WorldWideScience

Sample records for duke university medical

  1. Institutional Strategies: Duke University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Phyllis

    1982-01-01

    The planning process, objectives, and procedures used by Duke's chancellor during the retrenchment process are summarized. The emphasis was placed on enhancing the university's strengths while reducing costs and on enlisting faculty support and assistance in the change process. (MSE)

  2. Duke University's Quality Appearance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The Grounds Services Unit at Duke University has implemented a new program that involves a process of self evaluation, which embraces the concept of perpetual and continuous improvement. The Quality Appearance Program (QAP) embellishes and expands upon the Quality Assurance Program concept, but with a twist to grounds management improvement…

  3. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven

  4. When the library is located in prime real estate: a case study on the loss of space from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Patricia L

    2010-01-01

    The Duke University Medical Center Library and Archives is located in the heart of the Duke Medicine campus, surrounded by Duke Hospital, ambulatory clinics, and numerous research facilities. Its location is considered prime real estate, given its adjacency to patient care, research, and educational activities. In 2005, the Duke University Library Space Planning Committee had recommended creating a learning center in the library that would support a variety of educational activities. However, the health system needed to convert the library's top floor into office space to make way for expansion of the hospital and cancer center. The library had only five months to plan the storage and consolidation of its journal and book collections, while working with the facilities design office and architect on the replacement of key user spaces on the top floor. Library staff worked together to develop plans for storing, weeding, and consolidating the collections and provided input into renovation plans for users spaces on its mezzanine level. The library lost 15,238 square feet (29%) of its net assignable square footage and a total of 16,897 (30%) gross square feet. This included 50% of the total space allotted to collections and over 15% of user spaces. The top-floor space now houses offices for Duke Medicine oncology faculty and staff. By storing a large portion of its collection off-site, the library was able to remove more stacks on the remaining stack level and convert them to user spaces, a long-term goal for the library. Additional space on the mezzanine level had to be converted to replace lost study and conference room spaces. While this project did not match the recommended space plans for the library, it underscored the need for the library to think creatively about the future of its facility and to work toward a more cohesive master plan.

  5. Duke University high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  6. Achieving Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging II: proceedings from the Second American College of Cardiology -- Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Chen, Jersey; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Hundley, W Gregory; Masoudi, Frederick; Patel, Manesh R; Peterson, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Despite rapid technologic advances and sustained growth, less attention has been focused on quality in imaging than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met in the second Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging Think Tank. The participants endorsed the previous consensus definition of quality in imaging and proposed quality measures. Additional areas of needed effort included data standardization and structured reporting, appropriateness criteria, imaging registries, laboratory accreditation, partnership development, and imaging research. The second American College of Cardiology-Duke University Think Tank continued the process of the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality improvement initiatives for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  7. The Senior Mentor Program at Duke University School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Mitchell T.

    2006-01-01

    The Duke University School of Medicine has a unique curriculum in which students complete basic sciences in year 1 and clinical clerkships in year 2, making way for an entire year of independent study in year 3. Into this compact curriculum, education in geriatrics has been successfully introduced through focused exercises and activities…

  8. Duke University: Licensing and Real Estate Joint Ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1984-01-01

    Joint ventures undertaken by Duke University with industry are reported that illustrate the imaginative arrangements and economic and otherwise advantageous structures possible in co-ventures. They include patent and trademark licensing, travel agency commissions, a racquetball and health club, a hotel, and an office building. (MSE)

  9. Duke University: Licensing and Real Estate Joint Ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1984-01-01

    Joint ventures undertaken by Duke University with industry are reported that illustrate the imaginative arrangements and economic and otherwise advantageous structures possible in co-ventures. They include patent and trademark licensing, travel agency commissions, a racquetball and health club, a hotel, and an office building. (MSE)

  10. William Raspberry: Duke University's Illustrious Appointment from Outside the Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Brock

    1996-01-01

    Introduces Duke University's efforts to attract qualified blacks to join their faculty by reaching out to black professionals, and describes one journalist's experience teaching about race in higher education. Teaching about racial relations and group identity from a "hands-on" treatment that brings the issues down to a more personal and…

  11. A Great and Towering Compromise: Religious Practice and Space at Duke University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Christy Lohr

    2013-01-01

    Duke University has a decidedly Christian history, and Duke University Chapel presents a decidedly Christian presence on campus. Yet, the chapel and its university partners are committed to creating an environment on campus where students of any faith may thrive. Staff members understand that it is important for individuals involved in religious…

  12. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the {mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  13. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water- lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  14. Achieving quality in cardiovascular imaging: proceedings from the American College of Cardiology-Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela; Iskandrian, Ami E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Jollis, James; Peterson, Eric; Chen, Jersey; Masoudi, Frederick; Mohler, Emile; McNamara, Robert L; Patel, Manesh R; Spertus, John

    2006-11-21

    Cardiovascular imaging has enjoyed both rapid technological advances and sustained growth, yet less attention has been focused on quality than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met, and this report provides an overview of the discussions. A consensus definition of quality in imaging and a convergence of opinion on quality measures across imaging modalities was achieved and are intended to be the start of a process culminating in the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality measures for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  15. The Duke University Religion Index (DUREL): validation and reliability of the Farsi version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Sina; Memari, Amir Hossein; Pakrah, Mohammad; Mohebi, Farnam; Saghazadeh, Amene; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the validation and reliability of the Farsi version of the Duke University Religion Index (FDUREL), a brief measure designed to evaluate the primary dimensions of religiosity. The study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, after translation of the original version of DUREL by using standard forward-backward translation, the FDUREL was administered to 427 medical students at different training levels. Reliability of the FDUREL was assessed by internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Principal components factor analysis was employed to assess the construct validity of the measure. In the second phase, 557 medical students were asked to fill out the FDUREL and Hoge Intrinsic Religiosity Scale to examine concurrent validity. The FDUREL was unidimensional and had good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Results suggest that the FDUREL is a reliable and valid measure of religiosity in Farsi-speaking populations.

  16. Duke Electronic Mail Post Office A Practical Mail Linking System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryfoos, James D.; Hammond, William E.; Spero, Laurence A.; Rabold, Jean S.; Straube, Mark J.; Stead, William W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a system designed to integrate the many different electronic mail systems in use throughout Duke University. The Duke Electronic Mail Post Office project is part of Duke University Medical Center's model for Achieving an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS). Main features of the systems, problems encountered during implementation, and future directions are presented and discussed.

  17. Duke University high energy physics. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  18. How Nan Keohane Is Changing Duke: With a Focus on Building Consensus, She Is Transforming the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Nannerl Keohane became president of Duke University in 1993, one of the first women to lead a top research university. This article details some of the changes that have taken place during her tenure as president. (JM)

  19. Laboratorio nuclear para la Duke University - Durham (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odell, Arquitectos Asociados

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available This building will actually serve three universities, with research departments surrounding an FN reactor. It has been placed next to the physics building and other smaller laboratories. With three floors, the ground floor containing laboratories, the middle floor access and offices, and the top floor for vehicle parking, the arrangement harmonizes with the considerable slope of the site. The construction Is fundamentally reinforced concrete with prefabricated elements which respect the architectural physiognomy of the area.El edificio servirá a tres Universidades, con secciones de investigación alrededor de un reactor FN, y se ha emplazado junto al edificio de Física y a otros dos laboratorios más pequeños. Se compone de tres plantas: — baja, con los laboratorios; — intermedia, con el acceso y oficinas, y — alta, que comprende el estacionamiento de vehículos. Esta disposición es función de la gran pendiente del solar. Construcción a base de hormigón armado, elementos prefabricados, fundamentalmente, tratando de respetar la fisonomía arquitectónica del entorno.

  20. Fostering creativity: how the Duke Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment encourages innovation in GME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolsek, Kathryn M; Murphy, Gwendolyn; Nagler, Alisa; Moore, Peggy R; Schlueter, Joanne; Weinerth, John L; Cuffe, Michael S; Dzau, Victor J

    2013-02-01

    The Duke Medicine Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment, established in 2006, provides infrastructure support and encourages educational innovation. The authors describe Duke's experience with the "grassroots innovation" part of the fund, the Duke Innovation Fund, and discuss the Innovation Fund's processes for application, review, and implementation, and also outcomes, impact, and intended and unintended consequences.In the five years of the Innovation Fund described (2007-2011), 105 projects have been submitted, and 78 have been funded. Thirty-seven projects have been completed. Approved funding ranged from $2,363 to $348,750, with an average award of $66,391. This represents 42% of funding originally requested. Funding could be requested for a period of 6 months to 3 years. The average duration of projects was 27 months, with a range from 6 months to 36 months. Eighty percent of projects were completed on time. Two projects were closed because of lack of progress and failure to adhere to reporting requirements. Thirty-nine are ongoing.Program directors report great success in meeting project outcomes and concrete impacts on resident and faculty attitudes and performance. Ninety-two percent report that their projects would have never been accomplished without this funding. Projects have resulted in at least 68 posters, abstracts, and peer-reviewed presentations. At least 12 peer-reviewed manuscripts were published.There has been tremendous diversity of projects; all 13 clinical departments have been represented. Interdepartmental and intradepartmental program cooperation has increased. This modest seed money has resulted in demonstrable sustainable impacts on teaching and learning, and increased morale and scholarly recognition.

  1. Programa de treinamento em pesquisa: Duke University e Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia Research training program: Duke University and Brazilian Society of Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Campos Pellanda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Um programa de coaching em pesquisa tem foco em desenvolvimento de habilidades e raciocínio científico. Para os profissionais da saúde, pode ser útil para o incremento no número e na qualidade de projetos e artigos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados iniciais e a metodologia de implantação do Research and Innovation Coaching Program do grupo Research on Research da Duke University na Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia. MÉTODOS: O programa trabalha em duas bases: o treinamento e o coaching. O treinamento é realizado online e aborda conteúdos sobre ideia de pesquisa, busca na literatura, escrita científica e estatística. Após o treinamento, o coaching favorece o estabelecimento de colaboração entre pesquisadores e centros mediante uma rede de contatos. O presente estudo descreve a implementação e os resultados iniciais dos anos 2011-2012. RESULTADOS: Em 2011, 24 centros receberam o treinamento, que consistiu em reuniões online, estudo e prática dos conteúdos abordados. Em janeiro de 2012, foi implementado um novo formato que teve como objetivo atingir mais pesquisadores. Em seis meses foram alocados 52 pesquisadores. No total, 20 artigos foram publicados e mais 49 artigos foram redigidos e aguardam submissão e/ou publicação. De forma adicional, foram elaboradas cinco propostas de financiamento de pesquisa. CONCLUSÃO: O número de artigos e as propostas de financiamento atingiram os objetivos inicialmente propostos. Contudo, os principais resultados desse tipo de iniciativa devem ser medidos em longo prazo, pois a consolidação da produção nacional de pesquisa de alta qualidade é um círculo virtuoso que se autoalimenta e expande com o tempo.BACKGROUND: Research coaching program focuses on the development of abilities and scientific reasoning. For health professionals, it may be useful to increase both the number and quality of projects and manuscripts. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the initial results and

  2. Duke Ferdinand: patient or possessed? The reflection of contemporary medical discourse in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullo, Ellen

    2010-06-01

    The Duchess of Malfi, a tragedy written by John Webster, makes frequent reference to contemporary Jacobean concerns about health and disease for dramatic effect. Most notably Webster chooses to highlight lycanthropy through the evolution of the condition in the character of Duke Ferdinand. This paper examines Webster's knowledge of contemporary medical, religious and political texts and explores the reflection of both a natural humoral understanding of lycanthropy as a disease, and the concurrent importance of supernatural concerns prevalent at the time. Although Webster's choice to associate Duke Ferdinand with lycanthropy primarily serves a dramatic purpose, it is proposed that fictional works such as The Duchess of Malfi can be considered as important sources for the history of medicine since authors often reflect the contemporary understanding of health and disease from the world around them.

  3. Programa de treinamento em pesquisa: Duke University e Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Campos Pellanda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Um programa de coaching em pesquisa tem foco em desenvolvimento de habilidades e raciocínio científico. Para os profissionais da saúde, pode ser útil para o incremento no número e na qualidade de projetos e artigos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados iniciais e a metodologia de implantação do Research and Innovation Coaching Program do grupo Research on Research da Duke University na Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia. MÉTODOS: O programa trabalha em duas bases: o treinamento e o coaching. O treinamento é realizado online e aborda conteúdos sobre ideia de pesquisa, busca na literatura, escrita científica e estatística. Após o treinamento, o coaching favorece o estabelecimento de colaboração entre pesquisadores e centros mediante uma rede de contatos. O presente estudo descreve a implementação e os resultados iniciais dos anos 2011-2012. RESULTADOS: Em 2011, 24 centros receberam o treinamento, que consistiu em reuniões online, estudo e prática dos conteúdos abordados. Em janeiro de 2012, foi implementado um novo formato que teve como objetivo atingir mais pesquisadores. Em seis meses foram alocados 52 pesquisadores. No total, 20 artigos foram publicados e mais 49 artigos foram redigidos e aguardam submissão e/ou publicação. De forma adicional, foram elaboradas cinco propostas de financiamento de pesquisa. CONCLUSÃO: O número de artigos e as propostas de financiamento atingiram os objetivos inicialmente propostos. Contudo, os principais resultados desse tipo de iniciativa devem ser medidos em longo prazo, pois a consolidação da produção nacional de pesquisa de alta qualidade é um círculo virtuoso que se autoalimenta e expande com o tempo.

  4. Torsemide versus furosemide in heart failure patients: insights from Duke University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Buggey, Jonathan; Fiuzat, Mona; Ersbøll, Mads K; Schulte, Phillip J; DeVore, Adam D; Eisenstein, Eric L; Anstrom, Kevin J; OʼConnor, Christopher M; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-05-01

    Furosemide has historically been the primary loop diuretic in heart failure patients despite data suggesting potential advantages with torsemide. We used the Duke Echocardiography Lab Database to investigate patients admitted with heart failure to Duke Hospital from 2000 to 2010 who were discharged on either torsemide or furosemide. We described baseline characteristics based on discharge diuretic and assessed the relationship with all-cause mortality through 5 years. Of 4580 patients, 86% (n = 3955) received furosemide and 14% (n = 625) received torsemide. Patients receiving torsemide were more likely to be female and had more comorbidities compared with furosemide-treated patients. Survival was worse in torsemide-treated patients [5-year Kaplan-Meier estimated survival of 41.4% (95% CI: 36.7-46.0) vs. 51.5% (95% CI: 49.8-53.1)]. After risk adjustment, torsemide use was no longer associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio 1.16; 95% CI: 0.98-1.38; P = 0.0864). Prospective trials are needed to investigate the effect of torsemide versus furosemide because of the potential for residual confounding.

  5. Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Huston Katsanis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice. Methods. We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers’ use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers’ awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers’ opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

  6. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL): a study on Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mohsen; Zeidi, Isa Mohammadi; Pakpour, Amir H; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was translation and validation of the Duke University Religion Index in Iranian Muslims. The study was performed in two stages. In the first stage, 1,762 college students from Qazvin city with an average age of 21.2 years participated in the study. In the second phase, 796 college students with an average age of 23.7 were recruited from Tehran. A demographic questionnaire, Santa Clara Strength Faith questionnaire (SCSORF), and Duke Religion Index (DUREL) were administered. Cultural adaptation of these measures was performed by a forward-backward translation technique. Test-retest reliability and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used for assessing reliability. Convergent validity was measured by Spearman correlation between DUREL and SCSORF. Explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) evaluated the factor structure. Results showed that the scale is reliable. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.866 to 0.921 and ICC ranged from 0.937 to 0.991. Correlations between DUREL and SCSORF were also strong (ranging from 0.62 to 0.79). Results obtained from CFA and EFA confirmed one-dimension for the DUREL. Thus, the DUREL appears to be a proper measure for assessing religiosity among Iranian Muslims. Further testing of the scale among minorities and those with special health-related conditions is suggested.

  7. Psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Duke University Religion Index in college students and community residents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhizhong; Rong, Y; Koenig, Harold G

    2014-10-01

    A Chinese version of the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL) was developed and the psychometric properties were assessed. The study was conducted in two separate samples of 1,285 college students and 2,564 community residents. To assess test-retest reliability, the DUREL was re-administered after 1 wk. to 105 college students and 199 community residents. In both samples, three factors were extracted using principal components factor analysis with Promax rotation, which is consistent with the scale content. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable. Test-retest ICCs ranged from .45 to .89 in college students and .75 to .93 in community residents. The Chinese version of the DUREL is a useful measure of religiosity in Mandarin-speaking populations.

  8. Lauren Berlant and Lee Edelman, Sex, Or The Unbearable (Durham: Duke University Press, 2014, pp. 168, ISBN: 9780822355946, £13.99, paperback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Proctor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 'So few colleges and universities bother to teach human sexuality...so much stigma adheres even to scholarly investigation of sex,' Gayle Rubin lamented in her 1984 essay 'Thinking Sex'. But it was an academic conference on Rubin's work - 'Rethinking Sex', a lavish threeday event, held at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009 - that provided the initial impetus for Lauren Berlant and Lee Edelman to enter into a dialogue on sexuality. The result is Sex, or the Unbearable, published by Duke University Press, the first in a series on queer theory edited by the authors.

  9. Hospital Duke Norte, Durham Carolina del Norte - EE. UU.

    OpenAIRE

    Hellmuth, George; Obata, Gyo; Kassabaum, George

    1980-01-01

    The Duke University Medical Centre is one of the main regional type research and medical training complexes in the United States. It was built as compliment of an expansion scheme of the old existing hospital, since its services and spaces had become old fashioned regarding the growing needs of same. The construction scheme, apart from making a new centre, includes redesigning the old hospital. The new building corporate all kinds of equipment for surgery and pediatrics, for intern pati...

  10. Measurement of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulent Fluxes with the Duke University Helicopter Observation Platform (HOP) in Support of CHATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-04

    temperature measurement at the same frequency. We also measured water and CO2 content at 120 Hz (smoothed to 40 Hz) with the Licor 7500. Thus, using the...were deployed. Figure 1: The Duke HOP basic sensors [including a Licor 7500 (www.licor.com), an Aventech AIMMS-20 (www.aventech.com), and a Kaijo

  11. Research on the Strategic Planning of Duke University Library%信息时代杜克大学图书馆的战略规划研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于凤银; 于目新; 李瑞芹

    2016-01-01

    The making and implementation of planning has played an important guiding role during Duke University Library becoming a great university library. In the information society, Duke University Library as supporters of the teaching and research, has become facilitators and active participants in academic research. It constructs and transforms library space for a long term, and serves the school teaching and scientific research as the foundation. Taking digital strategy as the center, it plans and constructs library resources, organization structure, team continuously for a long term.%杜克大学图书馆成为世界一流的高校图书馆,战略规划的制定和实施在其发展中起到了重要的指导作用。在应对信息社会的挑战中,杜克大学图书馆实现了从教学科研的支持者、促进者到学术研究的积极参与者的功能拓展,对图书馆空间进行了长期的建设和改造,以服务本校教学和科研为基础,以数字化战略为中心,对图书馆的资源、组织结构、队伍等方面进行长期的持续不断的规划和建设。

  12. Improving the health of the community: Duke's experience with community engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, J Lloyd; Yaggy, Susan; Lyn, Michelle; Warburton, Samuel; Champagne, Mary; Black, MaryAnn; Cuffe, Michael; Califf, Robert; Gilliss, Catherine; Williams, R Sanders; Dzau, Victor J

    2008-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the United States is falling behind in its potential to translate biomedical advances into practical applications for the population. Societal forces, increased awareness of health disparities, and the direction of clinical and translational research are producing a compelling case for AHCs to bridge the gaps between scientific knowledge and medical advancement and between medical advancement and health. The Duke University Health System, the city and county of Durham, North Carolina, and multiple local nonprofit and civic organizations are actively engaged in addressing this need. More than a decade ago, Duke and its community partners began collaborating on projects to meet specific, locally defined community health needs. In 2005, Duke and Durham jointly developed a set of Principles of Community Engagement reflecting the key elements of the partnership and crafted an educational infrastructure to train health professionals in the principles and practice of community engagement. And, most recently, Duke has worked to establish the Duke Translational Medicine Institute, funded in part by a National Institutes of Health Clinical Translational Science Award, to improve health through innovative behavioral, social, and medical knowledge, matched with community engagement and the information sciences.

  13. TERRAIN, DUKES COUNTY, MA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Dukes AOI consists of both Marthas Vineyard, the mainland, and Gosnold to the northwest. Ground Control is collected throughout the AOI for use in the processing...

  14. Attitudes of Mississippi college students toward David Duke before and after seeing the film Who is David Duke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, R; Girdner, E J; Burroughs, R G; Routman, M

    1993-01-01

    The attitudes of 211 students at a university in Mississippi were investigated both before and after seeing the Public Broadcasting Film Who Is David Duke? The film provided evidence of Duke's current racism, anti-Semitism, and pro-Nazi leanings. In a previous study with university students in Louisiana, the majority did not change their attitudes after watching the film (Eisenman, 1993). However, in the present study, students' attitudes showed change in an anti-Duke direction. The findings are discussed and reasons given for the differences between the two samples, and for the popularity of Duke, a former leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

  15. Modernizing and Transforming Medical Education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-01-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college’s medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-optic connectivity to the campus, offering campus-wide wireless access, opening student and faculty computer laboratories, and providing computer tablets to all incoming medical students. Beyond IT, the college is also offering wet laboratory instruction for hands-on diagnostic skills, team-based learning, and clinical skills workshops. In addition, modern teaching tools and techniques address the challenges posed by increasing numbers of students. To provide incentives for instructors, a performance-based compensation plan and teaching awards have been established. Also for faculty, IT tools and training have been made available, and a medical education course management system is now being widely employed. Student and faculty responses have been favorable, and the rapid uptake of these interventions by students, faculty, and the college’s administration suggests that the KCMU College MEPI approach has addressed unmet needs. This enabling environment has transformed the culture of learning and teaching at KCMU College, where a path to sustainability is now being pursued. PMID:25072581

  16. A cup full of domesticity: the "Duke-Fingard" vaporizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mallory

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the history of the "Duke-Fingard" domestic medical vaporizer. It considers the emergence of this Canadian device out of Rudolph Duke and David Fingard's larger institutional inhalation treatment system, and seeks to trace and explain the medical, social, commercial and cultural influences that shaped its subsequent sale, use of electricity, and design. What emerges through this synchronic and microhistorical analysis is a more concrete sense of the practice of domestic medicine during a transformative period of Canadian medical history.

  17. [Kyongsong Imperial University Medical College].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, C D

    1992-01-01

    Japan annexed Korea in 1910 and with the promulgation of the Chosen Kyoyuk Ryong (the Korea Education Decree) in 1911, it began to conduct education for the Korean people. However, this was only a matter of formality and a policy for liquidating the spirit of the Korean people. It finally resulted in the uprising of March 1, 1919 of the Korean people that has a cultural tradition of a high level. This event served as a cause of widely spread censure among the Korean people as well as the people of the whole world. Even in Japan voice of criticism rose high. Such being the situation, Japan amended the Korean educational law under the pretext of shifting to a so-called civil-rule policy. The Japanese authorities adopted the same educational system as was practiced in Japan proper, for primary and middle school education. As for higher education, they placed under a strict control the educational facilities already established by Korean people and foreign missionaries, suppressing even minor expansions of existing facilities. However, the movement by some Korean educators to establish a private university and efforts by some missionaries to integrate the existing educational organizations into a university made it inevitable for the Japanese authorities to set up a university of their own in Korea. Thus, they hurriedly established the Kyonsong Imperial University in which was included a medical college that was an indispensable organization for colonial education. They professed that the medical college was established for the purpose of providing equal opportunities and privileges to Korean and Japanese students, but, on the contrary, the operation of the college was done strictly under their colonial policy. The system of the Kyongsong Imperial University was enforced acording to the Japanese Imperial University Law, and all the faculty members and the administratial officials were Japanese. As for Koreans, a few graduates of the university was named nonpaid deputy

  18. Medical Physics Undergraduate Degree Courses at University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Described are the course, teaching/study, entry qualifications, and destination of graduates of four courses in medical physics from Exeter University, King's College London, University College London, and University College of Swansea. (YP)

  19. Duke on the Descartes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Apollo 16 astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., pilot of the Lunar Module 'Orion', stands near the Rover, Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) at Station no. 4, near Stone Mountain, during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Descartes landing site. Light rays from South Ray crater can be seen at upper left. The gnomon, which is used as a photographic reference to establish local vertical Sun angle, scale, and lunar color, is deployed in the center foreground. Note angularity of rocks in the area.

  20. Initiatives for Medical Education Research at the International Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chandra Jutti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical Education research is a relativelynew field but one that is progressing rapidly worldwide.This article is an attempt to take stock of the currentstatus of Medical Education research in InternationalMedical University and to explore the various factorsthat have influenced its direction. It also shares some ofthe initiatives that have been instituted or intended tobe instituted at our university.

  1. Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shoeibi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.  

  2. Implementing Medical Teaching Policy in University Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia Cornelia R. M. G.; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have…

  3. [Education for medical teamwork in Shinshu University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Both students of health sciences (medical technology, nursing science, physical therapy, and occupational therapy) and medical students learn medical teamwork in the primary stage by joint practice in Shinshu University. The aim of this class is for students that will become medical staff to increase their necessary communication skills for medical teamwork in addition to understanding the mutual medical professional fields in a medical institution. The 242 students of the medical department (147 students of health sciences and 95 students of medicine) take 15 classes during their first term as freshers. One teacher takes charge of a group consisting of 14 students for tutorials by mutually cooperation between teachers of medicine and health sciences. Positive relationships are expected to develop in the group, raising sociality and ethics so that both students of health science and medicine experience interdisciplinary discussion in small groups as an ideal method for continuing health care in times of poor knowledge of medicine and health care.

  4. Implementing medical teaching policy in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F J M

    2016-11-16

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have remained underexplored. Knowledge of these factors is needed to develop theory on the successful implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. To explore factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives and to develop a conceptual model for implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. We used the grounded theory methodology. We applied constant comparative analysis to qualitative data obtained from 12 semi-structured interviews conducted at the Radboud University Medical Center. We used a constructivist approach, in which data and theories are co-created through interaction between the researcher and the field and its participants. We constructed a model for the implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals, including five factors that were perceived to promote or inhibit faculty in a university hospital to make use of teaching policy incentives: Executive Board Strategy, Departmental Strategy, Departmental Structure, Departmental Culture, and Individual Strategy. Most factors we found to affect individual teachers' strategies and their use of medical teaching policy lie at the departmental level. If an individual teacher's strategy is focused on medical teaching and a medical teaching career, and the departmental context offers support and opportunity for his/her development, this promotes faculty's use of teaching policy incentives.

  5. The Duke Personal Computer Project: A Strategy for Computing Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, Thomas M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The introduction of an instructional computing strategy at Duke University that led to identification of three levels of user subsets and establishment of equipment clusters is described. Uses of the system in establishing computer literacy and special applications in chemistry, computer science, and the social sciences are reviewed. (MP)

  6. Wireless Infrared Networking in the Duke Paperless Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetten, George D.; Guthrie, Scott D.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses wireless (diffuse infrared) networking technology to link laptop computers in a computer programming and numerical methods course at Duke University (North Carolina). Describes products and technologies, and effects on classroom dynamics. Reports on effective instructional strategies for lecture, solving student problems, building shared…

  7. The French language virtual medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, A; Benhamou, A C; Spector, M; Bonnin, A; Debry, C

    2004-01-01

    The work program of the French Language Virtual Medical University started about 2 years ago, and entered into a real active phase of development and implementation in 2002. Various national programs and organizational initiatives should accelerate and facilitate further appropriation of modem pedagogical approaches by knowledge providers and all users of the FSVMU, so as to advance on the way of virtual education. The French Language Virtual Medical University under the auspices of both the National Conference of Deans of Medical Schools and the International Conference of Deans of French-Speaking Medical Schools has been developed to create a major Internet portal for French-speaking distance medical learning and teaching. This construct should be representative of all medical schools in France and French-speaking countries. Contents will also be translated into English, Spanish and Arabic. All medical disciplines with their various levels of teaching are to be included. Cross-related fields are also going to be present in order to offer full range programs. The latter are intended to provide both initial and continuing education for medical students as well as all other categories of health professionals and medical and scientific research workers. To develop the appropriate technology and make such a portal, on one hand correspond to the specific educational requirements and proper training for health professionals, and on the other hand provide a general access to e-learning in all schools of medicine; in keeping with such goals, the following approaches should be stressed upon. To build a virtual space where individual patients, their families, patient associations as well as the general public, can obtain medical information of good quality for the purposes of both education and prevention. Providing such categories with reliable and validated sources of information, and offering an ethical basis for the increasing practice of e-medicine, represent in today

  8. Knowledge Management within the Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzina, Svetlana Ye; Tikhonova, Tatiana A; Karpenko, Dmitriy S; Bogopolskiy, Gennady A; Zarubina, Tatiana V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is studying the possibilities of ontological engineering in managing of medical knowledge. And also practical implementation of knowledge management system (KMS) in medical university. The educational process model is established that allows analyzing learning results within time scale. Glossary sub-system has been developed; ontologies of educational disciplines are constructed; environment for setup and solution of situational cases is established; ontological approach to assess competencies is developed. The possibilities of the system for solving situation tasks have been described. The approach to the evaluation of competence has been developed.

  9. Notes for contributors to Journal of Nanjing Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition) JNMU, sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive English medical journal published locally and abroad.Since 2007, Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition )was granted Elsevier the full publishing and distribution rights worldwide for the Electronic Edition, excluding the People's Republic of China.

  10. Fasa University Medical School: a novel experience in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSAIN A. RONAGHY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In early 1970`s a combination of a shortage and misdistribution of health services and growing public dissatisfaction about the health care available, along with increasing expectations, has put great strain on the mind of the staff of the Department of Medicine Shiraz University School of Medicine. The purpose of this report is to give an account of what was originally planned and what has happened since the start of Fasa Medical School in April 1978. Methods: This is a case report about an experience in medical education in Iran. At the time, two major problems were facing our country. The first was gross mal-distribution of these healthcare facilities, which were mostly concentrated in Tehran and big cities of Iran, and the second problem was continuous exodus of Iranian Medical graduates to the Western countries. Results: The main idea of creating Fasa Medical School was to create a system in which primary care in small villages are provided by VHW with the middle level health workers of “Behdar Roustaee” to be supported by local physicians who reside in small towns. Conclusion: For Fasa Medical School, education was emphasized on community based, student centered, and problem based medical education located in the community and based on teamwork and cooperation.

  11. Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Walid F Gellad,3,4 Jivan Moaddeb,2,5 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 William Shrank,6 Bradi B Granger,7 Christopher B Granger,8 Troy Trygstad,9 Larry Z Liu,10 Hayden B Bosworth1,2,7,11 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6CVS Caremark Corporation; 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; 9North Carolina Community Care Networks, Raleigh, NC, USA; 10Pfizer, Inc., and Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Effective medications are a cornerstone of prevention and disease treatment, yet only about half of patients take their medications as prescribed, resulting in a common and costly public health challenge for the US healthcare system. Since poor medication adherence is a complex problem with many contributing causes, there is no one universal solution. This paper describes interventions that were not only effective in improving medication adherence among patients with diabetes, but were also potentially scalable (ie, easy to implement to a large population. We identify key characteristics that make these interventions effective and scalable. This information is intended to inform healthcare systems seeking proven, low resource, cost-effective solutions to improve medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, diabetes mellitus, chronic disease, dissemination research

  12. Promoting the Medical University's Governance: Content Analysis of Decisions Made by the Medical University's Governing Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Hadi, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Decisions made by the governing body of a university would overshadow university governance. This study aimed to analyze the quantity and quality of decisions made by the three governing bodies (Board of trustees, Board of Chancellors and University council) of a medical university in Isfahan, Iran. A mixed qualitative and quantitative approach was employed, with the quantitative part in cross-sectional format and the qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, the number of meetings and resolutions of the governing bodies were collected through Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. In the qualitative part, the content of 3121 resolutions that were selected using stratified sampling method was analyzed. The results indicated the defensible numbers of meetings and resolutions of the boards of trustees and chancellors. The governing bodies' resolutions were mostly operational in domain, administrative (boards of trustees and chancellors) and educational (university council) in nature, financing (board of trustees) and providing services (board of chancellors and university council) in function with the aim of responsiveness. The share of specific and single-department resolutions was greater compared to others. Better monitoring and evaluation of the activity of governing bodies, redirecting the decisions made by governing bodies, reminding the position of the governing bodies and revising their duties and responsibilities are recommended for better governance of the medical university.

  13. An upcoming program for medical humanities education in Fudan University's School of Basic Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-05-23

    Ideal medical care requires professional skills as well as appropriate communication skills. However, traditional medical education in medical schools mostly emphasizes the former. To remedy this situation, medical humanities education will be incorporated into education for medical students at Fudan University. Comprehensive medical education that includes both medical skills and humanities may greatly improve medical care.

  14. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  15. ON ENGLISH TEACHING METHOD OF MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QinDerong; ChangMingli

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines issues in Teaching College English toMedicine major students at the Shanxi Medical University.According to a questionnaire survey which I carried out at theend of English courses in 1999, quite a few students complainedthat they didn't make considerable progress in English study after2 years' learning. Through investigation, 1 found that one ofthe main reasons was the pressure of their medical subjects --There were so many subjects and heavy tasks for them that they didn't have enough time to learn English. Then how to improvetheir English level? Some feasible solutions therefore aresuggested here and applied into practice. Now, Generallyspeaking, the English level of the students has somewhatimproved, which is embodied in their performances of variousexaminations, such as CET Band 4, Band 6, the graduateentrance examination and all kinds of English competitions.

  16. Medical waste management at the University of Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical waste management at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. ... medical waste management and training in, and use of personal protective equipment. ... storage, treatment, and final disposal at the UPTH was inadequate.

  17. Hospital Duke Norte, Durham Carolina del Norte - EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth, George

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available The Duke University Medical Centre is one of the main regional type research and medical training complexes in the United States. It was built as compliment of an expansion scheme of the old existing hospital, since its services and spaces had become old fashioned regarding the growing needs of same. The construction scheme, apart from making a new centre, includes redesigning the old hospital. The new building corporate all kinds of equipment for surgery and pediatrics, for intern patients, and also complimentary diagnosis and treatment departments. The old hospital in turn is used for other services for interns and auxiliary functions.

    El Centro Médico Universitario de Dulce es uno de los principales complejos de investigación y enseñanza médica, de carácter regional, en los Estados Unidos. Fue construido como complemento de un programa de expansión del antiguo hospital existente, ya que sus servicios y espacios habían quedado desfasados respecto a las crecientes necesidades del mismo. El plan de construcción comprende, además de la realización de un nuevo centro, la remodelación del viejo hospital. El edificio nuevo incorpora toda clase de equipamiento para medicina quirúrgica y pediátrica destinada a pacientes internos, así como departamentos complementarios de diagnóstico y tratamiento. El antiguo hospital, por su parte, da cabida a otros servicios para internados y a las funciones auxiliares.

  18. Scientific production of medical sciences universities in north of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Firooz, Mousa Yamin; Vahedi, Mohammad; Aligolbandi, Kobra

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. The study of the scientific evidence citation production by famous databases of the world is one of the important indicators to evaluate and rank the universities. The study at investigating the scientific production of Northern Iran Medical Sciences Universities in Scopus from 2005 through 2010. This survey used scientometrics technique. The samples under studies were the scientific products of four northern Iran Medical universities. Viewpoints quantity of the Scientific Products Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences stands first and of Babol University of Medical Sciences ranks the end, but from the viewpoints of quality of scientific products of considering the H-Index and the number of cited papers the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences is a head from the other universities under study. From the viewpoints of subject of the papers, the highest scientific products belonged to the faculty of Pharmacy affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medial Sciences, but the three other universities for the genetics and biochemistry. Results showed that the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences as compared to the other understudies universities ranks higher for the number of articles, cited articles, number of hard work authors and H-Index of Scopus database from 2005 through 2010.

  19. 77 FR 23475 - PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Duke Energy Ohio, Inc., Duke Energy Kentucky, Inc; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Duke Energy Ohio, Inc., Duke Energy Kentucky, Inc; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 5, 2012, Duke Energy Ohio, Inc. and Duke...

  20. The Duke of York visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Duke of York chats before inaugurating the UK@CERN exhibition. From left to right: Robert Aymar, CERN's Director General, the Duke of York, and leading UK scientists at CERN: Jim Virdee, CMS deputy spokeman; theorist John Ellis ; and Steve Myers, head of the AB Department. On 23 November, the Duke of York visited CERN and, in his capacity as the UK's Special Representative for International Trade and Investment, inaugurated the UK@CERN Exhibition. This biennial trade show was initially held in 1968, the first such exhibition by a CERN member state. This year 22 companies displayed goods and services that could be of interest to CERN scientists. In his inaugural speech, the Duke emphasized that business between companies and CERN "is a two-way information flow with mutual benefits." The companies make sales but also benefit from technologies that CERN transfers to them. CERN benefits from the exchange, the Duke said, addressing CERN's scientists, because it "frees your time for what you do best: science....

  1. Journal of Nanjing Medical University Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University, a citation source of China Science and Technology papers,sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive medical English journal, published in China and abroad.And it has been embodied by many famous international Resource Indexes such as CA, AJ. The Journal publishes English articles, summaries, reviews and case reports concerning basic, clinical and preventive medicine from teachers and researchers in medical institutes and hospitals world-wide. Priority for publication will be given to those funded by national or provincial foundation and on prize-winning research projects.

  2. Are medical ethics universal or culture specific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furqaan; Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In our society and culture where family is of utmost importance,sometimes I wonder how much of a doctor’s duty is to the patient and how much is to the whole family.As a medical student,I remember being told by my professors that we should treat the patient as a whole and not focus on just one problem or organ system.Similarly when practicing medicine in Pakistan,one cannot treat the patient alone and ignore the family.How much should relatives’ wishes be taken into account when dealing with a patient? Don’t patients have a right to their medical information? When,how,and by whom can that right be waived? What role does culture play when debating medical ethics?

  3. Assessment of Medication Use among University Students in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessalegn Asmelashe Gelayee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The extent, nature, and determinants of medication use of individuals can be known from drug utilization studies. Objectives. This study intended to determine medication consumption, sharing, storage, and disposal practices of university students in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 404 university students selected through stratified random sampling technique. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS version 20 statistical software. Pearson’s Chi-square test of independence was conducted with P<0.05 taken as statistically significant. Results. At 95.3% response rate, the prevalences of medication consumption and sharing were 35.3% (N=136 and 38.2% (N=147, respectively. One hundred (26% respondents admitted that they often keep leftover medications for future use while the rest (N=285, 74% discard them primarily into toilets (N=126, 44.2%. Evidence of association existed between medication taking and year of study (P=0.048, medication sharing and sex (P=0.003, and medication sharing and year of study (P=0.015. Conclusion. There is a high prevalence of medication consumption, medication sharing, and inappropriate disposal practices which are influenced by sex and educational status of the university students. Thus medication use related educational interventions need to be given to students in general.

  4. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  5. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  6. STOMATOLOGICAL FACULTY OF SARATOV STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES - 20 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Googe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological faculty of SaratovState Medical University was founded in 1988. During 20 years scientific stomatologic school on the basis of all major directions was formed in our university. Greatamountof high professional scientific staff and practitioners was trained.

  7. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2)…

  8. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance.

  9. The Early Identification and Education of Brilliant Students: The Duke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Robert N.

    1985-01-01

    The Duke University Talent Identification Program was initiated to identify verbally and mathematically precocious youngsters. This program is a 16-state effort not only to identify brillant students, but to follow and nuture their talent and assist in their educational development. (MLW)

  10. From Quick Start Teams to Home Teams: The Duke TQM Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubans, John; Gordon, Heather

    This paper describes the Duke University Libraries' transition in early 1994 from its traditional hierarchical model to an organization emphasizing Total Quality Management (TQM) concepts such as self-managing teams and continuous improvement. Existing conditions at the libraries that played a role in the decision to switch included: (1) rising…

  11. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoreishi A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

  12. Self-Medication Practice with Nonprescription Medication among University Students: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Almasdy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature relating to self-medicationpractice with nonprescription medication among universitystudents.Methods: A narrative review of studies on self-medicationpractice with nonprescription medication among universitystudent was performed. An extensive literature search wasundertaken using indexing services available at UniversitiSains Malaysia (USM library. The following keywords wereused for the search: self-care, self-medication, over-thecountermedicine, nonprescription medicine, minor illnesses,minor ailment, university population and communitypharmacy. Electronic databases searched were Science Direct,Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Inside Web, JSTOR, SpringerLink, Proquest, Ebsco Host and Google Scholar. Theseelectronic databases were searched for full text paperspublished in English.Results: Eleven studies were identified. In general, the reviewhas shown that self-medication practice with nonprescriptionmedication highly prevalence among university students. Thereasons for self-medication are vary among this populationand the main symptoms leading to self-medication areheadache or minor pain; fever, flu, cough, or cold; anddiarrhoea.The common medication is analgesic, antipyreticproducts, cough and cold remedies, anti allergy andvitamins or minerals. The sources of the medicines arepharmacy, home medicine cabinet, supermarket/shopand other person such as family, friend, neighbours andclassmates. The sources of drug information are familymember, previous experience, pharmacy salesman,doctor or nurse, advertisement and others. The reviewalso has shown that the self-medication practice couldhave many problems.Conclusions: The review provides insights about theself-medication practices among the university students.These practices were highly prevalence among universitystudents. The symptoms leading to self-medication arevary, thus the medication used and the medicationsources. It needs an adequate drug information

  13. [Physical anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2008-12-01

    Medical research during the Japanese Colonial Period became systematic and active after the Keijo Imperial University Medical School was established in 1926. Various kinds of research were conducted there including pharmacological, physiological, pathological and parasitological research. The Keijo Imperial University was give a mission to study about Korea. Urgent topics for medical research included control of infectious diseases, hygiene and environmental health that might have affected colonizing bodies of the Japanese as well as the colonized. The bodies of Koreans had been studied by Japanese even before the establishment of the University. The Keijo Imperial University research team, however, organized several field studies for physical anthropology and blood typing research at the national scale to get representative sampling of the people from its north to its south of the Korean peninsula. In the filed, they relied upon the local police and administrative power to gather reluctant women and men to measure them in a great detail. The physical anthropology and blood typing research by the Japanese researchers was related to their eagerness to place Korean people in the geography of the races in the world. Using racial index R.I.(= (A%+AB%)/(B%+AB%)), the Japanese researchers put Koreans as a race between the Mongolian and the Japanese. The preoccupation with constitution and race also pervasively affected the medical practice: race (Japanese, Korean, or Japanese living in Korea) must be written in every kind of medical chart as a default. After the breakout of Chinese-Japanese War in 1937, the Keijo Imperial University researchers extended its physical anthropology field study to Manchuria and China to get data on physics of the people in 1940. The Japanese government and research foundations financially well supported the Keijo Imperial University researchers and the field studies for physical anthropology in Korea, Manchuria and China. The physical

  14. Implementation of an OSCE at Kaohsiung Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Huang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE, a tool to objectively and fairly assess medical students' clinical competences, has become widely used in medical education worldwide. However, most medical schools in Taiwan have just begun to adopt this assessment method. In 2003, Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU established the first standardized patient (SP program in Taiwan and applied SPs with an OSCE. This study reports the process of the implementation of an OSCE at KMU, which includes collecting information, visiting leading clinical skills centers, consulting medical educators from other countries, holding international conferences, establishing an OSCE committee, writing cases, training SPs, administrating the OSCE, and receiving feedback from medical students. Most students were satisfied with the assessment and appreciated the learning experience. Based on the experience in 2003, the OSCE committee decided to incorporate the OSCE into the medical curriculum as a measure to assess medical students' clinical competences. In addition to assessing medical students' clinical competence, the OSCE can also be applied to other professional health education, such as dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy. We are currently sharing our experience with other colleges at KMU.

  15. Exploring University Students' Online Information Seeking about Prescription Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalaf, Ahmad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    This study explored university students' information seeking behaviors related to prescription medication (PM) information. Specifically, it examined the different sources students use for PM information, their use and perceptions of online sources, the types of PM information they seek, their concerns about, and methods they apply to verify the…

  16. Medical humanities and philosophy: is the universe expanding or contracting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2007-12-01

    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine considered as a distinct field of study has suffered as a result. Indeed, consensus on whether the philosophy of medicine even constitutes a legitimate field of study is lacking. This paper presents an argument for the importance of a broad conception of the philosophy of medicine and the central role it should play in organizing and interpreting the various fields of study that make up the metamedical multiverse.

  17. A renewed Medication Adherence Alliance call to action: harnessing momentum to address medication nonadherence in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Bradi B Granger,3 Hayden B Bosworth,1–4 On behalf of the Medication Adherence Alliance 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University, 3Duke Heart Center Nursing Research Program, School of Nursing, Duke University, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA The problem: Nonadherence to prescription medications is a common and costly problem with multiple contributing factors, spanning the dimensions of individual behavior change, psychology, medicine, and health policy, among others. Addressing the problem of medication nonadherence requires strategic input from key experts in a number of fields.Meeting of experts: The Medication Adherence Alliance is a group of key experts, predominately from the US, in the field of medication nonadherence. Members include representatives from consumer advocacy groups, community health providers, nonprofit groups, the academic community, decision-making government officials, and industry. In 2015, the Medication Adherence Alliance convened to review the current landscape of medication adherence. The group then established three working groups that will develop recommendations for shifting toward solutions-oriented science.Commentary of expert opinion: From the perspective of the Medication Adherence Alliance, the objective of this commentary is to describe changes in the US landscape of medication adherence, framing the evolving field in the context of a recent think tank meeting of experts in the field of medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, health planning recommendations, chronic disease

  18. The Webometric Status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Behjat; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Zahed, Arash; Otroj, Zahra; Mazaheri, Elahe; Soleimanzade-Najafi, Nayere-Sadat

    2015-08-01

    Webometrics refers to the quantitative study of science production, application, structure and technology in the cyber environment. Impact analysis, website collaboration, and recognition of core websites are regarded as the most practical advantages of webometrics. Furthermore, webometrics is applied in ranking studies for universities and academic institutes. This serves as an internationally approved means of academic ranking worldwide. Our study aimed to evaluate the webometric status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) and its place in the Webometric Ranking of World Universities. We also tried to comment on how to improve the university's webometric rank at national, regional, and international levels. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study including all websites of Iranian universities. Census sampling was applied to cover all Iranian university websites. Then the websites were evaluated according to the latest criteria for the international webometric ranking methodology (Cyberometric Lab, July 2012) and their webometric rank at the international level as well as the changes in the rank between July 2012 and January 2013 were analyzed. The webometric rank of IUMS was compared with other medical universities at different levels as well. According to the findings, from July 2012 to January 2013, IUMS webometric rank improved by 707, 5 and 2 at international, national and ministerial levels, respectively. Moreover, the rank of IUMS for openness rose from 4477 to 193 during the mentioned period (∆ 4284). In excellence, the university rank did not change sensibly (1537 /1538). In the same period, the rank in presence shifted from 1137 to 1091. Meanwhile, growth in website impact was negative as the university impact rank declined from 3369 to 3393. It seems that impact as the most influential ranking indicator fails to grow proportionately as other factors of IUMS website. This is potentially due to the content language (Farsi) which is an

  19. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Mendys P; Zullig LL; Burkholder R; Granger BB; Bosworth HB

    2014-01-01

    Phil Mendys,1,2 Leah L Zullig,3 Rebecca Burkholder,4 Bradi B Granger,5 Hayden B Bosworth3,5,6 1Pfizer Inc, Medical Affairs, New York, NY, USA; 2Division of Cardiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4National Consumers League, Washington, DC, USA; 5School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6Department of Medicine and Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Du...

  20. Fitness and nutritional status of female medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, K; Mészáros, Zs; Mavroudes, M; Szmodis, M B; Zsidegh, M; Ng, N; Mészáros, J

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this comparison was to evaluate the nutritional status and cardio-respiratory fitness of future health professionals, namely university students engaged in medical studies. It was assumed that the lifestyle of such students would be reflected by healthy body composition and fitness performance indicators. Altogether 1,560 volunteer, female, university students of three institutions were investigated in 2008. Height, body weight, BMI, body fat content and 800 m run test means were compared.The height, weight and BMI means did not differ significantly but PE students recorded the lowest mean body fat (18.34% vs. 24.37 and 25.12%) and shortest mean running time (203 s vs. 239 and 243 s). Among the medical (11.23%) and technical university students (19.95%) statistically the same prevalence of obesity was observed.High body fat content and low running performance of medical students were in contrast with our hypothesis. Their prevalence of overweight/obesity and low fitness did not differ from that of relatively sedentary technical university students and the average Hungarian young adult population. Thus, it is questionable how young health professionals will promote the necessity and positive effects of regular physical activity if they do not apply them to their own lifestyle.

  1. E-learning in Type 1 Medical Universities of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher ROKNI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nowadays the Internet is the technological pedestal of organization in the information society and one of the main applications that the Internet offers is the Digital Library (DL. Each society, especially those that claim training of the public, predictably need implementation and endorsement these systems. The time of chalk and board is passed and the globalization and universal village demands a movement targeting to establish an information society. The university is said to be responsible for making "Human". In the era of information explosion, how can a university rely on a physical classroom, a tired teacher and some drowsy students listening to him? Internet "the sweet invention of man" is a bridge, between "slump" and "spurt". It is up to each authority in a university to design, employ, develop and evaluate a system embracing Internet, Multimedia, Network and so on to go parallel in modern era and to introduce the supreme system of E-learning in its program. Of different aspects of E-learning including computer networks, multimedia, search engines, electronic libraries, distance learning, and all that (Piskurich, 2003, most of the type 1 medical universities of Iran exploit, some how or another, all or some of them. These universities including Tehran, Iran, Shahid Beheshti, Mashhad, Isfahan, Tabriz, Shiraz, Ahwaz, and Kerman, at present encompass a powerful link with their audiences regarding digital libraries, search engine and authentic data bases. The present article is going to have a bird's eye view at various capacities of these universities in this regard.

  2. The Maastricht-Duke bridge: An era of mentoring in clinical research - A model for mentoring in clinical research - A tribute to Dr. Galen Wagner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijs, Loek; Zusterzeel, Robbert; Wellens, Hein Jj; Gorgels, Anton Pm

    With the passing of Dr. Galen Wagner, an exceptional collaboration between Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands, and Duke Clinical Research Institute, USA, has come to an end. This article focuses on the background of what Galen coined the Maastricht-Duke bridge (MD-bridge), its merits, limitations and development throughout the years, and his special role. Between 2004 and 2015, 23 Maastricht University medical students and post-graduate students were enrolled in the 4-month research elective, mentored by Galen and the Maastricht co-mentor. They were asked to complete a survey about their MD-bridge experience. Sixteen out of the 23 students responded. None but 1 participant had prior research experience. Following their MD bridge-program most participants published 1 or more manuscripts and/or presented their research in an international setting. They felt they had full responsibility as a leader of their project with all participants developing meaningful skills useful in their current job. Fourteen out of 16 would recommend the MD-bridge experience to others. Participants considered the program of great value for their personal growth and independence, giving a feeling of achievement. In addition, for some participants it led to careers in foreign countries including medical practice and research, or obtaining PhDs. With Galen's impressive career of mentoring students, including the 23 MD-bridge participants, he has left behind an amazing concept of self-development in research and personal life. The successes of the MD-bridge prove that it is possible for students to be young investigators during or just after medical school with the potential to contribute to developing meaningful skills and noteworthy careers. Collaborations between international universities, such as the MD-bridge, are feasible and should be embraced by other institutions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Ngoc Hoat; Nguyen, Lan Viet; van der Wilt, G J; Broerse, J; Ruitenberg, E J; Wright, E P

    2009-07-24

    Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  4. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruitenberg EJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Methods Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Results Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. Conclusion The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  5. Demographic Survey Of The Spiritual Intelligence In Medical Faculty Of Qom University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Marziye Raisi; Hoda Ahmari Tehran; Saeede Heidari; Nahid Mehran

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Spiritual intelligence is a kind of ultimate intelligence that shows the conceptual and valuable issues and to solve the problems associated with it. the foundation of individual beliefs can have important role in various fields especially in the promotion and provision of psychic health . Thus, the aim of this study was to survey the rate of spiritual intelligence among the students of Medical Faculty of Qom University of Medical Sciences and the relation between t...

  6. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Mirmohammadi; A. H Mehrparvar; M Bahaloo; M. H Davari

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In order to achieve acceptable quality in educations, the quality of learning should be assessed. opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni of Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012 Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on alumni graduated from 2008-2012. Data was collected using a questionnaire whic...

  7. Medical education quality assessment. Perspectives in University Policlinic context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Castellanos González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Quality has currently a central role within our National Health System, particularly in the formative process of human resources where we need professionals more prepared every day and ready to face complex tasks. We make a bibliographic review related to quality assessment of educational process in health system to analyze the perspectives of the new model of University Policlinic, formative context of Medical Sciences students.

  8. E-Readiness Assessment at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Salek Ranjbarzadesh; Mohammad Hossein Biglu; Susan Hassanzadeh; Naser Safaei; Parviz saleh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: E-readiness assessment is the evaluation of one’s ability to accept and use information technologies and their relevant applications. E-readiness assessment helps us identify and study the strengths and weaknesses and consequently find solutions and formulate strategies to improve e-readiness which is considered as a guarantee for the implementation of knowledge development programs. This study aimed to assess ereadiness at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The cur...

  9. University of North Carolina's experience with state medical assistance teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Jeff; Murtaugh, Lisa; Hoffman, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Events in the last several years have shown a clear need for better preparation regarding disaster management. In an effort to improve this preparation, North Carolina implemented state medical assistant teams to provide alternative care facilities, decontamination facilities, and shelter assistance during times of disaster. This article explores these teams from the perspective of the University of North Carolina, which serves as a lead agency for one of these teams. Key components of the team, training provided, and lessons learned will be discussed.

  10. Patient–provider communication, self-reported medication adherence, and race in a postmyocardial infarction population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Ryan J Shaw,1,3 Bimal R Shah,4,5 Eric D Peterson,4,5 Jennifer H Lindquist,1 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 Steven C Grambow,6 Hayden B Bosworth1–3,7 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 3School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 4Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 5Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Durham, NC, USA; 6Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 7Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Objectives: Our objectives were to: 1 describe patient-reported communication with their provider and explore differences in perceptions of racially diverse adherent versus nonadherent patients; and 2 examine whether the association between unanswered questions and patient-reported medication nonadherence varied as a function of patients’ race. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline in-person survey data from a trial designed to improve postmyocardial infarction management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results: Overall, 298 patients (74% reported never leaving their doctor’s office with unanswered questions. Among those who were adherent and nonadherent with their medications, 183 (79% and 115 (67% patients, respectively, never left their doctor’s office with unanswered questions. In multivariable logistic regression, although the simple effects of the interaction term were different for patients of nonminority race (odds ratio [OR]: 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–3.92 and those of minority race (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 0.54–2.66, the overall interaction effect was not statistically significant (P=0.24. Conclusion: The quality of patient–provider communication is critical for cardiovascular

  11. THE MEDICAL COLLECTIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TARTU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomsalu, Maie; Pärnsalu, Liina; Tapfer, Helle; Mesila, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the year 1999, a new and modern building Biomedicum was finished addressed to preclinic subjects of the Medical Faculty of the University of Tartu; the institutions of anatomy as well as pathological anatomy and forensic medicine moved there. However; no place was planned to exhibit the collections of specimens. Many of the specimens which had so far only been used for learning purposes found their place in the Old Anatomical Theatre, in the hope that this could be transformed as a museum. The medical collections of the Medical Faculty were opened up for a broader audience in October 2005. With the support of the national programme "The collections of humanities and natural sciences", the medical study specimens, models, moulages, and literature related to them in danger of being destroyed were collected from several subdivisions and buildings of the Medical Faculty. In 2012, the medical exhibition moved to the premises of Science Centre AHHAA and in the same time a specifc educational study began to be developed.

  12. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  13. Using Computer and Internet for Medical Literature Searching Among Medical Students in Hadramout University, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Salim Bin Ghouth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some researchers have observed that medical students used computer and internet for nonmedical purposes. Is this the case among medical students in a newly established medical college of Hadramout University in Yemen?Objectives: To assess the knowledge and usage of computer and internet among medical students of Hadramout University, find out the medical applications for which they use internet, and the factors that encourage the students to use computer and internet, with an emphasis on gender variations.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 102 randomly selected students from second to sixth year at the academic year 2005/2006 by using structured questionnaire of 23 items. Results: Seventy four students have computer at home (73%, 77 students use internet for general purposes (76.2% and lesser use internet for educational and research purposes, with significant gender variations. The students opined that accessibility of internet in the college (84.2% and training about online searching (74.3% were the most expected factors to improve using of internet for medical research.Conclusion: Incorporating online search of medical literature in curriculum planning is essential to improve the student skills in research.

  14. Medical students’ assessment preferences at King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Tawfik Amin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tarek Tawfik Amin1, Feroze Kaliyadan2, Nouria Saab Al-Muhaidib31Community Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Section; 3Vice Dean for Female Students, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To assess the preferred methods for assessment among medical students at both preclinical and clinical stages of medical education and the possible correlates that promote these preferences.Subjects and methods: All medical students from the third year onwards were surveyed. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was designed to gather information on the preferred assessment method for course achievement. The preferred methods were also evaluated in relation to cognitive functions. Preference for specific exam format, in the form of multiple choices, short essay questions, or both, and the stated reasons for that preference, was also included in the questionnaire.Results: Out of 310 questionnaires distributed, 238 were returned. Written tests, projects, portfolios, and take home exams were the preferred modes for assessing students’achievements in a course; oral tests including a viva voce were the least preferred type of assessment. Questions that tested the domains of ‘understanding’ and ‘application’ were the most preferred type while those entailing ‘analysis’ were the least preferred. Multiple choice question format was the most preferred type of question (68.7% at both pre- and clinical stages.Conclusion: Students’ assessments at the College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia, do not use the full range of cognitive domains. The emphasis on higher domains for medical students’ assessment incorporating critical thinking should increase as the students’ progress through their medical courses.Keywords: medical students, assessment, exams, multiple choices, essay

  15. Duke storage rink UV/VUV FEL: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The 1 GeV Duke storage ring was successfully commissioned with parameters exceeding initial specification. The OK-4 FEL has arrived at the Duke FEL laboratory from the Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The OK-4 installation and commissioning is in progress. In this paper we describe the up-to-date status of the Duke storage ring and the OK-4 FEL. The projected performance of the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL is presented based on the electron beam parameters achieved. Initial plans to operate the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL at the Duke 1 GeV storage ring are outlined. Future plans and prospects of both the OK-4 FEL and the Duke storage ring are discussed.

  16. Comparisonof depression prevalence in medical students between the first and last years of Birjand University of Medical Sciences: Brief Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Rahmani Bidokhti

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Apparently, prevalence of depression in medical students in Birjand university of Medical Sciences is high, although studying medicine is not significantly decisive in the occurrence of the problem.

  17. Attitude, Knowledge and Skill of Medical Students Toward E-Learning Kerman University Of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhovati M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: According to the development of e-learning and its high efficiency on the development of Iran’s universities, level of knowledge and the attitude of the students to this modern method of education and indeed students’ skills in using it needed to be assessed to improve the quality and quantity of universities’ education. This study aimed to determine the attitude, knowledge and skill of medical students toward e-learning at Kerman University of Medical Sciences.  Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study that was performed in 2013, 196 students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences were selected using proportional stratified sampling method. The research instrument was a valid and reliable questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and independent T tests by SPSS 19 software.  Findings: The level of knowledge and skill of the students toward e-learning was “moderate” and their attitude was “high”. There were significant relationships between knowledge and skill (p=0.001 r=0.82 and also knowledge and attitude (p=0.001 r=0.37 but there was no significant relationship between skill and attitude (p=0.35 r=0.82. The scores of knowledge and skill were significantly different according to sex, but attitude had no significant difference with sex.  Conclusion: Kerman University of Medical Sciences’ students have a positive attitude to e-learning but according to their moderate knowledge and skills, performing this method of learning is not welcomed in this university.

  18. Reflections: Evolution of PBL in the International Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hla-Yee-Yee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the evolution of PBL inthe International Medical University over a periodof twenty years; since its inception in 1992 till 2012.It is a record of the reasons for the evolution, the peopleinvolved and the strategies adopted. The PBL in IMUhas metamorphosed over the years from a paper-basedcomplete case history into its present form of staggeredrelease of information, paper-based or otherwise (videos,web-based, newspaper cuttings, debates. Strategies toimprove student and facilitator buy-in, strengtheningof facilitator training, adoption of PBL templates,innovations to improve student participation arediscussed.

  19. University libraries and the indispensable changes in Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elinor Dulzaides Iglesias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with some aspects related with university libraries as an ideal environment to articulate science, knowledge and culture and the need of reorganization of structures and functions within these institutions. We make reference to the changes in the Higher Educational System, which have an impact in other teaching levels. We discuss the new challenges in information and knowledge management and conditions in Medical Science field to adapt traditional methods to the new environment. We discuss how to support the required transformations to turn libraries into research and educational centres.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Dehghani, K. Azam, F. Changani, E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks. In the past, medical waste was often mixed with municipal solid waste and disposed in residential waste landfills or improper treatment facilities in Iran. In recent years, many efforts have been made by environmental regulatory agencies and waste generators to better managing the wastes from healthcare facilities. This study was carried in 12 educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The goals of this study were to characterize solid wastes generated in healthcare hospitals, to report the current status of medical waste management and to provide a framework for the safe management of these wastes at the considered hospitals. The methodology was descriptive, cross-sectional and consisted of the use of surveys and interviews with the authorities of the healthcare facilities and with personnel involved in the management of the wastes. The results showed that medical wastes generated in hospitals were extremely heterogeneous in composition. 42% of wastes were collected in containers and plastic bags. In 75% of hospitals, the stay-time in storage sites was about 12-24h. 92% of medical wastes of hospitals were collected by covered-trucks. In 46% of hospitals, transferring of medical wastes to temporary stations was done manually. The average of waste generation rates in the hospitals was estimated to be 4.42kg/bed/day.

  1. Accidental exposure to blood in medical interns of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Batoul; Shahidzadeh-Mahani, Ali; Oveysi, Turadj; Akhlaghi, Hengameh

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare workers and medical students are at risk of exposure to blood-borne viruses such as HBV, HCV HIV, etc. Here we report the results of a survey of the frequency and causes of cutaneous blood exposure accidents (CBEA) among medical students. Anonymous questionnaires were randomly distributed to 200 interns in their second year of internship in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A definite exposure was defined as injury by a sharp object causing obvious bleeding, whereas a possible exposure was defined as subtle or superficial injury due to contact with a contaminated instrument or needle but without bleeding, or contamination of an existing wound with blood or other body fluids. One hundred eighty-four subjects (92% of the original sample) responded to the questionnaire. We recorded 121 definite exposures and 259 possible exposures over a mean time interval of 14 months. Needles were the most common objects (41% of exposure episodes) causing CBEAs, while phlebotomy and suturing were the hospital procedures that accounted for the highest percentage of exposure episodes (30 and 28 percent, respectively). Only a minority of students regularly observed basic safety measures (wearing gloves, not recapping used needles and proper disposal of sharp objects). Considering the high incidence of blood exposure in medical interns at Tehran University of Medical Sciences and the ensuing risk of blood-borne infections, the subjects are likely to develop such infections during their internship period.

  2. Emotional Intelligence of Medical Residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Ghajarzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one’s own and other’s emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%. Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008. Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009. Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  3. Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

    2013-04-06

    Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  4. Self-citation of Medical and Non-medical Universities in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, Mohammad Ali; Yaminfirooz, Mousa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-citation is one of the main challenges in the evaluation of researchers’ scientific output. This study aimed at comparing the institutional self-citation among the universities located in Northern Iran. Methods: This study was conducted as a scientometric study. Research population included all scientific productions of 16 Northern Iran Universities with at least 100 indexed documents indexed in the Web of Science (WoS) by 2 June 2015. The citation analysis section of WoS was used for data collection. SPSS was applied for data analysis. Study hypotheses were tested with two independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test. Results: Producing 16,399 papers, northern Iran universities had 5.33% of contribution in Iran’s scientific production. They received 84,058 citations with 17% and 12% of self-citations belonged to the non-medical and medical universities, respectively. Testing hypotheses revealed that increase in received citations significantly increases the rate of self-citation and increase in scientific production does not necessarily increase the rate of self-citation. Conclusion: The rate of self-citation in the studied universities was not relatively high. However, investigating into the factors affecting the rate of and motives for self-citation needs further research. PMID:28077903

  5. The medical school curriculum at University Malaysia Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, P; Osman, A

    2005-08-01

    The integrated curriculum at the newly established medical school at University Malaysia Sabah is examined from aspects of the objectives of the medical training in achieving development of the required skills and knowledge as well as personal and professional development. The teaching is spread over five years with an emphasis on basic medical sciences in the first two years although the students are exposed to clinical skills right from the onset. A gradual transition to emphasis on the acquisition of clinical skills occurs from the third year onwards. However, community medicine and professional development are incorporated into the programme from the first year and are carried over to the final year. Although there are examinations to be passed in all the courses taught every semester, with a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 (65 percentile score) and the candidate has to pass all the examinations in that year to clear a particular year, two professional examinations are administered, one at the end of the Third Year (end of the Phase I of the Medical Programme) and another at the end of the Fifth or Final year (end of the Phase II of the Medical Programme). Programmes for Postings, Shadow House Officers (SHOP) and Population Health are also incorporated into the curriculum. Delivery of the courses involve Lectures, Self-Learning Packages (SLP), Small Group Discussions (SGD), Seminars, Debates, Dramas, Video clips, Special Study Modules (SSM), Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI), Problem-based Learning (PBL), Problem-solving Sessions (PSS) and Clinical Skills Learning (CSL). The examination involves elements of continuous assessment and final end of semester or end of phases I and II Professional Examinations. Practical may involve Objective Structured Practical Examinations (OSPE) and/or Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE). They may also involve viva voce and/or short and long case presentations and assessment of log book entries.

  6. Evaluation of board performance in Iran's universities of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Ravaghi, Hamid; Farzan, Homayoun; Aminlou, Hasan; Hadi, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME). In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time.RESULTS also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards' resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process.

  7. University engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Esmat; Abaszadeh, Abas; Maddah, Sadat Sayad Bagher

    2013-11-01

    Collaborative methods of learning in the university have been a successful and the main aspects of the students' engagement. The purpose of this study was to determine university engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This research was a descriptive correlation study on a total of 238 nursing students with different levels of education were asked to fill four subscales of the modified National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) tool with a total of 40 items. NSSE reliability was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.78). The NSSE instrument relies on a students' self-reports tool. Data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics by SPSS version 16. Means scores of university engagement in nursing students was 96.6 ± 19. 07. There was a significant positive correlation in components including active and collaborative learning (ACL) level, students' level of academic challenge (LAC) as well as student faculty interaction (SFI), supportive campuses environment and enriching educational experiences (EEE)with total score of university engagement (P < 0. 05). Findings in this study showed that university engagement level in nursing students is moderate and there is a significant association between the model of teaching and ACL, and LAC and EEE.

  8. Clinical education stressors in medical trainees in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momayyezi, Mahdieh; Fallahzadeh, Hossein; Momayyezi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Stress is an important factor in the educational process. Teaching and learning are stressful processes. This stress can affect one's ability and change his/her performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate stressors of clinical education from the perspective of medical students in Yazd University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive-analytic study was conducted in Yazd University of Medical Science during year 2014-2015. The sample size was 170 medical students who were selected randomly. The data were collected by a questionnaire including four components: interpersonal relationship, educational environment, clinical experience and the unpleasant emotions. A significance level of 0.05 was considered for analysis. The statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, ANOVA and T-tests, using SPSS software, version 14. The results showed that the highest domain score belonged to interpersonal relationship (3.33±0.3) followed by unpleasant emotions domain (3.3±0.3). The lowest domain score of clinical education stressors was educational environment (3.12±0.1). The results showed that the mean score of interpersonal relationship domain was more in women than in men (peffective factor in all dimensions of clinical education stressors. So proper measures such as the promotion of scientific awareness of teachers and educational staff about factors that lead to stress and the best way to communicate with students should be taken to reduce the students' stress.

  9. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  10. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  11. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  12. Developing an action plan for patient radiation safety in adult cardiovascular medicine. Proceedings from the Duke University Clinical Research Institute/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Think Tank Held on February 28, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cummings, Jennifer E; Gerber, Thomas C; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Taylor, Allen J

    2012-06-01

    Technological advances and increased utilization of medical testing and procedures have prompted greater attention to ensuring the patient safety of radiation use in the practice of adult cardiovascular medicine. In response, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government and nongovernmental agencies, industry, medical physicists, and patient representatives met to develop goals and strategies toward this end; this report provides an overview of the discussions. This expert "think tank" reached consensus on several broad directions including: the need for broad collaboration across a large number of diverse stakeholders; clarification of the relationship between medical radiation and stochastic events; required education of ordering and providing physicians, and creation of a culture of safety; development of infrastructure to support robust dose assessment and longitudinal tracking; continued close attention to patient selection by balancing the benefit of cardiovascular testing and procedures against carefully minimized radiation exposures; collation, dissemination, and implementation of best practices; and robust education, not only across the healthcare community but also to patients, the public, and media. Finally, because patient radiation safety in cardiovascular imaging is complex, any proposed actions need to be carefully vetted (and monitored) for possible unintended consequences.

  13. Developing an action plan for patient radiation safety in adult cardiovascular medicine: proceedings from the Duke University Clinical Research Institute/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Think Tank held on February 28, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cummings, Jennifer E; Gerber, Thomas C; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Taylor, Allen J

    2012-05-15

    Technological advances and increased utilization of medical testing and procedures have prompted greater attention to ensuring the patient safety of radiation use in the practice of adult cardiovascular medicine. In response, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government and nongovernmental agencies, industry, medical physicists, and patient representatives met to develop goals and strategies toward this end; this report provides an overview of the discussions. This expert “think tank” reached consensus on several broad directions including: the need for broad collaboration across a large number of diverse stakeholders; clarification of the relationship between medical radiation and stochastic events; required education of ordering and providing physicians, and creation of a culture of safety; development of infrastructure to support robust dose assessment and longitudinal tracking; continued close attention to patient selection by balancing the benefit of cardiovascular testing and procedures against carefully minimized radiation exposures; collation, dissemination, and implementation of best practices; and robust education, not only across the healthcare community, but also to patients, the public, and media. Finally, because patient radiation safety in cardiovascular imaging is complex, any proposed actions need to be carefully vetted (and monitored) for possible unintended consequences.

  14. David Duke, running for governor, proposes tattooing people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-19

    Former Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke, planning a second run for governor of Louisiana, said he would curb the AIDS epidemic by tattooing people who are infected with HIV. His suggestion is to put indelible, glow-in-the-dark tattoos on the genitals of people infected with HIV. According to Duke, it may sound very draconian but it would not demean people. He also believes that tattooing would be legal because courts have a history of supporting the quarantining and institutionalizing of people with infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. Duke said Cuba has had some success in using quarantines to reduce HIV infection, but he does not think it would work in the United States because it would cost too much. According to Duke, many people who get HIV from irresponsible behavior do not tell their partners that they have AIDS--these people are mad at the world and engage in dangerous behaviors even more.

  15. [Clinical study of laparoscopic adrenalectomy in Sapporo Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Masumori, Naoya; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Itoh, Naoki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsukawa, Masanori; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Kato, Ryuichi; Miyao, Noriomi; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify the surgical outcome and complications of laparoscopic adrenalectomy at Sapporo Medical University Hospital. One hundred fifty-six patients underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy due to primary aldosteronism in 64 (41.0%), Cushing's syndrome in 34 (21.8%), endocrinological non-functioning tumors in 27 (17.3%), pheochromocytoma in 23 (14.7%) and others. The median time of the surgery was 140 minutes (range 70 to 345) and the median volume of blood loss was 10 ml (0-1,200). From 1999, the operation time was around the median time of this study and from 2006, it was commonly below the median time of this study. There were 4 cases (2.6%) with complications; however, no severe cases occurred. In conclusion, laparoscopic adrenalectomy in our hospital has been performed safely as a standard treatment.

  16. [The assessment of health behaviours among Warsaw Medical University students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Alicja; Szewczyńiski, Jerzy A

    2002-01-01

    Some health behaviours among 228 students of Warsaw Medical University (130 women and 98 men) using anonymous questionnaire were examined. Percentage of smokers among female and male students was similar (13.1% and 14.3% respectively). Among respondents the greatest frequency of drinking alcohol was from a few times weekly to a few times monthly. Male students drunk alcohol more often than female ones. Beer was prefered by men, wine and beer--by women. Only male students (10.2%) used drugs (amphetamine, marihuana). About 1/3 of respondents did not do any sports. Female students had better knowledge about objective factors of their health status (blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol level) compared to males ones.

  17. Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran during 2010-2011. The research tool for data collection was a researcher-tailored questionnaire on political behaviors. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by seven management professors, and its reliability was tested by a pilot study using test-retest method which yielded a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.71. The respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire and express their perceptions and tendencies to engage in organizational behaviors. The collected data was read to and analyzed by IBM SPSS environment and correlation analytical methods. Overall, 729 respondents filled and returned the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 90%. Most of the respondents indicated that they had no tendency to engage in political behavior. Moreover, we found that there was a significant correlation between sex, higher education degrees, tenure and the employees' tendency to engage in political behavior. The participants were not overtly political because of their personal belief, ethical values, and personal characters. Non-political and overtly political employees are both prejudicial for all organizations. Therefore, it seems that the medium rate of good political behavior is vital and prevalent in Iranian organizations.

  18. Principles of Pedagogy in Teaching in a Diverse Medical School: The University of Capetown South Africa Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Julia Johnson; Holland, Errol

    This paper describes a 2-month project developed by the Sage Colleges (New York) and the University of Capetown Medical School in South Africa to help the medical faculty at the Capetown Medical School teach its newly diverse student body. The program is intended to improve student retention and it emphasizes the need for faculty to assure…

  19. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Mirmohammadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to achieve acceptable quality in educations, the quality of learning should be assessed. opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni of Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012 Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on alumni graduated from 2008-2012. Data was collected using a questionnaire which validity and reliability was confirmed. The questions were asked from 183 individuals were interviewed by telephone in 2012. Results: Mean satisfaction score of quality of education was 3.86/5 and 3.18/5 for basic and clinical sciences, respectively. The average satisfaction score for regular presence of faculty members in classes was 4.11/5 and 3.98/5 for basic and clinical sciences, respectively. The difference between the two groups regarding the satisfaction from quality of education was not diufferent (P=0.237. However, this difference was significant for satisfaction from regular presence in classes and time spent for education (P<0.001. Conclusion: The condition of education in Yazd University of Medical Sciences was satisfactory from the alumni viewpoint and the satisfaction level was higher for basic sciences than clinical science education.

  20. Medicalization of global health 4: the universal health coverage campaign and the medicalization of global health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocalyn Clark

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Universal health coverage (UHC has emerged as the leading and recommended overarching health goal on the post-2015 development agenda, and is promoted with fervour. UHC has the backing of major medical and health institutions, and is designed to provide patients with universal access to needed health services without financial hardship, but is also projected to have ‘a transformative effect on poverty, hunger, and disease’. Multiple reports and resolutions support UHC and few offer critical analyses; but among these are concerns with imprecise definitions and the ability to implement UHC at the country level. A medicalization lens enriches these early critiques and identifies concerns that the UHC campaign contributes to the medicalization of global health. UHC conflates health with health care, thus assigning undue importance to (biomedical health services and downgrading the social and structural determinants of health. There is poor evidence that UHC or health care alone improves population health outcomes, and in fact health care may worsen inequities. UHC is reductionistic because it focuses on preventative and curative actions delivered at the individual level, and ignores the social and political determinants of health and right to health that have been supported by decades of international work and commitments. UHC risks commodifying health care, which threatens the underlying principles of UHC of equity in access and of health care as a collective good.

  1. Medicalization of global health 4: The universal health coverage campaign and the medicalization of global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-01-01

    Universal health coverage (UHC) has emerged as the leading and recommended overarching health goal on the post-2015 development agenda, and is promoted with fervour. UHC has the backing of major medical and health institutions, and is designed to provide patients with universal access to needed health services without financial hardship, but is also projected to have 'a transformative effect on poverty, hunger, and disease'. Multiple reports and resolutions support UHC and few offer critical analyses; but among these are concerns with imprecise definitions and the ability to implement UHC at the country level. A medicalization lens enriches these early critiques and identifies concerns that the UHC campaign contributes to the medicalization of global health. UHC conflates health with health care, thus assigning undue importance to (biomedical) health services and downgrading the social and structural determinants of health. There is poor evidence that UHC or health care alone improves population health outcomes, and in fact health care may worsen inequities. UHC is reductionistic because it focuses on preventative and curative actions delivered at the individual level, and ignores the social and political determinants of health and right to health that have been supported by decades of international work and commitments. UHC risks commodifying health care, which threatens the underlying principles of UHC of equity in access and of health care as a collective good.

  2. Beginnings and development of English teaching in the medical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinidad Atiés Caballero

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Various authors have claimed the imperious necessity and significance of the acknowledgement and domain of the English language as a cultural means and way of communication among men. The present study aims an approximation to the teaching of this language in its diverse stages, starting from its beginnings up to its present situation in the Cuban Medical School. Here are stated the different approaches and methods that have engulfed the English teaching and its relations with the pedagogical and theoretical conceptions that have emerged, along with the criteria and judgments of the ones who dedicated their works to this field. Taking into consideration that the various pedagogical theories, the educational systems, the organization, the content and the teaching methods are determined by the conditions of the society's material life, whose development is influenced at a time; a revision and valorization of these conditions in different societies are carried out, as an important cause of the different pedagogical theories, methods and teaching approaches applied in the different schools, for example, in the Cuban Medical University.

  3. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  4. Meeting the challenges of training more medical students: lessons from Flinders University's distributed medical education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Ian D; Worley, Paul S

    2010-07-05

    To use data from an evaluation of the Flinders University Parallel Rural Community Curriculum (PRCC) to inform four immediate challenges facing medical education in Australia as medical student numbers increase. Thematic analysis of data obtained from focus groups with medical students undertaking the PRCC, a year-long undergraduate clinical curriculum based in rural general practice; and individual interviews with key faculty members, clinicians, health service managers and community representatives from 13 rural general practices and one urban tertiary teaching hospital in South Australia. Data were collected in 2006 and re-analysed for this study in January 2009. Participants' views grouped around the themes of the four identified challenges: how to expand the venues for clinical training without compromising the quality of clinical education; how to encourage graduates to practise in under-served rural, remote and outer metropolitan regions; how to engage in a sustainable way with teaching in the private sector; and how to reverse the current decline in altruism and humanism in medical students during medical school. Participants' views supported the PRCC approach as a solution to the challenges facing Australian medical education. The enabling capacity of the PRCC's longitudinal integrated approach to clinical attachments was revealed as a key factor that was common to each of the four themes. The continuity provided by longitudinal integrated clinical attachments enables an expansion of clinical training sites, including into primary care and the private sector. This approach to clinical training also enables students to develop the skills and personal qualities required to practise in areas of need.

  5. Knowledge of triage in the senior medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSEIN MAHMOODIAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Triage is a response to the problem of overcrowding in Emergency Departments (EDs and accuracy of decisions made by the triage unit affects the ultimate outcome of EDs. This study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge of triage among last year medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical study whose subjects were all the senior students of medicine (62 in the last year of medicine from January to June 2013 who attended emergency medicine course in the screen room of 2 University Hospitals. This questionnaire was designed in 3 sections including personal data, 15 questions on knowledge of triage and 10 case scenarios for triage decision making and completed by the students. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS statistical software (version 14 using independent sample t-test, one way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient (p≤0.001. Results: The total mean score of the participants was 10.6±1.5, ranging from 7 to 13. 58(93.5% students had poor triage knowledge. In the scenario’s section, the percentage of correct triage by students was 49.2% and those of over and under triage were 28.1% and 22.7%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the triage accuracy and level of triage (ESI 4 (p≤0.001. Conclusion: The level of knowledge of triage in the last year medical students was poor, although most of them had passed a course in the screen room. It is recommended that medical students’ educational courses should include sections on the knowledge of triage in emergency rooms.

  6. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    H Mozaffari-Khosravi; Vaziri, N; A. Mohammadimanesh; Z. Naderi; H. Daneshbodi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was comp...

  7. Evaluation of self-medication practices in acute diseases among university students in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Al Flaiti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of self-medication among university students was very high. There is a need for intensive education and comprehensive awareness campaign to advocate for reduction in the prevalence of self-medication practices among students.

  8. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-01-01

    Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University...

  9. The value of a writing center at a medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariail, Jennie; Thomas, Suzanne; Smith, Tom; Kerr, Lisa; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Shaw, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Students often enter graduate healthcare/biomedical schools with insufficient undergraduate instruction in effective writing, yet the ability to write well affects their career opportunities in health care and in scientific research. The present study was conducted to determine the value and effectiveness of instruction by faculty with expertise in teaching writing at a writing center at an academic health science center. Two separate sources of data were collected and analyzed. First, an anonymous campus-wide survey assessed students' satisfaction and utilization of the university's Writing Center. Second, a nonexperimental objective study was conducted comparing a subsample of students who used versus those who did not receive instruction at the Writing Center on quality of writing, as determined by an evaluator who was blind to students' utilization status. From the campus-wide survey, more than 90% of respondents who used the center (which was 26% of the student body) agreed that it was a valuable and effective resource. From the objective study of writing quality, students who used the Writing Center were twice as likely as students who did not to receive an A grade on the written assignment, and the blinded evaluator accurately estimated which students used the Writing Center based on the clarity of writing. The instruction at the Writing Center at our university is highly valued by students, and its value is further supported by objective evidence of efficacy. Such a center offers the opportunity to provide instruction that medical and other healthcare students increasingly need without requiring additions to existing curricula. By developing competency in writing, students prepare for scholarly pursuits, and through the process of writing, they engage critical thinking skills that can make them more attuned to narrative and more reflective and empathetic in the clinical setting.

  10. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Hayat, Ali Asghar; Abbasi, Karim; Bazrafkan, Aghdas; Rohalamini, Azadeh; Fardid, Mozhgan

    2017-01-01

    The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This was a descriptive-analytical study with cross-sectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship) studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310) was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association) with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors' and experts' comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach'salpha (0.85). Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean) and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance) using SPSS 14 software. 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7%) were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren't at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57) and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32).The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn't a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy. Finally, the result of independent t-test did not show a

  11. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFKAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study with crosssectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310 was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors’ and experts’ comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach’s alpha (0.85. Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance using SPSS 14 software. Results: 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7% were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren’t at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57 and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32. The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn’t a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy

  12. [Tobacco smoking amongst students in the Medical Faculty of Wroclaw Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Jasińska, Ajicja; Wojtal, Mariola; Sochocka, Lucyna; Seń, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of health promotion and diseases profilaxis is a struggle with smoking, which is a well known factor in many disorders, i.e. malignant carcinomas, noncarcinomatous diseases of respiratory system and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the study was the analysis of the smoking level amongst the students of 6th year of the Medical Faculty of Wroclaw Medical University. Amongst 131 polled women--116 were non-smoking persons (88.5%), 15 smoking (11.5%). Amongst 55 polled men--43 these are non-smoking persons (78%), 12 smoking (22%). Out of smoking women, the most women (6) is smoking from 11 to 15 cigarettes per day, out of smoking men, the most (5 men)--6-10 cigarettes per day. Smoking women began smoking during the secondary school the most often. 8 of men began the smoking in the secondary school. The majority of examined didn't try to limit smoking. Respondents would expect the biggest support from close persons during giving up smoking Only 59% of women and 64% of men disagree definitely to smoking in their presence. In the consequence of above results surprising seems still high percentage of smokers amongst examined, scantiness of taking attempts of giving up smoking and indifference of non-smoking medical students towards smoking in their presence.

  13. Medical universities in Austria: impact of curriculum modernization on medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischka, Martin

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade medical education in Austria has seen more changes than in the whole of the previous century, with a complete overhaul of the structure of undergraduate curricula. Curricula now are organized in thematic, integrated modules, students have early patient encounters, the number of examinations has been drastically reduced, objective examinations have been introduced throughout the entire course as has skills training, and quality management is assured. As a consequence of the judgement of the European Court in 2005 against discrimination and in favour of equal treatment of EU citizens, free enrolment was abandoned and admission tests were introduced. In postgraduate training, licensing examinations are now obligatory. Crucial results from the point of view of students as well as with regard to the supply of manpower to the health care system are a sharp decrease in the formerly extremely long mean duration of study programmes and a sharp fall in drop-out rates. The now fully autonomous medical universities have the opportunity to intensify collaboration and to embark on a process of continuous renewal. Structural reform of undergraduate and postgraduate curricula will eventually ensure full equality of Austrian and other European medical qualifications.

  14. Medical universities in Austria: impact of curriculum modernization on medical education [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lischka, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] During the last decade medical education in Austria has seen more changes than in the whole of the previous century, with a complete overhaul of the structure of undergraduate curricula. Curricula now are organized in thematic, integrated modules, students have early patient encounters, the number of examinations has been drastically reduced, objective examinations have been introduced throughout the entire course as has skills training, and quality management is assured. As a consequence of the judgement of the European Court in 2005 against discrimination and in favour of equal treatment of EU citizens, free enrolment was abandoned and admission tests were introduced. In postgraduate training, licensing examinations are now obligatory. Crucial results from the point of view of students as well as with regard to the supply of manpower to the health care system are a sharp decrease in the formerly extremely long mean duration of study programmes and a sharp fall in drop-out rates. The now fully autonomous medical universities have the opportunity to intensify collaboration and to embark on a process of continuous renewal. Structural reform of undergraduate and postgraduate curricula will eventually ensure full equality of Austrian and other European medical qualifications.

  15. Quality of life of medical students in Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Majdzadeh, Reza; Pasalar, Parvin; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the quality of life (QOL) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences' (TUMS) medical students at different educational levels and specify the most important factors related to this quality. A sample of 242 medical students was selected randomly, given their number in three educational levels (basic sciences, physiopathology-stager and intern). The QOL was measured by WHOQOL-BREF. The students obtained average high score in two psychological and environmental health domains, and low score in physical health and social relationship domains. As the educational level of students increased their quality of life decreased at all four domains. At social relationship domain, the female students had overall better situation as compared to males (p=0.009). The female and male students had opposite condition at the level of basic sciences and internship, in a way that the female students earned higher marks at basic sciences level and the males at internship level (P= 0.008). The condition of female students in terms of environmental, physical and psychological health became static while their education rose. However, only environmental health of the male students reduced as their education level increased (P= 0.05). The students were of undesirable conditions in two domains of social relationship and physical health. Internship is a specific level in both groups which has a negative impact on the dimensions of quality of life and naturally needs more care for the students. Married status improved the students' QOL and could moderate the undesired effects of internship.

  16. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deressa Wakgari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their training and future practice of medicine, and to identify factors associated with the intent to practice in rural or urban settings, or to migrate abroad. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2009 among 600 medical students (Year I to Internship program of the Faculty of Medicine at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. A pre-tested self-administered structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p  Results Only 20% of the students felt ‘excellent’ about studying medicine; followed by ‘very good’ (19%, ‘good’ (30%, ‘fair’ (21% and ‘bad’ (11%. About 35% of respondents responded they felt the standard of medical education was below their expectation. Only 30% of the students said they would like to initially practice medicine in rural settings in Ethiopia. However, students with rural backgrounds were more likely than those with urban backgrounds to say they intended to practice medicine in rural areas (adjusted OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.18-5.26. Similarly, students in clinical training program preferred to practice medicine in rural areas compared to pre-clinical students (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.12-2.99. About 53% of the students (57% males vs. 46% females, p = 0.017 indicated aspiration to emigrate following graduation, particularly to the

  17. Medical Residents’ Viewpoints on Clinical Training Status of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Ordoei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical training is an important process in residency academic program in different fields. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, we identified the views of clinical residents about clinical training status at Yazd University of Medical Sciences at their second-year of residency or above. We used questionnaire as the instrument for collecting information and select all residents as the sample of study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical tests. Clinical training status was assessed to be at an intermediate level by residents, and the areas of evaluation method, resources and facilities, training system, performance, performance of personnel of therapeutic departments, and resident’s performance received the highest score, respectively. Areas of evaluation method and facilities were determined as strengths, and areas of the performance of therapeutic department’s personnel and residents as the weaknesses of clinical training.

  18. Determining the Correlation Between Language Scores Obtained by Medical Students in their University Entrance and Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Some professors and educators in the field of English language believe that the high grades attained by medical students in their Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE are mainly a result of the students prior fluency in the language before entering medical colleges; they are of the opinion that these grades are not necessarily a result of the combined effort of the English teachers and students in language courses at the university. This research aims at determining the correlation between the level of fluency in English of medical students prior to university entrance and the grades obtained by them in their CMBSE after 3 terms of language courses at the university. Methods: Seven of the major and smaller universities of medical sciences were selected. The language scores of 2426 students admitted to these universities during the three academic years of 1999 to 2002 in both the National University Entrance Examination (NUEE and the Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE were obtained from their related universities and from the secretariat of the Council of Medical Basic Sciences Education respectively. The language scores of each student obtained in both NUEE and CMBSE were then matched. The related SPSS software was used to assess the level of correlation between these two groups of language scores for the students of each university, for each academic year and semester and also the overall score for the three years. Results: Overall a positive and moderately significant correlation was found between the NUEE language scores and those of the CMBSE of the students of the universities studied (P<0/001; R=443%. The level of correlation for the various universities studied differed (Max. 69%, min.27%. A comparison of the means of these two groups of scores also confirmed this correlation. Conclusion: students’ grades The NUEE language score was not the only factor affecting the student’s CMBSE

  19. Effect of Facebook on the life of Medical University students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Facebook is a social networking service launched in February 2004, owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. As of June 2012, Facebook reports more than 1 billion active users. Objective of study was to evaluate the effect of Facebook on the social life, health and behavior of medical students. Methodology It was a cross sectional, observational and questionnaire based study conducted in Dow University OF Health Sciences during the period of January 2012 to November 2012. We attempted to interview all the participants who could be approached during the period of the study. Participants were MBBS students, while all students of other courses and programs were taken as exclusion criteria. Approximately 1050 questionnaires were distributed to participants. Fifty questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers, yielding 1000 usable responses for an approximate 95% response rate. Informed verbal consent was taken from each participant. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result Out of total 1000 participants, males were 400 (40%) and females were 600 (60%). Participants were in the age group of 18–25 years with a mean age of 20.08 years. Most of the participants were using Facebook daily (N = 640, 64%) for around 3–4 hours (N = 401, 40.1%). Majority of them (N = 359, 35.9%) believed that they were equally active on Facebook and in real life while few believed their social life became worse after start using Facebook (N = 372, 37.2%). Most of the participants admitted that they were considered as shy in real world (N = 390, 39.0%) while in the world of Facebook they were considered as fun loving by their friends (N = 603, 60.3%). A large number of participants (N = 715, 75%) complained of mood swings. Conclusion Youngsters are willing to compromise their health, social life, studies for the sake of fun and

  20. Effect of Facebook on the life of Medical University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Hassan; Patel, Hamza; Aslam, Hafiz Muhammad; Ansari, Iqra Qamar; Khan, Mariya; Iqbal, Noureen; Rasheed, Hira; Jabbar, Qamar; Khan, Saqib Raza; Khalid, Barira; Nadeem, Anum; Afroz, Raunaq; Shafiq, Sara; Mustafa, Arwa; Asad, Nazia

    2013-10-17

    Facebook is a social networking service launched in February 2004, owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. As of June 2012, Facebook reports more than 1 billion active users. Objective of study was to evaluate the effect of Facebook on the social life, health and behavior of medical students. It was a cross sectional, observational and questionnaire based study conducted in Dow University OF Health Sciences during the period of January 2012 to November 2012. We attempted to interview all the participants who could be approached during the period of the study. Participants were MBBS students, while all students of other courses and programs were taken as exclusion criteria. Approximately 1050 questionnaires were distributed to participants. Fifty questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers, yielding 1000 usable responses for an approximate 95% response rate. Informed verbal consent was taken from each participant. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Out of total 1000 participants, males were 400 (40%) and females were 600 (60%). Participants were in the age group of 18-25 years with a mean age of 20.08 years. Most of the participants were using Facebook daily (N = 640, 64%) for around 3-4 hours (N = 401, 40.1%). Majority of them (N = 359, 35.9%) believed that they were equally active on Facebook and in real life while few believed their social life became worse after start using Facebook (N = 372, 37.2%). Most of the participants admitted that they were considered as shy in real world (N = 390, 39.0%) while in the world of Facebook they were considered as fun loving by their friends (N = 603, 60.3%). A large number of participants (N = 715, 75%) complained of mood swings. Youngsters are willing to compromise their health, social life, studies for the sake of fun and entertainment or whatever satisfaction they get

  1. An Investigation of GEPT Test Anxiety for Medical University Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-huei; Lai, Ching-Ju; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether or not different medical university students experience different levels of anxiety in taking the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT), and whether or not there are differences in GEPT test anxiety levels among medical university students with different genders and from different departments. This study uses a GEPT…

  2. Scientific Production of Medical Universities in the West of Iran: a Scientometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolabadi, Masoud; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Khayati, Fariba; Kalhor, Marya Maryam; Penjvini, Susan; Gharib, Alireza

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to compare scientific production by providing quantitative evaluation of science output in five Western Iranian Medical Universities including Hamedan, Ilam, Kermanshah, Kurdistan and Lorestan University of Medical Sciences using scientometrics indicators based on data indexed in Scopus for period between the years 2010 to 2014. In this scientometric study data were collected using Scopus database. Both searching and analyzing features of Scopus were used to data retrieval and analysis. We used Scientometrics indicators including number of publications, number of citations, nationalization index (NI), Internationalization Index (INI), H-index, average number of citations per paper, and growth index. Five Western Iranian Universities produced over 3011 articles from 2010 to 2014. These articles were cited 7158 times with an average rate of 4.2 citations per article. H- Index of under study universities are varying from 14 to 30. Ilam University of Medical Sciences had the highest international collaboration with an INI of 0.33 compared to Hamedan and Kermanshah universities with INI of 0.20 and 0.16 respectively. The lowest international collaboration belonged to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences (0.07). The highest Growth Index belonged to Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences (69.7). Although scientific production of five Western Iranian Medical Universities was increasing, but this trend was not stable. To achieve better performance it is recommended that five Western Iranian Universities stabilize their budgeting and investment policies in research.

  3. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  4. Compensation for booster leakage field in the Duke storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Popov, Victor; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2017-01-01

    The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is an accelerator-driven Compton gamma-ray source, providing high flux gamma-ray beam from 1 MeV to 100 MeV for photo-nuclear physics research. The HIGS facility operates three accelerators, a linac pre-injector (0.16 GeV), a booster injector (0.16—1.2 GeV), and an electron storage ring (0.24—1.2 GeV). Because of the proximity of the booster injector to the storage ring, the magnetic field of the booster dipoles close to the ring can significantly alter the closed orbit in the storage ring being operated in the low energy region. This type of orbit distortion can be a problem for certain precision experiments which demand a high degree of energy consistency of the gamma-ray beam. This energy consistency can be achieved by maintaining consistent aiming of the gamma-ray beam, and therefore a steady electron beam orbit and angle at the Compton collision point. To overcome the booster leakage field problem, we have developed an orbit compensation scheme. This scheme is developed using two fast orbit correctors and implemented as a feedforward which is operated transparently together with the slow orbit feedback system. In this paper, we will describe the development of this leakage field compensation scheme, and report the measurement results, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  5. A Study of Medical Students\\' Viewpoints at Zahedan Medical University on the Effects of the Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roudbari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The course "Health IV" and "consulting room" are two resources of learning about the method of preparing proposal and passing the final thesis for medical students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the students' viewpoints on the effects of "Health IV" and consulting room on their final theses (pl. of thesis. Methods : The sample in this descriptive study included 155 medical students of ZUMS who had registered their theses at the school. The study was conducted during 2005-2006 and the data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed via descriptive statistics of correlation and Chi-square test. Results : The findings of the study revealed that 38.1% of the students agreed or completely agreed with integrating the two courses "Research Methods" and "Health IV". Also, 43.9% of the subjects disagreed or completely disagreed with it. Approximately, 35% of the students used the services of the consulting room in writing their proposals. The effect of this service on the final thesis was low and very low in 10.3%, moderate in 12.3%, and high and very high in 20% of the students. About 25.8% of the subjects used the room services in conducting their theses, 61.3% did not use the services. The percent of the students who used the room in writing the proposal or doing their theses or did not use it at all was 85%. The effect of the room on conducting the thesis project was low and very low in 7.1%, moderate in 11.6%, and high and very high in 20%. Conclusion : The high amount of agreement with the complete integration of the "Research Methods" and "Health IV" needs more investigation. Also, the necessity of the consulting room should be revised by the manager and its continuation should be on the students' demands.

  6. Medical students' perceptions of the educational environment at an Iranian Medical Sciences University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazel Ismaeil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students' perceptions of their educational environment have a significant impact on their behavior and academic progress. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions of medical students concerning their educational environment at Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were distributed to 210 medical students and 182 were analyzed (response rate = 86.6%; twenty-eight questionnaires were excluded because they were incomplete or unreturned for analysis. Data were collected using a DREEM questionnaire which comprised 50 items based on the Likert scale (scores could range from 0 to 200. There were five domains to the questionnaire including students' perceptions of learning, students' perceptions of teachers, students' academic self-perceptions, students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. Results The mean age of the subjects was 21.7 years (SD = 2.7; 38.5% were male and 61.5% were female. Students' perceptions of learning, students' perceptions of teachers, students' academic self-perceptions, students' perceptions of atmosphere, students' social self-perceptions and total DREEM score were 21.2/48, 24.2/44, 15.8/32, 23.8/48, 14.5/28 and 99.6/200, respectively. There was no significant difference between male and female students in educational environment subscales, but there were significant differences between students enrolled on a basic sciences and pathophysiology course and those enrolled on a clinical course in terms of perceptions of learning, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere and overall perceptions of educational environment (p Conclusion Overall, respondents assessed the educational environment as average. Therefore, improvements are required across all five domains of the educational environment.

  7. Distributed generation - customer owned generation - Duke Energy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iung, Anderson M. [Duke Energy International, Geracao Paranapanema S.A., SP (Brazil). Market Analysis Dept.; Ribeiro, Paulo F. [Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Oliveira, A.R. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Distributed generation (DG) is getting more attractive. Although unit costs show strong economies of scale for all generation technology types, there is a potential niche market for DG technology to drive growth in addition to environmental concern issues. Duke Energy encourages the installation of cost effective small scale costumer owned generation. The objective of this article is to evaluate some aspects of DG connection in the Duke's distribution system regarding power quality, voltage stability, system protection, power balance control policy and the economical viability. (author)

  8. Antibiotics self-medication among medical and nonmedical students at two prominent Universities in Benghazi City, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F Ghaieth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trivial use of antibiotics is a major reason for the spread of antibiotics resistance. The aim behind undertaking this investigation was to study the prevalence antibiotics self-medication among university students in Benghazi city. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional, survey was conducted at both Libyan International Medical University and Benghazi University. A total of 665 copies of questionnaires was distributed. A total of 363 forms were completed and returned (response rate 55%. Remaining responses were either with no antibiotics use history within the past 1 year or were provided incomplete. Results: Among the respondents, 45% were males and 55% females. Males practiced self-medication more compared to females. Approximately, 43% and 46% from medical and nonmedical students, respectively, were antibiotics self-medicated. A total of 153 students (42% out of total respondents administered antibiotics for symptoms related to respiratory problems, among which 74 students (48% took antibiotics based on doctor′s prescription. Among the respondents, 94 students (27% who had antibiotics, were covered under medical insurance, and 19 (29% of the medically insured students had antibiotics without doctor′s prescription. About 14% of students did not complete their antibiotics course. Of these, 57% were medical students, and 43% were nonmedical students. The rate of self-medication among higher classes was more as compared to lower classes. About 58% of students overdosed the antibiotic, while 15% had antibiotics for <3 days, for treatment of ailments such as acne, toothache, diarrhea, earache, and tonsillitis. About 75% of students purchased the antibiotics in consultation with a pharmacist. Conclusion: Self-medication is a frequent problem among university students in Benghazi city. There is a need for an immediate intervention to address this malpractice among both students and medical practitioners.

  9. Antibiotics self-medication among medical and nonmedical students at two prominent Universities in Benghazi City, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaieth, Mohamed F; Elhag, Sara R M; Hussien, Mamoun E; Konozy, Emad H E

    2015-01-01

    Trivial use of antibiotics is a major reason for the spread of antibiotics resistance. The aim behind undertaking this investigation was to study the prevalence antibiotics self-medication among university students in Benghazi city. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional, survey was conducted at both Libyan International Medical University and Benghazi University. A total of 665 copies of questionnaires was distributed. A total of 363 forms were completed and returned (response rate 55%). Remaining responses were either with no antibiotics use history within the past 1 year or were provided incomplete. Among the respondents, 45% were males and 55% females. Males practiced self-medication more compared to females. Approximately, 43% and 46% from medical and nonmedical students, respectively, were antibiotics self-medicated. A total of 153 students (42%) out of total respondents administered antibiotics for symptoms related to respiratory problems, among which 74 students (48%) took antibiotics based on doctor's prescription. Among the respondents, 94 students (27%) who had antibiotics, were covered under medical insurance, and 19 (29%) of the medically insured students had antibiotics without doctor's prescription. About 14% of students did not complete their antibiotics course. Of these, 57% were medical students, and 43% were nonmedical students. The rate of self-medication among higher classes was more as compared to lower classes. About 58% of students overdosed the antibiotic, while 15% had antibiotics for <3 days, for treatment of ailments such as acne, toothache, diarrhea, earache, and tonsillitis. About 75% of students purchased the antibiotics in consultation with a pharmacist. Self-medication is a frequent problem among university students in Benghazi city. There is a need for an immediate intervention to address this malpractice among both students and medical practitioners.

  10. Quality of Ambulatory Education from the Viewpoint of the Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Niroumand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory education is an integral part of medical education. The present study was carried out to evaluate the quality of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of clinical medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study sample included medical externs externs and interns of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences that were selected through census sampling technique in the academic year 2012-2013. The instrument for data collection was a researcher-made questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using descriptive statistics. Results: 65 (50% externs and 75 (65% interns participated in the study and 1588 questionnaires were completed via self-administered technique. The mean of the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was 22.6±5.2 and the mean for the clinics’ quality of physical environment was 19±5.13, indicating favorable and semi-favorable status, respectively. Qualitative evaluation of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of externs and interns showed a significant difference with more satisfaction from the part of the interns (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was favorable, but the physical condition of the clinics indicated a semi-favorable status.

  11. New frontiers in medical education: simulation technology at Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Ronald W; Schmid, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine is using a variety of medical simulation systems in the training of its medical students. The simulators allow students to learn and practice skills in a controlled environment, and they enable faculty to challenge students with a broader range of conditions than might ordinarily be encountered during medical training.

  12. Analysis of the Status Quo of Humanistic Quality-Oriented Education in Medical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulei; Li, Yamin

    2012-01-01

    With transformation of contemporary modern medical educational modes and improvement of requirement upon doctors' humanistic quality, it seems quite important to strengthen humanistic quality-oriented education in medical colleges and universities. Medical humanistic quality-oriented education in China started late, which determines that there are…

  13. [Educational system for medical sciences at the University of Tsukuba--with special reference to medical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Toshiko

    2006-03-01

    Three-year colleges for nursing, medical technology, and so on, have all been reorganized into four-year educational institutions in national universities. Since the reform, universities are not responsible for educating medical scientists except nurses. The new College of Nursing and Medical Technology in the University of Tsukuba has been developed along these lines. Here introduce some of its attempts and provide an opportunity to a better system. The Department has the following three characteristics: 1. Medical scientists are educated in the new Department, and the Department is closely cooperating with the School of Medicine. 2. There are courses for medical researchers concerning Molecular Pathology, Pathological Engineering and Environmental Pathology. 3. The qualification to apply to a national test for medical technologists is given to the students. Unfortunately, the system is not fully understood by the faculty or the students and does not work well because the Medical Technology Department and the Nursing Department are grouped together as a single institution. Moreover, this flaw in the system prevents the Medical Technology Department from actively promoting highly advanced medical sciences, such as organ transplantation, artificial organs, gene therapy, reproductive medicines, and so forth (Fig. 1). Few specialists exist who can bridge achievements in basic or advanced sciences and clinical application. Serious social problems about food safety, care systems, post-genome medicine, the youth, and so on, have to be dealt with, too. We are thus planning to separate the Department as the College of Medical Science (Fig. 2) and link it to the educational system in the master's and doctoral programs (Fig. 3). This model will successfully educate a new type of medical specialists.

  14. The Portrait of the Duke in My Last Duchess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学敏

    2013-01-01

    My Last Duchess is one of best-known poems by Robert Browning. It has aroused continuous interests among critics and scholars throughout the world since its publication. The study of the novel from various perspectives has turned out to be profound and fruitful. This paper intends to portray the negative Duke by close reading the poem.

  15. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  16. Knowledge of Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences Regarding Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  17. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-07-13

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  18. Drug Use Pattern Among Medical Students in a Nigerian University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % (38/246), tobacco 15% ..... alcohol abuse found that people who are highly religious are less likely to use ... in Malaysia reported that 41.9% of the medical students .... Segal B. Adolescent initiation into drug-taking behavior:.

  19. Pattern of Medical Admissions at Enugu State University of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESUTTH are routinely admitted into any of the female and male medical wards ..... of electronic media for dissemination of information about the infection may also ... made data collection time consuming and laborious, and in some cases, to ...

  20. [Jageillonian University medical students' relationship to awarding of the doctorate degree in all medical sciences in the period between wars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolski, S

    1997-01-01

    The Academic Schools Act of 1920 and the Ordinance of 1924 pertaining to doctorates provided that one could earn the degree only having submitted a disseration. The Austrian Act which was in force up to that moment had allowed to receive the degree without writing a thesis. Protests voiced by medical students extended validity of the Act. The Jagiellonian University medicals played an important role in delaying the Ordinance coming into force. Protesting against the newest regulations they organized public meetings, wrote memorials and filled petitions. The Jagiellonian University Faculty of Medicine granted doctorates without dissertation up to the end of December 1932. However some doctorates were granted even after that term.

  1. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  2. Satisfaction of Iranian Medical Universities' faculty members towards holding Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosseini, Seyyed Nasrollah; Mohseni Band Pey, Anoshiravan; Hosseini, Seyyed Ali; Karami Matin, Behzad; Mirzaei Alavijeh, Mehdi; Jalilian, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    ... in Shahid Motahari Festival from 42 medical sciences universities in Iran. Data collection instruments were two reliable and valid questionnaires on the background and also participants' satisfaction towards Shahid Motahari Educational Festival...

  3. Self-medication among medical student in King Abdul-Aziz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooataz Mohammed Aashi

    2016-03-01

    Results: Paracetamol were the most frequently 117 (23.1% drug uses by medical students, followed by antihistaminic 48 (9.5%, antibiotic 33 (6.5%, NSAIDS 22 (4.3%, anti- anxiety 7 (1.4% and opioid 4 (0.8%. Most of them were self-medication (74%. Relief fever was the most common cause for seeking self-medication reported by medical student 103 (20.4%, most frequent side effects was nausea and vomiting 47 (9.3% Conclusions: There is an increase of self-medication in medical students of KAU especially paracetamol and NSAIDs use. We suggest increasing studies on the local irrational use of medications and increasing awareness on the importance of prescribed medications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 942-946

  4. Blended-learning strategy in the Altay State medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhacheva, Nina; Pupyrev, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    New educational technologies prove to be capable of solving many problems in the medical training. Students do not see e-Learning as replacing traditional instructor-led training but as a complement to it, forming part of a blended-learning strategy. Innovations in e-Learning technologies point toward a revolution in education, allowing learning to be individualized (adaptive learning), enhancing learners' interactions with others (collaborative learning), and transforming the role of the teacher. The integration of e-Learning into medical education can catalyze the shift towards applying adult learning theory, where educators will no longer serve mainly as the distributors of content, but will become more involved as facilitators of learning and assessors of competency. This survey analyzes possibilities to effectively use e-Learning in medical education, and what steps are to be made in that direction.

  5. The redesign of the medical informatics master of science course at the University of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Monique W M; Hasman, Arie

    2007-10-11

    The University of Amsterdam redesigned its former 4 years Medical Informatics university program into a Dutch 3 years BSc program and a 2 years English MSc program. The new MSc program is aimed at (international) baccalaureates in medical informatics, computer science, medicine, health sciences, and biology. Besides, health care professionals or professionals with a background in computer science may enter the program. We present our new MSc program shortly.

  6. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    OpenAIRE

    Ball L; Crowley J; Laur C; Rajput-Ray M; Gillam S; Ray S

    2014-01-01

    Lauren Ball,1 Jennifer Crowley,2 Celia Laur,3 Minha Rajput-Ray,3 Stephen Gillam,4 Sumantra Ray3 1Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of Public Health and Primary C...

  7. The Medical Branch Library at the Johannes-Gutenberg-University Mainz

    OpenAIRE

    Geisel, Heike; Schweizer, Stefanus

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Library (Fachbibliothek Medizin (FBM)) was founded in 1969 as a Department of the Central University Library (Zentralbibliothek), and is located within the grounds of the University Medical Center in Mainz. The purpose of the library is to provide all services for students and staff of clinical and clinical-theoretical medicine. Traditional library services focus on media lending, including the textbook collection. In the digital domain, emphasis is on electronic journals and book...

  8. Preventive medicine: self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students at the Medical University of Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsoi, Livia; Rieder, Anita; Stein, Katharina Viktoria; Hofhansl, Angelika; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2014-04-01

    Prevention and health promotion are gaining importance in modern medical curricula. Aim of this study was to evaluate the self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students towards health promotion and prevention. In 2012, at the Medical University of Vienna, 27% of the 633 fourth-year medical students (50.3% male and 49.7% female; mean age: 24 years) completed a questionnaire. Results show a high assessment of prevention in most respondents. Knowledge gaps were detected on occupational health and mother-child pass examinations. However, almost all students reported sufficient knowledge on screening and risk assessment of developing cardiovascular diseases. Almost all respondents estimated to be able to identify risky behaviours. Overall, estimation towards prevention of tomorrow's physicians is very positive. However, only 40% believed to have been adequately trained on preventive medicine so far. Relevant preventive aspects were added to the medical curriculum in 2012-2013 with the new block 'Public Health'.

  9. Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

  10. Geographical distribution of medical graduates from a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarina da Silva Ezequiel

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To evaluate the geographic distribution and career trajectory of medical graduates and the factors associated with their choice of practice location. Method: A cross-sectional study involving graduates from December 2001 to December 2010 was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire collected demographics and geographic information (place of birth, place of residence at the time of medical school admission, place of residency training and practice location, and reason for choosing the current location. Statistical analyses assessed trends in geographic distribution of graduates, and identified factors associated with location choice (through the population density of the location chosen for professional practice. Results: A total of 563 graduates completed the questionnaire. Of those, 4.3% (n=24 reported family medicine as their medical specialty, 19.9% (n=112 reported other primary care specialties (internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery and obstetrics-gynecology and the others chose subspecialties. Larger cities were more likely to be chosen for practice, particularly for newly-graduated doctors. Job invitations received during medical residency training increased the likelihood of choosing high-populated cities. In contrast, job invitations received during medical school increased the likelihood of choosing cities less populated. Amongst those in cities with lower population density, proximity to family members was an additional influencing factor; those who chose more densely populated cities did so because of better infrastructure and recreational options. Conclusion: Most of the physicians included in this study pursue subspecialties training and were practicing medicine in large cities. Knowing the multiple factors that influenced the choice of practice location can assist in planning future strategies to reduce physician workforce misdistribution.

  11. Collaboration between schools of social work and university medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, N F; Briar, S

    1979-05-01

    Although the interface involving social work, medicine, and the other health professions occurs primarily in the day-to-day world of practice in hospitals and other health agencies, an equally important opportunity exists for interaction at the university level between schools of social work and schools for health professionals. This artice analyzes one school's effort to build effective interdisciplinary linkages.

  12. Measuring and Reporting Physician's Performance in a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan-Fishman, Ana Lucia

    This paper describes a Patient Satisfaction survey and database used to measure and report on physician performance at the Ohio State University Health System (OSUHS). The OSUHS averages 6,000 inpatients in any given month, and more than 7,000 emergency patients and 70,000 outpatient encounters. Data from the Patient Satisfaction measures are…

  13. Consensus-Driven Development of a Terminology for Biobanking, the Duke Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Helena; Joshi, Mary-Beth; Lynn, Aenoch J; Walden, Anita

    2017-03-24

    Biobanking at Duke University has existed for decades and has grown over time in silos and based on specialized needs, as is true with most biomedical research centers. These silos developed informatics systems to support their own individual requirements, with no regard for semantic or syntactic interoperability. Duke undertook an initiative to implement an enterprise-wide biobanking information system to serve its many diverse biobanking entities. A significant part of this initiative was the development of a common terminology for use in the commercial software platform. Common terminology provides the foundation for interoperability across biobanks for data and information sharing. We engaged experts in research, informatics, and biobanking through a consensus-driven process to agree on 361 terms and their definitions that encompass the lifecycle of a biospecimen. Existing standards, common terms, and data elements from published articles provided a foundation on which to build the biobanking terminology; a broader set of stakeholders then provided additional input and feedback in a secondary vetting process. The resulting standardized biobanking terminology is now available for sharing with the biobanking community to serve as a foundation for other institutions who are considering a similar initiative.

  14. Factor Analysis of Teacher Professional Development in Chinese Military Medical Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Juan-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Teacher professional development potentially enhances teachers' professional morale, knowledge, skills and autonomy, which helps improve the quality of education. The military medical university is an important medical education institution in China; however, studies of teacher professional development within military…

  15. Factor Analysis of Teacher Professional Development in Chinese Military Medical Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Juan-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Teacher professional development potentially enhances teachers' professional morale, knowledge, skills and autonomy, which helps improve the quality of education. The military medical university is an important medical education institution in China; however, studies of teacher professional development within military…

  16. Attitudes toward Psychiatry: A Survey of Medical Students at the University of Nairobi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetei, David M.; Khasakhala, Lincoln; Ongecha-Owuor, Francisca; Kuria, Mary; Mutiso, Victoria; Syanda, Judy; Kokonya, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The authors aim to determine the attitudes of University of Nairobi, Kenya, medical students toward psychiatry. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. Self-administered sociodemographic and the Attitudes Toward Psychiatry-30 items (ATP-30) questionnaires were distributed sequentially to every third medical student in his or her…

  17. Teaching Medical Students about Quality and Cost of Care at Case Western Reserve University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Linda A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    At Case Western University (Ohio), medical students critically analyze the quality and cost of asthma care in the community by studying patients in primary care practices. Each writes a case report, listing all medical charges and comparing them with guidelines for asthma care. Several recommendations for improved care have emerged. (MSE)

  18. Opinions of medical students at the University of Cape Town on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical students at the University of Cape Town. Students from 1st to 5th year completed ... quently selected motivating factors were moral dissatisfaction ... both selection criteria and medical education; and the pro- ... sible effect of compulsory community service. .... prevent the departure of graduates to employment oppor-.

  19. Partnerships in Medical Education: An Exploration of Library Service Models for Postgraduate Medicine at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Macquarie University's new medical school, The Australian School of Advanced Medicine (ASAM), is developing a postgraduate program that incorporates a partnership with Macquarie University Library. The curriculum encompasses contemporary models of competency-based assessment, teamwork and lifelong learning that are integrated with research and…

  20. Prevalence of Depression Among Students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Eghtedar, Samereh; Rahbar, Narges; Jasemi, Madineh; Mesgar Zadeh, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, thoughts and behaviors. This study was performed to identify the presence of depression among medical students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 700 undergraduate medical and basic sciences students. Beck depression inventory (BDI) used for data gathering. Results: Mean score of BDI was 10.4 ± 0.8 and 52.6% of students scored under the depression th...

  1. To determine the level of satisfaction among medical students of a public sector medical university regarding their academic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzar Bushra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ongoing evaluation system is essential to determine if the academic system in place has worked to produce a better product, hence the objective of our study was to evaluate the satisfaction level among medical students regarding their academic teaching and assessment method and what measures will they suggest for the future to rectify the current situation. This questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in a public sector medical university from February to July 2010. A well structured questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 375 final year medical students. However 292 of the students provided informed consent and filled in the questionnaire which included their demographic profile as well as questions in line with the study objective. Data was entered in a Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version.16 and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings The male to female ratio in our study was 1:2. Most of the students (57.2% were dissatisfied with the quality of teaching in the university. Fifty-seven percent of the participants believed that the current standard of their institute were not at par with those of international medical universities. BCQ's were the mode of examination questions preferred by the majority of the students. Most of the students (66.1% wanted the university to conduct career planning seminars to help them plan their career. Conclusions These results suggest that the students of public sector medical universities are unsatisfied from current academic facilities and teaching activities. Students recommend increased emphasis on better lectures and practical training as well as a need to incorporate career planning sessions for the students to help plan them their future career paths.

  2. The Effectiveness of a Working Memory Training Regimen for Iranian University Students: Implications for Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gholam Reza Kiany; Bahman Mehraban; Reza Ghafar Samar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Working memory is thought to serve as a part of memory structure where functions like temporary storage and manipulation of information take place. This study investigates the effectiveness of working memory training regimens with Iranian university students, while considering the implications for medical students. Methods: Thirty university students studying at different universities in Kermanshah took part in the study. They were divided into two groups as the experimental...

  3. Limitations of tissue micro array in Duke's B colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brunner, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular...... distribution. We selected 61 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing patients diagnosed with Dukes B colon cancer. Two 1 mm and two 2 mm cores were taken from both the centre and the invasive front of the tumour respectively. The immunostaining included MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, p53, COX-2, TIMP and Betacatenin...... moderate to high agreement (kappa = 0.54-0.9) whereas TIMP-1 had the lowest score (kappa 0.19-0.25). The application of TMA in Dukes B colon cancer has several pitfalls and depends substantially on the immunohistochemical marker in question. Therefore a validation study seems justified before applying...

  4. Bone marrow transplantation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, P J; Armitage, J O

    1993-08-01

    The bone marrow transplant program at UNMC is currently one of the most active programs in the country. The benefits to patients who are cured of disease by transplantation cannot be measured. The large volume of clinical and basic science research related to transplantation has enhanced the academic stature of UNMC. The combination of patient care, education, clinical research, and basic science research provides an excellent model for the operation of an academic medical institution.

  5. Mistreatment of university students most common during medical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuutinen Matti

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study concerns the occurrence of various forms of mistreatment by staff and fellow students experienced by students in the Faculty of Medicine and the other four faculties of the University of Oulu, Finland. Methods A questionnaire with 51 questions on various forms of physical and psychological mistreatment was distributed to 665 students (451 females after lectures or examinations and filled in and returned. The results were analysed by gender and faculty. The differences between the males and females were assessed statistically using a test for the equality of two proportions. An exact two-sided P value was calculated using a mid-P approach to Fisher's exact test (the null hypothesis being that there is no difference between the two proportions. Results About half of the students answering the questionnaire had experienced some form of mistreatment by staff during their university studies, most commonly humiliation and contempt (40%, negative or disparaging remarks (34%, yelling and shouting (23%, sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based mistreatment (17% and tasks assigned as punishment (13%. The students in the Faculty of Medicine reported every form of mistreatment more commonly than those in the Faculties of Humanities, Education, Science and Technology. Experiences of mistreatment varied, but clear messages regarding its patterns were to be found in each faculty. Female students reported more instances of mistreatment than males and were more disturbed by them. Professors, lecturers and other staff in particular mistreated female students more than they mistreated males. About half of the respondents reported some form of mistreatment by their fellow students. Conclusion Students in the Faculty of Medicine reported the greatest amount of mistreatment. If a faculty mistreats its students, its success in the main tasks of universities, research, teaching and learning, will be threatened. The results

  6. Duke Energy Photovoltaic Integration Study: Carolinas Service Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Meng, Da; Chassin, Forrest S.; Zhang, Yu; Vyakaranam, Bharat; Warwick, William M.; Fuller, Jason C.; Diao, Ruisheng; Nguyen, Tony B.; Jin, Chunlian

    2014-03-01

    Solar energy collected using photovoltaic (PV) technology is a clean and renewable energy source that offers multiple benefits to the electric utility industry and its customers, such as cost predictability, reduced emissions, and loss reduction by distributed installations. Renewable energy goals established in North Carolina Senate Bill 3 (SB3), in combination with the state tax credit and decreases in the cost of energy from PV panels, have resulted in rapid solar power penetration within the Carolinas services areas of Duke Energy. Continued decreases in PV prices are expected to lead to greater PV penetration rates than currently required in SB3. Despite the potential benefits, significant penetration of PV energy is of concern to the utility industry because of its impact on operating reliability and integration cost to customers, and equally important, how any additional costs may be allocated to different customer groups. Some of these impacts might become limiting factors for PV energy, especially growing distributed generation installed at customer sites. Recognizing the importance of renewable energy developments for a sustainable energy future and economic growth, Duke Energy has commissioned this study to simulate the effects of high-PV penetration rates and to initiate the process of quantifying the impacts. The objective of the study is to inform resource plans, guide operation improvements, and drive infrastructure investments for a steady and smooth transition to a new energy mix that provides optimal values to customers. The study team consists of experts from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Power Costs, Inc. (PCI), Clean Power Research (CPR), Alstom Grid, and Duke Energy. PNNL, PCI, and CPR performed the study on generation impacts; Duke Energy modeled the transmission cases; and distribution simulations were conducted by Alstom Grid. PNNL analyzed the results from each work stream and produced the report.

  7. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Deressa Wakgari; Azazh Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their trainin...

  8. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shib Sekhar Datta; Boratne, Abhijit V; Rajkumar Patil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare ...

  9. Transition from traditional to innovative teaching in and beyond pharmacology at Ziauddin Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qamaruddin BARAKZAI

    2004-01-01

    Innovative teaching methodologies in different parts of the world are being practiced since last 3 decades. The aim of this review is to report the transition from traditional to innovative self learning process in Ziauddin Medical University, a new medical institute of Pakistan. Various problems encountered have been duly looked after by inducting faculty training programs and regular review sessions in which monitoring of the transition process was duly observed as well as further advancements were also planned. The University being a pioneer has attracted other institutions which have also planned to induct PBL in their curriculum.Vertical and horizontal integration has also inducted better understanding of subjects and fruitful advantages had been accomplished in subjects as pharmacology and pathology. In conclusion, the initial decision of the university to adapt innovative teaching methodologies along with following an integrated curriculum based on PBL and Community Oriented Medical Education system has now made ZMU a Novel institute amongst other medical institutes in the country.

  10. Mystery behind the match: an undergraduate medical education–graduate medical education collaborative approach to understanding match goals and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Nagler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a paucity of information regarding institutional targets for the number of undergraduate medical education (UME graduates being matched to graduate medical education (GME programs at their home institutions. At our institution, the Duke University, the number of UME graduates matched to GME programs declined dramatically in 2011. To better understand why this decline may have happened, we sought to identify perceived quality metrics for UME and GME learners, evaluate trends in match outcomes and educational program characteristics, and explore whether there is an ideal retention rate for UME graduates in their home institutions’ GME programs. Methods: We analyzed the number of Duke University UME graduates remaining at Duke for GME training over the past 5 years. We collected data to assess for changing characteristics of UME and GME, and performed descriptive analysis of trends over time to investigate the potential impact on match outcomes. Results: A one-sample t-test analysis showed no statistically significant difference in the number of Duke UME graduates who stayed for GME training. For both UME and GME, no significant changes in the characteristics of either program were found. Discussion: We created a process for monitoring data related to the characteristics or perceived quality of UME and GME programs and developed a shared understanding of what may impact match lists for both UME graduates and GME programs, leaving the Match somewhat less mysterious. While we understand the trend of graduates remaining at their home institutions for GME training, we are uncertain whether setting a goal for retention is reasonable, and so some mystery remains. We believe there is an invaluable opportunity for collaboration between UME and GME stakeholders to facilitate discussion about setting shared institutional goals.

  11. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine summer medical program for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jerome; Atkins, R Matthew; Tucker, Phebe; Monson, Angela; Corpening, Brian; Baker, Sherri

    2011-06-01

    To enhance diversity of applicants to University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, a Summer Medical Program for High School Students was started in 2009. This comprehensive pipeline program included sessions on applying to medical school, interaction with a panel of minority physicians and health care professionals role models, clinically oriented didactics taught by physician faculty, shadowing experiences in clinics and hospitals, and presentation of student research reports. Students' assessments in 2009 showed increased understanding of the medical school application process, the medical curriculum and the medical field, and an increase in students'likeliness to choose a medical career. Importance of long-term mentoring and follow-up with students to sustain their medical interests is discussed.

  12. Jewish Medical Students and Graduates at the Universities of Padua and Leiden: 1617–1740

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Collins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Jewish medical graduates at the University of Padua qualified in the fifteenth century. Indeed, Padua was the only medical school in Europe for most of the medieval period where Jewish students could study freely. Though Jewish students came to Padua from many parts of Europe the main geographical sources of its Jewish students were the Venetian lands. However, the virtual Padua monopoly on Jewish medical education came to an end during the seventeenth century as the reputation of the Dutch medical school in Leiden grew. For aspiring medieval Jewish physicians Padua was, for around three hundred years, the first, simplest, and usually the only choice.

  13. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  14. Collaboration between the University of Michigan Taubman Health Sciences library and the University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christine; Harris, Bethany; Mahraj, Katy; Schnitzer, Anna Ercoli; Rosenzweig, Merle

    2013-01-01

    Librarians have traditionally facilitated research development resulting in grants through performing biomedical literature searches for researchers. The librarians at the Taubman Health Sciences Library of the University of Michigan have taken additional steps forward by instituting a proactive approach to assisting investigators. To accomplish this, the librarians have taken part in a collaborative effort with the University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research. Through this partnership, both units have created and adopted various techniques intended to facilitate the submission of grants, thus allowing researchers more time to conduct their primary activities.

  15. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medical education can bea health hazard for medical students

  16. Investigation on the governance model and effect of medical schools merged with comprehensive universities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ge; Luo, Li

    2013-08-01

    This investigation analyzes the management of medical schools merged with comprehensive universities through internet search and research review to reveal management model and effect of the merger. The conclusion is safely reached that governance models are divided into two different patterns: centralized management and decentralized management. Eight universities, representing the two models, were selected and evaluated comprehensively. Among them, the universities that carried out decentralized management have greater development after the merger based on a quality comparison concerning freshmen, faculty, teaching, and research between the two patterns. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  17. Assessing bone banking activities at University of Malaya medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Suhaili; Samsuddin, Sharifah Mazni; Ramalingam, Saravana; Min, Ng Wuey; Yusof, Norimah; Zaman, T Kamarul; Mansor, Azura

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of establishing in-house bone banks is its ability to readily provide allograft bones for local surgeries. Bone procurement activities of our university bone bank during the 10 years of operation were reviewed. Socio-demographic data of donors, types of bone procured, cases of rejected bones and types of allograft bones transplanted are presented. From 179 potential donors, 73 % were accepted with 213 procured bones. Femoral head was the common bone transplanted (45 %), as it was also the most common procured (82 %). Bones were rejected mainly due to non-technical reasons (83 %) rather than positive results of microbiological (13 %) and serological (4 %) tests. Comprehensive data could not be obtained for further analysis due to difficulties in retrieving information. Therefore, quality assurance system was improved to establish more systematic documentations, as the basis of good banking practice with process control hence allowing traceability.

  18. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazaheri Tehrani A.MSc,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medical Sciences and all the 250 students studying at nursing, medical, and paramedical schools were participated in it. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 20 questions was used to determine the knowledge about and attitude toward solid waste recycling. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, Pearson correlation and independent T test. Findings The knowledge of students was the highest about the definition of recycling (84.4% and lowest about delivery of recycled materials to badgers (23.6%. Most medical (55.1% and paramedical (75.3% students had “weak” and most nursing students (47.1% had “moderate” knowledge about solid waste recycling. 69.2% of paramedical, 27.3% of medical and 25.5% of nursing students stated that “there is no information about recycling in the university courses”. Conclusion Most of the students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences have weak knowledge regarding to solid waste recycling and their knowledge are different among schools.

  19. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S.J. Mirmohammadi; A. H. Mehrparvar; M. Bahaloo; M. H. Davari

    2013-01-01

    .... opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni...

  20. Perception of the Medical Students on Their Future Career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Results: Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them...

  1. Perceptions of personal health risks by medical and non-medical workers in a university medical center : a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are faced with many work-related choices which may depend on how they perceive risk, such as whether or not to comply with safety regulations. Little research has investigated risk perception in medical workers in comparison with non-medical workers and the ext

  2. Perceptions of personal health risks by medical and non-medical workers in a university medical center : a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are faced with many work-related choices which may depend on how they perceive risk, such as whether or not to comply with safety regulations. Little research has investigated risk perception in medical workers in comparison with non-medical workers and the ext

  3. [Two research projects on infectious diseases conducted in Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana by Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Eiji; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Ghana-Tokyo Medical and Dental University Research Collaboration Center has been established since 2008 when our Program was chosen together with the Program in the Philippines proposed by Tohoku University as an additional small-scale research center of the Overseas Research Program on Emerging and Reemerging Diseases that is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government and started in 2005. This 5-year government-supported Program has changed its name to develop into a more active world-level program called Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) and entered the second 5-year phase in 2010, and our Program is playing an important role among other research centers located in Asia and Africa. Currently, two research projects are carried out in parallel in Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research by Tokyo Medical and Dental University: one is a J-GRID project and the other is the one of Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) which is a joint project between Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). This special article is describing what these two projects are all about.

  4. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Michael; Baumann, Adrian; Hofstetter, Christine; Korte, Rolf; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of "internationalizing" medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: Schwerpunktcurriculum Global Health, short: SPC) at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants' evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on "global health" in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and "at home" (e.g. in relation to migration). We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of "global health" represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The "SPC" at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  5. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knipper, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of “internationalizing” medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: , short: at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants’ evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on “global health” in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and “at home” (e.g. in relation to migration. We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of “global health” represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The “SPC” at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  6. [Medical surveillance in university: organizational difficulties, legal problems, scientific e technical specificities. Experience of University of Milan Bicocca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orso, M I; Giuliani, C; Assini, R; Riva, M A; Cesana, G

    2012-01-01

    Our research describes activities of Occupational Health carried out during last year in University of Milan Bicocca by Occupational Doctors. We describe results of medical surveillance in 1153 employees or students exposed to occupational risks for health and safety. We report results obtained, technical difficulties, organizational problems, and preventive actions decided to improve functionality of our activity. Students seem to be less protected and consequently seem to have higher professional safety and health risks.

  7. Characteristics of undergraduate medical thesis of a Peruvian public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Castro Maldonado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The undergraduate thesis rather than a requirement to graduate, are a way of doing research. Previous studies show a thesis published between 2.7% to 17.6% in indexed journals. Objective: Describe the characteristics of the undergraduate thesis of the Faculty of a medical school. Bibliometric study. 221 theses were reviewed, collecting: Year, number of authors, advisers, and references, study population, and national priorities for health research. A search was performed on Google Scholar to assess publication. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: Being lower production in the years 2008-2010 was observed. 91.6% had one advisor, 76% descriptive, 82.8% in hospital population, and 62.4% of adults. Theses displayed between 2010-2014 72.9% did not correspond to any national health research priority. Only 6.8% was based on literature of the last five years. Only 9 (4.1% were published in a scientific journal indexed. Conclusions: The undergraduate thesis were characterized as descriptive, hospital, adults, literature based on outdated and not in line with the national priorities for health research. The publication is low.

  8. A Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Multigranulation Rough Set over Two-Universe Model for Medical Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Deyu; Yan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In medical science, disease diagnosis is one of the difficult tasks for medical experts who are confronted with challenges in dealing with a lot of uncertain medical information. And different medical experts might express their own thought about the medical knowledge base which slightly differs from other medical experts. Thus, to solve the problems of uncertain data analysis and group decision making in disease diagnoses, we propose a new rough set model called dual hesitant fuzzy multigranulation rough set over two universes by combining the dual hesitant fuzzy set and multigranulation rough set theories. In the framework of our study, both the definition and some basic properties of the proposed model are presented. Finally, we give a general approach which is applied to a decision making problem in disease diagnoses, and the effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical example.

  9. Medical education reform in wuhan university, china: a preliminary report of an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow; Dong, Hongmei; Yunfeng, Zhou; Stern, Scott; Jiong, Yang; Matlin, Karl; Baoping, Yu; Husain, Aliya N; Morgan, Ivy; Cooper, Brian; Juan, Feng; Mehta, Sujata

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 Wuhan University Medical School in China proposed to reform its curriculum by adapting the curriculum of the University of Chicago Medical School. An assessment of Wuhan University Medical School's traditional curriculum conducted in 2009 informed the reform directions, which included course integration, use of clinical cases, improved relevance of basic sciences to clinical medicine, reduction of lecture time, increase in group and independent learning, and the use of formative assessments. Fifty student volunteers per year were chosen to participate in the reform, and the rest remained in the traditional curriculum. A student survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate the reform by comparing the attitudes of those in the reform and standard curricula. The reform met the needs of the school, was generally well received, improved satisfaction in reform participants, and had a positive impact on students. Areas needing improvement were also identified.

  10. Sleep Hygiene Practices and Their Relation to Sleep Quality in Medical Students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poor quality of sleep is a distressing and worrying condition that can disturb academic performance of medical students. Sleep hygiene practices are one of the important variables that affect sleep quality. The objective of this study was to assess association between sleep hygiene practices and sleep quality of medical students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, a total of 285 medical students completed a self-administered questionnaire. Demographic data, sleep-wake schedule in weekday and weekend, and sleep duration were collected. Students' sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver 13. Results: Overall, 164 (57.5 of students had poor sleep quality. Mean global PSQI score and average score of four subscales were significantly higher in male than female. Regression analysis showed that male students (β=-0.85, P<0.05, students at senior level (β=-0.81, P<0.05, married students (β=-0.45, P<0.05, and those with improper sleep hygiene practices slept worse. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the prevalence of poor sleep quality in medical students is high. Improper sleep hygiene behaviors might be a reason for poor quality of sleep in medical students.

  11. Student-Life Stress Level and its Related Factors among Medical Students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Nikanjam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Student-life stress can lead to various negative consequences such as physical illness, mental disorders or exhaustion. The present study was conducted to evaluate the level of student life stress and its related factors among medical students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study applied multistage random sampling to select 500university students at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences during 2015. The data collection tool used in this study was a self-report questionnaire containing two parts: a section on subjects' demographic details and another section for Student-Life Stress Inventory (SLSI. Data were analyzed in SPSS20-using descriptive and inferential statistics, such as independent t-test, Pearson’s correlation test and one-way ANOVA. Results: This study revealed that %57of the students had moderate levels of stress. The most important stressors included self-impose and pressure, and also the most important reactions to stressors included cognitive appraisal and emotional reactions, respectively. There was a significant association between exam stressors and branch, educational level, and mother's and father's education level (P< 0.05. Conclusions: According to the high level of stress in students and the recognition of demographic factors, effective educational interventions can be conducted to reduce stress.

  12. Perception of the medical students on their future career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-06-25

    Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them, 67.5% were female with mean age of 21.7±2.4. The main factors for deciding to study in medicine were their interest (64.1%), family pressure (13.5%) and social prestige of medical career (9.8%). The mean score of attitudes was 2.3±0.6. In total, 24.5% of students demonstrated not having interest in studying medicine. The most important cause of their interest change was long duration of education (24.4%) and cost of studying in medicine (13.8%). In total, 88.6% of students had negative viewpoint towards their medical career in future. In general, the attitude of medical students toward their future career was negative.

  13. Viewpoints of students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Mojahed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Academic advisors have been proven important in students’ success. Insufficient guidance and counseling can delay professional and educational achievements. Proper counseling can provide opportunities for educational success and also positive change students’ behavioral models. This study was accomplished with the purpose of assigning the function of advisors from the viewpoint of the students. Methods: This descriptive study was done on 385 students of Shahid Sadoughi University. Randomized stratified sampling was used. The data were collected by completing the self-reported questionnaire and then were analyzed by SPSS software. Advisors’ functions in each of the items were evaluated. The significance level of 0.05 was considered. Results: The majority of samples were from Nursing, Midwifery, and Public Health School and a few from Faculty of Medicine. The majority of students (41.8% agreed to have the same advisor from the first term to the last. Also the results showed that the functions of advisors were poor in the areas of constant supervision and monitoring of students’ educational status (35.8%, preparing the timetable for performing the personal or group counseling (41.8% and providing counseling sessions according to the timetable (42.3%. But their functions were fair in the areas of acceptable guidance of students in the educational problems (35.1%, and the advisor’s familiarity to educational regulations (43.9%. It is necessary to note that the advisor's ability in making the intimate relationship with students (37.1%, and the advisors’ motivation and tendency to guidance and counseling (30.1% were the two items evaluated excellent by students. Conclusion: It is necessary that advisors make the students familiar with educational regulations at the first semester of higher education. Also, the policies and regulations for advisors will clarify their activities and will help them to perform better.

  14. Mental health status among Japanese medical students: a cross-sectional survey of 20 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nanri, Hinako; Ohida, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the mental health status of Japanese medical students and to examine differences based on gender, as well as on university type and location, using the results of a nationwide survey. Between December 2006 and March 2007, we conducted a questionnaire survey among fourth-year medical students at 20 randomly selected medical schools in Japan. The data from 1,619 students (response rate: 90.6%; male: 1,074; female: 545) were analyzed. We used the Japanese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to measure mental health status. Poor mental health status (GHQ-12 score of 4 points or higher) was observed in 36.6% and 48.8% of the male and female medical students, respectively. The ratio of the age-adjusted prevalence of poor mental health status in female versus male medical students was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.62). The universities were categorized into two groups based on the university type (national/public: 15 vs. private: 5) or location (in a large city: 7 vs. in a local city: 13 cities). The prevalence of poor mental health status in both men and women differed between these groups, although not significantly. The GHQ-12 scores in men significantly differed between the categorized groups of universities. These results suggest that adequate attention must be paid to the mental health of medical students, especially females, and that a system for providing mental health care for medical students must be established in the context of actual conditions at each university.

  15. Perspectives in medical education - 4. A "global" dimension to reform at Keio University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Harsha

    2007-03-01

    Keio University School of Medicine is awakening to the realization that it will achieve international recognition as a center of excellence in medical education and healthcare only by inculcating clinical skills and critical thinking in its medical graduates. A new "global" perspective identifies the traditional failure of Japanese medical education to provide its graduates with clinical skills training as the root cause of a number of deficiencies. These include (i) the reluctance of Japanese medical graduates to seek global experience; (ii) the absence of interest in the global healthcare marketplace for Japanese medical graduates as potential recruits; (iii) the failure to incorporate globally accepted innovations, like problem-based learning, in Japanese medical education; (iv) the failure to follow globally accepted standards of clinical practice in Japan; (v) the lack of instruction in general internal medicine in Japan; and (vi) the neglect of evidence-based medicine in Japanese healthcare practice. Keio University is embarking on an ambitious effort that commits both the will and resources necessary to reform medical education at Keio in accordance with global norms. The initiatives currently underway include (i) incorporating PBL into the curriculum to foster active learning, (ii) implementing measures to promote interactive teaching techniques among the faculty, and (iii) granting recognition to teachers through new promotion policies. Wider implementation of these initiatives across the country will enable Japanese healthcare and Japanese physicians to occupy their rightful place of respect in the global healthcare market, comparable to the widespread international recognition given to Japanese medical researchers.

  16. Cases from the Osler Medical Service at Johns Hopkins University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Allison B; Kim, Yuli; Jefferson, Brian K

    2003-12-01

    A 50-year-old African American woman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain, a history of falls during the past several months, and personality and behavior changes. She had been in good health until approximately 5 months before admission, when she began to fall with increasing frequency, often while going down a flight of stairs. She described these falls as her "legs giving out" and feeling very heavy and unsteady. There was no head trauma or loss of consciousness. Her daughter noticed that her gait had become somewhat unsteady during the last several months. Her family also noted a change in her personality at this time. Previously, she had been a very tidy person who took great care with her appearance, who was working as a customer service representative. However, she had become less social and very withdrawn. She had been observed putting on dirty clothes after showering, as well as eating constantly. The patient denied any fevers, chills, night sweats, headaches, vision changes, or tinnitus. She also denied any rashes, muscle pain, or intolerance to heat or cold. There was no history of seizure disorder or depression. Her past medical history was notable only for hypertension and being a passenger in a motor vehicle crash 1 year before admission. She denied any alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drug use, and had no travel history other than coming to the United States, as she was originally from Trinidad. On physical examination, she was a moderately obese African American woman with a flat affect, psychomotor slowing, and alopecia of the scalp. She was alert and oriented to person, place, and time, but had a score of 26 out of 30 on the Mini-Mental State Examination. She lost points only for recall; she had no difficulty with serial 7s. Her cranial nerves were intact and her speech was fluent, although sparse, and she did not make any paraphasic errors. Her muscle strength was 5/5 in both the upper and lower extremities. Reflexes were 2+ in the upper

  17. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND OTHER LIFESTYLE HABITS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Jiménez Morgan; Jessenia Hernández-Elizondo

    2016-01-01

    Those engaged in medical sciences are social models. For this reason, their daily habits influence their professional practice and the primary prevention they carry out. The main purpose of this research was to determine whether this group of medicine training students, all from University of Costa Rica, met national and international recommendations regarding health and wellness regulations. In 2014, second semester, anonymous questionnaires were applied to all undergraduate medical students...

  18. Medical students' knowledge, abilities and access characteristics to the internet at a peruvian university

    OpenAIRE

    Horna, Pedro; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Curioso, Walter; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Guillén, Carlos; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Torres, Carla; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Kawano, Jorge; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To study the knowledge abilities and access characteristics to the Internet in undergraduate medical students from a Peruvian University. Methods: Development and application of a questionnaire to medical students, report of the results and nested case-control analysis of data to identify variables related to the ability to surf the Internet. Results: The students enter the Internet mainly from home. The most visited websites were those from web mail services and entertainment sit...

  19. Dysmenorrhea among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University: Prevalence, Predictors and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; AlGhamdi, Manar Saleh; Al-Shaibani, Alanoud Nawaf; AlAmri, Fatima Ali; Alharbi, Huda Abdulrahman; Al-Jadani, Arwa Kheder; Alfaidi, Raghad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, predictors and outcome of dysmenorrhea among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 435 medical students at KAU, Jeddah selected through stratified random sample method. A pre-constructed, validated, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal and socio-demographic information. Data about menstrual history, stress, smoking were also collected...

  20. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES TOWARDS THE INTERNSHIP TRAINING PERIOD AT KING FAISAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bashawri, Layla A.M.; Mirghani A Ahmed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.L.; Al-Salim, Jawaher A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this present survey was to look into the attitudes of medical laboratory technology (MLT) graduates towards the internship training period of the MLT Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Faisal University. Material and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed for this purpose. The study period was from December 1st 2002 – 31st December 2004. Two-hundred questionnaires were distributed to recent graduates, and 115 wer...

  1. Educational needs of faculty members of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S Mazloomy Mahmoodabad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying educational needs is an essential step in planning faculty development programs. It plays an important role in promoting the quality of education. The aim of this study was to determine and prioritize the educational needs of clinical and non clinical faculty members of Faculty of Medicne of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A questionnaire was developed for this cross-sectional study using the indices identified by reviewing the literature. The questionnaire was sent to all faculty members of Medical Faculty (n=260. The items were scored from 1 to 20 according to the importance of the educational needs. Data was analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Different areas of educational needs of the clinical faculty members were respectively prioritized as: familiarity with National Medical Universities Ranking Schemeresearch, personal development, administrative and executive activities, education, specialized activities outside the university and health services and health promotion. In the non clinical faculty members: research, familiarity with National Medical Universities Ranking Schemeeducation, personal development, specialized activities outside the university, administrative and executive activities. The first priority of education in the clinical faculty members was design, implementation and analysis of oral exams. In research domain priorities were data analysis skills and the first priority of education in the non clinical faculty members was how to foster critical thinking and reasoning in research and critical appraisal skills. Conclusion: Faculty members need all of the seven studiedmajor areas. It is recommended further research to determine the weight of these seven areas using a standard method.

  2. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Company; Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Compliance Filings Take notice that on July 10, 2013, Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Florida Power & Light Company, Tampa Electric Company, and Orlando...

  3. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-01-01

    Background Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using a pretested self-administered structured questionnaire from May-June 2013. The primary outcome indicator was self-reported absenteeism from lectures in the semester preceding the study period. The stud...

  4. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Mazaheri Tehrani A.1 MSc,; Hosseindoost Gh. MSc,; Miranzadeh M.B.* PhD

    2016-01-01

    Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medi...

  5. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually

  6. Developing a Performance Evaluation Model of Trustees Boards in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniye Sadat Sajadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The critical role of the boards of trustee in the governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. Despite the importance of such evaluation, evidence demonstrated few studies have been done on the model of board performance evaluation especially in Iran. Aim: This study was aimed to develop a model to evaluate the board performance in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. Methodology: The present study was a mix qualitative-quantitative study. The participants were all stakeholders of board performance evaluation. The study, firstly, focused on the world experiences about the models of the board performance evaluation in the universities. Then, this study tried to investigate the current and proposed model of the board performance evaluation in the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. Hence, data were collected through interviews, observation and relevant document analysis and analyzed using framework approach. After that, the clustering and rating of the proposed dimensions and indicators of the board performance evaluation was done using the concept mapping method. Finally, the study concentrated on the expert consensus about the initial proposed model of the board performance evaluation. A model was proposed to evaluate the board performance in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences, which had eight parts and sixty-four indicators proposing for the board performance evaluation. This study helped to develop a valid model to evaluate the board performance evaluation in a special kind of university. Such model can be used to produce useful tool for evaluating the performance of the board.

  7. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque,1 Nor Azlina A Rahman,2 Md Anwarul Azim Majumder,3 Seraj Zohurul Haque,4 Zubair M Kamal,5 Zakirul Islam,6 ATM Emdadul Haque,7 Nor Iza A Rahman,8 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi8 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, 4School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK; 5Sleep Research Unit, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 6Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Eastern Medical College, Comilla, Bangladesh; 7Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kuala Lumpur Royal College of Medicine Perak (UniKL RCMP, Ipoh, 8Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia Background: The use of Internet has now become indispensable, and the technology has revolutionized the medical education and practice worldwide. Currently, medical students and professionals have an enormous opportunity to keep them always updated with the exponential growth of knowledge because of potential progression of Internet throughout the world that enables them to become a lifelong learner. Internet addiction is a widespread phenomenon among students and academicians at universities in Malaysia. Students use the Internet for recreational purpose and personal and professional development. The Internet has become an integral part of day-to-day life of the university students, including medical students. The aim of the present study was to examine the Internet use and addiction among students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire, Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire, developed by the Center

  8. Features of Medical Student's Theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a Five-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdan Hamzavi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of the studies conducted in Iranian medical schools are carried out as student's theses on which a lot of time and energy is spent. The purpose of the present study was to determine the characteristics of medical student's theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a five year period (2004-2008.Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study a checklist consisting of 21 questions was designed. The data were gathered from all medical student's theses during 2004-2008 (n=189 using a consensus method of data collection. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software.Results: In terms of type, most of the theses were descriptive cross-sectional (33.3%, descriptive (29.1%, and descriptive-analytical (18.5%. The highest number of theses belonged to clinical psychiatry (18.5% and obstetrics and gynecology (17.5% departments. Other departments, especially basic science departments had the lowest number of theses because clinical teachers constituted 86.2% of the supervisors. The duration of the thesis completion was between 2 and 24 months. Using hospital records and inpatients files were the methods mostly used for data collection and as data sources. Furthermore, we could not find an appropriate assessment and scoring system of theses in place.Conclusion: Medical student's theses lacked appropriate quality therefore this issue should be seriously taken into consideration by educational managers.

  9. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, ATM Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Internet has now become indispensable, and the technology has revolutionized the medical education and practice worldwide. Currently, medical students and professionals have an enormous opportunity to keep them always updated with the exponential growth of knowledge because of potential progression of Internet throughout the world that enables them to become a lifelong learner. Internet addiction is a widespread phenomenon among students and academicians at universities in Malaysia. Students use the Internet for recreational purpose and personal and professional development. The Internet has become an integral part of day-to-day life of the university students, including medical students. The aim of the present study was to examine the Internet use and addiction among students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire, Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire, developed by the Center for Internet Addiction, USA, was used. One hundred forty-nine medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin participated in this study. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results The mean scores were 44.9±14.05 and 41.4±13.05 for male and female participants, respectively, which indicated that both the genders were suffering from mild Internet addiction. Conclusion This study shows almost similar level of Internet usage among medical students irrespective of their socioeconomic background, with no statistically significant (p>0.05) differences, except among the years of study (p=0.007). Overall, from the research data and having worked with this cohort very closely, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin medical students can be labeled as wonted and recurring users of the Internet. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to define as Internet addicts or pathological users of the Internet because of small sample size and cross-sectional study. PMID

  10. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, Atm Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    The use of Internet has now become indispensable, and the technology has revolutionized the medical education and practice worldwide. Currently, medical students and professionals have an enormous opportunity to keep them always updated with the exponential growth of knowledge because of potential progression of Internet throughout the world that enables them to become a lifelong learner. Internet addiction is a widespread phenomenon among students and academicians at universities in Malaysia. Students use the Internet for recreational purpose and personal and professional development. The Internet has become an integral part of day-to-day life of the university students, including medical students. The aim of the present study was to examine the Internet use and addiction among students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire, Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire, developed by the Center for Internet Addiction, USA, was used. One hundred forty-nine medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin participated in this study. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. The mean scores were 44.9±14.05 and 41.4±13.05 for male and female participants, respectively, which indicated that both the genders were suffering from mild Internet addiction. This study shows almost similar level of Internet usage among medical students irrespective of their socioeconomic background, with no statistically significant (p>0.05) differences, except among the years of study (p=0.007). Overall, from the research data and having worked with this cohort very closely, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin medical students can be labeled as wonted and recurring users of the Internet. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to define as Internet addicts or pathological users of the Internet because of small sample size and cross-sectional study.

  11. Content and technical evaluation of Type III Iranian medical universities\\' websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadejeh Shabankareh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Besides the role that universities websites have in reflection of universities’ educational and research activities, they have also significant importance in promotion of universities’ national and international ranking in webometrics ranking of world universities and also in webometric ranking of Islamic world Science Citation and subsequently obtaining national and international credibility and gaining student and funding. So, continuous evaluation of universities websites in different aspects, especially based on considering index of these ranking systems, is important. Therefore, present study aimed to review the situation of Type 3 Iranian medical universities’ websites based on content and technical features effecting on promotion of webometric rank. Materials and Methods : Present study is a survey with descriptive approach which descriptive the present situation of Type 3 Iranian medical universities’ websites. Data were collected using a researcher-made checklist which was consisted of two parts including content criteria effecting on webometric ranking (50 criteria and technical criteria of search engines optimization (52 criteria. Content evaluation of websites was done by researcher direct referring and observing. In order to evaluation of these websites, based on technical criteria of search engines optimization, automatic tools about website evaluation were used. Data were analyzed by SPSS20. Results: The finding of this study showed that, Gonabad, Bushehr & Shahrekord universities of medical sciences have the most accommodation with the research checklist.  Bam, Dezful & Jiroft universities of medical sciences have the least accommodation. According to research findings less than 50 percent of the research community, reached more than 50 percent of the criteria in checklist. Conclusion: Evaluation of studied websites indicated that whole websites are far from ideal situation. So type 3 medical universities

  12. [Innovative activity of dental faculty staff of Omsk State Medical University: results, problems and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, A I; Gudinova, Zh V

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes innovative activity in Omsk State Medical University (OSMU) and contains the review of innovative developments of staff of dental faculty of OSMU (a line of gels for caries prevetion, the DENTEST diagnostic unit, technology of tooth shape modular restoration, personified therapy.of patients with periodontal disease, caries diagnosis and periodontontal disease prognosis software, a set of the training materials on esthetic modeling of teeth, personification of clinical approaches in oral bioaesthetic rehabilitation, etc.). The analysis of the factors stimulating and complicating innovative detail in medical school, problems of introduction of medical innovations, lack of system of an assessment of medical technologies in Russia, regulations of the organization of innovative activity in medical schools is carried out, the prospects of their solution connected with decision-making at the state level are formulated.

  13. Critical limits (alert values) for physician notification: universal or medical center specific limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, G

    1998-01-01

    The concept of critical limits (alert values), defined as an imminent life threatening laboratory result requiring immediate physician notification, has been widely adopted as a standard of good laboratory practice. Although virtually all laboratories have tests with critical limits, surveys have shown that there is no universal alert value list. Recently, nine VA medical centers in the New England region, which now constitute one consolidated entity, were surveyed with the objective of summarizing critical limits. Universal (100 percent) critical limit tests for clinical chemistry were: Calcium; mean low/high, 6.5/12.4 mg/dL: Glucose 48/432 mg/dL: Potassium 2.8/6.1 mmol/L: Sodium 121/159 mmol/L. Universal hematology tests included: Hematocrit 22.2/59.7 percent: Platelet count 61K/983K: white blood count 1.9K/29K. Although there was universal agreement that abnormal coagulation tests (PT, PTT) should be included on the hematology critical limit list, there was wide variation in the reporting of coagulation tests (seconds and INR) and patient therapeutic status (anticoagulant or no-anticoagulant). Universal alert values for microbiology were: Positive blood culture: Positive cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) culture: Positive CSF Gram stain. There was no universal agreement regarding critically high (potentially toxic) therapeutic drugs, with two medical centers declining to notify physicians of any abnormally high therapeutic drug level. No other qualitative critical limits for other laboratory sections, such as physician notification of an unexpected malignancy (surgical pathology) were universal. Medical center specific critical limits, designed to meet the clinical needs of each facility, are the norm in the nine medical centers. Laboratories do need periodically to review their critical limit lists with appropriate clinical input to avoid including critical limits for laboratory tests not required for urgent physician notification and patient evaluation and treatment.

  14. Developing a model of proper governance for removing interaction barriers between universities of medical sciences andindustries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shiva madahian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goal: The interaction between university and industry, due to its highly constructive and positive effects on technical, economic and social changes, was traditionally at the center of policy makers’ and planners’ attention. The aim of the present study was to explain barriers and challenges existing in the interaction between medical sciences universities and industry. Method: This present descriptive-correlational study used measuring method fto investigate the interaction among Medical Sciences University (School of Public Health. 1468 individuals participated in this study. Using Morgan scale, 321 people were selected as the sample. Two questionnaires were prepared by the researcher. The proper governance questionnaire contains political, economic, social, legal and cultural dimensions composed of 69 questions. The barriers between university and industry questionnaire covering 3 dimensions of individual interaction barriers, organizational interaction barriers and environmental interaction barriers is composed of 40 questions. Data analysis was done using SPSS, version 21. Results: Based on factor analysis of the data, the main dimension of proper governance respectively was cultural factors and among various factors of barriers between university and industry, environmental interaction dimension was considered as the most important one. Moreover, the results showed that there was a direct and meaningful relationship between dimensions of proper governance and interaction between university and industry variable. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, considering culture and cultural differences can help improve the interaction between university and industry.

  15. Self-medication among non-healthcare students of the University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Ibrahim Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the following study is to estimate the prevalence of self-medication among university students and evaluate factors associated with the practice. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during May, 2012 using a pre-validated questionnaire distributed to 250 students of the 4 years of study at the college of business administration. Data were analyzed using PASW Statistics for Windows, Version 18.0. Chicago: SPSS Inc and results are expressed as counts and percentages. Chi-square test was used to evaluate significant association among the study variables and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: The response rate was 80% and all respondents were Arabs with 114 (57% females and 86 (43% males. Self-medication was practiced by 118 (59% students and most (88.1% of them obtained medications from pharmacies. About 21 (11% respondents self-medicated with antibiotics. Only 34 (17% and 16 (8% of respondents were aware of bacterial resistance and rational drug use respectively. The most common reasons for self-medication were seeking quick relief (134, 67%, physician′s advice of self-management (100, 50%, illness is minor (91, 45.5%. Common reasons against self-medication include risk of misdiagnosis of illness (160, 80%, risk of using the wrong medication (154, 77%, risk of adverse effects (140, 70%. Self-medication was practiced for headache or mild pain, eye and ear symptoms, gastric problems, cold, fever and allergy. Conclusion: Self-medication among non-healthcare students is common with high prevalence. Knowledge of students of reasons for and against self-medication was adequate, but awareness of respondents of rational drug use and risk of bacterial resistance in response to misuse was poor. Orientation courses/workshops directed to university students would be beneficial.

  16. Pattern of self-medication with analgesics among Iranian University students in central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Sarahroodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is defined as the use of drugs for the treatment of self-diagnosed disorders. It is influenced by factors such as education, family, society, law, availability of drugs and exposure to advertisements. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication with analgesics and its pattern among different groups of Iranian University Students. Materials and Methods: A randomized, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from December 2009 to February 2010. The target population of this study was 564 students out of 10,000 students attending four medical and non-medical science universities in Qom state. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16, and analysis was conducted with descriptive analysis procedures. Results: 76.6% of the students had used analgesics in self-medication in the previous 3 months. The frequency of analgesic use in the study period was once in 19.2% of the participants, twice in 22.2%, three times in 16.3% and more than three times in 35.5% of the participants, although 6.8% of them were not sure when they were used. Of all the respondents, 49.8% reported headache as the problem. This was the most common problem, after which came Dysmenorrhea,headache and stomach ache. Bone and joint pains were other problems that led to the use of analgesics. The most commonly used source of information for self-medication with analgesics was advice from friends and family (54.7%, previously prescribed medications (30.1%, their medical knowledge (13.3% and recommendation of a pharmacist (1.9%. Conclusion: Self-medication with analgesics is very high among Iranian students in Qom city. This could be an index for other parts of the Iranian community. Because the source of information about analgesics is inappropriate, we would recommend education courses about analgesics and self-medication on the radio and television for the entire population.

  17. [Medical pedagogy and special didactics in graduate courses at the medical school of the University of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, E; Vanzolini, M E; Basile, M A; Fujimura, I; Pasqualucci, C A

    1992-01-01

    Graduate courses of medical pedagogy and special didactics at S. Paulo University Medical School are analysed. The authors present objectives, subject matters and methodologies of both courses, as well as their evaluation by the graduate students. After an initial rejection, the evaluation became very positive (67% in medical pedagogy and 82% in special didactics). Some future perspectives are discussed.

  18. Relationship between Eating Disorders, Stress and Depression in Medical Students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences & Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Ahmadian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Nowadays eating disorders are considered as one of the main psychological disorders. These types of disorder result in physical and mental health problems and affect the individuals’ quality of life. This study has aimed to survey eating disorders and its relation with depression and stress in medical students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methodology: In a descriptive study, 340 university students were chosen by the use of simple random sampling and also three questionnaires had been used: 1 Eating attitude questionnaire (EAT-26, revised Beck depression inventory (BDI and Students stressors questionnaire by Pouladi. Collected information was analyzed by the use of SPSS software and statistical tests. Findings: Based on research results 9.41% of students had eating disorder, 12.5% had average depression, 33.4% had severe depression, 12.5% had average stress and 31.3% had high stress. Relative frequency of eating disorder in medical students was the same based on gender, age, living conditions and marital status. Also there was a significant relation between relative frequency of eating disorder, depression severity and stress. Conclusion: Study findings showed that there was a relation between eating disorder, depression severity and stress; thus necessity of paying more attention to some mental symptoms such as depression and stress helps clinicians diagnose and cure eating disorders.

  19. Experience of developing and implementing a motivation induction course for konyang university medical college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Beag Ju; Lee, Keumho; Kim, Kunil; Song, Daun; Hur, Yera

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a new course for Konyang University College of Medicine freshmen to motivate them with regard to their vision and medical professionalism and experience various learning methods of medical education. The course was developed by 4 faculty members through several intensive meetings throughout the winter of 2010. A 4-credit course was designed for 61 freshmen of Konyang University College of Medicine to provide structured guidance and an introduction to their medical education and increase their motivation with regard to their studies and school life. The course lasted for 4 weeks (February 28 to March 25), and every session of the program was evaluated by the students. The 'motivation induction course' consisted of the following sessions: university-wide: 'leadership camp' and 'special lectures for future vision;' college-wide: 'major immersion session,' 'Enneagram workshop,' 'STRONG workshop,' 'medical professionalism,' and 'team-based learning.' The group results were presented in a poster and by oral presentation and were awarded prizes for the best performance. Special features included: group discussion session on medical ethics, which used scenarios that were developed by a medical humanity course committee and visiting all departments and mentors of the medical college to fulfill their curiosity of their future major or workplace. Overall, the course was evaluated as satisfactory (M=4.22, SD=0.81). Although there was some dissatisfaction, the overall experience of the "motivation induction course" was a success. The course will continue to be valuable for freshmen in adapting to medical school and its culture and in defining one's view of a good doctor.

  20. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  1. Thirty years of heart transplantation at the university medical centre Utrecht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammani, Arjan; Wind, A. M.; Kirkels, J. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074708074; Klöpping, C; Buijsrogge, M. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/24420098X; Ramjakhan, F Z; Asselbergs, F. W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; de Jonge, N|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091457106

    Purpose To analyse patient demographics, indications, survival and donor characteristics for heart transplantation (HTx) during the past 30 years at the University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMCU). Methods Data have been prospectively collected for all patients who underwent HTx at the UMCU from 1985

  2. Impact of 5 years of Lean Six Sigma in a university medical center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C. Niemeijer; A. Trip; L.J. de Jong; K.W. Wendt; R.J.M.M. Does

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherla

  3. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  4. A Comprehensive Wellness Program for Veterinary Medical Education: Design and Implementation at North Carolina State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven; Borst, Luke; Huckle, Jeffrey; Barter, Hillary; Neel, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Research in veterinary medical education has illustrated the challenges students face with respect to mental and emotional wellness, lack of attention to physical health, and limited opportunities to meaningfully engage with persons from different backgrounds. In response, the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine has…

  5. Clinical outcome as a function of the PR-interval-there is virtue in moderation: data from the Duke Databank for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Fredrik; Thomas, Kevin L; Broderick, Samuel; Ersbøll, Mads; Singh, Devinder; Chiswell, Karen; Shaw, Linda K; Hegland, Donald D; Velazquez, Eric J; Daubert, James P

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a U-shaped association between PR-interval and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation was described, with higher risk in patients with long and short PR-intervals. Little is known regarding the association of PR-interval duration and mortality. The objective of the current study was to explore the relationship between PR-interval and major cardiovascular outcomes in patients with known coronary heart disease. Patients in sinus rhythm, undergoing coronary angiography at Duke University Medical Center between 1989 and 2010, who had significant stenosis in at least one native coronary artery, were included. Patients with arrhythmia, second- or third-degree AV-block, QRS > 120 ms were excluded. A total of 9,637 patients were included (median age 63, IQR 55-71 years, 67% men). After adjustment for relevant covariates, the risk of a CV event increased with a decreasing PR-interval (10 ms decrements) for PR-interval values PR-interval for values >162 ms were seen for any of the studied endpoints. In patients with coronary heart disease, a prolongation of the PR-interval was not independently associated with poor outcomes, but a PR-interval shorter than normal was associated with increased all-cause mortality and other major cardiovascular events. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Are the Duke criteria really useful for the early bedside diagnosis of infective endocarditis? Results of a prospective multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Enrico; Trinchero, Rita; Imazio, Massimo; Forno, Davide; Dal Conte, Ivano; Lipani, Filippo; Brusca, Antonio; Gnavi, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    To date, no studies have evaluated the usefulness of the Duke vs the modified Duke criteria for the early diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE), nor is it known whether a probabilistic approach may be useful in establishing an early clinical diagnosis of IE. The aim of this study was (1) to assess and compare the clinical usefulness of the Duke vs the modified Duke criteria for the early diagnosis of IE, and (2) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a probabilistic approach based on the echocardiographic criterion. From January 2000 to December 2001, 267 consecutive patients with suspected IE were enrolled in a prospective multicenter trial. IE was diagnosed in 147 cases (55%) and rejected in 120 cases (45%). The Duke and the modified Duke criteria had a high similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The time to diagnosis was 8.15 +/- 7.4 days for the Duke criteria and 8.18 +/- 7.1 days for the modified Duke criteria. The time to diagnosis based on a probabilistic approach was shorter than that based on the Duke and the modified Duke criteria (4.96 +/- 7.1 days, for all p < 0.001). Although the Duke and the modified Duke criteria have a very similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, the delay in the time to diagnosis may be significant. A probabilistic approach based on clinical suspicion and echocardiographic evidence may be useful for decision-making, whilst awaiting case definition by means of the Duke criteria.

  7. The effective factors on the academic progress of the students of Tehran University of Medical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudbari, Masoud; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Roudbari, Soudeh; Sedghi, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    To examine factors influencing the academic performance of students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted between 2008 and 2009 at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data was obtained from the education office of the university and SPSS version 15 was used for data analysis. Of the 670 students in the study, 230 (34.3%) were boys and 440 (65.6%) were girls.The highest mean score of courses belonged to the Psychiatry Institute (18.68) and the lowest was in the School of Medicine (15.20). Twenty nine per cent of students had failed course and 8.4% had failed semester. The variables gender, level of education, and school are the most important factors affecting the educational progress of students. Overall, students' failure ratios varied significantly between schools and educational levels.

  8. Testing and Validation for Internet Attitude Scale among male and female students at Isfahan University and University of Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Zaki

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the third millennium witnessed the culmination of two decades of interest expressed by social researchers about the importance, status and utilization of ICT, particularly the Net, concerning scientific production in the areas of theory-formation and research. Part of this scientific output dealt with measurement of internet attitude. The present paper attempts to test, measure and validate internet attitude scales. It offers the findings of a survey conducted among 200 students, both male and female, at Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Medical Science. Standard Dinev and Koufteros questionnaire was used. It measures two kinds of attitude towards internet use and self-efficacy. Using factor analysis, the present paper investigated the reliability of two sets of questionnaires. Both possessed appropriate internal consistency. Construct Validity was confirmed using factor analysis. The statements incorporated within the research instrument could be distinguished and therefore offers a suitable tool for evaluating internet attitude.

  9. Assessment of academic libraries in Mazandran, Goleston and Babol Medical Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehteram Sadat Ilali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 3 August, 2009; Accepted 13 Jan, 2010AbstractBackground and purpose: Libraries have a specific place in universities and have also an important role in students' education and research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the situation of academic libraries in Mazandaran, Babol and Golestan Universities of Medical Sciences.Materials and methods: This study is a descriptive survey in 25 academic libraries in Mazandaran, Golestan and Babol medical Universities. The tool of the survey was a standard questionnaire (ACRL, and the libraries were assessed using of checklist and interview.Results: Thirteen librarians (53% hold a BSc degree, one (4% with an MSc degree and two (8% had an AA degree. Regarding to prediction and design of the libraries structure, only 40% (10 libraries had prior programs. Related to budget, 40% relied on resources from the deputy for research, 12% on faculty current budget and 8% on hospital current budget, (40% of others libraries did not have a planned budget. 12 libraries (45% were open 6 days a week, 10 libraries (40% 5 days a week and 3 libraries (12% provided services every day. 39665 references were held at central library of Babol Medical Sciences University and less than 1016 at 5 Azar Hospital in Golestan Medical Sciences University. Fifteen libraries (60% had access to Medline and Elsevier databases and 10 Libraries (40% did not have any access.Conclusion: University libraries must be standardized to meet the need of the students and staff.Key words: School libraries, therapeutic and teaching hospitals, standards, ACRL, IranJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 20(74: 85-89 (Persian

  10. Research priorities in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: categories and subcategories in the Iranian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARISA NABEIEI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research in education is a globally significant issue without a long history. Due to the importance of the issue in Health System Development programs, this study intended to determine research priorities in medical education, considering their details and functions. By determining barriers existing in research in education progress, it is tried to make research priorities more functional by recommending acceptable strategies. Methods: This is a qualitative-descriptive study in two descriptive phases. The goal of these phases was to determine research priorities subcategories in medical education by Nominal Group Technique (NGT and two rounds of Delphi method. Through the first phase, subcategories of research priorities were determined, using Nominal Group Technique under medical education experts’ supervision. Through two rounds of Delphi, a questionnaire was constructed based on the subcategories. Eventually, research priorities were determined based on their highest score (scores more than 7 out of 10. Results: In the first phase (NGT, 35 priorities in 5 major fields of medical education were presented. In the second phase, priorities were scored, using Delphi method. Medical Ethics and professionalism gained the highest scores (7.63±1.26 and educational evaluation the lowest (7.28±1.52. In this stage, 7 items were omitted but 2 of them were added again after experts’ revision in the third round of Delphi. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study and based on previous studies, it really seems that the fields of “Learning and Teaching Approaches” and “Medical Ethics and Professionalism” were more important. Because of financial and resource limitations in our country and the importance of research priorities, it is recommended to frequently study “research priorities determination program” at universities.

  11. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices towards Medication Use among Health Care Students in King Saud University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah T. Eissa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences students are expected to have appropriate knowledge and attitudes toward medication use. However, literary evidence of such expertise among health sciences students of King Saud University is unknown. This study was completed to assess the knowledge about medicines and behavior of health science students towards safe use of medications. It also aims to assess the health knowledge, attitude and practices of the students. Methods: This cross-sectional study used a questionnaire consisting of 24 questions. This was administered by the researcher between October and December 2009 in the colleges of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, applied medical science and nursing of the King Saud University. The survey consisted of three parts: Ten questions assessed the students’ knowledge on drug safety (Part 1. Four questions assessed student attitude toward medication consultations by the pharmacist (Part 2 and ten questions involved medication use practices and consultation with pharmacists (Part 3. A stratified sampling method was used to select participants. Results: Pharmacy students had better medication knowledge compared to other health sciences students especially regarding antihypertensive drugs, antibiotics, paracetamol and antacids (p<0.05. Pharmacy students showed a positive attitude regarding the trustworthiness of a pharmacist to give a consultation. Nearly all other health science students showed a negative attitude about dispensing and consultation concerning nutritional supplements by a pharmacist. All health sciences students had a similar perception toward medication use and practice. Conclusion Pharmacy students had better knowledge about medication practice compared to other health sciences students. All other health sciences students lacked the appropriate attitude and practice related to the safe use of medications.

  12. Introduction of a learning management system for medical education at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handels, Heinz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Connected with the introduction of a learning management system at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf three different learning management systems were evaluated. Based on the purposes and demands of modern medical education the systems WebCT CE 4.0, ILIAS 3.6 and Moodle 1.5.3 were testet and evaluated.This comparison led to an installation of the learning management system Moodle, which is now used by pilot projects and is getting prepared for normal student access in autumn 2006. First experiences under practical conditions are denoted. Finally prospective subjects like the concept of support and further options of use, even in the research domain, are discussed.

  13. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  14. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was completed. Each correct answer had one score and wrong answers had no score. Results: Of 114 students, 69 students (60.5% were female and 45 students (39.5% were male with the mean age of 24.1±1.5 year. The mean score of students in basic nutrition, nutrition in the life cycle and diet therapy was 4.6±2.2, 6.2±3.2 and 6.2±3.8, respectively. There was significant association between the score of nutrition course and nutritional knowledge score in all of the fields. Conclusion: The average of scores was low. Improving the nutrition courses, especially clinical aspects, during clinical education and presence of nutritionist in treatment teams will be helpful.

  15. 77 FR 2766 - Facility Operating License Amendment from Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., Catawba Nuclear Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Facility Operating License Amendment from Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., Catawba Nuclear Station... and NPF-52 issued to Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Catawba Nuclear...

  16. 75 FR 33358 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; McGuire Nuclear Station; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Carolinas, LLC; McGuire Nuclear Station; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately) I Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC's (Duke Energy or Licensee) is the holder of License Nos. NPF-9 and NPF-17, issued by the Nuclear... Energy Nuclear Policy Manual, NSD 218.10.1, Revision 9, states in relevant part, that where unusual...

  17. 77 FR 26318 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 Exemption 1.0 Background Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility Operating Licenses DPR-38...

  18. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education.

  19. Should Undergraduate Lectures be Compulsory? The Views of Dental and Medical Students from a UK University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Daud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Formal lectures have been a traditional part of medical and dental education, but there is debate as to their compulsory status. This study was designed to explore dental and medical students’ views on compulsory lectures and the use of Video-Recorded Lectures (VRL. A cross-sectional study of University of Bristol students in Years 2 to 4 was conducted using an online questionnaire. The majority of both dental (76% and medical (66% students felt lectures should be non-compulsory. The most common learning resources used by both dental and medical students were live lectures, lecture handouts and VRL. The majority of both dental (84% and medical (88% students used VRL. Most students attended lectures all of the time both before and after the introduction of VRL, even though most dental and medical students believe lectures should be non-compulsory. VRL is a popular learning resource. These findings tie-in with General Dental Council and General Medical Council recommendations that encourage self-directed learning. Dental and Medical schools should offer a range of learning resources and make use of current technology, including the use of VRL.

  20. [Reliability and validity of assessment of educational outcomes obtained by students of Medical Rescue at Medical University of Warsaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczyk, Mariusz; Stachacz, Grzegorz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Gotlib, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of preservation of high degree of objectivity of information about students' educational outcomes, a system of assessment needs to meet criteria of appropriate reliability and validity. Analysis of reliability and validity of the system of assessment of students' educational outcomes for courses followed by an examination and covered by a curriculum in Medical Rescue at Medical University of Warsaw (MU W). A retrospective study enrolling a group of 421 students of eight subsequent full education cycles. Detailed data concerning grades for fourteen courses followed by an examination in the entire course of studies were collected. Reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficient) and criteria validity (Spearman's rank correlation) were assessed. Internal consistency was estimated using a multiple regression model. The levels of assessment reliability for the general university, pre-clinical, and clinical scopes amounted to alpha: 0.42, 0.53, and 0.70, respectively. The strongest positive correlations between the results of pre-clinical and clinical trainings were found for the Anatomy course (r ≈ 0.30). Only in the case of the Pharmacology course it was found that students' achievements in this field were significantly correlated with all other courses of clinical training. The influence of educational outcomes in particular areas of clinical training on the final grade for the entire course of studies was diverse (β regression between 0.04 and 0.11). While the Pharmacology course had the strongest impact on final results, the Surgery course had the least influence on students' final grades (β = 0.04). 1. Sufficient reliability of the system of assessment of educational outcomes in Medical Rescue showed good precision and repeatability of assessment. 2. A low level of validity was caused by a failure to keep the appropriateness of the assessment of educational outcomes in several clinical courses. 3. Prognostic and diagnostic validity of methods used for

  1. Evaluation of self-medication practices in acute diseases among university students in Oman

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marwa Al Flaiti; Khaloud Al Badi; Wefaq Othman Hakami; Shah Alam Khan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the practices of university students towards self-medication to treat minor ailments inMuscat andSohar region ofSultanate ofOman.Methods:A cross sectional study was conducted inOctober2013-January2014.A total of450 university students were randomly selected and their verbal consent was obtained.The data were collected through the self-administered, close ended, pretested questionnaire and was analyzed statistically bySPSS version19.0.Results:Overall204 males(45.3%) and246 females(56.7%) participated in the study.The mean age of respondents was22.3 years.Ninety-four percent of respondents reported practicing self-medication and165(36.7%) participants admitted of having purchased drugs without prescription more than four times over the last six months.Headache, fever, cough and cold were the most common ailments which prompted respondents to seek self-medication. Analgesics, cough preparations and antibiotics were the most common classes of drugs used in self-medication.The majority of respondents practiced self-medication either because their illness was not serious or they had prior experience with the drug.The majority of respondents had good medicationknowledge which they reported to acquire from reading drug leaflet or from pharmacists’ advice.Conclusion:The prevalence of self-medication among university students was very high.There is a need for intensive education and comprehensive awareness campaign to advocate for reduction in the prevalence of self-medication practices among students.

  2. Predictors of dietary supplement usage among medical interns of Tehran university of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudeh, Gity; Kabiri, Sanaz; Yeganeh, Haleh Sadrzadeh; Koohdani, Fariba; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Khosravi, Shahla

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dietary supplement-use and its relationship with demographics and lifestyle of medical interns. The study sample comprised 356 interns aged 23 to 25 years. Participants completed a questionnaire on dietary supplement-use during the month preceding the study, information on demographic characteristics and lifestyle was also obtained. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were employed to assess the correlates of dietary supplement-use. The prevalence of dietary supplement-use was about 33% (males 20.4% and females 43.2%, pnutritional status (39.3%) and reducing hair loss (23.4%). The decision to use dietary supplement was mostly driven by the interns themselves (56% in males, 61% in females). In the univariable analysis, men who exercised once or twice a week were less likely to use supplements compared to those who reported doing exercise more than twice weekly (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.12-0.98). Females who reported their health status to be 'excellent' were more likely to use supplements compared to those who described their health status as 'moderate/poor/very poor' (OR=2.53, 95% CI 1.15-5.56) as were women who mentioned their breakfast consumption status as 'always' (OR=2.69, 95% CI 1.47-4.92). In the multivariable analysis, only breakfast consumption was significantly related with dietary supplement-use in females (OR=2.20, 95% CI 1.11-4.38). In conclusion, dietary supplement-use among medical interns, especially among females, was relatively very common. Dietary supplement-use was related to a healthier lifestyle.

  3. Methylphenidate use among medical students at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Givon Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methylphenidate is a psychotropic agent commonly used for the treatment of attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity and narcolepsy in children and adults. The awareness to attention deficit disorder as well as the non-medical use of methylphenidate for cognitive enhancement has increased during the past years. Objectives: To evaluate the medical and non-medical use of methylphenidate among medical students in the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Materials and Methods: Medical students were asked to report methylphenidate use, symptoms and diagnosis of attention deficit disorder using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 229 students participated in the study, out of which 105 (45.9% were in the pre-clinical years of medical school. Twenty-two students (9.6% were previously diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. Lifelong use of methylphenidate was reported by 39 (17% students, while 31 students (13.5% reported using methylphenidate during the preceding 12 month. In the beginning of medical school, only 7% of the students used methylphenidate, most of them began using it during pre-clinical academic years. Discussion: High rates of attention deficit disorder compared to the general population were reported by medical students. The rate of methylphenidate use is similar to recent report from a US medical school, and is considerably higher than in college students population. Conclusions: Many medical students are using methylphenidate without a medical indication. Further study is needed to evaluate the effect of methylphenidate on academic performance of healthy adults.

  4. Teaching medical information retrieval and application courses in Chinese universities: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam W; Li, Hong-Mei

    2010-12-01

    An important aspect of Chinese academic health science libraries is their involvement in teaching medical information retrieval courses as part of the medical curriculum. Health science librarians in China have a more formal teaching role than is generally found in Western countries, including many full-time teaching positions. This article provides a case study of Kunming Medical University Library, where courses are provided as credit units at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The teaching practices of Chinese health science libraries are compared with teaching experiences reported in Western countries. It is noted that Chinese government's educational policy is similar to that of the United States in promoting the role of the library in teaching subjects as part of the medical curriculum. In China, this has lead to the development of teaching departments within health science libraries and the appointment of full and part-time teacher librarians.

  5. [Computerized medical register of venous thromboembolic disease at the Grenoble University Hospital Center: description and evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, E; Bosson, J L; Pichot, O; Vidal, F; Rossignol, S; Schwartzmann, J; Carpentier, P H

    1994-01-01

    The number of vascular exams for venous thromboembolic disease increases dramatically in the vascular medicine unit at the Grenoble University Hospital (France). In order to improve the efficiency and the homogeneity of all the medical staff involved, a computerized register has been created. It automatically provides a letter for the prescriber of the consultation. This database, working on a computer network, has three main functions: office automation (medical folder, report), education, and clinical research. The office automation evaluation is performed after a 6 month experience, comparing 100 medical reports about venous thrombosis assisted by the computer to 100 medical reports written before the installation of the system. The introduction of digitized register is real, still this evaluation has induced some modification in the system in order to be more efficient.

  6. Drug use prevalence among students of universities of medical sciences in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Taremian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug use among students of universities of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Method: Four thousands of medical students (both sexes in academic year 1388-89 in different level of education, B.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. were selected by random stratified sampling method. These students were selected from Iran, Tehran and Shahid Beheshti Universities of Medical Sciences considering their sex and level of education. We used drug use prevalence questionnaire. Findings: The most prevalent drug of abuse in life time period was qalyan (classical pipe, followed by cigarette, and alcohol. The least frequent drug of abuse was Shisheh, followed by heroine krack. As we expected, drugs morphine, ritalin and tramadol were placed in forth, fifth and sixth of prevalent drugs. Use of different substances was significantly more prevalent in male students. Conclusion: Using soft drugs (qalyan, cigarette and alcohol was more prevalent than hard drugs (hashish, taryak, heroine kerack among Universities Medical Sciences of Tehran. Similar to drug use pattern in society, use of all of drugs were more prevalent in male students. We should pay special attention to use of drugs such as tramadol, ritalin, petedin and morphine.

  7. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  8. The Effect of Instructing Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategies on the Academic Progress of Ilam Medical University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Amir; Keikhavani, Sattar; Hasel, Kourosh Mohammadi

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed the effect of instructing cognitive and metacognitive strategies on the academic progress of Medical Sciences of Ilam University students. The research is quasi-experimental including a pre-test and a post-test. The population of the research includes the students of Medical Sciences of Ilam University. The sample includes 120…

  9. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  10. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES PERFORMED AT MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are five Bulgarian medical universities in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. A major priority of medical universities is to encourage research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Projects are managed by the participating organizations called “beneficiaries”. Beneficiaries develop projects, apply for finances and if approved they implement those projects.Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the organizational structure of research project activities on the macro level and on the micro level in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the separate elements of the organizational structure and to analyze the relations and interaction between them we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: During the last six years there was a significant increase in the number and the overall annual financial value of the projects performed at medical universities in Bulgaria. The reasons for such increase are: managers realizing the advantages of and benefits from the implementation of research projects ensuring high quality modernization of research units’ equipment and facilities; access to innovative technologies; development of interdisciplinary relations, etc. Benefits arising from improved results motivate us to consider as appropriate some additional investments aimed at increasing the number of team members and further optimization of the currently existing structures (research centers in charge of research with the purpose of achieving even better results in this particular field. Conclusion: The role of research project activities in medical universities’ research field is of vital importance for the educational institutions’ success. Taking into consideration the changed conditions, European possibilities and the highly competitive environment, realizing this aspect will be essential for the

  11. Patenting of university and non-university public research organisations in Germany: evidence from patent applications for medical research results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tinnemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patents are one of the most important forms of intellectual property. They grant a time-limited exclusivity on the use of an invention allowing the recuperation of research costs. The use of patents is fiercely debated for medical innovation and especially controversial for publicly funded research, where the patent holder is an institution accountable to public interest. Despite this controversy, for the situation in Germany almost no empirical information exists. The purpose of this study is to examine the amount, types and trends of patent applications for health products submitted by German public research organisations. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic search for patent documents using the publicly accessible database search interface of the German Patent and Trademark Office. We defined keywords and search criteria and developed search patterns for the database request. We retrieved documents with application date between 1988 and 2006 and processed the collected data stepwise to compile the most relevant documents in patent families for further analysis. We developed a rationale and present individual steps of a systematic method to request and process patent data from a publicly accessible database. We retrieved and processed 10194 patent documents. Out of these, we identified 1772 relevant patent families, applied for by 193 different universities and non-university public research organisations. 827 (47% of these patent families contained granted patents. The number of patent applications submitted by universities and university-affiliated institutions more than tripled since the introduction of legal reforms in 2002, constituting almost half of all patent applications and accounting for most of the post-reform increase. Patenting of most non-university public research organisations remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: We search, process and analyse patent applications from publicly accessible databases

  12. Easing the transition: the final year of medical education at Maastricht University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Marjan; Dornan, Tim; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Snoeckx, Luc H E H

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes the final year of medical education at Maastricht University as it has been operating since 2006. At the time external drivers for the development of a new structure of the final year were: the desire to prepare medical students for lifelong learning, the CanMEDs that were increasingly acknowledged to state the final attainment level of medical education and an increasing recognition of the importance of learning by participating actively and by taking more responsibility. Internal drivers were students' evaluations and our wish to improve instructional design and quality control. The main aim of this new final year is to better prepare students for the transition from the medical master programme to one of the postgraduate training programmes to become a medical specialist. The final year of the medical master programme consists of two 18-weeks participation electives, one in health care and one in research. Students have a higher level of autonomy and responsibility during this final year compared to the preceding medical clerkships to enhance the transition. Portfolios are the key element in examination of SCIP and HELP. Student evaluations of the final year show high scores on coaching and instructiveness. Despite some differences between departments overall scores are very high. Suggestions to improve include the availability of work places and time for education and coaching.

  13. Satisfaction of Iranian Medical Universities' faculty members towards holding Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyyed Nasrollah; Mohseni Band Pey, Anoshiravan; Hosseini, Seyyed Ali; Karami Matin, Behzad; Mirzaei Alavijeh, Mehdi; Jalilian, Farzad

    2015-10-01

    Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival aims to improve the quality of medical education in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and has held since 2008. The present study was performed to determine the satisfaction level of Iranian medical universities' faculty members about holding Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival during the past six years, from 2008 to 2014. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 473 faculty members (FMs) including deputies and educational administrators, managers, and faculty members of medical education development centers, members of scientific committees, and faculty members who participated in Shahid Motahari Festival from 42 medical sciences universities in Iran. Data collection instruments were two reliable and valid questionnaires on the background and also participants' satisfaction towards Shahid Motahari Educational Festival. Data were analyzed using SPSS Software, version 14. Among all participants, 30 FMs (6.3%) were educational deputies, 36 FMs (7.6%) managers of medical education development centers, 226 FMs (56.2%) members of scientific committees, 29 FMs (6.1%) members of the national committees, 343 FMs (27.5%) attendees, and 264 FMs (55.8%) had participated for retraining. The total satisfaction level of the participants was 73.3% which shows a good satisfaction level. The results identified the main important strength points such as "proposals' review process at the country level" and weakness points such as "organizing the festival".

  14. Research performance of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 1385 (April 2006- March 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Aminpour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the frequently used measures of research performance of a country or a university is counting the related scientific production. In the present study the number of scientific production including research projects, books, journal articles and conference proceedings published under the name of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences were identified and then compared with those reported by Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education for the year
    1384. The purpose of this study was to identify one-year research performance of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and to show the growth rate of scientific production of this university from 1384 to 1385. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study was carried out by reviewing related official documents and running advanced searches in some of the most important databases. The time limitation was set on 1385 hijri shamsi, which is equal to the beginning of April 2006 till the end of March 2007.
    RESULTS: During the period of the study, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences published 56 books. The total number of approved research projects was 1080, most of which (61.67% were descriptive studies. A total of 721 journal articles published by the university researchers of which 146 papers were indexed by ISI, 26 papers were indexed by MEDLINE, 194 papers were indexed by EMBASE, Scopus, Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts and CINAHL, 318 articles were indexed by other databases. Only 37 articles published via non-indexed journals. 74.2% of the articles appeared in domestic journals while only 25.8% published in foreign journals. The total number of national and
    international conference proceedings was 726. The findings showed a significant increase (nearly 100% in all kinds of scientific productions compared to those published in 1384 except the published books. CONCLUTIONS: The present study

  15. AN ASSESSMENT OF PERSONALITY ASPECTS OF THE STUDENTS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nikpour

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a base-scale is prepared for the evaluation of the personality grounds of the Tehran University of Medical Science students. Such a scoring scale may be useful to help the medical science students in career development, psychosocial consultations, and appropriate supportive care plans. A sample of 205 female and male students resident in dormitories were evaluated using “Bernreuter” personality questionnaires and computer programs prepared in this center. The percentiles of each scale is scored and represented in a systematic framework. Considering the normal distribution of the results using their means and standard deviations, the important percentages in each scale is tabulated.

  16. The new University of Colorado medical school curriculum: a pediatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deterding, Robin R; Wong, Shale; Faries, Glenn; Glover, Jacqueline J; Garrington, Timothy P; Wang, Michael; Anderson, Marsha S; Krugman, Richard D

    2007-11-01

    The University of Colorado School of Medicine has developed an innovative 4-year undergraduate curriculum. As a strong advocate for education and curriculum reform, Dr M. Douglas Jones Jr. created an environment for pediatrics to flourish in this new curriculum. Pediatric content has increased in all years of the curriculum, and pediatric faculty have had greater opportunities to teach and seek career development in medical education. In this report, we review the process that led to curriculum reform, provide an overview of the new curriculum design, and highlight examples of the positive impact this process has had on education in pediatrics. We hope that sharing our experience, may benefit others in medical education.

  17. The first anatomy professors in the medical school of the University of Athens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piagkou, Maria; Androutsos, Georgios; Demesticha, Theano; Lappas, Dimitrios; Karamanou, Marianna; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Piagkos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this historical review is to add new elements to the international literature in relation to the birth and progress of the science of anatomy in modern Greece. Step by step, it outlines the efforts of prominent Greek anatomists to establish the course of the basic science of anatomy in the newly founded Medical School, the laborious effort to collect cadaveric material to compile museum anatomical collections and to gradually build the foundations of modern anatomy science at the Medical School of the Athenian University.

  18. [Attitudes of pharmacy and dentistry students of Poznan Medical University towards smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Cieślewicz, Artur; Szałek, Edyta; Jabłecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attitude of students of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Division of Dentistry (Poznan University of Medical Sciences) towards smoking. Information was collected using a self-completion questionnaire for students. 114 students of the 5th year of Faculty of Pharmacy and 60 students of 4th year of Division of Dentistry took part in the survey. Most of the students were non-smokers (77% in the Faculty of Pharmacy and 72% in the Division of Dentistry). The main reason for abandoning smoking in both groups was knowledge on the dangers of addiction obtained in medical studies.

  19. How Medical Statistics has been established at the University of Freiburg: a historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schumacher, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution gives an outline on the reasons why the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Freiburg established an Institute of Medical Statistics and Documentation about fourty years ago as one of the first in Germany. It will be shown that the Professor of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene at that time initiated and promoted this development being himself motivated by the successful implementation of a vaccine against poliomyelitis through rigorous design, conduct and statistical analysis of a large scale field trial.

  20. Weighing the views of a university hospital and medical school regarding an HMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, T J; Matthews, C W; Segadelli, L J

    1983-09-01

    After 14 years of study, the University of Michigan decided to terminate development of a health maintenance organization (HMO). The process was long and difficult because of the university's need to consider the HMO from the university's perspective of both an employer and a provider. As an employer, the university's early view was favorable and then declined when employee interest was found to be weak and the HMO's impact on the rapidly rising cost of the university's health insurance benefit was determined to be modest. As a provider, the university's view was mixed. In regard to its hospitals, the university's judgment was positive largely because it hoped that HMO incentives might help the hospitals remain viable in the health care delivery environment that was becoming increasingly competitive. From the Medical School's point of view, an HMO was felt not to be desirable because it could put in jeopardy the professional fee revenue used by the school to help underwrite its academic programs, which are the primary source of faculty pride and recognition.

  1. Students' attitudes and practices towards drug and alcohol use at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodati, A R; Shakurie, S K; Nazari, M; Raufie, M B

    2007-01-01

    This questionnaire survey examined attitudes and practices towards alcohol and drug use among male university students living in a dormitory at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Islamic Republic of Iran. Of 173 students, about one third (32%) had tried alcohol or drugs at least once in the last 6 months: 16% had tried alcohol, 6% cannabis, 6% opium and 2% heroin. Sixteen students (9%) reported they were abusing alcohol and 16 (9%) other illicit drugs, with 2 using drugs by injection. Many students believed that smoking and drug and alcohol use in the dormitory created disruption and an unpleasant atmosphere.

  2. Board of Undergraduate Courses: a Means to Improve Academic Quality in Medical Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Mur Villar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of the service provided to the society by the University of Medical Sciences and its participation in solving health problems is undoubtedly, the most important challenge facing this institution. In order to disseminate the results of the meeting of the board of undergraduate courses as a means to achieve academic quality, the main results derived from such meeting are presented. The board of undergraduate courses contributes to systematically foster a culture of quality in the university, particularly in professional training. Methodological guidelines for conducting the board meeting are discussed.

  3. Survey of Professional Skill Among Medical Residents of Tabriz University of Medical Science For Breaking Bad News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Matloubi-Sisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of knowledge on scientific behaving with patients during giving bad news involves most of physicians even experienced physicians. Interestingly, this hurts physicians mind and in some cases causes sadness and depression or reaction on dealing with patient. In a cross sectional-descriptive study, 203 clinical assistant were included in study from 2009 to 2010 at Tabriz university of medical sciences. Comments of residents about giving bad news were registered on valid and reliable questionnaire. State of awareness by considering positive answers of statistical population were categorized into three groups; first group: weak awareness (true questions fewer than 50%, second group: medium awareness (true questions between 50 to75%, and third group: good awareness (true questions more than 75%. Validity of questionnaire was assessed by evaluating contents and reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Stratified sampling was used based on academic year. Mean age of residents was 32.01±3.25 years between the ranges of 26 to 43 years. Females were 76 individuals (37.4% and 127 individuals (62.6% males. Mean of physicians work experience was 2.1-2.9 (0-15 years range at general period. Among residents, internal medicine residents agree on considering patients education before giving bad news much than other majors residents (P=0.004. Mean score for residents' awareness about patients' right for knowing disease were 4.81±1.58 (min=0, max=7; the mean for female residents was 4.9±1.49 and 4.75±1.64 for male residents. There is statistically significant differences between majors.Present study, has shown that the knowledge of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences residents about breaking bad news are low. It seems that holding workshops about breaking bad news are necessary for educating medical students and residents. Keywords: Breaking bad news; residents; knowledge; attitude

  4. Performance of the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, V N; Pinayev, I V; Wu, Y

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report measured parameters of the OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring. The OK-4 FEL was being operated continuously for 2 yr in the broad wavelength range for user applications utilising spontaneous and coherent XUV and UV radiation as well as Compton back-scattered gamma-rays in the range of 2-58 MeV. During this time, the OK-4 FEL lased in the range from 193.7 to about 730 nm using five sets of mirrors and electron beam energies from 240 to 800 MeV. Our predictions for the OK-4 FEL are compared with measured performance, both in the CW and in the giant pulse mode. We discuss our future plans for the OK-4 FEL operation as well as the construction and commissioning of the OK-5 FEL with helical wigglers.

  5. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  6. Reasons of absence from clinical foundation classes from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abedin vakili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Absence of students from classes can reduce the quality of education and increase the failure rate. The present study aims to assess the reasons of absence from classes in basic sciences from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed using a questionnaire with the participation of medical students who undertook basic sciences' course and BSc. students who studied in year two of the course. A questionnaire containing demographic data and factors influencing on students' absence including teacher, student, educational processing and physical conditions of classrooms was designed. Students completed the questionnaire before starting of lectures in classrooms. Results: The results showed that 39% of students were absent two hours and 22.4% were absent for four hours per course credit and 38.6% said they were not aim to be absent except in emergency situation. at all.   Inappropriate teaching was identified as the main reason for absence (3.53 / 4±1.1 followed by inadequate sleep the night before the class (3.45 / 4±1.33 lack of scholarship in teaching (3.43 / 4±1.21 and lack of self-interest to the field (1.76 / 4±1.13. Conclusion: Education planners should consider factors influencing on absence of students. In faculty recruitment, academic proficiency and scholarship of teaching should also be considered. Moreover, emotional status of students should be noticed.

  7. Effect of an Integrated Case-based Nutrition Curriculum on Medical Education at Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaghi, Ahmad; Mohamadi, Ali Akbar Haj Agha; Sarchami, Ramin; Ziaee, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutrition education is identified as an important part of medical education by organizations. Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, school of medicine (QUMS SOM), has a required basic nutrition course of 36 hr in second year of medical school, but education experts reports show that the course does not provide required therapeutic skills for graduate student. Method: We decided to organize an 8-hr diet therapy work shop in order to develop a patient experience clinical based case study teaching to enhance clinical skills at QUMS SOM. Results: Students’ perception score about adequacy of nutrition instruction increased from 20% (at baseline) to 70% (after intervention). The mean nutrition knowledge score of total students in clinical nutrition were different between before and one month after integration (8.3±2.5, 13.4±3.2, P curriculum at QUMS was appropriate method to enhance student’s perception about nutrition integration and to increase and translate the knowledge to clinical practice. PMID:22980104

  8. [Suggestions of reshaping medical education (The Hungarian medical elite at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences) 1947-1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Szabó, József

    2017-03-01

    This study is part of the monograph entitled Scientific Elites and Politics (1945-1948) to be published soon. The relationships of political parties with several elite groups, such as groups of agronomic, human, economic, legal, technical and natural sciences, as well as the roles of these elites in scientific life, have been looked into and published in renowned periodicals. Using new sources, different specialist groups' and political powers' suggestions of reshaping medical education in 1947 and 1948, are presented. The medical elite's situation at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is also outlined. The study renders an account of the entire post-war medical elite. It will be stated who and based on what scientific achievement became member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, who was appointed to professor and who became a habilitated doctor. This study, which is a desideratum of research, may not only interest researchers but is aimed at a broader readership, including physicians. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(11), 432-437.

  9. The situation analysis of the international relations management and inter-university collaboration in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during the years 2005-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farajollahi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nowadays, with the development of science and communication, collaboration with other countriesand universities seems inevitable to universities. The aim of this study was to analyze the situation of internationalrelations management and inter-university collaboration (IRM-IUC in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS,Iran, during the years 2005-2010. METHODS: In this descriptive study, one checklist was used for analysis of the inter-university collaboration management and another one for the situation analysis of international relations management which included 4 sections itself. There were a total of 56 questions designed and developed through literature review and the expert panel.RESULTS: The results indicated the poor performance of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in the international relations management and inter-university collaboration fields. Most of the reviewed items had not been adequatelypaid attention to in the management of international relations and only one out of 14 evaluated items was considered inthe field of inter-university collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: In line with the overall globalization process, education and research have also become globalizedprocesses, and as a result, it is necessary for universities to develop effective ties and relationships with otherorganizations. However, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences has not been doing quite optimally in this regard. Thus,it is suggested that, based on the shortcomings pointed out in this study, new appropriate plans and policies be set todevelop fruitful and effective relations and correspondences with other universities and countries.

  10. Prevalence of ADHD among the Students Residing in Dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Sadeghi Movahed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a heredity and psychological disorder that often continues to adulthood and causes great number of emotional, social, educational and occupational problem for college students. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of ADHD among students residing in the dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences.   Methods: In this cross sectional study, all students in the dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences were included. They filled the Self reporting Conner’s ADHD questionnaires. Data were extracted and analyzed with SPSS.   Results: During this study, the prevalence of ADHD was 8.6 percent. The males show more involvement rate than females. The students with ADHD showed more incidences of smoking and psychotropic drug consumption.   Conclusion: Due to the high prevalence of ADHD among the college students, early diagnosis and treatment of ADHD seems to be necessary.

  11. Pediatric сlinic of Odessa National Medical University: the quality of emergency medical care for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Starets

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to discuss the issue of improving the quality of emergency care for children with the most common diseases. Materials and methods. The quality of medical care includes 6 characteristics: 1 effectiveness — evidencebased health care results in improved health outcomes; 2 relevancy: health care is delivered in a manner that maximizes resource use and avoids wasting and provided in a setting where skills and resources are appropriate to medical need; 3 accessibility: health care is provided timely, reasonable and affordable; 4 acceptability/patient-centered: health care provided takes into account the preferences and aspirations of individual service users; 5 equity: health care provided does not vary in quality because of personal characteristics or socioeconomic status; 6 safety: health care provided minimizes risks and harm to service users and providers. Results. The Intensive Care Unit (ICU started working in the Pediatric Clinic of the Odessa National Medical University on February 1, 2017. The main task of ICU is the treatment of children with emergency conditions (who needs monitoring of breathing and cardiac activity, oxygen therapy, large-volume rehydration therapy, etc. The patients admit to the ICU according the results of triage. Triage is the process of rapidly screening of sick children soon after their addmission to hospital and in ICU, in order to identify those with emergency signs — obstruc-ted breathing or severe respiratory distress; central cyanosis; signs of shock; signs of severe dehydration; those with priority signs — very high temperature, severe pallor, respiratory distress etc. The local guidelines for the most common diseases in children have been developed in the Pediatric Clinic. These local guidelines are based on: 1 modern national guidelines; 2 WHO: Pocket book of hospital care for children: guidelines for the management of common childhood illnesses (2013; clinical

  12. Ethnic Differences And Motivation Based On Maslow’s Theory At a MedicaL University

    OpenAIRE

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Motivation in Malaysia is to a largeextent influenced by the value system amongst allMalaysians. Being able to motivate employees is one ofthe important keys to the success of the organization.In this paper, an attempt was made to look into theneeds of employees in organizations and in particular,the needs based on Maslow’s theory on motivation. Subjects and Methods: Employees which consisted ofboth academic and administrative employees of theInternational Medical University (...

  13. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Anbari; Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi; Rahmatollah Jadidi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health sciences research (HSR) is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conduct...

  14. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Haque M; Rahman NAA; Majumder MAA; Haque SZ; Kamal ZM; Islam Z; Haque ATME; Rahman NIA; Alattraqchi AG

    2016-01-01

    Mainul Haque,1 Nor Azlina A Rahman,2 Md Anwarul Azim Majumder,3 Seraj Zohurul Haque,4 Zubair M Kamal,5 Zakirul Islam,6 ATM Emdadul Haque,7 Nor Iza A Rahman,8 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi8 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences,...

  15. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Semenets; V. Yu. Kovalok

    2015-01-01

    An importance of the application of the electronic document management to the Ukraine healthcare is shown. The electronic document management systems market overview is presented. Example of the usage of the open-source electronic document management system in the Ternopil State Medical University by I. Ya. Horbachevsky is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. The electronic document management features of the Mi...

  16. An evaluation of University of Cape Town medical students’ community placements in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia S. Naidu; Virginia Zweigenthal; James Irlam; Leslie London; Johannah Keikelame

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fourth-year medical students at the University of Cape Town (UCT) work closely with stakeholders in community teaching sites to conduct community-based research projects and follow-up health promotion interventions during their Public Health training.Objectives: This study evaluated the placements as a learning experience from the perspectives of past students and community stakeholders.Methods: A total of 32 projects were randomly selected out of 232 projects undertaken during 20...

  17. Substance use and its predictors among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Azazh Aklilu; Deressa Wakgari

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Substance use remains high among Ethiopian youth and young adolescents particularly in high schools and colleges. The use of alcohol, khat and tobacco by college and university students can be harmful; leading to decreased academic performance, increased risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. However, the magnitude of substance use and the factors associated with it has not been investigated among medical students in the country. This study was co...

  18. Knowledge Management Components from the Viewpoint of Departments’ Chairmen Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraji Khiavi F

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Knowledge management is one of the most important success instruments for organizations in the competitive conditions and information era. Setting knowledge management in the organizational system of Medical Sciences’ Universities is required in order to achieve and use the latest research and scientific achievements. So this study aimed to determine the knowledge management components from the viewpoint of the departments’ chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional research was performed in the society of department chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (60 persons in 2012 and all of them were studied by census method. Data gathering instrument was a standard questionnaire with 2 parts demographic data and knowledge management. Data were analyzed by SPSS 17 software using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests like Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Findings: The situation of knowledge creation dimension (2.84±0.70 was estimated relatively not appropriate, while knowledge sharing (3.00±0.74, knowledge transfer (3.11±0.61, knowledge application (3.11±0.64, knowledge assessment (3.10±0.77 and general knowledge management (3.01±0.58 were estimated relatively appropriate. There was a significant relationship between samples’ age and the application of knowledge dimension (p=0.009. Conclusion: Knowledge management status seems relatively appropriate from the viewpoint of the departments’ chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences.

  19. On-campus physicians witnessing changes in medical problems faced by university students.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, S

    1996-01-01

    Most Canadian universities offer on-campus health services for their students. Ten years ago minor health problems such as infections, cuts and bruises were the common causes of visits to student health centres, but today medical staff report that students are seeking help for more serious problems such as sexually transmitted diseases, stress, sports injuries, eating disorders and asthma and allergies. Many are also seeking psychiatric counselling.

  20. Medical students’ perception of the learning environment at King Saud University Medical College, Saudi Arabia, using DREEM Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mona M; Sattar, Kamran; Alnassar, Sami; Alsaif, Faisal; Alswat, Khalid; Alghonaim, Mohamed; Alhaizan, Maysoon; Al-furaih, Nawaf

    2017-01-01

    Background The students’ perception of the learning environment is an important aspect for evaluation and improvement of the educational program. The College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU) reformed its curriculum in 2009 from a traditional to a system-oriented hybrid curriculum. Objective The objective of the present study was to determine the perception of the second batch (reformed curriculum) of medical graduates about the educational environment at the College of Medicine, KSU, using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) scale. Methods The fifth year medical students were asked to evaluate the educational program after graduation in May 2014. The questionnaire was distributed to the graduate students electronically. The DREEM questionnaire consisted of 50 items based on Likert’s scale; and five domains, namely, students’ perceptions of learning, perceptions of teachers, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results A total of 62 students participated in the study. The score for students’ perception of learning among medical students ranged from 2.93 to 3.64 (overall mean score: 40.17). The score for students’ perception of teachers ranged from 2.85 to 4.01 (overall mean score: 33.35). The score for students’ academic self-perceptions ranged from 3.15 to 4.06 (overall mean score: 28.4). The score for students’ perception of atmosphere ranged from 2.27 to 3.91 (overall mean score: 41.32). The score for students’ social self-perceptions ranged from 2.85 to 4.33 (overall mean score: 24.33). The general perceptions of the students in all five sub-scales were positive. Conclusion The overall student’s perception about the educational environment was satisfactory. This study was important to evaluate the students’ perception of the learning environment among medical graduates of the reformed curriculum and provided guidance on areas of

  1. Collision course: the privatization of graduate medical education at one university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasko, Stephen K; Ekarius, John C

    2007-03-01

    On December 18, 2003, Tenet Healthcare Corporation, an investor-owned hospital corporation, announced the closure of Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital, a historic institution that was home to many of Drexel University College of Medicine's (DUCOM's) faculty, residents, and medical students. The authors summarize the steps that were taken and lessons learned to avoid a disruption in the education of over 200 residents. The authors highlight the response by the medical school; the concerns of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME); the interaction between the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the ACGME; the importance of the designated institutional official (DIO) in a crisis situation; and the role of residents as students versus employees when their employer wishes to move or "trade" them to another institution. Through the lens of the DUCOM experience, the authors explore the legal, political, and educational conflicts that occur when an investor-owned company or private hospital employs residents but another entity holds moral and academic accountability for their future. Finally, the authors outline five lessons learned: (1) the important role the ACGME plays as the educational conscience of graduate medical education (GME), (2) the dramatically different roles that the ACGME and the CMS play in regulating and funding the national GME system, (3) the need for constant communication with the affected residents, (4) the important role that the DIO plays in GME, and (5) the need for medical school leaders to remain focused on their educational mission and responsibilities to young physicians.

  2. [Quality of medical records in Naples (Italy) 2nd University School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, E; Esposito, S; Parmeggiani, C; Piro, A; Grippo, N; Di Palma, M A

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate and improve the quality of medical-record keeping, in clinics and surgery departments. The evaluation involved 66 Operative Units (O.U.) of the "2nd University Hospital" in Naples (Italy). 10 medical records for each O.U. were randomly selected, for a total of 660. The quality was evaluated in all sections of medical records using the criteria of completeness, clarity and traceability of the data. The most critical issues are: unclear handwriting in almost all sections, in the whole scarse presence of a discharge letter (17.0%) in surgery (1.4%), almost total absence of the physicians signature in the clinical diary (2.3%). The completeness of medical records (presence of patient's history, physical examination, informed consent) is significantly higher in the surgery departments. The medical records are significantly righter in the clinic departments. In general, a poor quality of medical-record keeping was detected. This indicates the need to improve the quality by involving the staff in the importance of correct compilation.

  3. The analysis of the medical university students’ health condition and lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGA KHURS

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Significant psychophysiological burdens and unhealthy lifestyle constitute the risk factors leading to students’ health deterioration. Purpose: The purpose of the research was the analysis of students’ health condition and lifestyle in medical university. Material and methods: The objects of the research were 100 third year students of the Faculties of General Medicine and Pediatrics of Grodno State Medical University. For the study of students’ orientation on healthy lifestyle, a special scale-type questionnaire was developed and used. Results: According to the respondents’ opinions it has been detected that the basic factors influencing the state of health are the lifestyle and the living conditions. The students activity is evaluated as very low as well as their rational nutrition. The majority of them smoke and drink alcohol. Conclusions: The peculiarities of studying at a medical university accompanied by imbalanced nutrition might lead to the deterioration of health in the students which are doctors to be. The results ought to lead to the optimization of prophylaxis programs and entire alteration of the students’ lifestyles.

  4. Attitudes toward active euthanasia among medical students at two German universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Katri Elina; Klein, Eva; Jaspers, Birgit; Klaschik, Eberhard

    2008-06-01

    There has been an ongoing debate about a legalisation of active euthanasia (AE) in Germany. Palliative care education in German medical schools seeks to foster and cultivate a negative attitude toward AE, but little is known about its effectiveness in this respect. The aim of this study was to assess attitudes toward AE among students with and without palliative medicine tuition (PMT). The link to an anonymised online questionnaire was sent out to 1,092 third, fifth and sixth year medical students (YMS) in August-November 2006 at two German universities: university one (U1) with compulsory and additional optional PMT and university two (U2) without any PMT. Thirteen questions addressed active, passive or indirect euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (statistic: mean +/- SD (range), Wilcoxon, Whitney U Test, significance p circumstances that lack dignity'. Of all students, 21.1% at U1 and 37.2% at U2 could imagine to perform AE in patients, even though 72.6% at U1 and 78.2% at U2 think its legalisation would promote misuse. The high proportion of pro-AE attitudes gives reason to reconsider both 'standard' and palliative medicine tuition for medical students.

  5. Knowledge and Attitudes of Sana'a University Medical Students towards Premarital Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz A. Al-Nood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of Sana’a University medical students towards premarital screening (PMS. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the students of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sana’a University, during the academic year 2012/2013. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 516 Yemeni students. The questionnaire was composed of three parts; the first part was about socio-demographic data, the second part was about the students’ knowledge about PMS and the third part was about their attitudes towards the PMS. Results: Most of the respondents (92% knew that PMS reduces hereditary and sexually-transmitted diseases, believed that it is important to carry out and agreed to do it. Making PMS mandatory and legal prevention of marriage in case of positive results were accepted by 82% and 62% of the respondents, respectively. Conclusions: Although the majority of Sana’a University medical students favored PMS and had a fair knowledge about most of its aspects, a small proportion of them refused its mandating or legally preventing at-risk marriages. These negative attitudes could be reversed by health education of medical students on PMS.

  6. Study on attitudes of students of Islamic Azad University Tehran Medical Branch toward food safety, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Ali; Poursadeghiyan, Mohsen; Baneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Biglari, Hamed; Yari, Ahmad Reza; Khammar, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    Given the importance of high-quality healthy food for humans, contamination control is the most important concern for healthy staff. To determine the attitudes of students at Islamic Azad University (Tehran Medical Branch) toward food safety. This cross-sectional and analytic-descriptive study was conducted on 326 students of Azad University of Medical Sciences in 2016. A self-made questionnaire consisting of 40 questions was used. The reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed using internal consistency method (Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.80). After collecting data, we use descriptive statistical indexes (mean and standard deviation) among demographic variables and the level of knowledge to describe and analyze the data. The participants' attitudes and operation are measured by Spearman tests, and the analytical results are given using SPSS version 20. According to the findings, 55.3, 30 and 14.7 percent of students had high, moderate and low attitude scores toward food safety, respectively. In addition, male and female students had equal attitudes toward food safety, and no significant relationship between sex and attitude was observed a significant difference (p>0.05), but between educational levels (p=0.008) and ages (p=0.001) of students significance was a positive correlation. Due to the low attitudes score of about half of the students of Islamic Azad University Tehran Medical Branch toward food safety, it can be claimed, food safety training in this community is required.

  7. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Lelubre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU, University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program’s context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives.

  8. The Medical Humanities Program at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwood, Bryan; Casiro, Oscar; Hennen, Brian

    2003-10-01

    The current Medical Humanities Program at the University of Manitoba has evolved from a series of voluntary sessions into an integral element of the curriculum since its inception as the Human Values Program in 1986. With strong academic and financial support, the Medical Humanities Program has greatly benefited from dedicated leadership and a commitment to ongoing curricular review and redevelopment. The current Medical Humanities Program comprises six distinct components: Clinical Ethics; History of Medicine; Law; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Palliative Care; and Human Values. Each of these components is compulsory and the first five are tested through examinations and assignments. Human Values sessions are designed to be experiential and to explore the human side of medicine as well as the intersections between medicine and the arts, literature, social psychology, and spirituality. The authors outline the origins and evolution of this successful program and describe its current components, student and faculty opinions, funding, advantages, disadvantages, and anticipated growth.

  9. Assessment of Depression among Medical Students of Private University in Bhopal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Sharma, Sanjay Kumar Gupta, Neeraj Khare, Sanjay S Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Introduction: Medical students repeatedly experience different stresses which render them more vulnerable to psychological problems that may affect their emotional, psychosocial and physical health. Objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence of depression and associated factors leading to depression among medical students at People’s University. Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Peoples University using Theoretical Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (TDEQ there were 440 students participated in the study with duration of 1 month. Results: The participation rate was 90% (396 students. The mean age of participants was 21 ± 2 years, and more than half (62% i.e. 246 students were males. The prevalence of depression among students was 31 % (123 students. Conclusions: Symptoms of moderate severity were the predominant among students with the studied psychological illnesses. A substantial proportion of medical students had ongoing psychiatric problems that were associated with multiple social, behavioural, and educational factors. Interventions addressing the mental health of medical students should be initiated."

  10. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbari, Zohreh; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jadidi, Rahmatollah

    2015-01-01

    Health sciences research (HSR) is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3), but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7). The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  11. Evaluation of Student's Satisfaction toward Online Registration in Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakieh Rostamzadeh Khameneh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: in All field of education survey of student satisfaction viewpoint has important role in motivate them to study and improve the quality of teaching is effective. One of University educational services, is internet Registration. This study with thisaim, done to assess the UrmiaMedical Science University Students satisfaction of register online Methods: this descriptive study performed by sectional method with Stratified sampling at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health. Data were collected through a questionnaire and analyzed using spss statistical software. Findings: In this study, the satisfaction of 121 students (72.72% female and 28.28% male were examined, it was determined that 92.2 percent willing to register online and 80.3 percent were registration process were satisfied. Also, 54.1 percent of the students have suggested that facilities applications in the university, including a computer and internet were average. Many of the students had trouble with controlling the prerequisite and replenishment. Conclusion: The data showed that students werecontent with online registration and more willing to promote it. Therefore, it is suggested to increase the educational opportunities available, including computers and the Internet to improve the quality of educational services and the satisfaction of the students provided.

  12. Information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular disease patients in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Maryam; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Afshar, Mina; Shahrzadi, Leila; Zadeh, Akbar Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Patients, as one of the most prominent groups requiring health-based information, encounter numerous problems in order to obtain these pieces of information and apply them. The aim of this study was to determine the information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular patients who were hospitalized in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. This is a survey research. The population consisted of all patients with cardiovascular disease who were hospitalized in the hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences during 2012. According to the statistics, the number of patients was 6000. The sample size was determined based on the formula of Cochran; 400 patients were randomly selected. Data were collected by researcher-made questionnaire. Two-level descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used for analysis. The data showed that the awareness of the probability to recover and finding appropriate medical care centers were the most significant informational needs. The practitioners, television, and radio were used more than the other informational resources. Lack of familiarity to medical terminologies and unaccountability of medical staff were the major obstacles faced by the patients to obtain information. The results also showed that there was no significant relationship between the patients' gender and information-seeking behavior, whereas there was a significant relationship between the demographic features (age, education, place of residence) and information-seeking behavior. Giving information about health to the patients can help them to control their disease. Appropriate methods and ways should be used based on patients' willingness. Despite the variety of information resources, patients expressed medical staff as the best source for getting health information. Information-seeking behavior of the patients was found to be influenced by different demographic and environmental factors.

  13. Medical student mentorship in a university setting as a strategy for a career in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Parul N; Fallat, Mary E

    2011-11-01

    Gender balance in surgery is a respectable and necessary goal. At the University of Louisville (UL) School of Medicine, we have compared percentages of UL medical student applicants to general surgery or surgical subspecialty residency programs, surgical residents, and surgical faculty with the rest of the nation. Although UL has at times paralleled or exceeded the nation in many of these categories, there is room for improvement and the comparison data allow for strategic planning initiatives. To promote gender balance among future generations of surgeons at UL, we recently implemented a mentoring program that pairs medical students with residents and faculty in surgery. We plan to track the success over time and correct any shortcomings of this program. Virginia Commonwealth University's commitment to gender balance in surgery is exemplary. As part of a more comprehensive vision to create a mentorship program for female medical students at the UL School of Medicine, we have recently recruited female surgical residents and faculty, whom we hope will provide the type of inspiration and guidance that will increase the number of women from UL who decide to train in general surgery and the surgical specialties. To understand why women across the nation are not generally at numerical parity in these fields, it is important to consider the length and intensity of the surgical residency programs in the context of the other goals and objectives that a woman might have for her future. This article does not address this broad topic but provides a perspective of how a medical school can evaluate and perhaps intervene to mentor medical students more effectively about the satisfaction derived from a career in surgery. As part of this project, we have evaluated each step of the path through medical school and a surgical residency by comparing data for our students, residency programs, and faculty with national data.

  14. Assessment of the interns’ ability based on Dundee model in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITRA AMINI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of medical profession and the role of the physician in society is no secret to anyone. Skills and competencies in clinical practice are necessary for the medical profession. In fact, in patient care, doctors require practical skills in addition to scientific knowledge. This study examines the potentials of medical school students in three areas of doing the right thing, doing the right thing in an intermediate range, and doing the right thing by the right person. Methods: This study was done in a descriptive-analytical and sectional model. The population of this study was all interns of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who were passing internship at Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Emergency wards. About 100 persons were selected were selected by simple randomization. In order to collect data, a questionnaire with 12 questions was designed in two parts. The questionnaire was approved by 7 Faculty members of Clinical Medicine and Medical Education, and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 medical students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (82%. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS software version 14 using descriptive statistical methods. Results: Results showed that within the inner circle, interns evaluated their skills in surgery, internal medicine, and gynecology wards, intermediate and at other wards as weak. Also within the center circle, interns evaluated adequate educational evidence-based training in the field of medicine, and sufficiency of educational training in the field of clinical decision making and clinical care as suitable. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that medical interns’ skills in performing most medical skills are moderate. So teaching students by new educational methods and workshop techniques, using experienced teachers will be effective. The use of clinical skills training centers and objective

  15. Turning Microscopy in the Medical Curriculum Digital: Experiences from The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences at University of Copenhagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainer, Ben; Mortensen, Niels Werner; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Sørensen, Allan Have; Olsen, Jørgen; Saxild, Hans Henrik; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2017-01-01

    Familiarity with the structure and composition of normal tissue and an understanding of the changes that occur during disease is pivotal to the study of the human body. For decades, microscope slides have been central to teaching pathology in medical courses and related subjects at the University of Copenhagen. Students had to learn how to use a microscope and envisage three-dimensional processes that occur in the body from two-dimensional glass slides. Here, we describe how a PathXL virtual microscopy system for teaching pathology and histology at the Faculty has recently been implemented, from an administrative, an economic, and a teaching perspective. This fully automatic digital microscopy system has been received positively by both teachers and students, and a decision was made to convert all courses involving microscopy to the virtual microscopy format. As a result, conventional analog microscopy will be phased out from the fall of 2016.

  16. Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression among Female Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    IBRAHIM, Nahla; AL-KHARBOUSH, Dania; EL-KHATIB, Lamis; AL-HABIB, Ahd; ASALI, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical education & medical profession are among the most challenging and most stressful ones. Anxiety and depression represents an escalating public health problem among medical students. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence & predictors of anxiety and depression among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during 2010–2011. A stratified random sample method was used to sel...

  17. The resident as teacher: Medical students' perception in a Spanish university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal Bello, D; García de Tena, J; Jaenes Barrios, B; Martínez Lasheras, B; de Arriba de la Fuente, G; Rodríguez Zapata, M

    2014-10-01

    Residents play an important but scanty assessed role in medical students teaching. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of medical students about residents' teaching activity. Autofilled survey provided to medical students of the University of Alcalá (Spain) in the final year in their school of medicine. Student opinion about care and teaching abilities of residents and physicians was evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale. 104 surveys were collected. A 69,9% of students consider that as much as 50% of their knowledge came from rounds with residents. Students believe that resident teaching lacks enough academical acknowledgment (94.2%); they estimate necessary to acquire teaching skills during residency (82,7%), and they would like to provide tutoring other medical students (88,5%). Students rated residents better than physicians on relational and motivational abilities. There is a positive view about resident as a teacher among medical students, which suggests the need to improve the resident's teaching skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. [E-learning in ENT: Usage in University Medical Centers in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiherr von Saß, Peter; Klenzner, Thomas; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Chaker, Adam

    2017-01-18

    E-learning is an essential part of innovative medical teaching concepts. The challenging anatomy and physiology in ENT is considered particularly suitable for self-assessed and adaptive e-learning. Usage and data on daily experience with e-learning in German ENT-university hospitals are currently unavailable and the degree of implementation of blended learning including feed-back from medical students are currently not known. We investigated the current need and usage of e-learning in academic ENT medical centers in Germany. We surveyed students and chairs for Otorhinolaryngology electronically and paperbased during the summer semester 2015. Our investigation revealed an overall heterogenous picture on quality and quantity of offered e-learning applications. While the overall amount of e-learning in academic ENT in Germany is rather low, at least half of the ENT-hospitals in medical faculties reported that e-learning had improved their own teaching activities. More collaboration among medical faculties and academic ENT-centers may help to explore new potentials, overcome technical difficulties and help to realize more ambitious projects.

  19. Discharge against medical advice from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: 10 years experience at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim K Al-Turkistani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discharging patients against medical advice is a problem of every age-group. However, because of their physiological vulnerability, the risk for the neonatal population is greater when discharged against medical advice (DAMA. This article is a study of the prevalence of the problem, the possible causes and/or risk factors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 10 years of medical records of neonates discharged against medical advice from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU at a university hospital. Results: The overall prevalence of DAMA was 1.6%. Most of the 51 infants who were taken out of hospital against medical advice (AMA were term (72.5% with a mean gestational age of 37.78 ± 2.5 weeks, of normal birth weight, with a mean of 2736 ± 661 g, Saudis (96%, those delivered vaginally (69%, and those that were provisionally diagnosed with transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN and/or query sepsis (49%. There was no difference between males and females (M/F = 1.2. There was an association between DAMA and the timing of DAMA (27.5% of DAMA at weekends and 67% of DAMA from May to October. Conclusion: DAMA of neonates is particularly critical. The causes and risk factors are many and difficult to predict. In addition to several other factors, its prevalence is influenced negatively by some socio-cultural beliefs.

  20. Medical problems among dental patients at the school of dentistry, the university of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaty, H F; Murti, P R; Naidu, R S; Matthews, R; Simeon, D

    2009-12-01

    This study ascertained demographic information and prevalence rates of medical problems among 571 new and consecutive dental patients attending the emergency clinic of the School of Dentistry, The University of the West Indies. Patients were interviewed by specially trained and calibrated dental students and interns. Various medical problems of patients were recorded in individual open-ended case sheets, maintaining their privacy and confidentiality. This information was then transcribed into a specially designed and pretested form. The data were entered into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using the SPSS statistical package to obtain the prevalence rates of medical conditions, which were then cross-tabulated with gender, age, ethnicity, and other variables. Significance of differences, if any, was evaluated by chi-square test. In all, 303 medical conditions were encountered in 239 individuals, giving a prevalence rate of 42 percent. Hypertension (12.6 percent), diabetes (6.1 percent), asthma (5.8 percent), arthritis (4.7 percent), and various allergies (8.3 percent) constituted an important segment of the problems. Gender, ethnic, and age differences were also evident for some diseases. In this study-which was the first of this kind in the West Indies-vital information on medical problems among dental patients was obtained by interviews conducted by dental students and interns, forming an important part of their dental education.

  1. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  2. Medical emergencies in the imaging department of a university hospital: event and imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tonder, F C; Sutherland, T; Smith, R J; Chock, J M E; Santamaria, J D

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of medical emergencies that occurred in the medical imaging department (MID) of a university hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A database of 'Respond Medical Emergency Team (MET)' and 'Respond Blue' calls was retrospectively examined for the period June 2003 to November 2010 in relation to events that occurred in the MID. The hospital medical imaging database was also examined in relation to these events and, where necessary, patients' notes were reviewed. Ethics approval was granted by the hospital ethics review board. There were 124 medical emergency calls in the MID during the study period, 28% Respond Blue and 72% Respond MET. Of these 124 calls, 26% occurred outside of usual work hours and 12% involved cardiac arrest. The most common reasons for the emergency calls were seizures (14%) and altered conscious state (13%). Contrast anaphylaxis precipitated the emergency in 4% of cases. In 83% of cases the emergency calls were for patients attending the MID for diagnostic imaging, the remainder being for a procedure. Of the scheduled imaging techniques, 45% were for computed tomography. The scheduled imaging was abandoned due to the emergency in 12% of cases. When performed, imaging informed patient management in 34% of cases in diagnostic imaging and in all cases in the context of image-guided procedures. Medical emergency calls in the MID often occurred outside usual work hours and were attributed to a range of medical problems. The emergencies occurred in relation to all imaging techniques and imaging informed patient management in many cases. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Outpatients flow management and ophthalmic electronic medical records system in university hospital using Yahgee Document View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Gochi, Akira; Hirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tadashi; Kohno, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-01

    General electronic medical records systems remain insufficient for ophthalmology outpatient clinics from the viewpoint of dealing with many ophthalmic examinations and images in a large number of patients. Filing systems for documents and images by Yahgee Document View (Yahgee, Inc.) were introduced on the platform of general electronic medical records system (Fujitsu, Inc.). Outpatients flow management system and electronic medical records system for ophthalmology were constructed. All images from ophthalmic appliances were transported to Yahgee Image by the MaxFile gateway system (P4 Medic, Inc.). The flow of outpatients going through examinations such as visual acuity testing were monitored by the list "Ophthalmology Outpatients List" by Yahgee Workflow in addition to the list "Patients Reception List" by Fujitsu. Patients' identification number was scanned with bar code readers attached to ophthalmic appliances. Dual monitors were placed in doctors' rooms to show Fujitsu Medical Records on the left-hand monitor and ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document on the right-hand monitor. The data of manually-inputted visual acuity, automatically-exported autorefractometry and non-contact tonometry on a new template, MaxFile ED, were again automatically transported to designated boxes on ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document. Images such as fundus photographs, fluorescein angiograms, optical coherence tomographic and ultrasound scans were viewed by Yahgee Image, and were copy-and-pasted to assigned boxes on the ophthalmic charts. Ordering such as appointments, drug prescription, fees and diagnoses input, central laboratory tests, surgical theater and ward room reservations were placed by functions of the Fujitsu electronic medical records system. The combination of the Fujitsu electronic medical records and Yahgee Document View systems enabled the University Hospital to examine the same number of outpatients as prior to the implementation of the computerized filing system.

  4. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-04-14

    Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a pretested self-administered structured questionnaire from May-June 2013. The primary outcome indicator was self-reported absenteeism from lectures in the semester preceding the study period. The study included all regular undergraduate students who were enrolled in the University for at least one semester. The data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. The association between class absenteeism and socio-demographic and behavioral correlates of absenteeism was determined by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results were reported as crude odds ratios (COR), adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). 1200 students consented and filled the questionnaire. Of these students, 43.7% had missed three or more lectures and 14.1% (95% CI = 12.2-16.2) missed more than 8 lectures in the preceding semester. There was a significant association between missing more than 8 lectures and age of students, chosen discipline (medicine), and social drug use. The main reasons reported for missing lectures were preparing for another examination, lack of interest, lecturer's teaching style, and availability of lecture material. At Hawassa University College of Medicine and Health Science student habits and teacher performance play a role in absenteeism from lectures. A university culture that promotes discipline and integrity especially among medical and older students discourages social drug use will likely improve motivation and attendance. Training in teaching methodologies to improve the quality and delivery of lectures should also help increase attendance.

  5. Predictors of self-reported academic performance among undergraduate medical students of Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedefaw A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abel Gedefaw,1 Birkneh Tilahun,2 Anteneh Asefa3 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, 3School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia Background: This study was conducted to identify predictors of self-reported academic performance in undergraduate medical students at Hawassa University. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study involving 592 undergraduate medical students was conducted in November 2012. The academic performance of the study subjects was measured by self-reported cumulative grade point average (GPA using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Pearson's bivariate correlations, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were used to identify predictors of academic performance. Results: The self-reported academic performance of students had been decreasing as the academic years progressed, with the highest and lowest performance being in the premedicine (mean GPA 3.47 and clinical I (mean GPA 2.71 years, respectively. One hundred and fifty-eight (26.7% of the participants had ever been delayed, 37 (6.2% had ever re-sat for examination, and two (0.3% had ever been warned due to academic failure. The overall variation in self-reported academic performance of the students was 32.8%. Participant age alone explained 21.9% of the variation. On the other hand, university entrance examination results, substance use at university, and medicine as first choice by students were identified as predictors of variation in self-reported academic performance, accounting for 6.9%, 2.7%, and <1% of the variation, respectively. Students who had never used tobacco, alcohol, or khat after starting university were twice as likely to score a self-reported cumulative GPA above 3.0 (adjusted odds ratio 1.95, 95

  6. Tobacco Smoking Habits Among First Year Medical Students, University of Prishtina, Kosovo: Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuperjani, Frederik; Elezi, Shkëlzen; Lila, Albert; Daka, Qëndresë; Dakaj, Qëndrim; Gashi, Sanije

    2015-06-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in the world, requiring intensified national and international public health response. World Health Organization (WHO) has urged health professional organizations to encourage and support their members to be models for not using tobacco products and promote tobacco-free culture. Healthcare students are the future authority of the health society, they are in a position to play a vital role and have impact on social norms related to smoking. To determine the prevalence of tobacco smoking among healthcare students of Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina in Kosovo, so that recommendations can be made for its cessation among healthcare providers and thereafter the community. Descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using self-administrated questionnaire prepared for this purpose. A total of 284 first year healthcare students of Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina in Kosovo were enrolled in the study. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22. All respondents completed the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 100% (general medicine=180, dentistry = 104). The prevalence of students who have ever smoked was 53.2%. However, only 8.9% (9.1% M vs. 8.7% F) of the general medicine students and 5.8% (4.8% M vs. 6.5% F) of dentistry students declared that smoke tobacco every day. Overall, the research shows that the prevalence of occasional smokers among medical students in Kosova is quite high.

  7. A comparison of attitudes toward euthanasia among medical students at two Polish universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Kazmierczak-Lukaszewicz, Sylwia; Forycka, Maria; Cialkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study conducted upon completion of obligatory palliative medicine courses among 588 medical students at two universities was to compare their attitudes toward euthanasia. Four hundred ninety-two (84.97 %) students were Catholics; 69 (11.73 %) declared they would practice euthanasia, 303 (51.53 %) would not, and 216 students (36.73 %) were not sure. The idea of euthanasia legalisation was supported by 174 (29.59 %) respondents, opposed by 277 (47.11 %), and 137 (23.30 %) were undecided. Five hundred fifty-six (94.56 %) students did not change their attitudes toward euthanasia after palliative medicine courses. Students from the two universities were found to have different opinions on practicing euthanasia, euthanasia law and possible abuse which might follow euthanasia legalisation, but they shared similar views on the choice of euthanasia if they themselves were incurably ill and the legalisation of euthanasia. Gender and religion influenced students' answers. Differences observed between medical students at the two universities might be related to gender and cultural differences.

  8. New Methods of Evaluation for Postgraduate Training in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Revered editor evaluation of medical students in specialized medical fields has great importance in determining the necessary competence to learning clinical environments and necessary ability for functioning in the real environment (1. New specialized medical evaluation focuses on ways that confirm the clinical competence assistant that can point to the students’ experience booklet (log book; assay exams; Multiple Choice Question (MCQ; Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE; observation with check list or rating scale; self-assessment and assessment by peers rating scale general; Portfolio; Direct Observation of Procedure Skill (DOPS; Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX; 360-degree comprehensive assessment of Clinical Skills based on Records assistants (CSR; Objective Structural Practical Examination (OSPE (2. This descriptive-analytical study was performed to evaluate the use of modern methods of evaluation among eleven postgraduate departments in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Data collection tool was a checklist that was prepared by researchers and was completed by clinical group managers. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 software, Chi-square test and analysis of variance. In total of 11 studied groups, 106 full-time board faculty members, 14 co-education, 221 residents were working. The most modern methods to evaluate in %100 of groups were OSCE and MCQ, DOPS in %80 of groups, and Mini-CEX and CSR in% 27 of groups. Assay exams were used in infectious and pathology groups as the use of other modern methods of evaluation was not observed in all groups. Statistically, the most important reasons for the lack of significant new methods of evaluation were: internal decision of the department (P=0.002, unfamiliarity of team members with modern methods of evaluation (P=0.06, and the adequacy of other methods of evaluation according to the decision of the department (P<0.001. Other cited reasons such as lack of

  9. TOMORROW: Press Conference to Follow Sentencing of Duke Energy Subsidiaries for Clean Water Act Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), together with the United States Attorney's Offices for the Eastern, Middle and Western Districts of North Carolina, announces a press conference to discuss the sentencing of three Duke subsid

  10. Investigating the Relationship between Mental Health and Academic Achievement of Dental Students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdolreza Gilavand; Mohammad Shooriabi

    2016-01-01

    .... So, this research has been performed aiming at investigation of the relationship between mental health and academic achievement of dental students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS...

  11. Teaching of pharmacology in Universiti Malaya and the other medical schools in Malaysia- a historical perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si Mui SIM

    2004-01-01

    Traditional pharmacology teaching has focused more on drug instead of therapeutics, such that although pharmacological knowledge is acquired, practical skills in prescribing remain weak. In Malaysia many new medical schools (both public and private) have been set up in the last 12 years due to a change in government policy, resulting in a wide spectrum of medical curricula. Universiti Malaya (UM) being the oldest medical school in Malaysia was deep set in its traditional way of teaching-learning, since its inception in 1962, until a visit from the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom in 1984 triggered off a change of tide. Since then the medical curriculum in UM has undergone two major revisions. The first revised curriculum (1988) aimed to inject more clinical relevance into basic science teaching, through introducing clinical lectures and skills in the paraclinical year.Professional behaviour was also addressed. The second revised curriculum (1998) sought to improve further the integration of knowledge as well as to produce a holistic doctor, viewing the patient as a person instead of a clinical entity. The teaching-learning of pharmacology has gradually moved from factual regurgitation to more clinical reasoning, from lab-based to more patient-oriented approach. As more new medical schools are being set up in Malaysia, exchange of experience in this area of learning will hopefully help us find a happy medium between "the old is best" and "the new is better" type approach so that a pedagogically sound and yet logistically practical curriculum can be found in our local setting, to help produce doctors with good prescribing practice.

  12. Opening the Duke electronic health record to apps: Implementing SMART on FHIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Richard A; Polo-Wood, Felipe; Mandel, Joshua C; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2017-03-01

    Recognizing a need for our EHR to be highly interoperable, our team at Duke Health enabled our Epic-based electronic health record to be compatible with the Boston Children's project called Substitutable Medical Apps and Reusable Technologies (SMART), which employed Health Level Seven International's (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), commonly known as SMART on FHIR. We created a custom SMART on FHIR-compatible server infrastructure written in Node.js that served two primary functions. First, it handled API management activities such rate-limiting, authorization, auditing, logging, and analytics. Second, it retrieved the EHR data and made it available in a FHIR-compatible format. Finally, we made required changes to the EHR user interface to allow us to integrate several compatible apps into the provider- and patient-facing EHR workflows. After integrating SMART on FHIR into our Epic-based EHR, we demonstrated several types of apps running on the infrastructure. This included both provider- and patient-facing apps as well as apps that are closed source, open source and internally-developed. We integrated the apps into the testing environment of our desktop EHR as well as our patient portal. We also demonstrated the integration of a native iOS app. In this paper, we demonstrate the successful implementation of the SMART and FHIR technologies on our Epic-based EHR and subsequent integration of several compatible provider- and patient-facing apps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM) medical students' attitudes to research and learning: 1984-1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobigrot-Kleinman, D; Nobigrot-Streimbleinsky, M; Galván-Huerta, S C

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates, after a 10-year period, the attitudes of medical students towards research and learning at the National University of Mexico (UNAM), and tries to determine the role that experiences obtained during academic years could play in orienting these attitudes. Results indicate that all four groups of participant students,--1st and 4th-5th grades, in 1984 and in 1994--show slightly positive attitudes towards research and learning. No significant attitude changes were observed after the 10-year period in students who enter medical school nor in those who begin clinical practice. Besides, it was found a significant correlation between these two attitudinal factors. Some possible explanations for these results are discussed, as well as some steps that could help to promote positive attitudes towards research and learning.

  14. Energy drinks consumption practices among medical students of a Private sector University of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Asma; Bhombal, Swaleha Tariq; Jawaid, Ambreen; Zaki, Samar

    2015-09-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has become popular among students and athletes over the past few years. To explore the phenomenon, a cross-sectional survey was conducted through a self-administered pilot-tested questionnaire. Frequency of energy drinks consumption was found to be 121(52%) in a sample of 233 medical students. Red bull was the most common brand consumed 101(43%). The major reasons reported for its usage were to gain/replenish energy by 36(15.4%), and studying for examination by 34(14.6%). Television was reported as the major source of information 153(66%) followed by friends 113(48%). There was a high frequency of energy drinks' consumption among medical students of a private university. There is a strong need to create awareness regarding these drinks, especially among adolescents and teenagers.

  15. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study

    OpenAIRE

    Naja, Wadih J; Kansoun, Alaa H; Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Objective Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilizat...

  16. Evaluation of Exam Anxiety Level among Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Students and its Association with Demographic Characteristics in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    MM Mohammadi; Sh Parandin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Test -anxiety is one of the most common mental health problems among the students that can impair performance and leads to failure of the exam. So, this study aimed to determine the rate of exam-anxiety among Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences' students. Methods: This cross sectional-analytic study was conducted on 510 students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences by convenience sampling method in 2014. In this study, data collection tool was Test-Anxiety que...

  17. Social and psychological factors affecting eating habits among university students in a Malaysian medical school: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Ganasegeran Kurubaran; Al-Dubai Sami AR; Qureshi Ahmad M; Al-abed Al-abed AA; AM, Rizal; Aljunid Syed M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Eating habits have been a major concern among university students as a determinant of health status. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of eating habits and its associated social and psychological factors among medical students. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 132 medical students of pre-clinical phase at a Malaysian university. A self-administered questionnaire was used which included questions on socio-demography, anthropometry, eating ha...

  18. Assessing the performance of hospitals at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences by Pabon Lasso Model (2006-2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Behzad Karami Matin; Satar Rezaei; Moslem Soofi; Ali Kazemi Karyani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assessment of hospital performance plays an important role in improving the quantity and quality of services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the teaching hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences using Pabon Lasso model during 2006-2011. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out to assess the performance of six teaching hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during 2006-2011 using Pabon Lasso Model. Thi...

  19. Internet addiction among students of the medical university of białystok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta; Kułak, Wojciech; Marcinkowski, Jerzy Tadeusz; Damme-Ostapowicz, Katarzyna Van; Lewko, Jolanta; Lankau, Agnieszka; Lukaszuk, Cecylia; Rozwadowska, Emilia

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this research was to assess Internet addiction among students of the Faculty of Health Prevention at the Medical University of Białystok. The present study included 358 students-nursing (n = 232), midwifery (n = 71), and medical rescue (n = 55). The following instruments were administered to the participants:the Young test, a test of the intensity of the abstinence syndrome, and a test of "online" addiction. Students who did not have a computer at home spent 3 hours a day on the Internet; students who did have a computer at home spent 0.5 to 8hours. On average, all respondents spent 1.8 ± 1.3 hours daily online. Internet addiction was confirmed among 24 (10.3%) nursing, 7 (9.9%) midwifery, and 5(9.1%) medical rescue students. The abstinence syndrome was noted among 11 (4.7%) nursing, 7(9.9%) obstetrics, and 7 (12.7%) medical rescue students. Several students had both an Internet addiction and the abstinence syndrome.

  20. Marmara University Medical Students' Perception on Sexual Violence against Women and Induced Abortion in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüleci, Nimet Emel; Kaya, Eda; Aslan, Ece; Şenkal, Ece Söylem; Çiçek, Zehra Nadide

    2016-03-01

    Historically, sexual assault is a common issue in Turkey. As doctors are one of the steps to help sexually assaulted women, medical students should have basic knowledge of and sensitivity regarding this subject. Another common women's public health issue is induced abortion. In countries where access to abortion is restricted, there is a tendency towards unhealthy abortion. The aims of this study are: (1) to determine the attitudes and opinions of Marmara University Medical Faculty students about sexual assault against women and induced abortion and (2) to propose an educational program for medical students about sexual assault and abortion. Cross-sectional study. The questionnaires were self-administered and the data were analyzed using SPSS v.15.0. First, the descriptive statistics were analyzed, followed by Chi-square for contingency tests assessing differences in attitudes toward sexual assault and induced abortion by factors such as gender and educational term. Differences were considered statistically significant at p0.05). Although there was no significant difference regarding the extent of punishment by victim's status as a virgin, 21.3% (n=63) agreed that punishment should be more severe when the victim was a virgin. About 40.7% (n=120) agreed that the legal period of abortion in Turkey (10 weeks) should be longer. The majority (86.1%, n=255) agreed that legally prohibiting abortions causes an increase in unhealthy abortions. An educational program on these issues should be developed for medical students.

  1. Systematic Education of Self-Medication at Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narui, Koji; Samizo, Kazuo; Inoue, Michiko; Watanabe, Kinzo

    2016-01-01

    The promotion of self-medication by pharmacies, with the aim of encouraging a patient's self-selection of proper OTC drug, is written about in the national action plan "Japan is Back". The subject of self-medication has been improved in the 2013 revised edition of "Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education". At Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, the systematic education of self-medication was started from the onset of the six-year course in the third, fourth and fifth grade. We introduce here a new approach in our systematic education of self-medication. In the practice of the fourth grade, groups of around 5-6 students are formed. The pharmacy students assume various roles-of pharmacist, rater, observer, and chairman-and perform role-playing. We prepared a standardized patient (SP) showing various symptoms. The student of the role of pharmacist asks about the SP's symptoms, chooses an OTC drug suitable for the SP, and explains the OTC drug to the SP. After the role-playing, those in the roles of rater, observer, SP, and faculty give feedback to the student who played the role of pharmacist. Because we conduct this role-playing using SPs with a variety of symptoms, we can create a situation similar to a real drugstore.

  2. Attitudes toward learning communication skills among medical students of a university in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Ismaeil; Aghamolaei, Teamur

    2011-01-01

    Communication skills play a paramount role in clinical practice. In every clinical setting, medical doctors need to interview their patients efficiently and be persuasive toward their health issues. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students toward learning communication skills at Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences in Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the questionnaires were distributed to 210 medical students. Twenty eight students were excluded since they either did not return the questionnaires or filled them out incompletely. So, totally 182 questionnaires were analyzed (response rate=%86.6). Data was collected using communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) which consists of 26 items, 13 indicative of positive attitude and 13 indicative of negative attitude toward learning communication skills. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. The mean age of the participants was 21.7 (SD=2.7). Male and female students accounted for 38.5% and 61.5% of the participants respectively. The mean scores for positive attitude was 54.8 (SD=7.3) out of 65, and the mean scores for negative attitude was 35.3 (SD=5.9) out of 65. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students and between basic sciences and pathophysiology students on the one hand and clinical course students on the other as regards their attitudes toward learning communication skills (Pcommunication skills, curriculum planners should not lose sight of negative attitudes and measures need to be taken to minimize or if possible eliminate them.

  3. Comparison of Two Different Curricula in Psychiatry Clerkship at Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ali Ahmadi-Abhari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new psychiatry clerkship curriculum which was designed to improve the knowledge and skills of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran.Methods:This quasi-experimental study was conducted in two consecutive semesters from February 2009 to January 2010. In total, 167 medical students participated in the study. In the first semester, as the control group, the clerks’ training was based on the traditional curriculum. In the next semester, we constructed and applied a new curriculum based on the SPICES model (student-centered, problem-based, integrated, community-based, elective and systematic.At the end of the clerkship, the students were given two exams: Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ to assess their knowledge, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE to assess their skills. Baseline data and test performance for each student were analyzed. Results:Compared to the control group, students in the intervention group showed significantly higher OSCE scores (P= 0.01. With respect to MCQ score, no significant difference was found between the two groups.Conclusions:The results suggest that the revised curriculum is more effective than the traditional one in improving the required clinical skills in medical students during their psychiatry clerkship.

  4. Exploring the technology readiness of nursing and medical students at a Canadian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caison, Amy L; Bulman, Donna; Pai, Shweta; Neville, Doreen

    2008-06-01

    Technology readiness is a well-established construct that refers to individuals' ability to embrace and adopt new technology. Given the increasing use of advanced technologies in the delivery of health care, this study uses the Technology Readiness Index (Parasuraman, 2000) to explore the technology readiness of nursing and medical students from the fall 2006 cohort at Memorial University of Newfoundland. The three major findings from this study are that (i) rural nursing students are more insecure with technology than their urban counterparts, (ii) male medical students score higher on innovation than their female counterparts and have a higher overall technology readiness attitude than female medical students, and (iii) medical students who are older than 25 have a negative technology readiness score whereas those under 25 had a positive score. These findings suggest health care professional schools would be well served to implement curricular changes designed to support the needs of rural students, women, and those entering school at a non-traditional age. In addition, patterns such as those observed in this study highlight areas of emphasis for current practitioners as health care organizations develop continuing education offerings for staff.

  5. Impact of a novel dental school admission test on student performance at Innsbruck Medical University, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Kapferer, Ines; Ostermann, Herwig; Staudinger, Roland; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    Since the year 2000, prospective dental students at Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria, have undergone both theoretical and practical preadmission exams, called the Dental Admission Test (DAT). The aim of this investigation was to assess the suitability and outcome of this selection practice. Five classes from 2001 to 2005 (N=97; forty-three female, fifty-four male) were retrospectively reviewed. DAT results were compared with student performance, gender, ability to graduate on time, and dropout rates. Furthermore, the influence of a previous medical degree was evaluated. The t-test was used to analyze correlations between the results of the DAT and the following: gender, students who graduated on time, and students who had previously completed a medical degree. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was applied to analyze correlations among test scores, age, and students' performance during the first clinical year. Students graduating on time were noted to have significantly better DAT results; students with a previous medical degree showed significantly better grades during their first clinical year. The difference between the performance of male and female applicants on the DAT was not significant. Correlation was found between DAT results and dental school performance (r=-0.462). We conclude that the DAT may reduce dropout rates by excluding applicants unlikely to be successful in practical courses and that DAT scores are a reliable tool to predict student performance during the first clinical year of dental school in Innsbruck.

  6. Plasma homocysteine level in cardiac syndrome X and its relation with duke treadmill score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timurkaynak, Timur; Balcioglu, Serhat; Arslan, Ugur; Kocaman, Sinan A; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the plasma homocysteine level and the relationship between plasma homocysteine level and duke treadmill score (DTS) in cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients. Seventy-nine patients (36 male, 43 female, mean age: 50 +/- 8.8 years) admitted to Gazi University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey with typical effort angina, positive stress test, and angiographically normal coronary arteries between January and September 2006 were included in this prospective and controlled study. Thirty asymptomatic patients (11 male, 19 female, mean age: 47.6 +/- 8.3 years) with 2 cardiovascular risk factors were chosen as a control group. Plasma homocysteine level was measured in both groups and DTS was calculated in the CSX group. Plasma homocysteine was measured with the AxSYM homocysteine immunoassay method in both groups. Plasma homocysteine level was higher in the CSX group compared to the control group (16.5 +/- 4.9 micromol/L, n=79, versus 12.4 +/- 4.1 micromol/L, n=30, p<0.001). The DTS was -2.7 +/- 5.3 in the CSX group. There was a negative correlation between the DTS and homocysteine levels in the CSX group. (r= -0.506, p<0.001). Plasma homocysteine level, which is known to cause endothelial dysfunction and microvascular ischemia were higher in CSX patients. Also, this increase in homocysteine level inversely correlated with the DTS, which represents the magnitude of ischemia.

  7. HESS Opinions: Repeatable research: what hydrologists can learn from the Duke cancer research scandal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Bakker, Mark

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade, difficulties encountered in reproducing the results of a cancer study at Duke University resulted in a scandal and an investigation which concluded that tools used for data management, analysis, and modeling were inappropriate for the documentation of the study, let alone the reproduction of the results. New protocols were developed which require that data analysis and modeling be carried out with scripts that can be used to reproduce the results and are a record of all decisions and interpretations made during an analysis or a modeling effort. In the hydrological sciences, we face similar challenges and need to develop similar standards for transparency and repeatability of results. A promising route is to start making use of open-source languages (such as R and Python) to write scripts and to use collaborative coding environments (such as Git) to share our codes for inspection and use by the hydrological community. An important side-benefit to adopting such protocols is consistency and efficiency among collaborators.

  8. HESS Opinions: Repeatable research: what hydrologistscan learn from the Duke cancer research scandal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, Michael; Bakker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, difficulties encountered in reproducing the results of a cancer study at Duke University resulted in a scandal and an investigation which concluded that tools used for data management, analysis, and modeling were inappropriate for the documentation of the study, let alone the reproduction of the results. New protocols were developed which require that data analysis and modeling be carried out with scripts that can be used to reproduce the results and are a record of all decisions and interpretations made during an analysis or a modeling effort. In the hydrological sciences, we face similar challenges and need to develop similar standards for transparency and repeatability of results. A promising route is to start making use of open-source languages (such as R and Python) to write scripts and to use collaborative coding environments (such as Git) to share our codes for inspection and use by the hydrological community. An important side-benefit to adopting such protocols is consistency and efficiency among collaborators.

  9. Back pain and physical activity: Students of the Medical University of Lublin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis-Sochocka Marta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, back pain and posture problems affect a growing number of young people. This is probably due to a changing lifestyle which has led to less physical activity. The aims of our study were to evaluate the prevalence of pain associated with the spine, as well as to ascertain the relationship of these symptoms with the degree of physical activity among a group of students of the Medical University of Lublin. The research group consisted of 301 students (201 women and 100 men aged between 19 and 27 years. The survey was performed at the turn of the year 2014/2015.

  10. [Ninety years of education in Social Medicine at the Medical Faculty of Masaryk University in Brno].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holčík, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The Department of Social Medicine at the Medical Faculty of Masaryk University was founded by Prof. Dr František Hamza. Prof. Dr Adolf Žáček, who worked in the World Health Organization in Geneva in 1961-1963, uses his knowledge and experiences to remarkable increasing quality of education and research at this department. Present situation in health care system in the Czech Republic demonstrates that there are great challenges for education and research in the field of Social Medicine.

  11. [90th anniversary of the Chair and Department of Forensic Medicine Poznan University of Medical Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaba, Czesław

    2011-01-01

    The paper outlines the history of the Chair and Department of Forensic Medicine Poznan University of Medical Sciences since it was established until today. Changes in the appearance and organization of the seat of the institution were discussed briefly. The profiles of all former heads of the Department, their contribution to the development and improvement of the institution and formation of the new scientific forensic medicine staff were presented. The specification and analysis of the scientific staff achievements was performed, especially taking into account their scientific publications and scope of the research that contributed to the efficient service activities for the prosecution and police, as well as society.

  12. History of the Public Health Institute of Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahin, E; Morava, E

    2000-05-01

    The science of public health of the XVIIIth century named politia medica together with medicina forensis became an independent obligatory subject in 1793 at the Medical Faculty of the Hungarian Royal University of Science. The independent Public Health Institute of the Medical Faculty was established in 1874. The first professor of public health was József Fodor who attained international reputation during his professorship. He organized training for school physicians and health teachers first in Europe and he organized courses for medical officers and for military doctors. He held courses for law-, engineer- and architect-students. He promoted all fields of the public health. His research on the bactericide effect of serum places him among the founders of immunology. Fodor's successors at the Chair of Public Health were Leó Liebermann whose research activities included physico-chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology and social hygiene; Gusztáv Rigler who focused on the epidemiology of communicable diseases, on the health effects of spa treatment and mineral waters. The next famous professor was Gyula Darányi. His scientific field was public health bacteriology and public health chemistry. They were followed by József Melly and László Dabis (Scheff). After the Second World War fundamental changes took place in the life of the university. The Faculty of Medicine was separated from the University of Science on February 1, 1951 and became an independent university under the control of the Ministry of Health. In 1953 the Institute of Public Health was cut into two separate institutes: Institute of Public Health and Institute for the Organization of Health Service. The Institute of Public Health was transformed to Institute of Public Health and Epidemiology in 1973. The Institute for the Organization of Health Service was transformed into Institute of Social Medicine and History of Medicine in 1985 and later into Institute of History of Medicine and Social Medicine

  13. A Comparison of Attitudes Toward Euthanasia Among Medical Students at Two Polish Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Kazmierczak-Lukaszewicz, Sylwia; Forycka,Maria; Cialkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Kotlinska - Lemieszek,Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study conducted upon completion of obligatory palliative medicine courses among 588 medical students at two universities was to compare their attitudes toward euthanasia. Four hundred ninety-two (84.97 %) students were Catholics; 69 (11.73 %) declared they would practice euthanasia, 303 (51.53 %) would not, and 216 students (36.73 %) were not sure. The idea of euthanasia legalisation was supported by 174 (29.59 %) respondents, opposed by 277 (47.11 %), and 137 (23.30 %) were un...

  14. The Prevalence of Pemphigus (Razi Hospital and Department of Oral Pathology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshghyar N

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this retrospective statistical study was to determine the prevalcence and frequency of"nage and sex distributions of pemphigus disease. Pemphigus disease classified as autoimmune bullous"ndermatoses which is a chronic mucocutaneous disease."nThis study was performed in Razi Hospital and department of oral pathology of dental school, Tehran"nUniversity of Medical Sciences. The most frequently effected area was buccal moucosa of oral cavity. The"nmost rate of recurrence was found in oral cavity which being more common in middle age females (25-44"nyears.

  15. Examining a Paradigm for Cultural Development at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bakhtazmay Bonab

    2016-12-01

    Results: Assessing the effective factors on cultural development indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between current and optimal status (p<0.001 (95% CI: 1.435.00. Results indicated that there is a significant difference in cultural development between current status and optimal state among the staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Conclusion: The results of the research show that cultural education in its optimal state is of higher rank than other indicators. Thus it seems necessary to pay more attention to cultural development and sustainable development.

  16. Evaluation of Antidiabetic Prescriptions from Medical Reimbursement Applications at Banaras Hindu University Health Care Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dev Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is on rapid increase in third world countries undergoing rapid transition in terms of development particularly in India, which is often being referred as Diabetic capital. It is a disease more prevalent at latter part of life of human beings when finances dwindle and social care gets neglected. The medication continues till the whole life on a regular basis. In present study, the objective has been to provide pharmacoeconomic medication to the diabetic pensioners in the backdrop as mentioned in above background.Methods: The data was collected at the medical reimbursement section of pensioners of the University. The data was examined to answer issues of therapeutic decisions in the light of the pharmacoeconomic considerations. In this paper essentially data on choice of prescriptions with the angle of pharmacoeconomic prudence were included. The dichotomy of specialist versus non specialist prescribers at the tertiary center (i.e. medical college hospital was compared. Effort was made to define merit of the prescription based on comprehensive considerations of patient profile, disease profile and therapeutic choice.Results: Total 72 prescriptions were analyzed for the study in which 475 drugs were prescribed to the patients.  Total antidiabetic drugs prescribed to the patients were 169. Out of 72 cases 39 were males and 33 were females with mean age 66.04 ± 5.80 (Mean ± SEM. The average number of drugs per prescription was 6.59 which was very high as per guidelines. Most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug was Metformin (63.89% followed by Glimepiride (31.95%.Conclusion: This study reflects that there is need to make available the standard therapeutic optionat University Health Care Facility based upon pharmacoeconomic considerations.

  17. James Cook University's rurally orientated medical school selection process: quality graduates and positive workforce outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robin A; Woolley, Torres; Sen Gupta, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    The regionally based James Cook University (JCU) College of Medicine and Dentistry aims to meet its mission to address the health needs of the region by using a selection policy favouring rural origin applicants and providing students with early and repeated exposure to rural experiences during training. This study seeks to determine if the JCU medical school's policy of preferentially selecting rural and remote background students is associated with differing patterns of undergraduate performance or graduate practice location. Data at application to medical school and during the undergraduate years was retrieved from administrative databases held by the university and the medical school. Postgraduate location data were obtained either from personal contact via email, telephone or Facebook or electronically from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority website. Practice location was described across Australian Standard Geographical Classification Remoteness Area (ASGC-RA) categories, with 1 being a major city and 5 being a very remote location. The 856 Australian-based students accepted into the JCU medical program between 2000 and 2008 came from all geographical regions across Australia: 20% metropolitan (ASGC-RA 1), 20% inner regional (ASGC-RA 2), 56% outer regional (ASGC-RA 3), and 5% from remote or very remote locations (ASGC-RA 4 and 5). Having a rural or remote hometown at application (ASGC-RA 3-5) was significantly associated with a lower tertiary entrance score (pScholarship (p=0.005), taking longer to complete the 6-year course (p=exams in the clinical years (years 4-6) and are much more likely to practise in rural and remote areas. These data suggest that JCU's selection process favouring rural origin applicants does not compromise academic standards, but does produce graduates whose patterns of practice accord with the mission of the school.

  18. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Anbari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences research (HSR is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. Results: The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3, but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7. The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. Conclusion: The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  19. Spatial distribution and polarization of gamma-rays generated via Compton backscattering in the Duke/OK-4 storage ring FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S H; Tornow, W; Montgomery, C

    2001-01-01

    Beams of nearly monochromatic gamma-rays are produced via intracavity Compton backscattering in the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL, the high-intensity gamma-ray source (HI gamma S). Presently, HI gamma S generates gamma-ray beams with an energy tunable from 2 to 58 MeV and a maximum flux of 5x10 sup 7 gamma-rays per second. The gamma-rays are linearly polarized with a degree of polarization close to 100% (V.N. Litvinenko, et al., Predictions and expected performance for the VUV OK-5/Duke Storage Ring FEL with variable polarization, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, to be published in this proceeding) and they are collimated to pencil-like semi-monoenergetic beams with RMS energy spreads as low as 0.2%. The detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the gamma-ray beam quality were conducted during the last two years (S.H. Park, Thesis, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 2000). In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the experimental results on the spatial distribution and polarization of gamma-rays fro...

  20. Body-art practices among undergraduate medical university students in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacha Emmanuel Chacha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body-art practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. Although substantial data are available in developed countries, little has been documented about body-art practices in developing countries. Objective: To determine the magnitude, types and reasons for practicing body-art practices among undergraduate medical University students in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducteed among undergraduate University students in Dar es Salaam involving 536 respondents from two Universities. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect data. Analyses were based on summary measures and bivariate analyses. Results: While 7.5% of undergraduate students reported having tattoos, 20% reported having body puncturing or piercing. Body piercing is reported more among female university undergraduate students than their male counterparts. Reported main reasons for undergoing body-art include "a mark of beauty," 24%, "just wanted one," 18% and "a mark of femininity or masculinity," 17%. The majority (98% of students were aware that unsafe body-art practices may lead to contracting HIV and more than half (52% reported awareness of the risk of Hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Despite high awareness of the potential risks involved in unsafe body arts that include tattoo and piercing, these practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. There is need to have educational and counseling efforts so as to minimize associated health risks.

  1. Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models and medical education at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Margaret Maria

    2011-09-01

    In the 1860s, Dr. Louis Thomas Jérôme Auzoux introduced a set of papier-mâché teaching models intended for use in the botanical classroom. These botanical models quickly made their way into the educational curricula of institutions around the world. Within these institutions, Auzoux's models were principally used to fulfil educational goals, but their incorporation into diverse curricula also suggests they were used to implement agendas beyond botanical instruction. This essay examines the various uses and meanings of Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen in the nineteenth century. The two main conclusions of this analysis are: (1) investing in prestigious scientific collections was a way for these universities to attract fee-paying students so that better medical accommodation could be provided and (2) models were used to transmit different kinds of botanical knowledge at both universities. The style of botany at the University of Glasgow was offensive and the department there actively embraced and incorporated ideas of the emerging new botany. At Aberdeen, the style of botany was defensive and there was some hesitancy when confronting new botanical ideas.

  2. Study of Association between Social Adjustment and Spiritual Health in Qom University of Medical Sciences Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra Aliakbarzade arani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Admission to university is considered an opportunity to learn more and mentally grow further. At the same time, it is considered a stressor by some students and causes maladaptive reactions in them. This study was conducted to investigate the association between social adjustment and spiritual health in university students. Methods: Two hundred and fifty students were enrolled in this descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional study according to random, systematic sampling. The used instruments were Bell Adjustment Inventory, consisting of 32 items, with 89% reliability coefficient and Paloutzian & Ellison Spiritual Well-Being Scale, consisting of 20 items, with validity and reliability of 79% and 82%, respectively. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and univariate and multivariate linear regression in SPSS 16. Results: Women comprised 50.2% of the participants. The mean (SD age of the participants was 21.72 (5.02 and only 18.4% were married. Social adjustment was significantly correlated with total score of spiritual health and scores of the subscales religious health and existential health (P<0.001. Conclusion: Because social adjustment was moderate among Qom University of Medical Sciences students, and in the light of the association between spiritual health and social adjustment, group and individual counseling services can be delivered to students with low levels of social adjustment in universities to help them improve their social and spiritual health. Keywords:

  3. Effects of person-vocation fit and core self-evaluation on career commitment of medical university students: the mediator roles of anxiety and career satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Zhou, Liang; Wu, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Miao, Danmin; Zhang, Jiaxi; Peng, Jiaxi

    2014-02-20

    How the career commitment of medical university students can be improved is an underinvestigated topic. This experimental study aims to explore the factors that influence career commitment of medical university students. One hundred eighty-two medical university students completed the vocational value questionnaire, state anxiety scale, core self-evaluation scale, Minnesota satisfaction questionnaire, and the Chinese career commitment questionnaire. (1) A mismatch was found between the vocational value and the medical career of medical university students, primarily in their self-development; (2) Core self-evaluation can significantly predict the continued commitment of medical university students; (3) Vocational value, career fit, and core self-evaluation can significantly predict the affective commitment and normative commitment of medical university students, while state anxiety and vocational satisfaction play significant mediating roles. Both person-vocation fit and core self-evaluation can affect the career commitment of medical university students, while job satisfaction and state anxiety play mediating roles.

  4. Sleep Quality and Academic Progression among Students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horyeh Sarbazvatan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep deprivation and drowsiness are very common among university students. The aim of this study was to examine the sleep quality and academic achievement among university students across all medical disciplines in Northwest of Iran. Methods: This study was based on data from a longitudinal study, the "Health and Lifestyle of University Students" (HeLiS. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, a self-administered questionnaire consisting of general information about sleep quality, was completed by students during the first eight weeks of the first semester and academic achievement was assessed via Grade Point Average (GPA in the two semesters following the administration of the PSQI. Results: The mean age of students was 19.16±1.04 and the majority were female (64%. The mean overall score on the PSQI was 6.87±2.25; the majority of students (70% had a global PSQI score greater than 5, indicating they were poor sleepers. Only 28% reported getting over 7 hours of sleep. Female students had higher scores than male students in subjective sleep quality, which was statistically significant (2.15 vs. 1.95 respectively, P = 0.01; however, there was no difference between males and females on other component scores or on the global score. Results of a multiple regression model showed that PSQI score was a predictor of academic achievement (β=-.07, P=0.035, which implies that GPA will be lower among students whose quality of sleep is lower. Conclusion: Based on our sleep quality should be considered and assessed, and sleep hygiene should be promoted among medical university students in order to improve academic achievement.

  5. Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction among the Faculty Members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Mehrabian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job satisfaction plays a pivotal role in the performance of university faculty members. Identification of the factors influencing job satisfaction can be useful in advancing the educational and research objectives of the university. The aim of the present study was to analyze the factors influencing job satisfaction among the faculty members of Guilan University of medical sciences. Methods: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional research that was conducted in 2012. The statistical population of the research included 139 faculty members at faculties of Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected using stratified random sampling. The instrument of data collection was a questionnaire consisting of two sections; the first section contained 10 questions about demographic information and the second section comprised of 19 questions which was designed based on Herzberg's two-factor theory. The questionnaire was scored according to 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS 18 software and descriptive statistics indices of frequency, mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient reported.Results: 66.2% of the faculty members were male, 62.6% were clinical faculty members and 37.4% basic sciences faculty members. The most important factors affecting the faculty members’ job satisfaction were job security (4.14±0.96, friendly relationship with colleagues (4.01±0.81, and technology and technical knowledge (3.99±0.87. The most important motivational factors influencing job satisfaction were interest in job (4.24+0.71, achievement (3.99±0.87 and equal opportunities for career promotion (3.95±0.99.Conclusion: stability and job satisfaction, creating friendly working environment, proper environmental conditions, professor’s welfare and providing spiritual and material incentives are factors that influence the professor’s job satisfaction.

  6. Performance of the libraries in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on the EFQM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Saeid; Atashpour, Bahareh; Papi, Ahmad; Nouri, Rasul; Hasanzade, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Performance measurement is inevitable for university libraries. Hence, planning and establishing a constant and up-to-date measurement system is required for the libraries, especially the university libraries. The primary studies and analyses reveal that the EFQM Excellence Model has been efficient, and the administrative reform program has focused on the implementation of this model. Therefore, on the basis of these facts as well as the need for a measurement system, the researchers measured the performance of libraries in schools and hospitals supported by Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, using the EFQM Organizational Excellence Model. This descriptive research study was carried out by a cross-sectional survey method in 2011. This research study included librarians and library directors of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (70 people). The validity of the instrument was measured by the specialists in the field of Management and Library Science. To measure the reliability of the questionnaire, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient value was measured (0.93). The t-test, ANOVA, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for measurements. The data were analyzed by SPSS. Data analysis revealed that the mean score of the performance measurement for the libraries under study and between nine dimensions the highest score was 65.3% for leadership dimension and the lowest scores were 55.1% for people and 55.1% for society results. In general, using the ninth EFQM model the average level of all dimensions, which is in good agreement with normal values, was assessed. However, compared to other results, the criterion people and society results were poor. It is Recommended by forming the expert committee on criterion people and society results by individuals concerned with the various conferences and training courses to improve the aspects.

  7. Contraceptive behavior as risk factor for reproductive health of junior students attending a medical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Govyazina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 1–3 year students attending medical and preventive faculty of a medical university were our research object. Our research had many stages, and at the first one our goal was to examine and to assess basic behavioral risks for reproductive health of students attending medical and preventive faculty of a medical university. We conducted a sociological examination via questioning. 428 students were questioned as per materials collecting program which included 74 parameters; they accounted for 91.6 % out of the overall official number of students, 45.0 % male students and 40.0 % female students combined work and studies. We detected that, as per questioning results, the specific weight of students who took care of their health amounted to 79.2 % boys and 95.2 % girls. However, the students tended to have bad habits, i.e. constant alcohol intake or smoking. And although information on diseases prevention and on how to pursue healthy lifestyle was perfectly available to them, students didn't try to use it and preserve their health. All the respondents said they were against abortion. Girls were likely to adopt a complex approach when choosing a contraceptive, they resorted to hormonal agents, and, with their partners' consent, to condoms. But they often took hormonal agents without any consultations with a gynecologist or an endocrinologist. Contraceptives were rather rarely applied, and students appeared to have no knowledge on risk factors causing reproductive health deterioration. They also tended to be negligent and too self-confident when it came to reproductive health protection. A risk of abortions was very high for girls who didn't use contraceptives, and also all students ran rather high risk of catching sexual diseases. Sexual education is needed to correct contraceptive behavior; medical workers are a main source of information on reproductive health of young people in 7–10 % cases only. We need to create interactive educational programs

  8. An Evaluation of Graduates\\' Theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mozaffari Khosravi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Writing the thesis is one of the first experiences of university students. It is usually conducted satisfactorily under the advice an advisor. Yet, there are some problems in this regard. Objectives : The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the quality of the medical and dental theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods and Materials : This was a qualitative observational study conducted on 30% of medical theses and all the dental theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 1992-2002. The characteristics and features of the different parts of the theses were recorded in a questionnaire. Then, the quality score was calculated for each thesis. Results : In this study, 215 (76.2% volumes of theses of medical students and 67 (23.8% volumes of theses of dentistry students were studied and reviewed. Most of the theses studied (13.8% related to internal medicine, and least of them (1.8% related to pathology. The majority of the theses (92.7% were of experimental research type, and 2.5% included case studies.95.7% of the theses were appropriate regarding title characteristics. Almost 19% of them lacked the part "Statement of the Problem" and 43.2% were deficient in this part. 40.7% of the theses (52% of medical theses and 6% of dental theses lacked "Review of Literature". Only 51.6% of them (40.7% of medical theses and 86.4% of dental theses possessed a "Review of Literature" that was quite related to the thesis topic. In approximately 5.8% of the theses, there was no direct reference to the objectives. For 12.4% of theses, the objectives have been stated accurately while for 81.8% of them this was not the case. Regarding objectives, the medical theses were in a better state and showed a statistically significant correlation with the dental theses. Regarding the part "Results", in 6.9% of the theses, specific objectives have not been stated clearly. 82.6% reached completely to the preset

  9. Better Together: A Model University-Community Partnership for Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentleson, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This is the dramatic story behind the transformation of Duke University from an isolated, exclusive institution to the dynamic, civically engaged campus that exists today. "Better Together" examines the first decade of the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership (DDNP) and its involvement with Project HOPE, six quality community-based…

  10. Stress and Depressed Mood in Medical Students, Law Students, and Graduate Students at McGill University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmers, Karin F.; Danoff, Deborah; Steinert, Yvonne; Young, Simon N.; Leyton, Marco

    1997-01-01

    Administration of the Derogatis Stress Profile to 509 medical students, 380 law students, and 215 graduate students at McGill University (Ontario) revealed that medical students are not greatly stressed relative to other groups, so other explanations must be sought for elevated levels of depression in some. One clear stressor found is the…

  11. An integrated approach to distance learning with digital video in the French-speaking Virtual Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, J C; Cuggia, M; Soula, G; Spector, M; Kohler, F

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the French-speaking Virtual Medical University project (UMVF) is to share common resources and specific tools in order to improve medical training. Digital video on IP is an attractive tool for higher education but there are a number of obstacles to widespread implementation. This paper describes the UMVF approach to integrating digital video technologies and services in educational projects.

  12. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

  13. Correlation between Knowledge, Experience and Common Sense, with Critical Thinking Capability of Medical Faculty's Students at Indonesia Christian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeak, Bernadetha

    2015-01-01

    This research discusses correlation between knowledge, experience and common sense with critical thinking of Medical Faculty's Student. As to the objective of this research is to find the correlation between knowledge, experience and common sense with critical thinking of Medical Faculty's Students at Christian University of Indonesia. It is…

  14. University receives $1.4 million science education award from Howard Hughes Medical Institute to support innovate undergraduate science education

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech was among 50 top research universities nationwide to receive a Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) that will be used to encourage university faculty to develop new ways to teach and inspire undergraduate students about science and research.

  15. Coordination of Two On-Line Information Retrieval Services At the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Jan; Foreman, Gertrude

    The Bio-Medical Library at the University of Minnesota has access to two on-line computer systems: the MEDLINE system (MEDLARS ON-LINE) of the National Library of Medicine and the State University of New York (SUNY) Biomedical Communication Network. MEDLINE consists of two files which provide coverage of the "Index Medicus" from 1970 to the…

  16. Trends in Glaucoma Medication Expenditures under Universal Health Coverage: A National Population-Based Longitudinal Survey in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Lin Chiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical care in Taiwan is well known for its low cost, high efficiency, high quality, excellent medical accessibility, and high equity. We investigate the trends in medication expenditures for glaucoma from 1997 to 2010. The results show that higher medical expenditures were incurred by patients who were aged ≥40 years, male patients, and patients in the highest salary population whereas lower medical expenditures were incurred by blue-collar workers. The medications with the most significant increases in expenditure were prostaglandin analogs (PGAs, α-agonists, and fixed combinations, whereas the medications with the most significant decreases in expenditure were β-blockers and cholinergic agonists. The number of trabeculectomies shows two downward break points in 1999 and 2000 when PGAs were listed and were reimbursed. These results suggest socioeconomic disparities in glaucoma care, as well as understanding of the changes in the expenditure of glaucoma medications under such universal health insurance coverage system.

  17. Building a research program in rehabilitation sciences, Part II: case studies: University of Texas Medical Branch, Boston University, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leighton; Jette, Alan M; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Robinson, Lawrence R; Tietsworth, Monica L; Ricker, Joseph H; Boninger, Michael L

    2009-08-01

    This article presents four case studies of rehabilitation science programs that have created enduring research efforts: one in physical therapy, one in interdisciplinary rehabilitation sciences, and two in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Several themes emerge from these case studies. First, building an enduring research program takes time and significant foundational work. Most importantly, it is crucial to have the support of the dean, academic institution, and medical center. This seems to be a prerequisite for success in this area.

  18. Health rights knowledge among medical school students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayegh, Nasser Y.; Eldeek, Basem S.; Kafy, Souzan M.; Al-Ahwal, Mahmoud S.; Bondagji, Nabeel S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health care is a basic human right, and Saudi Arabia affirms these rights for all its citizens. Objectives To assess the knowledge of medical students regarding health rights in Saudi Arabia. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University (KAU) from September 2015 through November 2015. A questionnaire written in English collected demographic data and included questions about reproductive health care and health rights of women and patients with cancer, senility, or special needs. Results Of the 267 participants, 184 (68.9%) were female, and 252 (94.4%) were Saudi. Regarding consent, 87 (32.6%) and 113 (42.3%) participants believed a female patient required the consent of a male guardian to receive medical treatment or surgery, respectively, in Saudi Arabia, and only 106 (39.7%) knew that a female patient could provide consent for a caesarean section. Sixty-six (24.7%) believed that abortion is never allowed in Islam. Only 93 (34.8%) were aware that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients had health rights, about half (144, 53.9%) knew that cancer patients have a right to full information, and most (181, 67.8%) believed that a patient had the right to withhold health information from his/her family. Approximately half were aware that cancer patients have the right to free medical treatment (138, 51.7%) or that health rights applied to special needs patients (137, 51.3%) and senile patients (122, 45.7%). Conclusions The knowledge of KAU medical students regarding health rights of certain patient populations highlights the importance of health rights education in medical school. PMID:28459869

  19. The pipeline of physiology courses in community colleges: to university, medical school, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny; Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    Community colleges are significant in the landscape of undergraduate STEM (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) education (9), including biology, premedical, and other preprofessional education. Thirty percent of first-year medical school students in 2012 attended a community college. Students attend at different times in high school, their first 2 yr of college, and postbaccalaureate. The community college pathway is particularly important for traditionally underrepresented groups. Premedical students who first attend community college are more likely to practice in underserved communities (2). For many students, community colleges have significant advantages over 4-yr institutions. Pragmatically, they are local, affordable, and flexible, which accommodates students' work and family commitments. Academically, community colleges offer teaching faculty, smaller class sizes, and accessible learning support systems. Community colleges are fertile ground for universities and medical schools to recruit diverse students and support faculty. Community college students and faculty face several challenges (6, 8). There are limited interactions between 2- and 4-yr institutions, and the ease of transfer processes varies. In addition, faculty who study and work to improve the physiology education experience often encounter obstacles. Here, we describe barriers and detail existing resources and opportunities useful in navigating challenges. We invite physiology educators from 2- and 4-yr institutions to engage in sharing resources and facilitating physiology education improvement across institutions. Given the need for STEM majors and health care professionals, 4-yr colleges and universities will continue to benefit from students who take introductory biology, physiology, and anatomy and physiology courses at community colleges.

  20. Quality gap of educational services in viewpoints of students in Hormozgan University of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare Shahram

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher education is growing fast and every day it becomes more and more exposed to globalization processes. The aim of this study was to determine the quality gap of educational services by using a modified SERVQUAL instrument among students in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out at Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences in 2007. In this study, a total of 300 students were selected randomly and asked to complete a questionnaire that was designed according to SERVQUAL methods. This questionnaire measured students' perceptions and expectations in five dimensions of service that consists of assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability and tangibles. The quality gap of educational services was determined based on differences between students' perceptions and expectations. Results The results demonstrated that in each of the five SERVQUAL dimensions, there was a negative quality gap. The least and the most negative quality gap means were in the reliability (-0.71 and responsiveness (-1.14 dimensions respectively. Also, there were significant differences between perceptions and expectations of students in all of the five SERVQUAL dimensions (p Conclusion Negative quality gaps mean students' expectations exceed their perceptions. Thus, improvements are needed across all five dimensions.

  1. Factors Affecting Academic Failure in Nursing Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbasi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Academic failure of students is a major problem of higher education. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the factors causing academic failure in nursing students of Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Methods: This qualitative study was carried out via conventional qualitative content analysis approach. A total of 21 nursing students (18 males and 3 females who had a Grade Point Average (GPA lower than the previous semester and were conditioned (average 12 were selected through purposive sampling from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Qom University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected through semi-structured face-to-face interviews conducted with each individual. Interviews were continued until data saturation, taking about 45 to 70 minutes. Data analysis was performed simultaneously with data gathering. Results: In this study, the mean age of participants was 21.9±4.1 year. Data analysis demonstrated that individual factors, factors related to curriculum, teaching methods of the faculty, large number of students in class, lack of formative assessment of teachers, lack of interaction between the faculty and students, and failure to comply with lesson plans were major causes of academic failure among students. Conclusion: Based on the results, managers, instructors and counselors can monitor their students' academic achievement by careful planning, active teaching methods and continuous assessment of students, and conduct individual and group counseling sessions to prevent academic failure.

  2. New open source medical imaging tools released by CERN and University of Bath collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Rassat, KT group

    2016-01-01

    New toolbox has applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis.   3D X-ray imaging of a patient’s lungs and thorax. The TIGRE toolbox provides a high resolution image with only 1/30th of the radiation for the patient. (Image: Ander Biguri) CERN and the University of Bath have released a new toolbox for fast, accurate 3D X-ray image reconstruction with applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis. The software offers a very simple and affordable way to improve imaging and potentially reduce radiation doses for patients. The toolbox is based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a type of scanning process that takes a series of 2D X-ray pictures and that then processes them into a 3D image. As part of the collaborative project between CERN and the University of Bath, Ander Biguri, a PhD student at Bath, has reviewed a broad range of published CBCT algorithms and adapted them to be faster. Ander Biguri modified the algorithms to run on a laptop fitted with a GPU &ndash...

  3. The Survey of Hospitals Affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences in Preparedness Response to Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nekoei-Moghadam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Natural and man-made disasters always threaten human lives and properties. Iran as one of the disastrous countries has experienced both natural and man-made disasters. Preparedness is one of the vital elements in response to disasters. So, this study was arranged and carried out with the aim of measuring preparedness of hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences in response to disasters. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in four hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2015. A satisfactorily valid (kappa: 0.8 and reliable checklist was used. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in SPSS version 17. Results: The surveyed hospitals with the total score of 67 % were in good condition in response to disasters. The emergency departments (83%, reception (75%, communication (69%, education (70%, supply services (61%, human sources (71% and command (79% also acquired good scores. Discharge units (60%, traffic (55% and security (53% were in moderate condition in preparedness. In necessary fields for response to disasters, the whole research units acquired 67% which showed good condition in this field. Conclusion: The surveyed hospitals were in prepared and suitable condition in the emergency departments, reception, communication, education, human sources and command. In order to improve and enhance the preparedness, a schedule plan should be programmed for some elements such as discharge, transfer, traffic, security and six-crucial elements of the field.

  4. [Evaluation of qualification regulations for medical faculties of German universities and recommendations for standardization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelschmidt, M; Bergdolt, K; Troidl, H

    1998-04-01

    The original reason for using the German "Habilitation" degree to mean that a candidade had qualified and could conduct research and teach at a university is no longer really valid, as this is being threatened by its importance to further careers. Medical faculties must discuss how this development can be curtailed. In order to check the current situation, the Habilitation degree systems of 36 medical faculties of German universities were compared with the aid of a scoring system. They differed dramatically. Conformity existed only in the demand for a doctoral dissertation, scientific publications and a lecture on approval. Concerning other criteria for qualification there was decreasing consensus in the following order: Habilitation thesis, commitment to teaching, further professional education, participation in congresses, inaugural lecture, qualification to teach, scientific activity, broad background in the discipline, and introduction to the faculty. Application of the scoring system with a maximum of 33 score points resulted in a mean value of 15.2 points and a range from 6 to 29 points. A significant decrease in the score values occurred with increasing age of the Habilitation degree (P = 0.002). Even if scoring systems are ambiguous and unfair, our analysis revealed serious differences in the quality of the Habilitation degree. Presuming that the German Habilitation degree should be maintained as a high-level qualification, we developed proposals that might be used to standardize this academic examination.

  5. Students' Attitudes Towards Research at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Mahmoudi, Roghayeh; Habibi, Fatemeh; Latifi, Mahsoomeh; Zare-Gavgani, Vahideh

    2016-12-01

    In today's world, one of the criteria of progress in a country is research. In our country instead of paying to the research and study, attention is given to the training of human resources. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Students' Attitudes towards Research at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2015. In this cross-sectional study the data tool was questionnaire given to the study subjects. The study population were all the paramedical college students at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences selected. Cochrane methodology was used to determine the sample size, the t test used to know the attitudes and the ANOVA test to assess differences between the groups. The mean age of the students was 20 years (age range of 17 to 32 years), of them, 99 (61%) were female and 63 (39%) male, 100% undergraduate and 73% on their first semester. Their attitudes toward the usefulness of search for jobs and careers, anxiety, relationship with everyday life and Research problem was positive. Belief in research problem with the highest average and relation with everyday life with the lowest average, ranked the highest and lowest scores respectively. The findings also showed that there was insignificant difference between the variables of age, gender and level of education and the attitude of students towards research. The subjects under study had Positive attitude to research and in case of availability of research facilities, students would be more interested in performing research.

  6. Situation of Staffing Allocation in Shariati Hospital of Tehran Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azari S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Nowadays health care system is facing inappropriate special staffing distribution challenge not only in Iran bur all over the world. Current study has been done with purpose of survey on How to allocate nursing force to selected hospitals of Tehran Medical Science University. Research Method:This study is descriptive analytical and its studying society includes all units with nursing personnel (Nurse, Paramedic and Nurse Aids in Shariati Hospital of Tehran Medical University. Data has been gathered through self-made forms of researcher and its analysis has been done by Excel, descriptive statistic indexes and recommended Standards guidance by Health Ministry. Finding:Results of Estimations in 16 units of studying hospital and comparing it to current situation shows that based on Health Ministry’s recommended pattern, only one unit (6.25% was matched by this pattern from staffing, 11 units (66.75% were lower and 4 units (25% were upper than this pattern. Conclusion:It seems staffing distribution in studying hospital doesn’t follow and specific pattern and this is more affected by ministerial circulars and instructions. So it suggests that staffing schematization model be planned and performed by health system particles.

  7. Evaluation of board performance in Iran’s universities of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Ravaghi, Hamid; Farzan, Homayoun; Aminlou, Hasan; Hadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. Methods: The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME). In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Results: Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time.Results also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards’ resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Conclusion: Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process. PMID:25337597

  8. Study of educational furniture conformity with students anthropometric dimensions of Isfahan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi Sadeghi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal disorders, early fatigue induced by static work and the same symptoms are caused by inappropriate designed tools, equipment, building and workplace. Inadequate educational furniture is taken to be the reason of severe posture problems such as low back pain, spinal disorders, fatigue, shoulder and neck pain, and disturbance circulation in legs. So ergonomic design of educational furniture should be carefully considered. Materials and Methods: The present research was a cross-sectional study. Samples included desks and chairs (n=150 chosen from reading rooms of dormitories and faculties of Isfahan university of medical sciences Isfahan- Iran. In the study 2 parameters from desk and 5 parameters from chairs were assessed using a tape-measure and a set-sqare. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver 10 software. Results: Comparing the results from the mean of measured values (for seating height, desk height and desk clearance indicated a significant difference between them (p<0. 00. Conclusion: Findings of the study showed that existing standard in Iran about chairs and tables for educational institutions should be reviewed. Also the most important problem with chairs and desks are seating height and desk surface height respectively. These two parameters didn’t match with anthropometric dimensions of the sudents of Isfahan university of medical sciences.

  9. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the Success of Educational Managers at Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollah Mollaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional intelligence is a new evolution in the field of thought – excitement relationship, which has a major effect on the success of managers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and the success of educational managers at Golestan University of medical sciences. Methods: This study was conducted with all (n=96 educational managers (45 females and 51 males at Golestan University of Medical Sciences who were selected through census method in 2009. Data collection tools included a demographic data questionnaire, Shring Emotional Intelligence Scale and a success questionnaire. Relationship between emotional intelligence of the educational managers and their success rate was analyzed by spearman correlation coefficient. Results: The findings showed that mean emotional intelligence of successful and unsuccessful managers were 98.74 and 76.74 respectively. The spearman correlation coefficient between emotional intelligence and success of managers was 0.71 which indicates a direct relationship between emotional intelligence and success (P<0.001. Conclusion: With regard to the direct relationship between emotional intelligence of managers and their success demonstrated in this study, organizing some workshops on emotional intelligence are suggested to improve the capabilities of organizational managers.

  10. Evaluation of Board Performance in Iran’s Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniye Sajadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. Methods The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME. In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Results Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time. Results also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards’ resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Conclusion Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process.

  11. Substance use and its predictors among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azazh Aklilu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use remains high among Ethiopian youth and young adolescents particularly in high schools and colleges. The use of alcohol, khat and tobacco by college and university students can be harmful; leading to decreased academic performance, increased risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. However, the magnitude of substance use and the factors associated with it has not been investigated among medical students in the country. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of substance use and identify factors that influenced the behavior among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study using a pre-tested structured self-administered quantitative questionnaire was conducted in June 2009 among 622 medical students (Year I to Internship program at the School of Medicine. The data were entered into Epi Info version 6.04d and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software program. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Differences in proportions were compared for significance using Chi Square test, with significance level set at p Results In the last 12 months, alcohol was consumed by 22% (25% males vs. 14% females, p = 0.002 and khat use was reported by 7% (9% males vs. 1.5% females, p Khat use within the past 12 months was strongly and positively associated with alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 15.11, 95% CI = 4.24-53.91. Similarly, ever use of cigarette was also significantly associated with alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 8.65, 95% CI = 3.48-21.50. Conclusions Concordant use of alcohol, khat and tobacco is observed and exposure to friends' use of substances is often implicated. Alcohol consumption or khat use has been significantly associated with tobacco use. While the findings of this study suggest that substance use among the medical students was not alarming, but its trend increased among students

  12. Substance use and its predictors among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deressa, Wakgari; Azazh, Aklilu

    2011-08-22

    Substance use remains high among Ethiopian youth and young adolescents particularly in high schools and colleges. The use of alcohol, khat and tobacco by college and university students can be harmful; leading to decreased academic performance, increased risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. However, the magnitude of substance use and the factors associated with it has not been investigated among medical students in the country. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of substance use and identify factors that influenced the behavior among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study using a pre-tested structured self-administered quantitative questionnaire was conducted in June 2009 among 622 medical students (Year I to Internship program) at the School of Medicine. The data were entered into Epi Info version 6.04d and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software program. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Differences in proportions were compared for significance using Chi Square test, with significance level set at p alcohol was consumed by 22% (25% males vs. 14% females, p = 0.002) and khat use was reported by 7% (9% males vs. 1.5% females, p alcohol use in the last 12 months (adjusted OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.22-3.76). Students whose friends currently consume alcohol were more likely to consume alcohol (adjusted OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.50-4.08) and whose friends' use tobacco more likely to smoke (adjusted OR = 3.89, 95% CI = 1.83-8.30). Khat use within the past 12 months was strongly and positively associated with alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 15.11, 95% CI = 4.24-53.91). Similarly, ever use of cigarette was also significantly associated with alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 8.65, 95% CI = 3.48-21.50). Concordant use of alcohol, khat and tobacco is observed and exposure to friends' use of substances is often implicated. Alcohol

  13. Die Medizinische Abteilung der Universitätsbibliothek Kiel / The Medical Department of the Kiel University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hentschel, Eike

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Medical Department of the Kiel University Library provides the most comprehensive collection of scientific medical literature in Schleswig-Holstein and serves students, scientists and physicians of the Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein – Campus Kiel. Medical journals – mostly online – are managed by the Kiel University Library in cooperation with the Faculty of Medicine. Due to changes in user behaviour and considerable needs for assistance new services are provided, for example a full-service document delivery – easy to use and free of charge – and specialized training courses. Renovation and modernisation of the building and library are scheduled for the next years.

  14. Investigation of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences, a 6-year assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Yadollahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Science production is one of the main dimensions of sustainable development in any country. Thus, universities as the major centers for science production play a key role in development. The present study aimed to assess the trend of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences from 2007 to 2012. Method: In this study, the universities’ scores of empowering, governance and leadership, science production, student researches, and number of published articles were computed based on the evaluations of universities of medical sciences by the Ministry of Health, Treatment, and Medical Education from 2007 to 2012. Then, the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the figures were drawn by Excel software. Results: This study assessed science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences and analyzed each university’s proportion in publication of articles. According to the results, most of the published articles were affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. However, considering the role of number of faculty members, different results were obtained. With respect to the evaluation raw scores, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences showed a considerable reduction of scores in 2012, while other universities had a constant or ascending trend. Besides, indexed articles followed an ascending trend in all the universities and most of the articles had been published in index 1. Conclusion: Similar to other studies, the findings of this study revealed an increase in science productions in Iran through the recent years. Yet, the highest scores of the studied indexes, except for student researches, were related to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This great difference between this university and other universities might be due to accumulation of specific potentials and forces in this region. Overall, science productions followed an ascending trend in all type I universities of

  15. Technology Performance Report: Duke Energy Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, Jeff [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Mohler, David [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Gibson, Stuart [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Clanin, Jason [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Faris, Don [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hooker, Kevin [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States); Rowand, Michael [Duke Energy Renewables, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Duke Energy Renewables owns and operates the Notrees Wind Farm in west Texas’s Ector and Winkler counties. The wind farm, which was commissioned in April 2009, has a total capacity of 152.6 MW generated by 55 Vestas V82 turbines, one Vestas 1-V90 experimental turbine, and 40 GE 1.5-MW turbines. The Vestas V82 turbines have a generating capacity of 1.65 MW each, the Vestas V90 turbine has a generating capacity of 1.86 MW, and the GE turbines have a generating capacity of 1.5 MW each. The objective of the Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project is to validate that energy storage increases the value and practical application of intermittent wind generation and is commercially viable at utility scale. The project incorporates both new and existing technologies and techniques to evaluate the performance and potential of wind energy storage. In addition, it could serve as a model for others to adopt and replicate. Wind power resources are expected to play a significant part in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electric power generation by 2030. However, the large variability and intermittent nature of wind presents a barrier to integrating it within electric markets, particularly when competing against conventional generation that is more reliable. In addition, wind power production often peaks at night or other times when demand and electricity prices are lowest. Energy storage systems can overcome those barriers and enable wind to become a valuable asset and equal competitor to conventional fossil fuel generation.

  16. Computer Skill Levels of Staff of Vice Chancellery of Health at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Karami Matin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer is one of the fundamental tools in applying most electronically-based teaching methods. Many studies on the students of university of medical sciences have been focused on their computer and internet skill levels. The skill levels in using computers and internet in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS were estimated 14.87 and 12 (from 20, respectively (1 and this amount was 12 out of 20 for the managers of the hospitals affiliated with that university (2. 73% of the students of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences had average familiarity with the computer (3 While, 36.4% of the dentist students of this university had sufficient skill in using electronically-based education system (4. The present study aimed to measure skill level of using computer and internet among the staff of vice chancellery of health at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.In this study 246 individuals with associate and bachelor degree and physician of Kermanshah province, from urban and rural centers were selected using stratified sampling procedure. 88.2% of the participants returned the questionnaire. Generally, 43% of the participants had very high skill in using computer, in the following order: the staff of province centers (60%, urban area (56.2%, and rural ones (29.6%. The Findings of the present study are in line with those obtained by Bahadorani, Hosseini and Masoudi (1, 2, 4; while these findings are not in agreement with the results obtained by Vafaee and Alavi (3, 5. There was no statistically significantly association between staff's work experience and skill in using computer and internet. Generally, 13.8% of the participants had very high rate of skill in using internet. This amount belonged to individuals with 11 years of experience and above and lack of skill in using computer belonged to individuals with 5 years of experience. The lowest level of skill in using computer (8.3% and internet (9.3% belonged to rural centers. The

  17. Pediatric glaucoma medical therapy: who more accurately reports medication adherence, the caregiver or the child?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore DB

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniel B Moore,1 Rebecca F Neustein,2 Sarah K Jones,1 Alan L Robin,3 Kelly W Muir1,4 1Duke Eye Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 4Health Services Research & Development, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: As they grow older, most children with glaucoma must eventually face the transition to self-administering medications. We previously reported factors associated with better or worse medication adherence in children with glaucoma, using an objective, electronic monitor. Utilizing the same data set, the purpose of the current study was to determine whose report (the caregiver’s or the child’s corresponded better with electronically monitored adherence. Of the 46 participants (22 girls, the mean age of children primarily responsible, and caregiver primarily responsible for medication administration was 15±2 and 10±2 years, respectively. For the children whose caregiver regularly administered the eyedrops, the caregiver’s assessment of drop adherence was associated with measured adherence (P=0.012, but the child’s was not (P=0.476. For the children who self-administered eyedrops, neither the child’s (P=0.218 nor the caregiver’s (P=0.395 assessment was associated with measured percent adherence. This study highlights potential errors when relying on self-reporting of compliance in patients and caregivers with pediatric glaucoma, particularly when the child is responsible for administering their own eyedrops. Frank discussions about the importance of medication adherence and how to improve compliance may help both the child and caregiver better communicate with the treating provider. Keywords: glaucoma, children, adherence

  18. Assessing quality of education services at Yazd University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Ayatollahi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to modern approaches to management, quality is described as consumer’s requests. Thus, recognizing consumers’ perceptions of service quality is one of the first basic steps in formulating any quality improvement program. The objective of this study is assessing the consumers' perceptions of quality in Educational Services at Yazd University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was analytic cross-sectional and performed in 1389 in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd. The study group was medical student in their end period of inter ship which had passed internal, surgical, gynecological and pediatric ward. Questionnaire had been gathered based on SERVQUAL instrument, which proved to be valid and reliable, was used for data collection. Five dimensions of educational services quality (Reliability, Responsiveness, Empathy, Assurance, Tangibles were assessed by this questionnaire. For statistic analysis, descriptive statistic and Friedman and Manvitni tests were applied. Results: The findings showed that the respondents’ choices clearly showed that the reliability dimension of service quality was better and responsiveness dimension was worse. There was a significant difference in quality between five dimensions, and between four wards that we studied, pediatric has better service quality in all dimensions and gynecology was worse. Conclusion: Respondents’ perceptions of service quality in each statement of five dimensions indicated that there were opportunities for quality improvement. In these faculties, thus, in order to improve quality of educational services, considering what stated above, it is necessary to initiate strategies and implement those strategies, since there are significant differences of quality in the five dimensions, when allocating resources, these differences must be taken into consideration.

  19. The impact of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence In Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Parcham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational Culture is one of the most important factors that can change the climate of silence. The main aim of this research was to investigate the influence of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This research was a descriptive-correlation one. The target population was chosen from 1900 staff of the University of Medical sciences and Health Care headquarter in Shiraz. Thus 311 employees were selected using the Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The instrument used in this research was Denison (2006 organizational culture questionnaire and Dimitris Buratas and Maria Vacula (2007 organizational culture. Cornbrash’s alpha method was used to calculate the reliability. The Item analysis and expert consensus were applied to calculate the validity of instruments. All gathered data analyzed with PLS software. Results: The results showed that the four dimensions of organizational culture include organizational involvement, organizational adaptability, organizational concistency and organizational mission was moderate and the mean scores obtained for each factor were 2.85, 2.82, 2.94 and 2.93 respectively. Structural equation model showed Organizational culture has a significant positive impact on organizational silence (β=0.68; P<.001. Conclusion: Based on the results and impact of organizational culture on organizational silence that is positive and significant; The organization further efforts to strengthen various aspects of organizational culture, especially the employees’ involvement in decision making; Employees can better express their opinions and thus reduced their organizational silence. In other words strengthening corporate culture is combined with the reduction of organizational silence. Medical organizations can establish appropriate reward system for creative ideas and suggestions to encourage people express their ideas As a result, reduced

  20. Sexual attitudes and behaviors among medical students in Dokuz Eylul university, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, S; Aras, S; Semin, S; Orcin, E

    2005-09-01

    Gaining a healthy sexual attitude and behavior and being able to show appropriate approaches to patients in terms of sexual issues are important acquisitions for medical students. The aim of the present study was to determine, compare, and evaluate the sexual attitudes and behaviors of Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine students. An anonymous questionnaire was filled in by first- and sixth-year students in order to determine their sexual attitudes and behaviors. While information sources in the adolescence period for both genders were friends in the first place, these sources were mostly mothers, books, newspapers--magazines for females, and newspapers--magazines and television for males. The opinion of males about having sexual intercourse before marriage for males was positive, and females were more tolerant about males having this experience before marriage as compared to females having sexual experience before marriage. Rates of expression of having sexual intercourse and masturbation were found to be higher for male students. The first sexual experience with a sex worker or sentimentally insignificant partner was high among males. In general, the rate of condom use was lower, and the rate of coitus interruptus was found to be higher than in foreign studies. All the students declared 'my own will and values' as the most frequent factor affecting their sexual attitudes and behaviors, and high rates for 'social factors', 'religious requirements', 'the expectations of families', and 'protection from sexually transmitted diseases' were observed. The findings lead to the conclusions that gender differences exist in the sexual attitudes and behaviors of medical students; the enhancing effect of the traditional structure on gender discrimination is still continuing; students are not provided with sufficient scientific approach or training prior to the university education; and beyond biomedical training, they should receive more support in those fields during

  1. Knowledge transfer in Tehran University of Medical Sciences: an academic example of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qorbani Mostafa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past two decades, scientific publications in Iran have considerably increased their medical science content, and the number of articles published in ISI journals has doubled between 1997 and 2001. The aim of the present study was to determine how frequently knowledge transfer strategies were applied in Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. We were also interested in studying the determining factors leading to the type of strategy selected. Methodology All TUMS research projects that had received grants from inside and outside the university in 2004, and were completed by the end of 2006, were included in the study. In total, 301 projects were examined, and data on each of the projects were collected by the research team using a standardized questionnaire. The projects' principle investigators filled out a second questionnaire. In all, 208 questionnaires were collected. Results Researchers stated being more engaged in the passive strategies of knowledge transfer, especially those publishing in peer-reviewed journals. The mean score for the researchers' performance in passive and active strategies were 22% and 9% of the total score, respectively. Linear regression analysis showed that the passive strategy score decreased with the increase in the number of years working as a professional (p = 0.01 and personal interest as the only reason for choosing the research topic (p = 0.01. Regarding the active strategies of knowledge transfer, health system research studies significantly raised the score (p = 0.02 and 'executive responsibility' significantly lowered it (p = 0.03. Conclusion As a study carried out in a Middle Eastern developing country, we see that, like many other universities in the world, many academicians still do not give priority to active strategies of knowledge transfer. Therefore, if 'linking knowledge to action' is necessary, it may also be necessary to introduce considerable changes in academic

  2. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Al-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs.

  3. Stress among First and Third Year Medical Students at University Kebangsaan Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus; Mahadevan, Raynuha; Abdul Rahman, Amir; Abdullah, Norsyafiqah; Abd Harith, Aimi Aqilah; Shan, Chu Pei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the stress-prevalence and coping-strategies among University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) medical students. Methods: This was an observational study conducted among 234 UKM first and third year medical students. Standardized questionnaire on stress and coping strategies was used. Stress data was related to subjective experiences on some positive and negative adjectives such as tense, relaxed etc. Positive adjectives were measured by sign “++” and “+” scoring “1” while stress-negative adjectives were measured by sign “?” and “–“ scoring “0”. Forty-eight coping items under task, emotion and avoidance strategies were measured using 5-point Likert-scale. Results: Overall stress-prevalence was 49%. Female and Malay respondents were more stressed. Significant differences of stress-level was observed between Malays and non Malays in first year (p=0.04) and in third year (p=0.01). Most common strategies used to cope stress was task-oriented while emotion oriented was least. Conclusion: Stress-prevalence and stress-level in UKM medical students was high. Most of the respondents coped stress using task-oriented strategies. Stressor and its effective management must be ensured. Educational institutions should act as a creative designer of learning environment to get relieve from educational stressor. PMID:25878637

  4. Learning styles of medical students at Taibah University: Trends and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaista Salman Guraya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the learning styles of medical students can drive the institutions to adapt instructional materials to enhance students′ learning of knowledge and skills. This study explored the learning styles of undergraduate medical students, comparing gender variations in terms of their significant preferences. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 2012-2013, incorporating 1 st -5 th year undergraduate medical students of Taibah University. The instrument used was a Learning Style Questionnaire, with four learning styles (activist, reflector, theorist and pragmatist and 40 items. Results: Of 450 students, 384 responded (response rate; 85%. No single learning style predominated; 96 (25% reflectors, 78 (20% theorists, 68 (17% pragmatists, and 37 (9% activists. Combined reflector and theorist was the predominant dual learning style in 27 (7% students. Among genders, theorist style had a significant result (P = 0.071 indicating that theorists varied among genders due to their different opinions. Learning style preferences of theorists and pragmatists also showed a significant result (P = 0.000 each, depicting that both genders had unique preferences. Males had fewer variations of preferences, when compared with females who showed a significant difference of opinions (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The students in the study preferred diverse learning styles, which were unevenly distributed, reflectors being the most common and activists as the least common. The results reflect the need to promote self-directed learning and modifications of instructional strategies, with expectant tilt in the students′ learning styles towards activists and pragmatists.

  5. Learning styles of medical students at Taibah University: Trends and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guraya, Shaista Salman; Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Habib, Fawzia A; Khoshhal, Khalid I

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the learning styles of medical students can drive the institutions to adapt instructional materials to enhance students' learning of knowledge and skills. This study explored the learning styles of undergraduate medical students, comparing gender variations in terms of their significant preferences. A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 2012-2013, incorporating 1(st)-5(th) year undergraduate medical students of Taibah University. The instrument used was a Learning Style Questionnaire, with four learning styles (activist, reflector, theorist and pragmatist) and 40 items. Of 450 students, 384 responded (response rate; 85%). No single learning style predominated; 96 (25%) reflectors, 78 (20%) theorists, 68 (17%) pragmatists, and 37 (9%) activists. Combined reflector and theorist was the predominant dual learning style in 27 (7%) students. Among genders, theorist style had a significant result (P = 0.071) indicating that theorists varied among genders due to their different opinions. Learning style preferences of theorists and pragmatists also showed a significant result (P = 0.000 each), depicting that both genders had unique preferences. Males had fewer variations of preferences, when compared with females who showed a significant difference of opinions (P learning styles, which were unevenly distributed, reflectors being the most common and activists as the least common. The results reflect the need to promote self-directed learning and modifications of instructional strategies, with expectant tilt in the students' learning styles towards activists and pragmatists.

  6. Conflict of Interest Policies at Canadian Universities and Medical Schools: Some Lessons from the AMSA PharmFree Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu, Ghislaine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Launched in 2007, the American Medical Students Association (AMSA PharmFree Scorecard is an annual ranking of conflict of interest (COI policies at American medical centres; it focuses on COIs that may occur when medical education seems likely to be influenced by university-industry relationships, especially those with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. The PharmFree Scorecard has proven influential in stimulating changes in policy regarding the management of COI at American medical institutions, thus it provides a useful jumping off point for reflection on how and why medical education institutions in other countries – and for our purposes, Canada – should pay more attention to the appropriate identification and management of COI. The PharmFree Scorecard methodology examines a diversity of factors and interests that could influence medical education; as such, it is an interesting approach to analysing the COI policies of medical schools. To test its utility or applicability outside the US, we decided to apply the PharmFree Scorecard to the COI policies of the 16 Canadian universities hosting medical schools. Overall, Canadian institutions rank very poorly, especially in ensuring that education and training tools are provided to staff, students and faculty members to enable the identification and management of COI. However, differences between the US and Canadian medical education contexts, e.g., with regards to the governance and funding of universities, limit to some extent the direct applicability of the AMSA ranking. Canadian medical schools – and their host universities – nonetheless have much to learn from insights provided by the AMSA PharmFree Scorecard ranking, although they can and should go further in developing their own COI policies and procedures.

  7. Psychometric Properties of Interpersonal Communication skills Questionnaire (ISAQ from the Viewpoint of Students at Tabriz University and Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz Mahmoodi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: One of the skills needed for social life is interpersonal communication skills. Assessing the Interpersonal communication skills due to the growth and development of social networks is very important. This study aimed to validate the Fetro's (2000 interpersonal communication skills questionnaire among students of Tabriz University and Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this descriptivestudy, 750 students of Tabriz University and Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were selected by simple random sampling. Data collected by Fetro (2000 interpersonal communication skills questionnaire. This questionnaire has 65 items with five degrees based on Likert scale. Data were analyzed using Exploratory Factor Analysis through SPSS 23. Results: In total 750 Students filled questionnaires. 423 from University of Tabriz and 327 from of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Based on the results of exploratory factor analysis on original 65 items, 6 factors extracted and 54 items remained. Based on original questionnaire factors and literature extracted factors were labeled. So 45.26% of total variance were explained by these six factors (empathy and intimacy, communication skills, ability to maintain communication, assertiveness, listening and conflict resolution skills. Conclusion: According to the result of factor analysis, new validated questionnaire has less items and more components than the original questionnaire. So it is a suitable instrument for measuring interpersonal communication skills by researchers.

  8. Perceptions of Students and Clinical Instructors of Academic Learning Environments at Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Montazeri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to gain insight into the students and clinical instructors’ perception of learning environments at Yazd medical University in 2012. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, gender and age. Students and instructors’ perspectives are reported. Methods: The sample consisted of 158 undergraduate students in their final year of graduation in the nursing, anesthesia, operating room, laboratory, radiology, midwifery courses and their 20 clinical instructors at Yazd University. Data were obtained using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores were fairly high for both students and clinical instructors (M=110.0; SD=21.2 and M=93.1; SD=10.3 respectively, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments between both groups. The perception of atmosphere subscale (PA received the highest mean grade by both groups. Total DREEM scores didn’t vary significantly between courses (p>0.05 but the results of ANOVA test showed significant differences only for perception of teaching and perception of atmosphere domains. There was not a significant association between females and males regarding total DREEM score (p>0.05. Conclusions: The more positive than negative perception held by the Yazd University health science students and instructors is hopefully indicative of a favorable teaching-learning environment. Overall; teachers’ attention to principles of educational design and setting a favorable environment to promote better learning is recommended.

  9. Educational Needs Assessment of Faculty Members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Khoshbaten

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to determine the educational and research needs of faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran so that educational priorities can be found and presented to the authorities for the purpose of educational planning.Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2013 at aforementioned University. Overall, 250 faculty members were randomly selected from 10 faculties and recruited. Research tool, a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity had been confirmed by a number of experts, was distributed in person, and eventually 230 were completed. Data were analyzed in SPSS-21 software using descriptive statistical tests. Results: Faculty members of the University declared student assessment as their first educational priority. They also considered the following as their educational needs: teaching and learning, writing scientific articles, educational needs assessment, research in education and health systems, teaching methods and techniques, educational planning, program evaluation, educational guidance and counseling, professional ethics, and computer application in education, respectively. Conclusion: This study investigated the educational needs of faculty members in three areas and 50 subjects and prioritized these needs according to each area. Based on these needs, educational planning authorities of faculty members, by appropriate educational planning, can take an effective step in improving scientific knowledge of professors and play an important role in enhancing the overall quality of education.

  10. Organizational Climate and Work Addiction in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, 2014: a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Noora; Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Zare, Vahid; Mohammadi, Mahan

    2015-12-01

    The occupational nature of employees in headquarters units of the University requires them to deal with support issues. Thus, there is some pressure on these employees to complete their assignments on time so that employees in the line units can accurately and expeditiously perform their duties. As a result, work addiction behaviors are sometimes observed among the headquarters personnel. Considering the importance of work addiction and recognizing the factors that intensify it, this study investigated the relationship between organizational climate and the work addiction of headquarters personnel at the Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive-analytic study was conducted using stratified random sampling of 151 University employees in 2014. The data collection tool was an organizational climate questionnaire, which was supplemented by the Work Addiction Risk Test (WART). The data were analyzed using the Pearson test, Spearman test, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Kruskal-Wallis test using IBM-SPSS version 20. The findings of this study showed that the organizational climate was at a moderate level, and employees were in the danger level in terms of work addiction. In addition, among the dimensions of organizational climate, the risk dimension had a significant relationship with work addiction (porganizational climate score was low and the work addiction score was at the high-risk level, this issue demands more attention of senior managers and human resource officers of organizations to improve the organizational climate and increase employees' awareness of work addiction.

  11. Correlation of the Serum Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prolactin with Different Stages of Colorectal Carcinoma According to Dukes' Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M R; Sheikh, S H; Lima, I J; Islam, M R; Faisal, M; Islam, M S; Faruk, M O; Jalal, M T

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is well established tumor marker for colorectal cancers worldwide. Recent studies show that serum prolactin level is also raised in colorectal cancers. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the correlation of serum CEA and Prolactin with Dukes' staging of colorectal carcinomas. Between January 2013 and June 2013, Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin were measured by radioimmunoassay from 103 patients who were histopathologically diagnosed as colorectal carcinomas. Evaluation of the stages of the colorectal cancers was done on the basis of preoperative investigations and postoperative histopathology and correlated with Preoperative Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin. Results were presented as median value, range and percentage. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1 with median age of 42.26 years (range 17-78 years). Most of the patients in this series presented with carcinoma rectum (42%). Most of the patients (52%) were found in Dukes' stage C and 27% and 15% cases were found as Dukes' stage B and Dukes' stage D respectively. Stage of the disease is directly proportionate to percentage of the patient with high serum prolactin except early stage (Dukes' A-50%, Dukes' B-28.6%, Dukes' C-33.3% & Dukes' D-46.7%). Similarly serum CEA level is directly proportionate to tumor stage (Dukes' A-0%, Dukes' B-32%, Dukes' C-40.7% & Dukes' D-74.7%). A preoperative high serum CEA value suggests advanced disease either locally or with distant metastasis. In contrast preoperative high serum prolactin (hyperprolactinaemia) did not suggest advanced disease as it can be elevated even in early stage of disease. Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin both are valuable tumor markers but serum CEA could not be replaced by serum Prolactin. Serum Prolactin may be a helpful marker in earlier stages of the colorectal cancer.

  12. Evaluation of Medication Errors by Nurses in Hospitals Affiliated with Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimipour

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: One of the effective methods for prevention of medication error is providing teaching courses for nurses to raise their knowledge in this regard and aware them of the outcomes of wrong medication prescription.

  13. The University Hospital Zurich Offers a Medical Online Consultation Service for Men With Intimate Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Weitmann, Sabine; Schulz, Urs; Schmid, Daniel Max; Brockes, Christiane

    2017-05-01

    The University Hospital of Zurich offers a text-based, Medical Online Consultation Service to the public since 1999. Users asked health questions anonymously to tele-doctors. This study focused on the characteristics of male enquirers with intimate health problems, the content of their questions, the medical advice given by tele-doctors and the rating of the service to prove the benefit of an online service for medical laymen. This retrospective study included 5.1% of 3,305 enquiries from 2008 to 2010 using the International Classification of Diseases-10 and International Classification of Primary Care codes relevant for intimate and sexual health problems in men. A professional text analysis program (MAXQDA) supported the content analysis, which is based on the procedure of inductive category development described by Mayring. The average age was 40 years, 63.1% enquirers had no comorbidity, in 62.5% it was the first time they consulted a doctor, and 70.2% asked for a specific, single, intimate health issue. In 64.3%, the most important organ of concern was the penis. Overall, 30.4% asked about sexually transmitted diseases. In 74.4% a doctor visit was recommended to clarify the health issue. The rating of the problem solving was very good. The service was mainly used by younger men without comorbidity and no previous contact with a doctor with regard to an intimate health problem. The anonymous setting of the teleconsultation provided men individual, professional medical advice and decision support. Teleconsultation is suggested to empower patients by developing more health literacy.

  14. Nutritional and health status of medical students at a university in Northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Abdulkader R; Taha, Inass M; Al-Nozha, Omar M; Sultan, Intessar E

    2012-12-01

    To assess the nutrition and health status, nutrients intake, and physical activity among Saudi medical students. A cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, and laboratory assessments was conducted from January to May 2011 on 194 randomly selected Saudi medical students at Taibah University, Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The adequacy of nutrient intake was compared with the recommended daily intake (RDI) per the National Research Council. Caloric intake was derived from carbohydrates (72.1%), fats (19.4%) and proteins (8.4%). Proteins and fats were obtained from a greater number of animal sources than of plant sources (5.3% versus 3.2% for proteins and 11.6% versus 7.8% for fats). There were low percentages of RDI of fibers (8.5%), most vitamins especially vitamin D (14.2%), and minerals (potassium (31.3%), zinc (40.7%), magnesium (24.5%), and calcium (47%). Overall, 34.5% of the students were overweight, and 10.3% were obese. Dyslipidemia was diagnosed in 24.7%, and 56.2% had high high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). There was a positive correlation between the median caloric intake and both the BMI (r=0.42, p=0.00) and hs-CRP (r=0.3, p=0.001). Inactivity was prevalent among the students (64.4%). This study showed deficiencies in several essential nutrients among medical students, and the prevalence of overweight status, obesity, and inactivity were relatively high. These results indicate the need to improve nutrition and promote healthy lifestyles among the medical students.

  15. Academic leagues: a Brazilian way to teach about cancer in medical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diogo Antonio Valente; Aranha, Renata Nunes; de Souza, Maria Helena Faria Ornellas

    2015-12-30

    Performance of qualified professionals committed to cancer care on a global scale is critical. Nevertheless there is a deficit in Cancer Education in Brazilian medical schools (MS). Projects called Academic Leagues (AL) have been gaining attention. However, there are few studies on this subject. AL arise from student initiative, arranged into different areas, on focus in general knowledge, universal to any medical field. They are not obligatory and students are responsible for the organizing and planning processes of AL, so participation highlights the motivation to active pursuit of knowledge. The objective of this study was to explore the relevance of AL, especially on the development of important skills and attitudes for medical students. A survey was undertaken in order to assess the number of AL Brazilian MS. After nominal list, a grey literature review was conducted to identify those with AL and those with Oncology AL. One hundred eighty of the 234 MS were included. Only 4 MS selected held no information about AL and 74.4 % of them had AL in Oncology. The majority had records in digital media. The number of AL was proportional to the distribution of MS across the country, which was related to the number of inhabitants. The real impact and the potential of these projects can be truly understand by a qualitative analysis. AL are able to develop skills and competencies that are rarely stimulated whilst studying in traditional curriculum. This has positive effects on professional training, community approach through prevention strategies, and development on a personal level permitting a dynamic, versatile and attentive outlook to their social role. Besides stimulating fundamental roles to medical practice, students that participate in AL acquire knowledge and develop important skills such as management and leadership, entrepreneurship, innovation, health education, construction of citizenship. Oncology AL encourage more skilled care to patients and more

  16. An Experience of Peer Education Model among Medical Science University Students in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Peykari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of peer education among university students for reproductive health promotion based on researchers' experiences."nMethods: This interventional study was conducted in Qazvin University of Medical Science during 2002 to 2004 through stakeholders' partnership and selection of 24 volunteer students according to their knowledge, interest, com­munication skills. Capacity building was performed through holding an interactive reproductive health coarse contained marital health, illegal abortion, family planning, STI/AIDS, communication and counseling skills. Trained peer educators have introduced to other student and present education and counseling formally and informally. A post interventional study was conducted after 9 months in order to find its effectiveness."nResults: In our experience Stakeholders' partnership in community interventional programs led to the best expected availability of better health through ownership and adopting policies. In present study, the proper determined criteria for selection of peer educators and clear understood expectations of the peer educators' role were very important in health promotional program. Although peer education was acceptable program for university students, more support and supervising for peer groups are needed. The students believed that the power point of peer education and counseling related to same age groups sympathy, confident, well behaved, cheerful, and kind-hearted and peer educators awareness."nConclusion: Universities are appropriate real world for experience a friendly youth program and then disseminate it to other young communities. There seems peer education is effective strategy for reproductive health promotion and reinforce positive behaviors in youth.  

  17. Predictors of self-reported academic performance among undergraduate medical students of Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedefaw, Abel; Tilahun, Birkneh; Asefa, Anteneh

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to identify predictors of self-reported academic performance in undergraduate medical students at Hawassa University. Methods An analytical cross-sectional study involving 592 undergraduate medical students was conducted in November 2012. The academic performance of the study subjects was measured by self-reported cumulative grade point average (GPA) using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Pearson’s bivariate correlations, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were used to identify predictors of academic performance. Results The self-reported academic performance of students had been decreasing as the academic years progressed, with the highest and lowest performance being in the premedicine (mean GPA 3.47) and clinical I (mean GPA 2.71) years, respectively. One hundred and fifty-eight (26.7%) of the participants had ever been delayed, 37 (6.2%) had ever re-sat for examination, and two (0.3%) had ever been warned due to academic failure. The overall variation in self-reported academic performance of the students was 32.8%. Participant age alone explained 21.9% of the variation. On the other hand, university entrance examination results, substance use at university, and medicine as first choice by students were identified as predictors of variation in self-reported academic performance, accounting for 6.9%, 2.7%, and GPA above 3.0 (adjusted odds ratio 1.95, 95% confidence interval 1.25–3.02) and less likely to be delayed, have to re-sit an examination, or be warned (adjusted odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.29–0.77). Conclusion Only 32.8% of the variation in self-reported academic performance was explained by the studied variables. Hence, efficacious mechanisms should be designed to combat the intervenable determinants of self-reported academic performance, like substance use and a low

  18. Cognitive functions and neuropsychological status of medical students with different attitudes to alcohol use: a study conducted at the Belarusian State Medical University, Minsk, Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Menizibeya O; Razvodovsky, Yury E; Pereverzeva, Elena V; Pereverzev, Vladimir A

    2014-04-10

    This article presents findings on the effects of alcohol use on cognitive performance, functional (well-being, activity, mood) and neuropsychological status and anxiety levels of medical students. A total of 265 medical students (107 males and 158 females) from the Belarusian State Medical University, Minsk (Belarus) were administered questionnaire, containing the AUDIT, CAGE, MAST, and PAS, and other alcohol related questions. Academic Performance questionnaire was administered together with other tests. For analysis of cognitive functions, a "correction probe" test was used. The number of students who reported consumption of alcohol was 74 males and 142 females. Medical students who reported alcohol consumption had lower cognitive performance and academic success, poor self-assessment of their functional and neuropsychological states, compared to the non-alcohol users. The results of this study suggest an inverse dose-dependent relationship between alcohol consumption, and cognitive functions, academic performance and neuropsychological status of medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical Reform Should Follow Market Rules——Exclusive interview with Professor Hai Wen,Vice President of Peking University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翼; 孙晨

    2008-01-01

    Hai Wen, economist and vice president of Peking University, has for many years been involved in in-depth investigation and research of China’s medical reform, earning a reputation as one of the foremost economists in the field of medical reform. However, in the recent debate on medical reform policy, Hai Wen deliberately decided to keep a low profile. In his view, some of the ideas coming out of academic circles these days are "too short-sighted and political-motivated." During this interview, he talks about this recent round of medical reform debate, its challenges, and prospects for future reform.

  20. Finding Biomedical Information. A Learning Module for Medical Technology Students on the Basics of the Use of Medical Literature in the Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Barton B.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    This self-instructional library workbook was used in a series of workshops--sponsored by the Medical Technology Department in Wayne State University's College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions--in order to reduce attrition by increasing the probability of success for academically high-risk students in the professional medical technology…

  1. [Preliminary exploration on educational reform of general western medical history in medical colleges and universities under new situations and circumstances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Deming; Wang, Hongqi; Yan, Juan; He, Peifeng

    2015-03-01

    With the appearance of the "biological-psychological-social" medical model, the purpose, value and significance of medicine are reviewed and reconsidered by the people, and the history of medicine becomes one of the core subjects in the medical humanist education, along with change of the teaching of general western medical history. Medical history is no longer the accumulation of the achievements of human knowledge and medical experience, the intellectual history of theorytransformation, and the history of reformation of medical technologies, but a concrete and colorful living situation, displayed by the scientists, physicians and normal peoplecommunity during the process of their consistent recognition and transformation on medicine. Therefore, the teaching of generalwestern medical history should adjust the compilation of teaching materials, update the educational concept, change the contents, methods of teaching and examination in order to lay stress on the cultural viewpoint and the function of humanity and quality of education.

  2. Using a Cost-Construction Model To Assess the Cost of Educating Undergraduate Medical Students at the University of Texas-Houston Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Luisa; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Using a cost-construction model, cost of the University of Texas-Houston Medical School program, instructional costs, educational costs, and milieu costs were calculated. Sensitivity analysis revealed the financial effects of various factors, some of which increased and some of which decreased cost. Despite inherent complexities of the method and…

  3. A Study of the Growth and Flourish of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences; A Cultural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the striking features of ancient Persian civilization is the importance of medical sciences. One testimony to this is the foundation of Gondishapur University 1745 years ago in the south-western Persia (Iran. Gondishapur was one of the major cities of Persian Empire which was ordered by the Sassanid king, Shapur I (241-272 A. D to be built in 271 A. D. The city was built by employing Roman and Greek war prisoners after defeating a Roman army led by Emperor Valerian. Gondishapur was the greatest intellectual center and medical school of its time. It was one of the largest hospitals of the ancient world which hosted eminent scientists and physicians from around the world to do their research and practice medicine. In 651 A. D during the final years of Sassanid Empire the city was conquered by a Muslim Arab invasion. This led to the gradual emigration of the physicians to Baghdad and consequently to the demise and final closing of the center. After 12 centuries of being closed-down, Gondishapur (Jundishapur University was reopened in 1955 in Ahvaz, the central city of Khuzestan province. Currently, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS has: 650 faculty members, 7000 students studying at bachelors, masters and PhD levels, fellowship and higher degrees in 163 different fields and 15000 staff. The university is one of the most prestigious universities in Iran and is type one university based on the rating of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education.

  4. Clinical Review of Cochlear Implantation Performed at Sapporo Medical University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Noriko; Takano, Kenichi; Shintani, Tomoko; Saikawa, Etsuko; Takahashi, Nozomi; Ito, Fumie; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    More than 20 years have passed since cochlear implantation (CI) was first introduced in Japan. We began CI at the Sapporo Medical University Hospital in 1988; since then, up to the first half of 2015, we have performed CI on 280 ears. In patients aged less than and those aged over 18 years, 121 and 159 ears, respectively, have undergone surgery. This report presents typical cases of CI, such as an adult case, a bilateral case, a case where both hearing and vision were impaired, a pediatric case, a case with multiple handicaps, a case with a genetic mutation leading to severe hearing loss, and a complicated case. In addition, complications with CI cases experienced during extended follow-up periods are also summarized.

  5. [Therapeutic results in patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia at Sapporo Medical University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2010-10-01

    We reviewed the results of 6 patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) which the diagnostic standard of the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemia (EGIL) at Sapporo Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2008. There were 5 males and 1 females with an average age of 35 years. Among them, 4 were B lymphoid and myeloid, 2 were T lymphoid and myeloid, and one was T/B lymphoid. Two of 4 patients did not attain complete remission, and two relapsed after first treatment with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) protocol. On the other hand, two showed complete remission after the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) protocol. One of 4 patients survived who had been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a post-remission therapy. The ALL protocol was good for the induction therapy. However, overall treatment-related deaths were 4 patients and considerable caution was necessary.

  6. Assessment of dedicated revenue of non-educational hospitals in Guilan University of Medical Sciences (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asefzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals, as one of the main providers of health services, are of great importance in health and economy. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess the dedicated revenue of all non-educational hospitals in Guilan University of Medical Sciences (14 hospitals in 2012. On average, 22.35% of income was provided by cash earnings and 77.65% was provided by insurance organizations.There was 1.25% deficit by insurance. The net income of small hospitals with few available beds was very low and they were not economically affordable. The out of pocket to total income ratio was higher in the hospitals located in deprived areas due to lack of full insurance coverage.

  7. Seatbelt and child-restraint use in Kazakhstan: attitudes and behaviours of medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugmanova, Zhamilya S; Ussatayeva, Gainel; McNutt, Louise-Anne

    2015-04-01

    Traffic fatalities in Kazakhstan increased from 15 to more than 30 per 100 000 between 2001 and 2006. Mortality remains high compared with developed nations. Safety-restraint laws have been enacted, but little data exist regarding usage of seatbelts, particularly among children and passengers. This cross-sectional study surveyed medical university students about attitudes and behaviours regarding seatbelt and child safety-restraint usage. Seatbelts are widely used in the front seat (81%) but not in the back seat (79% 'never' or 'rarely' use a seatbelt in the back seat). Fewer than half reported 'always' or 'almost always' providing restraint for children under 7 years and 24% reported children secure the seatbelts themselves. Safety in the back seat merits attention. Adults generally do not buckle in the back seat despite a law requiring seatbelt use. Promotion of child safety restraints should be prioritised in prevention education for physicians and the community.

  8. [Outcomes of Infection Control Team Inspections at the Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Okihata, Rie; Tsuruoka, Hiromi; Yamada, Yuichi; Adachi, Toshiko; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    In the Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, an infection control team (ICT) has been formed to inspect each diagnosis department of clinics and wards in order to identify problems regarding nosocomial infection control. In this study, we analyzed the inspection reports and highlighted the following serious problems: 1) inadequate hygienic hand-washing for out- and in-patient treatment, 2) incomplete wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) by dental health care workers, 3) necessity of environmental improvement in the clinics, and 4) cross-infection risk induced by. the continuous use of treatment devices without appropriate disinfection. The ICT provided feedback to the inspected departments, suggesting solutions to problems regarding nosocomial infection control. In order to enhance infection control in our hospital, dental healthcare practitioners must make further efforts on nosocomial infection control and prevention, and act according to their position by continuously educating students and enlightening hospital staff about the importance of infection control.

  9. [Paternity exclusion tests in the Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralewska-Kordel, Małgorzata; Kordel, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Zygmunt; Wiśniewski, Sławomir A

    2006-01-01

    The study comprises the analysis of expert's hemogenetic reports carried out in the Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan, in the years 1980-2004 and associated with paternity determination or exclusion. In the analyzed period, the authors established 1064 cases of paternity exclusion in serological tests, 97 paternity exclusions in the HLA examinations, and 129 cases of paternity exclusions processed in DNA testing. On the base of gene frequencies, the theoretical chance of paternity exclusion was determined for every test. The significant usefulness of DNA testing in legal processes did not cause an increase in the percentage of paternity exclusions. Moreover, the authors observed a significant decrease in the number of paternity exclusions in comparison with results of serological tests (from 24.25% to 19.43%). With the drop in the number of births, the number of expert's reports significantly decreased.

  10. Congenital Microtia Treated at Sapporo Medical University Hospital: Clinical Characteristics and Associated Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Noriko; Jitsukawa, Sumito; Takahashi, Nozomi; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Seventy-three children who underwent plastic surgery for their external ear malformations between December 2010 and May 2013 at the Sapporo Medical University Hospital were evaluated. The predominance of right-sided malformation (62%) in males (71%) was similar to that reported previously, but the number of bilateral cases (9.3%) was lower than that in previous reports. We classified patients' ears using Marx's classification. The pure-tone average (average air conduction thresholds measured at 500, 1,000 and 2,000 Hz) was used as the representative value for the hearing level, which was compared with a patient's Marx classification. We evaluated the facial nerve position using high-resolution computed tomography scans. A thorough understanding of anatomical variations and complications, as well as performing appropriate treatments, is required for otolaryngologists to effectively manage congenital microtia.

  11. Medical school hotline: A History of the University of Hawai'i Postgraduate Medical Education Program at Okinawa Chubu Hospital, 1966-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshiro, Masao; Izutsu, Satoru; Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm

    2014-06-01

    The University of Hawai'i (UH) has been collaborating with Okinawa Prefectural Chubu Hospital for over 46 years. This collaboration started as a post-World War II effort to increase the physician workforce. At the initiation of the US Army and State Department, the University of Hawai'i was recruited, in cooperation with the government of the Ryukyus and USCAR, to initiate a US style postgraduate clinical training program. The Postgraduate Medical Training Program of University of Hawai'i at Okinawa Chubu Hospital introduced a style of training similar to that in the US by offering a rotating internship. The initial contract had UH establish and run the Postgraduate Medical Training Program of University of Hawaii at Okinawa Central Hospital. After Okinawa's reversion to Japan, under a new contract, UH physicians participated as consultants by providing lectures at "grand rounds" and guidance to faculty, staff, and students. To date, 895 physicians have completed the University of Hawai'i Postgraduate Medical Training Program with 74 currently training. Approximately 662 (74%) of the trainees have remained in Okinawa Prefecture to practice medicine. As a result, the program has enhanced the physician workforce for the islands of Okinawa and neighbor archipelagos of Miyako and Yaeyama Islands.

  12. [A Brief Homophobia Scale in Medical Students From Two Universities: Results of A Refinement Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Oviedo, Heidi Celina

    The process of evaluating measurement scales is an ongoing procedure that requires revisions and adaptations according to the characteristics of the participants. The Homophobia Scale of seven items (EHF-7) has showed acceptable performance in medical students attending to two universities in Colombia. However, performance of some items was poor and could be removed, with an improvement in the psychometric findings of items retained. To review the psychometric functioning and refine the content of EHF-7 among medical students from two Colombian universities. A group of 667 students from the first to tenth semester participated in the research. Theirs ages were between 18 and 34 (mean, 20.9±2.7) years-old, and 60.6% were females. Cronbach alpha (α) and omega of McDonald (Ω) were calculated as indicators of reliability and to refine the scale, an exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed. EHF-7 showed α=.793 and Ω=.796 and a main factor that explained 45.2% of the total variance. EFA and CFA suggested the suppression of three items. The four-item version (EHF-4) reached an α=.770 and Ω=.775, with a single factor that accounted for 59.7% of the total variance. CFA showed better indexes (χ(2)=3.622; df=1; P=.057; Root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA)=.063, 90% CI, .000-.130; Comparative Fit Indices (CFI)=.998; Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI)=.991). EHF-4 shows high internal consistency and a single dimension that explains more than 50% of the total variance. Further studies are needed to confirm these observations, that can be taken as preliminary. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and factors associated with 2009 to 2011 influenza vaccinations at a university medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kathleen A; Myers, Ronnie; Magda, Lori A; Morse, Stephen S; Brandt-Rauf, Paul; Gershon, Robyn R M

    2013-09-01

    Information on the rates and factors associated with influenza vaccinations, although limited, is important because it can inform the development of effective vaccination campaigns in a university medical center setting. A study was conducted in 2011 to identify individual and organizational level barriers and facilitators to influenza vaccination among clinical and nonclinical personnel (N = 428) from a major university medical center. Seventy-one percent of clinical personnel (n = 170) reported pandemic H1N1 vaccination compared with 27% of nonclinical personnel (n = 258), even though vaccine was made widely available to all personnel at no cost. Similarly, disparate rates between clinical and nonclinical personnel were noted for the 2009/2010 seasonal influenza vaccine (82% vs 42%, respectively) and 2010/2011 combination (pandemic plus seasonal) influenza vaccine (73% vs 28%, respectively). Factors associated with pandemic vaccination in nonclinical personnel included the following: high level of influenza-related knowledge, concern regarding influenza contagion, history of previous influenza vaccinations or influenza illness, participation in vaccine-related training, and awareness of the institution's written pandemic plan. For clinicians, past history of seasonal influenza vaccination was associated with pandemic vaccination. For all participants, taking any 1 or more of the 3 influenza vaccines available in 2009 to 2011 was associated with intent to take a hypothetical future novel pandemic vaccine (odds ratio, 6.7; 95% confidence interval: 4.32-10.44; P vaccination uptake are amenable to organizational strategies. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge and risk perception of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer among non-medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba; Tutlam, Nhial T

    2016-01-28

    To assess non-medical university students' knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among non-medical students of a private Midwestern university in the United States in May 2012. Questionnaire assessed demographic information and contained 21 previously validated questions regarding knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Knowledge scale was categorized into low and high. Risk level was estimated based on smoking, drinking, and sexual habits. Bivariate associations between continuous and categorical variables were assessed using Pearson correlation and Chi-square tests, respectively. The response rate was 87% (100 out of 115 students approached). Eighty-one percent (81%) had low oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge; and only 2% perceived that their oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer risk was high. Risk perception was negatively correlated with age at sexual debut, r (64) = -0.26, p = 0.037; one-way ANOVA showed a marginally significant association between risk perception and number of sexual partners, F(4, 60) = 2.48, p = 0.05. There was no significant association between knowledge and perception of risk; however, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge was significantly associated with frequency of prevention of STDs (p perception is low among this student population. Since oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer incidence is increasingly shifting towards younger adults, interventions must be tailored to this group in order to improve prevention and control.

  15. METHODS OF LABORATORY ANIMALS" CARCASSES COLLECTION, STORAGE AND DESTRUCTION IN ISFAHAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N SHAMANSOURI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Environmental problems due to hazardous wastes production are increasing everyday. Laboratories of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences produce hazardous wastes in their daily research avtivities. These hazardous wastes are produced from laboratory animals" carcasses, which were used in educational and research activities. These carcasses are mixed with other wastes while they are contaminated with pathogenic organisms, toxic and chemical agents. These wastes can contaminate environment and threaten human s health. So, carcasses produced in laboratories should be collected and handle with a specific method in order to destruct in an incinerator. Methods: In this study, methods of collection, storge and destruction of laboratory animals" carcasses in Isfahan university of medical Sciences were evaluated during four months. Specific questionnaires were used for data collection. The mean weight of carcasses of each labratories, produced within a week, were calculated. DRE (Destruction and Removal Efficacy in different Temperatures in the incinerator were calculated. Results: Mean weight of laboratory animals" carcasses produced during a week in all the laboratories were 20kg. DRE in the incinerator were 9S.39% in 750.C temperature during 1 hour, 94.20% in 850°c temperature during 30 minutes, 94.10% in 950°c temperature during 20 minutes and 94.80% in 1000°c temperature during 15 minutes. Discussion: According to laboratory animals" carcasses contamination with pathogenic organisms, toxic and chemical agents, present methods of collection, storage and destruction aren"t standard and healthy. Also, due to low amout of carcasses daily production, everyday destruction of these carcasses isn"t economic. As a result, carcasses produced everyday should be stored in a collecting box under zero temperature and destruct at the end of the week in the designed incinerator in 1000°c temperature .

  16. Research self-efficacy among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Kazempour, Zahra; Taheri, Behjat

    2015-01-01

    Research self-efficacy if the people's judgment of their abilities in order to organize and conduct meaningful research in different formats. The aim of this study is to determinate the rate of research self-efficacy among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on Research Self-efficacy Scale. The method of this study is an applied survey method. Statistical population is all students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and the sample size was calculated to be 361 samples based on Krejcie and Morgan table. Random sampling method was used with equal number of samples from every department. Data collection tool is Salehi et al. questionnaire (with 7 dimensions) with Likert scale (5 grades). Its validity and reliability were confirmed by Psychology and Research Method experts and Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.84) respectively. Data gathering method was direct visit to each department. The data was then analyzed using t-test and one-tailed ANOVA using SPSS 16 software. The finding showed that among research self-efficiency dimensions research ethics dimension had the highest and quality research dimension had the lowest means. Furthermore comparing the research self-efficacy scores with demographic characteristics suggests that there is no significant difference between total score of research self-efficacy of different departments, genders or educational degrees (P > 0.05). Since the score of most of the research self-efficacy dimensions were, lower than average, holding periodical workshops, inclusion of necessary courses in the educational plan, forcing student to perform research activity such as writing articles in lower educational levels and improvement of research culture for students with the help of experienced professors are some of practical solutions, which can lead to increasing the motivation of the students for conducting efficient research.

  17. Zinc Deficiency in First Year Female Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedyeh Haghollahi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Zinc deficiency is an important health problem in developing countries. The aim of this study was diagnosis of zinc deficiency among young female students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Materials and methods: This cross sectional study evaluated 420 medical and paramedical students of Tehran University in 2005. All of them were female and in the first year of their education. Serum concentrations of zinc were measured by enzymatic method students in whom had sufficient criteria to enroll in the study. Zinc concentration more than 85 µ/dl was considered as normal value.  Concentration less than 50 µ/dl was defined as severe zinc deficiency. Mild and moderate  deficiencies were described as zinc levels between 50 to 85 µ/dl. Analysis was performed by t-test, chi-square and ANOVA using SPSS software. Results: Zinc deficiency was found in 7.1% of the participants. In women with body weights between 50.1-60 kg, zinc deficiency was less than patients with body weight of ≤ 50 Kg (p=0.04. In zinc deficient group acne was observed more frequently (p=0.01. Also anemic participants (Hb<12 had lower zinc level than non anemic women (Hb≥12 (p=0.001.Conclusion: This study found severe and mild to moderate zinc deficiency in 1.4% and 5.7% of female students, respectively. Zinc deficiency is common in anemic students. Zinc supplementation is recommended in anemic patients and in cases of confirmed zinc deficiency.

  18. Eight year survival among breast cancer Malaysian women from University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed Mohammed; Isa, Zaleha Md; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Nor, Md Idris Mohd; Chen, Robert; Ismail, Fuad; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2009-01-01

    Survival after diagnosis of cancer is one of the major outcome measurements and a key criterion for assessing quality of cancer control related to both the preventive and the therapeutic level. The purpose of this study was to determine the 8-year survival time in Malaysia based on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A retrospective study of 472 Malaysian women with breast cancer from the Medical Record Department at University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) was therefore performed with survival analysis carried out using the Kaplan-Meier with log-rank test for univariate analysis and Cox-regression for multivariate analysis. Women who had cancer or family history of cancer had a longer 8-year survival time (p = 0.008) compared with others who did not have such a history. Tamoxifen use, positive oestrogen receptor status, and race were prognostic indicators for 8-year survival time (p = 0.036, p = 0.018, p = 0.053, respectively) in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that being Malays and having no family history of cancer were independent prognostic factors for shorter survival time (p = 0.008, p = 0.012, respectively). In conclusion, being Chinese and having a family history of cancer are predictors of longer survival among the Malaysian breast cancer women.

  19. [High frequency of plagiarism in medical thesis from a Peruvian public university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Gastulo, J Jhan C; Quezada-Osoria, C Claudia; Peña-Oscuvilca, Américo; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2010-03-01

    An observational study was conducted to describe the presence of plagiarism in medical thesis in 2008 performed at a public university in Peru. Search for plagiarism in 33 thesis introductions using a Google search algorithm, characterizes of the study type and we search in electronic form if the thesis mentor have published articles in scientific journals. We found evidence of plagiarism in 27/33 introductions, 37.3% (171/479) of all the paragraphs analyzed had some degree of plagiarism, literal plagiarism was the most frequent (20/27) and journals were the most common sources of plagiarism (19/27). The characteristics of the studies were observational (32/33), cross-sectional (30/33), descriptive (25/33) and retrospective (19/33). None of the authors had published in a scientific journal, and only nine of his tutors of them had at least one publication. No association was found between the characteristics of the thesis and the presence of plagiarism. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of plagiarism in theses analyzed. Is responsibility of medical schools take the necessary actions to detect and avoid plagiarism among their students.

  20. Determining Attachment Styles of the Residents (Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Firoozabadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Attachment system as described by John Bowlby, is an innate human tendency and it is in the service of infants to form a relationship with primary care givers for normal development. In adulthood, this system is activated under stressful conditions and the person responds to it based upon previous internal models of self and the others. Considering the importance of a secure style for health care professionals, the purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the attachment style in the residents of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present study 243 residents in different specialties were recruited and divided into 3 groups. We assessed the attachment styles of the participants using Van Oudenhoven's Adult Attachment Style Questionnaire. Results: No difference in attachment styles among these three groups was found. However, the female residents had a more secure score compared to the male participants. Conclusion: This study, as a preliminary one, offers some questions that may be addressed in the future studies. Paying attention to the attachment styles in the medical students, residents and health care professionals may lead to design proper programs to enhance their abilities to empathize with their patients and development of more effective relationships in their career.

  1. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND OTHER LIFESTYLE HABITS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Jiménez Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Those engaged in medical sciences are social models. For this reason, their daily habits influence their professional practice and the primary prevention they carry out. The main purpose of this research was to determine whether this group of medicine training students, all from University of Costa Rica, met national and international recommendations regarding health and wellness regulations. In 2014, second semester, anonymous questionnaires were applied to all undergraduate medical students from first year to seniors (n= 216. Based on this information, some personal data was gathered such as smoking habits, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable consumption, and the amount of physical activities they practiced. According to this evidence, 52.91% drank alcohol beverages while the prevalence of active smokers was low (3.39%. Furthermore, although they accomplished the national and international standards related to fruit and vegetable consumption, 40% of the subjects did not exercise in any way. Among those who did exercise daily, 68.9% invested only 7.8 minutes per day. Among other findings, those who performed some physical activity at least once a week devoted more time to studying than to watching television. In brief, fitness and health promotion programs should target these future professionals to prevent risk factors such as overweight, obesity, and chronic diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle. English translation by Jeannette Soto Segura

  2. [The centralization of medical studies in universities under Napoleon I. History and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichard, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The so called "Loi du 19 ventose au XI" is two centuries old. It is a very important text of the French universitary story. It stands out the end of the Revolution in the medical studies. It enjoyed the most part of the contemporary people. But other arrangements of the law are more debatable. Thus, medical and surgical unity was already acquired before French Revolution. Furthermore, the absence of surgical practical training was a serious gap. At last, universitary Centralisation, which contrasts, with previous Decentralisation and the historical evolution of many countries, is an option with later pejorative consequences. Il was necessary to remind the events which consolidated centralisation (creation of School of medicine without autonomy in 1820, 1958 ordonnances, 1968 Revolution and after 1981, "internat national", "internat qualifiant", Lastly, the creation of C-NRS and INSERM took the leadership of research from University. Of course, other events hindered centralisation (Epic of "Internat des hôpitaux", 1871-1878 crisis, and 1910 campaign against agregation). But today, the faculties of Medicine have no real autonomy. The consequences are the standardization of the studies, the absence of competition and a poor overall result. The components of this result are not peculiar to centralisation. But this one prevents any reform. Is this logical reform really whished by the French people?

  3. [The history of medical physics and biophysics at the Humboldt University in Berlin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, P

    2001-01-01

    The present Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics (former Institute of Radiation Research) was established on September 1st in 1923 by Walter Friedrich (1883-1968). It was after the Institute in Frankfurt A.M. (founded by Friedrich Dessauer in 1921) - the second Institute of its kind in Germany. As a physicist who wrote his dissertation under Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, he did research together with a Gynecologist in Friedburg on problems of radiation therapy and the prevention of radiation injuries. Thus Friedrich became one of the first German Biomedical Physicists and was appointed to a professorship at the university of Berlin and its faculty of medicine. The paper gives a survey of the history of the Institute of Radiation Research in the twenties, in the time of Nazi-rule, the period after the World War II and in the era of GDR until 1990 and up to the present time. The succession of directorship of the Institute and the main research subjects in medical physics and biophysics have been sketched.

  4. Learning styles of students of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Rashidi-jahan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding the learning styles of students may help educational planning and improve the learning. This study aims to assess learning styles, and relevant determinants, of students who study in various disciplines of medical sciences at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences (BUMS in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 180 students from BUMS were selected randomly. Data were collected sing the Kolb learning style questionnaire during April/May 2012. One-way ANOVA, Student t-test, Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for analyzing the data. Results: The mean age of participants was 29.3±7.0, majority of them were males. The preferred learning styles were diverger (76.7%, accommodator (12.8%, assimilator (7.8% and converger (2.8% respectively. The results showed that the factors such as age, sex, marriage status, father and mother education, grade point average (GPA and academic degree could be important to determine learning style characteristics of students. The findings also indicate that the preferred learning style among the students with different GPAs or academic degrees are not different considerably. Conclusion: Regarding the most preferred leaning style by the, proper planning to address proper teaching styles according to the preferred learning styles is necessary.

  5. The evaluation of psycho-emotional state in junior students of medical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Pavliuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, psychosocial factors, stress and mental exhaustion are considered by WHO experts and the International Labour Organization as an important new factor affecting the health, working capacity, training and career. Young generation, especially students, who are an industrial and intellectual potential of the country can be attributed to the risk group because of the extremely high burden of adaptation. The intensity and tension of modern life at a psychological level preceding the occurrence of negative emotional experiences and stress reactions that, accumulating, cause the formation of depressions. The aim of the study was to examine the level of psycho-emotional stress in the junior students of medical university. The observations of the medical students of the second year of study were performed. To determine the psycho-emotional stress we have used adaptive varint of H.Ayzenko method that include an anxiety, frustration, aggressiveness and rigidity, through questionnaires. According to a survey results of the state of psycho-emotional state low levels of stress resistance were found in students in learning activities, indicating that students are exposed to the negative impact of the environment. It should also be noted that the level of emotional condition of students depends on the personal experience of stressful situations that arise in students’ lives.

  6. Clinical learning environments (actual and expected): perceptions of Iran University of Medical Sciences nursing students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Pakpour, Vahid; Aalaa, Maryam; Shekarabi, Robabeh; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Haghani, Hamid; Mehrdad, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational clinical environment has an important role in nursing students' learning. Any difference between actual and expected clinical environment will decrease nursing students’ interest in clinical environments and has a negative correlation with their clinical performance. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study is an attempt to compare nursing students' perception of the actual and expected status of clinical environments in medical-surgical wards. Participants of the study were 127 bachelor nursing students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in the internship period. Data gathering instruments were a demographic questionnaire (including sex, age, and grade point average), and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) originally developed by Professor Chan (2001), in which its modified Farsi version (Actual and Preferred forms) consisting 42 items, 6 scales and 7 items per scale was used. Descriptive and inferential statistics (t-test, paired t-test, ANOVA) were used for data analysis through SPSS version 16. Results: The results indicated that there were significant differences between the preferred and actual form in all six scales. In other word, comparing with the actual form, the mean scores of all items in the preferred form were higher. The maximum mean difference was in innovation and the highest mean difference was in involvement scale. Conclusion: It is concluded that nursing students do not have a positive perception of their actual clinical teaching environment and this perception is significantly different from their perception of their expected environment. PMID:26034726

  7. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  8. Awareness and attitudes towards organ donation among medical students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedalamin, Zaid; Imran, Muhammad; Almutairi, Osama; Lamfon, Mohammed; Alnawwar, Majd; Baig, Mukhtiar

    2017-04-01

    To assess awareness and attitude of medical students about organ donation. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and comprised medical students. The participants were asked about their religious and other beliefs towards organ donation, their reasons for not donating organs, and their personal opinions about organ donation through a questionnaire. SPSS 21 was used for data analysis. Of the 481 participants, 250(52%) were females, and 231(48%) were males. The overall mean age was 21.36±1.63 years. Besides, 437(90.9%) students knew what organ donation means, 433(90%) supported organ donation, and 90(18.7%) knew someone who had donated an organ. Moreover, 245(50.9%) participants were willing to donate their organ to their family alone, 198(41.2%) were willing to donate to any deserving patient while 439(91.3%) rejected that religion precluded organ donation, and 354(73.6%) did not know about the grafting of organs from a man to a woman and vice versa. Awareness and attitude towards organ donation were not up to the mark among the participants.

  9. Evaluating the clinical teaching of medical imaging students at Curtin University of Technology, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohiy, H M; Davidson, R

    2011-01-01

    To ascertain the effectiveness of the clinical, tutorial-based component of teaching and the clinical assessment method in the Bachelor of Medical Imaging Science at Curtin University of Technology (CUT), Perth, Western Australia. In mid-2006, second- and third-year students enrolled in CUT's Medical Imaging Science degree were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) evaluation program and clinical teaching. Thirty-three of 57 students answered questions about demographics and their opinions of the laboratory sessions, clinical placements and the OSCEs. Seventy-six per cent of students were satisfied with their laboratory sessions and clinical placements. Sixty-four percent of respondents indicated that the OSCE was not an objective evaluation, but 82% of students felt the OSCE was an effective test of their radiography skills and knowledge, and believed that they were able to evaluate and care for a patient during the OSCE. Overall, the surveyed students believed that the practical skills explored in laboratory sessions helped improve clinical training outcomes; however, only 33% of the students were satisfied that the OSCE was an appropriate assessment of their clinical training in hospitals.

  10. Attitude towards and use of ecstasy in medical university interns' based on HBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghianimoghadam, M H; Mazloomy Mahmoodabad, S S; Mohammadi, S; Baghianimoghadam, B

    2009-12-01

    Using a self-reported questionnaire, 130 Yazd Medical University students were surveyed about their knowledge towards ecstasy and their use of ecstasy based on Health Belief Model. The age range was 18-31 years. Approximately, 23% of students had seen an ecstasy tablet, 6 (4.6%) had used ecstasy (2 female and 4 male), 4 of them lived in a dormitory and 2 were tenants. The levels of knowledge, perceived barrier and perceived benefit of students who had used ecstasy were lower than those who hadn't used ecstasy. There was a significant difference between the knowledge, perceived barrier and perceived benefit of samples and use of ecstasy (p university: 12.3%; friends: 12.3%; newspapers/magazine articles: 7.7%. The data revealed that the knowledge of participants about ecstasy was low (mean = 27.69 +/- 3.53 out of 48). The mean grade score of knowledge of males was more than females. A survey in Kerman (Iran) showed that the knowledge of general practitioners about ecstasy was lower than 50% and the knowledge of males was more than females.

  11. Prevalence Rate of Using ٍEcstasy among Medical Sciences Students in Urmia University in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Miri Ghaffarzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The present study aims to achieve a comprehensive depiction of ecstasy consumption among the students of Urmia University of medical sciences in 2007.Materials & Methods: Totally 950 students were surveyed in this cross-sectional descriptive study. A census was used as a sampling method. A self-report questionnaire regarding demographic details and ecstasy consumption was completed by students. Data was stored in a database and then was analyzed through descriptive tests by SPSS software. Chi square test was used to determine the correlation coefficient.Results: There were 798 subjects of all target population who had never used this drug. However, 132 subjects (18 regularly, 56 occasionally for fun and 58 at least once consumed ecstasy pills. Thus the point prevalence of ecstasy consumption among the students was 14.19 percent. There were 232 subjects who had never heard of the term “ecstasy". Instead, the knowledge source of the rest about ecstasy was books (116 subject, internet (56 subjects, mass media (489 subjects, friends (28 subjects, and family (2 subjects. A significant relation was observed between ecstasy consumption and other variables (parents' education, residence in student campus, attending parties, smoking, canabis and opium consumption. Conclusion: Results of this study revealed that the point prevalence of ecstasy pills consumption among university students was 14.19% that raises the need for purposive intervention and the necessity of planning to prevent and decrease this phenomenon.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:67-72

  12. Clinical reasoning of medical students in a public university in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Cristina Fornaziero

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to understand the reasoning developed by medical students in a public university in Brazil. This research on education included semi-structured interviews and film recordings of interns discussing 10 clinical cases. A sample of 16 interns analyzed cases presented on a notebook computer with a webcam. They were instructed to verbalize all their thoughts on the procedures they would use. The film recordings and transcripts of the interviews were analyzed. Quantitative data was evaluated using Yates' chi-squared test and speech analysis was used to evaluate the transcripts. The theme worked on in the practice of reasoning was: the student's perceptions of their clinical practice. Of the 160 diagnoses, 57% were done with analytical reasoning and 43% with non-analytical reasoning. The hypothetical deductive method was employed by 31% of the interns and the inductive method was employed by 69%. The diagnostic accuracy was 81% correct for easy cases and 85% correct for difficult cases. We observed two empirical categories: the cognitive universe of the student and the patient's context.

  13. [Postdoctoral qualification regulations of medical faculties in German universities. A comparison of 1998 and 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, K; Sorg, H; Vogt, P M

    2012-05-01

    In Germany, Austria and Switzerland the "Habilitation" (postgraduate qualification) is currently the highest ranked university degree which qualifies candidates to perform high ranking autonomous research and teach the specific subject at university level. Although it is legally not an academic degree, the habilitation is a mandatory qualification for the later appointment and employment as a professor. The habilitation process is a complex assessment of diverse prerequisites which differ highly in terms of uniformity among the medical faculties in Germany. In order to re-evaluate these prerequisites and to find out if there might be more conformity for candidates all habilitation requirements were analyzed for 12 primary outcome measures according to Nagelschmidt and rated with a specific scoring system (Nagelschmidt score). The overall scoring for habilitation requirements increased from 15.2±5.1 points in 1998 to 21.9±4.0 points in 2010 (95% confidence interval 20.6-23.3, p<0.001, mainly due to increased requirements in terms of publications, teaching and mandatory board certification. No correlation was found between the number of habilitation degrees per faculty and the overall Nagelschmidt score (y=-0.0545x+26.021, r(2)=0,00028). The requirements for habilitation have substantially increased by 44% from 1998 to 2010 in Germany. This is mainly based on higher requirements in terms of publications, teaching and board certification.

  14. Validation of the Defining Issues Test in Medical Students at El Rosario University, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Regina Pérez-Olmos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning medicine as a discipline is a complex process that demands more dedication every day. The acquisition of technical knowledge must be part of an integral education which favors the development of high level humanistic values in order to provide the physician with personal tools for the proper resolution of the ethical dilemmas that he/she will face during his/her education and professional practice. The assessment and improvement of these aspects are likewise necessary in the physicians’ education. For the purposes of this research, the reliability of the Opinion Questionnaire on Social Problems (COPS, for its acronym in Spanish was evaluated. This questionnaire is the Mexican version of the Defining Issues Test, and it was adapted by the authors. The test item performance was determined in medical students from El Rosario University at Bogota, Colombia in 2006. The obtained Cranach’s Alpha was 0.76, similar to the registers in scientific literature. COPS is considered to be a reliable instrument for the evaluation of moral judgment in medicine students at this University.

  15. The Effect of Medical Recording Training on Quantity and Quality of Recording in Gynecology Residents of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah-Melli, Manizheh; Nikravan Mofrad, Malahat; Amini, Abolghasem; Piri, Zakieh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Rahmani, Vahideh

    2017-09-01

    Introduction: Medical records contain valuable information about a patient's medical history and treatment. Patient safety is one of the most important dimensions of health care quality assurance and performance improvement. Completing the process of documentation is necessary to continue patient care and continuous quality improvement of basic services. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of medical recording education on the quantity and quality of recording in gynecology residents of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study is a quasi-experimental study and was conducted at Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, in 2016. Thirty-two second through fourth year gynecologic residents of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences who were willing to participate in the study were included by census sampling and participated in training workshop. Three evaluators reviewed the residents' records before and after training course by a checklist. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 13 software. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that before the intervention, there were significant differences in the quantity of information status among the evaluators and no significant difference was observed in the recording of qualitative status. After the workshop, among the 3 evaluators, there were also significant differences in the quantity of data recording status; however, no significant change was observed in recording of qualitative status. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that a sectional training course of correct and standardized medical records has no effect on reforming the process of recording.

  16. Experience of problem-based learning in nursing education at Kaohsiung Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Fan-Hao; Chin, Chi-Chun

    2009-05-01

    Nursing education must keep up with the rapidly changing medical landscape to support the competences of nurses in the areas of critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity. Problem-based learning (PBL) provides an appropriate strategy for nursing education innovation. Nursing curricula based on PBL remain in the growing stage in Taiwan. Kaohsiung Medical University introduced PBL into nursing education in 2002. The critical events in the process included: (1) nurturing key tutors; (2) using PBL teaching methods in an elective course--Oncology Nursing, and designing a new elective course--Symposiums Regarding Clinical Cases; (3) holding conferences inside and outside the school to promote PBL teaching methods; (4) linking e-learning and PBL teaching methods; (5) conducting PBL research; (6) establishing a committee of PBL, objective structured clinical examination, and teaching material review for the College of Nursing; and (7) setting up a required course--Nursing Ethics. We now have 12 key tutors in the College of Nursing. We have also completed two studies to evaluate the ability of students and to explore the experience of tutors. From our studies, we know that PBL can increase learner abilities in self-directed learning, critical thinking, and PBL performance. The approach helps students to cope with the changing medical landscape. Furthermore, tutors and teachers develop adequate PBL teaching skills. Based on the experience above, we believe that we are on the right path in terms of continuing tutor development, gradually increasing the number of PBL courses, and undertaking further research to promote PBL methods in Taiwan.

  17. [Predictors of success among first-year medical students at the University of Parakou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoukonou, Thierry; Tognon-Tchegnonsi, Francis; Mensah, Emile; Allodé, Alexandre; Adovoekpe, Jean-Marie; Gandaho, Prosper; Akpona, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Several factors including grades obtained in the Baccalaureate can influence academic performance of first year medical students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between results achieved by students taking Baccalaureate exam and student academic success during the first year of medical school. We conducted an analytical study that included the whole number of students regularly enrolled in their first year of medical school at the university of Parakou in the academic year 2010-2011. Data for the scores for each academic discipline and distinction obtained in the Baccalaureate were collected. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and multiple linear regression made it possible to determine the best predictors of success and grade point average obtained by students at the end of the year. SPSS Statistics 17.0 was used to analyse data and a p value p students regularly enrolled, we could exploit the data on 407 students. They were aged 15-31 years; 262 (64.4%) were male. 98 were enrolled with a success rate of 23.7%. Concerning men, the scores obtained in mathematics, in physical sciences, the grade point average obtained in the Baccalaureate and honors obtained in the Baccalaureate were associated with their success at the end of the year, but in multivariate analysis only a score in physical sciences > 15/20 was associated with success (OR: 2,8 [1,32-6,00]). Concerning the general average grade obtained at the end of the year, only an honor obtained in the Baccalaureate was associated (standard error of the correlation coefficient: 0,130 Beta =0,370 and p=0,00001). The best predictors of student academic success during the first year were a good grade point average in physical sciences during the Baccalaureate and an honor obtained in the Baccalaureate The inclusion of these elements in the enrollement of first-year students could improve academic performance.

  18. Medication non-adherence among adult psychiatric out patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfay, Kenfe; Girma, Eshetu; Negash, Alemayehu; Tesfaye, Markos; Dehning, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    Information on adherence of adult psychiatric patients to biological modes of treatment is scarce in Ethiopia. Knowledge on adherence is essential in terms of future prognosis, quality of life and functionality of such patients. This study was conducted to assess the magnitude and associated factors of non-adherence to medication. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted in November 2011 at the psychiatry facility of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, which provides service to more than 10 mill people. A sample of 422 adults with psychiatric illness in the follow-up outpatients was selected consecutively. Data was collected using a pre-tested questionnaire by face-to-face interview and from patient medical records. The four-item Morisky scale was used to assess degree of medication adherence. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 and descriptive, chi-square test and logistic regression statistical methods were used. P-Value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant in the final model. Out of the 422 patients, 40.3% were females and 59.7% males. The prevalence rate for non-adherence was 41.2%, non-affective psychoses diagnosis contributing the highest rate (44.5%). From the total non-adherent respondents, 78.2% attributed their non-adherence to forgetting. Irregular follow-up, poor social support and complex drug regimen were independently associated variables with non-adherence. The result of the study showed that non-adherence among psychiatric patients in Southwest Ethiopia is high and revealed possible associated factors. Adherence needs integrated efforts in creating a mechanism in enhancing regular follow-up, informal social support system and ongoing awareness creation among professionals.

  19. Impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA DEHGHANI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obtaining clinical competency in clinical education is one of the problems in nursing and use of the new methods of clinical training is very important. Clinical supervision is one of the methods used as a mechanism to promote knowledge and skill for promoting professional performance in nursing students. This study is carried out to determine the impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present experimental study, 32 nursing students were enrolled in the study based on census and randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control by block randomization. Clinical supervision was used in the experimental group and the control group received routine clinical trainings in the field. The students’ clinical skills were assessed using a researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was confirmed through content validity method by 13 faculty members and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 nursing students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (87%. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 14. Results: There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in clinical skills such as recognition and administration of medication, team participation, patients and their relatives’ education, considering the safety, infection prevention and nursing process (p<0.005. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that in clinical supervision process, students have a better communication and cooperation with their instructor and with each other and their confidence and understanding and the amount of learning in practical skills was enhanced more than routine clinical training. The implementation of this clinical training method for students of nursing and other fields of medical sciences is recommendable.

  20. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  1. Organizational Climate and Work Addiction in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, 2014: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Noora; Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Zare, Vahid; Mohammadi, Mahan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The occupational nature of employees in headquarters units of the University requires them to deal with support issues. Thus, there is some pressure on these employees to complete their assignments on time so that employees in the line units can accurately and expeditiously perform their duties. As a result, work addiction behaviors are sometimes observed among the headquarters personnel. Considering the importance of work addiction and recognizing the factors that intensify it, this study investigated the relationship between organizational climate and the work addiction of headquarters personnel at the Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods This descriptive-analytic study was conducted using stratified random sampling of 151 University employees in 2014. The data collection tool was an organizational climate questionnaire, which was supplemented by the Work Addiction Risk Test (WART). The data were analyzed using the Pearson test, Spearman test, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Kruskal-Wallis test using IBM-SPSS version 20. Results The findings of this study showed that the organizational climate was at a moderate level, and employees were in the danger level in terms of work addiction. In addition, among the dimensions of organizational climate, the risk dimension had a significant relationship with work addiction (porganizational climate score was low and the work addiction score was at the high-risk level, this issue demands more attention of senior managers and human resource officers of organizations to improve the organizational climate and increase employees’ awareness of work addiction. PMID:26816586

  2. P16 METHYLATION OF THE COLORECTAL CANCER AND ASSOCIATION WITH DUKES STAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志伟; 易静; 仓辉; 邹鸿志; 郁宝铭; 汤雪明

    2001-01-01

    To explore whether methylation of the CpG island in the promoter of the p16 tumor suppressor gene was associated with clinicopathological characteristics of the colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Methylation- specific PCR (MSP) was used to detect p16 methylation of the colorectal cancer patients. Results: In 58 sporadic colorectal cancer, 43.1% of the tumors had detectable p16 methylation. Dukes' stage was associated with p16 methylation status. Dukes C, D patients (75%) were more likely to contain methylated p16 compared with Dukes A, B patients (13.3%). Conclusion: p16 methylation plays a role in the carcinogenesis of a subset of colorectal cancer. P16 methylation might be considered as a prognostic indicator.

  3. Research on Practice Carrier and Method Formed by Medical Humanistic Spirit for Medical Students: Tianjin Medical University as a Case in Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Geng, Xin; Su, Zhenxing; Wang, Yutao

    2014-01-01

    Medical humanistic quality is an indispensable quality that eligible doctors should possess, and medical humanism is strongly advocated and carried forward by contemporary medicine. These are commonly understood worldwide, and formed by reflection on medicine and medical education. Cultivation of medical humanism requires in-depth discussions of…

  4. Integration of Cognitive Skills as a Cross-Cutting Theme Into the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum at Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Akbar; Allaa, Maryam; Moosapour, Hamideh; Aletaha, Azadeh; Shahrtash, Farzaneh; Monajemi, Alireza; Arastoo, Tohid; Ahmadinejad, Maryam; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Khabaz Mafinejad, Mahboobeh

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, improvement of thinking skills of students is one of the universally supported aims in the majority of medical schools. This study aims to design longitudinal theme of reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making into the undergraduate medical curriculum at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). A participatory approach was applied to design the curriculum during 2009-2011. The project was conducted by the contribution of representatives of both basic and clinical faculty members, students and graduates at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The first step toward integrating cognitive skills into the curriculum was to assemble a taskforce of different faculty and students, including a wide variety of fields with multidisciplinary expertise using nonprobability sampling and the snowball method. Several meetings with the contribution of experts and some medical students were held to generate the draft of expected outcomes. Subsequently, the taskforce also determined what content would fit best into each phase of the program and what teaching and assessment methods would be more appropriate for each outcome. After a pilot curriculum with a small group of second-year medical students, we implemented this program for all first-year students since 2011 at TUMS. Based on findings, the teaching of four areas, including scientific and critical thinking skills (Basic sciences), problem-solving and reasoning (Pathophysiology), evidence-based medicine (Clerkship), and clinical decision-making (Internship) were considered in the form of a longitudinal theme. The results of this study could be utilized as a useful pattern for integration of psycho-social subjects into the medical curriculum.

  5. Work-Related Quality of Life among Medical Residents at a University Hospital in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsila, Nattamon; Chaiear, Naesinee; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Tiamkao, Somsak

    2015-12-01

    1) To assess work-related quality of life (WRQOL) among medical residents at a university hospital in northeast Thailand. 2) To determine the strength of the association between personal and working condition components and WRQOL among medical residents. A descriptive study was used to describe the WRQOL among medical residents. The study population comprised of all 375 residents affiliated with the university hospital. The Thai version of a self-administered work-related quality of life scale-2 was used for data collection. Testing the reliability revealed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.908. Questionnaires were completed by 259 of 375 (68.3%). The study found that the mean rating by residents for overall WRQOL was 113.8 out of 170 (SD 14.8). Most rated WRQOL as moderate (76.6%). The seven sub-factors were rated as moderate to high for employee engagement and control at work, moderate for home/work interface, general well-being and working conditions, high-moderate for job career satisfaction, and low-moderate for stress at work. Relationships between the personal and working condition components and WRQOL were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Residents in minor specialties had a higher WRQOL than those in major specialties (OR 2.522, 95% CI: 1.37, 4.63). Residents who had less than eight duty shifts/week had a higher WRQOL than those with more than eight duty shifts/week (OR 2.263, 95% CI: 1.16, 4.41). Similarly, residents working with less than 80 hours/week had a higher WRQOL than those working more than 80 hours/week (OR 2.344, 95% CI: 1.17, 4.72). A subgroup analyzes of those working in minor specialties showed the trend that working less than eight shifts/month and working less than 80 hours/week had the potential association with good quality of work-life (QWL). This phenomenon is presented in the subgroup analyses of those working in major specialties. Therefore, working hours and number of shifts might have played important role in contributing good QWL

  6. The use of anti-TNFα medications for rheumatologic disease in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan EB Clowse

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Megan EB ClowseDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Anti-TNFα medications have led to vast improvements in the treatment of inflammatory conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn’s disease. As these diseases often afflict women in their reproductive years, the safety of these drugs during pregnancy is an important issue. Prospectively collected data thus far appear to be reassuring; however an analysis of the FDA-reported anomalies has raised some questions. It appears that significant levels of these drugs cross the placenta as the pregnancy nears term, but little is passed through breast milk. Prior to using these medications during pregnancy, the risks and benefits of these drugs, other treatment options, and the ongoing inflammatory condition all must be carefully weighed by both doctor and patient.Keywords: pregnancy, anti-TNFα medications, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, teratogenesis

  7. [Experience of Collaborative Research through Department of Medical Instrumental Research and Technology in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Both of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine which offers high, technical and safe medical treatment and Horiba, Ltd. which has small CBC analyzers in a core product established a joint research institute for development of advanced laboratory test analyzer from January 1, 2012 in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine as the "advanced treatment hospital" where the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has got approved. Clinical needs about analyzer and reagent for a laboratory test are being investigated to the emergency medical care unit and the intensive care unit as well as the laboratory test part in the affiliated hospital and many medical departments of the pediatrics, the internal medicine and the surgery. Developing the new analyzer based on high technology, evaluating the performance of them and spreading them to a medical examination and treatment site is our main target.

  8. [Lecturers in chemistry at the Medical Faculty of the University of Nagyszombat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadváry, F; Vámos, E

    1994-01-01

    After a short introduction on the development of the medieval universities at Pécs, Obuda, and Pozsony, and mentioning those who lectured in medicine in Hungary, the authors emphasise that modern chemistry was born during the 16th and 17th century. They stress the role of Paracelsus who invented iatro-chemistry, and that the first independent chairs, were founded in Germany in the beginning of 17th century at Altdorf, Marburg, Jéna, but were followed suit by Paris, when the Jardin des Plantes were erected. The first chemical textbook, the Cours de Chimie (Paris 1665), was also the work of a Frenchman, namely Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715). From the 18th century chemistry was also included in the curriculum of medical education in Hungary. Among the chairs of the newly founded medical faculty at Nagyszombat we find the chemical-botanical department in 1769. Its first professor was an Austrian physician Jakab Winterl (1773-1809), who had been a head physician at Selmecbánya, in Northern Hungary. Owing to a rash and premature publication Winterl's international reputation was unfortunately undermined in the last century by a leading German science historian, Hermann Kopp. The authors stress, however, that Winterl indeed played an important role in organizing the chemical department, and purchasing all the necessary equipment needed for up to date researches and analyses. And above all, in his Prolusiones ad chemiam saeculi decimi noni, he foresaw many forthcoming paths and discoveries of 19th century chemistry. After Winterl's retirement the department was divided into two parts. Pál Kitaibel (1757-1817) led the botanica department and János schuster (1777-1838) the other one for chemistry. Kitaibel made a name for himself by depicting Hungarian flora, but he also made discoveries in chemistry. He discovered chlore lime, before Tennant in 1795, a material which might have been used for whitening textiles. Schuster, on the other hand, introduced a system of Hungarian

  9. Unmet medical care and sexual health counseling needs-a cross-sectional study among university students in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kyagaba, Emmanuel; Asamoah, Benedict Oppong; Emmelin, Maria; Agardh, Anette

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, unmet medical care and sexual health counseling needs were assessed among students at a Ugandan University. Unmet medical care need was associated with poor mental health, experience of sexual coercion, and poor self-rated health. Unmet sexual health counseling need was significantly associated with being female, coming from an urban area, low social participation, poor mental health status, experience of sexual coercion, poor self-rated health, inconsistent condom use, and having mu...

  10. Survey of stress, anxiety, depression and self-concept of students of Fasa University of medical sciences, 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Najafi Kalyani; Elaheh Pourjam; Nahid Jamshidi; Shahnaz Karimi; Vahid Najafi Kalyani

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Studying periods in university is very important for students. Because of the problems, this period is usually accompanied with mental status changes of students. The aim of this study was the assessment of psychological variables (stress, anxiety and depression) and self-concept of students. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all the students studying at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in the academic year 89-88 were selected through census s...

  11. The pattern of time management in college students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in the year 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ravari; Fatemeh Alhani; Monireh Anoosheh; Tayebeh Mirzaie-Khalilabadi

    2008-01-01

    Background: One potential coping strategy frequently offered by university counseling services is time management for studying. Besides stress relief, time management skills will positively influence key outcomes such as academic performance, problem-solving ability, and health. Thus, it is necessary to investigate how college students manage their timing for studying. The aim of the present study was to assess the pattern of college students' time management in Kerman University of Medical S...

  12. A systematic approach of tracking and reporting medication errors at a tertiary care university hospital, Karachi, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Khurshid Khowaja1, Rozmin Nizar1, Rashida J Merchant2, Jacqueline Dias3, Irma Bustamante-Gavino4, Amina Malik11Division of Nursing Services, 2Nursing Education Services, 3Diploma Programme, Nurudin Jivraj Professorship of Nursing, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan; 4The Ahmed Shivji Professorship of Nursing, The Aga Khan University School of Nursing, Karachi, PakistanIntroduction: Administering medication is one of the high risk areas for any health professional. It is a multidisciplinar...

  13. Assessment of students’ perspectives about master of public health program in medical school of Shiraz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMAN FARAHANGIZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integration of public health and medical education has been thought to have an important role in medical students’ training. Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has developed an MD/MPH dual degree educational program for the talented volunteer students. The aim of this study was to assess the students’ viewpoints about various aspects of Shiraz MD/MPH program. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on Shiraz undergraduate medical students, who were enrolled in MD/MPH program. A self-structured questionnaire in Persian consisting of 4 parts was used; it included demographic factors including 16 questions which evaluated the students’ perspective of the goals, content, skill development, applicability and meeting their expectations; 7 questions evaluating the self-reported increase of knowledge; and 3 multiple choice questions to assess the students’ motivations and opinions on the impact of the program on their future career. Descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. Results: All MD/MPH students (89 with a mean age of 21.4±1.34 participated in this study. Forty one of the students (46.1% were male and 48 (53.9% female. Overall, 86.1% of them had positive views about the goals of the program; also, 83.5%, 81.2% and 81.9% of them reported a positive viewpoint about the contents, the applicability and development of specific skills, and meeting their expectations, respectively. The students’ most frequent motivation was “learning how to research systematically” (73%. The majority of the students reported this program to be moderately to highly effective in increasing their knowledge in the provided courses. Conclusion: The students had a positive view about almost all of the aspects of the MD/MPH program; this may be indicative of the program being successful in delivering the goals, increasing the students’ knowledge and skills, and meeting their expectations to date. Students’ enthusiasm for

  14. Assessment of students' perspectives about master of public health program in medical school of Shiraz University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahangiz, Saman; Salehi, Alireza; Rezaee, Rita; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Integration of public health and medical education has been thought to have an important role in medical students' training. Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has developed an MD/MPH dual degree educational program for the talented volunteer students. The aim of this study was to assess the students' viewpoints about various aspects of Shiraz MD/MPH program. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Shiraz undergraduate medical students, who were enrolled in MD/MPH program. A self-structured questionnaire in Persian consisting of 4 parts was used; it included demographic factors including 16 questions which evaluated the students' perspective of the goals, content, skill development, applicability and meeting their expectations; 7 questions evaluating the self-reported increase of knowledge; and 3 multiple choice questions to assess the students' motivations and opinions on the impact of the program on their future career. Descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. All MD/MPH students (89) with a mean age of 21.4±1.34 participated in this study. Forty one of the students (46.1%) were male and 48 (53.9%) female. Overall, 86.1% of them had positive views about the goals of the program; also, 83.5%, 81.2% and 81.9% of them reported a positive viewpoint about the contents, the applicability and development of specific skills, and meeting their expectations, respectively. The students' most frequent motivation was "learning how to research systematically" (73%). The majority of the students reported this program to be moderately to highly effective in increasing their knowledge in the provided courses. The students had a positive view about almost all of the aspects of the MD/MPH program; this may be indicative of the program being successful in delivering the goals, increasing the students' knowledge and skills, and meeting their expectations to date. Students' enthusiasm for the educational program may lead to their motivation for better learning and

  15. Risk factors of coronary heart disease among medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Mahnashi, Morooj; Al-Dhaheri, Amal; Al-Zahrani, Borooj; Al-Wadie, Ebtihal; Aljabri, Mydaa; Al-Shanketi, Rajaa; Al-Shehri, Rawiah; Al-Sayes, Fatin M; Bashawri, Jamil

    2014-04-28

    Nowadays, Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) represents an escalating worldwide public health problem. Providing consistent data on the magnitude and risk factors of CVDs among young population will help in controlling the risks and avoiding their consequences. The objective was to estimate the prevalence of risk factors of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) among medical students during their clinical clerkship (4th - 6th years). A cross-sectional study was done during the educational year 2012-2013 at King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah. Ethical standards were followed and a multistage stratified random sample method was used for selection of 214 medical students. Data was collected through an interviewing questionnaire, measurements and laboratory investigations. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were done by SPSS version 21. CHD risk percent in thirty years was calculated using Framingham algorithm for each student, then the risk among all students was determined. The commonest risk factors of CHDs were daily intake of high fat diet (73.4%), physical inactivity (57.9%), overweight/or obesity (31.2%) and daily consumption of fast food (13.1%). Hyper-cholesterolemia (17.2%) and hypertension (9.3%) were also prevalent risk factors. Smoking prevalence was low (2.8%). Males had significantly higher mean scores for most of CHD risk factors compared to females (p < 0.05). Systolic Blood pressure was higher among males (119.47 ± 11.17) compared to females (112.26 ± 9.06). A highly statistical significant difference was present (Students't test = 4.74, p < 0.001). Framingham Risk Score revealed that CHD risk percent in thirty-years among all students was 10.7%, 2.3% and 0.5% for mild, moderate and severe risk, respectively. An alarmingly high prevalence of CHD risk factors was prevailed among medical students, especially among males. However, a low prevalence of smoking may indicate the success of "Smoke-free Campus" program. Screening risk

  16. Quality management of medical education at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Peter Erich

    2008-12-01

    The Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany, was founded in 1993 after the reunification of Germany. In 1999, a reform process of medical education was started together with Harvard Medical International. The traditional teacher and discipline-centred curriculum was replaced by a student-centred, interdisciplinary and integrative curriculum which has been named DIPOL (Dresden Integrative Patient/Problem- Oriented Learning). The reform process was accompanied and supported by a parallel-ongoing Faculty Development Program. In 2004, a Quality Management Program in medical education was implemented, and in 2005 medical education received DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification. Quality Management Program and DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification were/are unique for the 34 medical schools in Germany. The students played a very important strategic role in all processes. They were/are members in all committees like the Faculty Board, the Board of Study Affairs (with equal representation) and the ongoing audits in the Quality Management Program. Students are the only ones who experience all years of the curriculum and are capable of detecting, for example gaps, overlaps, inconsistencies of the curriculum and assessments. Therefore, the in-depth knowledge of students about the medical school's curriculum is a very helpful and essential tool in curriculum reform processes and Quality Management Programs of medical education. The reform in medical education, the establishment of the Quality Management program and the certification resulted in an improvement of quality and output of medical education and medical research.

  17. The utility of Aspirin in dukes C and high risk dukes B colorectal cancer - The ASCOLT study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Raghib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High quality evidence indicates that aspirin is effective in reducing colorectal polyps; and numerous epidemiological studies point towards an ability to prevent colorectal cancer. However the role of Aspirin as an adjuvant agent in patients with established cancers remains to be defined. Recently a nested case-control study within the Nurses Health cohort suggested that the initiation of Aspirin after the diagnosis of colon cancer reduced overall colorectal cancer specific mortality. Although this data is supportive of Aspirin's biological activity in this disease and possible role in adjuvant therapy, it needs to be confirmed in a randomized prospective trial. Methods/Design We hypothesize through this randomized, placebo-controlled adjuvant study, that Aspirin in patients with dukes C or high risk dukes B colorectal cancer (ASCOLT can improve survival in this patient population over placebo control. The primary endpoint of this study is Disease Free Survival and the secondary Endpoint is 5 yr Overall Survival. This study will randomize eligible patients with Dukes C or high risk Dukes B colorectal cancer, after completion of surgery and standard adjuvant chemotherapy (+/- radiation therapy for rectal cancer patients to 200 mg Aspirin or Placebo for 3 years. Stratification factors include study centre, rectal or colon cancer stage, and type of adjuvant chemotherapy (exposed/not exposed to oxaliplatin. After randomization, patient will be followed up with 3 monthly assessments whilst on study drug and for a total of 5 years. Patients with active peptic ulcer disease, bleeding diathesis or on treatment with aspirin or anti-platelet agents will be excluded from the study. Discussion This study aims to evaluate Aspirin's role as an adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer. If indeed found to be beneficial, because aspirin is cheap, accessible and easy to administer, it will positively impact the lives of many individuals in Asia

  18. 75 FR 73074 - Duke Energy Hanging Rock II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Hanging Rock II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Duke Energy Hanging Rock II, LLC's application...

  19. 78 FR 40200 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...) for an exemption request submitted by Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, on August 13, 2012 for the Oconee Nuclear Station Independent Spent Fuel Storage Facility (ISFSI). ] ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket...

  20. Identification of high-risk Dukes B colorectal cancer by microRNA expression profiling: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M I; Venkatesh, J; Jameson, J S; West, K; Pringle, J H; Singh, B

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) from tumour tissue and common gene mutations were studied to determine whether they predict the development of metastasis in patients with Dukes B colorectal cancer. Patients who underwent curative resection for Dukes B colorectal cancer who subsequently developed distant metastatic disease at some stage in the following 5 years ('high-risk B') were compared with case-matched controls of Dukes A, Dukes B (no metastases, 'low-risk B') and Dukes C patients without any detectable metastasis at 5 years of follow-up. MiRNAs from tumour and adjacent normal tissue and common gene mutations (KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA) in primary cancer tissue were analysed to identify prognostic tissue markers for the development of metastasis in patients with Dukes B colorectal cancer. Expression of miR-15b and miR-135b was significantly downregulated (P risk B' tumours compared with Dukes A, 'low-risk B' and C without metastasis. No significant differences were noted for mutation status and the development of metastasis. The study suggests that the development of metastasis in Dukes B tumours may be predictable based on the miRNA expression of miR-15b and miR-135b. This requires further study on a much larger cohort. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. 77 FR 35373 - Duke Energy Dicks Creek, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Dicks Creek, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding of Duke Energy Dicks Creek, LLC's application for market-based...

  2. 75 FR 43571 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And..., issued to Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units...

  3. 78 FR 45575 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2, and 3; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... response to a request submitted by Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., on August 13, 2012, for the Oconee Nuclear... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos.: 72-1004, 72-40, 50-269, 50-270, 50-287; and NRC-2013- 0135] Duke Energy Carolinas...

  4. 75 FR 43572 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and... No. NPF-17, issued to Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the McGuire Nuclear...

  5. Factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among 4,669 clinical medical students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Yunbo; Hu, Guijie; Chen, Qingyun; Peng, Hailun; Li, Kailan; Wei, Jinling; Yi, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    To produce competent undergraduate-level medical doctors for rural township health centers (THCs), the Chinese government mandated that medical colleges in Central and Western China recruit rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMSs) starting in 2010. This study aimed to identify and assess factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among both RTMSs and other students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China. An internet-based self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with medical students in Guangxi province. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the attitudes toward work in a rural township health center. Among 4,669 medical students, 1,523 (33%) had a positive attitude and 2,574 (55%) had a neutral attitude toward working in THCs. Demographic characteristics, personal job concerns, and knowledge of THCs were associated with the choice of a career in THCs. The factors related to a positive attitude included the following: three-year program, a rural-oriented medical program, being male, an expectation of working in a county or township, a focus on medical career development, some perceived difficulty of getting a job, having family support, sufficient knowledge of THCs, optimism toward THC development, seeking lower working pressure, and a lower expected monthly salary. Male students in a three-year program or a rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education program were more likely to work in THCs. Selecting medical students through interviews to identify their family support and intentions to work in THCs would increase recruitment and retention. Establishing favorable policies and financial incentives to improve living conditions and the social status of rural physicians is necessary.

  6. Factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among 4,669 clinical medical students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Qing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To produce competent undergraduate-level medical doctors for rural township health centers (THCs, the Chinese government mandated that medical colleges in Central and Western China recruit rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMSs starting in 2010. This study aimed to identify and assess factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among both RTMSs and other students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China. Methods: An internet-based self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with medical students in Guangxi province. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the attitudes toward work in a rural township health center. Results: Among 4,669 medical students, 1,523 (33% had a positive attitude and 2,574 (55% had a neutral attitude toward working in THCs. Demographic characteristics, personal job concerns, and knowledge of THCs were associated with the choice of a career in THCs. The factors related to a positive attitude included the following: three-year program, a rural-oriented medical program, being male, an expectation of working in a county or township, a focus on medical career development, some perceived difficulty of getting a job, having family support, sufficient knowledge of THCs, optimism toward THC development, seeking lower working pressure, and a lower expected monthly salary. Conclusion: Male students in a three-year program or a rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education program were more likely to work in THCs. Selecting medical students through interviews to identify their family support and intentions to work in THCs would increase recruitment and retention. Establishing favorable policies and financial incentives to improve living conditions and the social status of rural physicians is necessary.

  7. Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Barbara S; Nagy, Suzanne P

    2003-07-01

    The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal cancellations economically advantageous. In this (almost) post-print environment, the new FSU Medical Library is being created and will continue to evolve. By analyzing print journal subscription lists of eighteen academic medical libraries with similar missions to the community-based FSU College of Medicine and by entering these and selected quality indicators into a Microsoft Access database, a core list was created. This list serves as a selection guide, as a point for discussion with faculty and curriculum leaders when creating budgets, and for financial negotiations in a broader university environment. After journal titles specific to allied health sciences, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, library science, and nursing were eliminated from the list, 4,225 unique journal titles emerged. Based on a ten-point scale including SERHOLD holdings and DOCLINE borrowing activity, a list of 449 core titles is identified. The core list has been saved in spreadsheet format for easy sorting by a number of parameters.

  8. A study on the Rate of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Medical Students towards Method of Medical Records Documentation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences Affiliated Therapeutic and Teaching Centers 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Balaghafari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: History, clinical findings, procedures undertaken, and patients response to treatment are written in clinical records, hence their contents are indicators of physicians’ evaluation. If clinical records are provided precisely, clear and systematized, they indicate the clinical thinking of the staff and facilitate patients diagnosis process. These records have an important role in coordinating professional staff involved in patient care. Since the physicians and medical students are involved more in medical records documentation than the other hospital staff, thus, a study on their knowledge, attitude and practice towards the principles of medical records documentation is undertaken.Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive study, which is done about the rate of knowledge, attitude and practice of 207 Medical students of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in university hospitals. Descriptive and inferential statistical analytic methods were used for the collected data. For comparison of the hospitals, regarding observing designed principals in the completion of medical files, according to the filled questionnaires the minimum and maximum score designated as 1-5 which is very poor to excellent. Then the mean score was calculated and considered for the comparison of hospitals. For the determination of the relationship between knowledge, attitude, and practice, β Kendall’s Tau Test was used.Results: The majority of the participants had low knowledge (77.8% about medical records documentation. Most of them did not have good attitude (54.1 about completion of medical records and significance and value of medical records documentation in treatment, education, and research.Conclusion: Results indicate that incompletion of medical records at the university affiliated hospitals are due to lack of awareness of the students towards the method of medical records documentation. In addition, not considering the

  9. From Infancy to Adolescence: The Kansas University School of Medicine-Salina: A Rural Medical Campus Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart-Rake, William; Robinson, Michael; Paolo, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    The University of Kansas School of Medicine established a rural regional campus in Salina, Kansas, in 2011. The creation of a four-year medical campus of only 32 total students in a town of less than 50,000 inhabitants appeared to contradict all previous practices where medical schools have been situated in large metropolitan cities with student bodies frequently in the hundreds. The rationale to open the Salina campus was to attract medical students with a desire to train in a rural environment, hoping that many would eventually elect to practice primary care in rural Kansas. The authors evaluated the admission demographics, academic performance, campus satisfaction, and graduate medical education choices of students at Kansas University School of Medicine-Salina (KUSM-S) during its first four years of existence. To date, the Salina campus has succeeded in its mission to train students from rural communities in a rural environment to eventually become rural-based physicians. KUSM-S students have adjusted well to the rigors of medical school, have shown steady improvement in academic performance as measured by United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, and have been overwhelmingly positive about the Salina medical education program. The initial cohort of students has now successfully graduated and secured residency training positions, and most KUSM-S graduates are either continuing their training in primary care in Kansas or intend to return to Kansas to practice following residency training.

  10. From Infancy to Adolescence: The Kansas University School of Medicine–Salina: A Rural Medical Campus Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael; Paolo, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The University of Kansas School of Medicine established a rural regional campus in Salina, Kansas, in 2011. The creation of a four-year medical campus of only 32 total students in a town of less than 50,000 inhabitants appeared to contradict all previous practices where medical schools have been situated in large metropolitan cities with student bodies frequently in the hundreds. The rationale to open the Salina campus was to attract medical students with a desire to train in a rural environment, hoping that many would eventually elect to practice primary care in rural Kansas. The authors evaluated the admission demographics, academic performance, campus satisfaction, and graduate medical education choices of students at Kansas University School of Medicine–Salina (KUSM-S) during its first four years of existence. To date, the Salina campus has succeeded in its mission to train students from rural communities in a rural environment to eventually become rural-based physicians. KUSM-S students have adjusted well to the rigors of medical school, have shown steady improvement in academic performance as measured by United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, and have been overwhelmingly positive about the Salina medical education program. The initial cohort of students has now successfully graduated and secured residency training positions, and most KUSM-S graduates are either continuing their training in primary care in Kansas or intend to return to Kansas to practice following residency training. PMID:27805948

  11. Conflicts of interest in medical school: missing policies and high need for student information at most German universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Klaus; Koch, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Medical students interact with pharmaceutical representatives already during medical school. The goal of this study was to find out: Do policies exist at German medical faculties that govern the interactions between medical students and pharmaceutical representatives, do schools offer courses on the subject and do students attend these courses? And What are the attitudes of medical students concerning the role of pharmaceutical companies in medical teaching? All 36 German medical faculty deans and 1151 medical students at eight German universities were asked to complete a questionnaire of 4 and 7 questions, respectively, regarding the above mentioned topics. 30 (83.3%) deans and 1038 (90.3%) medical students filled in the questionnaire, respectively. According to the deans' answers, only one school had a policy concerning conflicts of interest and one had a policy governing the interactions between medical students and industry. 8 (26.7%) deans showed an interest in constructing a policy or educational an activity on this subject. 149 (14.4%) students had participated in an activity that focussed the subject of conflicts of interest and 779 (77.8%) wanted more education on the subject. 701 (73.4%) were opposed to an improvement of medical studies through financial support by pharmaceutical companies, whereas 216 (21.9%) were of the opinion that students should not meet with pharmaceutical representatives. Unlike in other countries, like the US, most German medical faculties do not have policies that govern the interactions between medical students and pharmaceutical companies. Since most students want to be taught more about these interactions, the implementation of respective policies and lectures would be desirable.

  12. Conflicts of interest in medical school: Missing Policies and high need for student information at most German Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Klaus; Koch, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Medical students interact with pharmaceutical representatives already during medical school. The goal of this study was to find out: Do policies exist at German medical faculties that govern the interactions between medical students and pharmaceutical representatives, do schools offer courses on the subject and do students attend these courses? And What are the attitudes of medical students concerning the role of pharmaceutical companies in medical teaching? Methods: All 36 German medical faculty deans and 1,151 medical students at eight German universities were asked to complete a questionnaire of 4 and 7 questions, respectively, regarding the above mentioned topics. Results: 30 (83,3%) deans and 1,038 (90.3%) medical students filled in the questionnaire, respectively. According to the deans' answers, only one school had a policy concerning conflicts of interest and one had a policy governing the interactions between medical students and industry. 8 (26.7%) deans showed an interest in constructing a policy or educational an activity on this subject. 149 (14,4%) students had participated in an activity that focussed the subject of conflicts of interest and 779 (77,8%) wanted more education on the subject. 701 (73,4%) were opposed to an improvement of medical studies through financial support by pharmaceutical companies, whereas 216 (21,9%) were of the opinion that students should not meet with pharmaceutical representatives. Conclusions: Unlike in other countries, like the US, most German medical faculties do not have policies that govern the interactions between medical students and pharmaceutical companies. Since most students want to be taught more about these interactions, the implementation of respective policies and lectures would be desirable. PMID:24575152

  13. Clinical pharmacist-led program on medication reconciliation implementation at hospital admission: experience of a single university hospital in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinović, Ivana; Marušić, Srećko; Mucalo, Iva; Mesarić, Jasna; Bačić Vrca, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the clinical pharmacist-led medication reconciliation process in clinical practice by quantifying and analyzing unintentional medication discrepancies at hospital admission. Methods An observational prospective study was conducted at the Clinical Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Dubrava, during a 1-year period (October 2014 – September 2015) as a part of the implementation of