. Meanwhile, rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, reversed the increased cell proliferation induced by the HPV11 L1-L2 plasmid. Western blot analysis showed that Akt/mTOR/S6 were overexpressed in NP69-SV40T cells and CNE1 cells infected with the HPV11 L1-L2 plasmid. These data demonstrate that HPV promotes cell proliferation through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in NSIP. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A validated model for the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test subdomain structure in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Allen L; Wesely, Nicholas C; Hoehle, Lloyd P; Phillips, Katie M; Yamasaki, Alisa; Campbell, Adam P; Gregorio, Luciano L; Killeen, Thomas E; Caradonna, David S; Meier, Josh C; Gray, Stacey T; Sedaghat, Ahmad R

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have identified subdomains of the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22), reflecting distinct and largely independent categories of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) symptoms. However, no study has validated the subdomain structure of the SNOT-22. This study aims to validate the existence of underlying symptom subdomains of the SNOT-22 using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and to develop a subdomain model that practitioners and researchers can use to describe CRS symptomatology. A total of 800 patients with CRS were included into this cross-sectional study (400 CRS patients from Boston, MA, and 400 CRS patients from Reno, NV). Their SNOT-22 responses were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to determine the number of symptom subdomains. A CFA was performed to develop a validated measurement model for the underlying SNOT-22 subdomains along with various tests of validity and goodness of fit. EFA demonstrated 4 distinct factors reflecting: sleep, nasal, otologic/facial pain, and emotional symptoms (Cronbach's alpha, >0.7; Bartlett's test of sphericity, p Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin >0.90), independent of geographic locale. The corresponding CFA measurement model demonstrated excellent measures of fit (root mean square error of approximation, 0.95; Tucker-Lewis index, >0.95) and measures of construct validity (heterotrait-monotrait [HTMT] ratio, 0.7), again independent of geographic locale. The use of the 4-subdomain structure for SNOT-22 (reflecting sleep, nasal, otologic/facial pain, and emotional symptoms of CRS) was validated as the most appropriate to calculate SNOT-22 subdomain scores for patients from different geographic regions using CFA. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  9. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  10. Dust of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Eugene A.; Sawicki, Ignacy; Vikman, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel class of field theories where energy always flows along timelike geodesics, mimicking in that respect dust, yet which possess non-zero pressure. This theory comprises two scalar fields, one of which is a Lagrange multiplier enforcing a constraint between the other's field value and derivative. We show that this system possesses no wave-like modes but retains a single dynamical degree of freedom. Thus, the sound speed is always identically zero on all backgrounds. In particular, cosmological perturbations reproduce the standard behaviour for hydrodynamics in the limit of vanishing sound speed. Using all these properties we propose a model unifying Dark Matter and Dark Energy in a single degree of freedom. In a certain limit this model exactly reproduces the evolution history of ΛCDM, while deviations away from the standard expansion history produce a potentially measurable difference in the evolution of structure

  11. Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, Z.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-07-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist.

  12. Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, Z.; Qamar, A.; Ali, S.

    2014-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist

  13. Analysis of dust storms observed in Mongolia during 1937-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsagdorj, L.; Jugder, D.; Chung, Y. S.

    Climatology of dust storms in Mongolia is compiled based on observational data of 49 meteorological stations from 1960 to 1999 and compared them with data between 1937 and 1989. Three different maps of the distribution of dust storms, drifting dust and the number of dusty days are presented. The results of the analysis show that the number of days with dust storms is hollow of west Mongolia. It is found that 61% of dust storms occur in the spring in Mongolia and a dust storm lasts on average from 3.1 to 6.0 h. About 65.5-91.0% of dust storms occur in daytime and 9.0-34.5% at night. Dust storms occur more frequently in the city region and are accompanied by surface wind speeds usually from 6 to 20 ms -1. Dust storms usually occur when soil and air are dry, and 70% of dust storms occur in dry soil conditions. When dust storms occur, relative humidity averages 20-40% in Mongolia. An important outcome of this study is the trend of dusty days between 1960 and 1999. It shows that the number of dusty days has tripled from the 1960s to 1990s and has decreased since 1990.

  14. Saharan dust, climate variability, and asthma in Grenada, the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Martin, Francis E; Behr, Joshua G; Diaz, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    Saharan dust is transported across the Atlantic and interacts with the Caribbean seasonal climatic conditions, becoming respirable and contributing to asthma presentments at the emergency department. This study investigated the relationships among dust, climatic variables, and asthma-related visits to the emergency room in Grenada. All asthma visits to the emergency room (n = 4411) over 5 years (2001-2005) were compared to the dust cover and climatic variables for the corresponding period. Variation in asthma was associated with change in dust concentration (R(2) = 0.036, p asthma was positively correlated with rainfall (R(2) = 0.055, p asthma visits were inversely related to mean sea level pressure (R(2) = 0.123, p = 0.006) and positively correlated with relative humidity (R(2) = 0.593, p = 0.85). Saharan dust in conjunction with seasonal humidity allows for inhalable particulate matter that exacerbates asthma among residents in the Caribbean island of Grenada. These findings contribute evidence suggesting a broader public health impact from Saharan dust. Thus, this research may inform strategic planning of resource allocation among the Caribbean public health agencies.

  15. Long-term dust aerosol production from natural sources in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2017-02-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland is volcanic sandy deserts. Not only do natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze"), but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean >1000 km at times. The aim of this paper is to place Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long-term frequency of dust storm events in northeast Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in northeast Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the northeastern erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the northeastern deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and Aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland, which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust may contribute to the Arctic air pollution. Long-term records of meteorological dust observations from Northeast Iceland indicate the frequency of dust events from Icelandic deserts. The research involves a 60-year period and

  16. DISCOVERY OF 'WARM DUST' GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AT z {approx} 0.3: EVIDENCE FOR STRIPPING OF COOL DUST IN THE DENSE ENVIRONMENT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Rex, M.; Egami, E.; Walth, G.; Pereira, M. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Chung, S. M.; Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas,Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Smail, I. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Appleton, P.; Fadda, D. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Alba, A. Berciano [ASTRON, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, NL-7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Dessauges-Zavadsky, M. [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 Ch. des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Using far-infrared imaging from the 'Herschel Lensing Survey', we derive dust properties of spectroscopically confirmed cluster member galaxies within two massive systems at z {approx} 0.3: the merging Bullet Cluster and the more relaxed MS2137.3-2353. Most star-forming cluster sources ({approx}90%) have characteristic dust temperatures similar to local field galaxies of comparable infrared (IR) luminosity (T{sub dust} {approx} 30 K). Several sub-luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG; L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }) Bullet Cluster members are much warmer (T{sub dust} > 37 K) with far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes resembling LIRG-type local templates. X-ray and mid-infrared data suggest that obscured active galactic nuclei do not contribute significantly to the infrared flux of these 'warm dust' galaxies. Sources of comparable IR luminosity and dust temperature are not observed in the relaxed cluster MS2137, although the significance is too low to speculate on an origin involving recent cluster merging. 'Warm dust' galaxies are, however, statistically rarer in field samples (>3{sigma}), indicating that the responsible mechanism may relate to the dense environment. The spatial distribution of these sources is similar to the whole far-infrared bright population, i.e., preferentially located in the cluster periphery, although the galaxy hosts tend toward lower stellar masses (M{sub *} < 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }). We propose dust stripping and heating processes which could be responsible for the unusually warm characteristic dust temperatures. A normal star-forming galaxy would need 30%-50% of its dust removed (preferentially stripped from the outer reaches, where dust is typically cooler) to recover an SED similar to a 'warm dust' galaxy. These progenitors would not require a higher IR luminosity or dust mass than the currently observed normal star-forming population.

  17. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, E; Zook, H A; Baguhl, M; Fechtig, H; Hanner, M S; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I B

    1992-09-11

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of >5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains.

  18. Experiments on Dust Grain Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. N.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    Dust particles in various astrophysical environments are charged by a variety of mechanisms generally involving collisional processes with other charged particles and photoelectric emission with UV radiation from nearby sources. The sign and the magnitude of the particle charge are determined by the competition between the charging processes by UV radiation and collisions with charged particles. Knowledge of the particle charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a number of physical processes. The charge of a dust grain is thus a fundamental parameter that influences the physics of dusty plasmas, processes in the interplanetary medium and interstellar medium, interstellar dust clouds, planetary rings, cometary and outer atmospheres of planets etc. In this paper we present some results of experiments on charging of dust grains carried out on a laboratory facility capable levitating micron size dust grains in an electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. The charging/discharging experiments were carried out by exposing the dust grains to energetic electron beams and UV radiation. Photoelectric efficiencies and yields of micron size dust grains of SiO2, and lunar simulates obtained from NASA-JSC will be presented.

  19. A dust-free dock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrion, D. [E & F Services Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the process of unloading coal, petcoke and other dusty products in environmentally-sensitive areas. It presents a case study of the deepwater Port of Foynes on the west coast of Ireland which imports animal feed, fertiliser, coal and cement clinker, where dockside mobile loaders (DMLs) have eliminated spillage and controlled dust, and a record case study of the Humber International Terminal in the UK, where air curtinas, dust suppression grids and EFFEX{reg_sign} filters overcome the dust problems. 2 photos.

  20. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  1. [Asthma due to grain dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Preisser, A; Wegner, R

    2003-06-01

    The actual literature as well as two case reports described in detail show that grain dust induces asthmatic reactions and ODTS which are obviously not of allergic origin. For diagnosis occupational-type exposure tests are decisive whereas allergological testing usually is not. Endotoxins which are present in the grain dust samples in high concentrations have to be regarded as the major causative components. To avoid irreversible lung function impairment a comprehensive early diagnosis is necessary. Generally, a remarkable reduction of exposure to dust with high levels of airborne endotoxin in agriculture has to be achieved since in many workplaces corresponding exposures are still rather high.

  2. Experimental Determination of Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This technique is based on irradiating a single isolated charged dust particle suspended in balance by an electric field, and measuring the scattered radiation as a function of angle. The observed scattered intensity profile at a specific wavelength obtained for a dust particle of known composition is compared with Mie theory calculations, and the variable parameters relating to the particle size and complex refractive index are adjusted for a best fit between the two profiles. This leads to a simultaneous determination of the particle radius, the complex refractive index, and the scattering and extinction coefficients. The results of these experiments can be utilized to examine the IRAS and DIRBE (Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) infrared data sets in order to determine the dust particle physical characteristics and distributions by using infrared models and inversion techniques. This technique may also be employed for investigation of the rotational bursting phenomena whereby large size cosmic and interplanetary particles are believed to fragment into smaller dust particles.

  3. Evaluation of Airborne MDF Dust Concentration in Furniture Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renilson Luiz Teixeira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High concentrations of airborne dust are observed during the cutting of medium density fiberboard (MDF boards. This dust, at first considered just uncomfortable for workers, may be harmful to their health. The objective of this work was to evaluate the concentration of airborne dust during the cutting of medium density fiberboard (MDF. The experiment was developed in the MDF cutting sector of three furniture factories located in the city of Lavras/MG. The results showed that the mean concentrations of total dust suspended in these three furniture factories were above the tolerance limit set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH, giving evidence of a serious problem in these companies related to this type of risk agent.

  4. Dust particle formation in silane plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dust can be found anywhere: in the kitchen, in the car, in space… Not surprisingly we also see dust in commercial and laboratory plasmas. Dust can be introduced in the plasma, but it can also grow there by itself. In the microelectronics industry, contamination of the processing plasma by dust is an

  5. Comparison of coarse coal dust sampling techniques in a laboratory-simulated longwall section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patts, Justin R; Barone, Teresa L

    2017-05-01

    Airborne coal dust generated during mining can deposit and accumulate on mine surfaces, presenting a dust explosion hazard. When assessing dust hazard mitigation strategies for airborne dust reduction, sampling is done in high-velocity ventilation air, which is used to purge the mining face and gallery tunnel. In this environment, the sampler inlet velocity should be matched to the air stream velocity (isokinetic sampling) to prevent oversampling of coarse dust at low sampler-to-air velocity ratios. Low velocity ratios are often encountered when using low flow rate, personal sampling pumps commonly used in underground mines. In this study, with a goal of employing mine-ready equipment, a personal sampler was adapted for area sampling of coarse coal dust in high-velocity ventilation air. This was done by adapting an isokinetic nozzle to the inlet of an Institute of Occupational Medicine (Edinburgh, Scotland) sampling cassette (IOM). Collected dust masses were compared for the modified IOM isokinetic sampler (IOM-MOD), the IOM without the isokinetic nozzle, and a conventional dust sampling cassette without the cyclone on the inlet. All samplers were operated at a flow rate typical of personal sampling pumps: 2 L/min. To ensure differences between collected masses that could be attributed to sampler design and were not influenced by artifacts from dust concentration gradients, relatively uniform and repeatable dust concentrations were demonstrated in the sampling zone of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health experimental mine gallery. Consistent with isokinetic theory, greater differences between isokinetic and non-isokinetic sampled masses were found for larger dust volume-size distributions and higher ventilation air velocities. Since isokinetic sampling is conventionally used to determine total dust concentration, and isokinetic sampling made a difference in collected masses, the results suggest when sampling for coarse coal dust the IOM-MOD may

  6. Charging of dust grains in a plasma with negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Merlino, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of negative ions on the charging of dust particles in a plasma is investigated experimentally. A plasma containing a very low percentage of electrons is formed in a single-ended Q machine when SF 6 is admitted into the vacuum system. The relatively cold Q machine electrons (T e ≅0.2 eV) readily attach to SF 6 molecules to form SF 6 - negative ions. Calculations of the dust charge indicate that for electrons, negative ions, and positive ions of comparable temperatures, the charge (or surface potential) of the dust can be positive if the positive ion mass is smaller than the negative ion mass and if ε, the ratio of the electron to positive ion density, is sufficiently small. The Q machine plasma is operated with K + positive ions (mass 39 amu) and SF 6 - negative ions (mass 146 amu), and also utilizes a rotating cylinder to dispense dust into the plasma column. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of a Langmuir probe in the dusty plasma shows evidence for the reduction in the (magnitude) of the negative dust charge and the transition to positively charged dust as the relative concentration of the residual electrons is reduced. Some remarks are offered concerning experiments that could become possible in a dusty plasma with positive grains

  7. Charging of dust grains in a plasma with negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Merlino, Robert L.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of negative ions on the charging of dust particles in a plasma is investigated experimentally. A plasma containing a very low percentage of electrons is formed in a single-ended SF6 is admitted into the vacuum system. The relatively cold (Te≈0.2eV ) readily attach to SF6 molecules to form SF6- negative ions. Calculations of the dust charge indicate that for electrons, negative ions, and positive ions of comparable temperatures, the charge (or surface potential) of the dust can be positive if the positive ion mass is smaller than the negative ion mass and if ɛ, the ratio of the electron to positive ion density, is sufficiently small. The K+ positive ions (mass 39amu) and SF6- negative ions (mass 146amu), and also utilizes a rotating cylinder to dispense dust into the plasma column. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of a Langmuir probe in the dusty plasma shows evidence for the reduction in the (magnitude) of the negative dust charge and the transition to positively charged dust as the relative concentration of the residual electrons is reduced. Some remarks are offered concerning experiments that could become possible in a dusty plasma with positive grains.

  8. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  9. The Impact of Air Pollution, Including Asian Sand Dust, on Respiratory Symptoms and Health-related Quality of Life in Outpatients With Chronic Respiratory Disease in Korea: A Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Ishihara, Yoko; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Hyun, In-Gyu

    2018-05-01

    Air pollution is a growing concern in Korea because of transboundary air pollution from mainland China. A panel study was conducted to clarify the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in outpatients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Korea. Patients filled out a questionnaire including self-reported HR-QoL in February and were followed up in May and July. The study was conducted from 2013 to 2015, with different participants each year. Air quality parameters were applied in a generalized estimating equation as independent variables to predict factors affecting HR-QoL. Lower physical fitness scores were associated with Asian sand dust events. Daily activity scores were worse when there were high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) less than 10 μm in diameter (PM 10 ). Lower social functioning scores were associated with high PM less than 2.5 μm in diameter and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. High NO 2 concentrations also showed a significant association with mental health scores. Weather-related cough was prevalent when PM 10 , NO 2 , or ozone (O 3 ) concentrations were high, regardless of COPD severity. High PM 10 concentrations were associated with worsened wheezing, particularly in COPD patients. The results suggest that PM, NO 2 , and O 3 cause respiratory symptoms leading to HR-QoL deterioration. While some adverse effects of air pollution appeared to occur regardless of COPD, others occurred more often and more intensely in COPD patients. The public sector, therefore, needs to consider tailoring air pollution countermeasures to people with different conditions to minimize adverse health effects.

  10. The Impact of Air Pollution, Including Asian Sand Dust, on Respiratory Symptoms and Health-related Quality of Life in Outpatients With Chronic Respiratory Disease in Korea: A Panel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyuki Nakao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Air pollution is a growing concern in Korea because of transboundary air pollution from mainland China. A panel study was conducted to clarify the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL in outpatients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Korea. Methods Patients filled out a questionnaire including self-reported HR-QoL in February and were followed up in May and July. The study was conducted from 2013 to 2015, with different participants each year. Air quality parameters were applied in a generalized estimating equation as independent variables to predict factors affecting HR-QoL. Results Lower physical fitness scores were associated with Asian sand dust events. Daily activity scores were worse when there were high concentrations of particulate matter (PM less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10. Lower social functioning scores were associated with high PM less than 2.5 μm in diameter and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentrations. High NO2 concentrations also showed a significant association with mental health scores. Weather-related cough was prevalent when PM10, NO2, or ozone (O3 concentrations were high, regardless of COPD severity. High PM10 concentrations were associated with worsened wheezing, particularly in COPD patients. Conclusions The results suggest that PM, NO2, and O3 cause respiratory symptoms leading to HR-QoL deterioration. While some adverse effects of air pollution appeared to occur regardless of COPD, others occurred more often and more intensely in COPD patients. The public sector, therefore, needs to consider tailoring air pollution countermeasures to people with different conditions to minimize adverse health effects.

  11. Thermal tides and Martian dust storms: Direct evidence for coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leovy, C.B.; Zurek, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of surface pressure oscillations at the Viking 1 and Viking 2 lander sites on Mars indicate that the thermally driven global atmospheric tides were closely coupled to the dust content of the Martian atmosphere, especially during northern fall and winter, when two successive global dust storms occurred. The onset of each of these global storms was marked by substantial, nearly simultaneous increases in the dust opacity and in the range of the daily surface pressure variation observed at both lander sites. Although both the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal surface pressure components were amplified at Lander 1 during the onset of a global dust storm, the semidiurnal component was greatly enhanced in relation to the diurnal tide. Semidiurnal wind components were prominent at both lander sites during the height of the global dust storm. We have attempted to interpret these observations using simplified dynamical models. In particular, the semidiurnal wind component can be successfully related to the observed surface pressure variation using a simplified model of a semidiurnally forced Ekman boundary layer. On the other hand, a classical atmospheric tidal model shows that the preferential enhancement of the semidiurnal surface pressure oscillation at Lander 1 can be produced by a tidal heating distribution which places most of the heating (per unit mass) above 10-km altitude. Furthermore, when a dust storm expands to global scale, it does so rather quickly, and the total atmospheric heating at the peak of the dust storm can represent more than 50% of the available insolation. The Viking observations suggest that a number of mechanisms are important for the generation and decay of these episodic Martian global dust storms

  12. Khuzestan dust phenomenon: a content analysis of most widely circulated newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojadam, Mehdi; Matlabi, Mohammad; Haji, Alireza; Cheraghi, Maria; Bitaraf, Saeid; Khafaie, Morteza Abdullatif

    2018-06-01

    Dust is an atmospheric phenomenon that causes adverse environmental effects. It is deemed to have harmful effects on health, economics, and climate. This study aimed to analyze the content published on the phenomenon of dust in the widely circulated newspapers in Iran. We investigated the content of all national and provincial newspapers that were published between July and August 2014. Data on the materials related to the dust phenomenon in the newspapers were categorized and coded. From a total of 510 newspaper issues, 143 articles were devoted to the dust phenomenon which 74.1% of them were published in provincial newspapers. Among the national newspapers, Hamshahri newspaper with 16 headlines and from the provincial newspapers; Karoon with 23 headlines published the highest number of articles on dust phenomenon. 45.5% of content on dust were printed on the first page of the newspapers. The most common approach to the type of content published in these newspapers was an interview. Moreover, we noticed that 28.7% of the content published in the newspapers was related to the health issue. The media plays an important role in the transmission of health information. Weaknesses in addressing the causes of dust occurrence and also in providing solutions for the dust control and prevention were noticeable in the content published in the newspaper. It seems necessary to take practical measures to disseminate relevant information to dust and also address the needs of the target audience community influenced by the dust phenomenon properly.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into `bulgy' (early-type) and `discy' (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or fDeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of `bulgy' spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of `discy' spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disc ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with discy spirals at Mr ~ -21.5mag having the most reddening - more than twice as much as both the lowest luminosity and most massive, bulge-dominated spirals. An increase in dust content is well known for more luminous galaxies, but the decrease of the trend for the most luminous has not been observed before and may be related to their lower levels of recent star formation. We compare our results with the latest dust attenuation models of Tuffs et al. We find that the model reproduces the observed trends reasonably well but overpredicts the amount of u-band attenuation in edge-on galaxies. This could be an inadequacy in the Milky Way extinction law (when applied to external galaxies), but more likely indicates the need for a wider range of dust-star geometries. We end by discussing the effects of dust on large galaxy surveys and emphasize that these effects will become important as we push to higher precision measurements of galaxy properties and their clustering. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than

  14. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  15. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ..., rubber, drugs, dried blood, dyes, certain textiles, and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium..., furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal products and machinery manufacturing, pesticide... standard that will comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dust. The Agency...

  16. Rethinking wood dust safety standards

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnasingam, Jega; Wai, Lim Tau; Ramasamy, Geetha; Ioras, Florin; Tadin, Ishak; Universiti Putra Malaysia; Buckinghamshire New University; Centre for Occupational Safety and Health Singapore

    2015-01-01

    The current universal work safety and health standards pertaining to wood dust in factories lack the localisation required. As a study has shown, there is a urgent need to reevaluate the current guidelines and practices.

  17. Reply to Comment by Xu et al. on "Sr-Nd isotope composition and clay mineral assemblages in eolian dust from the central Philippine Sea over the last 600 kyr: Implications for the transport mechanism of Asian dust" by Seo et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Inah; Lee, Yong Il; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyung Jeek; Hyeong, Kiseong

    2016-12-01

    Against Xu et al. (2016), who argued that East Asian Desert (EAD) dust that traveled on East Asian Winter Monsoon winds dominates over Central Asian Desert (CAD) dust in the Philippine Sea with presentation of additional data, we reconfirm Seo et al.'s (2014) conclusion that CAD dust carried on the Prevailing Westerlies and Trade Winds dominates over EAD dust in overall dust budget of the central Philippine Sea. The relative contribution of dust from EADs and CADs using clay mineral composition should be evaluated with elimination of mineralogical contribution from the volcanic end-member which is enriched in kaolinite and overestimate the contribution of EAD dust.

  18. Physical properties of five grain dust types.

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, C B; Jones, D D; Rutherford, R D; Goforth, K J

    1986-01-01

    Physical properties of grain dust derived from five grain types (soybean, rice, corn, wheat, and sorghum) were measured and reported. The grain dusts were obtained from dust collection systems of terminal grain handling facilities and were assumed to be representative of grain dust generated during the handling process. The physical properties reported were as follows: particle size distributions and surface area measurements using a Coulter Counter Model TAII; percent dust fractions less tha...

  19. Efficient radiative transfer in dust grain mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, S.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of a dust grain mixture consisting of spherical dust grains with different radii and/or chemical composition on the resulting temperature structure and spectral energy distribution of a circumstellar shell is investigated. The comparison with the results based on an approximation of dust grain parameters representing the mean optical properties of the corresponding dust grain mixture reveal that (1) the temperature dispersion of a real dust grain mixture decreases substantially ...

  20. Charged dust structures in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, N.F.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    1999-01-01

    We report here on theoretical investigations of the mechanical-electrostatic modes of vibration of a dust-plasma crystal, extending earlier work on the transverse modes of a horizontal line of grains (where the ions flow vertically downward to a plane horizontal cathode), the modes of two such lines of grains, and the modes of a vertical string of grains. The last two arrangements have the unique feature that the effect of the background plasma on the mutual grain interaction is asymmetric because of the wake downstream of the grains studied in. The characteristic frequencies of the vibrations are dependent on the parameters of the plasma and the dust grains, such as the Debye length and the grain charge, and so measurement of the frequencies could provide diagnostics of these quantities. Although the current boom in dusty plasma research is driven mainly by such industrial applications as plasma etching, sputtering and deposition, the physical outcomes of investigations in this rapidly expanding field cover many important topics in space physics and astrophysics as well. Examples are the interaction of dust with spacecraft, the structure of planetary rings, star formation, supernova explosions and shock waves. In addition, the study of the influence of dust in environmental research, such as in the Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere, is important. The unique binding of dust particles in a plasma opens possibilities for so-called super-chemistry, where the interacting bound elements are not atoms but dust grains

  1. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  2. High Proportions of Sub-micron Particulate Matter in Icelandic Dust Storms in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Magnusdottir, Agnes

    2017-04-01

    in situ measurements at the dust source in 2013 revealed extremely high number concentrations of submicron particles, specifically in the size range 0.3-0.337 μm. The PM2.5/PM10 ratios of mass concentrations seem to be lower at the dust sources that in some distance from the sources as measured in 2015. Common dust storms in Iceland are of several hundred thousand tons of magnitude from relatively well defined main dust sources. Numerical simulations were used calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 - 280,000 tons in this study. The mean PM1 (PM10) concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 97 to 241 µg m-3 (PM10 = 158 to 583 µg m-3). The extent of moderate dust events was calculated as 2.450 km2 to 4.220 km2 of the land area suggesting the regional scale of the events. Dust plumes reported here passed the most densely inhabited areas of Iceland, health risk warnings for the general public were, however, not issued. The data provided stresses the need for such warning system and is an important step towards its development.

  3. Stochastic histories of refractory interstellar dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liffman, K.; Chayton, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors calculate histories for refractory dust particles in the interstellar medium. The double purposes are to learn something of the properties of interstellar dust as a system and to evaluate with specific assumptions the cosmic chemical memory interpretation of a specific class of isotopic anomalies. They assemble the profile of a particle population from a large number of stochastic, or Monte Carlo, histories of single particles, which are necessarily taken to be independent with this approach. They specify probabilities for each of the events that may befall a given particle and unfold its history by a sequence of random numbers. They assume that refractory particles are created only by thermal condensation within stellar material during its ejection from stars, and that these refractory particles can be destroyed only by being sputtered to a size too small for stability or by being incorporated into the formation of new stars. In order to record chemical detail, the authors take each new refractory particle to consist of a superrefractory core plus a more massive refractory mantle. They demonstrate that these superrefractory cores have effective lifetimes much longer than the turnover time of dust mass against sputtering. As examples of cosmic chemical memory they evaluate the 16 O-richness of interstellar aluminum and mechanisms for the 48 Ca/ 50 Ti correlation. Several related consequences of this approach are discussed

  4. Spherical dust collapse in higher dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Rituparno; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2004-01-01

    We consider here whether it is possible to recover cosmic censorship when a transition is made to higher-dimensional spacetimes, by studying the spherically symmetric dust collapse in an arbitrary higher spacetime dimension. It is pointed out that if only black holes are to result as the end state of a continual gravitational collapse, several conditions must be imposed on the collapsing configuration, some of which may appear to be restrictive, and we need to study carefully if these can be suitably motivated physically in a realistic collapse scenario. It would appear, that, in a generic higher-dimensional dust collapse, both black holes and naked singularities would develop as end states as indicated by the results here. The mathematical approach developed here generalizes and unifies the earlier available results on higher-dimensional dust collapse as we point out. Further, the dependence of black hole or naked singularity end states as collapse outcomes on the nature of the initial data from which the collapse develops is brought out explicitly and in a transparent manner as we show here. Our method also allows us to consider here in some detail the genericity and stability aspects related to the occurrence of naked singularities in gravitational collapse

  5. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto Magnetometer and Plasma Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Coates, A. J.; Goldstein, R.; Acuña, M. H.; Musmann, G.

    1990-01-01

    We report thirteen very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile‐up region of comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cemetery dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events ...

  6. Determinants of wood dust exposure in the Danish furniture industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Anders B; Schlunssen, Vivi; Sigsgaard, Torben; Schaumburg, Inger

    2002-11-01

    This paper investigates the relation between wood dust exposure in the furniture industry and occupational hygiene variables. During the winter 1997-98 54 factories were visited and 2362 personal, passive inhalable dust samples were obtained; the geometric mean was 0.95 mg/m(3) and the geometric standard deviation was 2.08. In a first measuring round 1685 dust concentrations were obtained. For some of the workers repeated measurements were carried out 1 (351) and 2 weeks (326) after the first measurement. Hygiene variables like job, exhaust ventilation, cleaning procedures, etc., were documented. A multivariate analysis based on mixed effects models was used with hygiene variables being fixed effects and worker, machine, department and factory being random effects. A modified stepwise strategy of model making was adopted taking into account the hierarchically structured variables and making possible the exclusion of non-influential random as well as fixed effects. For woodworking, the following determinants of exposure increase the dust concentration: manual and automatic sanding and use of compressed air with fully automatic and semi-automatic machines and for cleaning of work pieces. Decreased dust exposure resulted from the use of compressed air with manual machines, working at fully automatic or semi-automatic machines, functioning exhaust ventilation, work on the night shift, daily cleaning of rooms, cleaning of work pieces with a brush, vacuum cleaning of machines, supplementary fresh air intake and safety representative elected within the last 2 yr. For handling and assembling, increased exposure results from work at automatic machines and presence of wood dust on the workpieces. Work on the evening shift, supplementary fresh air intake, work in a chair factory and special cleaning staff produced decreased exposure to wood dust. The implications of the results for the prevention of wood dust exposure are discussed.

  7. NRC's limit on intake of uranium-ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1983-04-01

    In 1960 the Atomic Energy Commission adopted an interim limit on the intake by inhalation of airborne uranium-ore dust. This report culminates two decades of research aimed at establishing the adequacy of that limit. The report concludes that the AEC underestimated the time that thorium-230, a constituent of uranium-ore dust, would remain in the human lung. The AEC assumed that thorium-230 in ore dust would behave like uranium with a 120-day biological half-life in the lung. This report concludes that the biological half-life is actually on the order of 1 year. Correcting the AEC's underestimate would cause a reduction in the permitted airborne concentration of uranium-ore dust. However, another factor that cancels the need for that reduction was found. The uranium ore dust in uranium mills was found to occur with very large particle sizes (10-micron activity median aerodynamic diameter). The particles are so large that relatively few of them are deposited in the pulmonary region of the lung, where they would be subject to long-term retention. Instead they are trapped in the upper regions of the respiratory tract, subsequently swallowed, and then rapidly excreted from the body through the gastrointestinal tract. The two effects are of about the same magnitude but in opposing directions. Thus the present uranium-ore dust intake limit in NRC regulations should provide a level of protection consistent with that provided for other airborne radioactive materials. The report recalculates the limit on intake of uranium-ore dust using the derived air concentrations (DAC) from the International Commission on Radiological Protection's recent Publication 30. The report concludes that the silica contained in uranium-ore dust is a greater hazard to workers than the radiological hazard

  8. Analysis of Dust and Fission Products in PBMR Turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempniewicz, M.M.; Wessels, D.

    2014-01-01

    A 400 MWth direct cycle Pebble Bed Modular reactor was under development in South Africa. The work performed included design and safety analyses. In HTR/PBMR, graphite dust is generated during normal reactor operation due to pebble-to-pebble scratching. This dust will be deposited throughout the primary system. Furthermore, the dust will become radioactive due to sorption of fission products released, although in very small quantities, during normal operation. This paper presents a model and analyses of the PBMR turbine with the SPECTRA code. The purpose of the present work was to estimate the amount and distribution of deposited dust and the fission products, namely cesium, iodine, and silver, during plant life-time, which was assumed to be 40 full-power years. The performed work showed that after 40 years of plant life-time deposited layers are very small. The largest deposition is of course observed on the dust filters. Apart from the dust filters, the largest dust deposition is observed on the: • Outer Casing (inner walls) • Turbine Rotor Cooling Cavity (inner walls) • HPC Cold Cooling Gas Header (inner walls) This is caused by relatively low gas velocities in these volumes. The low velocities allow a continuous build-up of the dust layer. About 90% of cesium, 40% of iodine, and 99.9% of silver is adsorbed on the metallic structures of the turbine. The sorption rate increases along the turbine due to decreasing temperatures. In case of cesium and iodine the highest concentrations are observed in the last stage (stage 12) of the turbine. In the case of silver the sorption is so large that the silver vapor is significantly depleted in the last stages of the turbine. This is a reason for having a maximum in silver concentration in the stage 10. In the following stages the concentration decreases due to very small silver vapor fraction in the gas. (author)

  9. An overview of mineral dust modeling over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, Jianping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Kang, Litai; Yang, Ben; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yuzhi; Yuan, Tiangang; Wang, Tianhe; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guolong

    2017-08-01

    East Asian dust (EAD) exerts considerable impacts on the energy balance and climate/climate change of the earth system through its influence on solar and terrestrial radiation, cloud properties, and precipitation efficiency. Providing an accurate description of the life cycle and climate effects of EAD is therefore critical to better understanding of climate change and socioeconomic development in East Asia and even worldwide. Dust modeling has undergone substantial development since the late 1990s, associated with improved understanding of the role of EAD in the earth system. Here, we review the achievements and progress made in recent decades in terms of dust modeling research, including dust emissions, long-range transport, radiative forcing (RF), and climate effects of dust particles over East Asia. Numerous efforts in dust/EAD modeling have been directed towards furnishing more sophisticated physical and chemical processes into the models on higher spatial resolutions. Meanwhile, more systematic observations and more advanced retrieval methods for instruments that address EAD related science issues have made it possible to evaluate model results and quantify the role of EAD in the earth system, and to further reduce the uncertainties in EAD simulations. Though much progress has been made, large discrepancies and knowledge gaps still exist among EAD simulations. The deficiencies and limitations that pertain to the performance of the EAD simulations referred to in the present study are also discussed.

  10. Dust arcs in the region of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Aims: The surfaces of the Trojan asteroids are steadily bombarded by interplanetary micrometeoroids, which releases ejecta of small dust particles. These particles form the faint dust arcs that are associated with asteroid clouds. Here we analyze the particle dynamics and structure of the arc in the region of the L4 Trojan asteroids. Methods: We calculate the total cross section of the L4 Trojan asteroids and the production rate of dust particles. The motion of the particles is perturbed by a variety of forces. We simulate the dynamical evolution of the dust particles, and explore the overall features of the Trojan dust arc. Results: The simulations show that the arc is mainly composed of grains in the size range 4-10 microns. Compared to the L4 Trojan asteroids, the dust arc is distributed more widely in the azimuthal direction, extending to a range of [30, 120] degrees relative to Jupiter. The peak number density does not develop at L4. There exist two peaks that are azimuthally displaced from L4.

  11. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  12. Dust Allergens within Rural Northern Rocky Mountain Residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Emily; Semmens, Erin; Noonan, Curtis; Cady, Carol; Ward, Tony

    2015-01-23

    To date, few studies have characterized allergens within residences located in rural areas of the northern Rocky Mountain region. In this study, we collected dust samples from 57 homes located throughout western Montana and northern Idaho. Dust samples were collected and later analyzed for dust mite allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1 , Group 2 mite allergens ( Der p 2 and Der f 2 ), domestic feline ( Fel d 1 ), and canine ( Can f 1 ). Indoor temperature and humidity levels were also measured during the sampling program, as were basic characteristics of each home. Dog (96%) and cat (82%) allergens were the most prevalent allergens found in these homes (even when a feline or canine did not reside in the home). Results also revealed the presence of dust mites. Seven percent (7%) of homes tested positive for Der p 1 , 19% of homes were positive for Der f 1 , and 5% of homes were positive for the Group 2 mite allergens. Indoor relative humidity averaged 27.0 ± 7.6% within the homes. Overall, humidity was not significantly associated with dust mite presence, nor was any of the other measured home characteristics. This study provides a descriptive assessment of indoor allergen presence (including dust mites) in rural areas of the northern Rocky Mountains, and provides new information to assist regional patients with reducing allergen exposure using in-home intervention strategies.

  13. The Southern Kalahari: a potential new dust source in the Southern Hemisphere?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattachan, Abinash; D’Odorico, Paolo; Baddock, Matthew C; Zobeck, Ted M; Okin, Gregory S; Cassar, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Most sources of atmospheric dust on Earth are located in the Northern Hemisphere. The lower dust emissions in the Southern Hemisphere in part limit the supply of micronutrients (primarily soluble iron) to the Southern Ocean, thereby constraining its productivity. Climate and land use change can alter the current distribution of dust source regions on Earth. Can new dust sources be activated in the Southern Hemisphere? Here we show that vegetation loss and dune remobilization in the Southern Kalahari can promote dust emissions comparable to those observed from major contemporary dust sources in the Southern African region. Dust generation experiments support the hypothesis that, in the Southern Kalahari, aeolian deposits that are currently mostly stabilized by savanna vegetation are capable of emitting substantial amounts of dust from interdune areas. We show that dust from these areas is relatively rich in soluble iron, an important micronutrient for ocean productivity. Trajectory analyses show that dust from the Kalahari commonly reaches the Southern Ocean and could therefore enhance its productivity. (letter)

  14. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  15. Magnetic studies of dusts in the urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, S.

    2000-12-01

    Dusts are one of the major public health concerns in the urban environment. This study investigates the application of magnetic techniques in the studies of urban dust pollution. Measurements of magnetic properties, element concentrations, and the organic matter content were carried out on Liverpool (UK) street dust and/or Bootle (UK) deposited dust. Mixed dominant ferrimagnetic phases are found in Liverpool street dust although magnetite is probably a major one. The partial susceptibility technique is able to model the contributions of main magnetic components satisfactorily in Liverpool street dust. There are similar spatial distributions for some measurements, such as χLF and Pb, whilst there are different patterns for some measurements, such as χLF and the organic matter content. There are good linear correlations between the organic matter content and some magnetic mineral concentration-related parameters for < 1mm (bulk) samples. Among them, frequency dependent susceptibility (χFD) shows the highest correlation coefficient value. χFD percentage demonstrates a significant correlation with the organic matter content for size fraction and bulk samples. This suggests that re-entrainment of soil is probably a major source of the organic material present in street dust. The ratio χARM /SIRM shows a highly significant correlation with the organic matter content for <150μm fraction samples. The study demonstrates that the simple, rapid, and non-destructive magnetic measurements may be used as proxies for the organic matter content in street dust. Associations between magnetic properties and element concentrations are investigated by using correlation analysis and factor analysis, which may be a potential approach for source identification of magnetic material in the environment. The study suggests that ferrimagnetic minerals are the dominant magnetic component in Bootle dust samples. Both studied sites show similar magnetic properties, but they can be

  16. Hamiltonian Formulation and Perturbations for Dust Motion Around Cometary Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Schmidt, Juergen; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Hengnian; Li, Junfeng

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we analyze the dynamical behavior of large dust grains in the vicinity of a cometary nucleus. To this end we consider the gravitational field of the irregularly shaped body, as well as its electric and magnetic fields. Without considering the effect of gas friction and solar radiation, we find that there exist grains which are static relative to the cometary nucleus; the positions of these grains are the stable equilibria. There also exist grains in the stable periodic orbits close to the cometary nucleus. The grains in the stable equilibria or the stable periodic orbits won't escape or impact on the surface of the cometary nucleus. The results are applicable for large charge dusts with small area-mass ratio which are near the cometary nucleus and far from the Solar. It is found that the resonant periodic orbit can be stable, and there exist stable non-resonant periodic orbits, stable resonant periodic orbits and unstable resonant periodic orbits in the potential field of cometary nuclei. The comet gravity force, solar gravity force, electric force, magnetic force, solar radiation pressure, as well as the gas drag force are all considered to analyze the order of magnitude of these forces acting on the grains with different parameters. Let the distance of the dust grain relative to the mass centre of the cometary nucleus, the charge and the mass of the dust grain vary, respectively, fix other parameters, we calculated the strengths of different forces. The motion of the dust grain depends on the area-mass ratio, the charge, and the distance relative to the comet's mass center. For a large dust grain (> 1 mm) close to the cometary nucleus which has a small value of area-mass ratio, the comet gravity is the largest force acting on the dust grain. For a small dust grain (< 1 mm) close to the cometary nucleus with large value of area-mass ratio, both the solar radiation pressure and the comet gravity are two major forces. If the a small dust grain which is

  17. The Paleozoic Dust Bowl: Dust Deposition in Tropical Western Pangaea (Midcontinent U.S.) at the Terminus of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreghan, G. S.; Heavens, N. G.; Benison, K. C.; Soreghan, M. J.; Mahowald, N. M.; Foster, T.; Zambito, J.; Sweet, A.; Kane, M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric dust is well recognized and studied as both an archive and agent of climate change in Earth's relatively recent past. Archives of past dust include loess deposits and dust recovered from ocean- and ice-cores. Dust remains poorly known in Earth's past prior to the Cenozoic, but is increasingly recognized in the form of paleo-loess deposits, and (epeiric) marine strata that accumulated isolated from fluvio-deltaic influx. Here, we report on the growing recognition of voluminous dust deposits preserved in the Permian record of the U.S. Midcontinent (western tropical Pangaea). Fine-grained redbeds predominate in Permian strata throughout the U.S. Midcontinent, but notably in a swath extending from Oklahoma through South Dakota. These units consist predominantly of red mudstone and siltstone in commonly massive units, but sedimentary structures and bedding that signal aqueous processes (e.g. laminations, ripples) have led most to infer deltaic or tidal deposition. The absence of channel systems to deliver the sediment, as well as the predominantly massive and laterally continuous character and the uniform fine grain size signal wind transport, implying that these units record sustained dust deposition overprinted at times by sub-aqueous deposition in lakes, including ephemeral saline and acid lakes that led to evaporite cementation. Detrital zircon geochronology indicates that much of the dust originated in the relatively distant Appalachian-Ouachita orogenic systems, which formed part of the central Pangaean mountains (CPM), the collisional zone that sutured the supercontinent. Within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma, Permian redbeds record >2 km of predominantly dust deposition, some of the thickest dust deposits yet documented in Earth's record. Yet the tropical setting is remarkably non-uniformitarian, as much Quaternary loess occurs in mid- to high-latitude regions, commonly linked to glacial genesis. We are currently investigating with both data and

  18. Dust in the small Magellanic Cloud. 2: Dust models from interstellar polarization and extinction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, C. V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Coyne, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    We study the dust in the Small Magellanic Cloud using our polarization and extinction data (Paper 1) and existing dust models. The data suggest that the monotonic SMC extinction curve is related to values of lambda(sub max), the wavelength of maximum polarization, which are on the average smaller than the mean for the Galaxy. On the other hand, AZV 456, a star with an extinction similar to that for the Galaxy, shows a value of lambda(sub max) similar to the mean for the Galaxy. We discuss simultaneous dust model fits to extinction and polarization. Fits to the wavelength dependent polarization data are possible for stars with small lambda(sub max). In general, they imply dust size distributions which are narrower and have smaller mean sizes compared to typical size distributions for the Galaxy. However, stars with lambda(sub max) close to the Galactic norm, which also have a narrower polarization curve, cannot be fit adequately. This holds true for all of the dust models considered. The best fits to the extinction curves are obtained with a power law size distribution by assuming that the cylindrical and spherical silicate grains have a volume distribution which is continuous from the smaller spheres to the larger cylinders. The size distribution for the cylinders is taken from the fit to the polarization. The 'typical', monotonic SMC extinction curve can be fit well with graphite and silicate grains if a small fraction of the SMC carbon is locked up in the grain. However, amorphous carbon and silicate grains also fit the data well. AZV456, which has an extinction curve similar to that for the Galaxy, has a UV bump which is too blue to be fit by spherical graphite grains.

  19. Study on treatment of dust by dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, K.; Suzuki, K.

    1987-01-01

    In dismantling of nuclear reactors, various kinds of treatment of dust generated by cutting or dismantling concrete structures of components of reactors are evaluated for safety, cost, and performance comparing the work in air with water. A method of dust treatment for work in air is discussed. The dry method has an easy operation in practice and a good performance in the equipment, but has problem on the prevention from radioactive contamination by diffusion of dust in air. For the purpose of advancing the strong points and eliminating the weak points in dry method, an improved venturi scrubber system is proposed for dismantling work as a dust collecting system. The system consists of dust absorbing pipe, dust collector, separator of dust and water and dust transfer equipment to a storage of waste. This system would be expected to have better performance and lower operating cost in decommissioning nuclear reactors, especially, the number of dust filters, for example, HEPA filters, will be considerably saved

  20. Exposure to dust and its particle size distribution in shoe manufacture and repair workplaces measured with GRIMM laser dust monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroszejn-Mrowca, Grazyna; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2003-01-01

    in Poland for inhaled (4000 microg/m3) and respirable (2000 microg/m3) dust. In the workplaces under study, a relatively high proportion of extrathoracic fraction of leather dust was found, which supports a hypothesis on a potential etiologic role of this factor in the development of pathologies in the upper airways region.

  1. Dust emissions from unpaved roads on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duniway, M.; Flagg, C.; Belnap, J.

    2013-12-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, elevated levels of aeolian dust have become a major land management and policy concern due to its influence on climate, weather, terrestrial ecosystem dynamics, landscape development and fertility, melting of snow and ice, air quality, and human health. Most desert soil surfaces are stabilized by plants, rocks, and/or physical or biological soil crusts, but once disturbed, sediment production from these surfaces can increase dramatically. Road development and use is a common surface disturbing activity in the region. The extent and density of roads and road networks is rapidly increasing due to continued energy exploration, infrastructure development, and off-highway recreation activities. Though it is well known that unpaved roads produce dust, the relative contribution of dust from existing roads or the implications of future road development to regional dust loading is unknown. To address this need, we have initiated a multifaceted research effort to evaluating dust emissions from unpaved roads regionally. At 34 sites arranged across various road surfaces and soil textures in southeastern Utah, we are: 1) monitoring dust emissions, local wind conditions, and vehicle traffic and 2) evaluating fugitive dust potential using a portable wind tunnel and measuring road characteristics that affect dust production. We will then 3) develop a GIS-based model that integrates results from 1 & 2 to estimate potential dust contributions from current and future scenarios of regional road development. Passive, horizontal sediment traps were installed at three distances downwind from the road edge. One control trap was placed upwind of the samplers to account for local, non-road dust emissions. An electronic vehicle counter and anemometer were also installed at monitoring sites. Dust samples were collected every three months at fixed heights, 15 cm up to 100 cm above the soil surface, from March 2010 to the present. Threshold friction velocities (TFV

  2. De-coupling interannual variations of vertical dust extinction over the Taklimakan Desert during 2007-2016 using CALIOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yang; Wang, Yuxuan

    2018-03-26

    During the springtime, mineral dust from the Taklimakan Desert (TD) is lifted up to high altitudes and transported long distances by the westerlies. The vertical distributions of Taklimakan dust are important for both long-range transport and climate effects. In this study, we use CALIOP Level 3 dust extinction to describe interannual variation of dust extinction in TD aggregated at each 1km interval (1-2km, 2-3km, 3-4km, 4-5km and 5-6km) above mean sea level during springtime from 2007 to 2016. 87% of dust extinction over TD is concentrated at 1-4km taking a major composition of dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) and only 8.1% dust AOD is at 4-6km. Interannual variation of seasonal and monthly dust extinction at 1-4km is almost as same as dust AOD (R>0.99) but different from that at 4-6km (R are around 0.42). Our analysis provides observational evidence from CALIOP that vertical dust extinction over TD has distinctively different variability below and above 4km altitude and this threshold divides dust transport in TD into two systems. Taklimakan dust aerosols are more related to dust transport at high altitudes (4-10km) than low altitudes (0-4km) over downwind regions. High dust extinction below 4km over TD is necessary but not sufficient conditions to ensure dust transport easterly, while high dust extinction levels at 4-6km over TD are both necessary and sufficient conditions; such contrast leads to the de-coupled interannual variability seen by CALIOP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Carpet-dust chemicals as measures of exposure: Implications of variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead Todd P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in using chemicals measured in carpet dust as indicators of chemical exposures. However, investigators have rarely sampled dust repeatedly from the same households and therefore little is known about the variability of chemical levels that exist within and between households in dust samples. Results We analyzed 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 6 polychlorinated biphenyls, and nicotine in 68 carpet-dust samples from 21 households in agricultural communities of Fresno County, California collected from 2003-2005. Chemical concentrations (ng per g dust ranged from Conclusions Our findings suggest that attenuation bias should be relatively modest when using these semi-volatile carpet-dust chemicals as exposure surrogates in epidemiologic studies.

  4. Four Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approx. 0.1 sq m in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m/day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described . A summary of analytical techniques is described.

  5. Mass transfer of PBDEs from plastic TV casing to indoor dust via three migration pathways — A test chamber investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauert, C.; Harrad, S.

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely detected in humans with substantial exposure thought to occur in indoor environments and particularly via contact with indoor dust. Despite this, knowledge of how PBDEs migrate to indoor dust from products within which they are incorporated is scarce. This study utilises an in-house designed and built test chamber to investigate the relative significance of different mechanisms via which PBDEs transfer from source materials to dust, using a plastic TV casing treated with the Deca-BDE formulation as a model source. Experiments at both room temperature and 60 °C revealed no detectable transfer of PBDEs from the TV casing to dust via volatilisation and subsequent partitioning. In contrast, substantial transfer of PBDEs to dust was detected when the TV casing was abraded using a magnetic stirrer bar. Rapid and substantial PBDE transfer to dust was also observed in experiments in which dust was placed in direct contact with the source. Based on these experiments, we suggest that for higher molecular weight PBDEs like BDE-209; direct dust:source contact is the principal pathway via which source-to-dust transfer occurs. - Highlights: • Transfer from a TV casing to dust of high molecular weight PBDEs examined. • Direct source:dust contact effected rapid and most substantial transfer. • Substantial source:dust transfer also occurred via abrasion of source

  6. Cosmic dust investigations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.A.; Tuzzolino, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments have been completed using accelerator dust particles in the mass range ≅ 10 -9 -10 -6 g and velocity range ≅ 2-12 km/s to measure the velocity loss and degree of fragmentation for dust particles penetrating 6 and 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors. These measurements prove that even for a ratio of PVDF foil thickness to particle diameter as large as 0.6, the velocity loss and fragmentation is far less than expected from earlier reports in the literature. For 6 μm thick foils the velocity loss is ≤5%. These experiments are based on an extension of our earlier work which showed that two PVDF foils spaced a given distance apart could provide accurate time-of-flight (TOF) information due to the fast pulse rise time of PVDF detector response. We also report on our present state of development of PVDF position-sensing detectors which identify the x, y coordinates of particle impact, using detector and electronic pulse techniques adapted from our semiconductor position-sensing cosmic-ray detectors. Typical position errors of ≅ 1 mm are readily achieved. Finally, we have combined the above developments into a dust-particle telescope which accurately (≅ 1 0 angular accuracy) measures the trajectory of the incident particle as well as its mass and incident velocity, irrespective of whether it is a charged or neutral particle. We discuss how this practical dust telescope can be combined with dust capture cells for space flight and later recovery for laboratory determination of elemental and isotopic composition of captured dust. We also describe a simpler trajectory array based on discrete mosaics of thin detectors which would measure trajectories with a mean angular error of ≅ 4 0 . We discuss the application of these instruments for distinguishing between interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, and for measurements on a space station, from near-Earth trapped dust of artificial origin. (orig.)

  7. A review of airborne particle sampling with special reference to long-lived radioactive dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1990-03-01

    This report reviews some basic aspects related to the sampling of airborne particles with special reference to Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The report covers a number of areas of practical interest such as the production of aerosols, the dynamics of suspended particles, the physical and chemical characteristics and properties of dust clouds, and the inhalation and measurement of dust. It is followed with a brief review of dust sampling instrumentation, and with a short account of the work done on LLRD in Canada with a few references to work done outside this country. (34 figs., 7 tabs., 117 refs.)

  8. Charged dust in saturn's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.; Hill, J.R.; Houpis, H.L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Gravito-electrodynamic theory of charged dust grains is used to explain a variety of phenomena in those portions of the Saturnian ring system that are known to be dominated by fine (micron- and submicron-sized) dust, and in which collisional forces and Coulomb drag can be neglected. Among the phenomena discussed are the formation and evolution of the rotating near-radial spokes in the B-ring, the formation of waves in the F-ring, the cause of eccentricities of certain isolated ringlets, and the origin and morphology of the broad diffuse E-ring. Several novel processes predicted by the gravitoelectrodynamic theory, including 'magneto-gravitational capture' of exogenic dust by the magnetosphere, '1:1 magneto-gravitational orbital resonances' of charged dust with nearby satellites, and 'gyro-orbital resonances,' are used to explain individual observations. The effect of a ring current associated with this charged dust is also evaluated. Finally, the cosmogonic implications of the magneto-gravitational theory are briefly discussed. While several (although not all) of these processes have been discussed by one or more of the present authors elsewhere, the purpose of this paper is to synthesize all these processes within the framework of gravito-electrodynamics, and also to show its range of applicability within Saturn's ring system

  9. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  10. Physical properties of five grain dust types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, C B; Jones, D D; Rutherford, R D; Goforth, K J

    1986-01-01

    Physical properties of grain dust derived from five grain types (soybean, rice, corn, wheat, and sorghum) were measured and reported. The grain dusts were obtained from dust collection systems of terminal grain handling facilities and were assumed to be representative of grain dust generated during the handling process. The physical properties reported were as follows: particle size distributions and surface area measurements using a Coulter Counter Model TAII; percent dust fractions less than 100 micron of whole dust; bulk density; particle density; and ash content. PMID:3709482

  11. Shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of dusts from swine confinement and grain facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissy, Robert J; Romberger, Debra J; Roughead, William A; Weissenburger-Moser, Lisa; Poole, Jill A; LeVan, Tricia D

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance). The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70%) at the phylum level, Clostridia (44%) at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%). In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the bioinformatic analyses

  12. Shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of dusts from swine confinement and grain facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Boissy

    Full Text Available Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance. The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70% at the phylum level, Clostridia (44% at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%. In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the

  13. Optical and microphysical properties of natural mineral dust and anthropogenic soil dust near dust source regions over northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust aerosols (MDs not only influence the climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation but also modify cloud properties and change the ecosystem. From 3 April to 16 May 2014, a ground-based mobile laboratory was deployed to measure the optical and microphysical properties of MDs near dust source regions in Wuwei, Zhangye, and Dunhuang (in chronological order along the Hexi Corridor over northwestern China. Throughout this dust campaign, the hourly averaged (±standard deviation aerosol scattering coefficients (σsp, 550 nm of the particulates with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5 at these three sites were sequentially 101.5 ± 36.8, 182.2 ± 433.1, and 54.0 ± 32.0 Mm−1. Correspondingly, the absorption coefficients (σap, 637 nm were 9.7 ± 6.1, 6.0 ± 4.6, and 2.3 ± 0.9 Mm−1; single-scattering albedos (ω, 637 nm were 0.902 ± 0.025, 0.931 ± 0.037, and 0.949 ± 0.020; and scattering Ångström exponents (Åsp, 450–700 nm of PM2.5 were 1.28 ± 0.27, 0.77 ± 0.51, and 0.52 ± 0.31. During a severe dust storm in Zhangye (i.e., from 23 to 25 April, the highest values of σsp2.5 ( ∼  5074 Mm−1, backscattering coefficient (σbsp2.5,  ∼  522 Mm−1, and ω637 ( ∼  0.993 and the lowest values of backscattering fraction (b2.5,  ∼  0.101 at 550 nm and Åsp2.5 ( ∼  −0.046 at 450–700 nm, with peak values of aerosol number size distribution (appearing at the particle diameter range of 1–3 µm, exhibited that the atmospheric aerosols were dominated by coarse-mode dust aerosols. It is hypothesized that the relatively higher values of mass scattering efficiency during floating dust episodes in Wuwei and Zhangye are attributed to the anthropogenic soil dust produced by agricultural cultivations.

  14. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  15. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  16. Dust deposit in recirculation regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griemert, R.

    1985-03-01

    The present report shows investigations, which have been carried out in a closed duct at forward and backward facing steps. Distribution of fluid velocity and fluid fluctuations in and normal to main flow direction as well as the distribution of Reynolds shear stress have been measured. The mass transfer downstream of a backward facing step has been investigated as well. By using graphite-, copper-, tin- and rubber dust, conditions of deposition have been defined experimentally. A serie of photos shows the filling of a recirculation region downstream of a backward facing step with graphite dust. The present investigations allow to avoid deposition of dust in recirculation regions by selecting the fluid numbers in an appropriate way. (orig.) [de

  17. Dust Storm Hits Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A thick pall of sand and dust blew out from the Sahara Desert over the Atlantic Ocean yesterday (January 6, 2002), engulfing the Canary Islands in what has become one of the worst sand storms ever recorded there. In this scene, notice how the dust appears particularly thick in the downwind wake of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands. Perhaps the turbulence generated by the air currents flowing past the island's volcanic peaks is churning the dust back up into the atmosphere, rather than allowing it to settle toward the surface. This true-color image was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on January 7, 2002. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  18. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... deformed stainless steel flakes is transformed to expanded martensite/austenite during low-temperature carburization. Various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. The most promising procedure...... powders and flakes. The nature of the decomposition products, carbides of the form M23C6 and M7C3, were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermodynamic modelling. The decomposition was found to be dependent on several parameters such as thermal...

  19. Dust remobilization experiments on the COMPASS tokamak.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weinzettl, Vladimír; Matějíček, Jiří; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; De Angeli, M.; Riva, G.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Havlíček, Josef; Adámek, Jiří; Seidl, Jakub; Tomeš, Matěj; Cavalier, Jordan; Imríšek, Martin; Havránek, Aleš; Pánek, Radomír; Peterka, Matěj

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 446-449 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Dust remobilization * Tungsten * Disruption * ELM * Plasma * Tokamak Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617300650

  20. Intergalactic dust and quasar distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltan, A.

    1979-01-01

    Non-homogeneous intergalactic extinction may considerably affect the quasar distribution. Especially samples of quasars isolated on the basis of B-V colours are subject to this phenomenon. Apparent grouping and close pairs of quasars reported in the literature may be a result of intergalactic dust. Using surface distribution of faint blue objects selected by Hawkins and Reddish it is estimated that intergalactic extinction in B should reach approximately 1 mag out to the redshift of approximately 1. This is slightly larger than predicted by theory and comparable to the mean dust density derived from observations. (Author)

  1. The distribution of interstellar dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clocchiatti, A.; Marraco, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    We propose the interstellar matter structural function as a tool to derive the features of the interstellar dust distribution. We study that function resolving some ideal dust distribution models. Later we describe the method used to find a reliable computing algorithm for the observational case. Finally, we describe the steps to build a model for the interstellar matter composed by spherically symmetrical clouds. The density distribution for each of these clouds is D(r) = D 0 .esup(-r/r 0 ) 2 . The preliminary results obtained are summarised. (author)

  2. Electrostatic Dust Detector with Improved Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D.P.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Methods to measure the inventory of dust particles and to remove dust if it approaches safety limits will be required in next-step tokamaks such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces, biased to 30 or 50 V, has been developed for the detection of dust on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Gaining operational experience of dust detection on surfaces in tokamaks is important, however the level of dust generated in contemporary short-pulse tokamaks is comparatively low and high sensitivity is necessary to measure dust on a shot-by-shot basis. We report on modifications in the detection electronics that have increased the sensitivity of the electrostatic dust detector by a factor of up to 120, - a level suitable for measurements on contemporary tokamaks.

  3. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  4. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegen, I; Schepanski, K

    2009-01-01

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  5. Dust-acoustic solitons in quantum plasma with kappa-distributed ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Arbitrary amplitude dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves in an unmagnetized and col- lisionless quantum dusty plasma comprising cold dust particles, kappa (κ)-distributed ions and degenerate electrons are investigated. The influence of suprathermality and quantum effects on the linear dispersion relation of DA ...

  6. MATADOR 2002: A pilot field experiment on convective plumes and dust devils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renno, N.O.; Abreu, V.J.; Koch, J.; Smith, P.H.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Debruin, H.A.R.; Burose, D.; Delory, G.T.; Farrell, W.M.; Watts, C.J.; Garatuza, J.; Parker, M.; Carswell, A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research suggests that mineral dust plays an important role in terrestrial weather and climate, not only by altering the atmospheric radiation budget, but also by affecting cloud microphysics and optical properties. In addition, dust transport and related Aeolian processes have been

  7. 78 FR 25308 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ...; Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: 60-Day... mines. CPDMs must be designed and constructed for coal miners to wear and operate without impeding their... related to Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices. MSHA is particularly interested in comments that: Evaluate...

  8. Prevailing indoor climate classification to predict house-dust mite abundance in Dutch homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schober, G.; Verstappen, I.; Snijders, M.C.L.; Bronswijk, van J.E.M.H.

    1995-01-01

    In Europe 10-15 % of the human population is sensitized to allergens of house dust mites (Pyroglyphidae). Population development of house dust mites is primarily influenced by water activity (aw) of the mite habitat. The availability of H20 (water-activity and relative humidity) in the niches of

  9. Air-conditioner filters enriching dust mites allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Li, Chaopin; Xu, Haifeng; Xu, Pengfei; Zhu, Haibin; Diao, Jidong; Li, Na; Zhao, Beibei

    2015-01-01

    We detected the concentration of dust mites allergen (Der f1 & Der p1) in the air of different places before and after the starting of air-conditioners in Wuhu City, Anhui, China, and to discuss the relation between the dust mites allergen in air-conditioner filters and the asthma attack. The dust samples were collected from the air-conditioner filters in dining rooms, shopping malls, hotels and households respectively. Concentrations of dust mites major group allergen 1 (Der f 1, Der p1) were detected with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the dust mite immune activities were determined by dot-ELISA. The concentration of Der f1 in dining rooms, shopping malls, hotels and households was 1.52 μg/g, 1.24 μg/g, 1.31 μg/g and 1.46 μg/g respectively, and the concentration of Der p1 in above-mentioned places was 1.23 μg/g, 1.12 μg/g, 1.16 μg/g and 1.18 μg/g respectively. The concentration of Der f1 & Der p1 in air was higher after the air-conditioners starting one hours later, and the difference was significant (Pair-conditioner filters can enrich dust mites major group allergen, and the allergens can induce asthma. The air-conditioner filters shall be cleaned or replaced regularly to prevent or reduce accumulation of the dust mites and its allergens.

  10. New View of Gas and Dust in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2010-08-01

    The recognizable components in meteorites differ in their relative abundances of the three oxygen isotopes (16O, 17O, and 18O). In particular, the amount of 16O varies from being like that of the Earth to substantially enriched compared to the other two isotopes. The current explanation for this interesting range in isotopic composition is that dust and gas in the solar nebula (the cloud of gas and dust surrounding the primitive Sun) began with the same 16O-rich composition, but the solids evolved towards the terrestrial value. A new analysis of the problem by Alexander Krot (University of Hawaii) and colleagues at the University of Hawaii, the University of