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Sample records for dust enhances ovalbumin-induced

  1. Coke dust enhances coke plant wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrz, Piotr; Rozwadowski, Andrzej; Burmistrz, Michał; Karcz, Aleksander

    2014-12-01

    Coke plant wastewater contain many toxic pollutants. Despite physico-chemical and biological treatment this specific type of wastewater has a significant impact on environment and human health. This article presents results of research on industrial adsorptive coke plant wastewater treatment. As a sorbent the coke dust, dozen times less expensive than pulverized activated carbon, was used. Treatment was conducted in three scenarios: adsorptive after full treatment with coke dust at 15 g L(-1), biological treatment enhanced with coke dust at 0.3-0.5 g L(-1) and addition of coke dust at 0.3 g L(-1) prior to the biological treatment. The enhanced biological treatment proved the most effective. It allowed additional removal of 147-178 mg COD kg(-1) of coke dust. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Uvaol attenuates pleuritis and eosinophilic inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergy in mice.

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    Agra, Lais Costa; Lins, Marvin Paulo; da Silva Marques, Patrícia; Smaniotto, Salete; Bandeira de Melo, Christianne; Lagente, Vincent; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-06-05

    Uvaol, a triterpene present in olives and virgin olive oil, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidant effects. However, until now, no studies have demonstrated its potential effects on allergic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of uvaol in a mouse model of allergy characterized by eosinophil-dominant inflammation in actively sensitized mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of uvaol was analyzed in two murine models of allergic inflammation (pleurisy and asthma). In these models, Swiss mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). In the pleurisy model, the pleural eosinophilic inflammation and IL-5 concentrations were examined 24h after the OVA challenge, while in the asthma model were examined the airway inflammation via bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cytology and lung histopathology analyses. Our results showed that uvaol decreased the accumulation of eosinophils and the concentration of IL-5 in pleural effluent. Uvaol also demonstrated important anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting production of IL-5 and influx of leukocytes, mainly of eosinophils, in BAL fluid, but without interfering with levels of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes. Moreover, the eosinophil infiltration, mucus production, number of alveoli that collapsed, and IL-5 levels in the lung were clearly decreased by uvaol treatment. These findings indicate that uvaol can be a good candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammation by inhibiting eosinophil influx and IL-5 production in ovalbumin-induced allergy.

  3. Galangin Abrogates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation via Negative Regulation of NF-κB

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    Wang-Jian Zha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB has been associated with the development of asthma. Galangin, the active pharmacological ingredient from Alpinia galanga, is reported to have a variety of anti-inflammatory properties in vitro via negative regulation of NF-κB. This study aimed to investigate whether galangin can abrogate ovalbumin- (OVA- induced airway inflammation by negative regulation of NF-κB. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with OVA developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and inflammation. Galangin dose dependently inhibited OVA-induced increases in total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and interleukin-(IL- 4, IL-5, and IL-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced serum level of OVA-specific IgE. Galangin also attenuated AHR, reduced eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia, and reduced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1 levels in lung tissue. Additionally, galangin blocked inhibitor of κB degradation, phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and p65 nuclear translocation from lung tissues of OVA-sensitized mice. Similarly, in normal human airway smooth muscle cells, galangin blocked tumor necrosis factor-α induced p65 nuclear translocation and expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, eotaxin, CXCL10, and VCAM-1. These results suggest that galangin can attenuate ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  4. Puerarin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Lung Inflammation and Hemostatic Unbalance in Rat Asthma Model

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    Feng Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We aimed to investigate and evaluate the preventive activity of puerarin on the ovalbumin-induced asthma rat model. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats were sensitized intraperitoneally on days 0, 7, and 14 and challenged to ovalbumin intratracheally on day 21. Groups of sensitized rats were treated randomly either with placebo, puerarin, dexamethasone, or puerarin combined with dexamethasone, from days 15 to 20. Inflammatory markers, including cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, inflammatory cytokines, histopathology, and coagulation parameters, such as coagulation tests and the activity of coagulation factors, were analyzed. Results. Puerarin significantly inhibited the recruitment of inflammatory cells in BALF and lung tissue. At the same time, the release of IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the expression of mRNAs in lung tissue homogenate were changed by puerarin. Administration of puerarin also effectively rectified the coagulation disorder in asthmatic rats, such as prothrombin time (PT (P<0.01, thrombin time (TT (P<0.05, fibrinogen (FIB (P<0.01,the activity of factor II (FII (P<0.01, the activity of factor V (FV (P<0.05, the activity of factor VII (FVII (P<0.05, the activity of factor X (FX (P<0.05, the activity of factor VIII (FVIII (P<0.01, the activity of factor IX (FIX (P<0.05, and the activity of factor XII (FXII (P<0.05. Conclusions. Our results provide a clue that puerarin was useful for the preventive of allergic airway disease in rodents.

  5. Effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on lung pathology and inflammation in ovalbumin-induced asthma in mouse

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    Maryam Mohammadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have attracted significant interest to treat asthma and its complication. In this study, the effects of BMSCs on lung pathology and inflammation in an ovalbumin-induced asthma model in mouse were examined. Materials and Methods:BALB/c mice were divided into three groups: control group (animals were not sensitized, asthma group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin, asthma+BMSC group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin and treated with BMSCs. BMSCs were isolated and characterized and then labeled with Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. After that the cells transferred into asthmatic mice. Histopathological changes of the airways, BMSCs migration and total and differential white blood cell (WBC count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid were evaluated. Results:A large number of BrdU-BMSCs were found in the lungs of mice treated with BMSCs. The histopathological changes, BAL total WBC counts and the percentage of neutrophils and eosinophils were increased in asthma group compared to the control group. Treatment with BMSCs significantly decreased airway pathological indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and also goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion:The results of this study revealed that BMSCs therapy significantly suppressed the lung pathology and inflammation in the ovalbumin induced asthma model in mouse.

  6. Saharan dust enhances carbon sequestration in the North Atlantic

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    Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Lampitt, Richard; Le Moigne, Frederic; Sanders, Richard; Statham, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We present unique time-series data from sediment traps deployed at 3000 m depth in the subtropical North (NOG) and South (SOG) Atlantic oligotrophic gyres during 2007-2010. The sampling sites have similar physical properties and carbon fixation rates but different surface ocean biogeochemistry owing to enhanced input of Saharan dust in the North. NOG and SOG sites are thus ideal to investigate the effects of dust input on carbon sequestration in low-nutrient low-chlorophyll oceans. Analyses of the trap material (chemical, microscopic and stable isotope) revealed significant inter-basin differences in the downward particle flux and its composition, showing that biogeochemical differences at the surface have major effects on deep ocean sequestration scenarios. Particulate organic carbon flux in the dustier Northern gyre was twice that in the dust-poor Southern gyre. We conclude that this is a consequence of tight coupling between fertilization and ballasting due to dust deposition. We suggest that excess of micronutrient Fe from the dust increased phytoplankton biomass by stimulating di-nitrogen fixation, while dust particles caused rapid and more efficient transport to depth via ballasting. These findings present compelling direct evidence of two distinct biogeochemical provinces in the subtropical oligotrophic Atlantic not only with respect to surface nutrient biogeochemistry but also with respect to carbon sequestration.

  7. Wind-Enhanced Interaction of Radiation and Dust (WEIRD) and the Growth and Maintenance of Local Dust Storms on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Rafkin, Scot C Randell

    2011-01-01

    A radiative-dynamic positive feedback mechanism (Wind Enhanced Interaction of Radiation and Dust: WEIRD) for localized Mars dust disturbances was previously found to operate in highly idealized numerical experiments. Numerical simulations are used to test for the presence and quantitative effect of the radiative-dynamic WEIRD feedback mechanism under more realistic conditions. Comparisons between cases where lifted dust is radiatively active and radiatively passive elucidate the importance of the dust radiative forcing on the thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the atmosphere. The WEIRD feedback mechanism does operate under realistic conditions, although it can be masked and diminished by a variety of other forcing mechanisms. Globally increased dust loading is found to accelerate the local winds while simultaneously diminishing the impact of local physiographical forcing. Local enhancements of dust produce a thermal and dynamical response that resembles many of the essential features seen in the idealiz...

  8. Short-term smoke exposure attenuates ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in allergic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, BN; Postma, DS; Geerlings, M; Luinge, MA; Klok, PA; van der Strate, BWA; Kerstjens, HAM; Timens, W; Hylkema, MN

    Little is known about effects of smoking on airway inflammation in asthma. We tested the hypothesis that smoking enhances established airway inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. C57Bl/6j mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and challenged with OVA (OVA-mice) or sham-sensitized to

  9. Hesperetin-7,3'-O-dimethylether selectively inhibits phosphodiesterase 4 and effectively suppresses ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness with a high therapeutic ratio

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    Yang You-Lan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hesperetin was reported to selectively inhibit phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4. While hesperetin-7,3'-O-dimethylether (HDME is a synthetic liposoluble hesperetin. Therefore, we were interested in investigating its selectivity on PDE4 and binding ability on high-affinity rolipram-binding sites (HARBs in vitro, and its effects on ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo, and clarifying its potential for treating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods PDE1~5 activities were measured using a two-step procedure. The binding of HDME on high-affinity rolipram-binding sites was determined by replacing 2 nM [3H]-rolipram. AHR was assessed using the FlexiVent system and barometric plethysmography. Inflammatory cells were counted using a hemocytometer. Cytokines were determined using mouse T helper (Th1/Th2 cytokine CBA kits, and total immunoglobulin (IgE or IgG2a levels were done using ELISA method. Xylazine (10 mg/kg/ketamine (70 mg/kg-induced anesthesia was performed. Results HDME revealed selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4 inhibition with a therapeutic (PDE4H/PDE4L ratio of 35.5 in vitro. In vivo, HDME (3~30 μmol/kg, orally (p.o. dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway resistance (RL and increased lung dynamic compliance (Cdyn, and decreased enhanced pause (Penh values induced by methacholine in sensitized and challenged mice. It also significantly suppressed the increases in the numbers of total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of these mice. In addition, HDME (3~30 μmol/kg, p.o. dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin (IgE levels in the BALF and serum, and enhanced IgG2a level in the serum of these mice. Conclusions HDME exerted anti

  10. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

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    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper fiber supplementation promotes effectively the

  11. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

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    Zhiyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD.We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms.The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g. administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight, respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA content in fecal samples using real-time PCR.Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly.Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper fiber supplementation promotes

  12. Justicia procumbens Extract (DW2008) Selectively Suppresses Th2 Cytokines in Splenocytes and Ameliorates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Asthma.

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    Youm, Jihyun; Lee, Hyunyong; Chang, Hwan Bong; Jeon, Jihyun; Yoon, Mi Hee; Woo, Ji Young; Choi, Min-Soo; Hwang, Yunha; Seong, Seungkyoo; Na, Kyuheum; Yoon, Joobyoung

    2017-01-01

    DW2008 is an anhydrous ethanol extract of Justicia procumbens produced by Dong-Wha Pharmaceutical, Inc., Co. as a candidate anti-asthmatic drug. In this study, DW2008 selectively reduced T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines in mouse splenocytes and ameliorated ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation by downregulating pulmonary infiltration of differential inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines more than a decoction or ethanol extract of J. procumbens did in a mouse asthma model. DW2008 also significantly inhibited airway hyperresponsiveness and reduced the thickness of the airway epithelium. HPLC analysis showed that the major peaks (justicidin A and B) of DW2008 were higher than those of the other extracts. Justicidin A and B significantly suppressed Th2 cytokine levels in mouse spleen cells and exhibited a protective effect in ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Our findings indicate that DW2008 effectively inhibits allergic airway inflammatory reactions and airway hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of asthma, suggesting its potential as an anti-asthmatic agent.

  13. Inhibitory effect of n-butanol fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a guinea pig model of asthma.

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    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Banerjee, Aryamitra; Chauhan, Bhupendrasinh F; Padh, Harish; Nivsarkar, Manish; Mehta, Anita A

    2009-01-01

    Moringaceae, which belongs to the Moringa oleifera Lam. family, is a well-known herb used in Asian medicine as an antiallergic drug. In the present study, the efficacy of the n-butanol extract of the seeds of the plant (MONB) is examined against ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs. The test drugs (MONB or dexamethasone) are administered orally prior to challenge with aerosolized 0.5% ovalbumin. During the experimental period, bronchoconstriction tests are performed, and lung function parameters are measured. The blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are collected to assess cellular content, and serum is used for cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-4, and interleukin-6) assays. Histamine assays of lung tissue are performed using lung tissue homogenate. The results suggest that in ovalbumin-sensitized model control animals, tidal volume is decreased, respiration rate is increased, and both the total and differential cell counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are increased significantly compared with nonsensitized controls. MONB treatment shows improvement in all parameters except bronchoalveolar lavage tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-4. Moreover, MONB treatment demonstrates protection against acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation. These results indicate that MONB has an inhibitory effect on airway inflammation. Thus, MONB possesses an antiasthmatic property through modulation of the relationship between Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalances.

  14. Enhancement of oceanic parameters associated with dust storms using satellite data

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    Singh, Ramesh P.; Prasad, Anup K.; Kayetha, Vinay K.; Kafatos, Menas

    2008-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role on the dynamics of climate processes through direct and indirect effects. Dust storms originating over the world's arid regions contribute a large fraction of aerosols in the atmosphere. Using remote sensing data, an anomalous enhancement in the biological productivity of sea was observed in the Gulf of Oman which was attributed only to cold sea surface temperature (SST) eddies (during November to early December months of 1996-1999), whereas recent study has shown that during dust storms (June-July-August and October-November-December months of 1997-2004), major nutrient supply is from atmospheric dust deposition. We have carried out a study of individual cases of major dust storms over the Arabian Sea during the entire year (December 2003-December 2006) to quantify role of dust storms and changes in ocean surface due to chlorophyll bloom. Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua, we have found that the deposition of dust along the passage of major dust storms (aerosol optical depth (AOD) ˜0.25-0.41) occuring over the Arabian Sea causes chlorophyll blooming (usually 10-22.43 mg/m3) within a period of 1-2 to up to 3-4 days. However, we have also found significant anomalous cooling of the ocean surface (SST) and relatively higher ocean wind speeds (QuikSCAT) during dust storms that may lead to favorable conditions for blooming. Exact nature and cause of chlorophyll bloom in the semienclosed northern Arabian Sea, surrounded by one of the world's major sources of dust storms (Africa, Middle East, Iran, and Afghanistan), are very important in understanding the productivity and the biogeochemical cycles of the marine ecosystem. The results have been validated using the Indian Remote Sensing Polar-4 Ocean Color Monitor (IRS P4 OCM) data.

  15. Inhibitory effects of Pycnogenol® (French maritime pine bark extract) on airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma.

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    Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Jeon, Chan-Mi; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jong-Choon; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Hahn, Kyu-Woung; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2013-12-01

    Pycnogenol® (PYC) is a standardized extracts from the bark of the French maritime pine (Pinus maritime) and used as a herbal remedy for various diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PYC on airway inflammation using a model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and RAW264.7 cells. PYC decreased nitric oxide production and reduced the interleukine (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PYC also reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and enhanced the expression of hemeoxygenase (HO)-1. In the in vivo experiment, PYC decreased the inflammatory cell count and the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and immunoglobulin (Ig) E in BALF or serum. These results are consistent with the histological analysis findings, which showed that PYC attenuated the airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion induced by OVA challenge. In addition, PYC enhanced the expression of HO-1. In contrast, PYC inhibited the elevated expression of iNOS and MMP-9 proteins induced by OVA challenge. In conclusion, PYC exhibits protective effects against OVA-induced asthma and LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that PYC has potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma.

  16. Potentiation by viral respiratory infection of ovalbumin-induced guinea-pig tracheal hyperresponsiveness: role for tachykinins.

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    Ladenius, A. R.; Folkerts, G.; van der Linde, H. J.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1995-01-01

    1. We investigated whether virus-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea-pigs could be modulated by pretreatment with capsaicin and whether viral respiratory infections could potentiate ovalbumin-aerosol-induced tracheal hyperresponsiveness. 2. Animals were inoculated intratracheally with bovine parainfluenza-3 virus or control medium 7 days after treatment with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.). Four days after inoculation, tracheal contractions were measured to increasing concentrations of substance P, histamine and the cholinoceptor agonist, arecoline. 3. In tracheae from virus-infected guinea-pigs, contractions in response to substance P, histamine and arecoline were significantly enhanced (P arecoline completely. 4. In another series of experiments animals were first sensitized with ovalbumin (20 mg kg-1, i.p.). After 14 days animals were exposed to either saline or ovalbumin aerosols for 8 days. After 4 aerosol exposures (4 days) animals were inoculated with either parainfluenza-3 virus or control medium. One day after the last ovalbumin aerosol, tracheal contraction in response to increasing concentrations of substance P, histamine and arecoline was measured. 5. Tracheae from ovalbumin-aerosol-exposed control inoculated animals showed a similar degree of airway hyperresponsiveness to saline-aerosol-exposed virus-treated guinea-pigs. Virus inoculation of ovalbumin-treated animals significantly potentiated the tracheal contractions to substance P compared to either of the treatments alone. The contractions in response to histamine and arecoline were only slightly enhanced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582502

  17. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Antiallergic Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Heliotropium indicum L. in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Conjunctivitis

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    Samuel Kyei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliotropium indicum is used traditionally as a remedy for conjunctivitis in Ghana. This study therefore evaluated the antiallergic potential of an aqueous whole plant extract of Heliotropium indicum (HIE in ovalbumin-induced allergic conjunctivitis and attempted to predict its mode of action. Clinical scores for allergic conjunctivitis induced by intraperitoneal ovalbumin sensitization (100 : 10 μg OVA/Al(OH3 in phosphate-buffered saline [PBS] and topical conjunctival challenge (1.5 mg OVA in 10 μL PBS in Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were estimated after a week’s daily treatment with 30–300 mg kg−1 HIE, 30 mg kg−1 prednisolone, 10 mg kg−1 chlorpheniramine, or 10 mL kg−1 PBS. Ovalbumin-specific IgG and IgE and total IgE in serum were estimated using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Histopathological assessment of the exenterated conjunctivae was also performed. The 30 and 300 mg kg−1 HIE treatment resulted in a significantly (p≤0.001 low clinical score of allergic conjunctivitis. Ovalbumin-specific IgG and IgE as well as total serum IgE also decreased significantly (p≤0.01–0.001. The conjunctival tissue in HIE treated guinea pigs had mild mononuclear infiltration compared to the PBS-treated ones, which had intense conjunctival tissue inflammatory infiltration. HIE exhibited antiallergic effect possibly by immunomodulation or immunosuppression.

  18. Suppression of ovalbumin-induced Th2-driven airway inflammation by β-sitosterol in a guinea pig model of asthma.

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    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Mehta, Anita A

    2011-01-10

    In the present study, the efficacy of β-sitosterol isolated from an n-butanol extract of the seeds of the plant Moringa oleifera (Moringaceae) was examined against ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs. All animals (except group I) were sensitized subcutaneously and challenged with aerosolized 0.5% ovalbumin. The test drugs, β-sitosterol (2.5mg/kg) or dexamethasone (2.5mg/kg), were administered to the animals (p.o.) prior to challenge with ovalbumin. During the experimental period (on days 18, 21, 24 and 29), a bronchoconstriction test (0.25% acetylcholine for 30s) was performed and lung function parameters (tidal volume and respiration rate) were measured for each animal. On day 30, blood and bronchoalveolar lavaged fluid were collected to assess cellular content, and serum was collected for cytokine assays. Lung tissue was utilized for a histamine assay and for histopathology. β-sitosterol significantly increased the tidal volume (V(t)) and decreased the respiration rate (f) of sensitized and challenged guinea pigs to the level of non-sensitized control guinea pigs and lowered both the total and differential cell counts, particularly eosinophils and neutrophils, in blood and bronchoalveolar lavaged fluid. Furthermore, β-sitosterol treatment suppressed the increase in cytokine levels (TNFα, IL-4 and IL-5), with the exception of IL-6, in serum and in bronchoalveolar lavaged fluid detected in model control animals. Moreover, treatment with β-sitosterol protected against airway inflammation in lung tissue histopathology. β-sitosterol possesses anti-asthmatic actions that might be mediated by inhibiting the cellular responses and subsequent release/synthesis of Th2 cytokines. This compound may have therapeutic potential in allergic asthma.

  19. An essential regulatory role of downstream of kinase-1 in the ovalbumin-induced murine model of asthma.

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    Chang-Min Lee

    Full Text Available The downstream of kinase (DOK-1 is involved in the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK pathway in mast cells, but the role of DOK-1 in the pathogenesis of asthma has not been defined. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel regulatory role of DOK-1 in airway inflammation and physiologic responses in a murine model of asthma using lentiviral vector containing DOK-1 cDNA or DOK-1-specific ShRNA. The OVA-induced inflammatory cells, airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 cytokine expression, and mucus response were significantly reduced in DOK-1 overexpressing mice compared to OVA-challenged control mice. The transgenic introduction of DOK-1 significantly stimulated the activation and expression of STAT-4 and T-bet, while impressively inhibiting the activation and expression of STAT-6 and GATA-3 in airway epithelial cells. On the other hand, DOK-1 knockdown mice enhanced STAT-6 expression and its nuclear translocation compared to OVA-challenged control mice. When viewed in combination, our studies demonstrate DOK-1 regulates allergen-induced Th2 immune responses by selective stimulation and inhibition of STAT-4 and STAT-6 signaling pathways, respectively. These studies provide a novel insight on the regulatory role of DOK-1 in allergen-induced Th2 inflammation and airway responses, which has therapeutic potential for asthma and other allergic diseases.

  20. Enhancement and identification of dust events in the south-west region of Iran using satellite observations

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    Taghavi, F.; Owlad, E.; Ackerman, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    South-west Asia including the Middle East is one of the most prone regions to dust storm events. In recent years, there was an increase in the occurrence of these environmental and meteorological phenomena. Remote sensing could serve as an applicable method to detect and also characterise these events. In this study, two dust enhancement algorithms were used to investigate the behaviour of dust events using satellite data, compare with numerical model output and other satellite products and finally validate with in-situ measurements. The results show that the use of thermal infrared algorithm enhances dust more accurately. The aerosol optical depth from MODIS and output of a Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM8b) are applied for comparing the results. Ground-based observations of synoptic stations and sun photometers are used for validating the satellite products. To find the transport direction and the locations of the dust sources and the synoptic situations during these events, model outputs (HYSPLIT and NCEP/NCAR) are presented. Comparing the results with synoptic maps and the model outputs showed that using enhancement algorithms is a more reliable way than any other MODIS products or model outputs to enhance the dust.

  1. Enhancement and identification of dust events in the south-west region of Iran using satellite observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Taghavi; E Owlad; S A Ackerman

    2017-03-01

    South-west Asia including the Middle East is one of the most prone regions to dust storm events. In recent years, there was an increase in the occurrence of these environmental and meteorological phenomena. Remote sensing could serve as an applicable method to detect and also characterise these events. In this study, two dust enhancement algorithms were used to investigate the behaviour of dust events using satellite data, compare with numerical model output and other satellite products and finally validate with in-situ measurements. The results show that the use of thermal infrared algorithm enhances dust moreaccurately. The aerosol optical depth from MODIS and output of a Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM8b) are applied for comparing the results. Ground-based observations of synoptic stations and sun photometers are used for validating the satellite products. To find the transport direction and thelocations of the dust sources and the synoptic situations during these events, model outputs (HYSPLIT and NCEP/NCAR) are presented. Comparing the results with synoptic maps and the model outputs showed that using enhancement algorithms is a more reliable way than any other MODIS products or model outputs to enhance the dust.

  2. Solar wind plasma profiles during interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs): Consistent with charged-dust pickup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-06-01

    The solar wind contains many magnetic structures, and most of them have identifiable correlated changes in the flowing plasma. However, the very characteristic rise and fall of the magnetic field in an interplanetary field enhancement has no clear solar wind counterpart. It appears to be a pure magnetic ``barrier'' that transfers solar wind momentum to charged dust produced in collisions of interplanetary bodies in the size range of tens to hundreds of meters. This transfer lifts the fine scale dust out of the Sun's gravitational well. We demonstrate the lack of field-plasma correlation with several examples from spacecraft records as well as show an ensemble average velocity profile during IFEs which is consistent with our IFE formation hypothesis.

  3. Enhancing weak transient signals in SEVIRI false colour imagery: application to dust source detection in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jon E.; Brindley, Helen E.; Bryant, Robert G.; Russell, Jacqui E.; Jenkins, Katherine F.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the processes governing the availability and entrainment of mineral dust into the atmosphere requires dust sources to be identified and the evolution of dust events to be monitored. To achieve this aim a wide range of approaches have been developed utilising observations from a variety of different satellite sensors. Global maps of source regions and their relative strengths have been derived from instruments in low Earth orbit (e.g. Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer (TOMS) (Prospero et al., 2002), MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) (Ginoux et al., 2012)). Instruments such as MODIS can also be used to improve precise source location (Baddock et al., 2009) but the information available is restricted to the satellite overpass times which may not be coincident with active dust emission from the source. Hence, at a regional scale, some of the more successful approaches used to characterise the activity of different sources use high temporal resolution data available from instruments in geostationary orbit. For example, the widely used red-green-blue (RGB) dust scheme developed by Lensky and Rosenfeld (2008) (hereafter LR2008) makes use of observations from selected thermal channels of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) in a false colour rendering scheme in which dust appears pink. This scheme has provided the basis for numerous studies of north African dust sources and factors governing their activation (e.g. Schepanski et al., 2007, 2009, 2012). However, the LR2008 imagery can fail to identify dust events due to the effects of atmospheric moisture, variations in dust layer height and optical properties, and surface conditions (Brindley et al., 2012). Here we introduce a new method designed to circumvent some of these issues and enhance the signature of dust events using observations from SEVIRI. The approach involves the derivation of a composite clear-sky signal for selected channels on an individual time-step and

  4. A Science-enhanced Database of GALEX UV spectra to Characterize Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has performed the first surveys of the sky in the Ultraviolet (UV). Its unprecedented database, including almost 300 million photometric source measurements in far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV), offers unique sensitivity for studying selected classes of astrophysical objects, such as hot stars, star-forming galaxies, and zimaging data have been amply mined; science-enhanced source catalogs enable comprehensive investigations long after the mission is concluded. GALEX has also collected 125,564 UV spectra (range 1344-2831Ang; resolution about 200(FUV) - 120(NUV)): a homogeneous template tenfold larger and at fainter fluxes than the IUE target sample. Yet, this unique resource has hardly been exploited, due to poor calibration and lack of standard quality assessment of the complex grism spectral extraction. The homogeneous set of >120,000 UV spectra distributed all over the sky will enable - among other investigations - derivation of UV extinction curves for thousands of sightlines throughout the Milky Way (MW), yielding information on properties of interstellar dust that cannot be obtained otherwise, and, furthermore, validating extinction maps derived from vastly larger photometric samples. Our proposed map of MW dust properties will be 3D, since Gaia will provide accurate distances for all stellar sources. The first step to make this study possible will be to classify all sources in the [grism, hence serendipitous] GALEX spectroscopic sample, and to assess quality and flux calibration. We will combine multi-band photometry of the spectral sources (GALEX, SDSS, Pan-STARRs, ...), any existing information (e.g., from SIMBAD), available IUE spectra (about 100) and SDSS spectra (8,000), besides examining the UV spectral features. Hot stellar sources constitute over half of the GALEX spectroscopic sample. For those with spectra of sufficient quality (about 9,000 in NUV, >1,000 in FUV+NUV) we will derive UV extinction curves by the

  5. An Enhanced Satellite-Based Algorithm for Detecting and Tracking Dust Outbreaks by Means of SEVIRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marchese

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dust outbreaks are meteorological phenomena of great interest for scientists and authorities (because of their impact on the climate, environment, and human activities, which may be detected, monitored, and characterized from space using different methods and procedures. Among the recent dust detection algorithms, the RSTDUST multi-temporal technique has provided good results in different geographic areas (e.g., Mediterranean basin; Arabian Peninsula, exhibiting a better performance than traditional split window methods, in spite of some limitations. In this study, we present an optimized configuration of this technique, which better exploits data provided by Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI aboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG satellites to address those issues (e.g., sensitivity reduction over arid and semi-arid regions; dependence on some meteorological clouds. Three massive dust events affecting Europe and the Mediterranean basin in May 2008/2010 are analysed in this work, using information provided by some independent and well-established aerosol products to assess the achieved results. The study shows that the proposed algorithm, christened eRSTDUST (i.e., enhanced RSTDUST, which provides qualitative information about dust outbreaks, is capable of increasing the trade-off between reliability and sensitivity. The results encourage further experimentations of this method in other periods of the year, also exploiting data provided by different satellite sensors, for better evaluating the advantages arising from the use of this dust detection technique in operational scenarios.

  6. Dust capture and long-lived density enhancements triggered by vortices in 2D protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Surville, Clément; Lin, Douglas N C

    2016-01-01

    We study dust capture by vortices and its long-term consequences in global two-fluid inviscid disk simulations using a new polar grid code RoSSBi. We perform the longest integrations so far, several hundred disk orbits, at the highest resolution attainable in global simulations of disks with dust, namely 2048x4096 grid points. This allows to study the dust evolution well beyond vortex dissipation. We vary a wide range of parameters, most notably the dust-to-gas ratio in the initial setup varies in the range $10^{-3}$ to $0.1$. Irrespective of the initial dust-to-gas ratio we find rapid concentration of the dust inside vortices, reaching dust-to-gas ratios of order unity inside the vortex. We present an analytical model that describes very well the dust capture process inside vortices, finding consistent results for all dust-to-gas ratios. A vortex streaming instability develops which causes invariably vortex destruction. After vortex dissipation large-scale dust-rings encompassing a disk annulus form in most ...

  7. Increase the use of the stone dust bagged barrier enhancing its application for differing conditions.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, JJL

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available for the Compilation of a Mandatory Code of Practice for the Prevention of coal Dust Explosions in Underground Coal Mines (1997) on the constrLiction of a bagged stone dust barrier apply: The horizontal distance between the hooks of the bags on a plane must...

  8. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: II. EFFECTIVE DIELECTRIC CONSTANT AND LOCAL FIELD ENHANCEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part 1 of the work has shown that electrical breakdown in dust layers obeys Paschen's Law, but occurs at applied field values which appear too small to initiate the breakdown. In this paper the authors show how an effective dielectric constant characterizing the dust layer can be...

  9. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: II. EFFECTIVE DIELECTRIC CONSTANT AND LOCAL FIELD ENHANCEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part 1 of the work has shown that electrical breakdown in dust layers obeys Paschen's Law, but occurs at applied field values which appear too small to initiate the breakdown. In this paper the authors show how an effective dielectric constant characterizing the dust layer can be...

  10. Asian sand dust enhances murine lung inflammation caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Shoji; Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Nishikawa, Masataka; Mori, Ikuko; Sun, Guifan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2012-01-15

    Inhaling concomitants from Asian sand dust (ASD) may result in exacerbation of pneumonia by the pathogen. The exacerbating effect of ASD on pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) was investigated in ICR mice. The organic substances adsorbed onto ASD collected from the atmosphere of Iki-island in Japan were excluded by heat treatment at 360°C for 30min. ICR mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD at doses of 0.05mg or 0.2mg/mouse four times at 2-week intervals (total dose of 0.2mg or 0.8mg/mouse) and were administrated with ASD in the presence or absence of KP at the last intratracheal instillation. Pathologically, ASD caused exacerbation of pneumonia by KP as shown by increased inflammatory cells within the bronchiolar and the alveolar compartments. ASD enhanced the neutrophil number dose dependently as well as the expression of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α) and chemokines (KC, MCP-1, MIP-1α) related to KP in BALF. In an in vitro study using RAW264.7 cells, combined treatment of ASD and KP increased gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-β, KC, MCP-1, and MIP-1α. The same treatment tended to increase the protein level of IL-1β, TNF-α and MCP-1 in a culture medium compared to each treatment alone. The combined treatment tended to increase the gene expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and NALP3, ASC and caspase-1 compared with KP alone. These results suggest that the exacerbation of pneumonia by ASD+KP was due to the enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators via activation of TLR2 and NALP3 inflammasome pathways in alveolar macrophages.

  11. Asian sand dust enhances murine lung inflammation caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Miao [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 11001, Shenyang (China); Ichinose, Takamichi; Yoshida, Seiichi [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201, Oita (Japan); Yamamoto, Shoji; Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie [Pathophysiology Research Team, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikawa, Masataka; Mori, Ikuko [Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sun, Guifan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 11001, Shenyang (China); Shibamoto, Takayuki, E-mail: tshibamoto@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Inhaling concomitants from Asian sand dust (ASD) may result in exacerbation of pneumonia by the pathogen. The exacerbating effect of ASD on pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) was investigated in ICR mice. The organic substances adsorbed onto ASD collected from the atmosphere of Iki-island in Japan were excluded by heat treatment at 360 °C for 30 min. ICR mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD at doses of 0.05 mg or 0.2 mg/mouse four times at 2-week intervals (total dose of 0.2 mg or 0.8 mg/mouse) and were administrated with ASD in the presence or absence of KP at the last intratracheal instillation. Pathologically, ASD caused exacerbation of pneumonia by KP as shown by increased inflammatory cells within the bronchiolar and the alveolar compartments. ASD enhanced the neutrophil number dose dependently as well as the expression of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α) and chemokines (KC, MCP-1, MIP-1α) related to KP in BALF. In an in vitro study using RAW264.7 cells, combined treatment of ASD and KP increased gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-β, KC, MCP-1, and MIP-1α. The same treatment tended to increase the protein level of IL-1β, TNF-α and MCP-1 in a culture medium compared to each treatment alone. The combined treatment tended to increase the gene expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and NALP3, ASC and caspase-1 compared with KP alone. These results suggest that the exacerbation of pneumonia by ASD + KP was due to the enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators via activation of TLR2 and NALP3 inflammasome pathways in alveolar macrophages.

  12. Amelioration of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease following Der p 1 peptide immunotherapy is not associated with induction of IL-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldaver, D M; Bharhani, M S; Wattie, J N; Ellis, R; Neighbour, H; Lloyd, C M; Inman, M D; Larché, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, we show therapeutic amelioration of established ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway disease following house dust mite (HDM) peptide therapy. Mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA and HDM protein extract (Dermatophagoides species) to induce dual allergen sensitization and allergic airway disease. Treatment of allergic mice with peptides derived from the major allergen Der p 1 suppressed OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, tissue eosinophilia, and goblet cell hyperplasia upon rechallenge with allergen. Peptide treatment also suppressed OVA-specific T-cell proliferation. Resolution of airway pathophysiology was associated with a reduction in recruitment, proliferation, and effector function of T(H)2 cells and decreased interleukin (IL)-17⁺ T cells. Furthermore, peptide immunotherapy induced the regulatory cytokine IL-10 and increased the proportion of Fox p3⁺ cells among those expressing IL-10. Tolerance to OVA was not associated with increased IL-35. In conclusion, our results provide in vivo evidence for the creation of a tolerogenic environment following HDM peptide immunotherapy, leading to the therapeutic amelioration of established OVA-induced allergic airway disease.

  13. Indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane enhances house dust mite-induced activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbaz, Derya; Lebre, M Cristina; Logiantara, Adrian; van Ree, Ronald; van Rijt, Leonie S

    2016-11-01

    The indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has been added as flame retardant to many consumer products but detaches and accumulates in house dust. Inhalation of house dust leads to exposure to house dust mite (HDM) allergens in the presence of HBCD. Activation of dendritic cells is crucial in the sensitization to HDM allergens. The current study examined whether exposure to HBCD affected activation/maturation of HDM-exposed human dendritic cells (DC). Human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) were exposed simultaneously to HDM and a concentration range of HBCD (0.1-20 μM) in vitro. HDM exposure of moDC induced expression of co-stimulatory molecule CD80 and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, simultaneous exposure of moDC to HBCD and HDM enhanced the expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR, co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 depending on the dose of HBCD. Our results indicate that simultaneous exposure of HDM and HBCD can enhance the antigen presentation and maturation/activation of DC.

  14. Evaluation of pharmacological relaxation effect of the natural product naringin on in vitro cultured airway smooth muscle cells and in vivo ovalbumin-induced asthma Balb/c mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Lu, Yun; Luo, Mingzhi; Shi, Xiaohao; Pan, Yan; Zeng, Huilong; Deng, Linhong

    2016-01-01

    Asthma has become a common chronic respiratory disease worldwide and its prevalence is predicted to continue increasing in the next decade, particularly in developing countries. A key component in asthma therapy is to alleviate the excessive bronchial airway narrowing ultimately due to airway smooth muscle contraction, which is often facilitated by a smooth muscle relaxant, such as the β2-adrenergic agonists. Recently, bitter taste receptor (TAS2R) agonists, including saccharin and chloroquine, have been found to potently relax the airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) via intracellular Ca2+ signaling. This inspires a great interest in screening the vast resource of natural bitter substances for potential bronchodilatory drugs. In the present study, the relaxation effect of naringin, a compound extracted from common grapefruit, on ASMCs cultured in vitro or bronchial airways of Balb/c mice in vivo was evaluated. The results demonstrated that, when exposed to increasing doses of naringin (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mM), the traction force generated by the cultured ASMCs decreased progressively, while the intracellular calcium flux signaling in the ASMCs increased. When inhaled at increasing doses (15, 30 and 60 µg), naringin also dose-dependently reduced the bronchial airway resistance of the normal and ovalbumin-induced asthma Balb/c mice in response to challenge with methacholine. In conclusion, these findings indicate that naringin was able to effectively relax murine ASMCs in vitro and in vivo, thus suggesting that it is a promising drug agent to be further investigated in the development of novel bronchodilators for the treatment of asthma. PMID:28101344

  15. Effect of Desloratadine Citrate Disodium Injections on Ovalbumin-induced Allergic Rhinitis in Rats%枸地氯雷他定注射液对大鼠过敏性鼻炎的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    揭琼; 袁馨; 陈美灵; 吴玉林

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of desloratadine citrate disodium injections (DLC) on ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis in rats, including the rhinitis symptoms, PGD2 and LTC4 levels and inflammatory cell infiltration in nasal lavage fluid (NLF). Methods: Ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis male SD rats were randomly divided in five groups: model group, DLC low, medium and high dose groups, and chlorphenamine maleate injectlon (CHM) group as positive group. In addition, the normal rats were also recorded. From the 22nd day of being modeled, rats of the model and normal groups were given iv saline, the DLC low, medium and high dose groups were given DLC at 0.3, 0.6 and 1.2 mg·kg-1, CHM group were given CHM at 0.6 mg·kg-1, all the iv treatments were once a day for five days. Rats were topically sensitized by instilling ovalbumin solution into the bilateral nasal cavities on alternate days. Symptoms of rhinitis were observed continuously for 30 min at the last time for administration and topically sensitization, taking the scoring method to record the symptoms of rhinitis. Two hours after the intranasal challenge, NLF was collected, PGD2 and LTC4 levels and inflammatory cellular infiltration were evaluated, respectively. Results and Conclusion: DLC significantly attenuated ovalbumin-induced rhinitis symptoms and caused a significant reduction in PGD2 and LTC4 levels and inflammatory cellular infiltration.%目的:研究枸地氯雷他定注射液对卵白蛋白(OVA)致大鼠过敏性鼻炎的鼻部症状及鼻腔灌洗液PGD2、LTC4含量和炎症细胞浸润的影响。方法:采用OVA建立大鼠过敏性鼻炎模型,将造模成功的SD雄性大鼠随机分成5组:模型组、枸地氯雷他定注射液(简称枸地)低、中、高剂量组,阳性药马来酸氯苯那敏注射液(扑尔敏)组。另随机取正常大鼠设正常组。造模第22天,模型组和正常组静注生理盐水;枸地低、中、高剂量组分别静注0.3、0

  16. Inhibitory effects of kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside on ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Mi Ja; Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Choi, Ji Won; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Choi, Doo Jin; Park, Yong Il

    2015-04-01

    The modification of natural flavonoid by glycosylation alters their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, such as increased water solubility and stability, reduced toxicity, and sometimes enhanced or even new pharmacological activities. Kaempferol (KF), a plant flavonoid, and its glycosylated derivative, kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside (K-3-rh), were evaluated and compared for their anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-asthmatic effects in an asthma model mouse. The results showed that K-3-rh fully maintained its anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic effects compared with KF in an asthma model mouse. Both KF and K-3-rh significantly reduced the elevated inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). KF and K-3-rh also significantly inhibited the increase in Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and TNF-α protein levels through inhibition of the phosphorylation Akt and effectively suppressed eosinophilia in a mouse model of allergic asthma. The total immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels in the serum and BALF were also blocked by KF and K-3-rh to similar extents. K-3-rh exerts similar or even slightly higher inhibitory effects on Th2 cytokines and IgE production compared with KF, whereas K-3-rh was less effective at DPPH radical scavenging and the inhibition of ROS generation in inflammatory cells compared with KF. These results suggested that the K-3-rh, as well as KF, may also be a promising candidate for the development of health beneficial foods or therapeutic agents that can prevent or treat allergic asthma.

  17. On initial enhancement of mesospheric dust associated plasma irregularities subsequent to radiowave heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Scales

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Important observational manifestations of subvisible mesospheric dust are Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSE which are produced by scattering from electron irregularities produced by dust charging. It has been observed that the PMSE strength can be artificially modified by using a ground-based ionospheric heating facility to perturb the electron irregularity source region that is believed to produce PMSE. Recently it has become evident that significant diagnostic information may be available about the dust layer from the temporal behavior of the electron irregularities during the heating process which modifies the background electron temperature. Particularly interesting and important periods of the temporal behavior are during the turn-on and turn-off of the radiowave heating. Although a number of past theoretical and experimental investigations have considered the turn-off period, the objective here is to consider futher possibilities for diagnostic information available as well as the underlying physical processes. Approximate analytical models are developed and compared to a more accurate full computational model as a reference. Then from the temporal behavior of the electron irregularities during the turn-off of the radiowave heating, the analytical models are used to obtain possible diagnostic information for various charged dust and background plasma quantities.

  18. Tropical cyclone activity enhanced by Sahara greening and reduced dust emissions during the African Humid Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Emanuel, Kerry A.; Chiacchio, Marc; Diro, Gulilat T.; Zhang, Qiong; Sushama, Laxmi; Stager, J. Curt; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.

    2017-06-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) can have devastating socioeconomic impacts. Understanding the nature and causes of their variability is of paramount importance for society. However, historical records of TCs are too short to fully characterize such changes and paleo-sediment archives of Holocene TC activity are temporally and geographically sparse. Thus, it is of interest to apply physical modeling to understanding TC variability under different climate conditions. Here we investigate global TC activity during a warm climate state (mid-Holocene, 6,000 yBP) characterized by increased boreal summer insolation, a vegetated Sahara, and reduced dust emissions. We analyze a set of sensitivity experiments in which not only solar insolation changes are varied but also vegetation and dust concentrations. Our results show that the greening of the Sahara and reduced dust loadings lead to more favorable conditions for tropical cyclone development compared with the orbital forcing alone. In particular, the strengthening of the West African Monsoon induced by the Sahara greening triggers a change in atmospheric circulation that affects the entire tropics. Furthermore, whereas previous studies suggest lower TC activity despite stronger summer insolation and warmer sea surface temperature in the Northern Hemisphere, accounting for the Sahara greening and reduced dust concentrations leads instead to an increase of TC activity in both hemispheres, particularly over the Caribbean basin and East Coast of North America. Our study highlights the importance of regional changes in land cover and dust concentrations in affecting the potential intensity and genesis of past TCs and suggests that both factors may have appreciable influence on TC activity in a future warmer climate.

  19. CTIF`s contribution to enhance cupola furnace smoke de-dusting; Contribution du CTIF a l`amelioration du depoussierage des fumees de cubilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charbonnier, M. [Centre Technique des Industries de la Fonderie (CTIF), 92 - Sevres (France)

    1996-12-31

    Two industrial prototypes for enhancing subsequent smoke dust extraction in cupola furnaces have been developed by the CTIF French Foundry research center: processes involve post-combustion of smokes inside the furnace, which allow for a strong reduction in carbon monoxide emissions and a lower hydrocarbon content, and smoke conditioning by evaporative cooling, which regulates the smoke flow and stimulates filtration condition optimization before de-dusting. Prototypes have been installed in two foundries and results are discussed

  20. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: implications for life and habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Sushil K; Wong, Ah-San; Renno, Nilton O; Farrell, William M; Delory, Gregory T; Sentman, Davis D; Cummer, Steven A; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a new mechanism for producing oxidants, especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), on Mars. Large-scale electrostatic fields generated by charged sand and dust in the martian dust devils and storms, as well as during normal saltation, can induce chemical changes near and above the surface of Mars. The most dramatic effect is found in the production of H2O2 whose atmospheric abundance in the "vapor" phase can exceed 200 times that produced by photochemistry alone. With large electric fields, H2O2 abundance gets large enough for condensation to occur, followed by precipitation out of the atmosphere. Large quantities of H2O2 would then be adsorbed into the regolith, either as solid H2O2 "dust" or as re-evaporated vapor if the solid does not survive as it diffuses from its production region close to the surface. We suggest that this H2O2, or another superoxide processed from it in the surface, may be responsible for scavenging organic material from Mars. The presence of H2O2 in the surface could also accelerate the loss of methane from the atmosphere, thus requiring a larger source for maintaining a steady-state abundance of methane on Mars. The surface oxidants, together with storm electric fields and the harmful ultraviolet radiation that readily passes through the thin martian atmosphere, are likely to render the surface of Mars inhospitable to life as we know it.

  1. Use of Factory-Waste Shingles and Cement Kiln Dust to Enhance the Performance of Soil Used in Road Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental work was conducted to study the use of factory-waste roof shingles to enhance the properties of fine-grained soil used in road works. Cement kiln dust (CKD, a cogenerated product of Portland cement manufacturing, was used as a stabilizing agent while the processed shingles were added to enhance the soil tensile strength. The effects of shingles on strength and stability were evaluated using the unconfined compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and California Bearing Ratio (CBR tests. The results showed that the use of CKD alone resulted in a considerable increase in the unconfined compressive strength but had a small effect on the tensile strength. The addition of shingles substantially improved the tensile strength of the stabilized soil. A significant reduction in the capillary rise and a slight decrease in the permeability were obtained as a result of shingle addition. An optimal shingle content of 10% is recommended to stabilize the soil.

  2. Enhanced dust heating in the bulges of early-type spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbracht, C W; Skibba, R A; Hinz, J L; Calzetti, D; Gordon, K D; Roussel, H; Crocker, A F; Misselt, K A; Bolatto, A D; Kennicutt, R C; Appleton, P N; Armus, L; Beirão, P; Brandl, B R; Croxall, K V; Dale, D A; Draine, B T; Dumas, G; de Paz, A Gil; Groves, B; Hao, C -N; Johnson, B D; Koda, J; Krause, O; Leroy, A K; Meidt, S E; Murphy, E J; Rahman, N; Rix, H -W; Sandstrom, K M; Sauvage, M; Schinnerer, E; Smith, J -D T; Srinivasan, S; Vigroux, L; Walter, F; Warren, B E; Wilson, C D; Wolfire, M G; Zibetti, S

    2010-01-01

    Stellar density and bar strength should affect the temperatures of the cool (T ~ 20-30 K) dust component in the inner regions of galaxies, which implies that the ratio of temperatures in the circumnuclear regions to the disk should depend on Hubble type. We investigate the differences between cool dust temperatures in the central 3 kpc and disk of 13 nearby galaxies by fitting models to measurements between 70 and 500 microns. We attempt to quantify temperature trends in nearby disk galaxies, with archival data from Spitzer/MIPS and new observations with Herschel/SPIRE, which were acquired during the first phases of the Herschel observations for the KINGFISH (key insights in nearby galaxies: a far-infrared survey with Herschel) sample. We fit single-temperature modified blackbodies to far-infrared and submillimeter measurements of the central and disk regions of galaxies to determine the temperature of the component(s) emitting at those wavelengths. We present the ratio of central-region-to-disk-temperatures ...

  3. House dust mite allergen Der f enhanced bronchial epithelial cell cytokine expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO QING SUN; WEI TANG; ALBERT CHAN; ADRIAN WU; NAN SHAN ZHONG

    2006-01-01

    The house dust mites ( Dermatophagoides farinae, Der f) are the major source of aeroallergens implicated in the expression of atopic disorders, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. In particular, strong circumstantial evidence suggests that house dust mite antigens are important precipitating factors of asthma. Many house dust mite allergens are proteases that can elicit airway inflammation by stimulating the release of cytokines from bronchial epithelial cells. To investigate whether Derf allergen proteases induced cytokine production from the epithelial cell line BEAS-2B,BEAS-2B cells were cultured with 4 different concentrations of Derf (0.02, 0.2, 2, 20 μg/ml) for 24-96 h, after which supernatants were assayed for interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 with ELISA. Reverse transcription-PCR was also performed. The cell sheets were intact throughout the observation in control group without any exposure to Derf antigen. In the experimental groups cells treated with Der f allergen showed changes in the anchorage status of the monolayer. There was a significant increase in the level of cytokine production compared with the untreated sample. The release of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in a concentration-dependent manner ( P < 0.05, respectively) with the addition of increasing dosage of Der f to the cell sheets. Levels of IL-6 and IL-8 began to rise at 24 h and 48 h after allergen exposure, and they increased significantly in the supernatants at 72 h and 96 h. At the same time the concentration dependence of induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression as well as an increase in the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA manifested evidently. HDM-induced airway inflammation may include Der f-mediated release of inflammatory mediators, and the proteolytic activity of an allergen may stimulate the release of proinflammatory cytokines from human bronchial epithelium. It is suggested that IL-6 and IL-8 production by bronchial epithelial cells may play a role in the

  4. Enhancement of aged and denatured fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming technique following dusting with amino acid-containing powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Carly; Almond, Matthew J; Baum, John V; Bond, John W

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out experiments to investigate the aging of latent fingerprints deposited on black PVC over a period of 4-15 weeks. A thumbprint was used in each case and before deposition of the print the donor rubbed their thumb around their nose to add sebaceous deposits. We have studied the effect of heat, light, and moisture and we find that moisture is the most significant factor in the degradation of the latent print. We have attempted to enhance these latent prints by dusting with valine powder or powders composed of valine mixed with gold or red fluorescent commercial fingerprint powders. To make a direct comparison between "treated" and "untreated" prints, the prints were cut in half with one-half being "treated" and one-half not. Our studies show the best results being obtained when powders of valine and red fluorescent powders are applied prior to cyanoacrylate fuming.

  5. Toward enhanced capability for detecting and predicting dust events in the western United States: the Arizona case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Tong, D.; Lee, P.; Pan, L.; Tang, Y.; Stajner, I.; Pierce, R. B.; McQueen, J.; Wang, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dust aerosols affect human life, ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry and climate in various aspects. Some studies have revealed intensified dust activity in the western US during the past decades despite the weaker dust activity in non-US regions. It is important to extend the historical dust records, to better understand their temporal changes, and to use such information to improve the daily dust forecasting skill as well as the projection of future dust activity under the changing climate. This study develops dust records in Arizona in 2005-2013 using multiple observation data sets, including in situ measurements at the surface Air Quality System (AQS) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites, and level 2 deep blue aerosol product by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. The diurnal and inter-annual variability of identified dust events are shown related to observed weather patterns (e.g., wind and soil moisture) and surface conditions (e.g., land cover type and vegetation conditions), suggesting a potential for use of satellite soil moisture and land products to help interpret and predict dust activity. Backtrajectories computed using NOAA's Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model indicate that the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts are important dust source regions during identified dust events in Phoenix, Arizona. Finally, we assess the impact of a recent strong dust event on western US air quality, using various observational and modeling data sets, during a period with a stratospheric ozone intrusion event. The capability of the current US National Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC) Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to represent the magnitude and the temporal variability of aerosol concentrations is evaluated for this event. Directions for integrating observations to further improve dust emission modeling in CMAQ are also suggested.

  6. Spectrally Enhanced Cloud Objects—A generalized framework for automated detection of volcanic ash and dust clouds using passive satellite measurements: 1. Multispectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavolonis, Michael J.; Sieglaff, Justin; Cintineo, John

    2015-08-01

    While satellites are a proven resource for detecting and tracking volcanic ash and dust clouds, existing algorithms for automatically detecting volcanic ash and dust either exhibit poor overall skill or can only be applied to a limited number of sensors and/or geographic regions. As such, existing techniques are not optimized for use in real-time applications like volcanic eruption alerting and data assimilation. In an effort to significantly improve upon existing capabilities, the Spectrally Enhanced Cloud Objects (SECO) algorithm was developed. The SECO algorithm utilizes a combination of radiative transfer theory, a statistical model, and image processing techniques to identify volcanic ash and dust clouds in satellite imagery with a very low false alarm rate. This fully automated technique is globally applicable (day and night) and can be adapted to a wide range of low earth orbit and geostationary satellite sensors or even combinations of satellite sensors. The SECO algorithm consists of four primary components: conversion of satellite measurements into robust spectral metrics, application of a Bayesian method to estimate the probability that a given satellite pixel contains volcanic ash and/or dust, construction of cloud objects, and the selection of cloud objects deemed to have the physical attributes consistent with volcanic ash and/or dust clouds. The first two components of the SECO algorithm are described in this paper, while the final two components are described in a companion paper.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Moldavica Total Flavone on Airway Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness in Ovalbumin-induced Asthmatic Rats%香青兰总黄酮对哮喘大鼠气道炎症及高反应性的改善作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康小龙; 何承辉; 邢建国; 闫丽丽

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of moldavica total flavone on airway inflammation and hyperrespon-siveness in ovalbumin-induced asthmatic rats. METHODS The cough model in rats and asthma model in cavies were made by using ammonia water and histamine-acetylcholine chloride to observe the antitussive and antiasthmatic actions. The inhibitory effect on airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in ovalbumin-induced asthmatic rats were observed. RESLUTS The moldavica total flavone in middle and high dose group could extend the cough latent period in rats(.P<0.05 or 0.01) and gasp latent period in cavies (P<0.01), decreased the levels of serum ovalbumin specific IgE (P<0.01) and eosinophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P<0.01), attenuate the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in ovalbumin-induced asthmatic rats (P<0.05 or 0.01). CONCLUSION Moldavica total flavone has antitussive and antiasthmatic actions and may inhibit ariway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in asthma.%目的研究香青兰总黄酮对哮喘大鼠气道炎症及高反应性的影响.方法采用氨水引咳实验和磷酸组胺-氯化乙酰胆碱引喘实验观察香青兰总黄酮的镇咳、平喘作用;同时观察香青兰总黄酮对哮喘大鼠支气管肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中白细胞分类计数和离体气管螺旋条张力的影响.结果香青兰总黄酮中、高剂量能延长小鼠咳嗽潜伏期,减少小鼠2 min内咳嗽次数(P<0.05或P<0.01),延长豚鼠引喘潜伏期(P<0.01);降低哮喘大鼠血清卵白蛋白特异性IgE水平(P<0.01),减少BALF中嗜酸性粒细胞数量(P<0.01)及减小离体气管螺旋条张力(P<0.05或P<0.01).结论 香青兰总黄酮具有一定镇咳、平喘作用;可改善哮喘气道炎症及高反应性.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide enhances the oxidation of oxygenated volatile organic compounds on mineral dust particles: a case study of methacrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Huang, Dao; Huang, Liubin; Chen, Zhongming

    2014-09-16

    Heterogeneous oxidation of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) serves as an important sink of OVOCs as well as a source of secondary organic material. However, the roles of gas phase oxidants in these reactions are poorly understood. In this work, we present the first laboratory study of the heterogeneous reactions of methacrolein (MACR) on various mineral dust particles in the presence of gaseous H2O2. It is found that the presence of gaseous H2O2 significantly promotes both the uptake and oxidation of MACR on kaolinite, α-Al2O3, α-Fe2O3, and TiO2, but not on CaCO3. The oxidation of MACR produces organic acids as its major low-molecular-weight product, whose yields are enhanced by a factor of 2-6 in the presence of H2O2. In addition, organic peroxides such as methyl hydroperoxide, peroxyformic acid, and peroxyacetic acid are only formed in the presence of H2O2, and the formation of methyl hydroperoxide indicates that MACR oxidation on the surface involves reaction with OH radicals. A probe reaction using salicylic acid verifies the production of OH radicals from H2O2 decomposition on kaolinite, α-Al2O3, α-Fe2O3, and TiO2, which rationalizes the enhanced MACR oxidation observed on these particles. The uptake coefficients of MACR on kaolinite, α-Fe2O3, and TiO2 in the presence of H2O2 are on the order of 10(-5)-10(-4). Our results provide new insights into the formation and chemical evolution of organic species in the atmosphere.

  9. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Université de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  10. Enhancement of inorganic Martian dust simulant with carbon component and its effects on key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    Evidence on the past existence of subsurface organic-bearing fluids on Mars was recently achieved basing on the investigation of organic carbon from the Tissint Martian meteorite (Lin et al., 2014). Tremendous amount of meteorites containing abundant carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily (Pizzarello and Shock 2010). National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institute of Health panel of research scientists revealed recently that accumulating evidences suggest that nano-sized air pollution may have a significant impact on central nervous system in health and disease (Block et al., Neurotoxicology, 2012). During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Based on above facts, the aims of this study were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust stimulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission and to compare its effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in Na+-dependent uptake of L-[14C]glutamate that is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of isolated rat brain nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon-contained Martian dust analogue. This fact indicated that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamatergic neurtransmission.

  11. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  12. Enhanced Cysteinyl-Leukotriene Type 1 Receptor Expression in T Cells from House Dust Mite-Allergic Individuals following Stimulation with Der p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse Thivierge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the potential for allergen to modulate T cell expression of the CysLT1 receptor and responsiveness to leukotrienes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from house dust mite-allergic or nonallergic individuals were incubated with D. pteronyssinus allergen (Der p. Baseline CysLT1 expression was similar in both groups of donors, but Der p significantly enhanced CysLT1 expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of only allergic individuals and induced enhanced responsiveness of CD4+ T cells to LTD4 in terms of calcium mobilisation. This effect was prevented by the CysLT1 antagonist MK571. Der p also induced IL-4 and IL-10 production, and neutralizing antibody to IL-4 prevented both the enhanced CysLT1 expression and the enhanced responsiveness of T cells to LTD4 induced by Der p. In allergic individuals, Der p also induced T cell proliferation and a Th2-biased phenotype. Our data suggest that, in allergen-sensitized individuals, exposure to allergen can enhance T cell expression of CysLT1 receptors through a mechanism involving IL-4 production. This, in turn, would induce CD4+ T cell responsiveness to cysteinyl-leukotrienes and Th2 cell activation.

  13. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  14. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  15. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust mite allergy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dust mite allergy is an allergic reaction to tiny bugs that commonly live in house dust. Signs of dust mite allergy include those common to hay fever, such as ...

  16. Do other components of bedding dust affect sensitisation to house dust mites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire; Stanley, Thorsten; Crane, Julian; Siebers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Bedding dust is a mixture of many components, of which the house dust mite (HDM) allergen, Der p 1, is the most allergenic. There has been little work to investigate the effect of other bedding dust components on HDM sensitisation. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of endotoxin in bedding dust on the allergic response in HDM-sensitised individuals. Twenty-nine house dust mite-sensitised adults were skin prick and allergen patch tested against a sterile solution of their own bedding dust and against a solution containing the same concentration of Der p 1 as the bedding solution for comparison. There was no significant difference in wheal size between the diluted house dust mite solution and the bedding dust in spite of their high levels of endotoxin. Symptomatic subjects had larger, but not statistically significant, responses to commercial house dust mite solution than asymptomatic subjects. Allergen patch test responses were negative in 22/29 of subjects using either bedding dust solutions or comparable diluted house dust mite solutions. An individual's own bedding dust does not appear to contain factors that enhance skin prick test or atopy patch test responses to house dust mites.

  17. Background dust emission following grassland fire: a snapshot across the particle-size spectrum highlights how high-resolution measurements enhance detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Luis M [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Field, Jason P [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Villegas, Juan C [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Brehsears, David D [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Law, Darin J [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Urgeghe, Anna M [UNIV OF ARIZONA

    2009-01-01

    Dust emission rates vary temporally and with particle size. Many studies of dust emission focus on a particular temporal scale and the portion of the particle-size spectrum associated with a single instrument; fewer studies have assessed dust emission across the particle-size spectrum and associated temporal scales using multiple instruments. Particularly lacking are measurements following disturbances such as fire that are high-resolution and focused on finer particles - those with direct implications for human health and potential for long-distance biogeochemical transport - during less windy but more commonly occurring background conditions. We measured dust emissions in unburned and burned semiarid grassland using four different instruments spanning different combinations of temporal resolution and particle-size spectrum: Big Springs Number Eight (BSNE) and Sensit instruments for larger saltating particles, DustTrak instruments for smaller suspended particles, and Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) samplers for measuring the entire range of particle sizes. Unburned and burned sites differed in vegetation cover and aerodynamic roughness, yet surprisingly differences in dust emission rates were only detectable for saltation using BSNE and for smaller aerosols using DustTrak. Our results, surprising in the lack of consistently detected differences, indicate that high-resolution DustTrak measurements offered the greatest promise for detecting differences in background emission rates and that BSNE samplers, which integrate across height, were effective for longer intervals. More generally, our results suggest that interplay between particle size, temporal resolution, and integration across time and height can be complex and may need to be considered more explicitly for effective sampling for background dust emissions.

  18. Are enhanced dust explosion hazards to be foreseen in production, processing and handling of powders consisting of nano-size particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhoff, Rolf K.

    2011-07-01

    Based on experience with powders having particle sizes down to the range 1 - 0.1 μm one might expect that dust clouds from combustible nm-particle powders would exhibit extreme ignition sensitivities (very low MIEs) and extreme explosion rates (very high KSt-values). However, there are two basic physical reasons why this may not necessarily be the case. Firstly, the formation of clouds of well-dispersed primary particles from bulk powders consisting of nm-particles is extremely difficult to achieve, due to the comparatively very strong inter-particle cohesion forces. Secondly, should such a dispersion process nevertheless be fully successful, extremely fast coagulation processes in clouds within the explosive mass concentration range, would transform the primary nm-particles into much larger agglomerates within fractions of a second. Furthermore, for organic dusts and coal, the basic mechanism of flame propagation in the dust cloud is a further reason for not expecting extreme ignition sensitivities and explosion rates dust clouds from nm-particles. The overall conclusion is that dust clouds consisting of nm primary particles would not necessarily be expected to exhibit more severe MIE and KSt-values than those of dust clouds of μm primary particles. Recent experimental evidence confirms that this is in fact the case for KSt, whereas for MIE the values for some metals are significantly lower for nm primary particles than for μm ones.

  19. Are enhanced dust explosion hazards to be foreseen in production, processing and handling of powders consisting of nano-size particles?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhoff, Rolf K, E-mail: rolf.eckhoff@ift.uib.no [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2011-07-06

    Based on experience with powders having particle sizes down to the range 1 - 0.1 {mu}m one might expect that dust clouds from combustible nm-particle powders would exhibit extreme ignition sensitivities (very low MIEs) and extreme explosion rates (very high K{sub St-}values). However, there are two basic physical reasons why this may not necessarily be the case. Firstly, the formation of clouds of well-dispersed primary particles from bulk powders consisting of nm-particles is extremely difficult to achieve, due to the comparatively very strong inter-particle cohesion forces. Secondly, should such a dispersion process nevertheless be fully successful, extremely fast coagulation processes in clouds within the explosive mass concentration range, would transform the primary nm-particles into much larger agglomerates within fractions of a second. Furthermore, for organic dusts and coal, the basic mechanism of flame propagation in the dust cloud is a further reason for not expecting extreme ignition sensitivities and explosion rates dust clouds from nm-particles. The overall conclusion is that dust clouds consisting of nm primary particles would not necessarily be expected to exhibit more severe MIE and K{sub St}{sup -}values than those of dust clouds of {mu}m primary particles. Recent experimental evidence confirms that this is in fact the case for K{sub St}, whereas for MIE the values for some metals are significantly lower for nm primary particles than for {mu}m ones.

  20. Dust-Acoustic Waves in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas Containing Variable-Charge Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-Song; HE Kai-Fen; M. Y. Yu

    2000-01-01

    A relatively self-consistent theory of dust-acoustic waves in the strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing variable charge impurities is given. Relevant physical processes such as dust elastic relaxation and dust charge relaxation are taken into account. It is shown that the negative dispersion of dust-acoustic waves due to the strong correlation of dusts is enhanced in the presence of dust-neutral collisions.

  1. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  2. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  3. 廊坊市人工增雨作业区粉尘银环境影响分析%Environmental Impact Analysis of the dust silver of Precipitation Enhancement Affected areas in Langfang City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯华; 宫进忠; 陈宝江; 展芳

    2011-01-01

    According to the chemical properties of catalysts AgI and precipitation enhancement principles, 3 precipitation areas and the nearly 600 km2 contrast areas in Langfang City were selected to discuss the influence of , silver content of surface dust samples on artificial precipitation area. Results showed that dust silver content in working area was higher than that in dust silver content. Physical and mental conditions survey showed that artificial rainfall had no adverse effects on human health.%根据催化剂AgI的化学性质和人工增雨的天气学原理,选取廊坊市3个增雨作业影响区和对比区的面积各约50~100 km范围内的地袁粉尘样品进行银含量测定分析,探讨人工增雨区粉尘银对环境的影响.结果表明,作业影响区较对比区粉尘银含量略有提高.人群身心状况调查显示,人工增雨对人类健康没有不良影响.

  4. Enhancement Algorithm for the Restoration of Dust Image Based on Dark-Channel Prior%基于暗原色先验的沙尘天气图像恢复算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海燕; 钟梦之

    2016-01-01

    Concerning the problem that image captured from dust weather has low contrast and details, based on the McCarney physical model and dark-channel piror theory ,an enhancement algorithm for the restoration of single dust image was proposed.The clear image could be recovered quickly.The experimental results show that the method can improve the quality and enhance the detail of the degraded image.%针对沙尘天气下图像质量下降的情况,在McCarney大气模型上,利用暗原色先验的规律和图像增强方法,提出一种快速、有效的单一图像恢复算法,并进行了仿真。实验结果表明,该算法能有效地恢复沙尘天气图像的清晰度,增强图像细节呈现。

  5. On the Role of Flash Floods for Dust Emission over North Africa: Alluvial Sediments acting as Dust Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, K.; Klueser, L.; Tegen, I.

    2014-12-01

    Studies analyzing satellite dust products show that numerous dust sources are located in the foothills of arid and semi-arid mountain regions. There, alluvial sediments deposited on valley bottoms and flood plains are very susceptible to wind erosion and frequently serve as dust source. This study focuses on the spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation events over the mountain foothills and flood plains over North Africa. Satellite dust retrievals with sub-daily resolution such as from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and METOP A/B Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instruments are used to identify dust source regions. Identified dust source regions are then linked to soil properties and land type classification data sets. Information on the mineralogical composition of transported dust inferred from IASI observation are used (a) to investigate the impact of different source geomorphologies and thus different radiative properties of airborne dust particles, and (b) to estimate the contribution of dust uplift from alluvial sediments compared to dust emission from non-hydrological sources. Ultimately, this study contributes to the understanding of controlling mechanism on the interannual variability of dust source activation and will improve current dust emission modules coupled to atmosphere models.

  6. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  7. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  8. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  9. Dust in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  10. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  11. Wind-Speed—Surface-Heat-Flux Feedback in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junshi; Niino, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Strong winds associated with dust devils can induce locally large heat fluxes from the surface, and resulting enhanced buoyancy may further intensify the dust devils. This positive wind—surface-heat-flux feedback is studied using a large-eddy simulation of a convective boundary layer. A comparison of the results with and without the feedback process for the same environment demonstrates the significance of the feedback process for simulated dust devils.

  12. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  13. Dusts in ITER: diagnostics and removal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Worms, J.; Hong, S.H. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DRFC/SIPP), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Delaporte, P. [Universite de la Mediterranee, LP3, UMR 6182 CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Onofrie, J.F. [University of Provence, IUSTI-CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Counsell, G. [Association Euratom/UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Winter, J. [lnstitute of Experimental Physics 2, Bochum (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Dusts will be present in ITER and will represent an issue in terms of safety. As a matter of facts, dusts will be created by interaction of the plasma with the in-vessel materials and will be thus made of carbon, beryllium and tungsten. They will be activated, tritiated and chemically toxic. Safety limits have been set in order to reduce these dust hazards. The first set of limits is based on a limitation of the radiological impact on environment in case of dust spreading. Tungsten has been used as representative of ITER dust because it is the most radiologically hazardous of the plasma facing materials. Thus the mobilizable dust inside the vacuum vessel has to be limited to few hundreds of kilograms of carbon, beryllium and tungsten. The objective of the second set of limits is to ensure that the dust chemical reactivity is adequately controlled. Indeed this reactivity is greatly enhanced on the hot surfaces of the divertor in case of steam ingress, oxidation of the metals, beryllium in particular, leading to hydrogen production and possible explosion. The dusts on the hot surfaces of the divertor should not exceed few kilograms of carbon, beryllium and tungsten. Some calculations have shown that the dusts limits inside the vacuum vessel could be reached in about 500 plasma pulses, and in any case before the assumed replacement of the divertor for planned maintenance. Thus techniques for dust diagnostics and removal need to be developed for ITER to ensure that the set of safety limits are fulfilled. To minimize the impact on the machine operation time, these techniques have to be elaborated considering the ITER vacuum vessel constraints if entering the machine (magnetic field, radiation, vacuum and temperature) or to be non invasive. This paper will present a strategy that could be developed at different periods of the machine operation (during/between pulses and during short or long maintenance periods) in order to monitor the

  14. Formation of SiC Grains in Pulsation-Enhanced Dust-Driven Wind Around Carbon Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (C-rich AGB) stars in order to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process; one is the LTE case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters $T_{\\rm v}$ is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which $T_{\\rm v}$ is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass $M_{\\ast}$=1.0 $M_{\\odot}$, luminosity $L_{\\ast}$=10$^{4}$ $L_{\\odot}$, effective temperature $T_{\\rm eff}$=2600 K, C/O ratio=1.4, and pulsation period $P$=650 days show the followings: In the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of $\\sim$ 10$^{-8}$ is too small to reproduce the ...

  15. Stone dusting process advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Ryan; David Humphreys [Mining Attachments (Qld.) Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    The coal mining industry has, for many years, used dry stone dust or calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in the prevention of the propagation of coal dust explosions throughout their underground mines in Australia. In the last decade wet stone dusting has been introduced. This is where stone dust and water are mixed together to form a paste like slurry. This mixture is pumped and sprayed on to the underground roadway surfaces. This method solved the contamination of the intake airways but brought with it a new problem known as 'caking'. Caking is the hardened layer that is formed as the stone dust slurry dries. It was proven that this hardened layer compromises the dispersal characteristics of the stone dust and therefore its ability to suppress a coal dust explosion. This project set out to prove a specially formulated, non toxic slurry additive and process that could overcome the caking effect. The slurry additive process combines dry stone dust with water to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated with the additive and compressed air to create a highly vesicular foam like stone dusted surface. The initial testing on a range of additives and the effectiveness in minimising the caking effect of wet dusting were performed at Applied Chemical's research laboratory in Melbourne, Victoria and independently tested at the SGS laboratory in Paget, Queensland. The results from these tests provided the platform to conduct full scale spraying trials at the Queensland Mines Rescue Station and Caledon Coal's Cook Colliery, Blackwater. The project moved into the final stage of completion with the collection of data. The intent was to compare the slurry additive process to dry stone dusting in full-scale methane explosions at the CSIR Kloppersbos explosion facility in Kloppersbos, South Africa.

  16. Ice nucleation by soil dusts: relative importance of mineral dust and biogenic components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O'Sullivan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20% to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10−12 to 10−6 L, we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (−6 °C down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (−36 °C. At temperatures above 258 K (−15 °C we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the ice nuclei stem from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that although only a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the enhanced IN activities of dusts generated from agricultural activities may play an important role in cloud glaciation, particularly at temperatures above 258 K.

  17. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  18. Dust escape from Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  19. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  20. Atmospheric Bioaerosols Transported Via Dust Storms in Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.; Painter, T. H.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Chirokova, G.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements are presented showing the presence of biological material within frequent dust storms in the Western United States. Previous work has indicated that biological particles were enhancing the impact of dust storms on the formation of clouds. This paper presents multiple case studies, between April and May 2010, showing the presence of and quantifying the amount of biological material via an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer during dust events. All dust storms originated in the Four Corners region in the Western U.S. and were measured at Storm Peak Laboratory, a high elevation facility in northwestern Colorado. From an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, the mean dust particle size during these events was approximately 23 1μm, with number concentrations between 6 cm-3 and 12 cm-3. Approximately 0.2% of these dust particles had fluorescence signatures, indicating the presence of biological material.

  1. Data assimilation of dust aerosol observations for the CUACE/dust forecasting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Niu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A data assimilation system (DAS was developed for the Chinese Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment – Dust (CUACE/Dust forecast system and applied in the operational forecasts of sand and dust storm (SDS in spring 2006. The system is based on a three dimensional variational method (3D-Var and uses extensively the measurements of surface visibility (phenomena and dust loading retrieval from the Chinese geostationary satellite FY-2C. By a number of case studies, the DAS was found to provide corrections to both under- and over-estimates of SDS, presenting a major improvement to the forecasting capability of CUACE/Dust in the short-term variability in the spatial distribution and intensity of dust concentrations in both source regions and downwind areas. The seasonal mean Threat Score (TS over the East Asia in spring 2006 increased from 0.22 to 0.31 by using the data assimilation system, a 41% enhancement. The forecast results with DAS usually agree with the dust loading retrieved from FY-2C and visibility distribution from surface meteorological stations, which indicates that the 3D-Var method is very powerful by the unification of observation and numerical model to improve the performance of forecast model.

  2. Dust acoustic shock wave generation due to dust charge variation in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Gupta; S Sarkar; M Khan; Samiran Ghosh

    2003-12-01

    In a dusty plasma, the non-adiabaticity of the charge variation on a dust grain surface results in an anomalous dissipation. Analytical investigation shows that this results in a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic (DA) wave propagation which is described by the Korteweg–de Vries–Burger equation. Results of the numerical investigation of the propagation of large-amplitude dust acoustic stationary shock wave are presented here using the complete set of non-linear dust fluid equations coupled with the dust charging equation and Poisson equation. The DA waves are of compressional type showing considerable increase of dust density, which is of significant importance in astrophysical context as it leads to enhanced gravitational attraction considered as a viable process for star formation. The DA shock transition to its far downstream amplitude is oscillatory in nature due to dust charge fluctuations, the oscillation amplitude and shock width depending on the ratio pd/ch and other plasma parameters.

  3. Positive response of Indian summer rainfall to Middle East dust

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Qinjian

    2014-06-02

    Using observational and reanalyses data, we investigated the impact of dust aerosols over the Middle East and the Arabian Sea (AS) on the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall. Satellite and aerosol reanalysis data show extremely heavy aerosol loading, mainly mineral dust, over the Middle East and AS during the ISM season. Multivariate empirical orthogonal function analyses suggest an aerosol-monsoon connection. This connection may be attributed to dust-induced atmospheric heating centered over the Iranian Plateau (IP), which enhances the meridional thermal contrast and strengthens the ISM circulation and rainfall. The enhanced circulation further transports more dust to the AS and IP, heating the atmosphere (positive feedback). The aerosols over the AS and the Arabian Peninsula have a significant correlation with rainfall over central and eastern India about 2 weeks later. This finding highlights the nonlocal radiative effect of dust on the ISM circulation and rainfall and may improve ISM rainfall forecasts. © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Amplification of dust loading in Martian dust devils by self-shadowing

    CERN Document Server

    Kuepper, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Insolation of the Martian soil leads to a sub-surface overpressure due to thermal creep gas flow. This could support particle entrainment into the atmosphere. Short time shadowing e.g. by the traverse of a larger dust devil would enhance this effect. We find in microgravity experiments that mass ejection rates are increased by a factor of 10 for several seconds if a light source of 12.6 kW/$\\rm m^2$ is turned off. Scaled to Mars this implies that self-shadowing of a partially opaque dust devil might lead to a strongly amplified flux of lifted material. We therefore suggest that self-shadowing might be a mechanism on Mars to increase the total dust loading of a dust devil and keep it self-sustained.

  5. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  6. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  7. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  8. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  9. Dust Versus Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A N

    1999-01-01

    Two groups have recently discovered a statistically significant deviation in the fluxes of high-redshift type Ia supernovae from the predictions of a Friedmann model with zero cosmological constant. This letter argues that bright, dusty, starburst galaxies would preferentially eject a dust component with a shallower opacity curve (hence less reddening) and a higher opacity/mass than the observed galactic dust which is left behind. Such dust could cause the falloff in flux at high-z without violating constraints on reddening or metallicity. The specific model presented is of needle-like dust, which is expected from the theory of crystal growth and has been detected in samples of interstellar dust. Carbon needles with conservative properties can supply the necessary opacity, and would very likely be ejected from galaxies as required. The model is not subject to the arguments given in the literature against grey dust, but may be constrained by future data from supernova searches done at higher redshift, in clust...

  10. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  11. Modeling of Plasma Irregularities in Expanding Ionospheric Dust Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Bordikar, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Natural dust layers occur in the earth’s mesosphere (50km-85km). Plasma irregularities are associated with these natural dust layers that produce radar echoes. Recently, an Ionospheric sounding rocket experiment was performed to investigate the plasma irregularities in upper atmospheric dust layers. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE) uses a rocket payload injection of particles in the ionosphere to determine the mechanisms for enhanced radar scatter from plasma irregularities embedded in artificial dusty plasma in space. A 2-D hybrid computational model is described that may be used to study a variety of irregularities in dusty space plasmas which may lead to radar echoes. In this model, the dust and ions are both treated with Particle-In-Cell method while the dust charge varies with time based on the standard dust Orbit Motion Limited charging model. A stochastic model is adopted to remove particle ions due to the dust charging process. Electrons are treated with a fluid model including the parallel dynamics of magnetic fields. Fourier spectral methods with a predictor-corrector time advance are used to solve it. This numerical model will be used to investigate the electrodynamics and several possible plasma irregularity generation mechanisms after the creation of an artificial dust layer. The first is the dust ion-acoustic instability due to the drift of dust relative to the plasma. The instability saturates by trapping some ions. The effects of dust radius and dust drift velocity on plasma irregularities will be analyzed further. Also, a shear- driven instability in expanding dusty clouds is investigated.

  12. Lunar Dust Contamination Effects on Lunar Base Thermal Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John R.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to develop a thermal control system that can operate under the extreme thermal environments found on the lunar surface. While these proposed heat rejection systems use different methods to reject heat, each system contains a similar component, a thermal radiator system. These studies have always considered pristine thermal control system components and have overlooked the possible deleterious effects of lunar dust contamination. Since lunar dust has a high emissivity and absorptivity (greater than 0.9) and is opaque, dust accumulation on a surface should radically alter its optical properties and therefore alter its thermal response compared to ideal conditions. In addition, the non-specular nature of the dust particles will alter the performance of systems that employ specular surfaces to enhance heat rejection. To date, few studies have examined the effect of dust deposition on the normal control system components. These studies only focused on a single heat rejection or photovoltaic system. These studies did show that lunar dust accumulations alter the optical properties of any lunar base hardware, which in turn affects component temperatures, and heat rejection. Therefore, a new study was conducted to determine the effect of lunar dust contamination on heat rejection systems. For this study, a previously developed dust deposition model was incorporated into the Thermal Synthesizer System (TSS) model. This modeling scheme incorporates the original method of predicting dust accumulation due to vehicle landings by assuming that the thin dust layer can be treated as a semitransparent surface slightly above and in thermal contact with the pristine surface. The results of this study showed that even small amounts of dust deposits can radically alter the performance of the heat rejection systems. Furthermore. this study indicates that heat rejection systems be either located far from any landing sites or be protected from dust

  13. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas, E-mail: michael.kopp@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: thomas.haugg@physik.lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, 80333 (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  14. CUACE/Dust ─ an integrated system of observation and modeling systems for operational dust forecasting in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An integrated sand and dust storm (SDS forecasting system – CUACE/Dust (Chinese Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment for Dust has been developed, which consists of a comprehensive dust aerosol module with emission, dry/wet depositions and other atmospheric dynamic processes, and a data assimilation system (DAS using observational data from the CMA (China Meteorological Administration ground dust monitoring network and retrieved dust information from a Chinese geostationary satellite – FY-2C. This is the first time that a combination of surface network observations and satellite retrievals of the dust aerosol has been successfully used in the real time operational forecasts in East Asia through a DAS. During its application for the operational SDS forecasts in East Asia for spring 2006, this system captured the major 31 SDS episodes observed by both surface and satellite observations. Analysis shows that the seasonal mean threat score (TS for 0–24 h forecast over the East Asia in spring 2006 increased from 0.22 to 0.31 by using the DAS, a 41% enhancement. The time series of the forecasted dust concentrations for a number of representative stations for the whole spring 2006 were also evaluated against the surface PM10 monitoring data, showing a very good agreement in terms of the SDS timing and magnitudes near source regions where dust aerosols dominate. This is a summary paper for a special issue of ACP featuring the development and results of the forecasting system.

  15. Dust sources and atmospheric circulation in concert controlling Saharan dust emission and transport towards the Western Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Mallet, Marc; Heinold, Bernd; Ulrich, Max

    2017-04-01

    Dust transported from north African source regions towards Europe is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the Mediterranean region, a geographic region that is in part densely populated. Besides its impacts on the atmospheric radiation budget, dust suspended in the atmosphere results in reduced air quality, which is generally sensed as a reduction in quality of life. Furthermore, the exposure to dust aerosols enhances the prevalence of respiratory diseases, which reduces the general human wellbeing, and ultimately results in an increased loss of working hours due to illness and hospitalization rates. Characteristics of the atmospheric dust life cycle that determine dust transport will be presented with focus on the ChArMEx special observation period in June and July 2013 using the atmosphere-dust model COSMO-MUSCAT (COSMO: Consortium for Small-scale MOdeling; MUSCAT: MUltiScale Chemistry Aerosol Transport Model). Modes of atmospheric circulation were identified from empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of the geopotential height at 850 hPa for summer 2013 and compared to EOFs calculated from 1979-2015 ERA-Interim reanalysis. Generally, two different phases were identified. They are related to the eastward propagation of the subtropical ridge into the Mediterranean basin, the position of the Saharan heat low, and the predominant Iberian heat low. The relation of these centres of action illustrates a dipole pattern for enhanced (reduced) dust emission fluxes, stronger (weaker) meridional dust transport, and consequent increase (decrease) atmospheric dust concentrations and deposition fluxes. In concert, the results from this study aim at illustrating the relevance of knowing the dust source locations in concert with the atmospheric circulation. Ultimately, this study addresses the question of what is finally transported towards the Mediterranean basin and Europe from which source regions - and fostered by which atmospheric circulation pattern. Outcomes from this study

  16. The Barcelona Dust Forecast Center: The first WMO regional meteorological center specialized on atmospheric sand and dust forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basart, Sara; Terradellas, Enric; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Benincasa, Francesco; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (WMO SDS-WAS, http://sds-was.aemet.es/) project has the mission to enhance the ability of countries to deliver timely and quality sand and dust storm forecasts, observations, information and knowledge to users through an international partnership of research and operational communities. The good results obtained by the SDS-WAS Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe (NAMEE) Regional Center and the demand of many national meteorological services led to the deployment of operational dust forecast services. On June 2014, the first WMO Regional Meteorological Center Specialized on Atmospheric Sand and Dust Forecast, the Barcelona Dust Forecast Center (BDFC; http://dust.aemet.es/), was publicly presented. The Center operationally generates and distributes predictions for the NAMEE region. The dust forecasts are based on the NMMB/BSC-Dust model developed at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS). The present contribution will describe the main objectives and capabilities of BDFC. One of the activities performed by the BDFC is to establish a protocol to routinely exchange products from dust forecast models as dust load, dust optical depth (AOD), surface concentration, surface extinction and deposition. An important step in dust forecasting is the evaluation of the results that have been generated. This process consists of the comparison of the model results with multiple kinds of observations (i.e. AERONET and MODIS) and is aimed to facilitate the understanding of the model capabilities, limitations, and appropriateness for the purpose for which it was designed. The aim of this work is to present different evaluation approaches and to test the use of different observational products in the evaluation system.

  17. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  18. Effects of dust grains on early galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, H

    2002-01-01

    Stars form out of molecular gas and supply dust grains during their last evolutionary stages; in turn hydrogen molecules (H2) are produced more efficiently on dust grains. Therefore, dust can drastically accelerate H2 formation, leading to an enhancement of star formation activity. In order to examine the first formation of stars and dust in galaxies, we model the evolution of galaxies in the redshift range of 55) galaxies in sub-millimetre and near-infrared bands. We find that: i) ALMA can detect dust emission from several thousands of galaxies per square degree, and ii) NGST can detect the stellar emission from 10^6 galaxies per square degree. Further observational checks of our predictions include the integrated flux of metal (oxygen and carbon) lines. We finally discuss possible color selection strategies for high-redshift galaxy searches.

  19. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant.

  20. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  1. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Kai-Biao [Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  2. Characteristics and sources of 2002 super dust storm in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yele; ZHUANG Guoshun; YUAN Hui; ZHANG Xingying; GUO Jinghua

    2004-01-01

    On 20 March, 2002, a super dust storm attacked Beijing, which was stronger than any dust storm ever recorded. The concentration of total suspended particulates air quality standard. The concentrations of major crustal elements, such as Ca, Al, Fe, Na, Mg and Ti, were 30-58times higher than those in non-dust storm days. The concentrations of pollution elements, such as Zn, Cu, Pb, As, Cd and S, were also about several or even nearly ten times higher than those in normal days. The enrichment factors of Pb, As, Cd and S in PM2.5 were as high as 12.7, 29.6, 43.5,28.4, indicating that these pollutants came from the mixing of mineral aerosol with pollution aerosol emitted by pollution sources on the way of dust storm's long-range transport. The overlap of invaded air mass from dust with pollution air mass from Beijing local area was another reason for the enhancement of pollutants. During dust storm, fine particles (PM2.5) accounted for 30% of TSP and pollutants in PM2.5accounted for even as high as 45%-69% of TSP. The increase of pollutants after dust storm proved further that mineral aerosol, especially the fine particles from dust storm favored the transformation and accumulation of pollutants.It must be noted that Fe (Ⅱ) was detected again in this dust storm, which provided new evidence for the mechanism of coupling and feedback between iron and sulfur in the atmosphere and the ocean. The increase of both pollutants and nutrient, Fe(Ⅱ), during dust storm illuminated that dust storm is an important factor affecting the global environment change.

  3. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  4. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  5. Novel approach for suppressing cutting dust using foam on a fully mechanized face with hard parting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hetang; Wang, Deming; Wang, Qingguo; Jia, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The cutting dust created by the shearer drum is the main source of dust on a fully mechanized coal face. However, overexposure to respirable dust may cause pneumoconiosis in coal workers, while coal dust may lead to serious explosions. The fully mechanized face known as II1051 Face, found at the Zhuxianzhuang Coal Mine located in east China, generates dust by way of the drum on a high-power shear. The coal seam involves hard rock parting so there is a high concentration of cutting dust when the shearer is working. Thus, we developed a new foam dust suppression method with an air self-suction system based on an analysis of the dust generation characteristics that suppressed the shearer cutting dust level. The new foam system was evaluated in a field test where the dust concentration was measured at two points. The results showed that the foam reduced the cutting dust concentration significantly. The respirable dust exposure levels were reduced from 378.4 mg/m(3)to 53.5 mg/m(3)and the visibility was enhanced dramatically. Thus, we conclude that our new foam system is highly efficient at capturing cutting dust, and it has a much lower water consumption. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: Contact angle of cutting dust sample, migration trajectory of cutting dust, technological process for suppressing shearer cutting dust using foam, the layout of the foam dust suppression system on coal face, real object of the air self-suction type foam generator, the special foam nozzle used for shearers, relevant experimental results of the air self-suction foam system.].

  6. Cassini Dust Measurements at Enceladus and Implications for the Origin of the E Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Schmidt, Jürgen; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Makuch, Martin; Seiß, Martin; Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Krivov, Alexander V.; Sremčević, Miodrag; Tuzzolino, Anthony J.; Economou, Thanasis; Grün, Eberhard

    2006-03-01

    During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on 14 July 2005, the High Rate Detector of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer registered micron-sized dust particles enveloping this satellite. The dust impact rate peaked about 1 minute before the closest approach of the spacecraft to the moon. This asymmetric signature is consistent with a locally enhanced dust production in the south polar region of Enceladus. Other Cassini experiments revealed evidence for geophysical activities near Enceladus' south pole: a high surface temperature and a release of water gas. Production or release of dust particles related to these processes may provide the dominant source of Saturn's E ring.

  7. Dust charging and charge fluctuations in a weakly collisional radio-frequency sheath at low pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piel, Alexander, E-mail: piel@physik.uni-kiel.de; Schmidt, Christian [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Models for the charging of dust particles in the bulk plasma and in the sheath region are discussed. A new model is proposed that describes collision-enhanced ion currents in the sheath. The collisions result in a substantial reduction of the negative charge of the dust. Experimental data for the dust charge in the sheath can be described by this model when a Bi-Maxwellian electron distribution is taken into account. Expressions for the dust charging rate for all considered models are presented and their influence on the rise of the kinetic dust temperature is discussed.

  8. Dust Quantization and Effects on Agriculture Over Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    Dust plays a very important role in the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this communication, the effect of atmospheric dust on the yields of certain crops grown in Uttar Pradesh, India is assessed. Coherent physical and thermodynamic fingerprints of dust parameters such as from Satellite data- KALPANA-1, MODIS, OMI, CALIPSO; Model data- DREAM, HYSPLIT, ECMWF; have been considered to run the APSIM model to derive the impacts. This paper assesses dust as a physical atmospheric phenomenon including its Long Range Transport (LRT) and dispersion along with considerable variations of Aerosol Optical Depths (AODs) over the subcontinent of India. While AODs significantly increase by more dust concentration, the local dispersion of pollutants is a major concern with deposition of atmospheric dust such as sulphates and other chemical constituents that affect agricultural land. An approach in atmospheric physics is also taken to parameterize the model outputs. This communication indicates dust to be a positive factor for the cultivation of certain crops such as wheat, maize in the experimental location. Initial results suggest that LRT dust is a viable counterpart to decrease the concentration of soil acidity and related parameters thus enhancing the vitality of crops.

  9. Dust Devil Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 6 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Dust devils, small cyclonic wind storms, are common in the American Southwest and on Mars. As the dust devil moves across the surface it picks up the loose dust, leaving behind a dark track to mark its passage. These dust devil tracks are in the Argyre Basin. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -46.6, Longitude 317.5 East (42.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the

  10. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Fenton, Lori; Neakrase, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michael; Statella, Thiago; Whelley, Patrick; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Balme, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Dust devils that leave dark- or light-toned tracks are common on Mars and they can also be found on the Earth's surface. Dust devil tracks (hereinafter DDTs) are ephemeral surface features with mostly sub-annual lifetimes. Regarding their size, DDT widths can range between ˜1 m and ˜1 km, depending on the diameter of dust devil that created the track, and DDT lengths range from a few tens of meters to several kilometers, limited by the duration and horizontal ground speed of dust devils. DDTs can be classified into three main types based on their morphology and albedo in contrast to their surroundings; all are found on both planets: (a) dark continuous DDTs, (b) dark cycloidal DDTs, and (c) bright DDTs. Dark continuous DDTs are the most common type on Mars. They are characterized by their relatively homogenous and continuous low albedo surface tracks. Based on terrestrial and martian in situ studies, these DDTs most likely form when surficial dust layers are removed to expose larger-grained substrate material (coarse sands of ≥500 μm in diameter). The exposure of larger-grained materials changes the photometric properties of the surface; hence leading to lower albedo tracks because grain size is photometrically inversely proportional to the surface reflectance. However, although not observed so far, compositional differences (i.e., color differences) might also lead to albedo contrasts when dust is removed to expose substrate materials with mineralogical differences. For dark continuous DDTs, albedo drop measurements are around 2.5 % in the wavelength range of 550-850 nm on Mars and around 0.5 % in the wavelength range from 300-1100 nm on Earth. The removal of an equivalent layer thickness around 1 μm is sufficient for the formation of visible dark continuous DDTs on Mars and Earth. The next type of DDTs, dark cycloidal DDTs, are characterized by their low albedo pattern of overlapping scallops. Terrestrial in situ studies imply that they are formed when sand

  11. Dust during the Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, E; Elfgren, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that population III stars have reionized the Universe at redshifts greater than 6 has recently gained momentum with WMAP polarization results. Here we analyse the role of early dust produced by these stars and ejected into the intergalactic medium. We show that this dust, heated by the radiation from the same population III stars, produces a submillimetre excess. The electromagnetic spectrum of this excess is compatible with the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) cosmic far infrared background. This spectrum, a Doppler spectrum times the $\

  12. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  13. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  14. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Senovilla, J M M; Senovilla, Jose M. M.; Vera, Raul

    2000-01-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has new surprising features. The universe is ``closed'' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is ``enclosed'' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable agai...

  15. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has surprising new features. The universe is `closed' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is `enclosed' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable against some global non-vacuum perturbations.

  16. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  17. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  18. Evaluation of the electrical properties of dust storms by multi-parameter observations and theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2017-03-01

    Dusty phenomena, such as wind-blown sand, dust devils, and dust storms, play key roles in Earth's climate and geological processes. Dust electrification considerably affects the lifting and transport of dust particles. However, the electrical properties of dust storms remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted multi-parameter measurements and theoretical calculations to investigate the electrical properties of dust storms and their application to dust storm prediction. The results show that the vertical electric field (E-field) decreases first, then increases, and finally decreases with the height above the ground, reversing its direction at two heights, ∼ 8- 12 and ∼ 24 m. This suggests that the charge polarity of dust particles changes from negative to positive and back to negative again as the height increases. By carefully analyzing the E-field and dust concentration data, we further found that there is a significant positive linear relationship between the measured E-field intensity and dust concentration at the given ambient conditions. In addition, measurements and calculations demonstrate that a substantial enhancement in the vertical E-field can be observed several hours before the arrival of the external-source dust storms, indicating that the E-field can be used to provide an early warning of external-source dust storms.

  19. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  20. Saharan dust detection using multi-sensor satellite measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Qu, John J; Hao, X

    2017-02-01

    Contemporary scientists have vested interest in trying to understand the climatology of the North Atlantic Basin since this region is considered as the genesis for hurricane formation that eventually get shipped to the tropical Atlantic region and the Caribbean. The effects of atmospheric water cycle and the climate of West Africa and the Atlantic basin are hugely impacted by the radiative forcing of Saharan dust. The focus area in this paper would be to improve the dust detection schemes by employing the use of multi sensor measurements in the thermal emissive wavelengths using legacy sensors such as Terra (T) and Aqua (A) MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), fusing with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Previous work by Hao and Qu (2007) had considered a limited number of thermal infrared channels which led to a correlation coefficient R(2) value of 0.765 between the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at 550 nm and the modeled dust index. In this work, we extend the thermal infrared based dust detection by employing additional channels: the 8.55 μm which has shown high sensitivity to the Saharan dust, along with water vapor channel of 7.1 μm and cloud top channel of 13.1 μm. Also, the dust pixels were clearly identified using the OMI based aerosol types. The dust pixels were cleanly segregated from the other aerosol types such as sulfates, biomass, and other carbonaceous aerosols. These improvements led to a much higher correlation coefficient R(2) value of 0.85 between the modified dust index and the AOT in comparison to the previous work. The key limitations from the current AOT products based on MODIS and were put to test by validating the improved dust detection algorithm. Two improvements were noted. First, the dust measurement radiometry using MODIS is significantly improved by at least an order of 2. Second the spatial measurements are enhanced by a factor of at least 10.

  1. Saharan dust detection using multi-sensor satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha Madhavan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientists have vested interest in trying to understand the climatology of the North Atlantic Basin since this region is considered as the genesis for hurricane formation that eventually get shipped to the tropical Atlantic region and the Caribbean. The effects of atmospheric water cycle and the climate of West Africa and the Atlantic basin are hugely impacted by the radiative forcing of Saharan dust. The focus area in this paper would be to improve the dust detection schemes by employing the use of multi sensor measurements in the thermal emissive wavelengths using legacy sensors such as Terra (T and Aqua (A MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, fusing with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. Previous work by Hao and Qu (2007 had considered a limited number of thermal infrared channels which led to a correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.765 between the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT at 550 nm and the modeled dust index. In this work, we extend the thermal infrared based dust detection by employing additional channels: the 8.55 μm which has shown high sensitivity to the Saharan dust, along with water vapor channel of 7.1 μm and cloud top channel of 13.1 μm. Also, the dust pixels were clearly identified using the OMI based aerosol types. The dust pixels were cleanly segregated from the other aerosol types such as sulfates, biomass, and other carbonaceous aerosols. These improvements led to a much higher correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.85 between the modified dust index and the AOT in comparison to the previous work. The key limitations from the current AOT products based on MODIS and were put to test by validating the improved dust detection algorithm. Two improvements were noted. First, the dust measurement radiometry using MODIS is significantly improved by at least an order of 2. Second the spatial measurements are enhanced by a factor of at least 10.

  2. Galaxy Zoo: Dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies with prominent dust lanes

    CERN Document Server

    Kaviraj, Sugata; Bureau, Martin; Shabala, Stanislav S; Crockett, R Mark; Silk, Joseph; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon; Keel, William C; Masters, Karen L; Schawinski, Kevin; Bamford, Steven P

    2011-01-01

    We study dust and associated molecular gas in 352 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) with prominent dust lanes. 65% of these 'dusty ETGs' (D-ETGs) are morphologically disturbed, suggesting a merger origin. This is consistent with the D-ETGs residing in lower-density environments compared to a control sample drawn from the general ETG population. 80% of D-ETGs inhabit the field (compared to 60% of the controls) and <2% inhabit clusters (compared to 10% of the controls). Compared to the control sample, D-ETGs exhibit bluer UV-optical colours (indicating enhanced star formation) and an AGN fraction that is more than an order of magnitude greater. The clumpy dust mass residing in large-scale features is estimated, using the SDSS r-band images, to be between 10^{4.5} and 10^{6.5} MSun. Comparison to the total (clumpy + diffuse) dust masses - calculated using far-infrared fluxes of the 15% of the D-ETGs that are detected by IRAS - indicates that only ~20% of the dust resides in these large-scale features. The dus...

  3. Climatic controls on the interannual to decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust activity: Toward the development of a seasonal dust prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Wang, Fuyao; Alkolibi, Fahad; Fadda, Eyad; Bakhrjy, Fawzieh

    2015-03-01

    The observed climatic controls on springtime and summertime Saudi Arabian dust activities during 1975-2012 are analyzed, leading to development of a seasonal dust prediction model. According to empirical orthogonal function analysis, dust storm frequency exhibits a dominantly homogeneous pattern across Saudi Arabia, with distinct interannual and decadal variability. The previously identified positive trend in remotely sensed aerosol optical depth since 2000 is shown to be a segment of the decadal oscillation in dust activity, according to long-duration station record. Regression and correlation analyses reveal that the interannual variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is regulated by springtime rainfall across the Arabian Peninsula and summertime Shamal wind intensity. The key drivers of Saudi Arabian dust storm variability are identified. Winter-to-spring La Niña enhances subsequent spring dust activity by decreasing rainfall across the country's primary dust source region, the Rub' al Khali Desert. A relatively cool tropical Indian Ocean favors frequent summer dust storms by producing an anomalously anticyclonic circulation over the central Arabian Peninsula, which enhances the Shamal wind. Decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is associated with North African rainfall and Sahel vegetation, which regulate African dust emissions and transport to Saudi Arabia. Mediterranean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also regulate decadal dust variability, likely through their influence on Sahel rainfall and Shamal intensity. Using antecedent-accumulated rainfall over the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa, and Mediterranean SSTs, as low-frequency predictors, and tropical eastern Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean SSTs as high-frequency predictors, Saudi Arabia's seasonal dust activity is well predicted.

  4. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  5. Southern Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 9 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. In our final dust devil image we are again looking at the southern hemisphere of Mars. These tracks occur mainly on the northeast side of the topographic ridges. Of course, there are many exceptions, which makes understanding the dynamics that initiate the actual dust devil cyclone difficult. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -47.6, Longitude 317.3 East (42.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed

  6. Plentiful Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 8 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. These dust devil tracks occur on the northern plains of Mars. The majority of the surface seen in the image has been affected by the passage of dust devils. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -54.6, Longitude 79.3 East (280.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  7. Dust Properties in HII Regions in M33

    CERN Document Server

    Relano, M; Lisenfeld, U; Verley, S; Hermelo, I; Boquien, M; Albrecht, M; Kramer, C; Braine, J; Perez-Montero, E; De Looze, I; Xilouris, M; Kovacs, A; Staguhn, J

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of the IR emission into star formation rate can be strongly dependent on the physical properties of the dust, which are affected by the environmental conditions where the dust is embedded. We study here the dust properties of a set of HII regions in the Local Group Galaxy M33 presenting different spatial configurations between the stars, gas and dust to understand the dust evolution under different environments. We model the SED of each region using the DustEM tool and obtain the mass relative to hydrogen for Very Small Grains (YVSG), Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (YPAH) and Big Grains (YBG). The relative mass of the VSGs (YVSG/YTOT) is a factor of 1.7 higher for HII regions classified as filled and mixed than for regions presenting a shell structure. The enhancement of VSGs within NGC 604 and NGC 595 is correlated to expansive gas structures with velocities greater than 50 km/s. The gas-to-dust ratio derived for the HII regions in our sample exhibits two regimes related to the HI-H2 transit...

  8. Satellite Observations of Desert Dust-induced Himalayan Snow Darkening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Hsu, N. Christina; Lau, William K.-M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2013-01-01

    The optically thick aerosol layer along the southern edge of the Himalaya has been subject of several recent investigations relating to its radiative impacts on the South Asian summer monsoon and regional climate forcing. Prior to the onset of summer monsoon, mineral dust from southwest Asian deserts is transported over the Himalayan foothills on an annual basis. Episodic dust plumes are also advected over the Himalaya, visible as dust-laden snow surface in satellite imagery, particularly in western Himalaya. We examined spectral surface reflectance retrieved from spaceborne MODIS observations that show characteristic reduction in the visible wavelengths (0.47 nm) over western Himalaya, associated with dust-induced solar absorption. Case studies as well as seasonal variations of reflectance indicate a significant gradient across the visible (0.47 nm) to near-infrared (0.86 nm) spectrum (VIS-NIR), during premonsoon period. Enhanced absorption at shorter visible wavelengths and the resulting VIS-NIR gradient is consistent with model calculations of snow reflectance with dust impurity. While the role of black carbon in snow cannot be ruled out, our satellite-based analysis suggests the observed spectral reflectance gradient dominated by dust-induced solar absorption during premonsoon season. From an observational viewpoint, this study underscores the importance of mineral dust deposition toward darkening of the western Himalayan snow cover, with potential implications to accelerated seasonal snowmelt and regional snow albedo feedbacks.

  9. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  10. A coal dust burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhrshev, B.M.; Khasnullin, I.G.; Krauze, Ye.G.; Ushakov, Yu.A.; Zinovyev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The burner for combustion of coal dust fuel, primarily, in rotating furnaces, contains coaxially disposed pipes, a branch pipe for feeding in the air mixture and a rotating mechanism. The first two pipes are switched in to an air source. The third pipe on the input end has an oblique section and the pipe may be rotated around an axis by a mechanism. The first pipe has ports and it may be moved in an axial direction. By installing the third pipe in the first and second positions, it is possible to direct the dust coming from the branch pipe along the central (the larger part of the dust) or the central pipe, respectively, which makes it possible to regulate the configuration of the torch and its temperature. Hot air is sucked from the furnace through the ports in the perforated first pipe to the mouth of the burner, which makes it possible to intensify combustion. By moving the fifitpipe to the right it is possible to overlap the ports with the projections and to rule out suction of the air. The possibility of regulating combustion in wide ranges makes it possible to reduce the expenditure of fuel by 2 to 3 percent.

  11. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  12. Testing the sensitivity of past climates to the indirect effects of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoo, Navjit; Storelvmo, Trude

    2017-06-01

    Mineral dust particles are important ice nuclei (IN) and as such indirectly impact Earth's radiative balance via the properties of cold clouds. Using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.6, and Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1, and a new empirical parameterization for ice nucleation on dust particles, we investigate the radiative forcing induced by dust IN for different dust loadings. Dust emissions are representative of global conditions for the Last Glacial Maximum and the mid-Pliocene Warm Period. Increased dust leads to smaller and more numerous ice crystals in mixed phase clouds, impacting cloud opacity, lifetime, and precipitation. This increases the shortwave cloud radiative forcing, resulting in significant surface temperature cooling and polar amplification—which is underestimated in existing studies relative to paleoclimate archives. Large hydrological changes occur and are linked to an enhanced dynamical response. We conclude that dust indirect effects could potentially have a significant impact on the model-data mismatch that exists for paleoclimates.Plain Language SummaryMineral dust and climate are closely linked, with large fluctuations in dust deposition recorded in geological archives. Dusty conditions are generally associated with cold, glacial periods and low dust with warmer climates. The direct effects of dust on the climate (absorbing and reflecting radiation) are well understood; however, the indirect effects of dust on climate have been overlooked. Dust indirectly impacts the climate through its role as ice nuclei; the presence of dust makes it easier for ice to form in a cloud. We explore the indirect effects of dust in climates with different dust loading from the present by conducting a climate modeling study in which dust are able to act as ice nuclei. Including dust indirect effects increases the sensitivity of our model to changes in dust emission. Increasing dust impacts ice crystal numbers (increased) and size

  13. Climate, not conflict, explains extreme Middle East dust storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolari, Anthony J.; Li, Dan; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Katul, Gabriel G.; Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-11-01

    The recent dust storm in the Middle East (Sepember 2015) was publicized in the media as a sign of an impending ‘Dust Bowl.’ Its severity, demonstrated by extreme aerosol optical depth in the atmosphere in the 99th percentile compared to historical data, was attributed to the ongoing regional conflict. However, surface meteorological and remote sensing data, as well as regional climate model simulations, support an alternative hypothesis: the historically unprecedented aridity played a more prominent role, as evidenced by unusual climatic and meteorological conditions prior to and during the storm. Remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index demonstrates that vegetation cover was high in 2015 relative to the prior drought and conflict periods, suggesting that agricultural activity was not diminished during that year, thus negating the media narrative. Instead, meteorological simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model show that the storm was associated with a cyclone and ‘Shamal’ winds, typical for dust storm generation in this region, that were immediately followed by an unusual wind reversal at low levels that spread dust west to the Mediterranean Coast. These unusual meteorological conditions were aided by a significant reduction in the critical shear stress due to extreme dry and hot conditions, thereby enhancing dust availability for erosion during this storm. Concluding, unusual aridity, combined with unique synoptic weather patterns, enhanced dust emission and westward long-range transport across the region, thus generating the extreme storm.

  14. Lifting particles in martian dust devils by pressure excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Marc; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-10-01

    The passage of a dust devil vortex goes along with a pressure reduction above ground. This leads to a sub-soil overpressure. It has been suggested that this enhances the lift on particles and facilitates dust entrainment by dust devils. We quantify the necessary pressure difference to lift fine sand from sand beds with thickness of 50, 150, and 250 mm in laboratory experiments with basalt samples consisting of 63-125 μm grains. The absolute pressure was varied between 1,300 and 3,600 Pa. In general, a pressure differences of about 30 Pa per mm depth is needed to lift sand grains. With slight systematic variations this is in agreement to simply accounting for the weight of a lifted particle layer. On Mars observed absolute pressure difference are several Pa. This limits particle lift to a layer smaller than 100 μm . However, it clearly allows Δp lifting if the top layer has a decreased permeability. This might be the case for dust layers sitting on top of a coarse grained sand bed. These measurements support the idea of enhanced dust entrainment due to the Δp -effect in Martian dust devils under certain conditions.

  15. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  16. Clouds and Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote

  17. Tracing water vapor and ice during dust growth

    CERN Document Server

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Bergin, Edwin A

    2016-01-01

    The processes that govern the evolution of dust and water (in the form of vapor or ice) in protoplanetary disks are intimately connected. We have developed a model that simulates dust coagulation, dust dynamics (settling, turbulent mixing), vapor diffusion, and condensation/sublimation of volatiles onto grains in a vertical column of a protoplanetary disk. We employ the model to study how dust growth and dynamics influence the vertical distribution of water vapor and water ice in the region just outside the radial snowline. Our main finding is that coagulation (boosted by the enhanced stickiness of icy grains) and the ensuing vertical settling of solids results in water vapor being depleted, but not totally removed, from the region above the snowline on a timescale commensurate with the vertical turbulent mixing timescale. Depending on the strength of the turbulence and the temperature, the depletion can reach factors of up to ${\\sim}50$ in the disk atmosphere. In our isothermal column, this vapor depletion r...

  18. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  19. Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, Z.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-07-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist.

  20. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  1. Mechanisms of particle-induced pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model: exposure to wood dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Juha; Lehto, Maili; Leino, Marina; Tillander, Sari; Haapakoski, Rita; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Wolff, Henrik; Rautio, Sari; Welling, Irma; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Repeated airway exposure to wood dust has long been known to cause adverse respiratory effects such as asthma and chronic bronchitis and impairment of lung function. However, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses of the airways after wood dust exposure are poorly known. We used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanisms of particle-induced inflammatory responses to fine wood dust particles. BALB/c mice were exposed to intranasally administered fine (more than 99% of the particles had a particle size of dusts twice a week for 3 weeks. PBS, LPS, and titanium dioxide were used as controls. Intranasal instillation of birch or oak dusts elicited influx of inflammatory cells to the lungs in mice. Enhancement of lymphocytes and neutrophils was seen after oak dust exposure, whereas eosinophil infiltration was higher after birch dust exposure. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in lung tissue. Oak dust appeared to be a more potent inducer of these inflammatory mediators than birch dust. The results from our in vivo mouse model show that repeated airway exposure to wood dust can elicit lung inflammation, which is accompanied by induction of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Oak and birch dusts exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in the elicitation of pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that the inflammatory responses induced by the wood species may rise via different cellular mechanisms.

  2. An Observational and Numerical Study on the Topographic Influence on Dust Transport in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xuegong; CHEN Shoujun

    2009-01-01

    Based on observations and numerical simulations, the topographic impacts on dust transport in East Asia were studied. Two regions frequently attacked by dust storms have been confirmed: one is the western part of Inner Mongolia and the southern Mongolia (namely the Mongolia Plateau), and the other is the Tarim Basin.The most frequent dust storm occurrence area within the first region appears in its hinterland while that of the second one lies in its southern boundary. Moreover, the region from the northeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) to the Loess Plateau is attacked by dust storms second frequently. The dust storms frequently occurring over the Mongolia Plateau are related not only to the abundant sand and dust sources, but also to the special topographic conditions of East Asia. The most significant factor that influences the dust storms forming in the hinterland of the Mongolia Plateau is the canyon low level jet (CLLJ), which dominates around the southern areas of the Altay-Sayan Mountains with an east-west direction in the beginning of its formation, and is accompanied by significantly enhanced surface wind afterwards. Due to the obstructive effects of the CLLJ, a lot of dust particles carried by the southward down-slope cold air mass would pile up over the southern slope of the Sayan Mountains. Meanwhile, uneven surface conditions are favorable for the dust particles to go up into the upper atmosphere. With the dust particles piling up continuously, a dust layer is formed in the troposphere and can be recognized as a "dust accumulating container", which provides abundant dust particles to be transported later to the downstream areas. Additionally, the topographic features of East Asia also exert a great influence on dust transport. Generally, the easterly CLLJ enhances the easterly dust transport. The down-slope air current over the southern Sayan Mountains and the air flow surrounding the TP near its northeastern edge enhance the southward dust

  3. Aeolian Dust and Forest Fire Smoke in Urban Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2006-12-01

    Particles of aeolian dust and forest fire smoke are now regularly detected in urban air. Although dusts are common on the Asian Pacific Rim and forest fire smoke characteristic of South East Asia they also frequently detected elsewhere. In the past dust was treated as though it was fairly inert and reactions on the surface limited to the neutralizing ability of alkaline minerals. More recent work shows that that dust has a complex organic chemistry. Observations in China found fatty acids from urban areas (oleic acid and linoleic acid from cooking) on dust derived aerosols. The fatty acids and PAHs decreased sharply after dust storms, suggesting a role for dust in removal processes. When silica particles absorb unsaturated compounds they can react with ozone and release compounds such as formaldehyde. Particles from forest fires have a similarly complex chemistry and the acid-alkaline balance may vary depend on the balance of removal rates of alkaline materials (ammonia, potassium carbonate) and inorganic and organic acids. Airborne dust and forest fire soot can contain humic like substances (HULIS) either as primary material or as secondary oxidation products of the surface of soot. This paper will report on the role polluted air masses in the generation humic materials, particularly those that are surface active. These materials of high molecular weight oxygen rich organic compounds, which exhibit a range of properties of importance in aerosols: they can form complexes with metal ions and thus enhance their solubility, photosensitize the oxidation of organic compounds and lower the surface tension of aqueous aerosols. HULIS can be oxidized to form a range of simpler acids such as formic, acetic and oxalic acid. Dust and forest fire smoke particles have a different composition and size range to that of typical urban combustion particles, so it is likely that the health impacts will be different, yet current regulation often does not recognize any significant

  4. Effects of dust enrichment on oxygen fugacity of cosmic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedkin, Alexei V.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    The degree to which dust enrichment enhances the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a system otherwise solar in composition depends on the dust composition. Equilibrium calculations were performed at 10-3 bar in systems enriched by a factor of 104 in two fundamentally different types of dust to investigate the iron oxidation state in both cases. One type of dust, called SC for solar condensate, stopped equilibrating with solar gas at too high a temperature for FeO or condensed water to be stabilized in any form, and thus has the composition expected of a nebular condensate. The other has CI chondrite composition, appropriate for a parent body that accreted from SC dust and low-temperature ice. Upon total vaporization at 2300 K, both systems have high fO2, >IW. In the SC dust-enriched system, FeO of the bulk silicate reaches ~10 wt% at 1970 K but decreases to <1 wt% below 1500 K. The FeO undergoes reduction because consumption of gaseous oxygen by silicate recondensation causes a precipitous drop in fO2. Thus, enrichment in dust having the composition of likely nebular condensates cannot yield a sufficiently oxidizing environment to account for the FeO contents of chondrules. The fO2 of the system enriched in water-rich, CI dust, however, remains high throughout condensation, as gaseous water remains uncondensed until very low temperatures. This allows silicate condensates to achieve and maintain FeO contents of 27-35 wt%. Water-rich parent bodies are thus excellent candidate sources of chondrule precursors. Impacts on such bodies may have created the combination of high dust enrichment, total pressure, and fO2 necessary for chondrule formation.

  5. Optimizing Saharan dust CALIPSO retrievals

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    V. Amiridis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improvements in CALIPSO dust extinction retrievals over North Africa and Europe when corrections are applied regarding the Saharan dust lidar ratio assumption, the separation of dust portion in detected dust mixtures, and the averaging scheme introduced in the Level 3 CALIPSO product. First, a universal, spatially constant lidar ratio of 58 sr instead of 40 sr is applied to individual Level 2 dust-related backscatter products. The resulting aerosol optical depths show an improvement compared with synchronous and co-located AERONET measurements. An absolute bias of the order of −0.03 has been found, improving on the statistically significant biases of the order of −0.10 reported in the literature for the original CALIPSO product. When compared with the MODIS co-located AOD product, the CALIPSO negative bias is even less for the lidar ratio of 58 sr. After introducing the new lidar ratio for the domain studied, we examine potential improvements to the climatological CALIPSO Level 3 extinction product: (1 by introducing a new methodology for the calculation of pure dust extinction from dust mixtures and (2 by applying an averaging scheme that includes zero extinction values for the non-dust aerosol types detected. The scheme is applied at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1° for ease of comparison with the instantaneous and co-located dust extinction profiles simulated by the BSC-DREAM8b dust model. Comparisons show that the extinction profiles retrieved with the proposed methodology reproduce the well-known model biases per sub-region examined. The very good agreement of the proposed CALIPSO extinction product with respect to AERONET, MODIS and the BSC-DREAM8b dust model, makes this dataset an ideal candidate for the provision of an accurate and robust multi-year dust climatology over North Africa and Europe.

  6. Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Mehta, Anita A

    2008-08-01

    To determine the therapeutic potential of herbal medicine Moringa oleifera Lam. family: Moringaceae in the control of allergic diseases, the efficacy of the ethanolic extract of the seeds of the plant (MOEE) against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs was examined. During the experimental period, the test drugs (MOEE or dexamethasone) were administered by oral route prior to challenge with aerosolized 0.5% OVA. Bronchoconstriction tests were performed and respiratory parameters (i.e., tidal volume and respiratory rate) were measured. At the end of experiment, blood was collected from each animal to perform total and differential counts and serum was used for assay of IL-4, IL-6, and TNFalpha. Lung lavage fluid (BAL) was collected for estimation of cellular content and cytokine levels. Lung tissue histamine assays were performed using the homogenate of one lobe from each animal; a separate lobe and the trachea were subjected to histopathology to measure the degree of any airway inflammation. The results suggest that in OVA-sensitized control animals that did not receive either drug, tidal volume (V(t)) was decreased, respiration rate (f) was increased, and both the total and differential cell counts in blood and BAL fluid were increased significantly. MOEE-treatment of sensitized hosts resulted in improvement in all parameters except BAL TNFalpha and IL-4. Moreover, MOEE-treatment also showed protection against acetylcholine-induced broncho-constriction and airway inflammation which was confirmed by histological observations. The results of these studies confirm the traditional claim for the usefulness of this herb in the treatment of allergic disorders like asthma.

  7. Inhibitory effects of sunitinib on ovalbumin-induced chronic experimental asthma in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Mao; LIU Xuan; DU Qiang; YAO Xin; YIN Kai-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase signaling cascades play a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation. Sunitinib, a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been reported to exert potent immunoregulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis effects. We investigated whether sunitinib could suppress the progression of airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma. Methods Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice were chronically challenged with aerosolized OVA for 8 weeks. Some mice were intragastrically administered with sunitinib (40 mg/kg) daily during the period of OVA challenge. Twelve hours after the last OVA challenge, mice were evaluated for the development of airway inflammation, AHR and airway remodeling. The levels of total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Th2 cytokines (interieukin (IL)-4 and IL-13) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured by ELISA. The expression of phosphorylated c-kit protein in the lungs was detected by immunoprecipitation/Western blotting (IP/WB) analysis.Results Sunitinib significantly inhibited eosinophilic airway inflammation, persistent AHR and airway remodeling in chronic experimental asthma. It reduced levels of total serum IgE and BALF Th2 cytokines and also lowered the expression of phosphorylated c-kit protein in remodelled airways.Conclusions Sunitinib may inhibit the development of airway inflammation, AHR and airway remodeling. It is potentially beneficial to the prevention or treatment of asthma.

  8. Secretoglobin Superfamily Protein SCGB3A2 Deficiency Potentiates Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation

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    Taketomo Kido

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretoglobin (SCGB 3A2, a cytokine-like secretory protein of small molecular weight, which may play a role in lung inflammation, is predominantly expressed in airway epithelial cells. In order to understand the physiological role of SCGB3A2, Scgb3a2−/− mice were generated and characterized. Scgb3a2−/− mice did not exhibit any overt phenotypes. In ovalbumin- (OVA- induced airway allergy inflammation model, Scgb3a2−/− mice in mixed background showed a decreased OVA-induced airway inflammation, while six times C57BL/6NCr backcrossed congenic Scgb3a2−/− mice showed a slight exacerbation of OVA-induced airway inflammation as compared to wild-type littermates. These results indicate that the loss of SCGB3A2 function was influenced by a modifier gene(s in mixed genetic background and suggest that SCGB3A2 has anti-inflammatory property. The results further suggest the possible use of recombinant human SCGB3A2 as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  9. Ligustrazine attenuates inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumine-induced mouse asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Hongying; Du, Xin; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Li, Mihui; Xu, Fei; Wei, Kai; Dong, Jingcheng

    2016-09-01

    Ligustrazine which is isolated from Chinese herb ligusticum chuanxiong hort, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for asthma treatment. In this study, we aim to observe the effect of ligustrazine on inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse asthma model. Our data demonstrates that ligustrazine suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and lung inflammation in OVA-induced mouse asthma model. Ligustrazine also induces inhibition of inflammatory cells including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. In addition, ligustrazine significantly reduces IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A, CCL3, CCL19 and CCL21 level in BALF of asthma mice. Furthermore, ligustrazine induces down-regulation of CCL19 receptor CCR7, STAT3 and p38 MAPK protein expression. Collectively, these results suggest that ligustrazine is effective in attenuation of allergic airway inflammatory changes and related chemokines and receptors in OVA-induced asthma model, and this action might be associated with inhibition of STAT3 and p38 MAPK pathway, which indicates that ligustrazine may be used as a potential therapeutic method to treat asthma.

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Sihuangxiechai Decoction on Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation in Guinea Pigs

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    Xue Ping Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sihuangxiechai decoction on asthmatic Guinea pig model which was sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of ovalbumin (OVA and challenged by OVA inhalation to induce chronic airway inflammation. Differential cell counts of cytospins were performed after staining with Giemsa solution. The quantity of leukocytes and its classification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and blood were evaluated by blood cell analyzer and microscope. Histological analysis of the lung was performed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining. The levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in BALF and serum were detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA. The total number of leukocytes in BALF and blood has no significant difference between Sihuangxiechaitang decoction treated group and dexamethasone (DXM treated group but was significantly lower than those of asthma group. The percentage of eosinophils in lung tissues of sihuangxiechai decoction treated group was significantly lower than that of asthma group. The results demonstrated that the levels of IL-4 and TNF-α in the sihuangxiechai decoction treated group were significantly reduced compared with the asthma group. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that sihuangxiechai decoction has a protective effect on OVA-induced asthma in reducing airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR in a Guinea pig model and may be useful as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of bronchial asthma.

  11. Connexin 43 Upregulation in Mouse Lungs during Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma.

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    Yin Yao

    Full Text Available Connexin (Cx-based gap junction channels play important roles in the inflammatory response. Cx43 is involved in the pathogenesis of some lung diseases such as acute lung injury. However, the Cx43 expression in asthma is unclear. In the present study, we used a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced allergic airway disease to examine the levels of Cx43 and analyze the relationship between Cx43 and airway inflammation in allergic airway disease.Asthma was induced in mice via sensitization and challenge with OVA. Cx43 mRNA and protein expression levels were investigated via QT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry 0 h, 8 h, 1 d, 2 d and 4 d after the first challenge. The relationship between Cx43 protein levels and inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine levels was analyzed.The OVA-induced mice exhibited typical pathological features of asthma, including airway hyper-responsiveness; strong inflammatory cell infiltration surrounding the bronchia and vessels; many inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF; higher IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels; and high OVA specific IgE levels. Low Cx43 expression was detected in the lungs of control (PBS mice. A dramatic increase in the Cx43 mRNA and protein levels was found in the asthmatic mice. Cx43 mRNA and protein expression levels increased in a time-dependent manner in asthma mice, and Cx43 was mostly localized in the alveolar and bronchial epithelial layers. Moreover, lung Cx43 protein levels showed a significant positive correlation with inflammatory cell infiltration in the airway and IL-4 and IL-5 levels in the BALF at different time points after challenge. Interestingly, the increase in Cx43 mRNA and protein levels occurred prior to the appearance of the inflammatory cell infiltration.Our data suggest that there is a strong upregulation of Cx43 mRNA and protein levels in the lungs in asthma. Cx43 levels also exhibited a positive correlation with allergic airway inflammation. Cx43 may represent a target to treat allergic airway diseases in the future.

  12. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

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    Yuan Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA- sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were abolished by morin, implying that ROS/MAPK signaling contributes to the relief of airway inflammation. Our findings indicate for the first time that morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma, which probably occurs via the oxidative stress-responsive MAPK pathway, highlighting a novel profile of morin as a potent agent for asthma management.

  13. Deficiency of phospholipase A2 receptor exacerbates ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Shun; Mishina, Hideto; Watanabe, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Fujioka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Soichiro; Suzuki, Koji; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Obata, Jun-Ei; Kawabata, Kenichi; Yokota, Yasunori; Murakami, Makoto; Hanasaki, Kohji; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2013-08-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) plays a critical role in the genesis of lung inflammation through proinflammatory eicosanoids. A previous in vitro experiment showed a possible role of cell surface receptor for sPLA2 (PLA2R) in the clearance of extracellular sPLA2. PLA2R and groups IB and X sPLA2 are expressed in the lung. This study examined a pathogenic role of PLA2R in airway inflammation using PLA2R-deficient (PLA2R(-/-)) mice. Airway inflammation was induced by immunosensitization with OVA. Compared with wild-type (PLA2R(+/+)) mice, PLA2R(-/-) mice had a significantly greater infiltration of inflammatory cells around the airways, higher levels of groups IB and X sPLA2, eicosanoids, and Th2 cytokines, and higher numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after OVA treatment. In PLA2R(-/-) mice, intratracheally instilled [(125)I]-labeled sPLA2-IB was cleared much more slowly from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with PLA2R(+/+) mice. The degradation of the instilled [(125)I]-labeled sPLA2-IB, as assessed by trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after instillation, was lower in PLA2R(-/-) mice than in PLA2R(+/+) mice. In conclusion, PLA2R deficiency increased sPLA2-IB and -X levels in the lung through their impaired clearance from the lung, leading to exaggeration of lung inflammation induced by OVA treatment in a murine model.

  14. Mangiferin Attenuates Th1/Th2 Cytokine Imbalance in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthmatic Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Guang-Han; Du, Jun; Huang, Xin; Lu, Yi; Keller, Evan T.; Zhang, Jian; Deng, Jia-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Mangiferin is a major bioactive ingredient in Mangifera indica Linn. (Anacardiaceae) leaves. Aqueous extract of such leaves have been used as an indigenous remedy for respiratory diseases like asthma and coughing in traditional Chinese medicine. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of mangiferin on anti-asthma remain unclear. In our present study, we investigated the anti-asthmatic effect of mangiferin on Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and explored its underlying immunoregulatory mechanism in mouse model of allergic asthma. Mangiferin significantly reduced the total inflammatory cell counts and eosinophil infiltration, decreased the production of ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum and PGD2 in BALF. The antibody array analysis showed that mangiferin down-regulated the levels of one group of cytokines/chemokines including Th2-related IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and others IL-3, IL-9, IL-17, RANTES, TNF-α, but simultaneously up-regulated Th1-related IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 and IL-12 expression in serum. Thus it attenuates the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells ratio by diminishing the abnormal mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Finally, mangiferin substantially inhibited the activation and expression of STAT-6 and GATA-3 in excised lung tissues. Our results suggest that mangiferin can exert anti-asthmatic effect. The underlying mechanism may attribute to the modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalance via inhibiting the STAT6 signaling pathway. PMID:24955743

  15. Mangiferin attenuates TH1/TH2 cytokine imbalance in an ovalbumin-induced asthmatic mouse model.

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    Hong-Wei Guo

    Full Text Available Mangiferin is a major bioactive ingredient in Mangifera indica Linn. (Anacardiaceae leaves. Aqueous extract of such leaves have been used as an indigenous remedy for respiratory diseases like asthma and coughing in traditional Chinese medicine. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of mangiferin on anti-asthma remain unclear. In our present study, we investigated the anti-asthmatic effect of mangiferin on Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and explored its underlying immunoregulatory mechanism in mouse model of allergic asthma. Mangiferin significantly reduced the total inflammatory cell counts and eosinophil infiltration, decreased the production of ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum and PGD2 in BALF. The antibody array analysis showed that mangiferin down-regulated the levels of one group of cytokines/chemokines including Th2-related IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and others IL-3, IL-9, IL-17, RANTES, TNF-α, but simultaneously up-regulated Th1-related IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 and IL-12 expression in serum. Thus it attenuates the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells ratio by diminishing the abnormal mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12 and Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Finally, mangiferin substantially inhibited the activation and expression of STAT-6 and GATA-3 in excised lung tissues. Our results suggest that mangiferin can exert anti-asthmatic effect. The underlying mechanism may attribute to the modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalance via inhibiting the STAT6 signaling pathway.

  16. Erythronium japonicum attenuates histopathological lung abnormalities in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SEO, JI-HYE; BANG, MI-AE; KIM, GYEYEOP; CHO, SEUNG SIK; PARK, DAE-HUN

    2016-01-01

    .... Erythronium japonicum (E. japonicum) is a traditional herb used in Korea and East Asian countries that has been found to exert free radical scavenging activity and anti-proliferative effects in human colorectal carcinoma cells...

  17. Effects of 4 months of smoking in mice with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, B. N.; Timens, W.; Kerstjens, H. A.; Geerlings, M.; Luinge, M. A.; Schouten, J. P.; Postma, D. S.; Hylkema, M. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background The effects of smoking on asthma pathogenesis are complex and not well studied. We have shown recently that 3 weeks of smoking attenuates ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation in mice and that 4-6 months of smoking induces emphysema in mice without airway inflammation. Effects of co

  18. Class A dioscorins of various yam species suppress ovalbumin-induced allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Chi; Lin, Kuo-Chih

    2014-06-01

    Dioscorins, the primary storage proteins in yam tubers, of different species exhibited varying immunomodulatory activities in mice. We inferred that this might be attributed to the various isoforms in the yam tubers. We aimed to investigate the antiallergic potential of the Class A dioscorins of various yam species using the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine allergy model. We purified the recombinant Class A dioscorins (rDioscorins) of various yam species from Escherichia coli and evaluated their antiallergic potential by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Class A rDioscorins of various yam species suppressed allergic reactions by significantly decreasing the serum IgE and histamine levels. The serum IFN-γ and IgG2a levels significantly increased in all rDioscorin-treated mice. The splenocytes of the rDioscorin-treated mice also exhibited upregulated IFN-γ secretion in response to ConA stimulation. By contrast, the serum IL-5 levels decreased to basal levels in mice treated with Class A rDioscorins and the amount of IL-5 produced by splenocytes decreased in response to ConA stimulation. The Class A rDioscorins suppress allergic reactions, possibly through modulating an imbalanced Th1/Th2 immune response to OVA by promoting Th1 cell responses. Furthermore, the Class A rDioscorins of various yam species exhibited similar immunomodulatory activities in OVA-sensitized mice, which were different from the activities demonstrated by native dioscorins, suggesting that distinct immunomodulatory effects of native dioscorins on mice were attributed to the various isoforms in the yam tubers. The Class A dioscorins of various yam species exhibit antiallergic activity and are potential immunotherapeutic agents for treating IgE-mediated hypersensitivity.

  19. Protective Effects of Scrophularia Striata in Ovalbumin-induced Mice Asthma Model

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    Abbas Azadmehr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Scrophularia striata Boiss. (Scrophulariaceae is a plant growing in the northeastern part of Iran and being used as a traditional herb for various inflammatory disorders.This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the Scrophularia striata extract in Ovalbumin (OVA induced-asthma mice model.Methods:OVA-sensitized mice were intrapritonealy treated with two doses (100 and 200 mg/kg of the extract on days 8 to 14 separately. Broncoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF was collected 48 h after the final OVA challenge and then the number of eosinophils and other inflammatory cells were assessed by direct microscopic counting. In addition, total immunoglubolin (Ig E and OVA-specific IgE levels in serum, IL-4 and IL-5 cytokines in BALF were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Moreover, phytochemical assay by thin layer chromatography (TLC and the 2, 2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH were used to evaluate the main compounds and the antioxidant capacity of the plant extract, respectively.Results:The results showed that the main components; including flavonoids, phenolic compounds and phenyl propanoids were presented in the S. striata extract. In addition, the treatment with extract significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and suppressed T-helper 2 (Th2 cytokines including IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF. Also, total IgE and OVA-specific IgE levels in the serum decreased.Conclusion:Collectively, it is concluded that the extract has the potential to modulate the Th2 cytokines and could be used as immunomodulatory agent in the treatment of allergic asthma.

  20. Inhibitory Effect of Pycnogenol® on Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günel, Ceren; Demirci, Buket; Eryılmaz, Aylin; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Meteoğlu, İbrahim; Ömürlü, İmran Kurt; Başal, Yeşim

    2016-01-01

    Background The supplement Pycnogenol® (PYC) has been used for the treatment of several chronic diseases including allergic rhinitis (AR). However, the in vivo effects on allergic inflammation have not been identified to date. Aims To investigate the treatment results of PYC on allergic inflammation in a rat model of allergic rhinitis. Study Design Animal experimentation. Methods Allergic rhinitis was stimulated in 42 rats by intraperitoneal sensitization and intranasal challenge with Ovalbumin. The animals were divided into six subgroups: healthy controls, AR group, AR group treated with corticosteroid (dexamethasone 1 mg/kg; CS+AR), healthy rats group that were given only PYC of 10 mg/kg (PYC10), AR group treated with PYC of 3mg/kg (PYC3+AR), and AR group treated with PYC of 10 mg/kg (PYC10+AR). Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (Ig-E) levels of serum were measured. Histopathological changes in nasal mucosa and expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β were evaluated. Results The levels of the IL-4 were significantly decreased in the PYC3+AR, PYC10+AR and CS+AR groups compared with the AR group (p=0.002, p<0.001, p=0.006). The production of the IFN-γ was significantly decreased in the PYC3+AR and PYC10+AR groups compared with the AR group (p=0.013, p=0.001). The administration of PYC to allergic rats suppressed the elevated IL-10 production, especially in the PYC3+AR group (p=0.006). Mucosal edema was significantly decreased respectively after treatment at dose 3 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg PYC (both, p<0.001). The mucosal expression of TNF-α has significantly decreased in the PYC3+AR and PYC10+AR groups (p=0.005, p<0.001), while the IL-1β expression significantly decreased in the CS+AR, PYC3+AR, and PYC10+AR groups (p<0.001, p=0.003, p=0.001). Conclusion PYC has multiple suppressive effects on allergic response. Thus, PYC may be used as a supplementary agent in allergic response. PMID:27994914

  1. Immunomodulatory Effects of Astragalus gypsicolus Hydroalcoholic Extract in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Ghafourian Boroujerdnia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that herbal extracts possess various biological effects including anti-inflammatory and  anti-cancer  activities. The  present  study  was aimed to investigate the protective effects of the Astragalus gypsicolus  (AG hydroalcoholic extract in early allergic sensitized mice induced by ovalbumin.Phytochemical assay was used  to  recognize the  main active constituents  in the  AG hydroalcoholic extract. Mice were immunized with subcutaneous injection of ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide. Efficiency of  sensitization was assessed by serum  IgE  levels and eosinophil count. After sensitization, two doses of extract (250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg were injected intrapritoneally.On  day 14, mice were challenged with intrapritoneal injection of ovalbumin. IL-4 and IFNγ  levels in  broncoalveolar  lavage fluid, which had  been  collected on  day 15, were assessed by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA kit.Our results indicate two main active constituents including flavonoids and terpenoids are present in the AG hydroalcoholic extract. Intrapritoneal injection of the AG hydroalcoholic extract was able to decrease IL-4 and increase IFNγ. It seems the AG hydroalcoholic extract has the potential to modulate the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines in allergy.

  2. Rutin has anti-asthmatic effects in an ovalbumin-induced asthmatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research June 2017; 16 (6): 1337-1347 ... Conclusion: Rutin effectively suppresses OVA-induced asthma and improves airway function by suppressing ..... Djukanovic R, Roche WR, Wilson JW, Beasley CR,.

  3. Inhibitory effects of l-theanine on airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jin, Sun Woo; Choi, Jae Ho; Choi, Chul Yung; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Se Jong; Kim, Yongan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2017-01-01

    l-theanine, a water-soluble amino acid isolated from green tea (Camellia sinensis), has anti-inflammatory activity, antioxidative properties, and hepatoprotective effects. However, the anti-allergic effect of l-theanine and its underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of l-theanine on asthmatic responses, particularly airway inflammation and oxidative stress modulation in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of asthma. Treatment with l-theanine dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Histological studies revealed that l-theanine significantly inhibited OVA-induced mucus production and inflammatory cell infiltration in the respiratory tract and blood vessels. l-theanine administration also significantly decreased the production of IgE, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interferon-gamma in BALF. The lung weight decreased with l-theanine administration. l-theanine also markedly attenuated the OVA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and matrix metalloprotease-9 in BALF. Moreover, l-theanine reduced the TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in A549 cells. Together, these results suggest that l-theanine alleviates airway inflammation in asthma, which likely occurs via the oxidative stress-responsive NF-κB pathway, highlighting its potential as a useful therapeutic agent for asthma management.

  4. Sulforaphane inhibits the Th2 immune response in ovalbumin-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Chang-Min; Kim, Yeong Dae; Chung, Sung Woon; Jung, In Duk; Noh, Kyung Tae; Park, Jin Wook; Heo, Deok Rim; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Seo, Jong Keun; Park, Yeong-Min

    2012-05-01

    Sulforaphane (1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)-butane), belonging to a family of natural compounds that are abundant in broccoli, has received significant therapeutic interest in recent years. However, the molecular basis of its effects remains to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to determine whether sulforaphane regulates the inflammatory response in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. Mice were sensitized with OVA, treated with sulforaphane, and then challenged with OVA. Sulforaphane administration significantly alleviated the OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine. Additionally, sulforaphane suppressed the increase in the levels of SOCS-3 and GATA-3 and IL-4 expression in the OVA-challenged mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that sulforaphane regulates Th2 immune responses. This sutdy provides novel insights into the regulatory role of sulforaphane in allergen-induced Th2 inflammation and airway responses, which indicates its therapeutic potential for asthma and other allergic diseases.

  5. Alteration of airway responsiveness mediated by receptors in ovalbumin-induced asthmatic E3 rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-wen LONG; Xu-dong YANG; Lei CAO; She-min LU; Yong-xiao CAO

    2009-01-01

    Aim:Airway hyperresponsiveness is a constant feature of asthma.The aim of the present study was to investigate airway hyperreactivity mediated by contractile and dilative receptors in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced model of rat asthma.Methods:Asthmatic E3 rats were prepared by intraperitoneal injection with OVA/aluminum hydroxide and then challenged with intranasal instillation of OVA-PBS two weeks later.The myograph method was used to measure the responses of constriction and dilatation in the trachea,main bronchi and lobar bronchi.Results:In asthmatic E3 rata,β2 adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle pre-contracted with 5-HT was inhibited,and there were no obvious difference in relaxation compared with normal E3 rats.Contraction of lobar bronchi mediated by 5-HT and sarafotoxin 6c was more potent than in the trachea or main bronchi.Airway contractions mediated by the endothelin (ET)A receptor,ETB receptor and M3 muscarinic receptor were augmented,and the augmented contraction was most obvious in lobar bronchi.The order of efficacy of contraction for lobar bronchi induced by agonists was ET-1,sarafotoxin 6c>ACh>5-HT.OX8 (an antibody against CD8+ T cells) strongly shifted and 0X35 (an antibody against CD4+ T cells) modestly shifted isoprenaline-induced concentration-relaxation curves in a nonparallel fashion to the left with an increased Rmax in asthmatic rats and sarafotoxin 6c-induced concentration-contractile curves to the right with a decreased Emax.Conclusion:The inhibition of airway relaxation and the augmentation of contraction mediated by receptors contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and involve CD8+ and CD4+ T cells.

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ailanthus altissima in ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mei Hua; Yook, Jumin; Lee, Eunkyung; Lin, Chang Xin; Quan, Zhejiu; Son, Kun Ho; Bae, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Pyo; Kang, Sam Sik; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2006-05-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation to find bioactive medicinal herbs exerting anti-inflammation activity, the effect of an ethanol extract from the parts of Ailanthus altissima (Simaroubaceae) was evaluated in both in vitro and in in vivo system. The ethanol extract of A. altissima (EAa) inhibited generation of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dependent phases of prostaglandin D2 in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 214.6 microg/ml. However, this compound did not inhibit COX-2 protein expression up to a concentration of 400 microg/ml in the BMMC, indicating that EAa directly inhibits COX-2 activity. In addition, EAa inhibited leukotriene C4 production with an IC50 value of 25.7 microg/ml. Furthermore, this compound inhibited degranulation reaction in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 27.3 microg/ml. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice were orally pretreated with EAa before aerosol challenges. EAa reduced the eosinophil infiltration into the airway and the eotaxin, IL-4, and IL-13 mRNA expression levels. These results suggest that the anti-inflammation activity of A. altissima in OVA-induced lung inflammation may occur in part via the down regulation of T(H)2 cytokines and eotaxin transcripts as well as the inhibition of inflammatory mediators.

  7. A humanized microbiota mouse model of ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Sadarangani, Manish; Brown, Eric M; Russell, Shannon L; Nimmo, Michael; Dean, John; Turvey, Stuart E; Chan, Edmond S; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-07-03

    There is increasing evidence for a role of early life gut microbiota in later development of asthma in children. In our recent study, children with reduced abundance of the bacterial genera Lachnospira, Veillonella, Faecalibacterium, and Rothia had an increased risk of development of asthma and addition of these bacteria in a humanized mouse model reduced airway inflammation. In this Addendum, we provide additional data on the use of a humanized gut microbiota mouse model to study the development of asthma in children, highlighting the differences in immune development between germ-free mice colonized with human microbes compared to those colonized with mouse gut microbiota. We also demonstrate that there is no association between the composition of the gut microbiota in older children and the diagnosis of asthma, further suggesting the importance of the gut microbiota-immune system axis in the first 3 months of life.

  8. Sulforaphane inhibits the Th2 immune response in ovalbumin-induced asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ho Park

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl-butane, belongingto a family of natural compounds that are abundant in broccoli,has received significant therapeutic interest in recent years.However, the molecular basis of its effects remains to beelucidated. In this study, we attempt to determine whether sulforaphaneregulates the inflammatory response in an ovalbumin(OVA-induced murine asthma model. Mice were sensitizedwith OVA, treated with sulforaphane, and then challenged withOVA. Sulforaphane administration significantly alleviated theOVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine.Additionally, sulforaphane suppressed the increase inthe levels of SOCS-3 and GATA-3 and IL-4 expression in theOVA-challenged mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate thatsulforaphane regulates Th2 immune responses. This sutdy providesnovel insights into the regulatory role of sulforaphane in allergen-induced Th2 inflammation and airway responses, whichindicates its therapeutic potential for asthma and other allergicdiseases. [BMB reports 2012; 45(5: 311-316

  9. Sesame Oil Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Pulmonary Edema and Bronchial Neutrophilic Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dur-Zong Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allergic asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases of airways. Severe asthma may lead to hospitalization and death. Sesame oil is a natural product with anti-inflammatory property. However, the effect of sesame oil on allergic asthma has never been studied. Objective. We investigate the effect of sesame oil on pulmonary inflammation in allergic asthma model. Methods. Allergic airway inflammation was induced by sensitizing with two doses of 10 mg ovalbumin (OVA and then challenged with 1% OVA nebulizer exposure (1 h/day for 3 days. Sesame oil (0.25, 0.5, or 1 mL/kg/day was given orally 30 min before each challenge. Samples were collected 24 h after the last challenge. Results. Data showed that sesame oil inhibited pulmonary edema and decreased interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in OVA-treated mice. Sesame oil also decreased pulmonary nitrite level, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and neutrophil infiltration induced by OVA. Further, sesame oil decreased serum IgE level in OVA-treated mice. Conclusion. Sesame oil may attenuate pulmonary edema and bronchial neutrophilic inflammation by inhibiting systemic IgE level in allergic asthma.

  10. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  11. Flying Through Dust From Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    How can we tell what an asteroid is made of? Until now, weve relied on remote spectral observations, though NASAs recently launched OSIRIS-REx mission may soon change this by landing on an asteroid and returning with a sample.But what if we could learn more about the asteroids near Earth without needing to land on each one? It turns out that we can by flying through their dust.The aerogel dust collector of the Stardust mission. [NASA/JPL/Caltech]Ejected CluesWhen an airless body is impacted by the meteoroids prevalent throughout our solar system, ejecta from the body are flung into the space around it. In the case of small objects like asteroids, their gravitational pull is so weak that most of the ejected material escapes, forming a surrounding cloud of dust.By flying a spacecraft through this cloud, we could perform chemical analysis of the dust, thereby determining the asteroids composition. We could even capture some of the dust during a flyby (for example, by using an aerogel collector like in the Stardust mission) and bring it back home to analyze.So whats the best place to fly a dust-analyzing or -collecting spacecraft? To answer this, we need to know what the typical distribution of dust is around a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) a problem that scientists Jamey Szalay (Southwest Research Institute) and Mihly Hornyi (University of Colorado Boulder) address in a recent study.The colors show the density distribution for dust grains larger than 0.3 m around a body with a 10-km radius. The distribution is asymmetric, with higher densities on the apex side, shown here in the +y direction. [Szalay Hornyi 2016]Moon as a LaboratoryTo determine typical dust distributions around NEAs, Szalay and Hornyi first look at the distribution of dust around our own Moon, caused by the same barrage of meteorites wed expect to impact NEAs. The Moons dust cloud was measured in situ in 2013 and 2014 by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) on board the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment

  12. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  13. The changing role of dust in biogeochemical cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, J. C.; Reynolds, R. L.; Farmer, G. L.; Reheis, M.

    2007-12-01

    Dust emission and deposition have the potential to deplete and enrich ecosystems of mineral resources essential to life. In many parts of the world, and particularly in semi-arid settings, wind erosion of soils and the subsequent long-distance transport and deposition of mineral aerosols play a basic role in soil composition and processes, including the production of essential plant nutrients through weathering. Although the long-term role of dust in the development of soils is reasonably well understood, the effects of recent dust emission and deposition on ecosystems are not. Recent work on ecosystems around the world has highlighted the fundamental importance of contemporary wind erosion and dust deposition in biogeochemical cycling. In the western U.S., studies of Sr and Nd isotopes, elemental concentrations, and magnetic properties elucidate the role of dust in recent soil development and soil loss by wind erosion related to land-use change. In the arid landscapes in and around Canyonlands National Park (Utah), these techniques provide insight into the development of soils in stable settings where human activities have been minimal but the loss of soil in areas affected by grazing and recreational activities. In stable settings of the central Colorado Plateau (Utah), dust deposition is responsible for a large proportion (as much as 20 percent) of surface soil mass and elemental content. In contrast, wind erosion is responsible for large losses of nutrients and surface soil of nearby, closely similar geomorphic settings disturbed by human activity. In the San Juan Mountains (Colorado) downwind of the Colorado Plateau, Nd and Sr isotopes in dust and lake sediments provide evidence for large increases in dust deposition during the 19th and 20th century compared to records from the middle to late Holocene. The recent enhancement in dust deposition is also responsible for increased loading of many elements, including essential nutrients that may influence

  14. Full-sky, High-resolution Maps of Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron Michael

    We present full-sky, high-resolution maps of interstellar dust based on data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Planck missions. We describe our custom processing of the entire WISE 12 micron All-Sky imaging data set, and present the resulting 15 arcsecond resolution, full-sky map of diffuse Galactic dust emission, free of compact sources and other contaminating artifacts. Our derived 12 micron dust map offers angular resolution far superior to that of all other existing full-sky, infrared dust emission maps, revealing a wealth of small-scale filamentary structure. We also apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. We derive full-sky 6.1 arcminute resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting this two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 micron data. In doing so, we obtain the first ever full-sky 100-3000 GHz Planck-based thermal dust emission model, as well as a dust temperature correction with ~10 times enhanced angular resolution relative to DIRBE-based temperature maps. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration (2013) single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales. Future work will focus on combining

  15. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  16. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  17. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  18. Mining dust filter. Bergbaustaubfilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igelbuescher, H.; Hoelter, H.

    1988-12-28

    A dust filter for application underground, whose casing is designed as a transportable unit combinable with further casings and fitted with removable filter pockets. These filter pockets have a frame which seals towards the casing and with the lattices on which the filter cloth is stretched and with spacers holding the said lattices at a distance. Each casing as such has inspection ports that are operationable optionally on either side, and clean and crude gas channels on its upper side. The ends of these channels have coupleable head pieces, so that connection is made easy when casings are arranged in a line. Each crude gas channel is connected to the inside of the casing by means of perforations in the floor of said channel, whereas the clean gas channel, for its part, is in connection with the inside of the casing by means of a channel on the head side of the casing. It is thus possible to create a dust filter having practically any desired output by arranging individual modules in line, in which connection each individual module is reliably transportable on the facilities available below ground, as pre-fabricated above ground. Stable support of the sides of the filter cloths is ensured by the lattice that consists of reciprocally cranked longitudinal and transverse wires. 10 figs.

  19. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  20. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  1. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  2. The dust content of QSO hosts at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Calura, F; Vignali, C; Pozzi, F; Pipino, A; Matteucci, F

    2013-01-01

    Infrared observations of high-z quasar (QSO) hosts indicate the presence of large masses of dust in the early universe. When combined with other observables, such as neutral gas masses and star formation rates, the dust content of z~6 QSO hosts may help constraining their star formation history. We have collected a database of 58 sources from the literature discovered by various surveys and observed in the FIR. We have interpreted the available data by means of chemical evolution models for forming proto-spheroids, investigating the role of the major parameters regulating star formation and dust production. For a few systems, given the derived small dynamical masses, the observed dust content can be explained only assuming a top-heavy initial mass function, an enhanced star formation efficiency and an increased rate of dust accretion. However, the possibility that, for some systems, the dynamical mass has been underestimated cannot be excluded. If this were the case, the dust mass can be accounted for by stan...

  3. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  4. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  5. Source, route and effect of Asian sand dust on environment and the oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Zhang; Fahe Chai; Renjian Zhang; Zhigang Xue

    2010-01-01

    We summarize in this overview achievements in current research frontiers in Asian sand dust with emphasis on the method for sand dust research,the sources of sand dust aerosols,emission of sand dust,mechanism of sand dust weather,chemical transformation during transport,and influences on climatic environment and oceans.Our main results show that most of Asian sand dust comes from Mongolia,the Gobi Desert,arid and semiarid desert areas in northwest China,which is divided into initial sources and enhanced sources.Half of the global production of dust originates from Asian dust source regions.Asian dust weather is so immense that it can cover a 5-7-day journey from the sources to the Korean Peninsula,Japan Islands,and the Pacific Ocean to even impact North America.Asian dust weather plays an active role in the biogeochemical cycles of trace elements in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere.

  6. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  7. Atmospheric bioaerosols transported via dust storms in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Chirokova, Galina; McCubbin, Ian; Painter, Thomas H.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Dodson, Craig

    2011-09-01

    Measurements are presented showing the presence of biological material within frequent dust storms in the western United States. Previous work has indicated that biological particles were enhancing the impact of dust storms on the formation of clouds. This paper presents multiple case studies, between April and May 2010, showing the presence of and quantifying the amount of biological material via an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer during dust events. All dust storms originated in the Four Corners region in the western Untied States and were measured at Storm Peak Laboratory, a high elevation facility in northwestern Colorado. From an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, the mean dust particle size during these events was approximately 1 μm, with number concentrations between 6 cm-3 and 12 cm-3. Approximately 0.2% of these dust particles had fluorescence signatures, indicating the presence of biological material.

  8. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  9. Martian Arctic Dust Devil and Phoenix Meteorology Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander caught this dust devil in action west-southwest of the lander at 11:16 a.m. local Mars time on Sol 104, or the 104th Martian day of the mission, Sept. 9, 2008. Dust devils have not been detected in any Phoenix images from earlier in the mission, but at least six were observed in a dozen images taken on Sol 104. Dust devils are whirlwinds that often occur when the Sun heats the surface of Mars, or some areas on Earth. The warmed surface heats the layer of atmosphere closest to it, and the warm air rises in a whirling motion, stirring dust up from the surface like a miniature tornado. The vertical post near the left edge of this image is the mast of the Meteorological Station on Phoenix. The dust devil visible at the horizon just to the right of the mast is estimated to be 600 to 700 meters (about 2,000 to 2,300 feet) from Phoenix, and 4 to 5 meters (10 to 13 feet) in diameter. It is much smaller than dust devils that have been observed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit much closer to the equator. It is closer in size to dust devils seen from orbit in the Phoenix landing region, though still smaller than those. The image has been enhanced to make the dust devil easier to see. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  11. E ring dust sources: Implications from Cassini's dust measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Kempf, Sascha; Krivov, Alexander V.; Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seiß, Martin; Miodrag Sremčević

    2006-08-01

    The Enceladus flybys of the Cassini spacecraft are changing our understanding of the origin and sustainment of Saturn's E ring. Surprisingly, beyond the widely accepted dust production caused by micrometeoroid impacts onto the atmosphereless satellites (the impactor-ejecta process), geophysical activities have been detected at the south pole of Enceladus, providing an additional, efficient dust source. The dust detector data obtained during the flyby E11 are used to identify the amount of dust produced in the impactor-ejecta process and to improve related modeling [Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., Kempf, S., Srama, R., Dikarev, V.V., Helfert, S., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Krivov, A.V., Sremčević, M., Tuzzolino, A., Economou, T., Grün, E., 2006. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus: implications for Saturn's E ring. Science, in press]. With this, we estimate the impact-generated dust contributions of the other E ring satellites and find significant differences in the dust ejection efficiency by two projectile families - the E ring particles (ERPs) and the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Together with the Enceladus south-pole source, the ERP impacts play a crucial role in the inner region, whereas the IDP impacts dominate the particle production in the outer E ring, possibly accounting for its large radial extent. Our results can be verified in future Cassini flybys of the E ring satellites. In this way poorly known parameters of the dust particle production in hypervelocity impacts can be constrained by comparison of the data and theory.

  12. Increased dust deposition in the Pacific Southern Ocean during glacial periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer; Winckler, Gisela; Esper, Oliver; Jaeschke, Andrea; Kuhn, Gerhard; Ullermann, Johannes; Martinez-Garcia, Alfredo; Lambert, Fabrice; Kilian, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Dust deposition across the Southern Ocean plays a critical role for marine biological production through iron fertilization and is supposed to control a significant fraction of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 changes. However, in the Pacific, the largest Southern Ocean sector, reliable sediment records are sparse and climate models mostly indicate low dust deposition both for modern times and the last glacial maximum. Here, we present comprehensive data-sets of dust supply based on the analysis of sediment records recently retrieved across the Pacific Southern Ocean. The shape and glacial/interglacial pattern of lithogenic sediment input records in the western and central sector reveals strong similarities to dust records from Antarctica and the South Atlantic. Though our new data document substantial sediment redistribution, glacial dust mass accumulation rates corrected for sediment focusing exceed interglacial values by a factor of ~3. The first-order changes in Subantarctic biological productivity largely follow increased dust supply during glacials. Taken together our new sediment records document a substantial glacial dust supply from Australian and New Zealand sources to the Pacific SO sector eastward to at least 125°W. Such enhancement of dust supply is consistent with stronger aridity in Australia and a glacial dust source in New Zealand. Although the most likely dust source for the South Pacific is Australia/New Zealand, the glacial/interglacial pattern and timing of lithogenic sediment deposition is similar to dust records from Antarctica and the South Atlantic dominated by Patagonian sources. These similarities imply large-scale common climate forcings such as latitudinal shifts of the southern westerlies and regionally enhanced glaciogenic dust mobilization in New Zealand and Patagonia.

  13. The past, present and future of African dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, Amato T.; Flamant, Cyrille; Gaetani, Marco; Guichard, Françoise

    2016-03-01

    African dust emission and transport exhibits variability on diurnal to decadal timescales and is known to influence processes such as Amazon productivity, Atlantic climate modes, regional atmospheric composition and radiative balance and precipitation in the Sahel. To elucidate the role of African dust in the climate system, it is necessary to understand the factors governing its emission and transport. However, African dust is correlated with seemingly disparate atmospheric phenomena, including the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation, the meridional position of the intertropical convergence zone, Sahelian rainfall and surface temperatures over the Sahara Desert, all of which obfuscate the connection between dust and climate. Here we show that the surface wind field responsible for most of the variability in North African dust emission reflects the topography of the Sahara, owing to orographic acceleration of the surface flow. As such, the correlations between dust and various climate phenomena probably arise from the projection of the winds associated with these phenomena onto an orographically controlled pattern of wind variability. A 161-year time series of dust from 1851 to 2011, created by projecting this wind field pattern onto surface winds from a historical reanalysis, suggests that the highest concentrations of dust occurred from the 1910s to the 1940s and the 1970s to the 1980s, and that there have been three periods of persistent anomalously low dust concentrations—in the 1860s, 1950s and 2000s. Projections of the wind pattern onto climate models give a statistically significant downward trend in African dust emission and transport as greenhouse gas concentrations increase over the twenty-first century, potentially associated with a slow-down of the tropical circulation. Such a dust feedback, which is not represented in climate models, may be of benefit to human and ecosystem health in West Africa via improved air quality and

  14. Wool and grain dusts stimulate TNF secretion by alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D M; Donaldson, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of two organic dusts, wool and grain, and their soluble leachates to stimulate secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by rat alveolar macrophages with special reference to the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). METHODS: Rat alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and treated in vitro with whole dust, dust leachates, and a standard LPS preparation. TNF production was measured in supernatants with the L929 cell line bioassay. RESULTS: Both wool and grain dust samples were capable of stimulating TNF release from rat alveolar macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. The standard LPS preparation caused a dose-dependent secretion of TNF. Leachates prepared from the dusts contained LPS and also caused TNF release but leachable LPS could not account for the TNF release and it was clear that non-LPS leachable activity was present in the grain dust and that wool dust particles themselves were capable of causing release of TNF. The role of LPS in wool dust leachates was further investigated by treating peritoneal macrophages from two strains of mice, LPS responders (C3H) and LPS non-responders (C3H/HEJ), with LPS. The non-responder mouse macrophages produced very low concentrations of TNF in response to the wool dust leachates compared with the responders. CONCLUSIONS: LPS and other unidentified leachable substances present on the surface of grain dust, and to a lesser extent on wool dust, are a trigger for TNF release by lung macrophages. Wool dust particles themselves stimulate TNF. TNF release from macrophages could contribute to enhancement of inflammatory responses and symptoms of bronchitis and breathlessness in workers exposed to organic dusts such as wool and grain. PMID:8758033

  15. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    Crew members can be directly exposed to celestial dust in several ways. After crew members perform extravehicular activities (EVAs), they may introduce into the habitat dust that will have collected on spacesuits and boots. Cleaning of the suits between EVAs and changing of the Environmental Control Life Support System filters are other operations that could result in direct exposure to celestial dusts. In addition, if the spacesuits used in exploration missions abrade the skin, as current EVA suits have, then contact with these wounds would provide a source of exposure. Further, if celestial dusts gain access to a suit's interior, as was the case during the Apollo missions, the dust could serve as an additional source of abrasions or enhance suit-induced injuries. When a crew leaves the surface of a celestial body and returns to microgravity, the dust that is introduced into the return vehicle will "float," thus increasing the opportunity for ocular and respiratory injury. Because the features of the respirable fraction of lunar dusts indicate they could be toxic to humans, NASA conducted several studies utilizing lunar dust simulants and authentic lunar dust to determine the unique properties of lunar dust that affect physiology, assess the dermal and ocular irritancy of the dust, and establish a permissible exposure limit for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during missions that would involve no more than 6 months stay on the lunar surface. Studies, with authentic lunar soils from both highland (Apollo 16) and mare (Apollo17) regions demonstrated that the lunar soil is highly abrasive to a high fidelity model of human skin. Studies of lunar dust returned during the Apollo 14 mission from an area of the moon in which the soils were comprised of mineral constituents from both major geological regions (highlands and mares regions) demonstrated only minimal ocular irritancy, and pulmonary toxicity that was less than the highly toxic terrestrial crystalline

  16. Dust fluxes and iron fertilization in Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Fabrice; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Shaffer, Gary; Lamy, Frank; Winckler, Gisela; Farias, Laura; Gallardo, Laura; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols play a major role in present and past climates. To date, we rely on climate models for estimates of dust fluxes to calculate the impact of airborne micronutrients on biogeochemical cycles. Here we provide a new global dust flux data set for Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions based on observational data. A comparison with dust flux simulations highlights regional differences between observations and models. By forcing a biogeochemical model with our new data set and using this model's results to guide a millennial-scale Earth System Model simulation, we calculate the impact of enhanced glacial oceanic iron deposition on the LGM-Holocene carbon cycle. On centennial timescales, the higher LGM dust deposition results in a weak reduction of atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced efficiency of the biological pump. This is followed by a further ~10 ppm reduction over millennial timescales due to greater carbon burial and carbonate compensation.

  17. Accretion Rates of Meteorites and Cosmic Dust in the Early Ordovician

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birger Schmitz; Bernhard Peucker-Ehrenbrink; Maurits Lindström; Mario Tassinari

    1997-01-01

    ... an interval of the Early Ordovician than at present. Osmium isotope and iridium analyses of whole-rock limestone indicate a coeval enhancement of one order of magnitude in the influx rate of cosmic dust...

  18. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  19. Satellite-based Dust Source Identification over North Africa: Diurnal Cycle, Meteorological Controls, and Interannual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Tegen, Ina; Macke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. For a better representation of dust-related processes in numerical models and climate change projections the knowledge on the natural variability of dust source activity has to be improved. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for identifying active dust sources. The accuracy of dust source identification using such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. Here, a data set on the spatial (1°x1°) and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled by analyzing 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images since March 2006. The index is designed using radiances measured by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) on-board MSG at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm which are converted to brightness temperatures (BTs). To strengthen the dust signal, differences of BTs are used to compute RGB-composite images. This newly data set providing information on the diurnal cycle of dust emission has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of DSAs. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources become active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJs for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a regional modeling study. Four years of DSA observations indicate an interannual variability in

  20. Impact of dust deposition on the albedo of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Monika; Dorothea Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Pálsson, Finnur; Arnalds, Olafur; Björnsson, Helgi; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Deposition of small amounts of airborne dust on glaciers causes positive radiative forcing and enhanced melting due to the reduction of surface albedo. To study the effects of dust deposition on the mass balance of Brúarjökull, an outlet glacier of the largest ice cap in Iceland, Vatnajökull, a study of dust deposition events in the year 2012 was carried out. The dust-mobilisation module FLEXDUST was used to calculate spatio-temporally resolved dust emissions from Iceland and the dispersion model FLEXPART was used to simulate atmospheric dust dispersion and deposition. We used albedo measurements at two automatic weather stations on Brúarjökull to evaluate the dust impacts. Both stations are situated in the accumulation area of the glacier, but the lower station is close to the equilibrium line. For this site ( ˜ 1210 m a.s.l.), the dispersion model produced 10 major dust deposition events and a total annual deposition of 20.5 g m-2. At the station located higher on the glacier ( ˜ 1525 m a.s.l.), the model produced nine dust events, with one single event causing ˜ 5 g m-2 of dust deposition and a total deposition of ˜ 10 g m-2 yr-1. The main dust source was found to be the Dyngjusandur floodplain north of Vatnajökull; northerly winds prevailed 80 % of the time at the lower station when dust events occurred. In all of the simulated dust events, a corresponding albedo drop was observed at the weather stations. The influence of the dust on the albedo was estimated using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 to simulate the albedo of a clean glacier surface without dust. By comparing the measured albedo to the modelled albedo, we determine the influence of dust events on the snow albedo and the surface energy balance. We estimate that the dust deposition caused an additional 1.1 m w.e. (water equivalent) of snowmelt (or 42 % of the 2.8 m w.e. total melt) compared to a hypothetical clean glacier surface at the lower station, and 0.6 m w.e. more melt (or 38 % of

  1. Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Deluane, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s plans for implementing the Vision for Space Exploration include returning to the moon as a stepping stone for further exploration of Mars, and beyond. Dust on the lunar surface has a ubiquitous presence which must be explicitly addressed during upcoming human lunar exploration missions. While the operational challenges attributable to dust during the Apollo missions did not prove critical, the comparatively long duration of impending missions presents a different challenge. Near term plans to revisit the moon places a primary emphasis on characterization and mitigation of lunar dust. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems. This paper presents the current perspective and implementation of dust knowledge management and integration, and mitigation technology development activities within NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program. This work is presented within the context of the Constellation Program s Integrated Lunar Dust Management Strategy. The Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development project has been implemented within the ETDP. Project scope and plans will be presented, along with a a perspective on lessons learned from Apollo and forensics engineering studies of Apollo hardware. This paper further outlines the scientific basis for lunar dust behavior, it s characteristics and potential effects, and surveys several potential strategies for its control and mitigation both for lunar surface operations and within the working volumes of a lunar outpost.

  2. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon Solvents Styrene Sulfur Dioxide Toluene Uranium Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) For Educators Introduction Tox Town-Based Curriculum Units / Science Club Careers in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español ...

  3. Dust Acoustic Wave Excitation in a Plasma with Warm Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Thomas, E., Jr.; Marcus, L.; Fisher, R.; Williams, J. D.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the dust acoustic wave dispersion relation in dusty plasmas formed in glow discharges at the University of Iowa [1] and Auburn University [2] have shown the importance of finite dust temperature effects. The effect of dust grains with large thermal speeds was taken into account using kinetic theory of the ion-dust streaming instability [3]. The results of analytic and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation based on the kinetic theory will be presented and compared with the experimental results. [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [3] M. Rosenberg, E. Thomas Jr., and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 15, 073701 (2008).

  4. Trans-Pacific dust events observed at Whistler, British Columbia during INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. McKendry

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The meteorology and physico-chemical characteristics of aerosol associated with two new cases of long range dust transport affecting western Canada during spring 2006 are described. Each event showed enhancements of both sulfate aerosol and crustal material of Asian origin. However, the events were of quite different character and demonstrate the highly variable nature of such events. The April event was a significant dust event with moderate sulfate enhancement while the May event was a weak dust event with very significant sulfate enhancement. The latter event was interesting in the sense that it was of short duration and was quickly followed by significant enhancement of organic material likely of regional origin. Comparison of these two events with other documented cases extending back to 1993, suggests that all dust events show coincident enhancements of sulfate and crustal aerosol. However, events vary across a wide continuum based on the magnitude of aerosol enhancements and their sulfate to calcium ratios. At one extreme, events are dominated by highly significant crustal enhancements (e.g. the well-documented 1998 and 2001 "dust" events while at the other are events with some dust transport, but where sulfate enhancements are of very high magnitude (e.g. the 1993 event at Crater Lake and the 15 May 2006 event at Whistler. Other events represent a "mix". It is likely that this variability is a function of the comparative strengths of the dust and anthropogenic SO2 sources, the transport pathway and in particular the extent to which dust is transported across industrial SO2 sources, and finally, meteorological and chemical processes.

  5. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  6. Sensitivity of transatlantic dust transport to chemical aging and related atmospheric processes

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelkader, Mohamed

    2017-03-20

    (HSO4−), nitrate (NO3−) and chloride (Cl−), on the surface of mineral particles. The subsequent neutralization reactions with the calcium cation form various salt compounds that cause the uptake of water vapor from the atmosphere, i.e., through the chemical aging of dust particles leading to an increase of 0.15 in the AOD under subsaturated conditions (July 2009 monthly mean). As a result of the radiative feedback on surface winds, dust emissions increased regionally. On the other hand, the aged dust particles, compared to the non-aged particles, are more efficiently removed by both wet and dry deposition due to the increased hygroscopicity and particle size (mainly due to water uptake). The enhanced removal of aged particles decreases the dust burden and lifetime, which indirectly reduces the dust AOD by 0.05 (monthly mean). Both processes can be significant (major dust outflow, July 2009), but the net effect depends on the region and level of dust chemical aging.

  7. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  8. Metal-dusting resistance of uncoated and coated iron and nickel base materials against metal-dusting in heat treatment furnaces with carbonaceous atmospheres; Bestaendigkeit von unbeschichteten und beschichteten Eisen- und Nickelbasiswerkstoffen gegenueber Metal-Dusting in Aufkohlanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleingries, Mirko; Ackermann, Helen; Lucka, Klaus [OWI Oel-Waerme-Institut GmbH, Aachen (Germany); Hoja, Timo; Mehner, Andeas; Zoch, Hans-Werner [IWT, Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, Bremen (Germany); Altena, Herwig [AICHELIN Ges.m.b.H, Moedling (Austria)

    2010-03-15

    Metal-Dusting is a well-known corrosion problem that occurs in carburizing atmospheres in industrial thermal processing plants. In literature almost no quantitative data on the metal dusting resistance of typical alloys employed in industrial furnaces are available. Therefore, a series of experiments with uncoated and sol gel ZrO{sub 2} coated high temperature materials was conducted in order to quantify their metal dusting behaviour under conditions close to those in case hardening furnaces. The experimental results show a strong influence of the surface conditions on the alloys resistance and a noticeable enhancement of the resistance by sol gel coatings. (orig.)

  9. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  10. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  11. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, Leonardo; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean; Blum, Juergen; Carpenter, John; Dominik, Carsten; Isella, Andrea; Natta, Antonella; Williams, Jonathan; Wilner, David

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In the core accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow from the submicron sizes typical of interstellar dust to micron size particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds and cores, the growth from micron size particles to pebbles and kilometre size bodies must occur in protoplanetary disks. This step in the formation of planetary systems is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in young extrasolar systems. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational...

  12. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  13. Automated Classification of Stratospheric Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S. W.; Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T.

    2010-03-01

    We have applied data mining techniques to the JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 16 cluster particles. We have demonstrated a technique capable of reproducing the separation between cosmic and contaminant particles.

  14. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Andrews, S.; Blum, J.; Carpenter, J.; Dominik, C.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Williams, J. P.; Wilner, D. J.

    In the core-accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow up to micrometer-sized particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds, the growth to pebbles and kilometer-sized bodies must occur at the high densities within protoplanetary disks. This critical step is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in extrasolar systems before the appearance of large planetary-sized bodies. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational signatures of these processes are summarized. We briefly discuss grain growth in molecular cloud cores and in collapsing envelopes of protostars, as these likely provide the initial conditions for the dust in protoplanetary disks. We then review the observational constraints on grain growth in disks from millimeter surveys, as well as the very recent evidence for radial variations of the dust properties in disks. We also include a brief discussion on the small end of the grain size distribution and dust settling as derived from optical, near-, and mid-infrared observations. Results are discussed in the context of global dust-evolution models; in particular, we focus on the emerging evidence for a very efficient early growth of grains and the radial distribution of maximum grain sizes as the result of growth barriers. We also highlight the limits of the current models of dust evolution in disks, including the need to slow the radial drift of grains to overcome the migration/fragmentation barrier.

  15. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  16. Ammonium deficiency caused by heterogeneous reactions during a super Asian dust episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Celine Siu Lan; Huh, Chih-An; Shaheen, Robina; Lin, Fei-Jan; Liu, Shaw Chen; Liang, Mao-Chang; Tao, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Mineral dust particles exert profound impacts on air quality, visibility, and ocean biogeochemistry. Interactions between dust particles and other anthropogenic pollutants modify not only the size spectrum and morphology but also physicochemical properties of dust particles, thereby affecting their radiative properties and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei and in turn their impact on climate. Here we report field observations on the surface chemical transformations in a super Asian dust plume captured in coastal areas of China and the adjacent marginal seas. The dust plume showed enhanced concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and calcium along with a decrease in ammonium. The percentages of total Ca in water-soluble form increased from an intrinsic value of ~5% to 25-40% at four stations along the path of the dust plume. From these increases, we estimated the extent to which carbonate was modified by heterogeneous reactions and calculated that the enhanced sulfate and nitrate could account for 40-60% of the observed concentrations. Our observation suggests that the formation of ammonium sulfate via the H2SO4-NH3-H2O ternary system was impeded by heterogeneous reactions in the marine boundary layer when dust loads exceeded a certain threshold. A conceptual model is proposed to elucidate the heterogeneous reactions during the super Asian dust event and their impacts on atmospheric chemistry.

  17. The link between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 to 5.5 ka ago. The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. Here we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface. We simulate the mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. Mid-Holocene surface characteristics, including vegetation cover and lake surface area, are derived from proxy data and simulations. In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the increase in dust accumulation in marine cores is directly linked to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone.

  18. Assessing the mineral dust indirect effects and radiation impacts on a simulated idealized nocturnal squall line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Seigel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is arguably the most abundant aerosol species in the world and it plays a large role in aerosol indirect effects (AIEs. This study assesses and isolates the individual responses in a squall line that arise (1 from radiation, (2 from dust altering the microphysics, as well as (3 from the synergistic effects between (1 and (2. To accomplish these tasks, we use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS set up as a cloud-resolving model (CRM. The CRM contains aerosol and microphysical schemes that allow mineral dust particles to nucleate as cloud drops and ice crystals, replenish upon evaporation and sublimation, be tracked throughout hydrometeor transition, and scavenge by precipitation and dry sedimentation.

    Factor separation is used on four simulations of the squall line in order to isolate the individual roles of radiation (RADIATION, microphysically active dust (DUST MICRO, and the nonlinear interactions of those factors (SYNERGY. Results indicate that RADIATION acts to increase precipitation, intensify the cold pool, and enhance the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to changes in microphysics beginning from cloud top cooling. Conversely, DUST MICRO decreases precipitation, weakens the cold pool, and weakens the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to an enhancement of the warm rain process. SYNERGY shows little impact on the squall line, except near the freezing level, where an increase in mesoscale organization takes place. The combined effect of the mineral dust AIE due to both DUST MICRO and SYNERGY is to weaken the squall line.

  19. Mineral dust indirect effects and cloud radiative feedbacks of a simulated idealized nocturnal squall line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Seigel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is arguably the most abundant aerosol species in the world and as such potentially plays a large role in aerosol indirect effects (AIEs. This study assesses and isolates the individual responses in a squall line that arise (1 from radiation, (2 from dust altering the microphysics, as well as (3 from the synergistic effects between (1 and (2. To accomplish these tasks, we use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS set up as a cloud-resolving model (CRM. The CRM contains aerosol and microphysical schemes that allow mineral dust particles to nucleate as cloud drops and ice crystals, replenish upon evaporation and sublimation, be tracked throughout hydrometeor transition, and be scavenged by precipitation and dry sedimentation. Factor separation is used on four simulations of the squall line in order to isolate the individual roles of radiation (RADIATION, microphysically active dust (DUST MICRO, and the nonlinear interactions of those factors (SYNERGY. Results indicate that RADIATION acts to increase precipitation, intensify the cold pool, and enhance the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to changes in microphysics originating from cloud top cooling. Conversely, DUST MICRO decreases precipitation, weakens the cold pool, and weakens the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to an enhancement of the warm rain process. SYNERGY shows little impact on the squall line, except near the freezing level, where an increase in mesoscale organization takes place. The combined effect of the mineral dust AIE due to both DUST MICRO and SYNERGY is to weaken the squall line.

  20. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  1. Dust in the Interplanetary Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Lamy, Herve

    2010-01-01

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nano dust particles of sizes 1 - 10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nano dust are detected near 1AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Though such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  2. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  3. Modeling Dust Evolution in Galaxies with a Multiphase, Inhomogeneous ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovska, Svitlana; Dobbs, Clare; Jenkins, Edward B.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a model of dust evolution in a multiphase, inhomogeneous interstellar medium (ISM) using hydrodynamical simulations of giant molecular clouds in a Milky Way-like spiral galaxy. We improve the treatment of dust growth by accretion in the ISM to investigate the role of the temperature-dependent sticking coefficient and ion-grain interactions. From detailed observational data on the gas-phase Si abundances [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}] measured in the local Galaxy, we derive a relation between the average [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}] and the local gas density n({{H}}) that we use as a critical constraint for the models. This relation requires a sticking coefficient that decreases with the gas temperature. The relation predicted by the models reproduces the slope of -0.5 for the observed relation in cold clouds, which is steeper than that for the warm medium and is explained by dust growth. We find that growth occurs in the cold medium for all adopted values of the minimum grain size a min from 1 to 5 nm. For the classical cutoff of {a}\\min =5 {nm}, the Coulomb repulsion results in slower accretion and higher [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}] than the observed values. For {a}\\min ≲ 3 {nm}, the Coulomb interactions enhance the growth rate, steepen the slope of the [{{Si}}{gas}/{{H}}]-n({{H}}) relation, and provide a better match to observations. The rates of dust re-formation in the ISM by far exceed the rates of dust production by stellar sources. After the initial 140 Myr, the cycle of matter in and out of dust reaches a steady state, in which the dust growth balances the destruction on a similar timescale of 350 Myr.

  4. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  5. Temperate grasslands as a dust source: Knowledge, uncertainties, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, M.; Gillies, J. A.; Mikami, M.; Shao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Temperate grasslands are sensitive to climate change and are significant, or potentially significant, dust sources. Temperate grassland aeolian processes are unique in that the vegetation growth-decay cycle and weathering process due to extreme temperature changes profoundly affect the occurrence and intensity of wind erosion and dust emission. Human activities, such as animal husbandry or cultivation, also may result in land degradation and enhanced wind erosion. So far, little systematic research on temperate grassland wind erosion has been done, but this issue deserves particular attention. In this review paper, we summarize the understanding of temperate grassland wind-erosion processes and identify the uncertainties and research needs. The needs include (1) a deeper understanding of the aerodynamic and physical controls of grassland vegetation on wind erosion and dust emission processes, (2) scaling known relationships upwards to model the regional scale, (3) quantifying critical parameters affecting dust emissions (i.e., surface and aerodynamic roughness) via remote-sensing techniques, and (4) integrated wind-erosion modeling that incorporates grassland aeolian database and vegetation modeling of both seasonal growth and decay plus the impacts of grazing and cultivation. We also outline the research being carried out by Japanese scientists in collaboration with colleagues at Mongolian, American, and German research institutes in developing a temperate grassland wind-erosion modeling system, which can be used as a pre-warning system of severe dust storms and as a tool for strategic management of temperate grasslands.

  6. Dust removal and filter technology. Entstaubungs- und Filtertechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockmann, H.W. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany). DMT-Institut fuer Staubbekaempfung, Gefahrstoffe und Ergonomie); Henke, B. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany). DMT-Institut fuer Staubbekaempfung, Gefahrstoffe und Ergonomie)

    1991-01-01

    New approaches were adopted in filter technology to respond to technological changes in mechanized mining and to allow perfect dust removal in keeping with occupational hygiene requirements. Self-supporting filter materials based on ceramic fibres and synthetic granulates were taken to develop filter elements allowing lamination to enhance their separation-active surface area. Filter materials made from thermally fixed fibre nonwovens were processed to form plicated filter bags of the same structural volume but with a surface area increased by a factor of 2.5. Integrated inlet nozzles were developed to allow these elements to be cleaned of dust deposits. These nozzles were also studied in basic filter-technology tests. A test rig supplied design findings which were included in a study to develop new generations of dedusters. A reduction of design volume and an increase of through-put rate greater than 20% could be predicted. Service tests with modified filter materials were run for ventilation-air dust dust removal both for whole faces and for face segments. The benefits of filter technology for face, face opening and drifting were highlighted. New methods for wetting and transport of the dust removed from the dedusters were developed. New concepts of exhaust-air filter separators allow flat storage bunkers to be used in pneumatic conveyance of building materials at the face. (orig.)

  7. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  8. Circumplanetary dust dynamics : application to Martian dust tori and Enceladus dust plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Makuch, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Our Solar system contains a large amount of dust, containing valuable information about our close cosmic environment. If created in a planet's system, the particles stay predominantly in its vicinity and can form extended dust envelopes, tori or rings around them. A fascinating example of these complexes are Saturnian rings containing a wide range of particles sizes from house-size objects in the main rings up to micron-sized grains constituting the E ring. Other example are ring systems in g...

  9. Elemental tracers for Chinese source dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小曳; 张光宇; 朱光华; 张德二; 安芷生; 陈拓; 黄湘萍

    1996-01-01

    The mass-particle size distributions of 10 dust-carrying elements in aerosol particles were determined tor 12 sites in desert regions of northern China. The desert dust is proved to he of origin of eolian loess deposited on the Loess Plateau. Their transport to the loess was mainly attributable to the non-dust storm processes under the interglacial climate condition. The impact ot" dust storm on the accumulation of the loess increased in the glacial stage. On the basis of the signatures of 4 dust elements (Al. Fe, Mg and Sc). Chinese dust is believed to have 3 major desert sources (northwestern deserts, northern high dust deserts and northern low dust deserts). With a chemical element balance model, an elemental tracer system is established to proportion the export of China-source dust.

  10. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  11. A Case Study of a Typical Dust Storm Event over the Loess Plateau of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiao-Lu; GUO Wei-Dong; ZHAO Qian-Fei; ZHANG Bei-Dou

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced observational meteorological elements, energy fluxes, and the concentration of dust aerosols collected from the Semi-Arid Climate Observatory and Laboratory (SACOL) during a typical dust storm period in March 2010 at Lanzhou were used in this paper to investigate the impact of dust aerosols on near surface atmospheric variables and energy budgets. The results show that the entire dust storm event was associated with high wind velocities and decreasing air pressure, and the air changed from cold and wet to warm and dry and then recovered to its initial state. The response of energy fluxes occurred behind meteorological elements. At high dust concentration periods, the net radiation was significantly less in the daytime and higher at night, while the heat fluxes displayed the same trend, indicating the weakening of the land-atmosphere energy exchange. The results can be used to provide verification for numerical model results in semi-arid areas.

  12. ALMA Reveals Potential Localized Dust Enrichment from Massive Star Clusters in II Zw 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, S. Michelle; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara; Meier, David S.

    2016-12-01

    We present subarcsecond images of submillimeter CO and continuum emission from a local galaxy forming massive star clusters: the blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. At ˜0.″4 resolution (20 pc), the CO(3-2), CO(1-0), 3 mm, and 870 μm continuum maps illustrate star formation on the scales of individual molecular clouds. Dust contributes about one-third of the 870 μm continuum emission, with free-free accounting for the rest. On these scales, there is not a good correspondence between gas, dust, and free-free emission. Dust continuum is enhanced toward the star-forming region as compared to the CO emission. We suggest that an unexpectedly low and spatially variable gas-to-dust ratio is the result of rapid and localized dust enrichment of clouds by the massive clusters of the starburst.

  13. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  14. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  15. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  16. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  17. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Conroy, Charlie

    2017-02-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to the gas, in neutral turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains (>100 Å) under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar metal abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars can form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. We argue that the metal abundances of these “promoted” stars may contain interesting signatures as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced and/or fluctuate almost independently. Remarkably, the otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well fit by standard IMF-averaged core-collapse SNe yields if we allow for fluctuating local dust-to-gas ratios. We also show that the observed log-normal distribution of enhancements in these species agrees with our simulations. Moreover, we confirm that Mg and Si are correlated in these stars the abundance ratios are similar to those in local silicate grains. Meanwhile [Mg/Ca], predicted to be nearly invariant from pure SNe yields, shows very large enhancements and variations up to factors of ≳100 as expected in the dust-promoted model, preferentially in the [C/Fe]-enhanced metal-poor stars. Together, this suggests that (1) dust exists in second-generation star formation, (2) local dust-to-gas ratio fluctuations occur in protogalaxies and can be important for star formation, and (3) the light element abundances of these stars may be affected by the local chemistry of dust where they formed, rather than directly tracing nucleosynthesis from earlier

  18. Coal dust: the real cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S. [Independent Editorial and Technical Services, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    A recent British court case awarded retired coal miners compensation for asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Although the sums involved were small, large numbers of retired coal miners are likely to be eligible for such awards, as British safety in mines was not substantially worse than most other producers at the time, and was better than many. In some parts of the world safety standards are still poor. Dust suppression should be used on coal cutting machines, and dust controlled in transit. This may prove less expensive than it initially appears since the coal dust can be used instead of lost. This particularly important for transport in open trucks. Employers must also ensure that the safety equipment supplied is both comfortable and used. 3 refs., 5 photos.

  19. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  20. Polarized Emission from Interstellar Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillancourt, J E

    2006-01-01

    Observations of far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (SMM) polarized emission are used to study magnetic fields and dust grains in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). These observations place constraints on models of molecular clouds, star-formation, grain alignment mechanisms, and grain size, shape, and composition. The FIR/SMM polarization is strongly dependent on wavelength. We have attributed this wavelength dependence to sampling different grain populations at different temperatures. To date, most observations of polarized emission have been in the densest regions of the ISM. Extending these observations to regions of the diffuse ISM, and to microwave frequencies, will provide additional tests of grain and alignment models. An understanding of polarized microwave emission from dust is key to an accurate measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The microwave polarization spectrum will put limits on the contributions to polarized emission from spinning dust and vibrat...

  1. Microwave Emission from Aligned Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    Polarized microwave emission from dust is an important foreground that may contaminate polarized CMB studies unless carefully accounted for. We discuss potential difficulties associated with this foreground, namely, the existence of different grain populations with very different emission/polarization properties and variations of the polarization yield with grain temperature. In particular, we discuss observational evidence in favor of rotational emission from tiny PAH particles with dipole moments, i.e. ``spinning dust'', and also consider magneto-dipole emission from strongly magnetized grains. We argue that in terms of polarization, the magneto-dipole emission may dominate even if its contribution to total emissivity is subdominant. Addressing polarized emission at frequencies larger than approsimately 100 GHz, we discuss the complications arising from the existence of dust components with different temperatures and possibly different alignment properties.

  2. Whirling-type dust catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachev, V.G.; Butylkin, Yu.P.; Denisov, V.I.; Ermin, Yu.S.

    1980-10-07

    A whirling-type dust catcher is proposed, containing a cylindrical body mounted in its upper part, a diaphragm, a tangential nozzle (venturi) for delivery of the secondary gas, located in the lower part of the bunker body and an axial pipe with a vortex generator for introduction of the gas to be cleaned and a coaxial pipe connecting the bunker with the evacuation zone of the vortex generator. For increasing the degree of dust collection by elimination of gas fedthrough from the bunker into the axial zone of the dust catcher, it is equipped with an additional vortex generator set up in the outlet of the coaxial pipe, which is made in the shape of an inverse cone.

  3. Experimental evidence of dust-induced shaping of surface dissolved organic matter in the oligotrophic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Villena, Elvira; Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Charrière, Bruno; Delmont, Anne; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Marc, Tedetti; Wambeke France, Van

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has shown that dust deposition may impact the functioning of the microbial loop. On one hand, it enhances bacterial mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM), and so may limit the carbon export. On the other hand, the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and DOM in the surface ocean can increase the residence time of DOM, promoting its export and sequestration in the deep ocean. The main goal of this study was to experimentally assess whether the bacterial response to dust deposition is prone to have an effect on the residence time of the DOM pool by modifying its bioavailability. The bacterial degradation of DOM was followed on dust-amended and control treatments during long-term incubations. Dissolved organic carbon concentration decreased by 9 μmol L-1 over the course of the experiment in both control and dust-enriched conditions, with no significant differences between treatments. However, significant differences in DOM optical properties appeared at the latest stage of the incubations suggesting an accumulation of DOM of high molecular weight in the dust-amended treatment. At the end of the incubations, the remaining water was filtered and re-used as a new culture medium for a bacterial natural assemblage. Bacterial abundance and production was lower in the treatment previously submitted to dust enrichment, suggesting a decrease in DOM lability after a dust deposition event. These preliminary results point to a new link between dust and ocean carbon cycle through the modification of the residence time of the DOM pool.

  4. Dust growth in protoplanetary disks - a comprehensive experimental/theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    More than a decade of dedicated experimental work on the collisional physics of protoplanetary dust has brought us to a point at which the growth of dust aggregates can — for the first time — be self-consistently and reliably modeled. In this article, the emergent collision model for protoplanetery dust aggregates, as well as the numerical model for the evolution of dust aggregates in protoplanetary disks, is reviewed. It turns out that, after a brief period of rapid collisional growth of fluffy dust aggregates to sizes of a few centimeters, the protoplanetary dust particles are subject to bouncing collisions, in which their porosity is considerably decreased. The model results also show that low-velocity fragmentation can reduce the final mass of the dust aggregates but that it does not trigger a new growth mode as discussed previously. According to the current stage of our model, the direct formation of kilometer-sized planetesimals by collisional sticking seems unlikely, implying that collective effects, such as the streaming instability and the gravitational instability in dust-enhanced regions of the protoplanetary disk, are the best candidates for the processes leading to planetesimals.

  5. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  6. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  7. Physicochemical Processes on Ice Dust Towards Deuterium Enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Water and some organic molecules were found to be deuterium enriched toward various astronomical targets. Understanding the deuterium-fractionation process pertains directly to know how and when molecules are created. Although gas phase chemistry is certainly important for deuterium enrichment, the role of physicochemical processes on the dust surfaces should be also considered. In fact, the extreme deuterium enrichment of formaldehyde and methanol requires the dust grain-surface process. In this context, we have performed a series of experiments on the formation of deuterated species of water and simple organic molecules. From the results of these experiments and related works, I will discuss the key processes for the deuterium enrichment on dust. For deuterium chemistry, another important issue is the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of H_{2}, which is closely related to the formation of H_{2}D^{+} and thus the deuterium fractionation of molecules in the gas phase. Because the radiative nuclear spin conversion of H_{2} is forbidden, the ortho-para conversion is very slow in the gas phase. In contrast, it was not obvious how the nuclear spins behave on cosmic dust. Therefore, it is desirable to understand how the OPR of H_{2} is determined on the dust surfaces. We have tackled this issue experimentally. Using experimental techniques of molecular beam, photostimulated-desorption, and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization, we measured the OPRs of H_{2} photodesorbed from amorphous solid water at around 10 K, which is an ice dust analogue. It was first demonstrated that the rate of spin conversion from ortho to para drastically increases from 2.4 × 10^{-4} to 1.7 × 10^{-3} s^{-1} within the very narrow temperature window of 9.2 to16 K. The observed strong temperature cannot be explained by solely state-mixing models ever proposed but by the energy dissipation model via two phonon process. I will present our recent experiments regarding this.

  8. Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    KAUST Repository

    Prakash, P. Jish

    2016-09-26

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effects on the Red Sea, land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of windblown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used in climate

  9. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  10. Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Tao, Weichun; Yapici, Tahir; Warsama, Bashir; Engelbrecht, Johann P.

    2016-09-01

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effects on the Red Sea, land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of windblown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used in climate

  11. Genotoxicity of organic extracts of house dust from Shanxi, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naufal, Z.; Zhou, G.D.; McDonald, T.; Li, Z.W.; Li, Z.; Donnelly, K.C. [Texas A& amp; M Health Science Center, College Station, TX (USA). School for Rural Public Health

    2007-07-01

    Indoor combustion of solid fuel such as coal may generate respirable particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) that may adhere to settled dust. Dust might therefore present a major source of PAH exposure in humans. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of PAH mixtures extracted from house dust samples. Four dust samples (E1-4) were collected from houses in Shanxi, China, where coal is heavily used for heating and cooking. For comparison, a coal sample was also collected from one of the houses and included in the analyses. The samples were extracted with methylene chloride: acetone (95:5 v/v), dried, and redissolved in appropriate solvents for assessment in genotoxicity assays. Samples were evaluated for their ability to induce point mutations in bacteria and DNA adducts in vivo. DNA adduct levels were analyzed by nuclease P1-enhanced P-32-postlabeling. PAH were quantified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Based on chemical analysis, sample E1 had the highest concentration by sampling area of benzo(a) pyrene (BaP) (181 {mu} g/m{sup 2}) and total PAH (10100 {mu} g/m{sup 2}). However, based on the microbial genotoxicity assay, sample E3, with the highest carcinogenic PAH/total PAH ratio (26%), produced the greatest number of revertants. In mice, administration of the extract of coal induced more adducts (9.81 adducts per 109 nucleotides) than dust extracts. The results of this study confirm the presence of genotoxic chemicals in residential dust. Inhalation of respirable particles containing similar mixtures of PAH represents a cancer risk for humans.

  12. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  13. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  14. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  15. Efficient radiative transfer in dust grain mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, S

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a dust grain mixture consisting of spherical dust grains with different radii and/or chemical composition on the resulting temperature structure and spectral energy distribution of a circumstellar shell is investigated. The comparison with the results based on an approximation of dust grain parameters representing the mean optical properties of the corresponding dust grain mixture reveal that (1) the temperature dispersion of a real dust grain mixture decreases substantially with increasing optical depth, converging towards the temperature distribution resulting from the approximation of mean dust grain parameters, and (2) the resulting spectral energy distributions do not differ by more than 10% if >= 2^5 grain sizes are considered which justifies the mean parameter approximation and the many results obtained under its assumption so far. Nevertheless, the dust grain temperature dispersion at the inner boundary of a dust shell may amount to >>100K and has therefore to be considered in the cor...

  16. Dust records from three ice cores: relationships to spring atmospheric circulation over the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shichang; Mayewski, Paul A.; Yan, Yuping; Qin, Dahe; Yao, Tandong; Ren, Jiawen

    Non-sea-salt Mg 2+ (nssMg 2+) records from three Northern Hemisphere ice cores (Mt. Everest, Himalayas; Mt. Logan, Yukon Territory; and 20D, southern Greenland) are presented as a proxy of atmospheric dust. NssMg 2+ concentrations of both Mt. Everest and 20D ice core have increased since the 20th century. Relationships between the three ice core annual nssMg 2+ series and instrumental sea-level pressure (SLP) series of spring (March-April-May) are investigated for the last century (AD 1899-1996), in order to develop an understanding of dust aerosol transport over the Northern Hemisphere during the spring season. On a hemispheric scale, an enhanced spring Arctic High weakens dust aerosol transport from central Asia to subarctic regions (e.g., southern Greenland and Yukon Territory), but strengthens transport of dust to the Himalaya (e.g., Mt. Everest). An intensification of the Siberian High may strengthen transport of dust aerosols to Greenland, and an enhancement of the Tibetan High strengthens transport to Himalaya and Yukon regions in spring. A stronger spring Azores High favors dust transport to both the Himalayas and south Greenland. On a regional scale, a deepened spring Icelandic Low and Aleutian Low increases transport of dust aerosols to Greenland and the Yukon Territory, respectively. Understanding these transport patterns is significant for the interpretation of ice core records and reconstruction of atmospheric circulation using longer records.

  17. 75 FR 64411 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... the CMDPSU or CPDM and the sampled work shift is less than 8 hours, the value of t used for... Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety and...

  18. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  19. Early dust evolution in protostellar accretion disks

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We investigate dust dynamics and evolution during the formation of a protostellar accretion disk around intermediate mass stars via 2D numerical simulations. Using three different detailed dust models, compact spherical particles, fractal BPCA grains, and BCCA grains, we find that even during the early collapse and the first 10,000 yr of dynamical disk evolution, the initial dust size distribution is strongly modified. Close to the disk's midplane coagulation produces dust particles of sizes ...

  20. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  1. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  2. Formation and properties of astrophysical carbonaceous dust

    CERN Document Server

    Mauney, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The classical theory of grain nucleation suffers from both theoretical and predictive deficiencies. We strive to alleviate these deficiencies in our understanding of dust formation and growth by utilizing an atomistic model of nucleation. Carbon cluster geometries are determined with a set of global minimization algorithms. Using density functional theory, the binding energies of carbon clusters from $n=2$ to $n=99$ are then calculated. These energies are used to calculate the critical size and nucleation rate of carbon clusters. We find that the critical cluster size is largely determined by the changes in geometry of the clusters. Clusters with size $n=27$ and $n=8$, roughly corresponding to the transition from ring-to-fullerene geometry and chain-to-ring geometry respectively, are the critical sizes across the range of temperature and saturation where nucleation is significant. In contrast to the classical theory, nucleation is enhanced at low-temperatures, and suppressed at high temperatures. These result...

  3. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  4. Origin of Harmattan dust settled in Northern Ghana – Long transported or local dust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Awadzi, Theodore W; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    compositions of the bulk dust samples. Traces of minerals in the clay fraction of the Harmattan period dust may have their origin in the Bodélé Depression or other saline environments. The Harmattan dust deposited in Ghana shows only little resemblance to dust from the Chad basin and with Harmattan dust...... deposited in Niger. This study therefore suggests that the dust deposited during the Harmattan period in northern Ghana is not under significant influence of sediments from the Bodélé Depression. Similarity in the mineral and elemental composition of the dust from both the Harmattan and Monsoon periods...

  5. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  6. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  7. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate fur...

  8. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  9. Ice nucleation of ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation characteristics of montmorillonite mineral dust aerosols with and without exposure to ammonia gas were measured at different atmospheric temperatures and relative humidities with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. The montmorillonite particles were exposed to pure (100% and diluted ammonia gas (25 ppm at room temperature in a stainless steel chamber. There was no significant change in the mineral dust particle size distribution due to the ammonia gas exposure. 100% pure ammonia gas exposure enhanced the ice nucleating fraction of montmorillonite mineral dust particles 3 to 8 times at 90% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw and 5 to 8 times at 100% RHw for 120 min exposure time within our experimental conditions. The percentages of active ice nuclei were 2 to 9 times higher at 90% RHw and 2 to 13 times higher at 100% RHw in 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite compared to unexposed montmorillonite. All montmorillonite particles are more efficient as ice nuclei with increasing relative humidities and decreasing temperatures. The activation temperature of montmorillonite exposed to 100% pure ammonia was 12°C higher than for unexposed montmorillonite particles at 90% RHw and 10°C higher at 100% RHw. In the 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite experiments, the activation temperature was 7°C warmer than unexposed montmorillonite at 100% RHw. Degassing does not reverse the ice nucleating ability of ammonia exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles. This is the first experimental evidence that ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles can enhance its activation as ice nuclei and that the activation can occur at temperatures warmer than –10°C where natural atmospheric ice nuclei are very scarce.

  10. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, G.; Barthel, P. D.; Peletier, R. F.; Pel, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and detect dust tori within radio galaxies of various types. Methods: Using VISIR on the VLT, we acquired sub-arcsecond (~0.40 arcsec) resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 μm, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio gala

  11. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  12. Dust in the interplanetary medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ingrid; Lamy, Herve [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Czechowski, Andrzej [Space Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud, E-mail: ingrid.mann@aeronomie.b [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    2010-12-15

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nanodust particles of sizes {approx_equal}1-10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nanodust are detected near 1 AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Although such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  13. Detailed cloud resolving model simulations of the impacts of Saharan air layer dust on tropical deep convection – Part 1: Dust acts as ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies suggest that the Saharan Air Layer (SAL, an elevated layer (850–500 hPa of Saharan air and mineral dust, has strong impacts on the microphysical as well as dynamical properties of tropical deep convective cloud systems along its track. In this case study, numerical simulations using a two-dimensional Detailed Cloud Resolving Model (DCRM were carried out to investigate the dust-cloud interactions in the tropical deep convection, focusing on the dust role as Ice Nuclei (IN.

    The simulations showed that mineral dust considerably enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at temperatures warmer than −40 °C, resulting in more ice hydrometeors number concentration and reduced precipitating size of ice particles. Because of the lower in the saturation over ice as well as more droplet freezing, total latent heating increased, and consequently the updraft velocity was stronger.

    On the other hand, the increased ice deposition consumed more water vapor at middle troposphere, which induces a competition for water vapor between heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing and nucleation. As a result, dust suppressed the homogeneous droplet freezing and nucleation due to the heterogeneous droplet freezing and the weakened transport of water vapor at lower stratosphere, respectively. These effects led to decreased number concentration of ice cloud particles in the upper troposphere, and consequently lowered the cloud top height during the stratus precipitating stage.

    Acting as IN, mineral dust also influenced precipitation in deep convection. It initiated earlier the collection because dust-related heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at middle troposphere occur earlier than homogeneous nucleation at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the convective precipitation was suppressed by reduced collection of large graupel particles and insufficient fallout related to decreased sizes of precipitating ice hydrometeors

  14. Measurement of macrocyclic trichothecene in floor dust of water-damaged buildings using gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-dust matrix effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Rena; Park, Ju-Hyeong; LeBouf, Ryan; Green, Brett J; Park, Yeonmi

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was used to detect fungal secondary metabolites. Detection of verrucarol, the hydrolysis product of Stachybotrys chartarum macrocyclic trichothecene (MCT), was confounded by matrix effects associated with heterogeneous indoor environmental samples. In this study, we examined the role of dust matrix effects associated with GC-MS/MS to better quantify verrucarol in dust as a measure of total MCT. The efficiency of the internal standard (ISTD, 1,12-dodecanediol), and application of a matrix-matched standard correction method in measuring MCT in floor dust of water-damaged buildings was additionally examined. Compared to verrucarol, ISTD had substantially higher matrix effects in the dust extracts. The results of the ISTD evaluation showed that without ISTD adjustment, there was a 280% ion enhancement in the dust extracts compared to neat solvent. The recovery of verrucarol was 94% when the matrix-matched standard curve without the ISTD was used. Using traditional calibration curves with ISTD adjustment, none of the 21 dust samples collected from water damaged buildings were detectable. In contrast, when the matrix-matched calibration curves without ISTD adjustment were used, 38% of samples were detectable. The study results suggest that floor dust of water-damaged buildings may contain MCT. However, the measured levels of MCT in dust using the GC-MS/MS method could be significantly under- or overestimated, depending on the matrix effects, the inappropriate ISTD, or combination of the two. Our study further shows that the routine application of matrix-matched calibration may prove useful in obtaining accurate measurements of MCT in dust derived from damp indoor environments, while no isotopically labeled verrucarol is available.

  15. Forecast of enhanced activity of eta-Aquariids in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, J.

    2014-07-01

    We tried to simulate distributions for Eta-Aquariids (ETA) of dust trails from 1P/Halley, we found out that some dust trails formed by meteoroids ejected in -1197 and -910 would approach the Earth in 2013. It means that the enhancement of eta-Aquariids would be expected. Actually, the enhanced activity of eta-Aquariids was observed in 2013. Its peak time corresponded with the time when the dust trails approached the Earth based on our simulation. Therefore, it was sure that the enhancement was caused by these dust trails.

  16. The impacts of mineral dust on organized mesoscale deep convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigel, Robert Brian

    The overarching goal of this research is to investigate how mineral dust can impact organized deep moist convection using numerical modeling. This is achieved through four modeling studies that each address a different aspect of organized mesoscale DMC. The first study uses the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to simulate a supercell storm in order to examine the pathways in which mineral dust is entrained into DMC. This is achieved by simulating a supercell within three commonly observed dust regimes. Results indicate that the supercell in EXP-BACKGROUND ingests large dust concentrations ahead of the rear-flank downdraft (RFD) cold pool. Conversely, dust lofted by the cold pool in EXP-STORM is ingested by the supercell in relatively small amounts via a narrow corridor generated by turbulent mixing between the RFD cold pool and ambient air. The addition of a convergence boundary in EXP-BOUNDARY is found to act as an additional source of dust for the supercell and represents the case between EXP-BACKGROUND and EXP-STORM. Results demonstrate the importance of using an appropriate dust parameterization when modeling DMC, especially within more arid regions. The second study utilizes an idealized simulation of a nocturnal squall line to assess and isolate the individual responses in a squall line that arise (1) from radiation, (2) from dust altering the microphysics, as well as (3) from the synergistic effects between (1) and (2). To accomplish these tasks, we again use RAMS set up as a cloud-resolving model (CRM). Results indicate that RADIATION acts to increase precipitation, intensify the cold pool, and enhance the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to radiation-induced changes in the microphysics that appear to initiate from cloud top cooling. Conversely, DUST MICRO decreases precipitation, weakens the cold pool, and weakens the mesoscale organization of the squall line due to an enhancement of the warm rain process. SYNERGY shows little

  17. Spatio-temporal distribution of Saharan dust source activations inferred from 15-minute MSG-SEVIRI observations and its links to meteorological processes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, K.; Tegen, I.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. The emission of dust particles depend strongly on surface wind velocity and turbulent fluxes as well as on surface characteristics like surface texture and vegetation cover. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for localizing active dust sources. Thereby the accuracy of determining dust sources from such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. A 1°x1° map on the spatial and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled starting in March 2006. For dust source identification 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images are used based on brightness temperature measurements by the Spinning enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm. This data set has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of occurring dust source activations. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources becomes active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJ for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a modelling study. DSA observations of the last 3.5 years indicate an interannual variability in frequencies of local dust source activations. The causes of this variability will be analyzed with respect to corresponding atmospheric conditions.

  18. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  19. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhuohan

    2014-01-01

    An accurate model of thermal dust emission at the far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths is important for studying the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and for understanding the cycling of matter and energy between stars and the interstellar medium. I will present results of fitting all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100 - 240 μm maps from the COBE-DIRBE, and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. I will also discuss the implications of the analysis on understanding astrophysical processes and the physical properties of dust grains.

  20. Reducing Coal Dust With Water Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Jets also cool and clean cutting equipment. Modular pick-and-bucket miner suffers from disadvantage: Creates large quantities of potentially explosive coal dust. Dust clogs drive chain and other parts and must be removed by hand. Picks and bucket lips become overheated by friction and be resharpened or replaced frequently. Addition of oscillating and rotating water jets to pick-and-bucket machine keeps down dust, cools cutting edges, and flushes machine. Rotating jets wash dust away from drive chain. Oscillating jets cool cutting surfaces. Both types of jet wet airborne coal dust; it precipitates.

  1. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  2. Global amount of dust in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fukugita, Masataka

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the total amount of dust in the Universe that is produced in stellar evolution in the entire cosmic time is consistent with the observed amount, if we add to the dust amount inferred for galactic discs the amount recently uncovered in galactic haloes and the surrounding of galaxies in reddening of the quasar light passing through the vicinity of galaxies. The inventory concerning the dust closes. This implies that dust produced from stars should survive effectively for the cosmic time, and that a substantial amount of dust is produced in the burning phase of evolved stars of intermedaite mass.

  3. Harmattan, Saharan heat low, and West African monsoon circulation: modulations on the Saharan dust outflow towards the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schepanski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The outflow of dust from the northern African continent towards the North Atlantic is stimulated by the atmospheric circulation over North Africa, which modulates the spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation and consequently the entrainment of mineral dust into the boundary layer, as well as the transport of dust out of the source regions. The atmospheric circulation over the North African dust source regions, predominantly the Sahara and the Sahel, is characterized by three major circulation regimes: (1 the harmattan (trade winds, (2 the Saharan heat low (SHL, and (3 the West African monsoon circulation. The strength of the individual regimes controls the Saharan dust outflow by affecting the spatio-temporal distribution of dust emission, transport pathways, and deposition fluxes.This study aims at investigating the atmospheric circulation pattern over North Africa with regard to its role favouring dust emission and dust export towards the tropical North Atlantic. The focus of the study is on summer 2013 (June to August, during which the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range TRansport and Aerosol-Cloud interaction Experiment field campaign also took place. It involves satellite observations by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI flying on board the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG satellite, which are analysed and used to infer a data set of active dust sources. The spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation frequencies (DSAFs allows for linking the diurnal cycle of dust source activations to dominant meteorological controls on dust emission. In summer, Saharan dust source activations clearly differ from dust source activations over the Sahel regarding the time of day when dust emission begins. The Sahara is dominated by morning dust source activations predominantly driven by the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet. In contrast, dust source activations in the Sahel are

  4. Modified Dust and the Small Scale Crisis in CDM

    CERN Document Server

    Capela, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    At large scales and for sufficiently early times, dark matter is described as a pressureless perfect fluid---dust---non-interacting with Standard Model fields. These features are captured by a simple model with two scalars: a Lagrange multiplier and an other playing the role of the velocity potential. We consider a simple version of this scenario with high derivative terms, such that the dust solutions are preserved at the background level, but there is a non-zero sound speed at the linear level. We associate this {\\it Modified Dust} with dark matter, and study the linear evolution of cosmological perturbations in that picture. The most prominent effect is the suppression of the power spectrum at sufficiently small wavelengths. This can be relevant in view of the missing satellites problem. For even shorter cosmological modes, however, perturbations of Modified Dust are enhanced compared to the predictions of more common particle dark matter scenarios. This is a peculiarity of their evolution in radiation dom...

  5. The metal and dust yields of the first massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marassi, S; Limongi, M; Chieffi, A; Bocchio, M; Bianchi, S

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the role of Population (Pop) III core-collapse supernovae (SNe) as the first cosmic dust polluters. Starting from a homogeneous set of stellar progenitors with masses in the range [13 - 80] Msun, we find that the mass and composition of newly formed dust depend on the mixing efficiency of the ejecta and the degree of fallback experienced during the explosion. For standard Pop III SNe, whose explosions are calibrated to reproduce the average elemental abundances of Galactic halo stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5, between 0.18 and 3.1 Msun (0.39 - 1.76 Msun) of dust can form in uniformly mixed (unmixed) ejecta, and the dominant grain species are silicates. We also investigate dust formation in the ejecta of faint Pop III SN, where the ejecta experience a strong fallback. By examining a set of models, tailored to minimize the scatter with the abundances of carbon-enhanced Galactic halo stars with [Fe/H ] < -4, we find that amorphous carbon is the only grain species that forms, with masses in the range 2...

  6. The impact of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation on springtime dust activity in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Bing; Ginoux, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The increasing trend of aerosol optical depth in the Middle East and a recent severe dust storm in Syria have raised questions as to whether dust storms will increase and promoted investigations on the dust activities driven by the natural climate variability underlying the ongoing human perturbations such as the Syrian civil war. This study examined the influences of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) on dust activities in Syria using an innovative dust optical depth (DOD) dataset derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue aerosol products. A significantly negative correlation is found between the Syrian DOD and the PDO in spring from 2003 to 2015. High DOD in spring is associated with lower geopotential height over the Middle East, Europe, and North Africa, accompanied by near-surface anomalous westerly winds over the Mediterranean basin and southerly winds over the eastern Arabian Peninsula. These large-scale patterns promote the formation of the cyclones over the Middle East to trigger dust storms and also facilitate the transport of dust from North Africa, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia to Syria, where the transported dust dominates the seasonal mean DOD in spring. A negative PDO not only creates circulation anomalies favorable to high DOD in Syria but also suppresses precipitation in dust source regions over the eastern and southern Arabian Peninsula and northeastern Africa.On the daily scale, in addition to the favorable large-scale condition associated with a negative PDO, enhanced atmospheric instability in Syria (associated with increased precipitation in Turkey and northern Syria) is also critical for the development of strong springtime dust storms in Syria.

  7. The impact of Pacific Decadal Oscillation on springtime dust activity in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, B.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing trend of aerosol optical depth in the Middle East and a recent severe dust storm in Syria have raised questions as whether dust storms will increase and promoted investigations on the dust activities driven by the natural climate variability underlying the ongoing human perturbations such as the Syrian civil war. This study examined the influences of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) on dust activities in Syria using an innovative dust optical depth (DOD) dataset derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue aerosol products. A significantly negative correlation is found between the Syrian DOD and the PDO in spring from 2003-2015. High DOD in spring is associated with lower geopotential height over the Middle East, Europe, and North Africa, accompanied by near surface anomalous westerly winds over the Mediterranean basin and southerly winds over the eastern Arabian Peninsula. These large-scale patterns promote the formation of the cyclones over the Middle East to trigger dust storms and also facilitate the transport of dust from North Africa, Iraq, and Saudi Arabian to Syria, where the transported dust dominates the seasonal mean DOD in spring. A negative PDO not only creates circulation anomalies favorable to high DOD in Syria but also suppresses precipitation in dust source regions over the eastern and southern Arabian Peninsula and northeastern Africa. On the daily scale, in addition to the favorable large-scale condition associated with a negative PDO, enhanced atmospheric instability in Syria associated with increased precipitation in Turkey and northern Syria is also critical for the development of strong springtime dust storms in Syria.

  8. Impact of dust size parameterizations on aerosol burden and radiative forcing in RegCM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikerdekis, Athanasios; Zanis, Prodromos; Steiner, Allison L.; Solmon, Fabien; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Katragkou, Eleni; Karacostas, Theodoros; Foret, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of aerosol representation in the regional climate model RegCM4 for two dust parameterizations for the period 2007-2014 over the Sahara and the Mediterranean. We apply two discretization methods of the dust size distribution keeping the total mass constant: (1) the default RegCM4 4-bin approach, where the size range of each bin is calculated using an equal, logarithmic separation of the total size range of dust, using the diameter of dust particles, and (2) a newly implemented 12-bin approach with each bin defined according to an isogradient method where the size ranges are dependent on the dry deposition velocity of dust particles. Increasing the number of transported dust size bins theoretically improves the representation of the physical properties of dust particles within the same size bin. Thus, more size bins improve the simulation of atmospheric processes. The radiative effects of dust over the area are discussed and evaluated with the CALIPSO dust optical depth (DOD). This study is among the first studies evaluating the vertical profile of simulated dust with a pure dust product. Reanalysis winds from ERA-Interim and the total precipitation flux from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) observational gridded database are used to evaluate and explain the discrepancies between model and observations. The new dust binning approach increases the dust column burden by 4 and 3 % for fine and coarse particles, respectively, which increases DOD by 10 % over the desert and the Mediterranean. Consequently, negative shortwave radiative forcing (RF) is enhanced by more than 10 % at the top of the atmosphere and by 1 to 5 % on the surface. Positive longwave RF locally increases by more than 0.1 W m-2 in a large portion of the Sahara, the northern part of the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. The four-bin isolog method is to some extent numerically efficient, nevertheless our work highlights that the simplified representation of the four

  9. Quantifying local-scale dust emission from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain

    KAUST Repository

    Anisimov, Anatolii

    2017-01-23

    Dust plumes emitted from the narrow Arabian Red Sea coastal plain are often observed on satellite images and felt in local population centers. Despite its relatively small area, the coastal plain could be a significant dust source; however, its effect is not well quantified as it is not well approximated in global or even regional models. In addition, because of close proximity to the Red Sea, a significant amount of dust from the coastal areas could be deposited into the Red Sea and serve as a vital component of the nutrient balance of marine ecosystems. In the current study, we apply the offline Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) to better quantify dust emission from the coastal plain during the period of 2009-2011. We verify the spatial and temporal variability in model results using independent weather station reports. We also compare the results with the MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). We show that the best results are obtained with 1 km model spatial resolution and dust source function based on Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) measurements. We present the dust emission spatial pattern, as well as estimates of seasonal and diurnal variability in dust event frequency and intensity, and discuss the emission regime in the major dust generation hot spot areas. We demonstrate the contrasting seasonal dust cycles in the northern and southern parts of the coastal plain and discuss the physical mechanisms responsible for dust generation. This study provides the first estimates of the fine-scale spatial and temporal distribution of dust emissions from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain constrained by MERRAero and short-term WRF-Chem simulations. The estimate of total dust emission from the coastal plain, tuned to fit emissions in MERRAero, is 7.5 ± 0.5 Mt a. Small interannual variability indicates that the study area is a stable dust source. The mineralogical composition analysis shows that the coastal plain

  10. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  11. Ice nucleation properties of agricultural soil dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Isabelle; Funk, Roger; Busse, Jacqueline; Iturri, Antonela; Kirchen, Silke; Leue, Martin; Möhler, Ottmar; Schwartz, Thomas; Sierau, Berko; Toprak, Emre; Ulrich, Andreas; Hoose, Corinna; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain large amounts of organic material such as fungi, bacteria and plant debris. Being carrier for potentially highly ice-active biological particles, agricultural soil dusts are candidates for being very ice-active as well. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the AIDA cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. Results are presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode: all soil dusts show higher ice nucleation efficiencies than desert dusts, especially at temperatures above 254 K. For one soil dust sample, the effect of heat treatments was investigated. Heat treatments did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency which presumably excludes primary biological particles as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency. Therefore, organo-mineral complexes or organic compounds may contribute substantially to the high ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dusts.

  12. Dust Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Grün, E; Landgraf, M; Grün, Eberhard; Krüger, Harald; Landgraf, Markus

    1999-01-01

    Dust measurements in the outer solar system are reviewed. Only the plasma wave instrument on board Voyagers 1 and 2 recorded impacts in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (EKB). Pioneers 10 and 11 measured a constant dust flux of 10-micron-sized particles out to 20 AU. Dust detectors on board Ulysses and Galileo uniquely identified micron-sized interstellar grains passing through the planetary system. Impacts of interstellar dust grains onto big EKB objects generate at least about a ton per second of micron-sized secondaries that are dispersed by Poynting-Robertson effect and Lorentz force. We conclude that impacts of interstellar particles are also responsible for the loss of dust grains at the inner edge of the EKB. While new dust measurements in the EKB are in an early planning stage, several missions (Cassini and STARDUST) are en route to analyze interstellar dust in much more detail.

  13. A lunar dust simulant: CLDS-i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Li, Xiongyao; Zhang, Sensen; Wang, Shijie; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Shijie; Li, Yang; Wu, Yanxue

    2017-02-01

    Lunar dust can make serious damage to the spacecrafts, space suits, and health of astronauts, which is one of the most important problems faced in lunar exploration. In the case of rare lunar dust sample, CLDS-i with high similarity to the real lunar dust is an important objective for studying dust protection and dust toxicity. The CLDS-i developed by the Institute of Geochemistry Chinese Academy Sciences contains ∼75 vol% glass and a little nanophase metal iron (np-Fe0), and with a median particle size about 500 nm. The CLDS-i particles also have complicated shape and sharp edges. These properties are similar to those of lunar dust, and make the CLDS-i can be applied to many fields such as the scientific researches, the treatment technology and toxicological study of lunar dust.

  14. The Role of African Easterly Wave on Dust Transport and the Interaction Between Saharan Dust Layer and Atlantic ITCZ During Boreal Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationships among Saharan dust outbreak and transport, African easterly waves (AEW), African easterly jet (AEJ) and associated convective activities of Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) using Cloudsat-Calipso, MODIS and MERRA data. We find that a major Saharan dust outbreak is associated with the formation of a westward propagating strong cyclone around 15-25N over the western part northern Saharan. The strong cyclonic flow mobilizes and lifts the dust from the desert surface to a high elevation. As the cyclone propagate westward, it transports a thick elevated dust layer between 900 -500 hPa from the African continent to the eastern Atlantic. Cloudiness is reduced within the warm, dry dusty layer, but enhanced underneath it, possibly due to the presence of a shallow inversion layer over the marine boundary layer. The dust outbreak is linked to enhanced deep convection in the northern part of Atlantic ITCZ, abutting the southern flank of the dust layer, and a strengthening of the northward flank of the AEJ. As the dust layer spreads westward, it loses elevation and becomes increasing diffused as it reaches the central and western Atlantic. Using band pass filtered EOF analysis of MERRA winds, we find that AEWs propagating westward along two principal tracks, centered at 15-25N and 5-10N respectively. The easterly waves in the northern track are highly correlated with major dust outbreak over North Africa and associated with slower moving systems, with a quasi-periodicity of 6-9 day. On the other hand, easterly waves along the southern track are faster, with quasi-periodicity of 3-5 days. These faster easterly waves are closely tied to rainfall/cloud variations along the Atlantic ITCZ. Dust transport along the southern track by the faster waves generally leads rainfall/cloud anomalies in the same region by one or two days, suggesting the southern tracks of dust outbreak are regions of strong interaction between

  15. Implementation of dust emission and chemistry into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and initial application to an Asian dust storm episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7 is further developed to enhance its capability in simulating the photochemical cycles in the presence of dust particles. The new model treatments implemented in CMAQ v4.7 in this work include two online dust emission schemes (i.e., the Zender and Westphal schemes, nine dust-related heterogeneous reactions, an updated aerosol inorganic thermodynamic module ISORROPIA II with an explicit treatment of crustal species, and the interface between ISORROPIA II and the new dust treatments. The resulting improved CMAQ (referred to as CMAQ-Dust, offline-coupled with the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF, is applied to the April 2001 dust storm episode over the trans-Pacific domain to examine the impact of new model treatments and understand associated uncertainties. WRF/CMAQ-Dust produces reasonable spatial distribution of dust emissions and captures the dust outbreak events, with the total dust emissions of ~111 and 223 Tg when using the Zender scheme with an erodible fraction of 0.5 and 1.0, respectively. The model system can reproduce well observed meteorological and chemical concentrations, with significant improvements for suspended particulate matter (PM, PM with aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm, and aerosol optical depth than the default CMAQ v4.7. The sensitivity studies show that the inclusion of crustal species reduces the concentration of PM with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5 over polluted areas. The heterogeneous chemistry occurring on dust particles acts as a sink for some species (e.g., as a lower limit estimate, reducing O3 by up to 3.8 ppb (~9% and SO2 by up to 0.3 ppb (~27% and as a source for some others (e.g., increasing fine-mode SO42− by up to 1.1 μg m−3 (~12% and PM2.5 by up to 1.4 μg m−3 (~3% over the domain. The

  16. Regional characteristics of dust events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShigong; WANGJinyan; ZHOUZijiang; SHANGKezheng; YANGDebao; ZHAO

    2003-01-01

    The regional characteristics of dust events in China has been mainly studied by using the data of dust storm,wind-blown sand and floating dust from 338 observation stations through China from 1954 to 2000.The results of this study are as follows:(1)In China,there are two high frequent areas of dust events,one is located in the area of Minfeng and Hotan in the South xinjiang Basin,the other is situated in the area of Minqin and Jilantai in the Hexi Region.Furthermore,the spatial distributions of the various types of dust events are different.The dust storms mainly occur in the arid and semiarid areas covering the deserts and the areas undergoing desertification in northern China.Wind-blown sand and floating-dust not only occur in the areas where dust storms occur,but also extend to the neighboring areas.The range of wind-blown sand extends northeastward and southeastward,but floating-dust mainly extends southeastward to the low-latitude region such as the East China Plain and the area of the middloe and lower reaches of the Yangtze River.Compared with wind-blown sand,the floating-dust seldom occurs in the high latitude areas such as North xinjiang and Northeast China.(2)The affected areas of dust storms can be divided into seven sub-regions,that is,North Xinjiang Region,South Xinjiang Region,Hexi Region,Qaidam Basin Region,Hetao Region.Northeastem China Region and Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Region.The area of the most frequent occurrence of dust storms and floating-dust is in South Xinjiang Region,and of wind-blown sang in the Hexi Region.In general,the frequency of dust events in all the seven regions shows a decreasing thendency from 1954 to 2000,but there are certain differences between various dust events in different regions.The maximum interannual change and ariance of dust events during this time happened in South Xinjiang Region and Hexi Region.The udst events generally occur most frequently in April in most parts of China.The spring occurred days of dust events

  17. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  18. Smaller desert dust cooling effect estimated from analysis of dust size and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Ridley, David A.; Zhou, Qing; Miller, Ron L.; Zhao, Chun; Heald, Colette L.; Ward, Daniel S.; Albani, Samuel; Haustein, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Desert dust aerosols affect Earth's global energy balance through direct interactions with radiation, and through indirect interactions with clouds and ecosystems. But the magnitudes of these effects are so uncertain that it remains unclear whether atmospheric dust has a net warming or cooling effect on global climate. Consequently, it is still uncertain whether large changes in atmospheric dust loading over the past century have slowed or accelerated anthropogenic climate change, or what the effects of potential future changes in dust loading will be. Here we present an analysis of the size and abundance of dust aerosols to constrain the direct radiative effect of dust. Using observational data on dust abundance, in situ measurements of dust optical properties and size distribution, and climate and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations of dust lifetime, we find that the dust found in the atmosphere is substantially coarser than represented in current global climate models. As coarse dust warms the climate, the global dust direct radiative effect is likely to be less cooling than the ~-0.4 W m-2 estimated by models in a current global aerosol model ensemble. Instead, we constrain the dust direct radiative effect to a range between -0.48 and +0.20 W m-2, which includes the possibility that dust causes a net warming of the planet.

  19. Reducing aluminum dust explosion hazards: case study of dust inerting in an aluminum buffing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy J

    2008-11-15

    Metal powders or dusts can represent significant dust explosion hazards in industry, due to their relatively low ignition energy and high explosivity. The hazard is well known in industries that produce or use aluminum powders, but is sometimes not recognized by facilities that produce aluminum dust as a byproduct of bulk aluminum processing. As demonstrated by the 2003 dust explosion at aluminum wheel manufacturer Hayes Lemmerz, facilities that process bulk metals are at risk due to dust generated during machining and finishing operations [U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, Investigation Report, Aluminum Dust Explosion Hayes Lemmerz International, Inc., Huntington, Indiana, Report No. 2004-01-I-IN, September 2005]. Previous studies have shown that aluminum dust explosions are more difficult to suppress with flame retardants or inerting agents than dust explosions fueled by other materials such as coal [A.G. Dastidar, P.R. Amyotte, J. Going, K. Chatrathi, Flammability limits of dust-minimum inerting concentrations, Proc. Saf. Progr., 18-1 (1999) 56-63]. In this paper, an inerting method is discussed to reduce the dust explosion hazard of residue created in an aluminum buffing operation as the residue is generated. This technique reduces the dust explosion hazard throughout the buffing process and within the dust collector systems making the process inherently safer. Dust explosion testing results are presented for process dusts produced during trials with varying amounts of flame retardant additives.

  20. Dunes and Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    22 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of dark sand dunes that formed in winds blowing from east (right) to west (left), along with smaller, lighter-toned ripples and many dark dust devil tracks. The dust devil tracks indicate movement from a variety of directions, while the dunes only indicate winds from the east. In the lower left quarter of the image, dune sand has flowed around a layered rock obstacle. This scene is located near 19.9oN, 280.5oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. The development of a HEPA filter with improved dust holding characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyment, J.; Hamblin, C.

    1995-02-01

    A limitation of the HEPA filters used in the extract of nuclear facilities is their relatively low capacity for captured dust. The costs associated with the disposal of a typical filter means that there are clear incentives to extend filter life. The work described in this report are the initial stages in the development of a filter which incorporates a medium which enhances its dust holding capacity. Experimental equipment was installed to enable the dust loading characteristics of candidate media to be compared with those of the glass fibre based papers currently used in filter construction. These tests involved challenging representative samples of the media with an air stream containing a controlled concentration of thermally generated sodium chloride particles. The dust loading characteristics of the media were then compared in terms of the rate of increasing in pressure differential. A number of {open_quotes}graded density{close_quotes} papers were subsequently identified which appeared to offer significant improvements in dust holding. In the second phase of the programme deep-pleat filters (1,700 M{sup 3}h{sup {minus}1}) incorporating graded density papers were manufactured and tested. Improvements of up to 50% were observed in their capacity for the sub-micron sodium chloride test dust. Smaller differences (15%) were measured when a coarser, carbon black, challenge was used. This is attributed to the differences in the particles sizes of the two dusts.

  2. Occupational exposure to poultry dust and effects on the respiratory system in workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, S; Faísca, V M; Dias, H; Clérigo, A; Carolino, E; Viegas, C

    2013-01-01

    Farmers are occupationally exposed to many respiratory hazards at work and display higher rates of asthma and respiratory symptoms than other workers. Dust is one of the components present in poultry production that increases risk of adverse respiratory disease occurrence. Dust originates from poultry residues, molds, and feathers and is biologically active as it contains microorganisms. Exposure to dust is known to produce a variety of clinical responses, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic airways obstructive disease (COPD), allergic alveolitis, and organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS). A study was developed to determine particle contamination in seven poultry farms and correlate this with prevalence rate of respiratory defects and record by means of a questionnaire the presence of clinical symptoms associated with asthma and other allergy diseases by European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Poultry farm dust contamination was found to contain higher concentrations of particulate matter (PM) PM5 and PM10. Prevalence rate of obstructive pulmonary disorders was higher in individuals with longer exposure regardless of smoking status. In addition, a high prevalence for asthmatic (42.5%) and nasal (51.1%) symptoms was noted in poultry workers. Data thus show that poultry farm workers are more prone to suffer from respiratory ailments and this may be attributed to higher concentrations of PM found in the dust. Intervention programs aimed at reducing exposure to dust will ameliorate occupational working conditions and enhance the health of workers.

  3. Use of SEVIRI images and derived products in a WMO Sand and dust Storm Warning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, M A; Ruiz, J; Cuevas, E [Agencia Estatal de MeteorologIa (AEMET) (Spain)], E-mail: mig@inm.es

    2009-03-01

    The Visible/IR images of SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager), on board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, are used to monitor dust events. Satellite-based detection of dust is a difficult problem due in part to the observing-system limitations. The main difficulty is that the dust can be confused with water/ice clouds. SEVIRI is not as optimal for the viewing of dust as SEAWIFS or MODIS, due to the fact that both of them count with additional short-wavelength channels. However, the SEVIRI 15-minute loop images can detect small dust plumes as well as subtle changes from one image to the next. A description of how the AEMET, former INM, is developing the environment to support MSG satellite imagery to the WMO/GEO Sand and Dust Storm Warning System (SDS WS) for Europe, Africa and Middle East Regional Centre will be briefly presented, together with some on-going operational developments to best monitor dust events.

  4. Mineralogical properties and internal structures of individual fine particles of Saharan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Park, Mi Yeon; Kandler, Konrad; Nousiainen, Timo; Kemppinen, Osku

    2016-10-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing radiation, gases, other aerosols, and clouds. The assessment of its optical and chemical impacts requires knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of bulk dust and single particles. Despite the existence of a large body of data from field measurements and laboratory analyses, the internal properties of single dust particles have not been defined precisely. Here, we report on the mineralogical organization and internal structures of individual fine ( common particle type was clay-rich agglomerate, dominated by illite-smectite series clay minerals with subordinate kaolinite. Submicron grains of iron (hydr)oxides (goethite and hematite) were commonly dispersed through the clay-rich particles. The median total volume of the iron (hydr)oxide grains included in the dust particles was estimated to be about 1.5 % vol. The average iron content of clay minerals, assuming 14 wt % H2O, was determined to be 5.0 wt %. Coarse mineral cores, several micrometers in size, were coated with thin layers of clay-rich agglomerate. Overall, the dust particles were roughly ellipsoidal, with an average axial ratio of 1.4 : 1.0 : 0.5. The mineralogical and structural properties of single Saharan dust particles provide a basis for the modeling of dust radiative properties. Major iron-bearing minerals, such as illite-smectite series clay minerals and iron (hydr)oxides, were commonly submicron- to nano-sized, possibly enhancing their biogeochemical availability to remote marine ecosystems lacking micronutrients.

  5. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Ragaini, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  6. Asian dust storm observed at a rural mountain site in southern China: chemical evolution and heterogeneous photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous processes on dust particles are important for understanding the chemistry and radiative balance of the atmosphere. This paper investigates an intense Asian dust storm episode observed at Mount Heng (1269 m a.s.l. in southern China on 24–26 April 2009. A set of aerosol and trace gas data collected during the study was analyzed to investigate their chemical evolution and heterogeneous photochemistry as the dust traveled to southern China. Results show that the mineral dust arriving at Mt. Heng experienced significant modifications during transport, with large enrichments in secondary species (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium compared with the dust composition collected at an upwind mountain top site (Mount Hua. A photochemical age "clock" (−Log10(NOx/NOy was employed to quantify the atmospheric processing time. The result indicates an obvious increase in the abundance of secondary water-soluble ions in dust particles with the air mass atmospheric processing time. Based on the observations, a 4-stage evolution process is proposed for carbonate-containing Asian dust, starting from fresh dust to particles coated with hydrophilic and acidic materials. Daytime-enhanced nitrite formation on the dust particles was also observed, which indicates the recent laboratory result of the TiO2 photocatalysis of NO2 as a potential source of nitrite and nitrous acid.

  7. Asian dust storm observed at a rural mountain site in Southern China: chemical evolution and heterogeneous photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous processes on dust particles are important for understanding the chemistry and radiative balance of the atmosphere. This paper investigates an intense Asian dust storm episode observed at Mount Heng (1250 m a.s.l. in Southern China on 24–26 April 2009. A set of aerosol and trace gas data collected during the study was analyzed to investigate their chemical evolution and heterogeneous photochemistry as the dust traveled to Southern China. Results show that the mineral dust arriving at Mt. Heng experienced significant modifications during transport, with large enrichments in secondary species (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium compared with the dust composition collected at an upwind mountain top site (Mount Hua. A photochemical age "clock" (−log10(NOx/NOy was employed to quantify the atmospheric processing time. The result indicates an obvious increase in the abundance of secondary water-soluble ions in dust particles with the air mass' photochemical age. Based on the observations, a 4-stage evolution process is proposed for carbonate-rich Asian dust, starting from fresh dust to particles coated with hydrophilic and acidic materials. Daytime-enhanced nitrite formation on the dust particles was also observed, which indicates the recent laboratory result of the TiO2 photocatalysis of NO2 as a potential source of nitrite and nitrous acid.

  8. Recombinant house dust mite allergens

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    House dust mites (HDM) are a globally important source of allergen responsible for the sensitization of more than 50% of allergic patients. Specific immunotherapy with HDM extracts is effective but allergen extracts cannot be fully standardized and severe side-effects can occur during the protracted course of treatment. The introduction of molecular biological techniques into allergy research allowed the indentification of more than 20 groups of HDM allergens. Recombinant HDM allergens can be...

  9. Dust amorphization in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Glauser, Adrian M; Watson, Dan M; Henning, Thomas; Schegerer, Alexander A; Wolf, Sebastian; Audard, Marc; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla

    2009-01-01

    High-energy irradiation of the circumstellar material might impact the structure and the composition of a protoplanetary disk and hence the process of planet formation. In this paper, we present a study on the possible influence of the stellar irradiation, indicated by X-ray emission, on the crystalline structure of the circumstellar dust. The dust crystallinity is measured for 42 class II T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region using a decomposition fit of the 10 micron silicate feature, measured with the Spitzer IRS instrument. Since the sample includes objects with disks of various evolutionary stages, we further confine the target selection, using the age of the objects as a selection parameter. We correlate the X-ray luminosity and the X-ray hardness of the central object with the crystalline mass fraction of the circumstellar dust and find a significant anti-correlation for 20 objects within an age range of approx. 1 to 4.5 Myr. We postulate that X-rays represent the stellar activity and consequ...

  10. EXPOSURE TO SWINE HOUSING DUST MODULATES MACROPHAGE MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth J. Pender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine Confinement Facility (SCF dust consists of a complex mixture of feed grain particles, bacterial components, organic particulates and gases. When these particles are inhaled they deposit along the respiratory tract and mediate respiratory symptoms and disease in swine farmers and facility workers. Macrophages ingest and eliminate microbes and debris under chronic conditions; however, the role of macrophages in agricultural-related respiratory disease has not been fully elucidated. The goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that chronic exposure to SCF dust causes inflammation by modulating pulmonary protein levels and macrophage function. Balb/c mice were exposed to 5, 12.5 and 25% SCF Dust Extract (DE via nebulization 30 min/day five days a week, for eight weeks with weekends excluded. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF was collected and analyzed for protein concentration, leukocyte distribution and macrophage morphology. For comparison, THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to 0.1-10% DE overnight and evaluated for phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species production. Repeated exposure to DE via nebulizer caused a significant increase in protein concentration and inflammatory cell number, namely macrophages, in a dose-dependent manner within the lung as compared to controls. Macrophages with pseudopods and vacuoles were the most abundant leukocytes within BALF of mice exposed to DE. Similarly, in vitro studies with 10% DE treated THP-1 cells revealed enhanced phagocytosis (p<0.05, pseudopodia and vacuolization following exposure to compared to control cells. In addition, there were time- and dose-dependent increases of intracellular ROS production by THP-1 cells exposed to 5 and 10% DE compared to control (p<0.01. These findings indicate repeated, long-term inhalation of swine confinement facility dust may mediate chronic airway and lung inflammation through modulation of protein concentration and macrophage function. The aerosolized dust

  11. Transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols across Alexandria, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Askary

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow of pollutants from Europe and desert dust to Europe from the Sahara desert both affects the air quality of the coastal regions of Egypt. As such, measurements from both ground and satellite observations assume great importance to ascertain the conditions and flow affecting the Nile Delta and the large city of Alexandria. We note that special weather conditions prevailing in the Mediterranean Sea result in a westerly wind flow pattern during spring and from North to South during the summer. Such flow patterns transport dust-loaded and polluted air masses from the Sahara desert and Europe, respectively, through Alexandria, and the Nile Delta in Egypt. We have carried out measurements acquired with a ground- based portable sun photometer (Microtops II and the satellite-borne TERRA/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor during the periods of October 1999–August 2001 and July 2002–September 2003. These measurements show a seasonal variability in aerosol optical depth (AOD following these flow patterns. Maximum aerosol loadings accompanied by total precipitable water vapor (W enhancements are observed during the spring and summer seasons. Pronounced changes have been observed in the Ångström exponent (α derived from ground-based measurements over Alexandria (31.14° N, 29.59° E during both dust and pollution periods. We have followed up the observations with a 3-day back-trajectories model to trace the probable sources and pathways of the air masses causing the observed aerosol loadings. We have also used other NASA model outputs to estimate the sea salt, dust, sulfates and black carbon AOD spatial distributions during different seasons. Our results reveal the probable source regions of these aerosol types, showing agreement with the trajectory and Ångström exponent analysis results. It is confirmed that Alexandria is subjected to different atmospheric conditions involving dust, pollution, mixed aerosols and

  12. The Dust & Gas Properties of M83

    CERN Document Server

    Foyle, K; Mentuch, E; Bendo, G; Dariush, A; Parkin, T; Pohlen, M; Sauvage, M; Smith, M W L; Roussel, H; Baes, M; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Davies, J I; Eales, S A; Madden, S; Page, M J; Spinoglio,

    2012-01-01

    We examine the dust and gas properties of the nearby, barred galaxy M83, which is part of the Very Nearby Galaxy Survey. Using images from the PACS and SPIRE instruments of Herschel, we examine the dust temperature and dust mass surface density distribution. We find that the nuclear, bar and spiral arm regions exhibit higher dust temperatures and masses compared to interarm regions. However, the distribution of dust temperature and mass are not spatially coincident. Assuming a trailing spiral structure, the dust temperature peaks in the spiral arms lie ahead of the dust surface density peaks. The dust mass surface density correlates well with the distribution of molecular gas as traced by CO (J=3-2) images (JCMT) and the star formation rate as traced by H?2 with a correction for obscured star formation using 24 micron emission. Using HI images from THINGS to trace the atomic gas component, we make total gas mass surface density maps and calculate the gas-to-dust ratio. We find a mean gas-to-dust ratio of 84 \\...

  13. House dust mites, our intimate associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadchatram, M

    2005-06-01

    House dust mites have lived in human contact from time immemorial. Human dander or dead skin constitutes the major organic component of the house dust ecosystem. Because the mites feed on dander, dust mites and human association will continue to co-exist as part of our environment. Efficient house-keeping practice is the best form of control to reduce infestation. However, special precautions are important when individuals are susceptible or sensitive to dust mites. House dust mites are responsible for causing asthma, rhinitis and contact dermatitis. The respiratory allergies are caused by the inhalation of dead or live mites, their faecal matter or other byproducts. Immune factors are of paramount importance in the development of dust related or mite induced respiratory diseases. House dust mites were found in some 1,000 samples of dust taken from approximately 330 dwellings in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore. Mattresses, carpets, corners of a bedroom, and floor beneath the bed are favourable dust mite habitats. The incriminating species based on studies here and elsewhere, as well as many other species of dust mites of unknown etiological importance are widely distributed in Malaysian homes. Density of dust mites in Malaysia and Singapore is greater than in temperate countries. Prevention and control measures with reference to subjects sensitive to dust mite allergies, including chemical control described in studies conducted in Europe and America are discussed. However, a cost free and most practical way to remove mites, their faecal matter and other products is to resort to sunning the bedding and carpets to kill the living mites, and then beaten and brushed to remove the dust and other components.

  14. Photoelectric Charging of Dust in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickafoose, A. A.; Robertson, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Horanyi, M.

    1999-09-01

    Illumination of surfaces in space by solar ultraviolet light produces photoelectrons which form a plasma sheath near the surface. Dust particles on the surface can acquire a charge and be transported horizontally and vertically by electric fields within the sheath. On the moon, suspended dust grains have been observed on multiple occasions, and there is evidence for horizontal lunar dust transport. Photoelectron production and dust particle charging are also expected to be significant near the surface of Mars. Understanding the photoelectric charging properties of dust can help explain the observed dynamics of lunar dust and help predict the behavior of dust on surfaces of planetary satellites, asteroids, planetary ring particles, and planetesimals. In addition, any human or spacecraft activity on planetary bodies is affected by dust dynamics near the surface. We have examined the photoelectric charging of dust dropped through UV illumination and dust dropped past a UV illuminated surface having a photoelectron sheath. Experiments are performed in vacuum with illumination from a 1 kW Hg-Xe arc lamp. The lamp produces a spectrum down to ~ 200 nm ( ~ 6.2 eV), and the photoemitter is a 12 cm diameter zirconium plate. Dust dropped through UV illumination loses electrons due to photoemission, while dust dropped past an illuminated surface gains electrons from the photoelectron sheath. Initial results are consistent with expected charge calculated from the work function of the materials, the energy of incoming photons, and the capacitance of the grains. Photoelectric charging experiments have been done for several different kinds of dust 90-106 mu m in diameter. We will present the results of these experiments and compare the charging properties of zinc, copper, graphite, Martian regolith simulant (JSC Mars-1), lunar regolith simulant (JSC-1), and lunar soil from an Apollo 17 sample. This research is supported by NASA.

  15. Metal Dusting-Mechanisms and Preventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q.ZHANG; D.J.YOUNG

    2009-01-01

    Metal dusting attacks iron, low and high alloy steels and nickel-or cobalt-base alloys by disintegrating bulk metals and alloys into metal particles in a coke deposit. It occurs in strongly carburising gas atmospheres (carbon activity aC>1) at elevated temperatures (400℃~1000℃). This phenomenon has been studied for decades, but the detailed mechanism is still not well understood. Current methods of protection against metal dusting are either directed to the process conditions-temperature and gas composition-or to the development of a dense adherent oxide layer on the surface of the alloy by selective oxidation. However, metal dusting still occurs by carbon dissolving in the base metal via defects in the oxide scale. The research work at UNSW is aimed at determining the detailed mechanism of metal dusting of both ferritic and austenitic alloys, in particular the microprocesses of graphite deposition, nanoparticle formation and underlying metal destruction. This work was carried out using surface observation, cross-section analysis by focused ion beam and electron microscopic examination of coke deposits at different stages of the reaction. It was found that surface orientation affected carbon deposition and metal dusting at the initial stage of the reaction. Metal dusting occurred only when graphite grew into the metal interior where the volume expansion is responsible for metal disintegration and dusting. It was also found that the metal dusting process could be significantly changed by alterations in alloy chemistry. Germanium was found to affect the iron dusting process by destabilising FeC but increasing the rate of carbon deposition and dusting, which questions the role of cementite in ferritic alloy dusting. Whilst adding copper to iron did not change the carburisation kinetics, cementite formation and coke morphology, copper alloying reduced nickel and nickel-base alloy dusting rates significantly. Application of these fundamental results to the dusting

  16. Long-range transport of Saharan dust and chemical transformations over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Protonotariou, A.; Papangelis, G.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2016-09-01

    Three recent Saharan dust outbreaks during different seasons (4-6 days in winter of 2009, late autumn of 2010 and summer of 2011) are selected in order to study the chemical footprint and aging processes of dust intrusions over the Eastern Mediterranean (EM). The applied model system (PMCAMx, WRF and GEOS-CHEM) and methodology are found competent to reproduce dust production, long-range transport and chemical transformations over the EM, with the synergistic use of synoptic patterns analysis, optical depth retrievals, back-trajectories, surface and satellite aerosol measurements. The dust loads were high during the cold period events and much lighter during summertime, when transport was mainly in the free troposphere. In all cases, dust originated from the northwest and/or west Saharan desert and reached the EM from the west/southwest. Sensitivity runs underlie the effect of dust transport on the chemical constituents of aerosols over the EM and show a large impact on calcium (70-90% of maximum daily values 2-5 μg m-3), with its gradient at surface level being around -10% per 100 km along the dust pathway. For the cold period cases, this value can also be considered analogous to the dust dissipation ratio, because the plume is vertically extended down to the surface layers. Interestingly, the surface particulate nitrate concentrations over the EM are reversely affected by the approaching dust loads, exhibiting the highest values (up to 6 μg m-3) and the largest dust fraction (ca. 70%) during summertime. This is attributed to the enhanced nitric acid formation under high atmospheric temperature and insolation, its uptake onto the carbonate dust particles, and their effective accumulation, due to low deposition rates over the sea and scarce precipitation. Sulfate formation onto dust particles is found insignificant (rapid reaction with ammonia and/or sea-salt), while the influence of dust and sea-salt on sodium, when spatio-temporal averages are calculated, is

  17. Aerosol optical absorption by dust and black carbon in Taklimakan Desert, during no-dust and dust-storm conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Lu; Wenshou Wei; Mingzhe Liu; Weidong Gao; Xi Han

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol absorption coefficient σap involves the additive contribution of both black carbon aerosol (BC) and dust aerosol.The linear statistical regression analysis approach introduced by Fialho et al.(2005) is used to estimate the absorption exponents of BC and dust aerosol absorption coefficients,and further to separate the contributions of these two types of aerosols from the total light absorption coefficient measured in the hinterland of Taklimakan Desert in the spring of 2006.Absorption coefficients are measured by means of a 7-wavelength Aethalometer from 1 March to 31 May and from 1 November to 28 December,2006.The absorption exponent of BC absorption coefficient α is estimated as (-0.95 ±0.002) under background weather (supposing the observed absorption coefficient is due only to BC); the estimated absorption exponent of dust aerosol absorption coefficient β during the 6 dust storm periods (strong dust storm) is (-2.55 ± 0.009).Decoupling analysis of the measured light absorption coefficients demonstrates that,on average,the light absorptions caused by dust aerosol and BC make up about 50.5% and 49.5% respectively of the total light absorption at 520 nm; during dust weather process periods (dust storm,floating dust,blowing dust),the contribution of dust aerosol to absorption extinction is 60.6% on average; in the hinterland of desert in spring,dust aerosol is also the major contributor to the total aerosol light absorption,more than that of black carbon aerosol.

  18. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  19. What we learned from the Dust Bowl: lessons in science, policy, and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeman, Robert A; Dupre, Juliette; Berrang Ford, Lea; Ford, James; Gajewski, Konrad; Marchildon, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a review and synthesis of scholarly knowledge of Depression-era droughts on the North American Great Plains, a time and place known colloquially as the Dust Bowl era or the Dirty Thirties. Recent events, including the 2008 financial crisis, severe droughts in the US corn belt, and the release of a popular documentary film, have spawned a resurgence in public interest in the Dust Bowl. Events of the Dust Bowl era have also proven in recent years to be of considerable interest to scholars researching phenomena related to global environmental change, including atmospheric circulation, drought modeling, land management, institutional behavior, adaptation processes, and human migration. In this review, we draw out common themes in terms of not only what natural and social scientists have learned about the Dust Bowl era itself, but also how insights gained from the study of that period are helping to enhance our understanding of climate-human relations more generally.

  20. The implications of dust for high-redshift protogalaxies and the formation of binary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Spaans, M

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations suggest that the first galaxies are formed in protogalactic halos with virial temperatures $\\rm \\geq 10^{4}$ K. The presence of dust can significantly change the chemistry and dynamics of early galaxies. We have performed high resolution cosmological simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH to study the influence of dust on the thermal evolution of protogalactic halos and the assembly of the first galaxies in the presence of a background UV flux. We have developed a chemical network appropriate for these conditions and coupled it with the FLASH code. The main ingredients of our chemical model include the formation of molecules (both in the gas phase and on dust grains), a multi-level treatment of atomic hydrogen, line trapping of Lyman alpha photons and, photoionization and photodissociation processes in a UV background. We found that the formation of molecules is significantly enhanced in the presence of dust grains as compared to only gas phase reactions, depending on ...

  1. Improved Algorithm of Pattern Classification and Recognition Applied in a Coal Dust Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Feng-ying; SONG Shu

    2007-01-01

    To resolve the conflicting requirements of measurement precision and real-time performance speed, an improved algorithm for pattern classification and recognition was developed. The angular distribution of diffracted light varies with particle size. These patterns could be classified into groups with an innovative classification based upon reference dust samples. After such classification patterns could be recognized easily and rapidly by minimizing the variance between the reference pattern and dust sample eigenvectors. Simulation showed that the maximum recognition speed improves 20 fold. This enables the use of a single-chip, real-time inversion algorithm. An increased number of reference patterns reduced the errors in total and respiring coal dust measurements. Experiments in coal mine testify that the accuracy of sensor achieves 95%. Results indicate the improved algorithm enhances the precision and real-time capability of the coal dust sensor effectively.

  2. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants II. The effects of pulsation and circumstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Nowotny, Walter; Höfner, Susanne; Lederer, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    By using self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres which simulate pulsation-enhanced dust-driven winds of AGB stars we studied in detail the influence of (i) pulsations of the stellar interiors, and (ii) the development of dusty stellar winds on the spectral appearance of long period variables with carbon-rich atmospheric chemistry. While the pulsations lead to large-amplitude photometric variability, the dusty envelopes cause pronounced circumstellar reddening. Based on one selected dynamical model which is representative of C-type Mira variables with intermediate mass loss rates, we calculated synthetic spectra and photometry for standard broad-band filters from the visual to the near-infrared. Our modelling allows to investigate in detail the substantial effect of circumstellar dust on the resultant photometry. The pronounced absorption of amorphous carbon dust grains leads to colour indices which are significantly redder than the corresponding ones based on hydrostatic dust-free models. Only if we account...

  3. ALMA Reveals Potential Localized Dust Enrichment from Massive Star Clusters in II Zw 40

    CERN Document Server

    Consiglio, S Michelle; Beck, Sara; Meier, David S

    2016-01-01

    We present subarcsecond images of submillimeter CO and continuum emission from a local galaxy forming massive star clusters: the blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. At $\\sim$0.4" resolution (20 pc), the CO(3-2), CO(1-0), 3mm and 870${\\mu}$m continuum maps illustrate star formation on the scales of individual molecular clouds. Dust contributes about a third of the 870${\\mu}$m continuum emission, with free-free accounting for the rest. On these scales, there is not a good correspondence between gas, dust, and free-free emission. Dust continuum is enhanced toward the star-forming region as compared to the CO emission. We suggest that an unexpectedly low and spatially variable gas-to-dust ratio is the result of massive clusters of the starburst.

  4. House dust in seven Danish offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jørgensen, O.

    Floor dust from Danish offices was collected and analyzed. The dust was to be used in an exposure experiment. The dust was analyzed to show the composition of the dust which can be a source of airborne dust indoors. About 11 kg of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from seven Danish office buildings with about 1047 occupants (12 751 m 2) was processed according to a standardized procedure yielding 5.5 kg of processed bulk dust. The bulk dust contained 130.000-160.000 CFU g -1 microorganisms and 71.000-90.000 CFU g -1 microfungi. The content of culturable microfungi was 65-123 CFU 30 g -1 dust. The content of endotoxins ranged from 5.06-7.24 EU g -1 (1.45 ng g -1 to 1.01 ng g -1). Allergens (ng g -1) were from 147-159 (Mite), 395-746 (dog) and 103-330 (cat). The macro molecular organic compounds (the MOD-content) varied from 7.8-9.8 mg g -1. The threshold of release of histamine from basophil leukocytes provoked by the bulk dust was between 0.3 and 1.0 mg ml -1. The water content was 2% (WGT) and the organic fraction 33%. 6.5-5.9% (dry) was water soluble. The fiber content was less than 0.2-1.5% (WGT) and the desorbable VOCs was 176-319 μg g -1. Most of the VOC were aldehydes. However, softeners for plastic (DBP and DEHP) were present. The chemical composition includes human and animal skin fragments, paper fibers, glass wool, wood and textilefibers and inorganic and metal particles. The sizes ranged from 0.001-1 mm and the average specific density was 1.0 g m -3. The bulk dust was resuspended and injected into an exposure chamber. The airborne dust was sampled and analyzed to illustrate the exposures that can result from sedimented dirt and dust. The airborne dust resulting from the bulk dust reached concentrations ranging from 0.26-0.75 mg m -3 in average contained 300-170 CFU m -3. The organic fraction was from 55-70% and the water content about 2.5% (WGT). The content of the dust was compared to the similar results reported in the literature and its toxic potency is

  5. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  6. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere.

  7. Astrophysics of Dust in Cold Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2003-01-01

    Nine lectures reviewing the astrophysics of dust in interstellar clouds. Topics include: (1) Summary of observational evidence concerning interstellar dust: broadband extinction, scattering of starlight, polarization of starlight, spectroscopy of dust, IR and FIR emission, and depletions of grain-forming elements. (2) Optics of interstellar dust grains: dielectric functions of nonconducting and conducting materials, calculational techniques, formulae valid in the Rayleigh limit, Kramers-Kronig relations, microwave emission mechanisms, and X-ray scattering. (3) IR and FIR emission: heating of interstellar dust, including single-photon heating, and resulting IR emission spectrum. (4) Charging of dust grains: collisional charging, photoelectric emission, and resulting charge distribution functions. (5) Dynamics: gas drag, Lorentz force, forces due to anisotropic radiation, and resulting drift velocities. (6) Rotational dynamics: brownian rotation, suprathermal rotation, and effects of starlight torques. (7) Alig...

  8. Simulation of dust statistical characteristics in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D.A. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, 92093 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    In this work we analyze the size (radius) distribution function of dust particles in tokamak plasmas during a steady state discharge. A relation between the radius distribution function of dust in the plasma and the radius distribution of dust injected from tokamak walls is obtained using a Green's function formalism. Numerical simulations of the dust radius distribution function in a tokamak plasma with the Dust Transport (DUSTT) code are used to obtain the analytical form of the Green's function semi-empirically. It is demonstrated that the Green's function obtained can be used to predict qualitatively the dust size distributions in the tokamak plasmas. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. CRADE OF SAND AND DUST STORM WEATHER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Ruoyun; Tian Cuiying; Bi Baogui; Yang Keming; Wang Youheng; Tuo Ya; Ding Haifang; Zhang Tairen

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand and dust storm,as one of the main disastrous weathers that affect northern China,not only affect the people health and normal life,but cause the short-term climatic changes due to the direct and indirect radiation of the earth-atmosphere system through the dust floating in the sky.The sand end dust weather and its potential harm on the national economy,ecological environment,social activities and other aspects have aroused worldwide concern.

  10. Physical properties of suspended dust in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Skrabalova, Lenka; Sigurdardottir, Gudmunda; Branis, Martin; Hladil, Jindrich; Chadimova, Leona; Skala, Roman; Navratil, Tomas; Menar, Sibylle von Lowis of; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric Dust Measurements (ADMI 2013) of one of the most active dust sources in Iceland (Mælifellsandur) were conducted during season with high precipitation on August 8th-18th, 2013. We measured mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10), particle size distributions in size range 0.3-10μm and number concentrations during rather small dust event. Dust samples of the event were analyzed (morpho-textural observations, optical and scanning-electron microscopy). Two TSI 8520 DustTrak Aerosol Monitors (light-scattering laser photometers that measure aerosol mass concentrations in range 0.001 to 100 mg/m3) and one TSI Optical Particle Sizer (OPS) 3330 (optical scattering from single particle up to 16 different channels - 0.3 to 10 μm - measuring particle size distribution) were used. We measured a dust event which occurred during wet and low wind/windless conditions as result of surface heating in August 2013. Maximum particle number concentration (PM~0.3-10 µm) reached 149954 particles cm-3 min-1 while mass concentration (PM1.5-5 µm in diameter. Close-to-ultrafine particle size distributions showed a significant increase in number with the severity of the dust event. Number concentrations were well correlated with mass concentrations. The mineralogy and geochemical compositions showed that glaciogenic dust contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles and 80 % of the particulate matter is volcanic glass rich in heavy metals. Wet dust particles were mobilized within < 4 hours. Here we introduced a comprehensive study on physical properties of the Icelandic dust aerosol and the first scientific study of particle size distributions in an Icelandic dust event including findings on initiation of dust suspension.

  11. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with dust-charge fluctuation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Mondal

    2004-11-01

    For an unmagnetized partially ionized dusty plasma containing electrons, singly charged positive ions, micron-sized massive negatively charged dust grains and a fraction of neutral atoms, dispersion relations for both the dust-ion-acoustic and the dust-acoustic waves have been derived, incorporating dust charge fluctuation. The dispersion relations, under various conditions, have been exhaustively analysed. The explicit expressions for the growth rates have also been derived.

  12. Halo dust detection around NGC 891

    CERN Document Server

    Bocchio, M; Hunt, L K; Schneider, R

    2015-01-01

    Observations of edge-on galaxies allow us to investigate the vertical extent and properties of dust, gas and stellar distributions. NGC 891 has been studied for decades and represents one of the best studied cases of an edge-on galaxy. We use deep PACS data together with IRAC, MIPS and SPIRE data to study the vertical extent of dust emission around NGC 891. We also test the presence of a more extended, thick dust component. By performing a convolution of an intrinsic vertical profile emission with each instrument PSF and comparing it with observations we derived the scaleheight of a thin and thick dust disc component. For all wavelengths considered the emission is best fit with the sum of a thin and a thick dust component. The scaleheight of both dust components shows a gradient passing from 70 $\\mu$m to 250 $\\mu$m. This could be due to a drop in dust heating (and thus dust temperature) with the distance from the plane, or to a sizable contribution ($\\sim 15 - 80%$) of an unresolved thin disc of hotter dust t...

  13. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; Marassi, Stefania; Schneider, Raffaella; Bianchi, Simone; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, A.

    2016-06-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. We have developed a new code (GRASH_Rev) which follows the newly-formed dust evolution throughout the supernova explosion until the merging of the forward shock with the circumstellar ISM. We have considered four well studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN1987A, CasA, the Crab Nebula, and N49. For all the simulated models, we find good agreement with observations and estimate that between 1 and 8% of the observed mass will survive, leading to a SN dust production rate of (3.9± 3.7)×10^(-4) MM_{⊙})/yr in the Milky Way. This value is one order of magnitude larger than the dust production rate by AGB stars but insufficient to counterbalance the dust destruction by SNe, therefore requiring dust accretion in the gas phase.

  14. Modern dust aerosol availability in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Cheng, Hong; Che, Huizheng; Sun, Jimin; Lu, Huayu; Qiang, Mingrui; Hua, Ting; Zhu, Bingqi; Li, Hui; Ma, Wenyong; Lang, Lili; Jiao, Linlin; Li, Danfeng

    2017-08-18

    The sources of modern dust aerosols and their emission magnitudes are fundamental for linking dust with climate and environment. Using field sample data, wind tunnel experiments and statistical analysis, we determined the contributions of wadis, gobi (stony desert), lakebeds, riverbeds, and interdunes to modern dust aerosol availability in the three important potential dust sources including the Tarim Basin, Qaidam Basin, and Ala Shan Plateau of China. The results show that riverbeds are the dominant landscape for modern dust aerosol availabilities in the Qaidam Basin, while wadis, gobi, and interdunes are the main landscapes over the Ala Shan Plateau and Tarim Basin. The Ala Shan Plateau and Tarim Basin are potential dust sources in northwestern China, while the Qaidam Basin is not a major source of the modern dust aerosols nowadays, and it is not acting in a significant way to the Loess Plateau presently. Moreover, most of modern dust aerosol emissions from China originated from aeolian processes with low intensities rather than from major dust events.

  15. Dust Devils and Convective Vortices on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez-Etxeberria, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-03-01

    Dust devils are low pressure convective vortices able to lift dust from the surface of a planet. They are a common feature on Mars and they can also be found on desertic locations on Earth. On Mars they are considered an important part of the atmospheric dust cycle. Dust in Mars is an essential ingredient of the atmosphere where it affects the radiative balance of the planet. Here we review observations of these dusty vortices from orbit, from in situ measurements on the surface of Mars and some of the models developed to simulate them.

  16. Effect of nonthermal ion distribution and dust temperature on nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Annou; R Annou

    2012-01-01

    Dust-acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma whose constituents are inertial charged dust grains, Boltzmannian electrons and nonthermal ions have been investigated by taking into account finite dust temperature. The pseudopotential has been used to study solitary solution. The existence of solitary waves having negative potential is reported.

  17. THE MAIN CULPRIT IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS - HOUSE DUST OR HOUSE DUST MITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis especially perennial type makes life miserable for the patient. House dust mite is one of the major players causing it. This study is to compare the allergen i n city of house dust mite versus house dust and evaluate any cross - allergenicity between them. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital. MATERIALS & METHODS: Forty patients of allergic rhinitis and well matched controls were subjected to intradermal skin tests to house dust and house dust mite allergen. The skin tests were graded as per standard norms and the responses matched after correlating with different parameters. Statistical analysis was done and the results evaluated. RESULTS: House dust mite was the main allergen, as compared to house dust, responsible for causing allergic rhinitis. The allergen reactivity potential of house dust mite was significantly more as compared to house dust. And, as such there was no statistically significant cross - allergenicity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: House dust mite rather than house dust is the main culprit in causing allergic rhinitis. Hence, precautionary and preventive measures to control the exposure to house dust mite can be undertaken

  18. Technical Note: High-resolution mineralogical database of dust-productive soils for atmospheric dust modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nickovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust storms and associated mineral aerosol transport are driven primarily by meso- and synoptic-scale atmospheric processes. It is therefore essential that the dust aerosol process and background atmospheric conditions that drive dust emissions and atmospheric transport are represented with sufficiently well-resolved spatial and temporal features. The effects of airborne dust interactions with the environment determine the mineral composition of dust particles. The fractions of various minerals in aerosol are determined by the mineral composition of arid soils; therefore, a high-resolution specification of the mineral and physical properties of dust sources is needed.

    Several current dust atmospheric models simulate and predict the evolution of dust concentrations; however, in most cases, these models do not consider the fractions of minerals in the dust. The accumulated knowledge about the impacts of the mineral composition in dust on weather and climate processes emphasizes the importance of including minerals in modeling systems. Accordingly, in this study, we developed a global dataset consisting of the mineral composition of the current potentially dust-producing soils. In our study, we (a mapped mineral data to a high-resolution 30 s grid, (b included several mineral-carrying soil types in dust-productive regions that were not considered in previous studies, and (c included phosphorus.

  19. Carbon petrology in cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) are collected in the Earth's stratosphere. There exists an extensive database on major and minor element chemistry, stable isotopes, noble gas abundances and mineralogy of many CP IDP's, as well as infrared and Raman spectroscopic properties. For details on the mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties of IDP's, I refer to the reviews by Mackinnon and Rietmeijer (1987), Bradley et al. (1988) and Sandford (1987). Texture, mineralogy (Mackinnon and Rietmeijer, 1987) and chemistry (Schramm et al., 1989; Flynn and Sutton, 1991) support the notion that CP IDP's are a unique group of ultrafine-grained extraterrestiral materials that are distinct from any known meteorite class. Their fluffy, or porous, morphology suggests that CP IDP's probably endured minimal alteration by protoplanetary processes since their formation. It is generally accepted that CP IDP's are solid debris from short-period comets. The evidence is mostly circumstantial but this notion gained significant support based on the comet Halley dust data (Brownlee, 1990). In this paper, I will accept that CP IDP's are indeed cometary dust. The C/Si ratio in CP IDP's is 3.3 times higher than in CI carbonaceous chondrites (Schramm et al. 1989). The intraparticle carbon distribution is heteorogeneous (Rietmeijer and McKay, 1986). Carbon occurs both in oxidized and reduced forms. Analytical electron microscope (AEM) and Raman spectroscopic analyses have shown the presence of several carbon forms in CP IDP's but the data are scattered in the literature. Carbons in cometary CP IDP's are among the most pristine Solar System carbons available for laboratory study. Similar to a recently developed petrological model for the diversity of layer silicates in CP IDP's (Zolensky, 1991) that is useful to constrain in situ aqueous alteration in comets (Rietmeijer and Mackinnon, 1987a), I here present the first effort to develop a petrological concept of carbons

  20. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (olivine (forsterite 83) grains olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  1. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sudarchikova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL, mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as "6 kyr", last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter "115 kyr" and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter "126 kyr". One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM (21 000 yr BP; hereafter "21 kyr", was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  2. The effect of dust lifting process on the electrical properties of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Francesca; Molinaro, Roberto; Ionut Popa, Ciprian; Molfese, Cesare; Cozzolino, Fabio; Marty, Laurent; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Di Achille, Gaetano; Silvestro, Simone; Ori, Gian Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Airborne dust and aerosol particles affect climate by absorbing and scattering thermal and solar radiation and acting as condensation nuclei for the formation of clouds. So, they strongly influence the atmospheric thermal structure, balance and circulation. On Earth and Mars, this 'climate forcing' is one of the most uncertain processes in climate change predictions. Wind-driven blowing of sand and dust is also responsible for shaping planetary surfaces through the formation of sand dunes and ripples, the erosion of rocks, and the creation and transport of soil particles. These processes are not confined to Earth, but occur also on Mars, Venus and Titan. It is clear that the knowledge of the atmospheric dust properties and the mechanisms of dust settling and raising into the atmosphere are important to understand planetary climate and surface evolution. On Mars the physical processes responsible for dust injection into the atmosphere are still poorly understood, but they likely involve saltation as on Earth. Saltation is a process where large sand grains are forced by the wind to move in ballistic trajectories on the soil surface. During these hops they hit dust particles, that are well bound to the soil due to interparticle cohesive forces, thus transferring to them the momentum necessary to be entrained into the atmosphere. Recently, it has been shown that this process is also responsible to generate strong electric fields in the atmosphere up to 100-150 kV/m. This enhanced electric force acts as a feedback in the dust lifting process, lowering the threshold of the wind friction velocity u* necessary to initiate sand saltation. It is an important aspect of dust lifting process that need to be well characterized and modeled. Even if literature reports several measurements of E-fields in dust devils events, very few reports deal with atmospheric electric properties during dust storms or isolated gusts. We present here preliminary results of an intense field test

  3. Dust deposition in Antarctica in glacial and interglacial climate conditions: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sudarchikova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide a unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distance. These cores are a paleoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret paleodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time-slices such as the pre-industrial control (CTRL, mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP, last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP and Eemian (126 000 yr BP. One glacial time interval, which is Last Glacial Maximum (LGM (21 000 yr BP was simulated as well as to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase of mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change of dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher Southern Hemisphere dust emissions, two times stronger atmospheric transport towards

  4. Desert dust hazards: A global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, N. J.

    2017-02-01

    Dust storms originate in many of the world's drylands and frequently present hazards to human society, both within the drylands themselves but also outside drylands due to long-range transport of aeolian sediments. Major sources of desert dust include the Sahara, the Middle East, central and eastern Asia, and parts of Australia, but dust-raising occurs all across the global drylands and, on occasion, beyond. Dust storms occur throughout the year and they vary in frequency and intensity over a number of timescales. Long-range transport of desert dust typically takes place along seasonal transport paths. Desert dust hazards are here reviewed according to the three phases of the wind erosion system: where dust is entrained, during the transport phase, and on deposition. This paper presents a synthesis of these hazards. It draws on empirical examples in physical geography, medical geology and geomorphology to discuss case studies from all over the world and in various fields. These include accelerated soil erosion in agricultural zones - where dust storms represent a severe form of accelerated soil erosion - the health effects of air pollution caused by desert aerosols via their physical, chemical and biological properties, transport accidents caused by poor visibility during desert dust events, and impacts on electricity generation and distribution. Given the importance of desert dust as a hazard to human societies, it is surprising to note that there have been relatively few attempts to assess their impact in economic terms. Existing studies in this regard are also reviewed, but the wide range of impacts discussed in this paper indicates that desert dust storms deserve more attention in this respect.

  5. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment.

  6. eblur/dust: a modular python approach for dust extinction and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-03-01

    I will present a library of python codes -- github.com/eblur/dust -- which calculate dust scattering and extinction properties from the IR to the X-ray. The modular interface allows for custom defined dust grain size distributions, optical constants, and scattering physics. These codes are currently undergoing a major overhaul to include multiple scattering effects, parallel processing, parameterized grain size distributions beyond power law, and optical constants for different grain compositions. I use eblur/dust primarily to study dust scattering images in the X-ray, but they may be extended to applications at other wavelengths.

  7. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wolk, G; Peletier, R F; Pel, J W

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and determine the presence of dust tori among radio galaxies of various types. Actively accreting supermassive black holes in the centres of radio galaxies may be uncovered through their dust tori reradiating the optical and ultraviolet continuum in mid-infrared bands. Using VISIR on the VLT, we have obtained sub-arcsecond (~0.40") resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 micron, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio galaxies of four types in the redshift range z=0.006-0.156. The sample consists of 8 edge-darkened, low-power Fanaroff-Riley class I (FR-I) radio galaxies, 6 edge-brightened, class II (FR-II) radio galaxies displaying low-excitation optical emission, 7 FR-IIs displaying high-excitation optical emission, and 6 FR-II broad emission line radio galaxies. Out of the sample of 27 objects, 10 nuclei are detected and several have constraining non-detections at 10 sigma sensitivities of 7 mJy. On the basis of the core ...

  8. Dust polarization and ISM turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, Robert R; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the most intriguing result of Planck's dust-polarization measurements is the observation that the power in the E-mode polarization is twice that in the B mode, as opposed to pre-Planck expectations of roughly equal dust powers in E and B modes. Here we show how the E- and B-mode powers depend on the detailed properties of the fluctuations in the magnetized interstellar medium. These fluctuations are classified into the slow, fast, and Alfv\\'en magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are determined once the ratio of gas to magnetic-field pressures is specified. We also parametrize models in terms of the power amplitudes and power anisotropies for the three types of waves. We find that the observed EE/BB ratio (and its scale invariance) and positive TE correlation cannot be easily explained in terms of favored models for MHD turbulence. The observed power-law index for temperature/polarization fluctuations also disfavors MHD turbulence. We thus speculate that the 0.1--30 pc length scales probed by these ...

  9. Galaxy Zoo: Dust in Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M; Keel, William C; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination-dependence of optical colours for 24,276 well-resolved SDSS galaxies visually classified in Galaxy Zoo. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4 magnitudes for the ugri passbands. We split the sample into "bulgy" (early-type) and "disky" (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or f_DeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of "bulgy" spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of "disky" spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disk ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with "disky" spirals at M_r ~ -21.5 mags having the most reddening. This decrease of reddening for the most luminous spirals has not been observed before ...

  10. Characterization of Modern and Fossil Mineral Dust Transported to High Altitude in the Western Alps: Saharan Sources and Transport Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Thevenon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust aerosols recently collected at the high-altitude Jungfraujoch research station (N, E; 3580 m a.s.l. were compared to mineral dust deposited at the Colle Gnifetti glacier (N, E; 4455 m a.s.l. over the last millennium. Radiogenic isotope signatures and backward trajectories analyses indicate that major dust sources are situated in the north-central to north-western part of the Saharan desert. Less radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions of PM10 aerosols and of mineral particles deposited during periods of low dust transfer likely result from the enhancement of the background chemically-weathered Saharan source. Saharan dust mobilization and transport were relatively reduced during the second part of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1690–1870 except within the greatest Saharan dust event deposited around 1770. After ca. 1870, sustained dust deposition suggests that increased mineral dust transport over the Alps during the last century could be due to stronger spring/summer North Atlantic southwesterlies and drier winters in North Africa. On the other hand, increasing carbonaceous particle emissions from fossil fuel combustion combined to a higher lead enrichment factor point to concomitant anthropogenic sources of particulate pollutants reaching high-altitude European glaciers during the last century.

  11. TWO-POP-PY: Two-population dust evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnstiel, T.; Klahr, H.; Ercolano, B.

    2017-08-01

    TWO-POP-PY runs a two-population dust evolution model that follows the upper end of the dust size distribution and the evolution of the dust surface density profile and treats dust surface density, maximum particle size, small and large grain velocity, and fragmentation. It derives profiles that describe the dust-to-gas ratios and the dust surface density profiles well in protoplanetary disks, in addition to the radial flux by solid material rain out.

  12. Dust Charging in Electronegative SiH4 Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ping; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; LIU Jin-Yuan; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We theoretically investigate the dust charging in electronegative silane (SiH4) plasmas, taking into account the effects of UV photodetachment. It is found that UV photodetachment could significantly lower the dust negative charge and even makes dust grains be positively charged under some special conditions. In addition, the other parameters, involving the negative ion and dust number densities, electron temperature and dust radius, have great effects upon the dust charging.

  13. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to gas, in neutral, turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars could form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms, even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. The abundances of these 'promoted' stars may contain interesting signatures, as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced or fluctuate independently. Remarkably, otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well-fit by standard core-collapse SNe yields, if we al...

  14. Wind modeling of Chihuahuan Desert dust outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Rivera, Nancy I.; Gill, Thomas E.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Bleiweiss, Max P.; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.

    The Chihuahuan Desert region of North America is a significant source of mineral aerosols in the Western Hemisphere, and Chihuahuan Desert dust storms frequently impact the Paso del Norte (El Paso, USA/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico) metropolitan area. A statistical analysis of HYSPLIT back trajectory residence times evaluated airflow into El Paso on all days and on days with synoptic (non-convective) dust events in 2001-2005. The incremental probability—a measure of the areas most likely to have been traversed by air masses arriving at El Paso during dusty days—was only strongly positively associated with the region west-southwest of the city, a zone of known dust source areas. Focused case studies were made of major dust events on 15 April and 15 December 2003. Trajectories approached the surface and MM5 (NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model) wind speeds increased at locations consistent with dust sources observed in satellite imagery on those dates. Back trajectory and model analyses suggested that surface cyclones adjacent to the Chihuahuan Desert were associated with the extreme dust events, consistent with previous studies of dust storms in the Southern High Plains to the northeast. The recognition of these meteorological patterns serves as a forecast aid for prediction of dust events likely to impact the Paso del Norte.

  15. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage...

  16. Health risks due to coffee dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula; Baur, Xaver

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed current health risks due to occupational exposure to coffee dust. We performed a cross-sectional study in a coffee haulage company (n = 24), a coffee silo (n = 19), and a decaffeinating company (n = 17). Cross-shift and cross-week case histories of these employees as well as lung function values were recorded. During the handling of green coffee, measurements of airborne dust were conducted. The employees in these workplaces were mainly affected by erythematous and rhinoconjunctival symptoms. They occurred especially in subjects exposed to a high dust load (> 10 mg of inhalable dust per cubic meter of air; n = 28) [Pearson chi(2) test, p = 0.020 and p = 0.023]. IgE antibodies to green coffee and castor beans were detected in 3 workers and 10 workers, respectively. The majority of them (two employees and six employees, respectively) had shown respiratory symptoms during the past 12 months. The preshift lung function values were below average but were not dependent on the level of the inhalable coffee dust exposure. Employees with a coffee dust load > 10 mg/m(3) of air showed higher unspecific bronchial responsiveness more frequently than those with lower exposures. During the transshipment (especially during unloading) of green coffee, a high and clinically relevant exposure to irritative and sensitizing dust occurs. Therefore, efforts to reduce these dust exposures are generally recommended.

  17. 29 CFR 1910.1043 - Cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the instrument must have a means of correcting volumes to body temperature saturated with water... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cotton dust. 1910.1043 Section 1910.1043 Labor Regulations...), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or designee. Equivalent Instrument means a cotton dust...

  18. Dust Dynamics in Kelvin-Helmholtz Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Tom; Keppens, Rony

    2013-04-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is a fluid instability which arises when two contacting flows have different tangential velocities. As shearing flows are very common in all sorts of (astro)physical fluid setups, the KHI is frequently encountered. In many astrophysical fluids the gas fluid in loaded with additional dust particles. Here we study the influence of these dust particles on the initiation of the KHI, as well as the effect the KHI has on the density distribution of dust species in a range of different particle sizes. This redistribution by the instability is of importance in the formation of dust structures in astrophysical fluids. To study the effect of dust on the linear and nonlinear phase of the KHI, we use the multi-fluid dust + gas module of the MPI-AMRVAC [1] code to perform 2D and 3D simulations of KHI in setups with physical quantities relevant to astrophysical fluids. A clear dependency on dust sizes is seen, with larger dust particles displaying significantly more clumping than smaller ones.

  19. Design and Implementation of Space Dust Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左维; 李春来; 徐琳; 刘剑; 刘建军

    2004-01-01

    Space debris is very dangerous to the security of on-the-orbit spacecrafts, and it is increasing in number at high speed with the expansion of human space exploration. Space debris has become a serious space pollutant noticed by many astronomers. The increase of space dust sources and the development of research on space dust urgently need space dust data sharing and exchanging. It is necessary for us to establish the Space Dust Database to realize the sharing and canonical management of the data. The Space Dust Database (SDD) management system, based on the 3-layer B/S computer mode, was designed and implemented in this paper. The system's features include significantly improved runtime efficiency, good scalability and maintainability. The Space Dust Database can provide some scientific bases for the study of the chemical constituents, mineral composition, origin and sources of space dust, but also provide excellent data services and decision-making support for the protection of space and model construction of space dust.

  20. Airborne microorganisms and dust from livestock houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiencies and suitability of samplers for airborne microorganisms and dust, which could be used in practical livestock houses. Two studies were performed: 1) Testing impaction and cyclone pre-separators for dust sampling in livestock houses; 2) Dete

  1. Personal gravimetric dust sampling and risk assessment.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available . At all the sampling sites extremely large variation in dust concentrations were measured on a day to day and shift basis. Correlation of dust concentrations between personal and stationary samples was very poor as was the correlation between quartz...

  2. Mechanical properties of dust collected by dust separators in iron ore sinter plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The flow-related mechanical properties of dusts from the de-dusting systems of several sinter plants were investigated. The mass median diameters of the dusts were in the range from approximately 3 to 100 µm. Also, the bulk density of the dusts varied in a wide range (approximately 400 to 2300 kg/m³). A good correlation between the bulk density and the mass median diameter for most of the dusts was found. In contrast, the angles of repose did not vary very much, only for the coarsest dust a significantly lower value was measured. The angles of internal friction as well as the wall friction angles were lower for coarse dust and higher for fine dust. The shear tests showed that both angles depend considerably on the stress level. At low stress, the angles decreased significantly with increasing values of stress, whereas at higher stress, the dependence was small or even disappeared. The only exception to this behaviour was shown by the finest dust. The flowability decreased with the particle size. The flowability categories suggested by the three flowability indicators were passable only for the coarser dusts. For the finer dusts, the flowability was overestimated by all flowability indicators.

  3. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. Simonia; Sh. Nabiyev

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  4. Inorganic analysis of dust fall and office dust in an industrial area of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Qasem M; Momani, Kamal A; Jbarah, Abdel-Aziz Q; Massadeh, Adnan

    2004-10-01

    This article deals with the determination and comparison of heavy metals and water-soluble anions and cations in indoor dust and outdoor dust fall in the petroleum refinery area in Jordan. Three sampling sites were considered in the Jordanian petroleum refinery complex for the collection of dust fall and office dust samples. These samples were analyzed for water-soluble anions (F-, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, C2O4(2-), and SO4(2-)) and cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) using auto-suppressed ion chromatography. Heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, and Al) were determined using flame or graphite-furnace atomic absorption. No correlations were found between heavy metal concentrations in dust fall and office dust samples, indicating different sources. High enrichment factors for heavy metals were found in dust-fall samples, except for Fe and Cr. Zinc showed the highest and cadmium the lowest flux rates.

  5. A note on dust grain charging in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Central to the study of dust-plasma interactions in the solar system is the electrostatic charging of dust grains. While previous calculations have generally assumed that the distributions of electrons and ions in the plasma are Maxwellian, most space plasmas are observed to have non-Maxwellian tails and can often be fit by a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution. Here we use such a distribution to reevaluate the grain potential, under the condition that the dominant currents to the grain are due to electron and ion collection, as is the case in certain regions of space. The magnitude of the grain potential is found to be larger than that in a Maxwellian plasma as long as the electrons are described by a kappa distribution: this enhancement increased with ion mass and decreasing electron kappa. The modification of the grain potential in generalized Lorentzian plasmas has implications for both the physics (e.g., grain growth and disruption) and the dynamics of dust in space plasmas. These are also briefly discussed.

  6. Analysis on the decadal scale variation of the dust storm in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Dujuan; WANG Huijun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the temporal variation characteristics of the dust storm in North China are investigated. Based on power spectrum analysis and wavelet analysis, 1956-1970 and 1985-1999 are chosen as the high-frequency and low-frequency dust storm decades respectively. Analysis results clearly show that the spring and wintertime anomalous atmospheric circulation between these two decades are significantly different. Compared with the former decade, there are a strengthened polar vortex, enhanced westerlies near 50(N, and a weak East Asian major though in the winter of the latter decade. The north and center parts of the Siberian high and the Aleutian low become weak. The southerly and easterly wind anomalies appear over the north and east parts of China, which implies the weakening of East Asian winter monsoon. Meanwhile, northern China experiences warmer winters and wetter springs, which are in favor of the weakening of dust storm intensity in North China. There are significant out-of-phase relationships between dust frequency and wintertime westerly intensity, as well as between dust frequency and Arctic Oscillation. It is also found that the frequency of dust weather is strongly related to winter-springtime East Asian monsoon intensity.

  7. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  8. Models of dust around Europa and Ganymede

    CERN Document Server

    Miljkovic, K; Mason, N J; Zarnecki, J C

    2012-01-01

    We use numerical models, supported by our laboratory data, to predict the dust densities of ejecta outflux at any altitude within the Hill spheres of Europa and Ganymede. The ejecta are created by micrometeoroid bombardment and five different dust populations are investigated as sources of dust around the moons. The impacting dust flux (influx) causes the ejection of a certain amount of surface material (outflux). The outflux populates the space around the moons, where a part of the ejecta escapes and the rest falls back to the surface. These models were validated against existing Galileo DDS (Dust Detector System) data collected during Europa and Ganymede flybys. Uncertainties of the input parameters and their effects on the model outcome are also included. The results of this model are important for future missions to Europa and Ganymede, such as JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer), recently selected as ESA's next large space mission to be launched in 2022.

  9. Cosmic Dust in the 21st Century

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, J M; Shen, Chuanjian

    2000-01-01

    The past century of interstellar dust has brought us from first ignoring it to finding that it plays an important role in the evolution of galaxies. Current observational results in our galaxy provide a complex physical and chemical evolutionary picture of interstellar dust starting with the formation of small refractory particles in stellar atmospheres to their modification in diffuse and molecular clouds and ultimately to their contribution to star forming regions. Observations of the properties of dust in very young galaxies will be an important probe of the rates of star formation in terms of the production and destruction of dust grains. Future observations of dust at high spectral and spatial resolution will provide detailed information on processes in collapsing clouds up to star formation. Space missions to comets in the next century will first study them in situ but ultimately will bring back pristine nucleus material which will contain the end product of the collapsing protosolar molecular cloud at ...

  10. Recycling of steelmaking dusts: The Radust concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalkanen H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of dusts and other wastes of steelmaking is becoming to a necessity of two reasons: due to high contents of iron oxides dusts are valuable raw material for steelmaking and tightening environmental legislation makes the landfill disposal of wastes more expensive. Fine dust fractions from various stages of steelmaking route contain besides iron and carbon heavy metals especially zinc and lead and heavy hydrocarbons that are acceptable neither for landfill disposal nor for recycling back to processes without any spe4cial treatments. Some theoretical and practical aspects concerning high temperature treatments of steelmaking dusts for removal of hazardous components and production of clean high iron raw material for recycling is discussed in this paper. The Radust technology developed at Koverhar steelwork in Finland for treatment of the most problematic fine fractions of blast furnace and oxygen converter dusts is shortly presented and discussed.

  11. Dust in the 55 Cancri planetary system

    CERN Document Server

    Jayawardhana, R; Greaves, J S; Dent, W R F; Marcy, G W; Hartmann, L W; Fazio, G G; Jayawardhana, Ray; Holland, Wayne S.; Greaves, Jane S.; Dent, William R. F.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Hartmann, Lee W.; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of debris disks around $\\sim$ 1-Gyr-old main sequence stars suggests that an appreciable amount of dust may persist even in mature planetary systems. Here we report the detection of dust emission from 55 Cancri, a star with one, or possibly two, planetary companions detected through radial velocity measurements. Our observations at 850$\\mu$m and 450$\\mu$m imply a dust mass of 0.0008-0.005 Earth masses, somewhat higher than that in the the Kuiper Belt of our solar system. The estimated temperature of the dust grains and a simple model fit both indicate a central disk hole of at least 10 AU in radius. Thus, the region where the planets are detected is likely to be significantly depleted of dust. Our results suggest that far-infrared and sub-millimeter observations are powerful tools for probing the outer regions of extrasolar planetary systems.

  12. Ionization and Dust Charging in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Caselli, P

    2016-01-01

    Ionization-recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field and the development of magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks. We present a self-consistent analytical model which allows us to exactly calculate abundances of charged species in dusty gas, in the regime where the dust-phase recombination dominates over the gas-phase recombination. The model is employed to verify applicability of a conventional approximation of low dust charges in protoplanetary disks, and to discuss the implications for the dust coagulation and the development of the "dead zone" in the disk. Furthermore, the importance of mutually consistent models for the ionization and dust evolution is addressed: These processes are coupled via several mechanisms operating in the disk, and therefore their interplay can be crucial for the ultimate ...

  13. [Wood dust as inhalative noxious agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, D; Liebetrau, G; Meister, W

    1985-01-01

    Wood dust is known as a cause of asthma and chronic bronchitis. From 1979 to 1983 we observed 115 patients with chronic lung diseases, who were exposed to wood dust during many years. We found an irritative pathogenesis in 101 patients with asthma or bronchitis. Twenty nine patients had got a positive skin test, especially with makoré, beech, koto, ash, pine. The inhalation test was positive in 7 of them. The occupational etiology was verified in 5 patients. Besides wood dust itself chemicals for wood protection or wood adhesives can have importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Fourteen patients had got alveolitis or lung fibrosis after wood-dust exposition. In each case we found precipitating antibodies against moulds, which could be cultivated from wood dust to which the patients were exposed.

  14. Mesospheric dust observations during the MAXIDUSTY campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Tarjei; Havnes, Ove; Fredriksen, Åshild; Friedrich, Martin; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Plane, John; Hartquist, Tom; Olsen, Sveinung; Eilertsen, Yngve; Trondsen, Espen; Mann, Ingrid; Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Moen, Jøran; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Höffner, Josef; Williams, Bifford; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Karlberg, Jan-Ove

    2017-04-01

    The MAXIDUSTY rocket payloads, launched from Andøya June 30 and July 8 2016, were equipped with dust impact detectors aiming to characterize mesospheric dust charge state, mass distribution of impact fragments and NLC/PMSE structure. One of the main scientific objectives for the campaign was to confirm that material of meteoric origin is abundant inside the icy mesospheric dust particles. The rockets were launched simultaneously with PMSE and NLC (MAXIDUSTY-1) and PMSE (MAXIDUSTY-1B) respectively, and radar measurements were made coincident with the rocket flight path. We report here on the initial results from the rocket probes and remote soundings, with emphasis on the dust impact detector results. Results from the Multiple Dust Detector (MUDD) confirm that NLC ice particles probably have a relatively high content of meteoric smoke particles with a filling factor of up to several percent. Comparisons of the DUSTY faraday bucket and PMSE show that there is no simple correlation between the two.

  15. Protective Effects of Intratracheally-Administered Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 on Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Hwa Jung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by bronchial inflammation, reversible airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR. Current therapeutic options for the management of asthma include inhaled corticosteroids and β2 agonists, which elicit harmful side effects. In the present study, we examined the capacity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2, one of the major components of bee venom (BV, to reduce airway inflammation and improve lung function in an experimental model of asthma. Allergic asthma was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal administration of ovalbumin (OVA on days 0 and 14, followed by intratracheal challenge with 1% OVA six times between days 22 and 30. The infiltration of immune cells, such as Th2 cytokines in the lungs, and the lung histology, were assessed in the OVA-challenged mice in the presence and absence of an intratracheal administration of bvPLA2. We showed that the intratracheal administration of bvPLA2 markedly suppressed the OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation by reducing AHR, overall area of inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia. Furthermore, the suppression was associated with a significant decrease in the production of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and a reduction in the number of total cells, including eosinophils, macrophages, and neutrophils in the airway.

  16. Irritant and adjuvant effects of gaseous formaldehyde on the ovalbumin-induced hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Y; Li, B; Yang, G; Yao, H; Yang, J; Liu, D; Yan, Y; Sigsgaard, T; Yang, X

    2009-12-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a common indoor air pollutant that can cause asthma in people experiencing long-term exposure. While FA and other man-made chemicals contribute to the stimulation of asthma in the general population, the underlying molecular pathogenesis of this relationship is not yet well understood. To explore FA as an irritant for the onset of asthma and as an adjuvant for the induction of allergy. In the present study, 40 Wistar rats in five experimental groups were exposed to: (i) saline; (ii) ovalbumin (OVA); (iii) OVA + FA at 417 ppb; (iv) OVA + FA at 2500 ppb; and (v) FA at 2500 ppb. Current and prior occupational exposure limits in China were established at 417 ppb and 2500 ppb, respectively. Gaseous FA was administrated to the animals for 6 h/day before and during OVA immunization or saline treatment. Measured outcomes included in situ lung function analysis, cytokine measurement, and histological changes in the rat lungs. The airway reactivity, lung histological changes, pulmonary interleukin-4 secretion, and eosinophil infiltration in the OVA and FA exposed rats were significantly higher after gaseous FA exposures of 417 and 2500 ppb. While FA exposure alone did not induce significant structural changes to the airway, and the rate of inflammatory cell infiltration was the same as for the control group, pulmonary levels of interferon-gamma were significantly elevated in the exposed rats. FA may be an irritant as well as serve as an adjuvant for the onset of asthma or asthma-like symptoms.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of Salvia plebeia R. Br extract in vitro and in ovalbumin-induced mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwan-Hee; Cho, Su-Yeon; Kim, Mi-Ju; Kim, Jung-Bong; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Mee-Young; Lee, Young-Min

    2016-10-05

    Asthma is an increasing global health problem, and novel strategies to prevent or ameliorate the condition are needed. Here, the effects of 80 % ethanol extracts of Salvia plebeia R. Br. (SE) on an induced inflammatory response were investigated. Salvia plebeia R. Br. inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, as well as nitric oxide (NO) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine production was suppressed more effectively by SE of the aerial parts (SE-A) than of the roots (SE-R) of S. plebeia. In BEAS-2B cells, both SE-A and SE-R inhibited the increase in production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. We also investigated the anti-asthmatic effects of SE in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced BALB/c mouse model. SE-A treatment significantly reduced the number of airway eosinophils, IL-4 and IL-13 levels, mucus production, and inflammatory infiltration, as compared with the corresponding levels in the untreated, OVA-induced mice, and had similar effects to dexamethasone. Salvia plebeia ethanol extract ameliorated the induced inflammatory response in RAW 264.7 and BEAS-2B cells, with more effective inhibition noted for SE-A than for SE-R. SE-A treatment was effective in improving the histopathological changes in the lungs of asthma model mice via modulation of eosinophils and Th2 cytokines. These results suggest that SE-A can be considered as a therapeutic agent that can potentially relieve asthma.

  18. An extract of Crataegus pinnatifida fruit attenuates airway inflammation by modulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in ovalbumin induced asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sik Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crataegus pinnatifida (Chinese hawthorn has long been used as a herbal medicine in Asia and Europe. It has been used for the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial weakness, tachycardia, hypertension and arteriosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of Crataegus pinnatifida ethanolic extracts (CPEE on Th2-type cytokines, eosinophil infiltration, expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and other factors, using an ovalbumin (OVA-induced murine asthma model. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Airways of OVA-sensitized mice exposed to OVA challenge developed eosinophilia, mucus hypersecretion and increased cytokine levels. CPEE was applied 1 h prior to OVA challenge. Mice were administered CPEE orally at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg once daily on days 18-23. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was collected 48 h after the final OVA challenge. Levels of interleukin (IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA assays. Lung tissue sections 4 µm in thickness were stained with Mayer's hematoxylin and eosin for assessment of cell infiltration and mucus production with PAS staining, in conjunction with ELISA, and Western blot analyses for the expression of MMP-9, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 protein expression. CPEE significantly decreased the Th2 cytokines including IL-4 and IL-5 levels, reduced the number of inflammatory cells in BALF and airway hyperresponsiveness, suppressed the infiltration of eosinophil-rich inflammatory cells and mucus hypersecretion and reduced the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MMP-9 and the activity of MMP-9 in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results showed that CPEE can protect against allergic airway inflammation and can act as an MMP-9 modulator to induce a reduction in ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. In conclusion, we strongly suggest the feasibility of CPEE as a therapeutic drug for allergic asthma.

  19. Icariin attenuates glucocorticoid insensitivity mediated by repeated psychosocial stress on an ovalbumin-induced murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Duan, Xiaohong; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Jinfeng; Liu, Baojun; Du, Yiji; Luo, Qingli; Jin, Hualiang; Gong, Weiyi; Dong, Jingcheng

    2014-04-01

    Evidence shows that psychosocial stress exacerbates asthma, but there is little intervention to alleviate negative effects of psychosocial stress on asthma. We investigated the role of icariin in anti-inflammation and anti-anxiety potential in a murine model combined psychosocial stress with allergic exposure. The results indicated that icariin administered remarkable increased activity in the center of the open field, reversed airway hyperresponsivenesss, reduced inflammatory cytokine infiltration to the lung and whole body and also in part recovered glucocorticoid responsiveness. Furthermore, our data also showed that icariin significantly inhibited increases of corticosterone and markedly increased glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in the lungs of mice exposed to both stress and allergen. Collectively, we speculate that inducing glucocorticoid receptor modulation might be the potential mechanisms of icariin to facilitate corticosteroid responsiveness of cytokine production.

  20. Antiallergic effect of an aqueous leaf extract of Pistia stratiotes in murine model of ovalbumin-induced allergic conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Abokyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to investigate the antiallergic effect of an aqueous leaf extract of Pistia stratiotes (ALPS in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced allergic conjunctivitis (AC. Materials and Methods: Prior to topical challenge (instillation of 1.5 mg OVA in 10 μL phosphate buffered saline into their conjunctival sacs to induce AC, groups of sensitized Imprinting Control Region mice (injected IP, on day 1 and 7, with 0.2 ml solution of 100 μg OVA and 0.01 mg aluminum hydroxide in phosphate buffered saline, were treated with 5 mg/kg cetirizine, 10, 50 or 100 mg/kg of ALPS, or 2 ml/kg normal saline per os. Conjunctival redness, lid edema, tearing and lid scratching (clinical symptoms of AC were scored. Serum OVA specific immunoglobulins were determined using ELISA. Histopathological assessment of the conjunctival mucosal tissue was conducted. The extract was screened for secondary plant metabolites. Results: Pretreatment with the extract significantly (P ≤ 0.05-0.01 and dose-dependently reduced the scores for clinical symptoms, which were marked in vehicle-pretreated mice. Pretreatment also lowered (P ≤ 0.01-0.001 serum OVA specific immunoglobulins. Mast cell infiltration and degranulation in conjunctival stroma (measured by an inflammatory score in histopathological studies was also significantly low (P ≤ 0.05-0.01 on pretreatment. Conclusion: The ALPS exhibited interesting antiallergic activity and hence could be useful in managing AC.

  1. Protective Effects of Intratracheally-Administered Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 on Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Hyunjung; Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Park, Sangwon; Lee, Sujin; Choi, Dabin; Kim, Woojin; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by bronchial inflammation, reversible airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Current therapeutic options for the management of asthma include inhaled corticosteroids and β2 agonists, which elicit harmful side effects. In the present study, we examined the capacity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), one of the major components of bee venom (BV), to reduce airway inflammation and improve lung function in an experimental model of asthma. Allergic asthma was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal administration of ovalbumin (OVA) on days 0 and 14, followed by intratracheal challenge with 1% OVA six times between days 22 and 30. The infiltration of immune cells, such as Th2 cytokines in the lungs, and the lung histology, were assessed in the OVA-challenged mice in the presence and absence of an intratracheal administration of bvPLA2. We showed that the intratracheal administration of bvPLA2 markedly suppressed the OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation by reducing AHR, overall area of inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia. Furthermore, the suppression was associated with a significant decrease in the production of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and a reduction in the number of total cells, including eosinophils, macrophages, and neutrophils in the airway. PMID:27669297

  2. Feeding probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (MTCC 5897) fermented milk to suckling mothers alleviates ovalbumin-induced allergic sensitisation in mice offspring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saliganti, Vamshi; Kapila, Rajeev; Sharma, Rohit; Kapila, Suman

    2015-01-01

    ...)-induced allergy in newborns was analysed. After allergen sensitisation, physical symptoms of allergy, gut immune response, humoral immune response and cell-mediated response through interleukins were detected...

  3. Suppression of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammatory responses in a mouse model of asthma by Mimosa pudica extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji-Sook; Yun, Chi-Young; Ryang, Yong Suk; Kim, Jong-Bae; Kim, In Sik

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory airway disease. The pathogenic mechanisms of asthma include the infiltration of leukocytes and release of cytokines. Mimosa pudica (Mp) has been used traditionally for the treatment of insomnia, diarrhea and inflammatory diseases. Although Mp extract has various therapeutic properties, the effect of this extract on asthma has not yet been reported. This study investigated the suppressive effects of Mp extract on asthmatic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Mp extract was acquired from dried and powdered whole plants of M. pudica using 80% ethanol. BALB/c mice were used for the mouse model of asthma induced by ovalbumin. Mp extract significantly inhibited the HMC-1 cell migration induced by stem cell factor and blocked the release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in EoL-1 cells. Leukocytosis, eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion in asthmatic lung were significantly suppressed by Mp extract. The release of ovalbumin-specific IgE in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum was also decreased. Mp extract treatment resulted in no liver cytotoxicity. The Mp extract has inhibitory properties on asthma and may be used as a potent therapeutic agent for allergic lung inflammation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. D-pinitol regulates Th1/Th2 balance via suppressing Th2 immune response in ovalbumin-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Sik; Lee, Chang-Min; Jeong, Young-Il; Jung, In Duk; Kim, Bo-Hye; Seong, Eun-Young; Kim, Jong-Il; Choi, Il-Whan; Chung, Hae Young; Park, Yeong-Min

    2007-01-09

    D-pinitol has been demonstrated to exert insulin-like and anti-inflammatory activities. However, its anti-allergic effect in the Th1/Th2 immune response is poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that T-bet and GATA-3 are master Th1 and Th2 regulatory transcription factors. In this study, we have attempted to determine whether D-pinitol regulates Th1/Th2 cytokine production, T-bet and GATA-3 gene expression in OVA-induced asthma model mice. We also examined to ascertain whether D-pinitol could influence eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity. After being sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) showed typical asthmatic reactions. These reactions included an increase in the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, an increase in inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung tissue around blood vessels and airways, airway luminal narrowing, and the development of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). The administration of D-pinitol before the last airway OVA challenge resulted in a significant inhibition of all asthmatic reactions. Accordingly, this study may provide evidence that D-pinitol plays a critical role in the amelioration of the pathogenetic process of asthma in mice. These findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of D-pinitol in terms of its effects in a murine model of asthma, and also broaden current perspectives in our understanding of the immunopharmacological functions of D-pinitol.

  5. Dust storm events over Delhi: verification of dust AOD forecasts with satellite and surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditi; Iyengar, Gopal R.; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Thar desert located in northwest part of India is considered as one of the major dust source. Dust storms originate in Thar desert during pre-monsoon season, affects large part of Indo-Gangetic plains. High dust loading causes the deterioration of the ambient air quality and degradation in visibility. Present study focuses on the identification of dust events and verification of the forecast of dust events over Delhi and western part of IG Plains, during the pre-monsoon season of 2015. Three dust events have been identified over Delhi during the study period. For all the selected days, Terra-MODIS AOD at 550 nm are found close to 1.0, while AURA-OMI AI shows high values. Dust AOD forecasts from NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) for the three selected dust events are verified against satellite (MODIS) and ground based observations (AERONET). Comparison of observed AODs at 550 nm from MODIS with NCUM predicted AODs reveals that NCUM is able to predict the spatial and temporal distribution of dust AOD, in these cases. Good correlation (~0.67) is obtained between the NCUM predicted dust AODs and location specific observations available from AERONET. Model under-predicted the AODs as compared to the AERONET observations. This may be mainly because the model account for only dust and no anthropogenic activities are considered. The results of the present study emphasize the requirement of more realistic representation of local dust emission in the model both of natural and anthropogenic origin, to improve the forecast of dust from NCUM during the dust events.

  6. Dust in the Quasar Wind (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Dusty grains -- including tiny specks of the minerals found in the gemstones peridot, sapphires and rubies -- can be seen blowing in the winds of a quasar, or active black hole, in this artist's concept. The quasar is at the center of a distant galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such quasar winds might have forged these dusty particles in the very early universe. The findings are another clue in an ongoing cosmic mystery: where did all the dust in our young universe come from? Dust is crucial for efficient star formation as it allows the giant clouds where stars are born to cool quickly and collapse into new stars. Once a star has formed, dust is also needed to make planets and living creatures. Dust has been seen as far back as when the universe was less than a tenth of its current age, but how did it get there? Most dust in our current epoch forms in the winds of evolved stars that did not exist when the universe was young. Theorists had predicted that winds from quasars growing in the centers of distant galaxies might be a source of this dust. While the environment close to a quasar is too hot for large molecules like dust grains to survive, dust has been found in the cooler, outer regions. Astronomers now have evidence that dust is created in these outer winds. Using Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, scientists found a wealth of dust grains in a quasar called PG2112+059 located at the center of a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. The grains - including corundum (sapphires and rubies); forsterite (peridot); and periclase (naturally occurring in marble) - are not typically found in galaxies without quasars, suggesting they might have been freshly formed in the quasar's winds.

  7. Release of monomers from composite dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokic, S M; Duca, R C; Godderis, L; Hoet, P H; Seo, J W; Van Meerbeek, B; Van Landuyt, K L

    2017-05-01

    Dental personnel are more at risk to develop asthmatic disease, but the exact reason is so far unknown. During abrasive procedures, dental personnel are exposed to nano-sized dust particles released from dental composite. The aim of this study was to investigate whether respirable composite dust may also release monomers. Respirable (composite dust was collected and the release of methacrylate monomers and Bisphenol A (BPA) in water and ethanol was evaluated by liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). The dust was ultra-morphologically and chemically analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that, irrespective of the type of composite, the respirable fraction of composite dust may release relatively high concentrations of unpolymerized methacrylate monomers, both in water and ethanol. Higher release was observed in ethanol. The endocrine disruptor BPA also emanated from the composite dust particles. TEM showed that most particles were nano-sized, although particle size ranged between 6nm and 5μm with a mode value between 12 and 39nm. Most particles consisted of several filler particles in resin matrix, although single nano-filler particles could also be observed. Elemental analysis by TEM-EDS proved that the particles collected on the filters originated from the dental composites. Theoretically, composite dust may function as a vehicle to transport monomers deeply into the respiratory system. The results of this study may shed another light on the increasing incidence of respiratory disease among dental personnel, and more care should be taken to prevent inhalation of composite dust. Special care should be taken to prevent inhalation of composite dust, as the dust particles may release methacrylate monomers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyers Valerie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind’s limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Methods Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm, reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles Results In vitro testing indicated minimal irritancy potential based on the time required to reduce cell viability by 50% (ET50. Follow-up testing using the Draize standard protocol confirmed that the lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Conclusions Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  9. An Israeli haboob: Sea breeze activating local anthropogenic dust sources in the Negev loess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouvi, Onn; Dayan, Uri; Amit, Rivka; Enzel, Yehouda

    2017-02-01

    Meso-scale weather systems, such as convective haboobs, are considered to be an important dust generation mechanism. In Israel, however, rather than of meso-scale weather systems, most dust storms are generated by synoptic-scale systems, originating from Sahara and Arabia. Consequently, only distal sources of suspended and deposited dust in Israel are currently reported. Here we report the first detailed study on the merging of synoptic- and meso-scale weather systems leading to a prominent dust outbreak over the Negev, Israel. During the afternoon of May 2nd, 2007, a massive dust storm covered the northern Negev, forming a one kilometer high wall of dust. The haboob was associated with PM10 concentrations of 1000-1500 μg m-3 that advanced at a speed of 10-15 m s-1 and caused temporary closure of local airports. In contrast to most reported haboobs, this one was generated by a sea breeze front acting as a weak cold front enhanced by a cold core cyclone positioned over Libya and Egypt. The sea breeze that brought cold and moist marine air acted as a gravity current with strong surface winds. The sources for the haboob were the loessial soils of the northwestern Negev, especially agricultural fields that were highly disturbed in late spring to early summer. Such surface disturbance is caused by agricultural and/or intensive grazing practices. Our study emphasizes the importance of local dust sources in the Negev and stresses loess recycling as an important process in contemporary dust storms over Israel.

  10. Models of millimeter-wave emission from dust in the coma of Comet 67P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareta, Theodore R.; Schloerb, F. Peter

    2017-01-01

    The spacecraft Rosetta ended its mission on September 30th, 2016 after spending more than 2 years studying Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The comet is constantly emitting gas and ejecting dust as it moves through the inner solar system, and understanding the properties of the gas and dust can help us better understand the comet and its origins. We present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of dust production developed for comparison with millimeter and submillimeter data obtained by the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). The MIRO instrument measures the millimeter-wave continuum emission from the comet at two wavelengths, 0.53 mm and 1.59 mm. During the months around the August 2015 perihelion of the comet, a small emission excess was observed above the sunlit limb of the comet. The excess emission extends many beam widths off the dayside limb and is a persistent feature for months of observations. No excess is observed above the nightside limb, and given the known strong day-night asymmetry of gas production from the nucleus, we interpret the observed continuum excess on the day side to result from thermal emission from dust. A full treatment of the millimeter-wave emission from the large dust particles observed by MIRO must include many effects, including acceleration of dust particles by outflowing gas and the integration of millimeter-wave emission from a broad range of particle sizes. Our model also incorporates an accurate cometary shape model to demonstrate how dust production might vary with solar illumination over the surface. We find that the complex shape of 67P can lead to asymmetric structures in the distribution of the coma dust, with significant enhancements occurring where large areas of the nucleus have similar orientations with respect to the Sun.

  11. [Lung tissue in intratracheal exposure to mine dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaĭlova, A; Vodenicharov, E

    1984-01-01

    The experiment was performed 64 albino female rats by a single, intretracheal treatment with 50 mg mine dust. Dynamic biochemical studies were carried out - by 3th and 6th months of the experiment. The data obtained were compared with the changes observed in the positive controls - DQ12 and Ti02 The activity of the oxidation-reduction enzymes and hydrolytic ones was enhanced, the content of sulphhydryl groups and soluble proteins was increased. The results obtained are an evidence of the advancing metabolic disturbances in pulmonary tissue, being better manifested by 6th month of the experiment.

  12. The dust mass in Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Looze, Ilse; Barlow, Mike; Marcowith, Alexandre; Tatischef, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical models predict that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) can be efficient dust producers (0.1-1 Msun) and potentially responsible for most of the dust production in the early Universe. Observational evidence for this dust production efficiency has remained limited. Herschel observations from 70-500 microns of the 335-year old Cassiopeia A have indicated the presence of ˜0.1 Msun of cool (T˜35 K) dust interior to the reverse shock (Barlow et al. 2010), while Dunne et al. (2009) have claimed a detection of ˜1 Msun of cold (˜20 K) dust, based on SCUBA 850-micron polarimetric data. At sub-millimeter wavelengths, the supernova dust emission is heavily contaminated by interstellar dust emission and by the synchrotron radiation from the SNR. We present the first spatially resolved analysis of the infrared and submillimeter emission of Cas, A at better than 1 parsec resolution, based on our Herschel PACS and SPIRE 70-500um images. We used our PACS IFU and SPIRE FTS spectra to remove the contaminating emission from bright lines (e.g. [OIII]88, [CII]158). We updated the spectral index of the synchrotron emission based on recent Planck data, and extrapolated this synchrotron spectrum from a 3.7 mm VLA image to infrared/submillimeter wavelengths. We modeled the interstellar dust emission using a Galactic dust emission template from Jones et al. (2013), while the ISM dust mass is scaled to reproduce the continuum emission in the SPIRE FTS spectra at wavelengths > 650 micron (after subtraction of synchrotron emission). The UV radiation field that illuminates the ISM dust was constrained through PDR modelling of the [CI] 1-0, 2-1 and CO 4-3 lines observed in the SPIRE FTS spectra, and was found to range between 0.3 G0 and 1.0 G0 in units of the Draine IS radiation field. Within the uncertainties of the radiation field that illuminates the ISM material and the observational errors, we detect a dust mass of up to 0.8 Msun in Cas, A, with an average temperature of 30 K

  13. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R. B.; Tratt, D. M.; Schichtel, B. A.; Falke, S. R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gassó, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N. S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M. C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B. N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G. C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R. J.; Merrill, J.; Dubois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W. E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W. C.

    2001-08-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 μg/m3 with local peaks >100 μg/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 μm, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  14. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R.B.; Tratt, D.M.; Schichtel, B.A.; Falke, S.R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gasso, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N.S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M.C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B.N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G.C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R.J.; Merrill, J.; DuBois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W.E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 ??g/m3 with local peaks >100 ??g/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 ??m, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  15. Iron fertilisation by Asian dust influences North Pacific sardine regime shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yongsong

    2015-05-01

    Forcing factors and mechanisms underlying multidecadal variability in the production of the world's major fish stocks are one of the great mysteries of the oceans. The Japanese and California sardine are species that exhibit the regime shifts. It is shown in the present work that during two periods of frequent Asian dust events over the last 100 years, sardines on opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean only flourished under a dust-active regime. The earlier such regime that peaked in the 1930s was strong, and it brought synchronous changes in the two species that were linked to the frequency of Asian dust events. However, there is an apparent mismatch in the rise and fall of abundance between the two species in the current dust-active regime. The massive increase in Japanese sardine stock in the 1970s was related to high levels of ocean precipitation and strong winter mixing, whereas the stock collapse since 1988 has been attributed to diminished winter mixing. High levels of ocean precipitation in the western North Pacific effectively cause wet deposition of Asian dust and enhance Japanese sardine stock, whereas it reduces dust flux that can be transported to the eastern North Pacific, delaying the increase of California sardine stock. Analysis further indicates that productivity of Japanese sardine stock is jointly controlled by wet deposition of Asian dust and winter mixing, which supplies macronutrients from depth. California sardine productivity is inversely related to precipitation in the western North Pacific and is positively affected by precipitation off western North America. This indicates that Asian dust influx dominates productivity of the species because of iron-limited ocean productivity in the California sardine ranges. The analysis suggests that dust regime shifts influence shifts in sardine productivity regimes and that iron input from Asian dust during trans-Pacific transport is directly responsible. It appears that in addition to enhancing

  16. Novel Thioester Prodrug of N-acetylcysteine for Odor Masking and Bioavailability Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhilare, Neha V; Dhaneshwar, Suneela S; Sinha, Akanksha J; Kandhare, Amit D; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2016-01-01

    The mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is used to control the excessive mucus secretion if mucus is the underlying cause of broncho-constriction. Its major drawbacks are poor bioavailability due to extensive first pass effect, poor lipophilicity, high protein binding and offensive odor. For minimizing above shortcomings of NAC, in present study thioester (A1) prodrug of NAC was synthesized by conventional as well as microwave-assisted methods. Release studies of A-1 were carried out using HPLC and pharmacological evaluation was performed in ovalbumin-induced model of pulmonary inflammation in Sprague dawley rats. A-1 was found to be stable in HCl buffer, phosphate buffer, stomach homogenates but furnished 30% NAC in 6h and 1.7% of NAC in 4h when incubated with small intestinal and liver homogenates respectively. Upon oral administration of A-1 to rats, 4.85% NAC was detected in blood at 8h. Urine samples pooled over a period of 24h exhibited 0.75% NAC while negligible concentration was found in 24 h pooled samples of feces. The findings of this preliminary investigation demonstrated significant effects of thioester prodrug A-1 as compared to NAC through reduction of lung inflammation, airway eosinophilia and reversal of lung function parameters in ovalbumin- challenged rats at half the equimolar dose of NAC. Interestingly masking thiol group through thioester formation resulted in odorless prodrug. We propose that thioester prodrug using palmitic acid as a carrier is a promising strategy to enhance bioavailability of NAC by increasing its lipophilicity/ absorption and minimizing its first pass metabolism.

  17. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, C. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Flamant, C.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Washington, R.; Brindley, H. E.; Highwood, E. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brooke, J. K.; Engelstaedter, S.; Estelles, V.; Formenti, P.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Kocha, C.; Marenco, F.; Sodemann, H.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bourdon, A.; Bart, M.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Chevaillier, S.; Crosier, J.; Darbyshire, E.; Dean, A. R.; Dorsey, J. R.; Kent, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Schepanski, K.; Szpek, K.; Trembath, J.; Woolley, A.

    2015-07-01

    The Fennec climate programme aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali) and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed for and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include (1) the first airborne measurement of dust particles sizes of up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), (2) dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible Infra-Red Imager) satellite imagery, (3) vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4) in situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) at -15 °C, (5) dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL), (6) airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold pool (haboob) issued from deep convection over the Atlas Mountains, (7) the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations) and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8) coincident ozone and dust surface area

  18. An improved dust emission model with insights into the global dust cycle's climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Fratini, G.; Gillies, J. A.; Ishizuka, M.; Leys, J. F.; Mikami, M.; Park, M.-S.; Park, S.-U.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Ward, D. S.; Zobeck, T. M.

    2014-03-01

    Simulations of the global dust cycle and its interactions with a changing Earth system are hindered by the empirical nature of dust emission parameterizations in climate models. Here we take a step towards improving global dust cycle simulations by presenting a physically-based dust emission model. The resulting dust flux parameterization depends only on the wind friction speed and the soil's threshold friction speed, and can therefore be readily implemented into climate models. We show that our parameterization's functional form is supported by a compilation of quality-controlled vertical dust flux measurements, and that it better reproduces these measurements than existing parameterizations. Both our theory and measurements indicate that many climate models underestimate the dust flux's sensitivity to soil erodibility. This finding can explain why dust cycle simulations in many models are improved by using an empirical preferential sources function that shifts dust emissions towards the most erodible regions. In fact, implementing our parameterization in a climate model produces even better agreement against aerosol optical depth measurements than simulations that use such a source function. These results indicate that the need to use a source function is at least partially eliminated by the additional physics accounted for by our parameterization. Since soil erodibility is affected by climate changes, our results further suggest that many models have underestimated the climate sensitivity of the global dust cycle.

  19. Dust in the planetary system: Dust interactions in space plasmas of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Czechowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic dust particles are small solid objects observed in the solar planetary system and in many astronomical objects like the surrounding of stars, the interstellar and even the intergalactic medium. In the solar system the dust is best observed and most often found within the region of the orbits of terrestrial planets where the dust interactions and dynamics are observed directly from spacecraft. Dust is observed in space near Earth and also enters the atmosphere of the Earth where it takes part in physical and chemical processes. Hence space offers a laboratory to study dust-plasma interactions and dust dynamics. A recent example is the observation of nanodust of sizes smaller than 10 nm. We outline the theoretical considerations on which our knowledge of dust electric charges in space plasmas are founded. We discuss the dynamics of the dust particles and show how the small charged particles are accelerated by the solar wind that carries a magnetic field. Finally, as examples for the space observation of cosmic dust interactions, we describe the first detection of fast nanodust in the solar wind near Earth orbit and the first bi-static observations of PMSE, the radar echoes that are observed in the Earth ionosphere in the presence of charged dust.

  20. Glacial to Holocene changes in trans-Atlantic Saharan dust transport and dust-climate feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross H; McGee, David; Kinsley, Christopher W; Ridley, David A; Hu, Shineng; Fedorov, Alexey; Tal, Irit; Murray, Richard W; deMenocal, Peter B

    2016-11-01

    Saharan mineral dust exported over the tropical North Atlantic is thought to have significant impacts on regional climate and ecosystems, but limited data exist documenting past changes in long-range dust transport. This data gap limits investigations of the role of Saharan dust in past climate change, in particular during the mid-Holocene, when climate models consistently underestimate the intensification of the West African monsoon documented by paleorecords. We present reconstructions of African dust deposition in sediments from the Bahamas and the tropical North Atlantic spanning the last 23,000 years. Both sites show early and mid-Holocene dust fluxes 40 to 50% lower than recent values and maximum dust fluxes during the deglaciation, demonstrating agreement with records from the northwest African margin. These quantitative estimates of trans-Atlantic dust transport offer important constraints on past changes in dust-related radiative and biogeochemical impacts. Using idealized climate model experiments to investigate the response to reductions in Saharan dust's radiative forcing over the tropical North Atlantic, we find that small (0.15°C) dust-related increases in regional sea surface temperatures are sufficient to cause significant northward shifts in the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone, increased precipitation in the western Sahel and Sahara, and reductions in easterly and northeasterly winds over dust source regions. Our results suggest that the amplifying feedback of dust on sea surface temperatures and regional climate may be significant and that accurate simulation of dust's radiative effects is likely essential to improving model representations of past and future precipitation variations in North Africa.

  1. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, M.; Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Bianchi, S.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. With this aim, we have developed a new code, GRASH_Rev, that allows following the dynamics of dust grains in the shocked SN ejecta and computing the time evolution of the mass, composition, and size distribution of the grains. We considered four well-studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN 1987A, CasA, the Crab nebula, and N49. These sources have been observed with both Spitzer and Herschel, and the multiwavelength data allow a better assessment the mass of warm and cold dust associated with the ejecta. For each SN, we first identified the best explosion model, using the mass and metallicity of the progenitor star, the mass of 56Ni, the explosion energy, and the circumstellar medium density inferred from the data. We then ran a recently developed dust formation model to compute the properties of freshly formed dust. Starting from these input models, GRASH_Rev self-consistently follows the dynamics of the grains, considering the effects of the forward and reverse shock, and allows predicting the time evolution of the dust mass, composition, and size distribution in the shocked and unshocked regions of the ejecta. All the simulated models aagree well with observations. Our study suggests that SN 1987A is too young for the reverse shock to have affected the dust mass. Hence the observed dust mass of 0.7-0.9 M⊙ in this source can be safely considered as indicative of the mass of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta. Conversely, in the other three SNe, the reverse shock has already destroyed between 10-40% of the

  2. Distribution of dust from Kuiper belt objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkavyi, N N; Taidakova, T; Mather, J C; Gorkavyi, Nick N.; Ozernoy, Leonid M.; Taidakova, Tanya; Mather, John C.

    2000-01-01

    (Abridged) Using an efficient computational approach, we have reconstructed the structure of the dust cloud in the Solar system between 0.5 and 100 AU produced by the Kuiper belt objects. Our simulations offer a 3-D physical model of the `kuiperoidal' dust cloud based on the distribution of 280 dust particle trajectories produced by 100 known Kuiper belt objects ; the resulting 3-D grid consists of $1.9\\times 10^6$ cells containing $1.2\\times 10^{11}$ particle positions. The following processes that influence the dust particle dynamics are taken into account: 1) gravitational scattering on the eight planets (neglecting Pluto); 2) planetary resonances; 3) radiation pressure; and 4) the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) and solar wind drags. We find the dust distribution highly non-uniform: there is a minimum in the kuiperoidal dust between Mars and Jupiter, after which both the column and number densities of kuiperoidal dust sharply increase with heliocentric distance between 5 and 10 AU, and then form a plateau betwee...

  3. Subregional inversion of North African dust sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Jerónimo; Boucher, Olivier; Chevallier, Frédéric; Huneeus, Nicolás.

    2016-07-01

    The emission of mineral dust aerosols in arid and semiarid regions is a complex process whose representation in atmospheric models remains crude, due to insufficient knowledge about the aerosol lifting process itself, the lack of global data on soil characteristics, and the impossibility for the models to resolve the fine-scale variability in the wind field that drives some of the dust events. As a result, there are large uncertainties in the total emission flux of mineral dust, its natural variability at various timescales, and the possible contribution from anthropogenic land use changes. This work aims for estimating dust emissions and reduces their uncertainty over the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula—the largest dust source region of the globe. We use a data assimilation approach to constrain dust emission fluxes at a monthly resolution for 18 subregions. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite-derived aerosol optical depth is assimilated in a regional configuration of a general circulation model coupled to an aerosol model. We describe this data assimilation system and apply it for 1 year, resulting in a total mineral dust emissions flux estimate of 2900 Tg yr-1 over the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula for the year 2006. The analysis field of aerosol optical depth shows an improved fit relative to independent Aerosol Robotic Network measurements as compared to the model prior field.

  4. Can Dust Segregation Mimic a Cosmological Constant?

    CERN Document Server

    Simonsen, J T; Simonsen, Jakob T.; Hannestad, Steen

    1999-01-01

    Recent measurements of type Ia supernovae indicate that distant supernovae are substantially fainter than expected from the standard flat cold dark matter model. One possible explanation is that the energy density in our universe is in fact dominated by a cosmological constant. Another possible solution is that there are large amounts of grey dust in the intergalactic medium. Dust grains can be grey either because they are non-spherical or very large. We have numerically investigated whether grey dust can be emitted from high redshift galaxies without also emitting standard, reddening dust, which would have been visible in the spectra of high redshift objects. Our finding is that grain velocities are almost independent of ellipticity so that if greyness are due to the grains being elongated, it will not be possible to separate grey dust from ordinary dust. We also find that velocities are fairly independent of grain size, but we cannot rule out possible sputtering of small grains, so that large, grey dust gra...

  5. Arsenic immobilization of Teniente furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimura, R. [Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corp., Kawasaki (Japan); Tateiwa, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Almendares, C. [Centro de Investigacion Minera y Metalurgica, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, G. [CODELCO, Santiago (Chile). Division Ventanas

    2007-07-01

    A 5-year joint Japanese-Chilean project to modify the treatment of furnace dust from a converter in Chile producing harmful amounts of arsenic and lead was described. A pilot plant was constructed to evaluate the method's commercialization potential. Flue dust was recovered by a dust collector installed to capture suspended dust generated by the smelting furnace. Arsenic content was approximately 15 per cent. Ninety per cent of the arsenic was then liquidated to lixivia and dissolved by leaching flue dust with sulphuric acid. The leaching rate decreased when flue dust had a high content of residual sulfide ore. A flotation device was then incorporated in the treatment process in order to increase the copper recovery rate. A solvent recovery process was then adopted to recover the copper and zinc contained in the solution after the arsenic recovery. An economic evaluation of the process indicated that efforts should be made to improve the efficiency of the dust treatment method. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 10 figs.

  6. Galaxy Simulation with Dust Formation and Destruction

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyama, Shohei; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Todoroki, Keita; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isolated galaxy with a new treatment for dust formation and destruction. To this aim, we treat dust and metal production self-consistently with star formation and supernova feedback. For dust, we consider a simplified model of grain size distribution by representing the entire range of grain sizes with large and small grains. We include dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by supernova (SN) shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering. We find that the assumption of fixed dust-to-metal mass ratio becomes no longer valid when the galaxy is older than 0.2 Gyr, at which point the grain growth by accretion starts to contribute to the nonlinear rise of dust-to-gas ratio. As expected in our previous one-zone model, shattering triggers grain growth by accretion since it increases the total surface area of grains. Coagulation becomes significant when the galaxy age is greater than $\\sim$ 1 Gyr: a...

  7. Cold dust clumps in dynamically hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Hony, S; Panuzzo, P; Sauvage, M; Roman-Duval, J; Gordon, K D; Engelbracht, C; Israel, F P; Misselt, K; Okumura, K; Li, A; Bolatto, A; Skibba, R; Galliano, F; Matsuura, M; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Galametz, M; Hughes, A; Kawamura, A; Onishi, T; Paradis, D; Poglitsch, A; Reach, W T; Robitaille, T; Rubio, M; Tielens, A G G M

    2010-01-01

    We present clumps of dust emission from Herschel observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and their physical and statistical properties. We catalog cloud features seen in the dust emission from Herschel observations of the LMC, the Magellanic type irregular galaxy closest to the Milky Way, and compare these features with HI catalogs from the ATCA+Parkes HI survey. Using an automated cloud-finding algorithm, we identify clouds and clumps of dust emission and examine the cumulative mass distribution of the detected dust clouds. The mass of cold dust is determined from physical parameters that we derive by performing spectral energy distribution fits to 250, 350, and 500 micronm emission from SPIRE observations using DUSTY and GRASIL radiative transfer calculation with dust grain size distributions for graphite/silicate in low-metallicity extragalactic environments. The dust cloud mass spectrum follows a power law distribution with an exponent of gamma=-1.8 for clumps larger than 400 solar mass and is si...

  8. Electric Field Generation in Martian Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Marsin situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the MacroscopicTriboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric ModelingSystem (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system.Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  9. THE MEASUREMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF WOOD DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosario Proto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the woodworking industry presents many issues in terms of occupational health and safety. This study on exposure to wood dust could contribute to the realization of a prevention model in order to limit exposure to carcinogenic agents to the worker. The sampling methodology illustrated the analysis of dust emissions from the woodworking machinery in operation throughout the various processing cycles. The quantitative and qualitative assessment of exposure was performed using two different methodologies. The levels of wood dust were determined according to EN indications and sampling was conducted using IOM and Cyclon personal samplers. The qualitative research of wood dust was performed using an advanced laser air particle counter. This allowed the number of particles present to be counted in real time. The results obtained allowed for an accurate assessment of the quality of the dust emitted inside the workplace during the various processing phases. The study highlighted the distribution of air particles within the different size classes, the exact number of both thin and ultra-thin dusts, and confirmed the high concentration of thin dust particles which can be very harmful to humans.

  10. Dust Sources of Saturn's E Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, F.; Schmidt, J.; Albers, N.; Kempf, S.; Krivov, A. V.; Sremcevic, M.

    The recent detection of a dust plume at Enceladus' south pole sheds new light on the origin of the E ring of Saturn. The particles probably condense from gas vents escaping from a system of cracks covering the south pole that appears unusually hot in the Cassini infrared experiments. The main fraction of the E ring dust is created in these gas vents. Still, significant amounts of dust should originate from grains ejected by hypervelocity impacts of E ring particles (ERPs), or alternatively, of interplanetary dust grains (IDPs) on the Saturnian moons embedded in the E ring. We estimate the contributions of impactor -ejecta created dust at these various satellites in the ring, relative to the production rate of grains in the plume at Enceladus. Furthermore, we compare the amount of dust created by both projectile families - ERPs and IDPs - and predict that one can clearly discriminate between the ejecta raised by either projectile families in the data of the Cassini dust detector (CDA) collected at close flybys with the moons embedded in the E ring.

  11. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54-0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas.

  12. Surface Properties Associated With Dust Storm Plume's Point-Source Locations In The Border Region Of The US And Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiweiss, M. P.; DuBois, D. W.; Flores, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storms in the border region of the Southwest US and Northern Mexico are a serious problem for air quality (PM10 exceedances), health (Valley Fever is pandemic in the region) and transportation (road closures and deadly traffic accidents). In order to better understand the phenomena, we are attempting to identify critical characteristics of dust storm sources so that, possibly, one can perform more accurate predictions of events and, thus, mitigate some of the deleterious effects. Besides the emission mechanisms for dust storm production that are tied to atmospheric dynamics, one must know those locations whose source characteristics can be tied to dust production and, therefore, identify locations where a dust storm is eminent under favorable atmospheric dynamics. During the past 13 years, we have observed, on satellite imagery, more than 500 dust events in the region and are in the process of identifying the source regions for the dust plumes that make up an event. Where satellite imagery exists with high spatial resolution (less than or equal to 250m), dust 'plumes' appear to be made up of individual and merged plumes that are emitted from a 'point source' (smaller than the resolution of the imagery). In particular, we have observed events from the ASTER sensor whose spatial resolution is 15m as well as Landsat whose spatial resolution is 30m. Tying these source locations to surface properties such as NDVI, albedo, and soil properties (percent sand, silt, clay, and gravel; soil moisture; etc.) will identify regions with enhanced capability to produce a dust storm. This, along with atmospheric dynamics, will allow the forecast of dust events. The analysis of 10 events from the period 2004-2013, for which we have identified 1124 individual plumes, will be presented.

  13. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  14. Characterization of African dust over southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A.; Dee Tomasi, F.; Filippo, E.; Manno, D.; Perrone, M. R.; Serra, A.; Tafuro, A. M.; Tepore, A.

    2003-12-01

    Dust samples from rainfall residues have been collected in southeast Italy (40º 20' N, 18º 6' E) during dust outbreaks occurred from April to June 2002 to characterize morphological and elemental particle composition by different techniques, and investigate the dependence of particle properties on source regions. Four-day analytical back trajectories and satellite images have been used to infer source regions of the investigated dust samples. It has been found that the TOMS absorbing aerosol index was in the range 0.7-2.2 over Southern Italy when samples have been collected. The particle-size and -shape analysis by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has revealed either that the particle-diameter distribution was between 0.3 and 30 mm with median-diameter values between 1.7-2.4 mm, and that the particles were characterized by a roundness factor varying from 0.8 to 2.5. The infrared transmission spectra have allowed recognizing that all dust samples contained a significant amount of illite. The X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) measurements have revealed that the Al/Si ratio of the transported dust varies from 0.41 to 0.50, and that the Al/Si, Ca/Al, K/Ca, and Fe/Ca ratios differ according to source regions and therefore can be used as indicators of dust source regions. Indeed, it has been found that dust samples with larger Ca/Al and Si/Al ratios and lower Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios, have been collected along dust events with a source region in northwestern Sahara. On the contrary, the samples collected along dust events with the origin mainly in Chad, Niger, Algeria and Lybia were characterized by larger Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios.

  15. Characterization of African dust over southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blanco

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust samples from rainfall residues have been collected in southeast Italy (40º 20' N, 18º 6' E during dust outbreaks occurred from April to June 2002 to characterize morphological and elemental particle composition by different techniques, and investigate the dependence of particle properties on source regions. Four-day analytical back trajectories and satellite images have been used to infer source regions of the investigated dust samples. It has been found that the TOMS absorbing aerosol index was in the range 0.7-2.2 over Southern Italy when samples have been collected. The particle-size and -shape analysis by a scanning electron microscope (SEM has revealed either that the particle-diameter distribution was between 0.3 and 30 mm with median-diameter values between 1.7-2.4 mm, and that the particles were characterized by a roundness factor varying from 0.8 to 2.5. The infrared transmission spectra have allowed recognizing that all dust samples contained a significant amount of illite. The X-ray energy dispersive (EDX measurements have revealed that the Al/Si ratio of the transported dust varies from 0.41 to 0.50, and that the Al/Si, Ca/Al, K/Ca, and Fe/Ca ratios differ according to source regions and therefore can be used as indicators of dust source regions. Indeed, it has been found that dust samples with larger Ca/Al and Si/Al ratios and lower Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios, have been collected along dust events with a source region in northwestern Sahara. On the contrary, the samples collected along dust events with the origin mainly in Chad, Niger, Algeria and Lybia were characterized by larger Fe/Ca and K/Ca ratios.

  16. Seasonal dynamics of threshold friction velocity and dust emission in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xin; Sokolik, Irina N

    2015-02-27

    An improved model representation of mineral dust cycle is critical to reducing the uncertainty of dust-induced environmental and climatic impact. Here we present a mesoscale model study of the seasonal dust activity in the semiarid drylands of Central Asia, focusing on the effects of wind speed, soil moisture, surface roughness heterogeneity, and vegetation phenology on the threshold friction velocity (u*t ) and dust emission during the dust season of 1 March to 31 October 2001. The dust model WRF-Chem-DuMo allows us to examine the uncertainties in seasonal dust emissions due to the selection of dust emission scheme and soil grain size distribution data. To account for the vegetation effects on the u*t , we use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer monthly normalized difference vegetation index to derive the dynamic surface roughness parameters required by the physically based dust schemes of Marticorena and Bergametti (1995, hereinafter MB) and Shao et al. (1996, hereinafter Shao). We find the springtime u*t is strongly enhanced by the roughness effects of temperate steppe and desert ephemeral plants and, to less extent, the binding effects of increased soil moisture. The u*t decreases as the aboveground biomass dies back and soil moisture depletes during summer. The u*t dynamics determines the dust seasonality by causing more summer dust emission, despite a higher frequency of strong winds during spring. Due to the presence of more erodible materials in the saltation diameter range of 60-200 µm, the dry-sieved soil size distribution data lead to eight times more season-total dust emission than the soil texture data, but with minor differences in the temporal distribution. On the other hand, the Shao scheme produces almost the same amount of season-total dust emission as the MB scheme, but with a strong shift toward summer due to the strong sensitivity of the u*t to vegetation. By simply averaging the MB and Shao model experiments, we obtain a mean

  17. Convective dust clouds in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mitic, S; Ivlev, A V; Hoefner, H; Thoma, M H; Zhdanov, S; Morfill, G E

    2008-01-01

    The plasma is generated in a low frequency glow discharge within an elongated glass tube oriented vertically. The dust particles added to the plasma are confined above the heater and form counter-rotating clouds close to the tube centre. The shape of the clouds and the velocity field of the conveying dust particles are determined. The forces acting on the particles are calculated. It is shown that convection of the dust is affected by the convective gas motion which is triggered, in turn, by thermal creep of the gas along the inhomogeneously heated walls of the tube.

  18. Point discharge current measurements beneath dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Neakrase, Lynn D. V.; Anderson, John P.; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri A.

    2016-12-01

    We document for the first time observations of point discharge currents under dust devils using a novel compact sensor deployed in summer 2016 at the USDA-ARS Jornada Experimental Range in New Mexico, USA. A consistent signature is noted in about a dozen events seen over 40 days, with a positive current ramping up towards closest approach, switching to a decaying negative current as the devil recedes. The currents, induced on a small wire about 10 cm above the ground, correlate with dust devil intensity (pressure drop) and dust loading, and reached several hundred picoAmps.

  19. Dust Extinction in Compact Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, TH; Kwok, S.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust extinction on the departure from axisymmetry in the morphology of planetary nebulae (PNs) are investigated through a comparison of the radio free-free emission and hydrogen recombination line images. The dust extinction maps from five compact PNs are derived using high-resolution (̃0"1) Hα and radio maps of the HST and VLA. These extinction maps are then analyzed by an ellipsoidal shell ionization model including the effects of dust extinction to infer the nebulae's intrin...

  20. Radiation and Dynamics of Dust Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    2002-01-01

    Relativistically covariant form of equation of motion for arbitrarily shaped dust particle (neutral in charge) under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived -- emission, scattering and absorption of radiation is considered. The result is presented in the form of optical quantities used in optics of dust particles. The obtained equation of motion represents a generalization of the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) effect, which is standardly used in orbital evolution of dust particles in astrophysics. Simultaneous action of electromagnetic radiation and gravitational fields of the central body -- star -- on the motion of the particle is discussed.

  1. Biomonitoring of industrial dusts on animals. II. Bioindication on alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaváciková, Z

    1986-01-01

    Rats and rabbits were exposed through the respiratory system to industrial dusts (magnesite emissions, solid wastes from nickel refinery dump, cement emissions) at biomonitory stations or in experimental chamber. Following exposure the animals were killed, the alveolar macrophages isolated and acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase estimated in the isolated cells. The activity of both enzymes was enhanced in the exposed animals in all cases. The enhancement was dependent on the length of exposure and amount of inhaled particles.

  2. Can dust emission mechanisms be determined from field measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field observations are needed to develop and test theories on dust emission for use in dust modeling systems. The dust emission mechanism (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) as well as the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under sed...

  3. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by the...

  4. 30 CFR 33.32 - Determination of dust concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of dust concentration. 33.32... MINES Test Requirements § 33.32 Determination of dust concentration. (a) Concentrations of airborne dust... microscopic technique shall be employed in determining concentrations of dust in terms of millions of...

  5. Chirality of quartz. Fibrosis and tumour development in dust inoculated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, P

    1991-10-01

    Dextro (d) and laevo (l) forms of quartz dust was inoculated intranasally and subcutaneously into 2-month-old (C57 x BALB/c)F1 mice which were killed 18 months later. Both d and l quartz caused fibrosis, liver nodule formation and an enhanced incidence of lymphoma/leukemia. However, the tumour incidence was significantly higher in l than in d quartz dust-treated animals. It is concluded that in addition to effects clearly independent of chirality there is evidence that the biological response to nonidentical mirror images of solid crystals may differ.

  6. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasma with variable dust charge

    CERN Document Server

    Forozani, Gh

    2011-01-01

    In this article we are going to consider dust acoustic wave in dusty plasma whose constituents are inertial negative charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed electrons and non-thermal distributed ions with variable dust charge. Using reductive perturbation method, we have obtained Korteweg-de Veries (kdv) and modified kdv(mkdv) equations. A Sagdeev potential for the system and stability conditions for solitonic solution are also derived.

  7. Saharan dust transport and deposition towards the Tropical Northern Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schepanski

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of Saharan dust export towards the tropical North Atlantic using the regional dust emission, transport and deposition model LM-MUSCAT. Horizontal and vertical distribution of dust optical thickness, concentration, and dry and wet deposition rates are used to describe seasonality of dust export and deposition towards the eastern Atlantic for three exemplary months in different seasons. Deposition rates strongly depend on the vertical dust distribution, which differs with seasons. Furthermore the contribution of dust originating from the Bodélé Depression to Saharan dust over the Atlantic is investigated. A maximum contribution of Bodélé dust transported towards the Cape Verde Islands is evident in winter when the Bodélé source area is most active and dominant with regard activation frequency and dust emission. Limitations of using satellite retrievals to estimate dust deposition are highlighted.

  8. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES (Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  9. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory.

  10. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES ( Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  11. Seasonal Variations in Dust Loading within Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Casey; Moores, John; Smith, Christina L.; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    , this may be an indication of enhanced suspension of fine grain regolith occurring, coincidentally, at the tail end of a regional dust storm, causing LOS-Ext to be larger than column extinction.

  12. The Marriage of Gas and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. J.; Laibe, G.

    2015-10-01

    Dust-gas mixtures are the simplest example of a two fluid mixture. We show that when simulating such mixtures with particles or with particles coupled to grids a problem arises due to the need to resolve a very small length scale when the coupling is strong. Since this is occurs in the limit when the fluids are well coupled, we show how the dust-gas equations can be reformulated to describe a single fluid mixture. The equations are similar to the usual fluid equations supplemented by a diffusion equation for the dust-to-gas ratio or alternatively the dust fraction. This solves a number of numerical problems as well as making the physics clear.

  13. The marriage of gas and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Dust-gas mixtures are the simplest example of a two fluid mixture. We show that when simulating such mixtures with particles or with particles coupled to grids a problem arises due to the need to resolve a very small length scale when the coupling is strong. Since this is occurs in the limit when the fluids are well coupled, we show how the dust-gas equations can be reformulated to describe a single fluid mixture. The equations are similar to the usual fluid equations supplemented by a diffusion equation for the dust-to-gas ratio or alternatively the dust fraction. This solves a number of numerical problems as well as making the physics clear.

  14. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is, to a large extent, covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it has been produced by meteorite impacts since the...

  15. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Perez, C.; Miller, R. L.; Rodriguez, S.

    2012-12-01

    Models of the soil (''mineral'') dust aerosol cycle, embedded in climate and Earth system models, are essential tools for understanding the causal relationships and feedbacks between dust and climate. Many soil dust schemes in Earth system models use a simplified representation of soil dust aerosols, where the soil dust is distinguished by size bins or size distribution modes, with a globally uniform representation of the mineralogical composition of the particles. Although models with such a simplified assumption about the properties of soil dust particles have already significantly contributed to the understanding of the role of soil dust aerosols in climate, this is a limitation for a number of reasons: 1. The response of clouds and the large-scale circulation depends on the radiative properties like the single scattering albedo, which should vary with the mineral composition of the source region; 2. Chemical processes at the surface of the soil dust particles that form sulfate and nitrate coatings depend on the dust mineral composition; 3. The availability of soil dust minerals as cloud condensation nuclei depends on their hygroscopicity, which in turn depends on the mineral composition; 4. Fertilization of phytoplankton with soluble iron, a process that influences ocean carbon uptake, depends upon mineral types. We present a new version of the soil dust scheme in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE, which takes into account the mineral composition of the soil dust particles. Soil dust aerosols are represented as a mixture of externally and internally mixed minerals, such as Illite, Kaolinite, Smectite, Calcite, Iron(hydr)oxide, Quartz, Feldspar, and Gypsum, as well as aggregates between Iron(hydr)oxide and each of the minerals. We test two approaches to constrain the mineral composition of the soil dust particles against data from measurements published in literature as well as measurements from Izaña (Tenerife). The comparison between modeled and measured data

  16. UV extinction properties of carina nebular dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Derck

    1993-01-01

    I have performed an analysis of the UV extinction by dust along the line of sight to the young open cluster Tr 16. The observed curves are parameterized in order to extract quantitative information about the structure of the curves. Furthermore, by constructing differential extinction curves, obtained by differencing curves for stars which lie within a few arc seconds of each other on the sky, I was able to obtain a curve which is free of the effects of foreground extinction, and represents the extinction by the dust in the Tr 16 molecular cloud. I then show that this curve is nearly identical to one due to dust in the Orion molecular cloud. This result shows that dust in the Carina arm exhibits the same behavior as that in the local arm.

  17. High-Fidelity Lunar Dust Simulant Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The severity of the lunar dust problems encountered during the Apollo missions were consistently underestimated by ground tests, illustrating the need to develop...

  18. Global coherence of dust density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  19. Planetary science: Cometary dust under the microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2016-09-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft made history by successfully orbiting a comet. Data from the craft now reveal the structure of the comet's dust particles, shedding light on the processes that form planetary systems. See Letter p.73

  20. From Dust Bowl to Conservation Tillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Dale

    1992-01-01

    Examines the causes of the dust bowl and recent changes in tillage practices in Oklahoma and other prairie states that conserve soil. Briefly discusses the success of programs that target school children for conservation education. (LZ)

  1. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  2. Regenerable Lunar Airborne Dust Filter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Effective methods are needed to control pervasive Lunar Dust within spacecraft and surface habitations. Once inside, airborne transmission is the primary mode of...

  3. Waste-moulding dusts modified with polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baliński

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article described problems of the influence of advanced oxidizing process, the supersonic tooling of waste - moulding dusts and their modification with polyelectrolytes, on the technological proprieties of the moulding sands prepared with their participation.Physicochemical characterization of the used polyelectrolytes PSS (poli 4-styreno sodium sulfonate and PEI (poli etyleno imine, in theaspect of their modificatory influences on the waste - moulding dust, was described. Defined the influence of adsorption proprieties ofthe polyelectrolyte PEI on the surface of small parts of the waste - dust, on technological proprieties of the sandmix. Ascertained theprofitable influence of this electrolyte on mechanical proprieties of the moulding sands, that is to say the increase in value of thecompression strength (about 10% and tensile strenght (about 13%, comparatively to analogous proprieties of the moulding sandsprepared with the participation of the not modified waste- dust.

  4. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels. This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  5. Organic matter in comets and cometary dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Jordi

    2005-03-01

    Comets are primitive conglomerates of the solar system containing a mixture of frozen gases, refractory grains, and carbonaceous particles rich in biogenic elements. The dramatic display of comets is mostly caused by a cloud of micrometer-sized dust particles that leave the comet nucleus when frozen gases sublimate as they approach the Sun. Analyses of cometary dust captured in the stratosphere together with data obtained from space missions to comets have revealed the presence of a great variety of organic molecules. Since substantial amounts of cometary dust were gently deposited on Earth, their organic content could have played a major role in prebiotic processes prior to the appearance of microorganisms. This review discusses the description and implications for life of the organic content of comets and cometary dust.

  6. Shock Heated Dust in Young Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R.; Strom, R. G.; van der Laan, H.; Greidanus, H.

    Infrared emission in young supernova remnants is interpreted as coming from shock-heated dust. Using models and data from other wavelength regimes, many physical parameters of the remnants can accurately be derived.

  7. Alpha self-absorption in monazite dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, K W

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the self-absorption effects in monazite of alpha particles of the 232Th decay series. Samples of six size fractions of monazite were deposited on filters at different dust concentrations and then the gross alpha activity determined. Self-absorption effects were negligible in monazite particles up to 8 microns diameter provided dust concentrations were less than 1 mg cm-2. Significant self-absorption effects occurred for both larger particle sizes and higher dust loadings. As reported AMAD values in the mineral sands industry range up to 15 microns, which is equivalent to an actual mean size of 8 microns diameter monazite particle, minimal self-absorption occurs in samples collected in air monitoring programs conducted in the industry provided that dust concentrations on the filters are less than 1 mg cm-2.

  8. Nanotube Electrodes for Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dust mitigation is critical to the survivability of vehicle and infrastructure components and systems and to the safety of astronauts during EVAs and planetary...

  9. Can dust coagulation trigger streaming instability?

    CERN Document Server

    Drazkowska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Streaming instability can be a very efficient way of overcoming growth and drift barriers to planetesimal formation. However, it was shown that strong clumping, which leads to planetesimal formation, requires a considerable number of large grains. State-of-the-art streaming instability models do not take into account realistic size distributions resulting from the collisional evolution of dust. We investigate whether a sufficient quantity of large aggregates can be produced by sticking and what the interplay of dust coagulation and planetesimal formation is. We develop a semi-analytical prescription of planetesimal formation by streaming instability and implement it in our dust coagulation code based on the Monte Carlo algorithm with the representative particles approach. We find that planetesimal formation by streaming instability may preferentially work outside the snow line, where sticky icy aggregates are present. The efficiency of the process depends strongly on local dust abundance and radial pressure g...

  10. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-02-01

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models.

  11. Nanotube Electrodes for Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dust mitigation is critical to the survivability of vehicle and infrastructure components and systems and to the safety of astronauts during EVAs and planetary...

  12. Compression Behaviour of Porous Dust Agglomerates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    The early planetesimal growth proceeds through a sequence of sticking collisions of dust agglomerates. Very uncertain is still the relative velocity regime in which growth rather than destruction can take place. The outcome of a collision depends on the bulk properties of the porous dust agglomerates. Continuum models of dust agglomerates require a set of material parameters that are often difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. Here, we aim at determining those parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our goal is to improveon the existing model that describe the interaction of individual monomers. We use a molecular dynamics approach featuring a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. The model includes normal forces, rolling, twisting and sliding between the dust grains. We present a new treatment of wall-particle interaction that allows us to perform customized simulations that directly correspond to laboratory experiments. We find that the existing i...

  13. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels. This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  14. Chemical composition of interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    Study of chemical evolution of interstellar medium is well recognized to be a challenging task. Interstellar medium (ISM) is a rich reservoir of complex molecules. So far, around 180 gas phase molecules and around 20 molecular species on the interstellar dust have been detected in various regions of ISM, especially in regions of star formation. In last decade, it was well established that gas phase reactions alone cannot explain molecular abundances in ISM. Chemical reactions which occur on interstellar dust grains are essential to explain formation of several molecules especially hydrogenated species including simplest and most abundant molecule H2. Interstellar grains provide surface for accreted species to meet and react. Therefore, an understanding of formation of molecules on grain surfaces is of prime importance. We concentrate mainly on water, methanol, carbon dioxide, which constitute nearly 90% of the grain mantle. These molecules are detected on grain surface due to their strong absorption bands arising out of multiple vibrational modes. Water is the most abundant species (with a surface coverage >60% ) on a grain in dense interstellar medium. CO2 is second most abundant molecule in interstellar medium with an abundance of around 20% with respect to H2O. However, this can vary from cloud to cloud. In clouds like W 33A it could be even less than 5% of water abundance. The next most abundant molecule is CO, which is well studied ice with an abundance varying between 2%\\ to 15% of water. Methanol (CH3OH) is also very abundant having abundance 2% to 30% of water. Measurement of water deuterium fractionation is a relevant tool for understanding mechanisms of water formation and evolution from prestellar phase to formation of planets and comets. We are also considering deuterated species in our simulation. We use Monte Carlo method (considering multilayer regime) to mimic the exact scenario. We study chemical evolution of interstellar grain mantle by varying

  15. The Dust Accelerator Facility at CCLDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, A. J.; Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Leblanc, S.; Munsat, T.; Northway, P.; Robertson, S. H.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.; Wagner, M.; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies

    2010-12-01

    At the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Science (CCLDAS) we are in the process of assembling a 3MV macroscopic (~1um) dust particle accelerator. The acceleration unit is being made by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). The accelerator consists of a pelletron generator and potential rings encased in an enclosure held at 6 atm of SF6. A pulsed dust source is used to inject particles into the accelerator. Here we describe advancements in dust accelerator technology at CCLDAS to allow more functionality and ease of use, focusing primarily on dust source control, and the capability to select a precise range in dust mass and velocity. Previously, the dust source was controlled by long plastic rods turning potentiometers inside the SF6 environment providing little to no feedback and repeatability. We describe a fiber optic control system that allows full control of the pulse characteristics being sent to the dust source using a LabVIEW control program to increase usability. An electrostatic Einzel lens is being designed using the ion-optics code SIMION to determine the properties of the electrodes needed for the optimum focusing of the dust beam. Our simulations studies indicate that the dust beam can be directed into a 0.5mm diameter spot. Our planned experiments require a high degree of control over particles size, speed, charge and other characteristics. In order to ensure that only particles of the desired characteristics are allowed to pass into the target chamber, two deflection plates are used to eliminate unwanted particles from the beam. Further simulations are being done to determine the possibility of bending the beamline to allow active selection of particles. The current design of the selection unit uses nuclear accelerator techniques to determine the velocity and charge of each particle and digital timing and logic to choose particles that will be allowed to pass. This requires a high signal to noise ratio due to the need for a well

  16. Evolution of grain size distribution in high-redshift dusty quasars: Integrating large amounts of dust and unusual extinction curves

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T

    2014-01-01

    The discoveries of huge amounts of dust and unusual extinction curves in high-redshift quasars (z > 4) cast challenging issues on the origin and properties of dust in the early universe. In this Letter, we investigate the evolutions of dust content and extinction curve in a high-z quasar, based on the dust evolution model taking account of grain size distribution. First, we show that the Milky-Way extinction curve is reproduced by introducing a moderate fraction (~0.2) of dense molecular-cloud phases in the interstellar medium for a graphite-silicate dust model. Then we show that the peculier extinction curves in high-z quasars can be explained by taking a much higher molecular-cloud fraction (>0.5), which leads to more efficient grain growth and coagulation, and by assuming amorphous carbon instead of graphite. The large dust content in high-z quasar hosts is also found to be a natural consequence of the enhanced dust growth. These results indicate that grain growth and coagulation in molecular clouds are ke...

  17. LADEE Search for a Dust Exosphere: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, D. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Elphic, R.

    2014-01-01

    The LADEE search for exospheric dust is strongly motivated by putative detections of forward-scattered sunlight from exospheric dust grains which were observed during the Apollo era. This dust population, if it exists, has been associated with charging and transport of dust near the terminators. It is likely that the concentration of these dust grains is governed by a saltation mechanism originated by micrometeoroid impacts, which are the source of the more tenuous ejecta cloud.

  18. Clearing the Martian air - The troubled history of dust storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L. J.

    1984-03-01

    This note is an attempt to resolve some misconceptions regarding the historical record of the Martian atmospheric phenomena referred to as 'dust storms,' but often called yellow storms, yellow clouds, planetwide dust storms, global dust storms, great dust storms, etc. The known frequency of planet-encircling storms will be specifically addressed. Better knowledge of the sizes, frequencies, and locations of Martian dust storms is needed for atmospheric modeling and for future mission planning.

  19. Allergy to house dust mites and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián, Evelyn; Díaz, Ana María

    2004-03-01

    House dust mites have been shown to be important sources of indoor allergens associated with asthma and other allergic conditions. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects millions of people worldwide, and numerous scientific studies have shown that the prevalence of asthma is increasing. The most common dust mite species around the world include Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), Euroglyphus maynei (Em) and Blomia tropicalis (Bt). Over the past three decades, many important allergens from these species have been identified and characterized at the molecular level. The biological function of several house dust mite allergens has been elucidated, with many of them showing enzymatic activity. However, Bt allergens remain the least studied, even though this mite is very common in tropical and subtropical regions of the world, including Puerto Rico. Therefore, it is very important to include Bt in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for house dust mite induced allergy and asthma, particularly in areas where Bt exposure and sensitization is high. Recombinant DNA technology, as well as other molecular biology and immunological techniques, have played a fundamental role in advances towards a better understanding of the biology of house dust mites and their role in allergic diseases. This kind of study also contributes to the understanding of the complex immunologic mechanisms involved in allergic reactions. The development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches depends on the continuity of research of house dust mite allergens. The objectives of this review are to describe the most important aspects of house dust mite allergy and to acquaint the scientific community with the latest findings pertaining to house dust mite allergens, particularly those derived from Bt.

  20. Waste and dust utilisation in shaft furnaces

    OpenAIRE

    Senk, D.; Babich, A.; Gudenau, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Wastes and dusts from steel industry, non-ferrous metallurgy and other branches can be utilized e.g. in agglomeration processes (sintering, pelletizing or briquetting) and by injection into shaft furnaces. This paper deals with the second way. Combustion and reduction behaviour of iron- and carbon-rich metallurgical dusts and sludges containing lead, zinc and alkali as well as other wastes with and without pulverized coal (PC) has been studied when injecting into shaft furnaces. Following sha...

  1. Cosmic Dust in the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The past century of interstellar dust has brought us from first ignoring it to finding that it plays an important role in the evolution of galaxies. Current observational results in our galaxy provide a complex physical and chemical evolutionary picture of interstellar dust starting with the formation of small refractory particles in stellar atmospheres to their modification in diffuse and molecular clouds and ultimately to their contribution to star forming regions. Observations of the prope...

  2. Cotton dust-mediated lung epithelial injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayars, G H; Altman, L C; O'Neil, C E; Butcher, B T; Chi, E Y

    1986-01-01

    To determine if constituents of cotton plants might play a role in byssinosis by injuring pulmonary epithelium, we added extracts of cotton dust, green bract, and field-dried bract to human A549 and rat type II pneumocytes. Injury was measured as pneumocyte lysis and detachment, and inhibition of protein synthesis. Extracts of cotton dust and field-dried bract produced significant dose- and time-dependent lysis and detachment of both target cells, while green bract extract was less damaging. ...

  3. Parameterization of cloud glaciation by atmospheric dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Madonna, Fabio; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko

    2016-04-01

    The exponential growth of research interest on ice nucleation (IN) is motivated, inter alias, by needs to improve generally unsatisfactory representation of cold cloud formation in atmospheric models, and therefore to increase the accuracy of weather and climate predictions, including better forecasting of precipitation. Research shows that mineral dust significantly contributes to cloud ice nucleation. Samples of residual particles in cloud ice crystals collected by aircraft measurements performed in the upper tropopause of regions distant from desert sources indicate that dust particles dominate over other known ice nuclei such as soot and biological particles. In the nucleation process, dust chemical aging had minor effects. The observational evidence on IN processes has substantially improved over the last decade and clearly shows that there is a significant correlation between IN concentrations and the concentrations of coarser aerosol at a given temperature and moisture. Most recently, due to recognition of the dominant role of dust as ice nuclei, parameterizations for immersion and deposition icing specifically due to dust have been developed. Based on these achievements, we have developed a real-time forecasting coupled atmosphere-dust modelling system capable to operationally predict occurrence of cold clouds generated by dust. We have been thoroughly validated model simulations against available remote sensing observations. We have used the CNR-IMAA Potenza lidar and cloud radar observations to explore the model capability to represent vertical features of the cloud and aerosol vertical profiles. We also utilized the MSG-SEVIRI and MODIS satellite data to examine the accuracy of the simulated horizontal distribution of cold clouds. Based on the obtained encouraging verification scores, operational experimental prediction of ice clouds nucleated by dust has been introduced in the Serbian Hydrometeorological Service as a public available product.

  4. Carbonaceous Components in the Comet Halley Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary grains containing large amounts of carbon and/or organic matter (CHON) were discovered by in situ measurements of comet Halley dust composition during VEGA and GIOTTO flyby missions. In this paper, we report the classification of these cometary, grains by means of cluster analysis, discuss the resulting compositional groups, and compare them with substances observed or hypothesized in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and the interstellar medium. Grains dominated by carbon and/or organic matter (CHON grains) represent approx. 22% of the total population of measured cometary dust particles. They, usually contain a minor abundance of rock-forming elements as well. Grains having organic material are relatively more abundant in the vicinity of the nucleus than in the outer regions of the coma, which suggests decomposition of the organics in the coma environment. The majority of comet Halley organic particles are multicomponent mixtures of carbon phases and organic compounds. Possibly, the cometary CHON grains may be related to kerogen material of an interstellar origin in carbonaceous meteorites. Pure carbon grains, hydrocarbons and polymers of cyanopolyynes, and multi-carbon monoxides are present in cometary dust as compositionally simple and distinctive components among a variety of others. There is no clear evidence of significant presence of pure formaldehyde or HCN polymers in Halley dust particles. The diversity of types of cometary organic compounds is consistent with the inter-stellar dust model of comets and probably reflects differences in composition of precursor dust. Preservation of this heterogeneity among submicron particles suggest the gentle formation of cometary, nucleus by aggregation of interstellar dust in the protosolar nebula without complete mixing or chemical homogenization at the submicron level.

  5. Lead in Chinese villager house dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan

    2016-04-01

    House dust has been recognized as an important contributor to children's blood Pb. Here we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate geographical variation of Pb in Chinese villager house dust. The concentrations of Pb in 477 house dust samples collected from twenty eight areas throughout China varied from 12 to 2510 mg/kg, with geometric mean and median concentration of 54 mg/kg and 42 mg/kg, respectively. The median Pb concentrations in different geographical areas ranged from 16 (Zhangjiakou, Hebei) to 195 mg/kg (Loudi, Hunan). The influences of outdoor soil Pb concentrations, dates of construction, house decorative materials, heating types, and site specific pollution on Pb concentrations in house dust were evaluated. No correlations were found between the house dust Pb concentrations and the age of houses, as well as house decorative materials. Whereas outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution may be potential Pb sources. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that Pb bearing particles appeared as cylindrical, flaky and irregular aggregates with the particle size ranging from about 10 to 800 μm. The energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) suggested that Pb in the dust particles may be associated with calcium compounds. But the major fraction of Pb in the household dust samples was found to be strongly bound to Fe-Mn oxide phases (37%) while Pb present in minor fractions individually making up between 14 and 18% was characterized in falling order as residual, carbonate, organic/sulphide and exchangeable fractions by the sequential extraction method applied. Bioaccessible Pb making up an average proportion of 53% in the household dusts was significantly correlated to the Fe-Mn oxide phases of Pb.

  6. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Q.

    2015-09-02

    © Author(s) 2015. The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (∼10 % of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan

  7. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.; Wei, J.; Yang, Z.-L.; Pu, B.; Huang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (~10 % of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan Plateau. This study

  8. Albedo changes on Vatnajökull associated with dust events, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragosics, Monika; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Pálsson, Finnur

    2015-04-01

    Deposition of aerosols on the glacier surface changes the albedo, thus enhances melt rates and affects the glacier mass balance. There are extensive sources for particles in Iceland; volcanic sandy deserts and glacial outwash plains cover more than 22% of the country. (Arnalds et al., 2001) Particles from these sources get airborne and transported on to the ice caps in several dust storms in most years, causing changes in albedo and surface energy balance. Long-term observations of atmospheric dust over the last 60 years show a high frequency of dust events in Iceland, with more than 34 dust days per year (Dagsson-Waldhauserova et al., 2013). Volcanoes are sources of large quantities of particles during an eruption, and for some years (even decades or centuries) after, due to re-suspension. Volcanic eruptions are frequent in Iceland, often with subsequent deposition of volcanic tephra on glaciers. The most recent are the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn in 2010 and 2011. The evolution of surface albedo is measured with in-situ automatic weather stations (AWS), during summer, on a few locations on icelandic ice-caps. To detect dust events on Brúarjökull outlet (NE Vatnajökull ice-cap), drops in albedo are compared with energy balance results from the measured values of the AWSs, temperature, dust storm occurrence (recorded at manned weather stations in the lowlands), and visible changes on satellite observations (MODIS images) as in-situ samples. A dust deposition event is detected by comparing the MODIS images of 20 May and 28 May 2012 and explains a drop in albedo on 21 May, lasting to June 4 from 0.86 to 0.51. The in-situ samples are: snow surface samples from Vatnajökull with impurities collected in October 2013, representing the deposition of one summer over the ice cap; and two firn cores of about 8 meters depth from Brúarjökull, taken in June 2014. The firn cores were analysed to detect dust layers and to measure mass, volume, density of

  9. Lunar Dust Separation for Toxicology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalex, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, crewmembers were briefly exposed to dust in the lunar module, brought in after extravehicular activity. When the lunar ascent module returned to micro-gravity, the dust that had settled on the floor now floated into the air, causing eye discomfort and occasional respiratory symptoms. Because our goal is to set an exposure standard for 6 months of episodic exposure to lunar dust for crew on the lunar surface, these brief exposures of a few days are not conclusive. Based on experience with industrial minerals such as sandblasting quartz, an exposure of several months may cause serious damage, while a short exposure may cause none. The detailed characteristics of sub-micrometer lunar dust are only poorly known, and this is the size range of particles that are of greatest concern. We have developed a method for extracting respirable dust (<2.5 micron) from Apollo lunar soils. This method meets stringent requirements that the soil must be kept dry, exposed only to pure nitrogen, and must conserve and recover the maximum amount of both respirable dust and coarser soil. In addition, we have developed a method for grinding coarser lunar soil to produce sufficient respirable soil for animal toxicity testing while preserving the freshly exposed grain surfaces in a pristine state.

  10. The Dust Management Project: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting longterm operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, approach, accomplishments, summary of deliverables, and lessons learned are presented.

  11. The Cosmic Dust Experiment of AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A.; James, D.; Horanyi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Cosmic Dust Experiment (CDE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission is a dust impact experiment designed to monitor the variability of the cosmic dust in ux. The instrument consists of fourteen permanently polarized thin plastic film sensors that generate an electrical signal when an impacting dust particle penetrates them. The total surface area is about 0.1 square meters and the detection threshold is about a micron in particle radius. The variability of these small grains is assumed to follow the variability of the dominant 100 micron radius particles, hence the measured flux can be used in correlation studies with various Noctilucent Cloud (NLC) activity indexes. CDE has been observing the cosmic dust influx since June 2007. In this talk, we present the first nine months of reduced data, focusing on the observed temporal and spatial variability of the dust influx. Data collected after February 2008 show increased levels of background noise and preliminary work on reducing this data will also be presented.

  12. Interstellar Dust Inside and Outside the Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Harald

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1990s, after its Jupiter flyby, the Ulysses spacecraft identified interstellar dust in the solar system. Since then the in-situ dust detector on board Ulysses continuously monitored interstellar grains with masses up to 10e-13 kg, penetrating deep into the solar system. While Ulysses measured the interstellar dust stream at high ecliptic latitudes between 3 and 5 AU, interstellar impactors were also measured with the in-situ dust detectors on board Cassini, Galileo and Helios, covering a heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 3 AU in the ecliptic plane. The interstellar dust stream in the inner solar system is altered by the solar radiation pressure force, gravitational focussing and interaction of charged grains with the time varying interplanetary magnetic field. The grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Our in-situ measurements imply the existence of a population of 'big' interstellar grains (up to 10e-13 kg) and a gas-to-dust-mass ratio i...

  13. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bocchio, M; Schneider, R; Bianchi, S; Limongi, M; Chieffi, A

    2016-01-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of AGB stars. However, nowadays there is increasing evidence for dust formation in SNe. In order to establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust it is important to know what is the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. With this aim, we have developed a new code, GRASH_Rev, that allows to follow the dynamics of dust grains in the shocked SN ejecta and to compute the time evolution of the mass, composition and size distribution of the grains. We consider four well studied SNe in the Milky Way and LMC: SN 1987a, Cas A, the Crab Nebula, and N49. For all the simulated models, we find good agreement with observations. Our study suggests that SN 1987A is too young for the reverse shock to have affected the dust mass. Conversely, in the other three SNe, the reverse shock has already destroyed between 10 and 40% of the...

  14. Abundant dust found in intergalactic space

    CERN Document Server

    Xilouris, E; Alikakos, J; Xilouris, K; Boumis, P; Goudis, C

    2006-01-01

    Galactic dust constitutes approximately half of the elements more massive than helium produced in stellar nucleosynthesis. Notwithstanding the formation of dust grains in the dense, cool atmospheres of late-type stars, there still remain huge uncertainties concerning the origin and fate of galactic stardust. In this paper, we identify the intergalactic medium (i.e. the region between gravitationally-bound galaxies) as a major sink for galactic dust. We discover a systematic shift in the colour of background galaxies viewed through the intergalactic medium of the nearby M81 group. This reddening coincides with atomic, neutral gas previously detected between the group members. The dust-to-HI mass ratio is high (1/20) compared to that of the solar neighborhood (1/120) suggesting that the dust originates from the centre of one or more of the galaxies in the group. Indeed, M82, which is known to be ejecting dust and gas in a starburst-driven superwind, is cited as the probable main source.

  15. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W. [and others

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  16. Radial transport of dust in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, E I; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations which detect dust at large galactocentric distances in the disks of spiral galaxies, we propose a mechanism of outward radial transport of dust by spiral stellar density waves. We consider spiral galaxies in which most of dust formation is localized inside the corotation radius. We show that in the disks of such spiral galaxies, the dust grains can travel over radial distances that exceed the corotation radius by roughly 25%. A fraction of the dust grains can be trapped on kidney-shaped stable orbits between the stellar spiral arms and thus can escape the destructive effect of supernova explosions. These grains form diffuse dusty spiral arms, which stretch 4-5 kpc from the sites of active star formation. About 10% of dust by mass injected inside corotation, can be transported over radial distances 3-4 kpc during approximately 1.0 Gyr. This is roughly an order of magnitude more efficient than can be provided by the turbulent motions.

  17. DIFFUSE EXTRAPLANAR DUST IN NGC 891

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seon, Kwang-il; Shinn, Jong-ho; Kim, Il-joong [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Witt, Adolf N., E-mail: kiseon@kasi.re.kr [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We report the detection of vertically extended far-ultraviolet and near-UV emissions in an edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891, which we interpret as being due to dust-scattered starlight. Three-dimensional radiative transfer models are used to investigate the content of the extraplanar dust that is required to explain the UV emission. The UV halos are well reproduced by a radiative transfer model with two exponential dust disks, one with a scale height of ≈0.2-0.25 kpc and the other with a scale height of ≈1.2-2.0 kpc. The central face-on optical depth of the geometrically thick disk is found to be τ{sub B}{sup thick}≈0.3--0.5 at the B band. The results indicate that the dust mass at |z| > 2 kpc is ≈3%-5% of the total dust mass, which is in good accordance with the recent Herschel submillimeter observation. Our results, together with the recent discovery of the UV halos in other edge-on galaxies, suggest the widespread existence of a geometrically thick dust layer above the galactic plane in spirals.

  18. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bocchio, M; Schneider, R; Bianchi, S; Limongi, M; Chieffi, A

    2016-01-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. We have developed a new code (GRASH\\_Rev) which follows the newly-formed dust evolution throughout the supernova explosion until the merging of the forward shock with the circumstellar ISM. We have considered four well studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN1987A, CasA, the Crab Nebula, and N49. For all the simulated models, we find good agreement with observations and estimate that between 1 and 8$\\%$ of the observed mass will survive, leading to a SN dust production rate of $(3.9 \\pm 3.7) \\times 10^{-4}$ M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ in the Milky Way. This value i...

  19. Dust Formation and Survival in Supernova Ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, S

    2007-01-01

    The presence of dust at high redshift requires efficient condensation of grains in SN ejecta, in accordance with current theoretical models. Yet, observations of the few well studied SNe and SN remnants imply condensation efficiencies which are about two orders of magnitude smaller. Motivated by this tension, we have (i) revisited the model of Todini & Ferrara (2001) for dust formation in the ejecta of core collapse SNe and (ii) followed, for the first time, the evolution of newly condensed grains from the time of formation to their survival - through the passage of the reverse shock - in the SN remnant. We find that 0.1 - 0.6 M_sun of dust form in the ejecta of 12 - 40 M_sun stellar progenitors. Depending on the density of the surrounding ISM, between 2-20% of the initial dust mass survives the passage of the reverse shock, on time-scales of about 4-8 x 10^4 yr from the stellar explosion. Sputtering by the hot gas induces a shift of the dust size distribution towards smaller grains. The resulting dust ex...

  20. Modeling Respiratory Toxicity of Authentic Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Patricia A.; James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing

    2010-01-01

    The lunar expeditions of the Apollo operations from the 60 s and early 70 s have generated awareness about lunar dust exposures and their implication towards future lunar explorations. Critical analyses on the reports from the Apollo crew members suggest that lunar dust is a mild respiratory and ocular irritant. Currently, NASA s space toxicology group is functioning with the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to investigate and examine toxic effects to the respiratory system of rats in order to establish permissible exposure levels (PELs) for human exposure to lunar dust. In collaboration with the space toxicology group, LADTAG and NIOSH the goal of the present research is to analyze dose-response curves from rat exposures seven and twenty-eight days after intrapharyngeal instillations, and model the response using BenchMark Dose Software (BMDS) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Via this analysis, the relative toxicities of three types of Apollo 14 lunar dust samples and two control dust samples, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quartz will be determined. This will be executed for several toxicity endpoints such as cell counts and biochemical markers in bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from the rats.

  1. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  2. Dust deposition in an oligotrophic marine environment: impact on the carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By bringing new nutrients and particles to the surface ocean, atmospheric deposition impacts biogeochemical cycles. The extent to which those changes are modifying the carbon balance in oligotrophic environments such as the Mediterranean Sea that receives important Saharan dust fluxes is unknown. DUNE project provides the first attempt to evaluate the changes induced in the carbon budget of an oligotrophic system after simulated Saharan dust wet and dry deposition events. Here we report the results for the 3 distinct artificial dust seeding experiments in large mesocosms that were conducted in the oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea in summer 2008 and 2010. Simultaneous measurements of the metabolic rates (C fixation, C respiration in the water column have shown that the dust deposition did not change drastically the metabolic balance as the tested waters remained net heterotroph (i.e. net primary production to bacteria respiration ratio < 1 and in some cases the net heterotrophy was even enhanced by the dust deposition. Considering the different terms of the carbon budget, we estimate that it was balanced with a dissolved organic carbon (DOC consumption of at least 10% of the initial stock. This corresponds to a fraction of the DOC stock of the surface mixed layer that consequently will not be exported during the winter mixing. Although heterotrophic bacteria were found to be the key players in the response to dust deposition, net primary production increased about twice in case of simulated wet deposition (that includes anthropogenic nitrogen and a small fraction of particulate organic carbon was still exported. Our estimated carbon budgets are an important step forward in the way we understand dust deposition and associated impacts on the oceanic cycles. They are providing knowledge about the key processes (i.e. bacteria respiration, aggregation that need to be considered for an integration of atmospheric deposition in marine

  3. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global s