WorldWideScience

Sample records for dual molecular imaging

  1. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2014-10-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ~70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using

  2. Dynamic molecular imaging of cardiac innervation using a dual headpinhole SPECT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jicun; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Reutter, BryanW.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-03-29

    Typically 123I-MIBG is used for the study of innervation andfunction of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. The protocolinvolves two studies: first a planar or SPECT scan is performed tomeasure initial uptake of the tracer, followed some 3-4 hours later byanother study measuring the wash-out of the tracer from the heart. A fastwash-out is indicative of a compromised heart. In this work, a dual headpinhole SPECT system was used for imaging the distribution and kineticsof 123I-MIBG in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) andnormotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The system geometry was calibratedbased on a nonlinear point projection fitting method using a three-pointsource phantom. The angle variation effect of the parameters was modeledwith a sinusoidal function. A dynamic acquisition was performed byinjecting 123I-MIBG into rats immediately after starting the dataacquisition. The detectors rotated continuously performing a 360o dataacquisition every 90 seconds. We applied the factor analysis (FA)methodand region of interest (ROI) sampling method to obtain time activitycurves (TACs)in the blood pool and myocardium and then appliedtwo-compartment modeling to estimate the kinetic parameters. Since theinitial injection bolus is too fast for obtaining a consistenttomographic data set in the first few minutes of the study, we appliedthe FA method directly to projections during the first rotation. Then thetime active curves for blood and myocardial tissue were obtained from ROIsampling. The method was applied to determine if there were differencesin the kinetics between SHR and WKY rats and requires less time byreplacing the delayed scan at 3-4 hours after injection with a dynamicacquisition over 90 to 120 minutes. The results of a faster washout and asmaller distribution volume of 123IMIBG near the end of life in the SHRmodel of hypertrophic cardiomyopthy may be indicative of a failing heartin late stages of heart failure.

  3. Dual coupled radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation for the solution of the forward problem in fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    The solution of the forward problem in fluorescence molecular imaging is among the most important premises for the successful confrontation of the inverse reconstruction problem. To date, the most typical approach has been the application of the diffusion approximation as the forward model. This model is basically a first order angular approximation for the radiative transfer equation, and thus it presents certain limitations. The scope of this manuscript is to present the dual coupled radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation model for the solution of the forward problem in fluorescence molecular imaging. The integro-differential equations of its weak formalism were solved via the finite elements method. Algorithmic blocks with cubature rules and analytical solutions of the multiple integrals have been constructed for the solution. Furthermore, specialized mapping matrices have been developed to assembly the finite elements matrix. As a radiative transfer equation based model, the integration over the angular discretization was implemented analytically, while quadrature rules were applied whenever required. Finally, this model was evaluated on numerous virtual phantoms and its relative accuracy, with respect to the radiative transfer equation, was over 95%, when the widely applied diffusion approximation presented almost 85% corresponding relative accuracy for the fluorescence emission.

  4. New Applications of Cardiac Computed Tomography Dual-Energy, Spectral, and Molecular CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool, and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Because of its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for the detection of coronary artery disease, and noninvasive n

  5. [Molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetschek, K; Wunderbaldinger, P

    2002-01-01

    The disclosure of the human genoma, the progress in understanding of diseases on molecular and cellular levels, the discovery of new disease-specific targets, and the development of new medications will revolutionize our understanding of the etiology and the treatment of many disease entities. Radiologists are faced with a paradigm shift from unspecific to specific molecular imaging techniques as well as with enormous speed in the development of new methods and should be enrolled actively in this field of medicine.

  6. Dual-Modality Activity-Based Probes as Molecular Imaging Agents for Vascular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withana, Nimali P; Saito, Toshinobu; Ma, Xiaowei; Garland, Megan; Liu, Changhao; Kosuge, Hisanori; Amsallem, Myriam; Verdoes, Martijn; Ofori, Leslie O; Fischbein, Michael; Arakawa, Mamoru; Cheng, Zhen; McConnell, Michael V; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are cellular mediators of vascular inflammation and are involved in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. These immune cells secrete proteases such as matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins that contribute to disease formation and progression. Here, we demonstrate that activity-based probes (ABPs) targeting cysteine cathepsins can be used in murine models of atherosclerosis to noninvasively image activated macrophage populations using both optical and PET/CT methods. The probes can also be used to topically label human carotid plaques demonstrating similar specific labeling of activated macrophage populations.

  7. Multifunctional dendrimer-based nanoparticles for in vivo MR/CT dual-modal molecular imaging of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kangan Li,1,4,5,* Shihui Wen,2,* Andrew C Larson,4,5 Mingwu Shen,2 Zhuoli Zhang,4,5 Qian Chen,3 Xiangyang Shi,2,3 Guixiang Zhang1 1Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Development of dual-mode or multi-mode imaging contrast agents is important for accurate and self-confirmatory diagnosis of cancer. We report a new multifunctional, dendrimer-based gold nanoparticle (AuNP as a dual-modality contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR/computed tomography (CT imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine dendrimers modified with gadolinium chelate (DOTA-NHS and polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether were used as templates to synthesize AuNPs, followed by Gd(III chelation and acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amine groups; multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped AuNPs (Gd-Au DENPs were formed. The formed Gd-Au DENPs were used for both in vitro and in vivo MR/CT imaging of human MCF-7 cancer cells. Both MR and CT images demonstrate that MCF-7 cells and the xenograft tumor model can be effectively imaged. The Gd-Au DENPs uptake, mainly in the cell cytoplasm, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The cell cytotoxicity assay, cell morphology observation, and flow cytometry show that the developed Gd-Au DENPs have good biocompatibility in the given concentration range. Our results

  8. Magnetic/upconversion fluorescent NaGdF4:Yb,Er nanoparticle-based dual-modal molecular probes for imaging tiny tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Gao, Zhenyu; Zeng, Jianfeng; Hou, Yi; Fang, Fang; Li, Yilin; Qiao, Ruirui; Shen, Lin; Lei, Hao; Yang, Wensheng; Gao, Mingyuan

    2013-08-27

    Detection of early malignant tumors remains clinically difficult; developing ultrasensitive imaging agents is therefore highly demanded. Owing to the unusual magnetic and optical properties associated with f-electrons, rare-earth elements are very suitable for creating functional materials potentially useful for tumor imaging. Nanometer-sized particles offer such a platform with which versatile unique properties of the rare-earth elements can be integrated. Yet the development of rare-earth nanoparticle-based tumor probes suitable for imaging tiny tumors in vivo remains difficult, which challenges not only the physical properties of the nanoparticles but also the rationality of the probe design. Here we report new approaches for size control synthesis of magnetic/upconversion fluorescent NaGdF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals and their applications for imaging tiny tumors in vivo. By independently varying F(-):Ln(3+) and Na(+):Ln(3+) ratios, the size and shape regulation mechanisms were investigated. By replacing the oleic acid ligand with PEG2000 bearing a maleimide group at one end and two phosphate groups at the other end, PEGylated NaGdF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles with optimized size and upconversion fluorescence were obtained. Accordingly, a dual-modality molecular tumor probe was prepared, as a proof of concept, by covalently attaching antitumor antibody to PEGylated NaGdF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles through a "click" reaction. Systematic investigations on tumor detections, through magnetic resonance imaging and upconversion fluorescence imaging, were carried out to image intraperitoneal tumors and subcutaneous tumors in vivo. Owing to the excellent properties of the molecular probes, tumors smaller than 2 mm was successfully imaged in vivo. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies on differently sized particles were performed to disclose the particle size dependent biodistributions and elimination pathways.

  9. Development of Molecular Probes Based on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for in Vivo Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual Imaging of Target Molecules in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kohei

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging probes that enable seamless diagnoses of tumors in the preoperative and intraoperative stages could lead to surgical resection of tumors based on highly accurate diagnoses. Because iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have high proton relaxivity and high molar extinction coefficients suitable for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic imaging, respectively, we planned to develop molecular imaging probes applicable to the pre- (MRI) and intraoperative (photoacoustic imaging) stages. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (EGFR2; HER2) was selected as a target molecule, and we designed IONPs (20, 50, and 100 nm) conjugated with anti-HER2 moieties [whole IgG (trastuzumab), single-chain fragment variable (scFv), and peptide] for HER2-targeted tumor imaging. Among the probes tested, scFv-conjugated IONPs (scFv-IONPs) (20 nm) exhibited the highest binding affinity to HER2 (Kd=0.01 nM). An in vivo biodistribution study using (111)In-labeled probes demonstrated that more scFv-IONPs (20 nm) accumulated in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative tumors, suggesting that the uptake of scFv-IONPs is HER2 specific. The scFv-IONPs (20 nm) showed high proton relaxivity and a probe concentration-dependent photoacoustic signal. In vivo MR/photoacoustic imaging studies using scFv-IONPs (20 nm) facilitated HER2-specific visualization of tumors. Furthermore, an iron-staining study demonstrated that the uptake of scFv-IONPs was notable only in HER2-positive tumors. These results suggest that scFv-IONPs (20 nm) may be useful for MR/photoacoustic dual imaging, which could achieve seamless diagnoses in the preoperative and intraoperative stages.

  10. 双模态分子影像探针研究进展%Progress of the Dual-Modality Probes for Molecular Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄佳国; 曾文彬; 周明; 高峰

    2011-01-01

    分子影像技术可以在分子水平上实现生物有机体生理和病理变化的在体、实时、动态、无刨的三维成像,融合不同影像的双、多模态技术,可实现不同影像设备的优势互补,同时亦可减少假阳性和假阴性,从而使获取的结果更为精确可靠.双、多模态融合已成为生物医学成像的发展趋势,并逐渐在疾病的治疗、诊断及监测等方面发挥重要作用.本文综述了双模态分子探针的优势和面临的挑战,总结了当前双模态分子探针独特的设计策略及其相关应用研究,并对目前的热点和前景进行了总结和展望.%Molecular imaging enables the visualisation of cellular functions, physiological and pathological changes and the follow-up of molecular process in living organisms with intravital, real-time, non-invansive,dymanic three-dimensional imaging. However, no single modality is sufficient and perfect to obtain all the necessary information. The combination of two or more imaging technologies, which called dual- or multi-modality imaging, can not only offer the benefits of relevant imagine devices complementary with each other, but also decrease false positive and negative rates, which will significantly improve the accuracy and credibility of diagnosis. Hence, Dual- or multi-modality probes open up the new horizon for biomedical imaging and play a critical role in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease as well as the treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of recent development in the design strategies and application of dual-modality probes. The perspective of future trends in this field and the research frontiers nowadays are also briefly outlined.

  11. Principle and applications of terahertz molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2013-05-31

    The principle, characteristics and applications of molecular imaging with terahertz electromagnetic waves are reviewed herein. The terahertz molecular imaging (TMI) technique uses nanoparticle probes to achieve dramatically enhanced sensitivity compared with that of conventional terahertz imaging. Surface plasmons, induced around the nanoparticles, raise the temperature of water in biological cells, and the temperature-dependent changes in the optical properties of water, which are large in the terahertz range, are measured differentially by terahertz waves. TMI has been applied to cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug delivery imaging. The technique is also compared with magnetic resonance imaging by using a dual-modality nanoparticle probe.

  12. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  13. Coherent Raman dual-comb spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    The invention of the optical frequency comb technique has revolutionized the field of precision spectroscopy, providing a way to measure the absolute frequency of any optical transition. Since, frequency combs have become common equipment for frequency metrology. In the last decade, novel applications for the optical frequency comb have been demonstrated beyond its original purpose. Broadband molecular spectroscopy is one of those. One such technique of molecular spectroscopy with frequency combs, dual-comb Fourier transform spectroscopy provides short measurement times with resolution and accuracy. Two laser frequency combs with slightly different repetition frequencies generate pairs of pulses with a linearly-scanned delay between pulses in a pair. The system without moving parts mimics a fast scanning Fourier transform interferometer. The measurement speed may be several orders of magnitude faster than that of a Michelson-based Fourier transform spectrometer, which opens up new opportunities for broadband molecular spectroscopy. Recently, dual-comb spectroscopy has been extended to nonlinear phenomena. A broadband Raman spectrum of molecular fingerprints may be measured within a few tens of microseconds with coherent Raman dual-comb spectroscopy. Raster scanning the sample leads to hyperspectral images. This rapid and broadband label-free vibrational spectroscopy and imaging technique might provide new diagnostic methods in a variety of scientific and industrial fields.

  14. Stochastic image reconstruction for a dual-particle imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, M.C., E-mail: mchamel@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Polack, J.K., E-mail: kpolack@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Poitrasson-Rivière, A., E-mail: alexispr@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Flaska, M., E-mail: mflaska@psu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 137 Reber Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Clarke, S.D., E-mail: clarkesd@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pozzi, S.A., E-mail: pozzisa@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Tomanin, A., E-mail: alice.tomanin@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 21027 Ispra, VA (Italy); Lainsa-Italia S.R.L., via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra, VA (Italy); Peerani, P., E-mail: paolo.peerani@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 21027 Ispra, VA (Italy)

    2016-02-21

    Stochastic image reconstruction has been applied to a dual-particle imaging system being designed for nuclear safeguards applications. The dual-particle imager (DPI) is a combined Compton-scatter and neutron-scatter camera capable of producing separate neutron and photon images. The stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) method was investigated as an imaging method for the DPI because only a minimal estimation of system response is required to produce images with quality that is comparable to common maximum-likelihood methods. This work contains neutron and photon SOE image reconstructions for a {sup 252}Cf point source, two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel canisters representing point sources, and the MOX fuel canisters representing a distributed source. Simulation of the DPI using MCNPX-PoliMi is validated by comparison of simulated and measured results. Because image quality is dependent on the number of counts and iterations used, the relationship between these quantities is investigated.

  15. Dual waveband compact catadioptric imaging spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2012-12-25

    A catadioptric dual waveband imaging spectrometer that covers the visible through short-wave infrared, and the midwave infrared spectral regions, dispersing the visible through shortwave infrared with a zinc selenide grating and midwave infrared with a sapphire prism. The grating and prism are at the cold stop position, enabling the pupil to be split between them. The spectra for both wavebands are focused onto the relevant sections of a single dual waveband detector. Spatial keystone distortion is controlled to less than one tenth of a pixel over the full wavelength range, facilitating the matching of the spectra in the midwave infrared with the shorter wavelength region.

  16. [Molecular diagnostics and imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Christian; Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Huss, Ralf; Nestle, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic methods and biological imaging techniques can make a major contribution to tailoring patients' treatment needs with regard to medical, ethical and pharmaco-economic aspects. Modern diagnostic methods are already being used to help identify different sub-groups of patients with thoracic tumours who are most likely to benefit significantly from a particular type of treatment. This contribution looks at the most recent developments that have been made in the field of thoracic tumour diagnosis and analyses the pros and cons of new molecular and other imaging techniques in day-to-day clinical practice.

  17. Characterization of partial ligation-induced carotid atherosclerosis model using dual-modality molecular imaging in ApoE knock-out mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik Jae Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, partial ligation of the common carotid artery (CCA was reported to induce carotid atheromata rapidly in apolipoprotein-E knockout (ApoE(-/- mice. We investigated this new atherosclerosis model by using combined matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF imaging and macrophage-tracking luciferase imaging. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Partial ligation of the left CCA was performed in 10-week-old ApoE(-/- mice on a high fat diet (n=33; the internal and external carotid arteries and occipital artery were ligated, while the superior thyroid artery was left intact. Two thirds of the animals were treated with either LiCl or atorvastatin. At 1-week, Raw264.7 macrophages modified to express the enhanced firefly-luciferase reporter gene (10(7 Raw-luc cells were injected intravenously. At 2-week, NIRF molecular imaging visualized strong MMP-2/9 activity in the ligated area of the left CCA as well as in the aortic arch. Left-to-right ratios of the NIRF signal intensities in the CCA had a decreasing gradient from the highest value in the upper-most ligated area to the lowest value in the lower-most region adjacent to the aortic arch. Luciferase imaging showed that most Raw-luc macrophages were recruited to the ligated area of the CCA rather than to the aortic arch, despite similarly strong MMP-2/9-related NIRF signal intensities in both areas. In addition, LiCl or atorvastatin could reduce MMP-2/9 activity in the aortic arch but not in the ligated area of the CCA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first molecular imaging study to characterize the partial ligation-induced carotid atherosclerosis model. Molecularly divergent types of atherosclerosis were identified: conventional lipogenic atherosclerosis in the aorta vs. flow-related mechanical atherosclerosis in the partially ligated left system.

  18. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; De Cecco, Carlo N; Caruso, Damiano; Tesche, Christian; Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  19. Precise diagnosis in different scenarios using photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging with dual-modality nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong; Du, Yang; Shi, Yiwen; Mao, Duo; Jia, Xiaohua; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging are emerging as important research tools for biomedical studies. Photoacoustic imaging offers both strong optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution, and fluorescence molecular imaging provides excellent superficial resolution, high sensitivity, high throughput, and the ability for real-time imaging. Therefore, combining the imaging information of both modalities can provide comprehensive in vivo physiological and pathological information. However, currently there are limited probes available that can realize both fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging, and advanced biomedical applications for applying this dual-modality imaging approach remain underexplored. In this study, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic-fluorescence imaging nanoprobe, ICG-loaded Au@SiO2, which was uniquely designed, consisting of gold nanorod cores and indocyanine green with silica shell spacer layers to overcome fluorophore quenching. This nanoprobe was examined by both PAI and FMI for in vivo imaging on tumor and ischemia mouse models. Our results demonstrated that the nanoparticles can specifically accumulate at the tumor and ischemic areas and be detected by both imaging modalities. Moreover, this dual-modality imaging strategy exhibited superior advantages for a precise diagnosis in different scenarios. The new nanoprobe with the dual-modality imaging approach holds great potential for diagnosis and stage classification of tumor and ischemia related diseases.Photoacoustic imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging are emerging as important research tools for biomedical studies. Photoacoustic imaging offers both strong optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution, and fluorescence molecular imaging provides excellent superficial resolution, high sensitivity, high throughput, and the ability for real-time imaging. Therefore, combining the imaging information of both modalities can provide

  20. Molecular imaging I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Wolfhard [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (DE). Abt. fuer Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie (E020) Forschungsschwerpunkt Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie (E); Schwaiger, Markus (eds.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this textbook of molecular imaging is to provide an up to date review of this rapidly growing field and to discuss basic methodological aspects necessary for the interpretation of experimental and clinical results. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of imaging technology and probe development, since the physical properties of the imaging approach need to be closely linked with the biologic application of the probe (i.e. nanoparticles and microbubbles). Various chemical strategies are discussed and related to the biologic applications. Reporter-gene imaging is being addressed not only in experimental protocols, but also first clinical applications are discussed. Finally, strategies of imaging to characterize apoptosis and angiogenesis are described and discussed in the context of possible clinical translation. (orig.)

  1. Molecular imaging II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Wolfhard [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (DE). Abt. fuer Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie (E020) Forschungsschwerpunkt Innovative Krebsdiagnostik und -therapie (E); Schwaiger, Markus (eds.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this textbook of molecular imaging is to provide an up to date review of this rapidly growing field and to discuss basic methodological aspects necessary for the interpretation of experimental and clinical results. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of imaging technology and probe development, since the physical properties of the imaging approach need to be closely linked with the biologic application of the probe (i.e. nanoparticles and microbubbles). Various chemical strategies are discussed and related to the biologic applications. Reporter-gene imaging is being addressed not only in experimental protocols, but also first clinical applications are discussed. Finally, strategies of imaging to characterize apoptosis and angiogenesis are described and discussed in the context of possible clinical translation. (orig.)

  2. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  3. Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 30 is being distributed for use in development and testing of fingerprint compression and fingerprint matching systems. The database allows the user to develop and evaluate data compression algorithms for fingerprint images scanned at both 19.7 ppmm (500 dpi) and 39.4 ppmm (1000 dpi). The data consist of 36 ten-print paired cards with both the rolled and plain images scanned at 19.7 and 39.4 pixels per mm. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  4. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  5. Aerial Triangulation Close-range Images with Dual Quaternion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the aerial triangulation of close-range images based on dual quaternion is presented. Using dual quaternion to represent the spiral screw motion of the beam in the space, the real part of dual quaternion represents the angular elements of all the beams in the close-range area networks, the real part and the dual part of dual quaternion represents the line elements corporately. Finally, an aerial triangulation adjustment model based on dual quaternion is established, and the elements of interior orientation and exterior orientation and the object coordinates of the ground points are calculated. Real images and large attitude angle simulated images are selected to run the experiments of aerial triangulation. The experimental results show that the new method for the aerial triangulation of close-range images based on dual quaternion can obtain higher accuracy.

  6. "How to" incorporate dual-energy imaging into a high volume abdominal imaging practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Eric P; Le, Ott; Liu, Xinming; Layman, Rick R; Cody, Dianna D; Bhosale, Priya R

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy CT imaging has many potential uses in abdominal imaging. It also has unique requirements for protocol creation depending on the dual-energy scanning technique that is being utilized. It also generates several new types of images which can increase the complexity of image creation and image interpretation. The purpose of this article is to review, for rapid switching and dual-source dual-energy platforms, methods for creating dual-energy protocols, different approaches for efficiently creating dual-energy images, and an approach to navigating and using dual-energy images at the reading station all using the example of a pancreatic multiphasic protocol. It will also review the three most commonly used types of dual-energy images: "workhorse" 120kVp surrogate images (including blended polychromatic and 70 keV monochromatic), high contrast images (e.g., low energy monochromatic and iodine material decomposition images), and virtual unenhanced images. Recent developments, such as the ability to create automatically on the scanner the most common dual-energy images types, namely new "Mono+" images for the DSDECT (dual-source dual-energy CT) platform will also be addressed. Finally, an approach to image interpretation using automated "hanging protocols" will also be covered. Successful dual-energy implementation in a high volume practice requires careful attention to each of these steps of scanning, image creation, and image interpretation.

  7. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  8. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  9. Precise diagnosis in different scenarios using photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging with dual-modality nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong; Du, Yang; Shi, Yiwen; Mao, Duo; Jia, Xiaohua; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2016-08-14

    Photoacoustic imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging are emerging as important research tools for biomedical studies. Photoacoustic imaging offers both strong optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution, and fluorescence molecular imaging provides excellent superficial resolution, high sensitivity, high throughput, and the ability for real-time imaging. Therefore, combining the imaging information of both modalities can provide comprehensive in vivo physiological and pathological information. However, currently there are limited probes available that can realize both fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging, and advanced biomedical applications for applying this dual-modality imaging approach remain underexplored. In this study, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic-fluorescence imaging nanoprobe, ICG-loaded Au@SiO2, which was uniquely designed, consisting of gold nanorod cores and indocyanine green with silica shell spacer layers to overcome fluorophore quenching. This nanoprobe was examined by both PAI and FMI for in vivo imaging on tumor and ischemia mouse models. Our results demonstrated that the nanoparticles can specifically accumulate at the tumor and ischemic areas and be detected by both imaging modalities. Moreover, this dual-modality imaging strategy exhibited superior advantages for a precise diagnosis in different scenarios. The new nanoprobe with the dual-modality imaging approach holds great potential for diagnosis and stage classification of tumor and ischemia related diseases.

  10. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  11. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect.

  12. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  13. Molecular imaging applications for immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Isabel Junie; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2004-05-01

    The use of multimodality molecular imaging has recently facilitated the study of molecular and cellular events in living subjects in a noninvasive and repetitive manner to improve the diagnostic capability of traditional assays. The noninvasive imaging modalities utilized for both small animal and human imaging include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT). Techniques specific to small-animal imaging include bioluminescent imaging (BIm) and fluorescent imaging (FIm). Molecular imaging permits the study of events within cells, the examination of cell trafficking patterns that relate to inflammatory diseases and metastases, and the ability to rapidly screen new drug treatments for distribution and effectiveness. In this paper, we will review the current field of molecular imaging assays (especially those utilizing PET and BIm modalities) and examine how they might impact animal models and human disease in the field of clinical immunology.

  14. Molecular imaging with fast beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heber, O. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics; Zajfman, D. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics; Kella, D. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics; Vager, Z. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics; Watson, R.L. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Horvat, V. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Three dimensional imaging of the molecular dissociation process in fast collisions is presented with two different setups. One setup is for a fast molecular beam from an accelerator colliding with a gas target. The second setup is for a molecular target system and the collision process is with highly ionized fast beam. The advantages of each system are discussed. The three dimensional imaging of the molecular fragments is done with special detectors that combine the CCD image with time of flight data. An example of the molecular beam measurement is given for an 11 MeV B{sub 2} beam. (orig.).

  15. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi; Ali Mahmoud Pashazadeh; Majid Assadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods...

  16. Molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Christopher

    2005-11-01

    Molecular imaging represents a new term for a long-standing quest to image cellular and molecular processes in vivo. The development of a successful molecular imaging approach starts with a well-defined diagnostic question best answered using in vivo imaging. A selective target for a particular disease state is then identified and a biocompatible probe selective for that target is developed. Many of the challenges of finding selective disease targets and probes that bind selectively to those targets in vivo are evident in the 25-year history of molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease. This article provides a brief overview of molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease and its potential for early diagnosis and treatment development.

  17. THE BINARY IMAGE OF THE DUAL OF QUATERNARY GOETHALS CODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔杰

    2002-01-01

    The 2-adic representations of codewords of the dual of quaternary Goethals code are given. By the 2-adic representations, the binary image of the dual of quaternary Goethals code under the Gray map is proved to be the nonlinear code constructed by Goethals in 1976.

  18. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  19. Tumor Molecular Imaging with Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI can provide not only structural images using traditional imaging techniques but also functional and molecular information using many newly emerging imaging techniques. Over the past decade, the utilization of nanotechnology in MI has exhibited many significant advantages and provided new opportunities for the imaging of living subjects. It is expected that multimodality nanoparticles (NPs can lead to precise assessment of tumor biology and the tumor microenvironment. This review addresses topics related to engineered NPs and summarizes the recent applications of these nanoconstructs in cancer optical imaging, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radionuclide imaging. Key challenges involved in the translation of NPs to the clinic are discussed.

  20. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  1. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods: In this review, using keywords such as photoacoustic, optoacoustic, laser-ultrasound, thermoacoustic at databases such as PubMed and ISI, studies performed in the field of photoacoustic and related findings were evaluated. Results: Photoacoustic imaging, acquiring images with high contrast and desired resolution, provides an opportunity to perform physiologic and anatomic studies. Because this technique does not use ionizing radiation, it is not restricted by the limitation of the ionizing-based imaging systems therefore it can be used noninvasively to make images from cell, vessels, whole body imaging of the animal and distinguish tumor from normal tissue. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging is a new method in preclinical researches which can be used in various physiologic and anatomic studies. This method, because of application of non-ionizing radiation, may resolve limitation of radiation based method in diagnostic assessments.

  2. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M. [Maastricht University, Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L. [Maastricht University, Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Narula, J. [University of California Irvine, Department of Cardiology, Irvine (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  3. Advances in multimodal molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, Luigi; Gramanzini, Matteo; Gargiulo, Sara; Albanese, Sandra; Salvatore, Marco; Greco, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical molecular imaging is an emerging field. Improving the ability of scientists to study the molecular basis of human pathology in animals is of the utmost importance for future advances in all fields of human medicine. Moreover, the possibility of developing new imaging techniques or of implementing old ones adapted to the clinic is a significant area. Cardiology, neurology, immunology and oncology have all been studied with preclinical molecular imaging. The functional techniques of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in association with each other or with the anatomic reference provided by computed tomography (CT) as well as with anatomic and functional information provided by magnetic resonance (MR) have all been proficiently applied to animal models of human disease. All the above-mentioned imaging techniques have shown their ability to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in animal models of disease. The clinical translatability of most of the techniques motivates the ongoing study of their possible fields of application. The ability to combine two or more techniques allows obtaining as much information as possible on the molecular processes involved in pathologies, reducing the number of animals necessary in each experiment. Merging molecular probes compatible with various imaging technique will further expand the capability to achieve the best results.

  4. Molecular In Vivo Imaging Using a Noninvasive Cardiac-Specific MLC-2v Promoter Driven Dual-Gene Recombinant Lentivirus Monitoring System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Zhang

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of using the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS to monitor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165 expression in vivo.We constructed a recombinant lentivirus plasmid with the MLC-2v promoter driving the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS reporter gene linked to the VEGF165 gene. Expression of NIS and VEGF gene were identified by Western blot. On days 2 and 54, 99mTc-MIBI imaging was used to evaluate changes in myocardial ischemia. Noninvasive 125I micro-SPECT/CT imaging was used to assess the expression of NIS reporter gene dynamically over the next 2 months.Western blot analysis showed that both NIS and VEGF165 were highly expressed in rat cardiomyoblast H9C2 cells transduced with Lenti-MLC-2v-NIS--VEGF165. 125I micro-SPECT/CT reporter imaging showed higher uptake in mouse myocardium transduced with Lenti-MLC-2v-VEGF165-IRES-NIS. NIS expression peaked on day 1 after transduction followed by a progressive decline to negligible levels by day 21. On day 1, mean 125I activity value in group 1 was higher than that in group 2 (P 0.05. In group 1 (test group, 99mTc-MIBI SPECT/CT revealed improvements in perfusion and wall thickening in the apical anterior wall. Mean IOD values of NIS and CD34 were significantly higher in group 1 than group 3 (P<0.05. Our study proved mean I-125 uptake was significantly correlated with mean IOD value of NIS and CD34 (P<0.05.This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the NIS gene to monitor VEGF165 expression in a mouse myocardial ischemia model.

  5. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  6. Molecular Imaging of Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Nemieboka, Brandon; Sala, Evis; Lewis, Jason S.; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Over the past decade, medical imaging has played an increasingly valuable role in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning of the disease. In this “Focus on Molecular Imaging” review, we seek to provide a brief yet informative survey of the current state of the molecular imaging of ovarian cancer. The article is divided into sections according to modality, covering rece...

  7. Effects on image quality of a 2D antiscatter grid in x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis: Initial experience using the dual modality (x-ray and molecular) breast tomosynthesis scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Tushita, E-mail: tp3rn@virginia.edu [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Peppard, Heather [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Williams, Mark B. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Radiation scattered from the breast in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) causes image degradation, including loss of contrast between cancerous and background tissue. Unlike in 2-dimensional (2D) mammography, an antiscatter grid cannot readily be used in DBT because changing alignment between the tube and detector during the scan would result in unacceptable loss of primary radiation. However, in the dual modality breast tomosynthesis (DMT) scanner, which combines DBT and molecular breast tomosynthesis, the tube and detector rotate around a common axis, thereby maintaining a fixed tube-detector alignment. This C-arm geometry raises the possibility of using a 2D (cellular) focused antiscatter grid. The purpose of this study is to assess change in image quality when using an antiscatter grid in the DBT portion of a DMT scan under conditions of fixed radiation dose. Methods: Two 2D focused prototype grids with 80 cm focal length were tested, one stack-laminated from copper (Cu) and one cast from a tungsten-polymer (W-poly). They were reciprocated using a motion scheme designed to maximize transmission of primary x-ray photons. Grid-in and grid-out scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) were measured for rectangular blocks of material simulating 30%, 50%, and 70% glandular tissue compositions. For assessment of changes in image quality through the addition of a grid, the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., phantom Model 011A containing a set of 1 cm thick blocks simulating a range of glandular/adipose ratios from 0/100 to 100/0 was used. To simulate 6.5 and 8.5 cm thick compressed breasts, 1 cm thick slices of PMMA were added to the Model 011A phantom. DBT images were obtained with and without the grid, with exposure parameters fixed for a given compressed thickness. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs), contrast, and voxel value-based attenuation coefficients (μ) were measured for all blocks from reconstructed phantom images. Results: For 4, 6, and

  8. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang WANG; Jun ZHAO; Jin ZENG; Kai-jie WU; Yu-le CHEN; Xin-ya ng WANG; Luke S CHANG; Da-lin HE

    2011-01-01

    Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detectbladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively.The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair.Methods:Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed,which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family.Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637,253J and T24,as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined.Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.For assays using dual FRET MBs,the excitation wavelength was 488 nm,and the emission detection wavelengths were 520+20 nm and 560+20 nm,respectively.Results:The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals.In contrast,no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs.Conclusion:The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer.

  9. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  10. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  11. Molecular imaging with terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Jae; Choi, Jihye; Maeng, Inhee; Park, Jae Yeon; Lee, Kwangyeol; Huh, Yong-Min; Suh, Jin-Suck; Haam, Seungjoo; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2011-02-28

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive THz molecular imaging (TMI) technique involving differential modulation of surface plasmons induced on nanoparticles and obtain target specific in vivo images of cancers. This technique can detect quantities of gold nanoparticles as small as 15 µM in vivo. A comparison of TMI images with near infrared absorption images shows the superior sensitivity of TMI. Furthermore, the quantification property of TMI is excellent, being linearly proportional to the concentration of nanoparticles. The target specificity issue is also addressed at the ex vivo and cell levels. The high thermal sensitivity of TMI can help extend photonic-based photothermal molecular imaging researches from the in vitro level to the in vivo level. The TMI technique can be used for monitoring drug delivery processes and for early cancer diagnosis.

  12. 钆-纳米金双模态分子成像探针的研制%Synthesis and characterization of dual-modal molecular imaging nanoprobes with gadolinium and gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田秀梅; 郑小丽; 阳范文; 朱继翔; 彭晔; 陈晓明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prepare a dual-modal nanoprobes with gadolinium and gold nanoparticles for optical and magnetic resonance imaging,and validate its efficiency in molecular imaging.Methods The gadolinium-gold nanocomposite particles were prepared by immobilizing negatively-charged 30 nm gold nanoparticles on polyethyleneimine (PEI)-treated surface of the gadolinium-mesoporous silica.For the prepared nanoparticles,we used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the surface physical properties,energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the constitution ratios of gadolinium and gold,ultraviolet spectrometry to determine the absorption spectra,picosecond streak camera to determine the timeresolved fluorescence spectra,and nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion to determine the longitudinal relaxivity (R1).Cell toxicity was measured by MTT;Optical imaging in bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated by confocal fluorescence microscopy;Biodistribution was detected by TEM;Dynamic contrastenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of metastatic liver tumors in the spleen were analyzed using a 3.0 T MR scanner.Results Black gold particles (30 nm) were successfully immobilized on the surface of PEI-coated gadolinium-mesoporous silica spheres.The atomic percent of gadolinium and gold is 6.74% and 0.52%,respectively,according to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.The ultraviolet absorption spectra revealed the absorption peaks at 525 nm and 749 nm.Time-resolved fluorescence spectra revealed a wide luminescence band (525~560 nm),with a luminescence peak at 550 nm.The relaxivity R1 was 3.171 nmol-1· L · s-1.The cytotoxicity is negligible as measured by MTL TEM indicated that the gold nanoparticles were separated from nanocomposites in the tissues at 4 h after injected into nude mice via tail vein.Optical imaging in cells are satisfactory.The significant enhancement of tumor MRI was demonstrated at 30 min after intravenous administration

  13. Coherent multiscale image processing using dual-tree quaternion wavelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Lam; Choi, Hyeokho; Baraniuk, Richard G

    2008-07-01

    The dual-tree quaternion wavelet transform (QWT) is a new multiscale analysis tool for geometric image features. The QWT is a near shift-invariant tight frame representation whose coefficients sport a magnitude and three phases: two phases encode local image shifts while the third contains image texture information. The QWT is based on an alternative theory for the 2-D Hilbert transform and can be computed using a dual-tree filter bank with linear computational complexity. To demonstrate the properties of the QWT's coherent magnitude/phase representation, we develop an efficient and accurate procedure for estimating the local geometrical structure of an image. We also develop a new multiscale algorithm for estimating the disparity between a pair of images that is promising for image registration and flow estimation applications. The algorithm features multiscale phase unwrapping, linear complexity, and sub-pixel estimation accuracy.

  14. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jie (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Intelligent Medical Research Center

    2013-07-01

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  15. Implementation and applications of dual-modality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, B.H. E-mail: bruceh@itsa.ucsf.edu; Barber, W.C.; Funk, Tobias; Hwang, A.B.; Taylor, Carmen; Sun Mingshan; Seo Youngho

    2004-06-01

    In medical diagnosis, functional or physiological data can be acquired using radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography or with single-photon emission computed tomography. However, anatomical or structural data can be acquired using X-ray computed tomography. In dual-modality imaging, both radionuclide and X-ray detectors are incorporated in an imaging system to allow both functional and structural data to be acquired in a single procedure without removing the patient from the imaging system. In a clinical setting, dual-modality imaging systems commonly are used to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake with respect to the patient's anatomy. This helps the clinician to differentiate disease from regions of normal radiopharmaceutical accumulation, to improve diagnosis or cancer staging, or to facilitate planning for radiation therapy or surgery. While initial applications of dual-modality imaging were developed for clinical imaging on humans, it now is recognized that these systems have potentially important applications for imaging small animals involved in experimental studies including basic investigations of mammalian biology and development of new pharmaceuticals for diagnosis or treatment of disease.

  16. Implementation and applications of dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Barber, William C.; Funk, Tobias; Hwang, Andrew B.; Taylor, Carmen; Sun, Mingshan; Seo, Youngho

    2004-06-01

    In medical diagnosis, functional or physiological data can be acquired using radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography or with single-photon emission computed tomography. However, anatomical or structural data can be acquired using X-ray computed tomography. In dual-modality imaging, both radionuclide and X-ray detectors are incorporated in an imaging system to allow both functional and structural data to be acquired in a single procedure without removing the patient from the imaging system. In a clinical setting, dual-modality imaging systems commonly are used to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake with respect to the patient's anatomy. This helps the clinician to differentiate disease from regions of normal radiopharmaceutical accumulation, to improve diagnosis or cancer staging, or to facilitate planning for radiation therapy or surgery. While initial applications of dual-modality imaging were developed for clinical imaging on humans, it now is recognized that these systems have potentially important applications for imaging small animals involved in experimental studies including basic investigations of mammalian biology and development of new pharmaceuticals for diagnosis or treatment of disease.

  17. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Mark H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  18. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  19. IMAGING AND MTI PROCESSING BASED ON DUAL-FREQUENCIES DUAL-APERTURES SPACEBORNE SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Jianfeng; Li Daojing; Wu Yirong

    2009-01-01

    Based on dual-frequencies dual-apertures spaceborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar), a new SAR system with four receiving channels and two operation modes is presented in this paper. SAR imaging and Moving Target Indication (MTI) are studied in this system. High resolution imaging with wide swath is implemented by the Mode I, and MTI is completed by the Mode II. High azimuth resolution is achieved by the Displaced Phase Center (DPC) multibeam technique. And the Coherent Accumulation (CA) method, which combines dual channels data of different carrier frequency, is used to enhance the range resolution. For the data of different carrier frequency, the two aperture interferometric processing is executed to implement clutter cancellation, respectively. And the couple of clutter suppressed data are employed to implement Dual Carrier Frequency Conjugate Processing (DCFCP), then both slow and fast moving targets detection can be completed, followed by moving target imaging. The simulation results show the validity of the signal processing method of this new SAR system.

  20. Dual-pulse frequency compounded superharmonic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neer, P.L.M.J. van; Danilouchkine, M.G.; Matte, G.M.; Steen, A.F.W. van der; Jong, N. de

    2011-01-01

    Tissue second-harmonic imaging is currently the default mode in commercial diagnostic ultrasound systems. A new modality, superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the third through fifth harmonics originating from nonlinear wave propagation through tissue. SHI could further improve the resolution and

  1. Molecular Imaging of the Kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Zsolt; Alachkar, Nada; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B.; Rabb, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging of the kidneys with gamma cameras involves the use of labeled molecules seeking functionally critical molecular mechanisms in order to detect the pathophysiology of the diseased kidneys and achieve an early, sensitive and accurate diagnosis. The most recent imaging technology, PET, permits quantitative imaging of the kidney at a spatial resolution appropriate for the organ. H215O, 82RbCl, and [64Cu] ETS are the most important radiopharmaceuticals for measuring renal blood flow. The renin angiotensin system is the most important regulator of renal blood flow; this role is being interrogated by detecting angiotensin receptor subtype AT1R using in vivo PET imaging. Membrane organic anion transporters are important for the function of the tubular epithelium; therefore, Tc-99m MAG3 as well as some novel radiopharmaceuticals such as copper-64 labeled mono oxo-tetraazamacrocyclic ligands have been utilized for molecular renal imaging. Additionally, other radioligands that interact with the organic cation transporters or peptide transporters have developed. Focusing on early detection of kidney injury at the molecular level is an evolving field of great significance. Potential imaging targets are the kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1) that is highly expressed in kidney injury and renal cancer but not in normal kidneys. While pelvic clearance, in addition to parenchymal transport, is an important measure in obstructive nephropathy, techniques that focus on upregulated molecules in response to tissue stress resulted from obstruction will be of great implication. Monocyte chemoattractant protein -1 (MCP-1) is a well-suited molecule in this case. The greatest advances in molecular imaging of the kidneys have been recently achieved in detecting renal cancer. In addition to the ubiquitous [18F]FDG, other radioligands such as [11C]acetate and anti-[18F]FACBC have emerged. Radioimmuno-imaging with [124I]G250 could lead to radioimmunotherapy for renal cancer

  2. Simultaneous dual-energy X-ray stereo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokso, Rajmund, E-mail: rajmund.mokso@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source, CH 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Oberta, Peter [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 1999/2, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rigaku Innovative Technologies Europe s.r.o., Novodvorska 994, Praha 4 (Czech Republic)

    2015-06-26

    A Laue–Bragg geometry is introduced for splitting an X-ray beam and tuning each of the two branches to selected wavelength. Stereoscopic and dual-energy imaging was performed with this system. Dual-energy or K-edge imaging is used to enhance contrast between two or more materials in an object and is routinely realised by acquiring two separate X-ray images each at different X-ray wavelength. On a broadband synchrotron source an imaging system to acquire the two images simultaneously was realised. The single-shot approach allows dual-energy and stereo imaging to be applied to dynamic systems. Using a Laue–Bragg crystal splitting scheme, the X-ray beam was split into two and the two beam branches could be easily tuned to either the same or to two different wavelengths. Due to the crystals’ mutual position, the two beam branches intercept each other under a non-zero angle and create a stereoscopic setup.

  3. Siderophores for molecular imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Milos; Zhai, Chuangyan; Haas, Hubertus; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    This review covers publications on siderophores applied for molecular imaging applications, mainly for radionuclide-based imaging. Siderophores are low molecular weight chelators produced by bacteria and fungi to scavenge essential iron. Research on these molecules has a continuing history over the past 50 years. Many biomedical applications have been developed, most prominently the use of the siderophore desferrioxamine (DFO) to tackle iron overload related diseases. Recent research described the upregulation of siderophore production and transport systems during infection. Replacing iron in siderophores by radionuclides, the most prominent Ga-68 for PET, opens approaches for targeted imaging of infection; the proof of principle has been reported for fungal infections using (68)Ga-triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC). Additionally, fluorescent siderophores and therapeutic conjugates have been described and may be translated to optical imaging and theranostic applications. Siderophores have also been applied as bifunctional chelators, initially DFO as chelator for Ga-67 and more recently for Zr-89 where it has become the standard chelator in Immuno-PET. Improved DFO constructs and bifunctional chelators based on cyclic siderophores have recently been developed for Ga-68 and Zr-89 and show promising properties for radiopharmaceutical development in PET. A huge potential from basic biomedical research on siderophores still awaits to be utilized for clinical and translational imaging.

  4. Generalized dual-plane digital holographic imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Panezai, Spozmai; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-12-01

    A generalized dual-plane technique for digital holographic imaging is proposed. Two holograms are recorded at two slightly displaced planes. The complex amplitude of the plane reference wave is obtained according to the measured intensity of the reference beam and the spectrum of hologram. The holograms are modified with the known information of the reference wave. Then, the modified holograms are reconstructed by the dual-plane algorithm. The zero-order and the twin images are removed in the reconstructed image. The simulation and experiments demonstrate that this method is valid for both on-axis and off-axis digital holography and high resolution reconstruction is achieved even with a very small offset angle of the reference beam.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Pituitary Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-01-01

    The presence of large numbers and/or the high affinity of dopamine D2 and/or somatostatin receptors on pituitary adenomas may enable their visualization with radionuclide-coupled receptor agonists or antagonists. However, the role of these imaging modalities in the differential diagnosis of or therapeutic purposes for pituitary lesions is very limited. Only in very specific cases might these molecular imaging techniques become helpful. These include the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions, ectopic production of pituitary hormones, such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone, growth hormone (GH) or their releasing hormones (corticotropin-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone), and the localization of metastases from pituitary carcinomas.

  6. Silica nanoparticle-based dual imaging colloidal hybrids: cancer cell imaging and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Haisung Lee,1 Dongkyung Sung,2 Jinhoon Kim,3 Byung-Tae Kim,3 Tuntun Wang,4 Seong Soo A An,5 Soo-Won Seo,6 Dong Kee Yi4 1Molecular Diagnostics, In Vitro Diagnostics Unit, New Business Division, SK Telecom, 2Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Korea University, 3Interdisciplinary Graduate Program of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, 4Department of Chemistry, Myongji University, Seoul, 5Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Seongnam, 6Medical Device Development Center, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation, Daegu, Republic of Korea Abstract: In this study, fluorescent dye-conjugated magnetic resonance (MR imaging agents were investigated in T mode. Gadolinium-conjugated silica nanoparticles were successfully synthesized for both MR imaging and fluorescence diagnostics. Polyamine and polycarboxyl functional groups were modified chemically on the surface of the silica nanoparticles for efficient conjugation of gadolinium ions. The derived gadolinium-conjugated silica nanoparticles were investigated by zeta potential analysis, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. MR equipment was used to investigate their use as contrast-enhancing agents in T1 mode under a 9.4 T magnetic field. In addition, we tracked the distribution of the gadolinium-conjugated nanoparticles in both lung cancer cells and organs in mice. Keywords: dual bioimaging, MR imaging, silica colloid, T1 contrast imaging, nanohybrid

  7. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Habib

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT and functional or metabolic (PET information provided in a "one-stop shop" and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed.

  8. Sparse image reconstruction for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Michael; Hero, Alfred O

    2008-01-01

    The application that motivates this paper is molecular imaging at the atomic level. When discretized at sub-atomic distances, the volume is inherently sparse. Noiseless measurements from an imaging technology can be modeled by convolution of the image with the system point spread function (psf). Such is the case with magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), an emerging technology where imaging of an individual tobacco mosaic virus was recently demonstrated with nanometer resolution. We also consider additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) in the measurements. Many prior works of sparse estimators have focused on the case when H has low coherence; however, the system matrix H in our application is the convolution matrix for the system psf. A typical convolution matrix has high coherence. The paper therefore does not assume a low coherence H. A discrete-continuous form of the Laplacian and atom at zero (LAZE) p.d.f. used by Johnstone and Silverman is formulated, and two sparse estimators derived by maximizing t...

  9. Image denoising with the dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Alauldeen S.; Pavlova, Olga N.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare image denoising techniques based on real and complex wavelet-transforms. Possibilities provided by the classical discrete wavelet transform (DWT) with hard and soft thresholding are considered, and influences of the wavelet basis and image resizing are discussed. The quality of image denoising for the standard 2-D DWT and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) is studied. It is shown that DT-CWT outperforms 2-D DWT at the appropriate selection of the threshold level.

  10. New dual mode gadolinium nanoparticle contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan B Ghaghada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liposomal-based gadolinium (Gd nanoparticles have elicited significant interest for use as blood pool and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. Previous generations of liposomal MR agents contained gadolinium-chelates either within the interior of liposomes (core-encapsulated gadolinium liposomes or presented on the surface of liposomes (surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes. We hypothesized that a liposomal agent that contained both core-encapsulated gadolinium and surface-conjugated gadolinium, defined herein as dual-mode gadolinium (Dual-Gd liposomes, would result in a significant improvement in nanoparticle-based T1 relaxivity over the previous generations of liposomal agents. In this study, we have developed and tested, both in vitro and in vivo, such a dual-mode liposomal-based gadolinium contrast agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THREE TYPES OF LIPOSOMAL AGENTS WERE FABRICATED: core-encapsulated, surface-conjugated and dual-mode gadolinium liposomes. In vitro physico-chemical characterizations of the agents were performed to determine particle size and elemental composition. Gadolinium-based and nanoparticle-based T1 relaxivities of various agents were determined in bovine plasma. Subsequently, the agents were tested in vivo for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA studies. Characterization of the agents demonstrated the highest gadolinium atoms per nanoparticle for Dual-Gd liposomes. In vitro, surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes demonstrated the highest T1 relaxivity on a gadolinium-basis. However, Dual-Gd liposomes demonstrated the highest T1 relaxivity on a nanoparticle-basis. In vivo, Dual-Gd liposomes resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio in CE-MRA studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dual-mode gadolinium liposomal contrast agent demonstrated higher particle-based T1 relaxivity, both in vitro and in vivo, compared to either the

  11. Dual-modality photothermal optical coherence tomography and magnetic-resonance imaging of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Hong, Tu; Colvin, Daniel C; Xu, Yaqiong; Skala, Melissa C

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate polyethylene-glycol-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as contrast agents for both photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) and magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). Photothermal OCT was accomplished with a spectral domain OCT system with an amplitude-modulated 750 nm pump beam using 10 mW of power, and T(2) MRI was achieved with a 4.7 T animal system. Photothermal OCT and T(2) MRI achieved sensitivities of nanomolar concentrations to CNTs dispersed in amine-terminated polyethylene glycol, thus establishing the potential for dual-modality molecular imaging with CNTs.

  12. A dual-modal retinal imaging system with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadway, Alexander; Girkin, Christopher A; Zhang, Yuhua

    2013-12-02

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) is adapted to provide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The AO-SLO function is unchanged. The system uses the same light source, scanning optics, and adaptive optics in both imaging modes. The result is a dual-modal system that can acquire retinal images in both en face and cross-section planes at the single cell level. A new spectral shaping method is developed to reduce the large sidelobes in the coherence profile of the OCT imaging when a non-ideal source is used with a minimal introduction of noise. The technique uses a combination of two existing digital techniques. The thickness and position of the traditionally named inner segment/outer segment junction are measured from individual photoreceptors. In-vivo images of healthy and diseased human retinas are demonstrated.

  13. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Josef J; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Several PET tracers are active in early-stage and late-stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), C11/F18-choline and sodium F18-fluoride have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting the utility of choline in early-stage prostate cancer. FDG and sodium F18-fluoride are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-fluorodihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel androgen receptor-targeted therapies. Prostate-specific membrane antigen PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer.

  14. Cerenkov luminescence imaging guided selective-reconstruction for a flexible dual-head PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Chen, X.; Zhang, C.; Wan, L.; Meng, F.; Xie, Q.; Liang, J.

    2017-04-01

    Dual-head PET can simply and flexibilly adjust its architecture to fit the size of the imaging object, making it great potential for simultaneous multi-modality molecular imaging. In this paper, we proposed conceptally dual-modality imaging system of distance-adjustable dual-head PET and Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), and implemented a CLI guided selective-reconstruction method. In the selective-reconstruction, we reconstructed the information inside a predefined region of interest using a fine voxel, whereas reconstructed other regions using a coarse voxel. We used CLI data as a priori information to outline the predefined region of interest. Simultaneously, for reducing the computaion burden, an attenuation map with a coarse voxel size was used for the attenuation correction. We demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed method with Monte Carlo based simulations by reconstructing phantom consisted of two hot rods. Experiment results show that an most improved efficiency over 70 times speedup with an MSE of 5.2235.

  15. Improvement of material decomposition and image quality in dual-energy radiography by reducing image noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Jo, B. D.; Jeon, P.-H.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-08-01

    Although digital radiography has been widely used for screening human anatomical structures in clinical situations, it has several limitations due to anatomical overlapping. To resolve this problem, dual-energy imaging techniques, which provide a method for decomposing overlying anatomical structures, have been suggested as alternative imaging techniques. Previous studies have reported several dual-energy techniques, each resulting in different image qualities. In this study, we compared three dual-energy techniques: simple log subtraction (SLS), simple smoothing of a high-energy image (SSH), and anti-correlated noise reduction (ACNR) with respect to material thickness quantification and image quality. To evaluate dual-energy radiography, we conducted Monte Carlo simulation and experimental phantom studies. The Geant 4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) v 6.0 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolation polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for simulation studies and digital radiography, and human chest phantoms were used for experimental studies. The results of the simulation study showed improved image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and coefficient of variation (COV) values and bone thickness estimation accuracy by applying the ACNR and SSH methods. Furthermore, the chest phantom images showed better image quality with the SSH and ACNR methods compared to the SLS method. In particular, the bone texture characteristics were well-described by applying the SSH and ACNR methods. In conclusion, the SSH and ACNR methods improved the accuracy of material quantification and image quality in dual-energy radiography compared to SLS. Our results can contribute to better diagnostic capabilities of dual-energy images and accurate material quantification in various clinical situations.

  16. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)], E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner.

  17. Molecular Imaging of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Borsò, Elisa; Mannironi, Antonio; Mansi, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    The onset and the clinical progression of Huntington Disease (HD) is influenced by several events prompted by a genetic mutation that affects several organs tissues including different regions of the brain. In the last decades years, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) helped to deepen the knowledge of neurodegenerative mechanisms that guide to clinical symptoms. Brain imaging with PET represents a tool to investigate the physiopathology occurring in the brain and it has been used to predict the age of onset of the disease and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of new drugs. This article reviews the contribution of PET and MRI in the research field on Huntington's disease, focusing in particular on some most relevant achievements that have helped recognize the molecular changes, the clinical symptoms and evolution of the disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1988-1993, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Simultaneous molecular and anatomical imaging of the mouse in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Meadors, A Ken; Silverman, Robert W; Cherry, Simon R

    2002-12-21

    Non-invasive imaging technologies are opening up new windows into mouse biology. We have developed a mouse imaging system that integrates positron emission tomography (PET) with x-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing simultaneous anatomic and molecular imaging in vivo with the potential for precise registration of the two image volumes. The x-ray system consists of a compact mini-focal x-ray tube and an amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector with a low-noise CMOS readout. The PET system uses planar arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillator coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. We describe the design of this dual-modality imaging system and show, for the first time, simultaneously acquired PET and CT images in a phantom and in mice.

  19. Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions for quantitative molecular imaging and targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Megan M; Caruthers, Shelton; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2009-10-01

    A broad array of nanomaterials is available for use as contrast agents for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Due to the lack of endogenous background signal in vivo and the high NMR sensitivity of the (19)F atom, liquid perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions make ideal agents for cellular and magnetic resonance molecular imaging. The perfluorocarbon core material is surrounded by a lipid monolayer which can be functionalized with a variety of agents including targeting ligands, imaging agents and drugs either individually or in combination. Multiple copies of targeting ligands (approximately 20-40 monoclonal antibodies or 200-400 small molecule ligands) serve to enhance avidity through multivalent interactions while the composition of the particle's perfluorocarbon core results in high local concentrations of (19)F. Additionally, lipophilic drugs contained within molecularly targeted nanoemulsions can result in contact facilitated drug delivery to target cells. Ultimately, the dual use of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for both site targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging may provide both imaging of disease states as well as conclusive evidence that drug delivery is localized to the area of interest. This review will focus on liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticles as (19)F molecular imaging agents and for targeted drug delivery in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  20. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics dual Hamiltonian free energy perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Iakov; Benighaus, Tobias; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter

    2013-08-14

    The dual Hamiltonian free energy perturbation (DH-FEP) method is designed for accurate and efficient evaluation of the free energy profile of chemical reactions in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. In contrast to existing QM/MM FEP variants, the QM region is not kept frozen during sampling, but all degrees of freedom except for the reaction coordinate are sampled. In the DH-FEP scheme, the sampling is done by semiempirical QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD), while the perturbation energy differences are evaluated from high-level QM/MM single-point calculations at regular intervals, skipping a pre-defined number of MD sampling steps. After validating our method using an analytic model potential with an exactly known solution, we report a QM/MM DH-FEP study of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by chorismate mutase. We suggest guidelines for QM/MM DH-FEP calculations and default values for the required computational parameters. In the case of chorismate mutase, we apply the DH-FEP approach in combination with a single one-dimensional reaction coordinate and with a two-dimensional collective coordinate (two individual distances), with superior results for the latter choice.

  1. Molecular imaging: current status and emerging strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pysz, M.A. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gambhir, S.S. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departments of Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Willmann, J.K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.ed [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use positron-emission tomography (PET) or single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research, novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multi-modality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound (US) with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and US imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies as they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and US techniques involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with US. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation, such as endoscopes and microcatheters, suggest that these molecular imaging methods have numerous potential clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future.

  2. Dual-mode imaging with radiolabeled gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashish; Shao, Xia; Rajian, Justin R.; Zhang, Huanan; Chamberland, David L.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xueding

    2011-05-01

    Many nanoparticle contrast agents have difficulties with deep tissue and near-bone imaging due to limited penetration of visible photons in the body and mineralized tissues. We are looking into the possibility of mediating this problem while retaining the capabilities of the high spatial resolution associated with optical imaging. As such, the potential combination of emerging photoacoustic imaging and nuclear imaging in monitoring of antirheumatic drug delivery by using a newly developed dual-modality contrast agent is investigated. The contrast agent is composed of gold nanorods (GNRs) conjugated to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) antibody and is subsequently radiolabeled by 125I. ELISA experiments designed to test TNF-α binding are performed to prove the specificity and biological activity of the radiolabeled conjugated contrast agent. Photoacoustic and nuclear imaging are performed to visualize the distribution of GNRs in articular tissues of the rat tail joints in situ. Findings from the two imaging modalities correspond well with each other in all experiments. Our system can image GNRs down to a concentration of 10 pM in biological tissues and with a radioactive label of 5 μCi. This study demonstrates the potential of combining photoacoustic and nuclear imaging modalities through one targeted contrast agent for noninvasive monitoring of drug delivery as well as deep and mineralized tissue imaging.

  3. Dual Energy Method for Breast Imaging: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koukou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual energy methods can suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues in the breast and therefore enhance the visibility of calcifications. In this study, a dual energy method based on analytical modeling was developed for the detection of minimum microcalcification thickness. To this aim, a modified radiographic X-ray unit was considered, in order to overcome the limited kVp range of mammographic units used in previous DE studies, combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor (pixel size of 22.5 μm for improved resolution. Various filter materials were examined based on their K-absorption edge. Hydroxyapatite (HAp was used to simulate microcalcifications. The contrast to noise ratio (CNRtc of the subtracted images was calculated for both monoenergetic and polyenergetic X-ray beams. The optimum monoenergetic pair was 23/58 keV for the low and high energy, respectively, resulting in a minimum detectable microcalcification thickness of 100 μm. In the polyenergetic X-ray study, the optimal spectral combination was 40/70 kVp filtered with 100 μm cadmium and 1000 μm copper, respectively. In this case, the minimum detectable microcalcification thickness was 150 μm. The proposed dual energy method provides improved microcalcification detectability in breast imaging with mean glandular dose values within acceptable levels.

  4. Fluorescence-Raman Dual Modal Endoscopic System for Multiplexed Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sinyoung; Kim, Yong-Il; Kang, Homan; Kim, Gunsung; Cha, Myeong Geun; Chang, Hyejin; Jung, Kyung Oh; Kim, Young-Hwa; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Yun-Sang; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Jeong, Dae Hong

    2015-03-01

    Optical endoscopic imaging, which was recently equipped with bioluminescence, fluorescence, and Raman scattering, allows minimally invasive real-time detection of pathologies on the surface of hollow organs. To characterize pathologic lesions in a multiplexed way, we developed a dual modal fluorescence-Raman endomicroscopic system (FRES), which used fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoprobes (F-SERS dots). Real-time, in vivo, and multiple target detection of a specific cancer was successful, based on the fast imaging capability of fluorescence signals and the multiplex capability of simultaneously detected SERS signals using an optical fiber bundle for intraoperative endoscopic system. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the breast cancer xenografts in a mouse orthotopic model were successfully detected in a multiplexed way, illustrating the potential of FRES as a molecular diagnostic instrument that enables real-time tumor characterization of receptors during routine endoscopic procedures.

  5. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  6. Dictionary-based image denoising for dual energy computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Allner, Sebastian; Mei, Kai; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional computed tomography (CT), dual energy CT allows for improved material decomposition by conducting measurements at two distinct energy spectra. Since radiation exposure is a major concern in clinical CT, there is a need for tools to reduce the noise level in images while preserving diagnostic information. One way to achieve this goal is the application of image-based denoising algorithms after an analytical reconstruction has been performed. We have developed a modified dictionary denoising algorithm for dual energy CT aimed at exploiting the high spatial correlation between between images obtained from different energy spectra. Both the low-and high energy image are partitioned into small patches which are subsequently normalized. Combined patches with improved signal-to-noise ratio are formed by a weighted addition of corresponding normalized patches from both images. Assuming that corresponding low-and high energy image patches are related by a linear transformation, the signal in both patches is added coherently while noise is neglected. Conventional dictionary denoising is then performed on the combined patches. Compared to conventional dictionary denoising and bilateral filtering, our algorithm achieved superior performance in terms of qualitative and quantitative image quality measures. We demonstrate, in simulation studies, that this approach can produce 2d-histograms of the high- and low-energy reconstruction which are characterized by significantly improved material features and separation. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches that attempt denoising without simultaneously using both energy signals, superior similarity to the ground truth can be found with our proposed algorithm.

  7. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  8. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heath Martin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed.

  9. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-10

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Study of a Dual-Cation Ionomer Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Fangfang; Jónsson, Erlendur; Forsyth, Maria

    2017-01-18

    The poly(N1222 )x Li1-x [AMPS] ionomer system (AMPS=2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) with dual cations has previously shown decoupled Li ion dynamics from polymer segmental motions, characterized by the glass-transition temperature, which can result in a conductive electrolyte material whilst retaining an appropriate modulus (i.e. stiffness) so that it can suppress dendrite formation, thereby improving safety when used in lithium-metal batteries. To understand this ion dynamics behavior, molecular dynamics techniques have been used in this work to simulate structure and dynamics in these materials. These simulations confirm that the Li ion transport is decoupled from the polymer particularly at intermediate N1222(+) concentrations. At 50 mol % N1222(+) concentration, the polymer backbone is more rigid than for higher N1222(+) concentrations, but with increasing temperature Li ion dynamics are more significant than polymer or quaternary ammonium cation motions. Herein we suggest an ion-hopping mechanism for Li(+) , arising from structural rearrangement of ionic clusters that could explain its decoupled behavior. Higher temperatures favor an aggregated ionic structure as well as enhancing these hopping motions. The simulations discussed here provide an atomic-level understanding of ion dynamics that could contribute to designing an improved ionomer with fast ion transport and mechanical robustness.

  11. Dual encryption scheme of images using polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalou, A; Brosseau, C

    2010-07-01

    We propose and analyze a dual encryption/decryption scheme, motivated by recent interest in polarization encoding. Compared to standard optical encryption methods, which are based on phase and amplitude manipulation, this encryption procedure relying on Mueller-Stokes formalism provides large flexibility in the key encryption design. The effectiveness of our algorithm is discussed, thanks to a numerical simulation of the polarization encryption/decryption procedure of a 256 gray-level image. Of additional special interest is the immunity of this encryption algorithm to brute force attacks.

  12. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  13. Dual-Energy SPECT and the Development of Peptide p5+14 for Imaging Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Wall PhD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is associated with a number of rare diseases and is characterized by the deposition, in abdominothoracic organs and peripheral nerves, of extracellular protein fibrils, which leads to dysfunction and severe morbidity. Effective clinical evaluation and management of patients with systemic amyloidosis are hampered by the lack of a noninvasive, quantitative method for detecting whole-body amyloid load. We have used a battery of assays including dual-energy SPECT imaging and comparative effectiveness studies in support of translation of a synthetic polybasic peptide, p5+14, as a novel radiotracer for visualization of amyloidosis by molecular imaging. These data provide support for a phase 1 positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging trial of this reagent, labeled with iodine-124, in patients with all forms of systemic amyloidosis.

  14. Dual-phase cardiac diffusion tensor imaging with strain correction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Stoeck

    Full Text Available In this work we present a dual-phase diffusion tensor imaging (DTI technique that incorporates a correction scheme for the cardiac material strain, based on 3D myocardial tagging.In vivo dual-phase cardiac DTI with a stimulated echo approach and 3D tagging was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. The time course of material strain was estimated from the tagging data and used to correct for strain effects in the diffusion weighted acquisition. Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, helix, transverse and sheet angles were calculated and compared between systole and diastole, with and without strain correction. Data acquired at the systolic sweet spot, where the effects of strain are eliminated, served as a reference.The impact of strain correction on helix angle was small. However, large differences were observed in the transverse and sheet angle values, with and without strain correction. The standard deviation of systolic transverse angles was significantly reduced from 35.9±3.9° to 27.8°±3.5° (p<0.001 upon strain-correction indicating more coherent fiber tracks after correction. Myocyte aggregate structure was aligned more longitudinally in systole compared to diastole as reflected by an increased transmural range of helix angles (71.8°±3.9° systole vs. 55.6°±5.6°, p<0.001 diastole. While diastolic sheet angle histograms had dominant counts at high sheet angle values, systolic histograms showed lower sheet angle values indicating a reorientation of myocyte sheets during contraction.An approach for dual-phase cardiac DTI with correction for material strain has been successfully implemented. This technique allows assessing dynamic changes in myofiber architecture between systole and diastole, and emphasizes the need for strain correction when sheet architecture in the heart is imaged with a stimulated echo approach.

  15. A new adrenal computer imaging technique using dual-radioisotopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohashi,Teruhisa

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer processed adrenal imaging using dual-radioisotopes, 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-nor-cholest-5(10-en-3 beta-ol-131I and 99mTc-phytate was performed in 12 patients with primary aldosteronism and 4 with Cushing's syndrome due to adrenocortical tumor. Adreno-photoscanning and hepato-photoscanning were performed in the same position 2-4 days following intravenous administration of radiocholesterol. The scintigraphic information was stored on cassettes and scan subtraction and a digital-computer method for data smoothing were performed on an oscilloscope. The tumor site could be determined in all cases until day 4 by this computer processed image.

  16. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  17. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  18. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  19. hNIS-IRES-eGFP Dual Reporter Gene Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiantu Che

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The human and rodent sodium iodide symporters (NIS have recently been cloned and are being investigated as potential therapeutic and reporter genes. We have extended this effort by constructing an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-linked human NIS (hNIS-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP hybrid reporter gene for both nuclear and optical imaging. A self-inactivating retroviral vector, termed pQCNIG, containing hNIS-IRES-eGFP dual reporter gene, driven by a constitutive CMV promoter, was constructed and used to generate RG2-pQCNIG cells and RG2-pQCNIG tumors. 131I-iodide and 99mTcO4-pertechnetate accumulation studies plus fluorescence microscopy and intensity assays were performed in vitro, and gamma camera imaging studies in RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumor-bearing athymic rats were performed. RG2-pQCNIG cells expressed high levels of hNIS protein and showed high intensity of eGFP fluorescence compared with RG2 wild-type cells. RG2-pQCNIG cells accumulated Na131I and 99mTcO4– to a 50:1 and a 170:1 tissue/medium ratio at 10 min, compared with 0.8:1.2 tissue/medium ratio in wild-type RG2 cells. A significant correlation between radiotracer accumulation and eGFP fluorescence intensity was demonstrated. RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumors were readily differentiated by in vivo gamma camera imaging; radiotracer uptake increased in RG2-pQCNIG but declined in RG2 tumors over the 50-min imaging period. Stomach and thyroid were the major organs of radionuclide accumulation. The IRES-linked hNIS-eGFP dual reporter gene is functional and stable in transduced RG2-pQCNIG cells. Optical and nuclear imaging of tumors produced from these cell lines provides the opportunity to monitor tumor growth and response to therapy. These studies indicate the potential for a wider application of hNIS reporter imaging and translation into patient studies using radioisotopes that are currently available for human use for both SPECT and PET imaging.

  20. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  1. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  2. Dual-imaging system for burn depth diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Priya; Tamminedi, Tejaswi; Qin, Yi; Nanney, Lillian; Cardwell, Nancy; Pollins, Alonda; Sexton, Kevin; Yadegar, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Currently, determination of burn depth and healing outcomes has been limited to subjective assessment or a single modality, e.g., laser Doppler imaging. Such measures have proven less than ideal. Recent developments in other non-contact technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pulse speckle imaging (PSI) offer the promise that an intelligent fusion of information across these modalities can improve visualization of burn regions thereby increasing the sensitivity of the diagnosis. In this work, we combined OCT and PSI images to classify the degree of burn (superficial, partial-thickness and full-thickness burns). Algorithms were developed to integrate and visualize skin structure (with and without burns) from the two modalities. We have completed the proposed initiatives by employing a porcine burn model and compiled results that attest to the utility of our proposed dual-modal fusion approach. Computer-derived data indicating the varying burn depths were validated through immunohistochemical analysis performed on burned skin tissue. The combined performance of OCT and PSI modalities provided an overall ROC-AUC=0.87 (significant at pdual-imaging system for wound tracking are underway.

  3. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography : a promising new imaging tool in breast cancer detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalji, Ulrich; Lobbes, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (CEDM) is a promising new breast imaging tool for breast cancer detection. In CEDM, an iodine-based contrast agent is intravenously administered and subsequently, dual-energy mammography is performed. This results in a set of images containing both a regular

  4. Advanced imaging of colorectal cancer: From anatomy to molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    García-Figueiras, Roberto; Baleato-González, Sandra; Padhani, Anwar R.; Marhuenda, Ana; Luna, Antonio; Alcalá, Lidia; Carballo-Castro, Ana; Álvarez-Castro, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Imaging techniques play a key role in the management of patients with colorectal cancer. The introduction of new advanced anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging techniques may improve the assessment of diagnosis, prognosis, planning therapy, and assessment of response to treatment of these patients. Functional and molecular imaging techniques in clinical practice may allow the assessment of tumour-specific characteristics and tumour heterogeneity. This paper will review recent...

  5. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cerenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, N Z; Bailey, K; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Filippone, B W; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J O; Hommez, B; Iodice, M; Jackson, H E; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kowalczyk, R; Lagamba, L; Maas, A; Muccifora, V; Nappi, E; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Connor, T; O'Neill, T G; Potterveld, D H; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Schwind, A; Shibata, T A; Suetsugu, K; Thomas, E; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van de Kerckhove, K; Van de Vyver, R; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G; Zhang, L F

    2002-01-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cerenkov(RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  6. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopov, N.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Bailey, K.; Bernreuther, S.; Bianchi, N.; Capitani, G. P.; Carter, P.; Cisbani, E.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; De Schepper, D.; Djordjadze, V.; Filippone, B. W.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hommez, B.; Iodice, M.; Jackson, H. E.; Jung, P.; Kaiser, R.; Kanesaka, J.; Kowalczyk, R.; Lagamba, L.; Maas, A.; Muccifora, V.; Nappi, E.; Negodaeva, K.; Nowak, W.-D.; O'Connor, T.; O'Neill, T. G.; Potterveld, D. H.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sakemi, Y.; Sato, F.; Schwind, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Suetsugu, K.; Thomas, E.; Tytgat, M.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Van de Kerckhove, K.; Van de Vyver, R.; Yoneyama, S.; Zohrabian, H.; Zhang, L. F.

    2002-03-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C 4F 10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  7. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, N; Bailey, K; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Filippone, B W; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J O; Hommez, B; Iodice, M; Jackson, H E; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kowalczyk, R; Lagamba, L; Maas, A; Muccifora, V; Nappi, E; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Connor, T; O'Neill, T G; Potterveld, D H; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Schwind, A; Shibata, T A; Suetsugu, K; Thomas, E; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van De Kerckhove, K; Van De Vyver, R; Yoneyama, S; Zhang, L F; Zohrabyan, H G

    2002-01-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C sub 4 F sub 1 sub 0 , a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  8. A Dual-Modality System for Both Multi-Color Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence and Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandukuri, Jayanth; Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of multiple targets (SIMT) in opaque biological tissues is an important goal for molecular imaging in the future. Multi-color fluorescence imaging in deep tissues is a promising technology to reach this goal. In this work, we developed a dual-modality imaging system by combining our recently developed ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging technology with the conventional ultrasound (US) B-mode imaging. This dual-modality system can simultaneously image tissue acoustic structure information and multi-color fluorophores in centimeter-deep tissue with comparable spatial resolutions. To conduct USF imaging on the same plane (i.e., x-z plane) as US imaging, we adopted two 90°-crossed ultrasound transducers with an overlapped focal region, while the US transducer (the third one) was positioned at the center of these two USF transducers. Thus, the axial resolution of USF is close to the lateral resolution, which allows a point-by-point USF scanning on the same plane as the US imaging. Both multi-color USF and ultrasound imaging of a tissue phantom were demonstrated. PMID:28165390

  9. Dual energy subtraction method for breast calcification imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukou, Vaia; Martini, Niki; Fountos, George; Michail, Christos; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota; Bakas, Athanasios; Kalyvas, Nektarios; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Speller, Robert; Nikiforidis, George

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to present an experimental dual energy (DE) method for the visualization of microcalcifications (μCs). A modified radiographic X-ray tube combined with a high resolution complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) X-ray detector was used. A 40/70 kV spectral combination was filtered with 100 μm cadmium (Cd) and 1000 μm copper (Cu) for the low/high-energy combination. Homogenous and inhomogeneous breast phantoms and two calcification phantoms were constructed with various calcification thicknesses, ranging from 16 to 152 μm . Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated from the DE subtracted images for various entrance surface doses. A calcification thickness of 152 μm was visible, with mean glandular doses (MGD) in the acceptable levels (below 3 mGy). Additional post-processing on the DE images of the inhomogeneous breast phantom resulted in a minimum visible calcification thickness of 93 μm (MGD=1.62 mGy). The proposed DE method could potentially improve calcification visibility in DE breast calcification imaging.

  10. In Vivo Dual Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Joint Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Lee, Sangmin; Brand, David D; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosis of cartilage damage in early stages of arthritis is vital to impede the progression of disease. In this regard, considerable progress has been made in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique. Arthritis can develop due to various mechanisms but one of the main contributors is the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that can degrade components of the extracellular matrix. Especially, MMP-1 and MMP-13 have main roles in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis because they enhance collagen degradation in the process of arthritis. We present here a novel NIRF imaging strategy that can be used to determine the activity of MMPs and cartilage damage simultaneously by detection of exposed type II collagen in cartilage tissue. In this study, retro-orbital injection of mixed fluorescent dyes, MMPSense 750 FAST (MMP750) dye and Alexa Fluor 680 conjugated monoclonal mouse antibody immune-reactive to type II collagen, was administered in the arthritic mice. Both dyes were detected with different intensity according to degree of joint destruction in the animal. Thus, our dual fluorescence imaging method can be used to detect cartilage damage as well as MMP activity simultaneously in early stage arthritis.

  11. Preparation and characterization of a magnetic and optical dual-modality molecular probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, A; Brechbiel, M W [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, NCI, NIH, Building 10, Room 1B53, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Regino, C A S; Ogawa, M; Choyke, P L [Molecular Imaging Program, NCI, NIH, Building 10, Room B3B69, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Perkins, M R [Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH, Building 40, Room 3608B, 40 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Bernardo, M [SAIC-Frederick Inc., NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Fugger, L [MRC Human Immunology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, The University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dobson, P J, E-mail: Bumba@mail.nih.gov, E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov [Oxford University Begbroke Science Park, Sandy Lane, Kidlington, Oxon OX5 1PF (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-30

    Multi-modality imaging probes combine the advantages of individual imaging techniques to yield highly detailed anatomic and molecular information in living organisms. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a dual-modality nanoprobe that couples the magnetic properties of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) with the near infrared fluorescence of Cy5.5. The fluorophore is encapsulated in a biocompatible shell of silica surrounding the iron oxide core for a final diameter of {approx} 17 nm. This silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticle (SCION) has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The particle demonstrates a strong negative surface charge and maintains colloidal stability in the physiological pH range. Magnetic hysteresis analysis confirms superparamagnetic properties that could be manipulated for thermotherapy. The viability of primary human monocytes, T cells, and B cells incubated with the particle has been examined in vitro. In vivo analysis of agent leakage into subcutaneous A431 tumors in mice was also conducted. This particle has been designed for diagnostic application with magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, and has future potential to serve as a heat-sensitive targeted drug delivery platform.

  12. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  13. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  14. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess;

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  15. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  16. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  17. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  18. Acoustic and Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed. PMID:24187042

  19. Acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed.

  20. Molecular imaging of movement disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karlo J Lizarraga; Alessandra Gorgulho; Wei Chen; Antonio A De Salles

    2016-01-01

    -to-rostral direction. Uptake declines prior to symptom presentation and progresses from contralateral to the most symptomatic side to bilateral, correlating with symptom severity. In progressive supranuclear palsy(PSP) and multiple system atrophy(MSA), striatal activity is symmetrically and diffusely decreased. The caudal-to-rostral pattern is lost in PSP, but could be present in MSA. In corticobasal degeneration(CBD), there is asymmetric, diffuse reduction of striatal activity, contralateral to the most symptomatic side. Additionally, there is hypometabolism in contralateral parietooccipital and frontal cortices in PD; bilateral putamen and cerebellum in MSA; caudate, thalamus, midbrain, mesial frontal and prefrontal cortices in PSP; and contralateral cortices in CBD. Finally, cardiac sympathetic SPECT signal is decreased in PD. The capacity of molecular imaging to provide in vivo time courses of gene expression, protein synthesis, receptor and transporter binding, could facilitate the development and evaluation of novel medical, surgical and genetic therapies in movement disorders.

  1. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Umeno, Marc M.

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  2. Oncological image analysis: medical and molecular image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael

    2007-03-01

    This paper summarises the work we have been doing on joint projects with GE Healthcare on colorectal and liver cancer, and with Siemens Molecular Imaging on dynamic PET. First, we recall the salient facts about cancer and oncological image analysis. Then we introduce some of the work that we have done on analysing clinical MRI images of colorectal and liver cancer, specifically the detection of lymph nodes and segmentation of the circumferential resection margin. In the second part of the paper, we shift attention to the complementary aspect of molecular image analysis, illustrating our approach with some recent work on: tumour acidosis, tumour hypoxia, and multiply drug resistant tumours.

  3. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  4. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing

  5. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. It is different from normal tissue in the extracellular matrix, vascular and lymphatic networks, as well as physiologic conditions. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment provides a better understanding of its function in cancer biology, and thus allowing for the design of new diagnostics and therapeutics for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The clinical translation of cancer molecular imaging is often hampered by the high cost of commercialization of targeted imaging agents as well as the limited clinical applications and small market size of some of the agents. Because many different cancer types share similar tumor microenvironment features, the ability to target these biomarkers has the potential to provide clinically translatable molecular imaging technologies for a spectrum of cancers and broad clinical applications. There has been significant progress in targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer molecular imaging. In this review, we summarize the principles and strategies of recent advances made in molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment, using various imaging modalities for early detection and diagnosis of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbubbles for Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Skachkov (Ilya)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn my thesis, microbubbles (MBs) for ultrasound (US) imaging, ultrasound molecular imaging, and drug delivery were studied. Microbubbles are gas-encapsulated lipid or polymer shell coated micro-particles, widely used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). MBs oscillate in response to t

  7. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  8. Molecular Imaging of Autoimmune Diseases and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anna Sargsyan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging methods allow the noninvasive detection and localization of specific molecules. Agents that report on molecular disease biomarkers can be used to diagnose and monitor disease. Many inflammatory diseases have molecular signatures within altered tissues. Although tissue biopsy is still the gold standard for detecting these signatures, several molecular imaging markers have been developed. Pharmacologic agents that block specific immune molecules have recently entered the clinic, and these drugs have already transformed the way we care for patients with immune-mediated diseases. The use of immunomodulatory drugs is usually guided by clinical assessment of the patient's response. Unfortunately, clinical assessment may miss the signs of inflammation, and many of the serologic markers of immune-mediated diseases correlate poorly with the underlying inflammatory activity within target tissues. Molecular imaging methods have the potential to improve our ability to detect and characterize tissue inflammation. We discuss some of the molecular signatures of immune activation and review molecular imaging methods that have been developed to detect active tissue inflammation.

  9. Ratiometric Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging for Methylmercury Detection in Living Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Sheng; Ma, Ying; Lin, Jing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Yueqing; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Peng

    2017-02-22

    Photoacoustic molecular imaging is an emerging and promising diagnostic tool for heavy metal ions detection. Methylmercury (MeHg(+) ) is one of the most potent neurotoxins, which damages the brain and nervous system of human beings through fish consumption. The development of a selective and sensitive method for MeHg(+) detection is highly desirable. In this Communication, we develope a chemoselective photoacoustic sensor (LP-hCy7) composed of the liposome (LP) and MeHg(+) -responsive near-infrared (NIR) cyanine dye (hCy7) for MeHg(+) detection within living subjects, such as zebrafish and mouse. The as-prepared LP-hCy7 nanoprobe displays unique dual-shift NIR absorbance peaks and produces a normalized turn-on response after the reaction of MeHg(+) and hCy7 through a mercury-promoted cyclization reaction. The absorbance intensities of LP-hCy7 nanoprobe at 690 and 860 nm are decreased and increased, respectively. The ratiometric photoacoustic signal (PA860/PA690) is noticeably increased in the presence of MeHg(+) . These findings not only provide a ratiometric photoacoustic molecular imaging probe for the detection of metal ions in vivo, but also provides a tool for spectroscopic photoacoustic molecular imaging.

  10. Processing and fusion for human body terahertz dual-band passive image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Shen, Yanchun; Jin, Weiqi; Zhao, Guozhong; Cai, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Compared with microwave, THz has higher resolution, and compared with infrared, THz has better penetrability. Human body radiate THz also, its photon energy is low, it is harmless to human body. So THz has great potential applications in the body searching system. Dual-band images may contain different information for the same scene, so THz dual-band imaging have been a significant research subject of THz technology. Base on the dual-band THz passive imaging system which is composed of a 94GHz and a 250GHz cell detector, this paper researched the preprocessing and fusion algorithm for THz dual-band images. Firstly, THz images have such problems: large noise, low SNR, low contrast, low details. Secondly, the stability problem of the optical mechanical scanning system makes the images less repetitive, obvious stripes and low definition. Aiming at these situations, this paper used the BM3D de-noising algorithm to filter noise and correct the scanning problem. Furthermore, translation, rotation and scaling exist between the two images, after registered by the intensity-base registration algorithm, and enhanced by the adaptive histogram equalization algorithm, the images are fused by image fusion algorithm based on wavelet. This effectively reduced the image noise, scan distortion and matching error, improved the details, enhanced the contrast. It is helpful to improve the detection efficiency of hidden objects too. Method in this paper has a substantial effect for improving the dual-band THz passive imaging system's performance and promoting technology practical.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Urogenital Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Steve Y.; Szabo, Zsolt; Morgan, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    There is an expanding and exciting repertoire of PET imaging radiotracers for urogenital diseases, particularly in prostate cancer, renal cell cancer, and renal function. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. With growing therapeutics options for the treatment of metastatic and advanced prostate cancer, improved functional imaging of prostate cancer beyond the limitations of conventional computed tomography (CT) and bone scan (BS) is becoming increasingly important for both clinical management and drug development. PET radiotracers beyond 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for prostate cancer include 18F-Sodium Fluoride, 11C-Choline and 18F-Fluorocholine and 11C-Acetate. Other emerging and promising PET radiotracers include a synthetic L-leucine amino acid analog (anti-18F-FACBC), dihydrotestosterone analog (18F-FDHT) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) based PET radiotracers (ex. 18F-DCFBC, 89Zr-DFO-J591, 68Ga(HBED-CC)). Larger prospective and comparison trials of these PET radiotracers are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer. Renal cell cancer imaging with FDG PET/CT although available can be limited, especially for detection of the primary tumor. Improved renal cell cancer detection with carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) based antibody (124I-girentuximab) and radioimmunotherapy targeting with 177Lu-cG250 appear promising. Evaluation of renal injury by imaging renal perfusion and function with novel PET radiotracers include p-18F-fluorohippurate (18F-PFH) and hippurate m-cyano-p-18F-fluorohippurate (18F-CNPFH) and Rubidium-82 chloride (typically used for myocardial perfusion imaging). Renal receptor imaging of the renal renin angiotensin system with a variety of selective PET radioligands are also becoming available for clinical translation. PMID:24484747

  12. Molecular and Functional Imaging of Internet Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA, which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  13. Molecular and functional imaging of internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqi; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA), which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  14. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  16. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in translational medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Costanzo, Pierluigi; Marciano, Caterina; Vassallo, Enrico; Marsico, Fabio; Ruggiero, Donatella; Petretta, Maria Piera; Chiariello, Massimo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Mount Sinai Medical Center, Z. and M.A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and M.-J. and H.R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, New York, NY (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Functional characterization of atherosclerosis is a promising application of molecular imaging. Radionuclide-based techniques for molecular imaging in the large arteries (e.g. aorta and carotids), along with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have been studied both experimentally and in clinical studies. Technical factors including cardiac and respiratory motion, low spatial resolution and partial volume effects mean that noninvasive molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries is not ready for prime time. Positron emission tomography imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose can measure vascular inflammation in the large arteries with high reproducibility, and signal change in response to anti-inflammatory therapy has been described. MRI has proven of value for quantifying carotid artery inflammation when iron oxide nanoparticles are used as a contrast agent. Macrophage accumulation of the iron particles allows regression of inflammation to be measured with drug therapy. Similarly, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is also being evaluated for functional characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. For all of these techniques, however, large-scale clinical trials are mandatory to define the prognostic importance of the imaging signals in terms of risk of future vascular events. (orig.)

  17. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  18. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  19. Dual-wavelength retinal images denoising algorithm for improving the accuracy of oxygen saturation calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yong-Li; Dai, Yun; Gao, Chun-Ming; Du, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) in retinal vessels is based on spectrophotometry and spectral absorption characteristics of tissue. Retinal images at 570 and 600 nm are simultaneously captured by dual-wavelength retinal oximetry based on fundus camera. SO2 is finally measured after vessel segmentation, image registration, and calculation of optical density ratio of two images. However, image noise can dramatically affect subsequent image processing and SO2 calculation accuracy. The aforementioned problem remains to be addressed. The purpose of this study was to improve image quality and SO2 calculation accuracy by noise analysis and denoising algorithm for dual-wavelength images. First, noise parameters were estimated by mixed Poisson-Gaussian (MPG) noise model. Second, an MPG denoising algorithm which we called variance stabilizing transform (VST) + dual-domain image denoising (DDID) was proposed based on VST and improved dual-domain filter. The results show that VST + DDID is able to effectively remove MPG noise and preserve image edge details. VST + DDID is better than VST + block-matching and three-dimensional filtering, especially in preserving low-contrast details. The following simulation and analysis indicate that MPG noise in the retinal images can lead to erroneously low measurement for SO2, and the denoised images can provide more accurate grayscale values for retinal oximetry.

  20. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Shue-Min Yeh

    Full Text Available Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (streptavidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(streptavidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii effective for real-time imaging; and (iii effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld.To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging.Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab'2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster. The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8, demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification.Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described, may possess properties (i-(iii desired for

  1. Dual energy computer tomography. Objectve dosimetry, image quality and dose efficiency; Dual Energy Computertomographie. Objektive Dosimetrie, Bildqualitaet und Dosiseffizienz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenzle, Jan Christian

    2012-05-24

    The aim of the present studies was an objective reflection of newly developed methods of modern imaging techniques concerning radiation exposure to the human body. Dual Source computed tomography has opened up a broad variety of new diagnostic possibilities. Using two X-ray sources with an angular offset of about 90 in a single gantry, images with a high spatiotemporal resolution can be achieved, for example in patients suffering acute chest pain. The Dual Energy Mode is based on the acquisition of two data sets with two different X-ray spectra which make it possible to identify certain substances with different spectral properties like bone, iodine or other organic material. [6-17] There is no doubt that this technical innovation will make an essential contribution to clinical diagnostics, but it remained to be proven that there is no additional dose. An anthropomorphic Phantom and thermoluminiscent detectors were used to objectively quantify the radiation dose resulting from the different examination protocols. For Dual Energy CT examinations, it was possible to verify dose neutrality in combination with comparable image quality and even improved contrast to noise ratio. Nowadays, this protocol is used in clinical routine examinations, e.g. for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism. A milestone in dose reduction was reached with modern triple rule out protocols. Causes of acute chest pain such as heart attack, pulmonary embolism or aortic rupture can be differentiated in a single examination with a high precision and a fractional amount of dose compared to conventional methods.

  2. An Image Fusion Method Based on NSCT and Dual-channel PCNN Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nianyi Wang; Yide Ma; Weilan Wang; Shijie Zhou

    2014-01-01

    NSCT is one of useful multiscale geometric analysis tools, which takes full advantage of geometric regularity of image intrinsic structures. The dual-channel PCNN is a simplified PCNN model, which can process multiple images by a single PCNN. This saves time in the process of image fusion and cuts down computational complexity. In this paper, we present a new image fusion scheme based on NSCT and dual-channel PCNN. Firstly, the fusion rules of subband coefficients of NSCT are discussed. For t...

  3. Radiogenomic imaging-linking diagnostic imaging and molecular diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathias; Goyen

    2014-01-01

    Radiogenomic imaging refers to the correlation between cancer imaging features and gene expression and is one of the most promising areas within science and medicine. High-throughput biological techniques have reshaped the perspective of biomedical research allowing for fast and efficient assessment of the entire molecular topography of a cell’s physiology providing new insights into human cancers. The use of non-invasive imaging tools for gene expression profiling of solid tumors could serve as a means for linking specific imaging features with specific gene expression patterns thereby allowing for more accurate diagnosis and prognosis and obviating the need for high-risk invasive biopsy procedures. This review focuses on the medical imaging part as one of the main drivers for the development of radiogenomic imaging.

  4. NAOMI: nanoparticle assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Graf, Christina; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2006-02-01

    Our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using OCT as the imaging modality are presented. We derive an expression to estimate the sensitivity of this technique. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with suitable dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. This report presents preliminary results of our investigation on the use of nanoshells to serve as contrast agents We injected nanoshells with specific contrast features in the 800 nm wavelength region in excised porcine eyes. The nanoshells showed up as bright reflecting structures in the OCT images, which confirm their potential as contrast agents.

  5. Towards molecular imaging by means of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norek, M.

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in the thesis is focused on the design of highly efficient contrast agents for molecular imaging by means of MRI based on the detailed physical characterization of the given material. Specifically, attention is paid on the development of contrast agents for magnetic fields higher

  6. Polypyrrole-based nanotheranostics for activatable fluorescence imaging and chemo/photothermal dual therapy of triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dongjin; Ahn, Kyung-Ohk; Jeong, Kyung-Chae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we fabricated polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPys) (termed HA10-PPy, HA20-PPy, and HA40-PPy) doped with different average molecular weight hyaluronic acids (HAs) (10, 20, and 40 kDa, respectively), and evaluated the effect of molecular weight of doped HA on photothermal induction, fluorescence quenching, and drug loading efficiencies. Doxorubicin-loaded HA-doped PPys (DOX@HA-PPys) could be used for imaging and therapy of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Fluorescence turn-on, stimuli-responsive drug release, and photo-induced heating of DOX@HA-PPys enabled not only activatable fluorescence imaging but also subsequent chemo/photothermal dual therapy for TNBC. In particular, we illustrated the potential usefulness of the photothermal effect of the nanoparticles for overcoming chemoresistance in TNBC.

  7. Imaging molecular structure with photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll, Rebecca

    2014-07-02

    The possibility to study the structure of polyatomic gas-phase molecules by photoelectron diffraction is investigated with the goal of developing a method capable of imaging ultrafast photochemical reactions with femtosecond temporal and sub-Angstroem spatial resolution. The fluorine 1s-level of adiabatically laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 5}F) molecules was ionized by X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source Free-Electron Laser, and the angular distributions of photoelectrons with kinetic energies between 30 and 60 eV were recorded by velocity map imaging. Comparison with density functional theory calculations allows relating the measured distributions to the molecular structure. The results of an IR-pump, X-ray-probe experiment on aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}Br{sub 2})molecules are presented to explore the potential of photoelectron diffraction for time-resolved imaging. The influence of the alignment laser pulse on the pumping and probing step is discussed. Laser-alignment is contrasted with determination of the molecular orientation by photoelectron-photoion coincidences for an exemplary data set on 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene molecules recorded at the PETRA III synchrotron. Both methods are evaluated with respect to their applicability to record time-dependent snapshots of molecular structure. The results obtained in this work indicate possible future avenues for investigating ultrafast molecular dynamics using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers.

  8. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  9. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy.

  10. Dual-time-point Imaging and Delayed-time-point Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography Imaging in Various Clinical Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind;

    2016-01-01

    The techniques of dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) and delayed-time-point imaging, which are mostly being used for distinction between inflammatory and malignant diseases, has increased the specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases. A gradually...

  11. Dual-path handheld system for cornea and retina imaging using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Kim, Pilun; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-11-01

    A dual-path handheld system is proposed for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The handheld sample arm is designed to acquire two images simultaneously. Both eyes of a person can be imaged at the same time to obtain the images of the cornea of one eye and the retina of the other eye. Cornea, retina, and optic disc images are acquired with the proposed sample arm. Experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of this system for imaging of different eye segments. This system reduces the time required for imaging of the two eyes and is cost effective.

  12. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. A dual molecular beacon approach for fast detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan-Xing; Zhao, Zi-Yun; Lv, Jian-Xin; Zhu, Ling

    2013-02-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess a dual molecular beacon approach for fast detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). MT beacon (Tb-B) was designed to target the unique IS6110 (114 bp) and rpoB (215 bp) fragment of the MT (H37Ra) genome, and the two fragments were inserted into the PMD-19T vector after purification, by PCR and sequencing, to construct plasmids. Different dilutions of positive plasmid standards were used for dual molecular beacon RT-PCR of rpoB and IS6110, and standard curves were established.The results show that the dual molecular beacon of rpoB and IS6110 detecting MT was stable (CV is 1.91-2.68 %) with a high amplification efficiency (95.6 %). In addition, the strains of non MT did not generate fluorescence signals, while strains of MT did, indicating that the primers and molecular beacons were specific, and only MT complex was amplified. The linear range was wide (10(3)-10(11) copies/mL), and clinical specimens presenting different bacterial counts can be detected.

  14. A low-cost dual-camera imaging system for aerial applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available remote sensing platform as low-cost and easy-to-use consumer-grade cameras are being increasingly used for aerial imaging. In this article, we report on a dual-camera imaging system we recently assembled that can capture RGB and near-infrared (NIR) i...

  15. Spatial Distribution of Iron Within the Normal Human Liver Using Dual-Source Dual-Energy CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadia, Andres F; Grant, Katharine L; Carey, Kathleen E; Bolch, Wesley E; Morin, Richard L

    2017-05-29

    Explore the potential of dual-source dual-energy (DSDE) computed tomography (CT) to retrospectively analyze the uniformity of iron distribution and establish iron concentration ranges and distribution patterns found in healthy livers. Ten mixtures consisting of an iron nitrate solution and deionized water were prepared in test tubes and scanned using a DSDE 128-slice CT system. Iron images were derived from a 3-material decomposition algorithm (optimized for the quantification of iron). A conversion factor (mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit) was calculated from this phantom study as the quotient of known tube concentrations and their corresponding CT values. Retrospective analysis was performed of patients who had undergone DSDE imaging for renal stones. Thirty-seven patients with normal liver function were randomly selected (mean age, 52.5 years). The examinations were processed for iron concentration. Multiple regions of interest were analyzed, and iron concentration (mg Fe/mL) and distribution was reported. The mean conversion factor obtained from the phantom study was 0.15 mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit. Whole-liver mean iron concentrations yielded a range of 0.0 to 2.91 mg Fe/mL, with 94.6% (35/37) of the patients exhibiting mean concentrations below 1.0 mg Fe/mL. The most important finding was that iron concentration was not uniform and patients exhibited regionally high concentrations (36/37). These regions of higher concentration were observed to be dominant in the middle-to-upper part of the liver (75%), medially (72.2%), and anteriorly (83.3%). Dual-source dual-energy CT can be used to assess the uniformity of iron distribution in healthy subjects. Applying similar techniques to unhealthy livers, future research may focus on the impact of hepatic iron content and distribution for noninvasive assessment in diseased subjects.

  16. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  17. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  18. Robust Reconstruction and Generalized Dual Hahn Moments Invariants Extraction for 3D Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Abderrahim; Zouhri, Amal; El Mallahi, Mostafa; Zenkouar, Khalid; Qjidaa, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new set of 3D weighed dual Hahn moments which are orthogonal on a non-uniform lattice and their polynomials are numerically stable to scale, consequent, producing a set of weighted orthonormal polynomials. The dual Hahn is the general case of Tchebichef and Krawtchouk, and the orthogonality of dual Hahn moments eliminates the numerical approximations. The computational aspects and symmetry property of 3D weighed dual Hahn moments are discussed in details. To solve their inability to invariability of large 3D images, which cause to overflow issues, a generalized version of these moments noted 3D generalized weighed dual Hahn moment invariants are presented where whose as linear combination of regular geometric moments. For 3D pattern recognition, a generalized expression of 3D weighted dual Hahn moment invariants, under translation, scaling and rotation transformations, have been proposed where a new set of 3D-GWDHMIs have been provided. In experimental studies, the local and global capability of free and noisy 3D image reconstruction of the 3D-WDHMs has been compared with other orthogonal moments such as 3D Tchebichef and 3D Krawtchouk moments using Princeton Shape Benchmark database. On pattern recognition using the 3D-GWDHMIs like 3D object descriptors, the experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm is more robust than other orthogonal moments for pattern classification of 3D images with and without noise.

  19. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.S.; Kim, A. M.; Bleher, R.; Myers, B.D.; Marvin, R. G.; Inada, H.; Nakamura, K.; Zhang, X.F.; Roth, E.; Li, S.Y.; Woodruff, T. K.; O'Halloran, T. V.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room- and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems. PMID:23500508

  20. Molecular orbital imaging for partially aligned molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    We investigate molecular orbital reconstruction using high-order harmonic emissions from partially aligned molecular ensembles. By carrying out the reconstruction procedure using the harmonic sampling with or without the spectral minimum, the roles of the harmonic phase and amplitude modulation due to the partial alignment can be separately studied. It is found that with the prior knowledge of the orbital symmetry, the reconstructed result is very sensitive to the modulation of the harmonic phase for the πg orbital, while in the case of σg orbital, the reconstructed result is mainly determined by the harmonic amplitude. These results can provide an important reference for the future experiment of molecular orbital imaging.

  1. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  2. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  3. Molecular Imaging in Synthetic Biology, and Synthetic Biology in Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Assaf A; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-06-01

    Biomedical synthetic biology is an emerging field in which cells are engineered at the genetic level to carry out novel functions with relevance to biomedical and industrial applications. This approach promises new treatments, imaging tools, and diagnostics for diseases ranging from gastrointestinal inflammatory syndromes to cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. As these cellular technologies undergo pre-clinical and clinical development, it is becoming essential to monitor their location and function in vivo, necessitating appropriate molecular imaging strategies, and therefore, we have created an interest group within the World Molecular Imaging Society focusing on synthetic biology and reporter gene technologies. Here, we highlight recent advances in biomedical synthetic biology, including bacterial therapy, immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. We then discuss emerging molecular imaging approaches to facilitate in vivo applications, focusing on reporter genes for noninvasive modalities such as magnetic resonance, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, bioluminescence, and radionuclear imaging. Because reporter genes can be incorporated directly into engineered genetic circuits, they are particularly well suited to imaging synthetic biological constructs, and developing them provides opportunities for creative molecular and genetic engineering.

  4. Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modality Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Dual-Therapy with Magnetic Porphyrin-Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yu-Hao; Chen, Yang; Wang, Man-Man; Wang, Xue-Sheng; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Phototherapy shows some unique advantages in clinical application, such as remote controllability, improved selectivity, and low bio-toxicity, than chemotherapy. In order to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy, imaging-guided therapy seems particularly important because it integrates visible information to speculate the distribution and metabolism of the probe. Here we prepare biocompatible core-shell nanocomposites for dual-modality imaging-guided photothermal and photodynamic dual-therapy by the in situ growth of porphyrin-metal organic framework (PMOF) on Fe3O4@C core. Fe3O4@C core was used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) agent. The optical properties of porphyrin were well remained in PMOF, and PMOF was therefore selected for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence and MR dual-modality imaging-guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy was confirmed with tumour-bearing mice as model. The high tumour accumulation of Fe3O4@C@PMOF and controllable light excitation at the tumour site achieved efficient cancer therapy, but low toxicity was observed to the normal tissues. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4@C@PMOF was a promising dual-imaging guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy platform for tumour diagnosis and treatment with low cytotoxicity and negligible in vivo toxicity. PMID:28272454

  5. An Image Fusion Method Based on NSCT and Dual-channel PCNN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianyi Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available NSCT is one of useful multiscale geometric analysis tools, which takes full advantage of geometric regularity of image intrinsic structures. The dual-channel PCNN is a simplified PCNN model, which can process multiple images by a single PCNN. This saves time in the process of image fusion and cuts down computational complexity. In this paper, we present a new image fusion scheme based on NSCT and dual-channel PCNN. Firstly, the fusion rules of subband coefficients of NSCT are discussed. For the fusion rule of low frequency coefficients, the maximum selection rule (MSR is used. Then, for the fusion rule of high frequency coefficients, spatial frequency (SF of each high frequency subband is considered as the gradient features of images to motivate dual-channel PCNN networks and generate pulse of neurons. At last, fused image is obtained by using the inverse NSCT transform. In order to show that the proposed method can deal with image fusion, we used two pairs of images as our experimental subjects. The proposed method is compared with other five methods. The performance of various methods is mathematically evaluated by using four image quality evaluation criteria. Experimental comparisons conducted on different fusion methods prove the effectiveness of the proposed fusion method

  6. Utility of iodine overlay technique and virtual unenhanced images for the characterization of renal masses by dual-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Bohyun

    2011-12-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the utility of dual-energy CT for characterizing renal masses using iodine overlay techniques and virtual unenhanced images and to measure the potential radiation dose reduction for two-phase kidney CT compared with a standard three-phase protocol. Sixty patients with suspected renal masses underwent dual-energy CT including true unenhanced, dual-energy corticomedullary, and dual-energy late nephrographic phase imaging. Iodine overlay and virtual unenhanced images were derived from the corticomedullary and late nephrographic phases, respectively. The CT numbers of renal masses were calculated using the iodine overlay images superimposed on the virtual unenhanced images. The overall imaging quality of the true unenhanced images and of the virtual unenhanced images was also evaluated. The effective radiation doses for dual-energy CT and for true unenhanced imaging were calculated. For overlay or enhancement values on iodine overlay images, 36 simple cysts and 10 hemorrhagic cysts had an attenuation value of less than 20 HU, whereas 21 renal cell carcinomas showed an attenuation value of 20 HU or greater. Eleven angiomyolipomas contained macroscopic fat tissue. All renal masses were accurately classified on the basis of dual-energy CT. The imaging quality of the virtual unenhanced images from the corticomedullary and late nephrographic phases was inferior to the image quality of the true unenhanced images (p overlay techniques and virtual unenhanced images may be useful for characterizing renal masses.

  7. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  8. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  9. X-ray synchrotron dual energy imaging for material specific study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Agrawal, A. K.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    X-ray imaging techniques, in general, are used to study the internal structures of an object non-destructively such as anatomy, imperfections, cracks and voids whereas insensitive to spatial distribution of different element or elemental compositions of the object. With the development of advance bright X-ray synchrotron sources and accurate energy tunability using high resolution crystal monochromator, detection of elemental distribution in an object became possible. Quantitative small concentrations with enhance contrast can be detected fast in X-ray synchrotron based dual energy imaging, in comparison to conventional X-ray lab based techniques. We report here the experimental setup, image acquisition and image processing for the dual energy X-ray imaging (DEI) technique to retrieve the spatial distribution of different elements in the object.

  10. Simultaneous dual molecular contrasts provided by the absorbed photons in photoacoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Jiang, Minshan; Fawzi, Amani A; Li, Xiang; Shung, K Kirk; Puliafito, Carmen A; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the feasibility of simultaneously imaging two distinctive molecular contrasts provided by the absorbed photons in biological tissues with a single light source. The molecular contrasts are based on two physical effects induced by the absorbed photons: photoacoustics (PA) and autofluorescence (AF). In an integrated multimodal imaging system, the PA and AF signals were detected by a high-sensitivity ultrasonic transducer and an avalanche photodetector, respectively. The system was tested by imaging ocular tissue samples, including the retinal pigment epithelium and the ciliary body. The acquired images provided information on the spatial distributions of melanin and lipofuscin in these samples.

  11. Molecular Imaging with Activatable Reporter Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a newly emerged multiple disciplinary field that aims to visualize, characterize and quantitatively measure biological processes at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems. A reporter gene is a piece of DNA encoding reporter protein, which presents as a readily measurable phenotype that can be distinguished easily from the background of endogenous protein. After being transferred into cells of organ systems (transgenes, the reporter gene can be utilized to visualize transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, or trafficking of proteins or cells in living subjects. Herein, we review previous classification of reporter genes and regroup the reporter gene based imaging as basic, inducible and activatable, based on the regulation of reporter gene transcription and post-translational modification of reporter proteins. We then focus on activatable reporters, in which the signal can be activated at the posttranslational level for visualizing protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylation or tertiary structure changes. The applications of several types of activatable reporters will also be summarized. We conclude that activatable reporter imaging can benefit both basic biomedical research and drug development.

  12. Tin-filter enhanced dual-energy-CT: image quality and accuracy of CT numbers in virtual noncontrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Sauter, Alexander; Spira, Daniel; Gatidis, Sergios; Ketelsen, Dominik; Heuschmid, Martin; Claussen, Claus D; Thomas, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    To measure and compare the objective image quality of true noncontrast (TNC) images with virtual noncontrast (VNC) images acquired by tin-filter-enhanced, dual-source, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of upper abdomen. Sixty-three patients received unenhanced abdominal CT and enhanced abdominal DECT (100/140 kV with tin filter) in portal-venous phase. VNC images were calculated from the DECT datasets using commercially available software. The mean attenuation of relevant tissues and image quality were compared between the TNC and VNC images. Image quality was rated objectively by measuring image noise and the sharpness of object edges using custom-designed software. Measurements were compared using Student two-tailed t-test. Correlation coefficients for tissue attenuation measurements between TNC and VNC were calculated and the relative deviations were illustrated using Bland-Altman plots. Mean attenuation differences between TNC and VNC (HUTNC - HUVNC) image sets were as follows: right liver lobe -4.94 Hounsfield units (HU), left liver lobe -3.29 HU, vena cava -2.19 HU, spleen -7.46 HU, pancreas 1.29 HU, fat -11.14 HU, aorta 1.29 HU, bone marrow 36.83 HU (all P Mean image noise was significantly higher in TNC images (P images (P = .19). The Hounsfield units in VNC images closely resemble TNC images in the majority of the organs of the upper abdomen (kidneys, liver, pancreas). In spleen and fat, Hounsfield numbers in VNC images are tend to be higher than in TNC images. VNC images show a low image noise and satisfactory edge sharpness. Other criteria of image quality and the depiction of certain lesions need to be evaluated additionally. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A dual oxygenation and fluorescence imaging platform for reconstructive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Nguyen, John N.; Venugopal, Vivek; Stockdale, Alan; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Lee, Bernard T.; Frangioni, John V.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    There is a pressing clinical need to provide image guidance during surgery. Currently, assessment of tissue that needs to be resected or avoided is performed subjectively, leading to a large number of failures, patient morbidity, and increased healthcare costs. Because near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is safe, noncontact, inexpensive, and can provide relatively deep information (several mm), it offers unparalleled capabilities for providing image guidance during surgery. These capabilities are well illustrated through the clinical translation of fluorescence imaging during oncologic surgery. In this work, we introduce a novel imaging platform that combines two complementary NIR optical modalities: oxygenation imaging and fluorescence imaging. We validated this platform during facial reconstructive surgery on large animals approaching the size of humans. We demonstrate that NIR fluorescence imaging provides identification of perforator arteries, assesses arterial perfusion, and can detect thrombosis, while oxygenation imaging permits the passive monitoring of tissue vital status, as well as the detection and origin of vascular compromise simultaneously. Together, the two methods provide a comprehensive approach to identifying problems and intervening in real time during surgery before irreparable damage occurs. Taken together, this novel platform provides fully integrated and clinically friendly endogenous and exogenous NIR optical imaging for improved image-guided intervention during surgery.

  14. Dual-/tri-apodization techniques for high frequency ultrasound imaging: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jin Ho; Jeong, Jong Seob

    2014-10-11

    In the ultrasound B-mode (Brightness-mode) imaging, high side-lobe level reduces contrast to noise ratio (CNR). A linear apodization scheme by using the window function can suppress the side-lobe level while the main-lobe width is increased resulting in degraded lateral resolution. In order to reduce the side-lobe level without sacrificing the main-lobe width, a non-linear apodization method has been suggested. In this paper, we computationally evaluated the performance of the non-linear apodization method such as dual-/tri-apodization focusing on the high frequency ultrasound image. The rectangular, Dolph-Chebyshev, and Kaiser window functions were employed to implement dual-/tri-apodization algorithms. The point and cyst target simulations were conducted by using a dedicated ultrasound simulation tool called Field-II. The center frequency of the simulated linear array transducer was 40 MHz and the total number of elements was 128. The performance of dual-/tri-apodization was compared with that of the rectangular window function focusing on the side-lobe level and the main-lobe widths (at -6 dB and -35 dB). In the point target simulation, the main-lobe widths of the dual-/tri-apodization were very similar to that of the rectangular window, and the side-lobe levels of the dual-/tri-apodization were more suppressed by 9~10 dB. In the cyst target simulation, CNR values of the dual-/tri-apodization were improved by 41% and 51%, respectively. The performance of the non-linear apodization was numerically investigated. In comparison with the rectangular window function, the non-linear apodization method such as dual- and tri-apodization had low side-lobe level without sacrificing the main-lobe width. Thus, it can be a potential way to increase CNR maintaining the main-lobe width in the high frequency ultrasound imaging.

  15. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  16. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hidetake; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Satoh, Hitoshi; Abe, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using dual-energy Computed tomography (DECT) to obtain virtual monochromatic images of this phantom. Virtual monochromatic images were created by using DECT voltages from 40 to 100 keV in steps of 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV in steps of 1 keV, under three conditions of the tube voltage with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images at voltages between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  17. Shock waves simulated using the dual domain material point method combined with molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Dhakal, Tilak R.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we combine the dual domain material point method with molecular dynamics in an attempt to create a multiscale numerical method to simulate materials undergoing large deformations with high strain rates. In these types of problems, the material is often in a thermodynamically nonequilibrium state, and conventional constitutive relations or equations of state are often not available. In this method, the closure quantities, such as stress, at each material point are calculated from a molecular dynamics simulation of a group of atoms surrounding the material point. Rather than restricting the multiscale simulation in a small spatial region, such as phase interfaces, or crack tips, this multiscale method can be used to consider nonequilibrium thermodynamic effects in a macroscopic domain. This method takes the advantage that the material points only communicate with mesh nodes, not among themselves; therefore molecular dynamics simulations for material points can be performed independently in parallel. The dual domain material point method is chosen for this multiscale method because it can be used in history dependent problems with large deformation without generating numerical noise as material points move across cells, and also because of its convergence and conservation properties. To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of this method, we compare the results of a shock wave propagation in a cerium crystal calculated using the direct molecular dynamics simulation with the results from this combined multiscale calculation.

  18. Radiolabeled nanogels for nuclear molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Smriti; Bingöl, Bahar; Morgenroth, Agnieszka; Mottaghy, Felix M; Möller, Martin; Schmaljohann, Jörn

    2013-04-12

    An efficient and simple synthesis approach to form stable (68) Ga-labeled nanogels is reported and their fundamental properties investigated. Nanogels are obtained by self-assembly of amphiphilic statistical prepolymers derivatised with chelating groups for radiometals. The resulting nanogels exhibit a well-defined spherical shape with a diameter of 290 ± 50 nm. The radionuclide (68) Ga is chelated in high radiochemical yields in an aqueous medium at room temperature. The phagocytosis assay demonstrates a highly increased internalization of nanogels by activated macrophages. Access to these (68) Ga-nanogels will allow the investigation of general behavior and clearance pathways of nanogels in vivo by nuclear molecular imaging.

  19. The application of image cytometry to viability assessment in dual fluorescence-stained fish spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flajshans, Martin; Cosson, Jacky; Rodina, Marek; Linhart, Otomar

    2004-01-01

    The viability of spermatozoa has been assessed using SYBR 14 staining for DNA of living cells and propidium iodide staining for DNA of degenerate cells. This dual staining was performed on four fish species (Siberian sturgeon, Acipenser baerii; common carp, Cyprinus carpio; tench, Tinca tinca and wels, Silurus glanis) and the proportions of live and dead spermatozoa were assessed by epifluorescence microscopy and image cytometry. Ten phase contrast and epifluorescent images were recorded per sample, corresponding images were overlaid, and the blended images were evaluated for live and dead spermatozoa, represented by green and red fluorescence signals. Live/dead proportions were assessed, after dual thresholding, by imaging software that counted absolute numbers of objects and computed their frequencies. All sperm heads were found to be labelled, emitting either green or red light. Mean numbers of spermatozoa per image were in the ranges 32-113, 61-105, 48-104 and 29-91 for Siberian sturgeon, common carp, tench and wels, respectively. The corresponding proportions of live spermatozoa were in the ranges 83.56-94.59%, 93.92-97.02%, 76.14-97.76% and 79.45-83.76%. Standard deviations did not exceed 5% of the means. The image cytometric system using dual staining with SYBR 14 and propidium iodide was clearly suitable for assessing the viability of freshwater fish spermatozoa.

  20. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging for Better Sensitivity to Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, S.J.; Yeom, K.W.; Antonucci, M.U.; Andre, J.B.; Rosenberg, J.; Aksoy, M.; Straka, M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Moseley, M.E.; Zaharchuk, G.; Skare, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Parallel imaging facilitates the acquisition of echo-planar images with a reduced TE, enabling the incorporation of an additional image at a later TE. Here we investigated the use of a parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo EPI sequence to improve lesion conspicuity in diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo DWI data were acquired in 50 consecutive patients suspected of stroke at 1.5T. The dual-echo acquisition included 2 EPI for 1 diffusion-preparation period (echo 1 [TE = 48 ms] and echo 2 [TE = 105 ms]). Three neuroradiologists independently reviewed the 2 echoes by using the routine DWI of our institution as a reference. Images were graded on lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence, and image quality. The apparent diffusion coefficient map from echo 1 was used to validate the presence of acute infarction. Relaxivity maps calculated from the 2 echoes were evaluated for potential complementary information. RESULTS Echo 1 and 2 DWIs were rated as better than the reference DWI. While echo 1 had better image quality overall, echo 2 was unanimously favored over both echo 1 and the reference DWI for its high sensitivity in detecting acute infarcts. CONCLUSIONS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo diffusion-weighted EPI is a useful method for evaluating lesions with reduced diffusivity. The long TE of echo 2 produced DWIs that exhibited superior lesion conspicuity compared with images acquired at a shorter TE. Echo 1 provided higher SNR ADC maps for specificity to acute infarction. The relaxivity maps may serve to complement information regarding blood products and mineralization. PMID:24763417

  1. Dual-time-point Imaging and Delayed-time-point Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography Imaging in Various Clinical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Segtnan, Eivind Antonsen; Grupe, Peter; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2016-01-01

    The techniques of dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) and delayed-time-point imaging, which are mostly being used for distinction between inflammatory and malignant diseases, has increased the specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases. A gradually increasing trend of FDG uptake over time has been shown in malignant cells, and a decreasing or constant trend has been shown in inflammatory/infectious processes. Tumor heterogeneity can be assessed by using early and delayed imaging because differences between primary versus metastatic sites become more detectable compared with single time points. This article discusses the applications of DTPI and delayed-time-point imaging.

  2. Enhancing Image Findability through a Dual-Perspective Navigation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Ling

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on investigating whether users will locate desired images more efficiently and effectively when they are provided with information descriptors from both experts and the general public. This study develops a way to support image finding through a human-computer interface by providing subject headings and social tags about…

  3. Adolescent Boys and Body Image: Weight and Muscularity Concerns as Dual Pathways to Body Dissatisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Diane Carlson; Crawford, Joy K.

    2005-01-01

    This research evaluated a dual pathway model for body dissatisfaction among adolescent boys. The study provides empirical support for the importance of distinguishing between weight and muscularity concerns in understanding male body image. A total of 128 boys from grades 8 and 11 completed a self-report questionnaire. Results indicated that…

  4. Dual Language Use in Sign-Speech Bimodal Bilinguals: fNIRS Brain-Imaging Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovelman, Ioulia; Shalinsky, Mark H.; White, Katherine S.; Schmitt, Shawn N.; Berens, Melody S.; Paymer, Nora; Petitto, Laura-Ann

    2009-01-01

    The brain basis of bilinguals' ability to use two languages at the same time has been a hotly debated topic. On the one hand, behavioral research has suggested that bilingual dual language use involves complex and highly principled linguistic processes. On the other hand, brain-imaging research has revealed that bilingual language switching…

  5. Preliminary Experimental Verification of Synthetic Aperture Flow Imaging Using a Dual Stage Beamformer Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ye; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A dual stage beamformer method for synthetic aperture flow imaging has been developed. The motivation is to increase the frame rate and still maintain a beamforming quality sufficient for flow estimation that is possible to implement in a commercial scanner. With the new method high resolution im...

  6. Dual Systems Competence [Image Omitted] Procedural Processing: A Relational Developmental Systems Approach to Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Robert B.; Overton, Willis F.

    2011-01-01

    Many current psychological models of reasoning minimize the role of deductive processes in human thought. In the present paper, we argue that deduction is an important part of ordinary cognition and we propose that a dual systems Competence [image omitted] Procedural processing model conceptualized within relational developmental systems theory…

  7. Extended Commissioning and Calibration of the Dual-Beam Imaging Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Masiero, Joseph; Harrington, David; Lin, Haosheng

    2008-01-01

    In our previous paper (Masiero et al. 2007) we presented the design and initial calibrations of the Dual-Beam Imaging Polarimeter (DBIP), a new optical instrument for the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. In this followup work we discuss our full-Stokes mode commissioning including crosstalk determination and our typical observing methodology.

  8. Stochastic dual-plane on-axis digital holographic imaging on irregular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-10

    An imaging method based on dual-plane on-axis digital holography is proposed for the situation in which an object is on the irregular surface of a transparent medium. Light propagation of the object on the uneven surface of the medium is analyzed and simulated. The diffracted pattern of the object is deformed or destroyed by the refracted light of the medium. Dual-plane on-axis digital holography is used to eliminate the twin image. In order to retrieve the information lost in the reconstructed image due to destructive interference, the object is illuminated by a stochastic beam that is a speckle wave produced by a ground glass. Simulated and experimental results are presented, to demonstrate that the proposed method can be used for imaging on the irregular surface of a transparent medium.

  9. Dual-source dual-energy CT angiography with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding: Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hao, E-mail: sunhao_robert@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Hou, Xin-Yi, E-mail: hxy_pumc@126.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Xue, Hua-Dan, E-mail: bjdanna95@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Xiao-Guang, E-mail: xglee88@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Jin, Zheng-Yu, E-mail: zhengyu_jin@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Qian, Jia-Ming, E-mail: qjiaming57@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Jian-Chun, E-mail: yu-jch@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhu, Hua-Dong, E-mail: huadongzhu@hotmail.com [Department of Emergency, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • GIB is a common gastrointestinal emergency with a high mortality rate. • Detection and localization of GIB source are important for imaging modality. • DSDECTA using a dual-phase scan protocol is clinically feasible. • DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map images can diagnose the active GIB source accurately. • DSDECTA can reduce radiation dose compared with conventional CT examination in GIB. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of dual-source dual-energy CT angiography (DSDECTA) with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Methods: From June 2010 to December 2012, 112 consecutive patients with clinical signs of active GIB underwent DSDECTA with true non-enhanced (TNE), arterial phase with single-source mode, and portal-venous phase with dual-energy mode (100 kVp/230 mAs and Sn 140 kVp/178 mAs). Virtual non-enhanced CT (VNE) image sets and iodine map were reformatted from ‘Liver VNC’ software. The mean CT number, noise, signal to noise ratio (SNR), image quality and radiation dose were compared between TNE and VNE image sets. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data, interpreted images from DSDECTA with TNE (protocol 1), and DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map (protocol 2) respectively, with discordant interpretation resolved by consensus. The standards of reference included digital subtraction angiography, endoscopy, surgery, or final pathology reports. Receiver–operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated for CT protocols 1 and 2, respectively. Results: There was no significant difference in mean CT numbers of all organs (including liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, abdominal aorta, and psoas muscle) (P > 0.05). Lower noise and higher SNR were found on VNE images than TNE images (P < 0.05). Image quality of VNE was lower than that of TNE without significant difference (P > 0.05). The active GIB source was identified

  10. Laboratory medicine for molecular imaging of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, Harald; Almer, Gunter; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Reininghaus, Eva; Prassl, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques are the main cause of life threatening clinical endpoints like myocardial infarction and stroke. To prevent these endpoints, the improved early diagnosis and treatment of vulnerable atherosclerotic vascular lesions are essential. Although originally applied for anticancer treatment, recent advances have also showed the considerable potential of nanotechnology for atherosclerosis. Otherwise, one domain of laboratory medicine is the investigation of new biomarkers. Recent research activities have identified the usability of biomarker-targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging and pharmacologic modification of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions leading to myocardial infarction or stroke. These investigations have established a new research interface between laboratory medicine, nanotechnology, cardiology/neurology, and radiology. In this review, we discuss inflammatory pathophysiologic mechanisms and biomarkers associated with a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. Further, we will emphasize cardiovascular relevant functionalized nanoparticle biomarker constructs which were developed within the cooperation interface between Laboratory Medicine (anti-inflammatory biomarkers), Nano-Medicine (nanoparticle development), and Radiology (molecular imaging). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens' surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber using wavelength-division multiplexing. The same focusing optics is used for both modalities. Back-reflected light from the sample is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. As the same optical components are used for OCT and photoacoustic imaging, the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically in lateral direction. Three-dimensional imaging is implemented by hybrid galvanometer and mechanical scanning. To allow fast B-scan measurements, scanning of the interrogation beam along one dimension is executed by a galvanometer scanner. Slow-axis scanning, perpendicular to the fast axis, is performed utilizing a linear translational stage. We demonstrate two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging on agarose phantoms.

  12. Dual energy contrast enhanced breast imaging optimization using contrast to noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Royle, G.; Speller, R.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of dual energy contrast enhanced breast imaging have been analyzed by imaging a 4 cm breast equivalent phantom consisting of adipose and glandular equivalent plastics. This phantom had superimposed another thin plastic which incorporated a 2 mm deep cylinder filled with iodinated contrast media. The iodine projected thicknesses used for this study was 3 mg/cm2. Low and high energy spectra that straddle the iodine K-edge were used. Critical parameters such as the energy spectra and exposure are discussed, along with post processing by means of nonlinear energy dependent function. The dual energy image was evaluated using the relative contrast to noise ratio of a 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm region of the image at the different iodine concentrations incorporating different breast composition with respect to the noniodinated areas. Optimum results were achieved when the low and high-energy images were used in such a way that relative contrast to noise ratio of the iodine with respect to the background tissue was maximum. A figure of merit suggests that higher noise levels can be tolerated at the benefit of lower exposure. Contrast media kinetics of a phantom incorporating a water flow of 20.4 ml/min through the plastic cylinder suggests that time domain imaging could be performed with this approach. The results suggest that optimization of dual energy contrast enhanced mammography has the potential to lead to the development of perfusion digital mammography.

  13. Medical image denoising using dual tree complex thresholding wavelet transform and Wiener filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Naimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image denoising is the process to remove the noise from the image naturally corrupted by the noise. The wavelet method is one among various methods for recovering infinite dimensional objects like curves, densities, images, etc. The wavelet techniques are very effective to remove the noise because of their ability to capture the energy of a signal in few energy transform values. The wavelet methods are based on shrinking the wavelet coefficients in the wavelet domain. We propose in this paper, a denoising approach basing on dual tree complex wavelet and shrinkage with the Wiener filter technique (where either hard or soft thresholding operators of dual tree complex wavelet transform for the denoising of medical images are used. The results proved that the denoised images using DTCWT (Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform with Wiener filter have a better balance between smoothness and accuracy than the DWT and are less redundant than SWT (StationaryWavelet Transform. We used the SSIM (Structural Similarity Index Measure along with PSNR (Peak Signal to Noise Ratio and SSIM map to assess the quality of denoised images.

  14. Development of microscopic systems for high-speed dual-excitation ratiometric Ca2+ imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Takashi; Shimozono, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-08-01

    For quantitative measurements of Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]), ratiometric dyes are preferable, because the use of such dyes allows for correction of uneven loading or partitioning of dye within the cell as well as variations in cell thickness. Although dual-excitation ratiometric dyes for measuring [Ca(2+)], such as Fura-2, Fura-Red, and ratiometric-pericam, are widely used for a variety of applications, it has been difficult to use them for monitoring very fast Ca(2+) dynamics or Ca(2+) changes in highly motile cells. To overcome this problem, we have developed three new dual-excitation ratiometry systems. (1) A system in which two laser beams are alternated on every scanning line, allowing us to obtain confocal images using dual-excitation ratiometric dyes. This system increases the rate at which ratio measurements can be made to 200 Hz and provides confocal images at 1-10 Hz depending on the image size. (2) A truly simultaneous dual-excitation ratiometry system that used linearly polarized excitation light and polarization detection, allowing us to obtain ratiometric images without any time lag. This system, however, is based on statistical features of the fluorescence polarization and is limited to samples that contain a large number of fluorophores. In addition, this method requires complicated calculations. (3) An efficient, nearly simultaneous dual-excitation ratiometry system that allows us to rapidly switch between two synchronized excitation-detection components by employing two high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and two high-speed liquid crystal shutters. The open/close operation of the two shutters is synchronized with the on/off switching of the two LEDs. This system increases the rate at which ratio measurements are made to 1 kHz, and provides ratio images at 10-100 Hz depending on the signal intensity.

  15. Molecular imaging and sensing using plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew James

    Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties that are beneficial to a variety of applications, including molecular imaging. The large scattering cross sections of nanoparticles provide high contrast necessary for biomarkers. Unlike alternative contrast agents, nanoparticles provide refractive index sensitivity revealing information regarding the local cellular environment. Altering the shape and composition of the nanoparticle shifts the peak resonant wavelength of scattered light, allowing for implementation of multiple spectrally distinct tags. In this project, nanoparticles that scatter in different spectral windows are functionalized with various antibodies recognizing extra-cellular receptors integral to cancer progression. A hyperspectral imaging system is developed, allowing for visualization and spectral characterization of cells labeled with these conjugates. Various molecular imaging and microspectroscopy applications of plasmonic nanoparticles are then investigated. First, anti-EGFR gold nanospheres are shown to quantitatively measure receptor expression with similar performance to fluorescence assays. Second, anti-EGFR gold nanorods and novel anti-IGF-1R silver nanospheres are implemented to indicate local cellular refractive indices. Third, because biosensing capabilities of nanoparticle tags may be limited by plasmonic coupling, polarization mapping is investigated as a method to discern these effects. Fourth, plasmonic coupling is tested to monitor HER-2 dimerization. Experiments reveal the interparticle conformation of proximal HER-2 bound labels, required for plasmonic coupling-enhanced dielectric sensing. Fifth, all three functionalized plasmonic tags are implemented simultaneously to indicate clinically relevant cell immunophenotype information and changes in the cellular dielectric environment. Finally, flow cytometry experiments are conducted utilizing the anti-EGFR nanorod tag to demonstrate profiling of receptor expression

  16. Dual cervical thoracic coil for spine magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totterman, S.; Foster, T.H.; Plewes, D.B.; Simon, J.H.; Ekholm, S.; Wicks, A. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Radiology Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    The need for repositioning of surface coils and patients in MR examinations of the cervical and thoracic spin prolongs examination time. A new receiver design is proposed which overcomes this problem. The device is composed of two actively decoupled receiver coils mounted on the frame of a Philadelphia collar. These coils may be used separately to image either the thoracic or cervical spine or together to produce larger field-of-view images of the combined region. Signal-to-noise ratios of the separate cervical and thoracic spine images are not degraded as a result of mounting the receivers together. The full cervical and thoracic region is shown to be imaged at a signal-to-noise ratio significantly higher than that afforded by the body coil. A retrospective review of our case load suggests that a time saving could be achieved in approximately 1/3 of spine examinations by using this coil. (orig.).

  17. Cardiac amyloidosis imaged by dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Mohamed; Pflederer, Tobias; Ropers, Dieter; Schmid, Michael; Wasmeier, Gerald; Söder, Stephan; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2008-11-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been reported previously. Typical myocardial distribution patterns of "late enhancement" have been described for MRI. The same patterns can be observed in CT imaging, albeit at a lower signal to noise ratio. We report a case of cardiac amyloidosis with a typical pattern of subendocardial, circumferential late enhancement in all four cardiac chambers.

  18. Dual-frequency transducer for nonlinear contrast agent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiroy, Axel; Novell, Anthony; Ringgaard, Erling; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Abellard, André-Pierre; Zawada, Tomasz; Bouakaz, Ayache; Levassort, Franck

    2013-12-01

    Detection of high-order nonlinear components issued from microbubbles has emerged as a sensitive method for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the detection of these high-frequency components, including the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics, remains challenging because of the lack of transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. In this context, we propose a new design of imaging transducer based on a simple fabrication process for high-frequency nonlinear imaging. The transducer is composed of two elements: the outer low-frequency (LF) element was centered at 4 MHz and used in transmit mode, whereas the inner high-frequency (HF) element centered at 14 MHz was used in receive mode. The center element was pad-printed using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) paste. The outer element was molded using a commercial PZT, and curved porous unpoled PZT was used as backing. Each piezoelectric element was characterized to determine the electromechanical performance with thickness coupling factor around 45%. After the assembly of the two transducer elements, hydrophone measurements (electroacoustic responses and radiation patterns) were carried out and demonstrated a large bandwidth (70% at -3 dB) of the HF transducer. Finally, the transducer was evaluated for contrast agent imaging using contrast agent microbubbles. The results showed that harmonic components (up to the sixth harmonic) of the microbubbles were successfully detected. Moreover, images from a flow phantom were acquired and demonstrated the potential of the transducer for high-frequency nonlinear contrast imaging.

  19. Molecular breast imaging: First results from Italian-National-Institute-of-Health clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Santanvenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Cinti, M. N.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Simonetti, G.; Schillaci, O.; Del Vecchio, S.; Salvatore, M.; Majewski, S.; De Vincentis, G.; Scopinaro, F.

    2007-02-01

    Dedicated high resolution detectors are needed for detection of small tumors by molecular imaging with radionuclides. Absorptive collimation are typically used for imaging single photon emitters, but it results in a strong reduction in efficiency. Systems based on electronic collimation offer higher efficiency but they are complex and expensive. In case of scintimammography, dual-head detectors increase sensitivity and cancel out the dependence of the lesion depth. In the system presented here, pixellated scintillator arrays (NaI:Tl) were coupled to arrays of PSPMT's, HPK H8500 Flat Panel. A dual-head detector having field of view of 100×100 mm 2 and 150×200 mm 2 were designed and built. The electronic system allows readout of all the anode pad signals. First clinical trials, performed in the framework of the Scintimammography project of Italian National Institute of Health and University of Tor Vergata in Rome, and University of Naples, are presented.

  20. Development of a Confocal Optical System Design for Molecular Imaging Applications of Biochip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel confocal optical system design and a dual laser confocal scanner have been developed to meet the requirements of highly sensitive detection of biomolecules on microarray chips, which is characterized by a long working distance (wd>3.0 mm, high numerical aperture (NA=0.72, and only 3 materials and 7 lenses used. This confocal optical system has a high scanning resolution, an excellent contrast and signal-to-noise ratio, and an efficiency of collected fluorescence of more than 2-fold better than that of other commercial confocal biochip scanners. The scanner is as equally good for the molecular imaging detection of enclosed biochips as for the detection of biological samples on a slide surface covered with a cover-slip glass. Some applications of gene and protein imagings using the dual laser confocal scanner are described.

  1. Multiscale Modeling using Molecular Dynamics and Dual Domain Material Point Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Tilak Raj [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, T-3; Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-07-07

    For problems involving large material deformation rate, the material deformation time scale can be shorter than the material takes to reach a thermodynamical equilibrium. For such problems, it is difficult to obtain a constitutive relation. History dependency become important because of thermodynamic non-equilibrium. Our goal is to build a multi-scale numerical method which can bypass the need for a constitutive relation. In conclusion, multi-scale simulation method is developed based on the dual domain material point (DDMP). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed to calculate stress. Since the communication among material points is not necessary, the computation can be done embarrassingly parallel in CPU-GPU platform.

  2. Dual-frequency transducer with a wideband PVDF receiver for contrast-enhanced, adjustable harmonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwook; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Li, Sibo; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic angiography is a contrast-enhanced, superharmonic microvascular imaging method. It has shown the capability of high-resolution and high-contrast-to-tissue-ratio (CTR) imaging for vascular structure near tumor. Dual-frequency ultrasound transducers and arrays are usually used for this new imaging technique. Stacked-type dual-frequency transducers have been developed for this vascular imaging method by exciting injected microbubble contrast agent (MCA) in the vessels with low-frequency (1-5 MHz), moderate power ultrasound burst waves and receiving the superharmonic responses from MCA by a high-frequency receiver (>10 MHz). The main challenge of the conventional dual-frequency transducers is a limited penetration depth (harmonic signal detection. A receiver with a high receiving sensitivity spanning a wide superharmonic frequency range (3rd to 6th) enables selectable bubble harmonic detection considering the required penetration depth. Here, we develop a new dual-frequency transducer composed of a 2 MHz 1-3 composite transmitter and a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) receiver with a receiving frequency range of 4-12 MHz for adjustable harmonic imaging. The developed transducer was tested for harmonic responses from a microbubble-injected vessel-mimicking tube positioned 45 mm away. Despite the long imaging distance (45 mm), the prototype transducer detected clear harmonic response with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 6-20 dB and the -6 dB axial resolution of 200-350 μm for imaging a 200 um-diameter cellulose tube filled with microbubbles.

  3. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  4. Simultaneous live cell imaging using dual FRET sensors with a single excitation light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins is a powerful tool for visualization of signal transduction in living cells, and recently, some strategies for imaging of dual FRET pairs in a single cell have been reported. However, these necessitate alteration of excitation light between two different wavelengths to avoid the spectral overlap, resulting in sequential detection with a lag time. Thus, to follow fast signal dynamics or signal changes in highly motile cells, a single-excitation dual-FRET method should be required. Here we reported this by using four-color imaging with a single excitation light and subsequent linear unmixing to distinguish fluorescent proteins. We constructed new FRET sensors with Sapphire/RFP to combine with CFP/YFP, and accomplished simultaneous imaging of cAMP and cGMP in single cells. We confirmed that signal amplitude of our dual FRET measurement is comparable to of conventional single FRET measurement. Finally, we demonstrated to monitor both intracellular Ca(2+ and cAMP in highly motile cardiac myocytes. To cancel out artifacts caused by the movement of the cell, this method expands the applicability of the combined use of dual FRET sensors for cell samples with high motility.

  5. Multiple Time-Step Dual-Hamiltonian Hybrid Molecular Dynamics - Monte Carlo Canonical Propagation Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunjie; Kale, Seyit; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R; Roux, Benoît

    2016-04-12

    A multiple time-step integrator based on a dual Hamiltonian and a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) is proposed to sample systems in the canonical ensemble. The Dual Hamiltonian Multiple Time-Step (DHMTS) algorithm is based on two similar Hamiltonians: a computationally expensive one that serves as a reference and a computationally inexpensive one to which the workload is shifted. The central assumption is that the difference between the two Hamiltonians is slowly varying. Earlier work has shown that such dual Hamiltonian multiple time-step schemes effectively precondition nonlinear differential equations for dynamics by reformulating them into a recursive root finding problem that can be solved by propagating a correction term through an internal loop, analogous to RESPA. Of special interest in the present context, a hybrid MD-MC version of the DHMTS algorithm is introduced to enforce detailed balance via a Metropolis acceptance criterion and ensure consistency with the Boltzmann distribution. The Metropolis criterion suppresses the discretization errors normally associated with the propagation according to the computationally inexpensive Hamiltonian, treating the discretization error as an external work. Illustrative tests are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  6. An algorithm for noise correction of dual-energy computed tomography material density images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Rafael Simon; Jacob, Christian; Hara, Amy K; Silva, Alvin C; Pavlicek, William; Ross, Mitchell J

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) images can undergo a two-material decomposition process which results in two images containing material density information. Material density images obtained by that process result in images with increased pixel noise. Noise reduction in those images is desirable in order to improve image quality. A noise reduction algorithm for material density images was developed and tested. A three-level wavelet approach combined with the application of an anisotropic diffusion filter was used. During each level, the resulting noise maps are further processed, until the original resolution is reached and the final noise maps obtained. Our method works in image space and, therefore, can be applied to any type of material density images obtained from any DECT vendor. A quantitative evaluation of the noise-reduced images using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and 2D noise power spectrum was done to quantify the improvements. The noise reduction algorithm was applied to a set of images resulting in images with higher SNR and CNR than the raw density images obtained by the decomposition process. The average improvement in terms of SNR gain was about 49 % while CNR gain was about 52 %. The difference between the raw and filtered regions of interest mean values was far from reaching statistical significance (minimum [Formula: see text], average [Formula: see text]). We have demonstrated through a series of quantitative analyses that our novel noise reduction algorithm improves the image quality of DECT material density images.

  7. Design of optimal collimation for dedicated molecular breast imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a functional imaging technique that uses specialized small field-of-view gamma cameras to detect the preferential uptake of a radiotracer in breast lesions. MBI has potential to be a useful adjunct method to screening mammography for the detection of occult breast cancer. However, a current limitation of MBI is the high radiation dose (a factor of 7-10 times that of screening mammography) associated with current technology. The purpose of this study was to optimize the gamma camera collimation with the aim of improving sensitivity while retaining adequate resolution for the detection of sub-10-mm lesions. Square-hole collimators with holes matched to the pixilated cadmium zinc telluride detector elements of the MBI system were designed. Data from MBI patient studies and parameters of existing dual-head MBI systems were used to guide the range of desired collimator resolutions, source-to-collimator distances, pixel sizes, and collimator materials that were examined. General equations describing collimator performance for a conventional gamma camera were used in the design process along with several important adjustments to account for the specialized imaging geometry of the MBI system. Both theoretical calculations and a Monte Carlo model were used to measure the geometric efficiency (or sensitivity) and resolution of each designed collimator. Results showed that through optimal collimation, collimator sensitivity could be improved by factors of 1.5-3.2, while maintaining a collimator resolution of either {<=}5 or {<=}7.5 mm at a distance of 3 cm from the collimator face. These gains in collimator sensitivity permit an inversely proportional drop in the required dose to perform MBI.

  8. Dual self-image technique for beam collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Fernandez, Jose Maria; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Morlanes, Tomas; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2016-07-01

    We propose an accurate technique for obtaining highly collimated beams, which also allows testing the collimation degree of a beam. It is based on comparing the period of two different self-images produced by a single diffraction grating. In this way, variations in the period of the diffraction grating do not affect to the measuring procedure. Self-images are acquired by two CMOS cameras and their periods are determined by fitting the variogram function of the self-images to a cosine function with polynomial envelopes. This way, loss of accuracy caused by imperfections of the measured self-images is avoided. As usual, collimation is obtained by displacing the collimation element with respect to the source along the optical axis. When the period of both self-images coincides, collimation is achieved. With this method neither a strict control of the period of the diffraction grating nor a transverse displacement, required in other techniques, are necessary. As an example, a LED considering paraxial approximation and point source illumination is collimated resulting a resolution in the divergence of the beam of δ φ =+/- 1.57 μ {rad}.

  9. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menten, Martin J., E-mail: martin.menten@icr.ac.uk; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oelfke@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  10. A Stereo Dual-Channel Dynamic Programming Algorithm for UAV Image Stitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Chen, Ruizhi; Zhang, Weilong; Li, Deren; Liao, Xuan; Wang, Lei; Pan, Yuanjin; Zhang, Peng

    2017-09-08

    Dislocation is one of the major challenges in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) image stitching. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for seamlessly stitching UAV images based on a dynamic programming approach. Our solution consists of two steps: Firstly, an image matching algorithm is used to correct the images so that they are in the same coordinate system. Secondly, a new dynamic programming algorithm is developed based on the concept of a stereo dual-channel energy accumulation. A new energy aggregation and traversal strategy is adopted in our solution, which can find a more optimal seam line for image stitching. Our algorithm overcomes the theoretical limitation of the classical Duplaquet algorithm. Experiments show that the algorithm can effectively solve the dislocation problem in UAV image stitching, especially for the cases in dense urban areas. Our solution is also direction-independent, which has better adaptability and robustness for stitching images.

  11. Novel Strategy for Preparing Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging Probes via Photo-Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Gai, Yongkang; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-05-18

    Preparation of small molecule based dual-modality probes remains a challenging task due to the complicated synthetic procedure. In this study, a novel concise and generic strategy for preparing dual-modality optical/PET imaging probes via photo-click chemistry was developed, in which the diazole photo-click linker functioned not only as a bridge between the targeting-ligand and the PET imaging moiety, but also as the fluorophore for optical imaging. A dual-modality AE105 peptidic probe was successfully generated via this strategy and subsequently applied in the fluorescent staining of U87MG cells and the (68)Ga based PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG xenograft. In addition, dual-modality monoclonal antibody cetuximab has also been generated via this strategy and labeled with (64)Cu for PET imaging studies, broadening the application of this strategy to include the preparation of macromolecule based imaging probes.

  12. Synthetic Aperture Flow Imaging Using a Dual Beamformer Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ye

    Color flow mapping systems have become widely used in clinical applications. It provides an opportunity to visualize the velocity profile over a large region in the vessel, which makes it possible to diagnose, e.g., occlusion of veins, heart valve deficiencies, and other hemodynamic problems....... However, while the conventional ultrasound imaging of making color flow mapping provides useful information in many circumstances, the spatial velocity resolution and frame rate are limited. The entire velocity distribution consists of image lines from different directions, and each image line...... the capability of acquiring color flow mapping with a high frame rate. Secondly, the new method is extended to the vector velocity estimation using directional beamforming, which beamforms data in the flow direction. The magnitude of the flow can be obtained and results of simulations and phantom measurements...

  13. Refinement of the tripartite influence model for men: dual body image pathways to body change behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, Tracy L

    2011-06-01

    Although muscularity and body fat concerns are central to conceptualizing men's body image, they have not been examined together within existing structural models. This study refined the tripartite influence model (Thompson, Heinberg, Altabe, & Tantleff-Dunn, 1999) by including dual body image pathways (muscularity and body fat dissatisfaction) to engagement in muscular enhancement and disordered eating behaviors, respectively, and added dating partners as a source of social influence. Latent variable structural equation modeling analyses supported this quadripartite model in 473 undergraduate men. Nonsignificant paths were trimmed and two unanticipated paths were added. Muscularity dissatisfaction and body fat dissatisfaction represented dual body image pathways to men's engagement in muscularity enhancement behaviors and disordered eating behaviors, respectively. Pressures to be mesomorphic from friends, family, media, and dating partners made unique contributions to the model. Internalization of the mesomorphic ideal, muscularity dissatisfaction, and body fat dissatisfaction played key meditational roles within the model.

  14. Sparsity-based Image Error Concealment via Adaptive Dual Dictionary Learning and Regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianming; Zhai, Deming; Zhou, Jiantao; Wang, Shiqi; Zhao, Debin; Gao, Huijun

    2016-10-31

    In this paper, we propose a novel sparsity-based image error concealment (EC) algorithm through Adaptive Dual dictionary Learning and Regularization (ADLR). We define two feature spaces: the observed space and the latent space, corresponding to the available regions and the missing regions of image under test, respectively. We learn adaptive and complete dictionaries individually for each space, where the training data are collected via an adaptive template matching mechanism. Based on the piecewise stationarity of natural images, a local correlation model is learned to bridge the sparse representations of the aforementioned dual spaces, allowing us to transfer the knowledge of the available regions to the missing regions for EC purpose. Eventually, the EC task is formulated as a unified optimization problem, where the sparsity of both spaces and the learned correlation model are incorporated. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques in terms of both objective and perceptual metrics.

  15. Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network Algorithm for Fusion of Multimodality Brain Images with Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha SRINIVASAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the review of medical imaging techniques, an important fact that emerged is that radiologists and physicians still are in a need of high-resolution medical images with complementary information from different modalities to ensure efficient analysis. This requirement should have been sorted out using fusion techniques with the fused image being used in image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy and non-invasive diagnosis. Aim: This paper focuses on Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN Algorithm for fusion of multimodality brain images and the fused image is further analyzed using subjective (human perception and objective (statistical measures for the quality analysis. Material and Methods: The modalities used in fusion are CT, MRI with subtypes T1/T2/PD/GAD, PET and SPECT, since the information from each modality is complementary to one another. The objective measures selected for evaluation of fused image were: Information Entropy (IE - image quality, Mutual Information (MI – deviation in fused to the source images and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR – noise level, for analysis. Eight sets of brain images with different modalities (T2 with T1, T2 with CT, PD with T2, PD with GAD, T2 with GAD, T2 with SPECT-Tc, T2 with SPECT-Ti, T2 with PET are chosen for experimental purpose and the proposed technique is compared with existing fusion methods such as the Average method, the Contrast pyramid, the Shift Invariant Discrete Wavelet Transform (SIDWT with Harr and the Morphological pyramid, using the selected measures to ascertain relative performance. Results: The IE value and SNR value of the fused image derived from dual channel PCNN is higher than other fusion methods, shows that the quality is better with less noise. Conclusion: The fused image resulting from the proposed method retains the contrast, shape and texture as in source images without false information or information loss.

  16. Dual-energy lung perfusion computed tomography: a novel pulmonary functional imaging method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sven F; Johnson, Thorsten R C; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2010-08-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) can be used for visualization of pulmonary microvascular contrast material distribution, representing regional perfusion. It is performed as DECT angiography and allows for the reconstruction of morphologic images as well as of "perfusion maps." The authors of previous studies have shown its potential to reliably depict perfusion defects, mainly in the context of pulmonary embolism. Also in the diagnostic work-up of other pulmonary diseases, there might be additional functional information provided by dual-energy acquisition techniques. This review focuses on the physical and technical background and the potential clinical value of pulmonary DECT. Technical improvements of a second-generation dual-source CT system are elucidated.

  17. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  18. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  19. Computational surgery and dual training computing, robotics and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, Barbara; Berceli, Scott; Collet, Christophe; Cerveri, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume focuses on the use of medical imaging, medical robotics, simulation, and information technology in surgery. It offers a road map for computational surgery success,  discusses the computer-assisted management of disease and surgery, and provides a rational for image processing and diagnostic. This book also presents some advances on image-driven intervention and robotics, as well as evaluates models and simulations for a broad spectrum of cancers as well as cardiovascular, neurological, and bone diseases. Training and performance analysis in surgery assisted by robotic systems is also covered. This book also: ·         Provides a comprehensive overview of the use of computational surgery and disease management ·         Discusses the design and use of medical robotic tools for orthopedic surgery, endoscopic surgery, and prostate surgery ·         Provides practical examples and case studies in the areas of image processing, virtual surgery, and simulation traini...

  20. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Molecular imaging in the era of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Clinical imaging creates visual representations of the body interior for disease assessment. The role of clinical imaging significantly overlaps with that of pathology, and diagnostic workflows largely depend on both fields. The field of clinical imaging is presently undergoing a radical change through the emergence of a new field called molecular imaging. This new technology, which lies at the intersection between imaging and molecular biology, enables noninvasive visualization of biochemical processes at the molecular level within living bodies. Molecular imaging differs from traditional anatomical imaging in that biomarkers known as imaging probes are used to visualize target molecules-of-interest. This ability opens up exciting new possibilities for applications in oncologic, neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Molecular imaging is expected to make major contributions to personalized medicine by allowing earlier diagnosis and predicting treatment response. The technique is also making a huge impact on pharmaceutical development by optimizing preclinical and clinical tests for new drug candidates. This review will describe the basic principles of molecular imaging and will briefly touch on three examples (from an immense list of new techniques) that may contribute to personalized medicine: receptor imaging, angiogenesis imaging, and apoptosis imaging.

  2. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, N. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Needles, A. [Visualsonics, Toronto (Canada); Willmann, J.K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.ed [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic.

  3. An Image-Domain Contrast Material Extraction Method for Dual-Energy Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jack W; Sun, Yuxin; Gould, Robert G; Ohliger, Michael A; Li, Zhixi; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2017-04-01

    Conventional material decomposition techniques for dual-energy computed tomography (CT) assume mass or volume conservation, where the CT number of each voxel is fully assigned to predefined materials. We present an image-domain contrast material extraction process (CMEP) method that preferentially extracts contrast-producing materials while leaving the remaining image intact. Image processing freeware (Fiji) is used to perform consecutive arithmetic operations on a dual-energy ratio map to generate masks, which are then applied to the original images to generate material-specific images. First, a low-energy image is divided by a high-energy image to generate a ratio map. The ratio map is then split into material-specific masks. Ratio intervals known to correspond to particular materials (eg, iodine, calcium) are assigned a multiplier of 1, whereas ratio values in between these intervals are assigned linear gradients from 0 to 1. The masks are then multiplied by an original CT image to produce material-specific images. The method was tested quantitatively at dual-source CT and rapid kVp-switching CT (RSCT) with phantoms using pure and mixed formulations of tungsten, calcium, and iodine. Errors were evaluated by comparing the known material concentrations with those derived from the CMEP material-specific images. Further qualitative evaluation was performed in vivo at RSCT with a rabbit model using identical CMEP parameters to the phantom. Orally administered tungsten, vascularly administered iodine, and skeletal calcium were used as the 3 contrast materials. All 5 material combinations-tungsten, iodine, and calcium, and mixtures of tungsten-calcium and iodine-calcium-showed distinct dual-energy ratios, largely independent of material concentration at both dual-source CT and RSCT. The CMEP was successful in both phantoms and in vivo. For pure contrast materials in the phantom, the maximum error between the known and CMEP-derived material concentrations was 0.9 mg

  4. Holographic Dual to Conical Defects III: Improved Image Method

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya; Tikhanovskaya, M D

    2016-01-01

    The geodesics prescription in holographic approach in Lorentzian signature is valid only for geodesics which connect spacelike-separated points at the boundary, since there is no timelike geodesics which reach the boundary. There is also no straightforward analytic Euclidean continuation for a general background, such as e. g. moving particle in AdS. We propose an improved geodesic image method for two-point Lorentzian correlators which is valid for arbitrary time intervals in case of the bulk spacetime deformed by point particles. We illustrate that our prescription is consistent with the case when the analytic continuation exists and with the quasigeodesics prescription used in previous work. We also discuss some other applications of the improved image method, such as holographic entanglement entropy and multiple particles in AdS3.

  5. Dual in vivo Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Imaging of HER2 Expression in Breast Tumors for Diagnosis, Margin Assessment, and Surgical Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-specific imaging probes offer ways to improve molecular diagnosis, intraoperative margin assessment, and tumor resection. Fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging probes are of particular interest for clinical applications because the combination enables deeper tissue penetration for tumor detection while maintaining imaging sensitivity compared to a single optical imaging modality. Here we describe the development of a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeting imaging probe to visualize differential levels of HER2 expression in a breast cancer model. Specifically, we labeled trastuzumab with Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ3 and fluorescein for photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging of HER2 overexpression, respectively. The dual-labeled trastuzumab was tested for its ability to detect HER2 overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated an over twofold increase in the signal intensity for HER2-overexpressing tumors in vivo, compared to low–HER2-expressing tumors, using photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of detecting tumors and positive surgical margins by fluorescence imaging. These results suggest that multimodal HER2-specific imaging of breast cancer using the BHQ3-fluorescein trastuzumab enables molecular-level detection and surgical margin assessment of breast tumors in vivo. This technique may have future clinical impact for primary lesion detection, as well as intraoperative molecular-level surgical guidance in breast cancer.

  6. Alternating Direction Total Variation Image Reconstruction and Practical Decomposition for Dual-energy Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Lei; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Hanming; Zheng, Zhizhong; Zhang, Wenkun; Lu, Wanli; Hu, Guoen

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has shown great potential and promising applications in advanced imaging fields for its capabilities of material decomposition. However, image reconstructions and decompositions under sparse views dataset suffers severely from multi factors, such as insufficiencies of data, appearances of noise, and inconsistencies of observations. Under sparse views, conventional filtered back-projection type reconstruction methods fails to provide CT images with satisfying quality. Moreover, direct image decomposition is unstable and meet with noise boost even with full views dataset. This paper proposes an iterative image reconstruction algorithm and a practical image domain decomposition method for DECT. On one hand, the reconstruction algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which containing total variation regularization term and data fidelity term. The alternating direction method is utilized to design the corresponding algorithm which shows faster convergence speed com...

  7. Prior Image Guided Undersampled Dual Energy Reconstruction with Piecewise Polynomial Function Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual energy CT has the ability to give more information about the test object by reconstructing the attenuation factors under different energies. These images under different energies share identical structures but different attenuation factors. By referring to the fully sampled low-energy image, we show that it is possible to greatly reduce the sampling rate of the high-energy image in order to lower dose. To compensate the attenuation factor difference between the two modalities, we use piecewise polynomial fitting to fit the low-energy image to the high-energy image. During the reconstruction, the result is constrained by its distance to the fitted image, and the structural information thus can be preserved. An ASD-POCS-based optimization schedule is proposed to solve the problem, and numerical simulations are taken to verify the algorithm.

  8. Security protection of DICOM medical images using dual-layer reversible watermarking with tamper detection capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chun Kiat; Ng, Jason Changwei; Xu, Xiaotian; Poh, Chueh Loo; Guan, Yong Liang; Sheah, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    Teleradiology applications and universal availability of patient records using web-based technology are rapidly gaining importance. Consequently, digital medical image security has become an important issue when images and their pertinent patient information are transmitted across public networks, such as the Internet. Health mandates such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act require healthcare providers to adhere to security measures in order to protect sensitive patient information. This paper presents a fully reversible, dual-layer watermarking scheme with tamper detection capability for medical images. The scheme utilizes concepts of public-key cryptography and reversible data-hiding technique. The scheme was tested using medical images in DICOM format. The results show that the scheme is able to ensure image authenticity and integrity, and to locate tampered regions in the images.

  9. Single laser pulse generates dual photoacoustic signals for differential contrast photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zhang, Ruochong; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-04-04

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent signal amplitude. An analytical model is derived to describe the generation of the dual photoacoustic pulses, incorporating Gruneisen saturation and thermal diffusion effect, which is experimentally proved. Lastly, an alternate of LDPA technique using quasi-CW laser excitation is also introduced and demonstrated for both super-contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. Compared with existing nonlinear PA techniques, the proposed LDPA nonlinear effect could enable a much broader range of potential applications.

  10. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full...... nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully...

  11. Translational research of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Ma, X; Tian, J

    2013-12-01

    In the medical imaging field, molecular imaging is a rapidly developing discipline and forms many imaging modalities, providing us effective tools to visualize, characterize, and measure molecular and cellular mechanisms in complex biological processes of living organisms, which can deepen our understanding of biology and accelerate preclinical research including cancer study and medicine discovery. Among many molecular imaging modalities, although the penetration depth of optical imaging and the approved optical probes used for clinics are limited, it has evolved considerably and has seen spectacular advances in basic biomedical research and new drug development. With the completion of human genome sequencing and the emergence of personalized medicine, the specific drug should be matched to not only the right disease but also to the right person, and optical molecular imaging should serve as a strong adjunct to develop personalized medicine by finding the optimal drug based on an individual's proteome and genome. In this process, the computational methodology and imaging system as well as the biomedical application regarding optical molecular imaging will play a crucial role. This review will focus on recent typical translational studies of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future development of optical molecular imaging are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the review is then concluded.

  12. Optimizing bioimpedance measurement configuration for dual-gated nuclear medicine imaging: a sensitivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Hakulinen, Mikko A

    2011-07-01

    Motion artefacts due to respiration and cardiac contractions may deteriorate the quality of nuclear medicine imaging leading to incorrect diagnosis and inadequate treatment. Motion artefacts can be minimized by simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating, dual-gating. Currently, only cardiac gating is often performed. In this study, an optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration was determined for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating signal acquisition. The optimized configuration was located on anterolateral upper thorax based on sensitivity simulations utilizing a simplified thorax model. The validity of the optimized configuration was studied with six healthy volunteers. In the peak-to-peak and frequency content analyses the optimized configuration showed consistently higher peak-to-peak values and frequency content than other studied measurement configurations. This study indicates that the bioimpedance method has potential for the dual-gating in nuclear medicine imaging. The method would minimize the need of additional equipment, is easy for the technologists to use and comfortable for the patients.

  13. Silica nanocapsules of fluorescent conjugated polymers and superparamagnetic nanocrystals for dual-mode cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Happy; Wang, Miao; Yang, Chang-Tong; Pant, Shilpa; Bhakoo, Kishore Kumar; Wong, Siew Yee; Chen, Zhi-Kuan; Li, Xu; Wang, John

    2011-06-01

    We describe here a facile and benign synthetic strategy to integrate the fluorescent behavior of conjugated polymers and superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanocrystals into silica nanocapsules, forming a new type of bifunctional magnetic fluorescent silica nanocapsule (BMFSN). The resultant BMFSNs are uniform, colloidally stable in aqueous medium, and exhibit the desired dual functionality of fluorescence and superparamagnetism in a single entity. Four conjugated polymers with different emissions were used to demonstrate the versatility of employing this class of fluorescent materials for the preparation of BMFSNs. The applicability of BMFSNs in cellular imaging was studied by incubating them with human liver cancer cells, the result of which demonstrated that the cells could be visualized by dual-mode fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic behavior of the BMFSNs was exploited for in vitro magnetic-guided delivery of the nanocapsules into the cancer cells, thereby highlighting their potential for targeting biomedical applications.

  14. Molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with stem cells holds tremendous therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Over the last decade, molecular imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted cells and assessing the therapeutic efficacy. This current review summarizes the role and capabilities of different molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. We discuss current challenges and perspectives of these techniques and encompass updated information such as theranostic imaging and optogenetics in stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Dual tree complex wavelet transform based denoising of optical microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ufuk

    2012-12-01

    Photon shot noise is the main noise source of optical microscopy images and can be modeled by a Poisson process. Several discrete wavelet transform based methods have been proposed in the literature for denoising images corrupted by Poisson noise. However, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has disadvantages such as shift variance, aliasing, and lack of directional selectivity. To overcome these problems, a dual tree complex wavelet transform is used in our proposed denoising algorithm. Our denoising algorithm is based on the assumption that for the Poisson noise case threshold values for wavelet coefficients can be estimated from the approximation coefficients. Our proposed method was compared with one of the state of the art denoising algorithms. Better results were obtained by using the proposed algorithm in terms of image quality metrics. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement effect of the proposed method on collagen fıber images is examined. Our method allows fast and efficient enhancement of images obtained under low light intensity conditions.

  16. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Beylergil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several molecular imaging modalities have been evaluated in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare and aggressive tumor with a high tendency to metastasize. Continuous progress in the field of molecular imaging might improve management in these patients. The authors review the current modalities and their impact on MCC in this brief review article.

  17. Click reaction: An applicable radiolabeling method for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Byung Chul [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, the click reaction has found rapidly growing applications in the field of radiochemistry, ranging from a practical labeling method to molecular imaging of biomacromolecules. This present review details the development of highly reliable, powerful and selective click chemistry reactions for the rapid synthesis of new radiotracers for molecular imaging.

  18. Click Reaction: An Applicable Radiolabeling Method for Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Byung Chul

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the click reaction has found rapidly growing applications in the field of radiochemistry, ranging from a practical labeling method to molecular imaging of biomacromolecules. This present review details the development of highly reliable, powerful and selective click chemistry reactions for the rapid synthesis of new radiotracers for molecular imaging.

  19. Eu/Tb codoped spindle-shaped fluorinated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for dual-color cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Xia, Haibing; Jiang, Huaidong; Claverie, Jerome; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-02

    Lanthanide doped fluorinated hydroxyapatite (FAp) nanoparticles are promising cell imaging nanomaterials but they are excited at wavelengths which do not match the light sources usually found in a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). In this work, we have successfully prepared spindle-shaped Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles by a hydrothermal method. Compared with single Eu doped FAp, Eu/Tb codoped FAp can be excited by a 488 nm laser, and exhibit both green and red light emission. By changing the amounts of Eu and Tb peaks, the emission in the green region (500-580 nm) can be decreased to the benefit of the emission in the red region (580-720 nm), thus reaching a balanced dual color emission. Using MC3T3-E1 cells co-cultured with Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles, it is observed that the nanoparticles are cytocompatible even at a concentration as high as 800 μg ml(-1). The Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and can be monitored by dual color-green and red imaging with a single excitation light at 488 nm. At a concentration of 200 μg ml(-1), the cytoplasm is saturated in 8 hours, and Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles retain their fluorescence for at least 3 days. The cytocompatible Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles with unique dual color emission will be of great use for cell and tissue imaging.

  20. Siloxane Nanoprobes for Labeling and Dual Modality Functional Imaging of Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Caroline P; Cusick, Alex; Shankar, Rohini Vidya; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E; Kodibagkar, Vikram D

    2016-03-01

    Cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic for a myriad of medical conditions, including cancer, traumatic brain injury, and cardiovascular disease among others. A thorough understanding of the efficacy and cellular dynamics of these therapies necessitates the ability to non-invasively track cells in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a platform to track cells as a non-invasive modality with superior resolution and soft tissue contrast. We recently reported a new nanoprobe platform for cell labeling and imaging using fluorophore doped siloxane core nanoemulsions as dual modality ((1)H MRI/Fluorescence), dual-functional (oximetry/detection) nanoprobes. Here, we successfully demonstrate the labeling, dual-modality imaging, and oximetry of neural progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) in vitro using this platform. Labeling at a concentration of 10 μL/10(4) cells with a 40%v/v polydimethylsiloxane core nanoemulsion, doped with rhodamine, had minimal effect on viability, no effect on migration, proliferation and differentiation of NPSCs and allowed for unambiguous visualization of labeled NPSCs by (1)H MR and fluorescence and local pO2 reporting by labeled NPSCs. This new approach for cell labeling with a positive contrast (1)H MR probe has the potential to improve mechanistic knowledge of current therapies, and guide the design of future cell therapies due to its clinical translatability.

  1. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Francesco; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss about the role of new probes for molecular imaging in the evaluation of prostate cancer (PCa). This review focuses particularly on the role of new promising radiotracers for the molecular imaging with PET/computed tomography in the detection of PCa recurrence. The role of these new imaging techniques to guide lesion-target therapies and the potential application of these molecular probes as theranostics agents is discussed. Finally, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to castration in PCa and the maintenance of active androgen receptor are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel Infectivity-Enhanced Oncolytic Adenovirus with a Capsid-Incorporated Dual-Imaging Moiety for Monitoring Virotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J. Kimball

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We sought to develop a cancer-targeted, infectivity-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus that embodies a capsid-labeling fusion for non-invasive dual-modality imaging of ovarian cancer virotherapy. A functional fusion protein composed of fluorescent and nuclear imaging tags was genetically incorporated into the capsid of an infectivity-enhanced conditionally replicative adenovirus. Incorporation of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk and monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1 into the viral capsid and its genomic stability were verified by molecular analyses. Replication and oncolysis were evaluated in ovarian cancer cells. Fusion functionality was confirmed by in vitro gamma camera and fluorescent microscopy imaging. Comparison of tk-mRFP virus to single-modality controls revealed similar replication efficiency and oncolytic potency. Molecular fusion did not abolish enzymatic activity of HSV-tk as the virus effectively phosphorylated thymidine both ex vivo and in vitro. In vitro fluorescence imaging demonstrated a strong correlation between the intensity of fluorescent signal and cytopathic effect in infected ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that fluorescence can be used to monitor viral replication. We have in vitro validated a new infectivity-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus with a dual-imaging modality-labeled capsid, optimized for ovarian cancer virotherapy. The new agent could provide incremental gains toward climbing the barriers for achieving conditionally replicated adenovirus efficacy in human trials.

  3. Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores for dual-channel image-guided abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hyun, Hoon; Vargas, Christina; Gravier, Julien; Park, GwangLi; Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas-related complications are some of the most serious ones in abdominal surgery. The goal of this study was to develop and validate novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores that would enable real-time pancreas imaging to avoid the intraoperative pancreatic injury. After initial screening of a large NIR fluorophore library, the performance of 3 selected pancreas-targeted 700 nm NIR fluorophores, T700-H, T700-F, and MB, were quantified in mice, rats, and pigs. Dose ranging using 25 and 100 nmol, and 2.5 µmol of T700-F, and its imaging kinetics over a 4 h period were tested in each species. Three different 800 nm NIR fluorophores were employed for dual-channel FLARE™ imaging in pigs: 2 μmol of ZW800-1 for vessels and kidney, 1 μmol of ZW800-3C for lymph nodes, and 2 μmol of ESNF31 for adrenal glands. T700-F demonstrated the highest signal to background ratio (SBR), with peak SBR at 4 h postinjection in mice. In pigs, T700-F produced an SBR≥2 against muscle, spleen, and lymph nodes for up to 8 h after a single intravenous injection. The combination of T700-F with each 800 nm NIR fluorophore provided simultaneous dual-channel intraoperative imaging of pancreas with surrounding organs in real time. Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores combined with the FLARE dual-channel imaging system enable the real-time intraoperative pancreas imaging which helps surgeons perform safer and more curative abdominal surgeries.

  4. Nanoparticle imaging probes for molecular imaging with computed tomography and application to cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Ryan K.; Curtis, Tyler E.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Irimata, Lisa E.; McGinnity, Tracie L.; Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2017-03-01

    Precision imaging is needed to realize precision medicine in cancer detection and treatment. Molecular imaging offers the ability to target and identify tumors, associated abnormalities, and specific cell populations with overexpressed receptors. Nuclear imaging and radionuclide probes provide high sensitivity but subject the patient to a high radiation dose and provide limited spatiotemporal information, requiring combined computed tomography (CT) for anatomic imaging. Therefore, nanoparticle contrast agents have been designed to enable molecular imaging and improve detection in CT alone. Core-shell nanoparticles provide a powerful platform for designing tailored imaging probes. The composition of the core is chosen for enabling strong X-ray contrast, multi-agent imaging with photon-counting spectral CT, and multimodal imaging. A silica shell is used for protective, biocompatible encapsulation of the core composition, volume-loading fluorophores or radionuclides for multimodal imaging, and facile surface functionalization with antibodies or small molecules for targeted delivery. Multi-agent (k-edge) imaging and quantitative molecular imaging with spectral CT was demonstrated using current clinical agents (iodine and BaSO4) and a proposed spectral library of contrast agents (Gd2O3, HfO2, and Au). Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au nanoparticles were demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and specificity for the detection of breast microcalcifications by conventional radiography and CT in both normal and dense mammary tissue using murine models. Moreover, photon-counting spectral CT enabled quantitative material decomposition of the Au and calcium signals. Immunoconjugated Au@SiO2 nanoparticles enabled highly-specific targeting of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells for contrast-enhanced detection in model tumors.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: A Concise Synopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and continues to be a major public health problem. Imaging of prostate cancer remains particularly challenging owing to disease heterogeneity. Molecular imaging can provide unprecedented opportunities for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the development and natural progression of prostate cancer from a localized process to the hormone-refractory metastatic disease. Such understanding will be the key for targeted imaging and therapy and for predicting and evaluating treatment response and prognosis. In this article, we review briefly the contribution of multimodality molecular imaging methods for the in vivo characterization of the pathophysiology of prostate cancer.

  6. Molecular imaging in Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Anders; Schaadt, Bente K; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Bruun, Niels E

    2015-04-01

    We present a 54-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), fever, pericardial effusion and a mitral valve vegetation. (18)F-Fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) showed very high accumulation of the isotope at the mitral valve. The patient underwent cardiothoracic surgery and pathologic examinations showed characteristic morphology of Libman-Sacks vegetations. All microbiological examinations including blood cultures, microscopy, culture and 16s PCR of the valve were negative and the diagnosis of Libman-Sacks endocarditis was convincing. It is difficult to distinguish Libman-Sacks endocarditis from culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular imaging techniques are being used increasingly in cases of suspected IE but no studies have previously reported the use in patients with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In the present case, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT clearly demonstrated the increased glucose uptake caused by infiltrating white blood cells in the ongoing inflammatory process at the mitral valve. In conclusion, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT cannot be used to distinguish between IE and non-infective Libman-Sacks vegetations.

  7. Massively parallel dual-comb molecular detection with subharmonic optical parametric oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Smolski, Viktor O; Xu, Jia; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy offers unparalleled sensitivity for the detection of trace gases, solids and liquids, which is based on the existence of strong telltale vibrational bands in this part of the spectrum. It was shown more than a decade ago that a dual-comb Fourier spectroscopy could provide superior spectral coverage combined with high resolution and extremely fast data acquisition. Capabilities of this method were limited because of difficulty of producing twins of mutually coherent frequency combs in the mid- IR. Here we report a phase-coherent and broadband dual-comb system that is based on a pair of subharmonic (frequency-divide-by-two) optical parametric oscillators, pumped in turn by two phase-locked thulium fiber lasers at 2-micron wavelength. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of multiple molecular species in the whole band of 3.2-5.3 microns (frequency span 1200 cm^{-1}) augmented by the pump laser band of 1.85-2 microns (span 400 cm^{-1}), with spectral resolution 0.01-0.07 cm^{-1...

  8. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Osamu F; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene th...

  9. A dual cone-beam CT system for image guided radiotherapy: Initial performance characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Giles, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a recently developed benchtop dual cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system with two orthogonally placed tube/detector sets. Methods: The benchtop dual CBCT system consists of two orthogonally placed 40 Multiplication-Sign 30 cm flat-panel detectors and two conventional x-ray tubes with two individual high-voltage generators sharing the same rotational axis. The x-ray source to detector distance is 150 cm and x-ray source to rotational axis distance is 100 cm for both subsystems. The objects are scanned through 200 Degree-Sign of rotation. The dual CBCT system utilized 110 Degree-Sign of projection data from one detector and 90 Degree-Sign from the other while the two individual single CBCTs utilized 200 Degree-Sign data from each detector. The system performance was characterized in terms of uniformity, contrast, spatial resolution, noise power spectrum, and CT number linearity. The uniformities, within the axial slice and along the longitudinal direction, and noise power spectrum were assessed by scanning a water bucket; the contrast and CT number linearity were measured using the Catphan phantom; and the spatial resolution was evaluated using a tungsten wire phantom. A skull phantom and a ham were also scanned to provide qualitative evaluation of high- and low-contrast resolution. Each measurement was compared between dual and single CBCT systems. Results: Compared to single CBCT, the dual CBCT presented: (1) a decrease in uniformity by 1.9% in axial view and 1.1% in the longitudinal view, as averaged for four energies (80, 100, 125, and 150 kVp); (2) comparable or slightly better contrast (0{approx}25 HU) for low-contrast objects and comparable contrast for high-contrast objects; (3) comparable spatial resolution; (4) comparable CT number linearity with R{sup 2}{>=} 0.99 for all four tested energies; (5) lower noise power spectrum in magnitude. Dual CBCT images of the skull phantom and the

  10. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  11. Dual-Modal Colorimetric/Fluorescence Molecular Probe for Ratiometric Sensing of pH and Its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Luling; Li, Xiaolin; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2016-08-16

    As traditional pH meters cannot work well for minute regions (such as subcellular organelles) and in harsh media, molecular pH-sensitive devices for monitoring pH changes in diverse local heterogeneous environments are urgently needed. Here, we report a new dual-modal colorimetric/fluorescence merocyanine-based molecular probe (CPH) for ratiometric sensing of pH. Compared with previously reported pH probes, CPH bearing the benzyl group at the nitrogen position of the indolium group and the phenol, which is used as the acceptor for proton, could respond to pH changes immediately through both the ratiometric fluorescence signal readout and naked-eye colorimetric observation. The sensing process was highly stable and reversible. Most importantly, the suitable pKa value (6.44) allows CPH to presumably accumulate in lysosomes and become a lysosome-target fluorescent probe. By using CPH, the intralysosomal pH fluctuation stimulated by antimalaria drug chloroquine was successfully tracked in live cells through the ratiometric fluorescence images. Additionally, CPH could be immobilized on test papers, which exhibited a rapid and reversible colorimetric response to acid/base vapor through the naked-eye colorimetric analysis. This proof-of-concept study presents the potential application of CPH as a molecular tool for monitoring intralysosomal pH fluctuation in live cells, as well as paves the way for developing the economic, reusable, and fast-response optical pH meters for colorimetric sensing acid/base vapor with direct naked-eye observation.

  12. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: application to dual-energy CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F; Li, Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R; Lerma, Fritz A

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z = 2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  13. Explaining reaction mechanisms using the dual descriptor: a complementary tool to the molecular electrostatic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio

    2013-07-01

    The intrinsic reactivity of cyanide when interacting with a silver cation was rationalized using the dual descriptor (DD) as a complement to the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) in order to predict interactions at the local level. It was found that DD accurately explains covalent interactions that cannot be explained by MEP, which focuses on essentially ionic interactions. This allowed the rationalization of the reaction mechanism that yields silver cyanide in the gas phase. Other similar reaction mechanisms involving a silver cation interacting with water, ammonia, and thiosulfate were also explained by the combination of MEP and DD. This analysis provides another example of the usefulness of DD as a tool for gaining a deeper understanding of any reaction mechanism that is mainly governed by covalent interactions.

  14. Three-dimensional measurement of bubble volume based on dual perspective imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ting; Zhang, Shao-jie; Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) volume measurement approach of bubble in gas-liquid two-phase flow. According to the dual perspective imaging principle, bubble feature images can be captured from two different view angles. The least square ellipse fitting algorithm is used to figure out the feature parameters from the captured images. Then the 3D volume of bubble can be quantitatively measured. Compaerd with the traditional volume estimation methods based on single perspective imaging, it can effectively reduce the loss of bubble feature information. In the experiment, the 3D volume reconstruction of bubbles from dual perspective images is conducted, and the variation of bubble volume in the bubble rising process is studied. The results show that the measurement accuracy based on the proposed 3D method is higher than those based on traditional methods. The volume of rising bubble is periodically changed, which indicates that bubble achieves periodic rotation and deformation in the rising process.

  15. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with the low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  16. Phase-dependent dual-frequency contrast imaging at sub-harmonic frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-02-01

    Sub-harmonic imaging techniques have been shown to provide a higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) at the cost of relatively low signal intensity from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). In this study, we propose a method of dual-frequency excitation to further enhance the CTR of subharmonic imaging. A dual-frequency excitation pulse is an amplitude-modulated waveform which consists of two sinusoids with frequencies of f₁ (e.g., 9 MHz) and f₂ (e.g., 6 MHz) and the resulting envelope component at (f₁ - f₂) (e.g., 3 MHz) can serve as a driving force to excite the nonlinear response of UCAs. In this study, the f₂, at twice of the resonance frequency of UCAs, is adopted to efficiently generate a sub-harmonic component at half of the f₂ frequency, and f₁ is included to enhance the high-order nonlinear response of UCAs at the sub-harmonic frequency. The second- and third-order nonlinear components resulting from the envelope component would spectrally overlap at the sub-harmonic frequency when f₁ and f₂ are properly selected. We further optimize the generation of the sub-harmonic component by tuning the phase terms between second- and third-order nonlinear components. The results show that, with dual-frequency excitation, the CTR at sub-harmonic frequency improves compared with the conventional tone-burst method. Moreover, the CTR changes periodically with the relative phase of the separate frequency component in the dual-frequency excitation, leading to a difference of as much as 9.1 dB between the maximal and minimal CTR at 300 kPa acoustic pressure. The echo produced from the envelope component appears to be specific for UCAs, and thus the proposed method has the potential to improve both SNR and CTR in sub-harmonic imaging. Nevertheless, the dual-frequency waveform may suffer from frequency-dependent attenuation that degrades the generation of the envelope component. The deviation of the microbubble's resonance characteristics from the selection of

  17. Computational methods in molecular imaging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gunjan, Vinit Kumar; Venkatesh, C; Amarnath, M

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the experimental investigations that have been carried out on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (MRI & CT) images using state-of-the-art Computational Image processing techniques, and tabulates the statistical values wherever necessary. In a very simple and straightforward way, it explains how image processing methods are used to improve the quality of medical images and facilitate analysis. It offers a valuable resource for researchers, engineers, medical doctors and bioinformatics experts alike.

  18. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  19. A supramolecular material for dual-modal imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shanyue; Liang, Ruizheng; Li, Chunyang; Wei, Min

    2017-04-01

    Recently, how to design a formulation system with simultaneous diagnosis and therapy toward cancer has attracted tremendous attention. Herein, a supramolecular material was prepared via a facile method by the co-intercalation of folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (DOX) into the gallery of Gd(3+)-doped layered double hydroxides (LDHs), followed by surface adsorption of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). This supramolecular agent was proved to exhibit excellent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging (FI) behavior, as well as chemotherapy toward cancer (KB cell). The co-intercalated FA enables an efficient and selective drug delivery with good specificity. This work provides a facile approach for the fabrication of a drug formulation with dual-modal imaging and targeted therapy, which could be potentially used in the practical chemotherapy and medical imaging.

  20. Optical image hiding based on dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry and compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaosheng; Zhong, Liyun; Zhang, Qinnan; Zhou, Yunfei; Xiong, Jiaxiang; Tian, Jindong; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2017-01-01

    We propose an optical image hiding method based on dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry (DCSPSI) and compressive sensing (CS) in all-optical domain. In the DCSPSI architecture, a secret image is firstly embedded in the host image without destroying the original host's form, and a pair of interferograms with the phase shifts of π/2 is simultaneously generated by the polarization components and captured by two CCDs. Then, the holograms are further compressed sampling to the less data by CS. The proposed strategy will provide a useful solution for the real-time optical image security transmission and largely reducing data volume of interferogram. The experimental result demonstrates the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  1. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  2. Justifying molecular images in cell biology textbooks: From constructions to primary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpente, Norberto

    2016-02-01

    For scientific claims to be reliable and productive they have to be justified. However, on the one hand little is known on what justification precisely means to scientists, and on the other the position held by philosophers of science on what it entails is rather limited; for justifications customarily refer to the written form (textual expressions) of scientific claims, leaving aside images, which, as many cases from the history of science show are relevant to this process. The fact that images can visually express scientific claims independently from text, plus their vast variety and origins, requires an assessment of the way they are currently justified and in turn used as sources to justify scientific claims in the case of particular scientific fields. Similarly, in view of the different nature of images, analysis is required to determine on what side of the philosophical distinction between data and phenomena these different kinds of images fall. This paper historicizes and documents a particular aspect of contemporary life sciences research: the use of the molecular image as vehicle of knowledge production in cell studies, a field that has undergone a significant shift in visual expressions from the early 1980s onwards. Focussing on textbooks as sources that have been overlooked in the historiography of contemporary biomedicine, the aim is to explore (1) whether the shift of cell studies, entailing a superseding of the optical image traditionally conceptualised as primary data, by the molecular image, corresponds with a shift of justificatory practices, and (2) to assess the role of the molecular image as primary data. This paper also explores the dual role of images as teaching resources and as resources for the construction of knowledge in cell studies especially in its relation to discovery and justification. Finally, this paper seeks to stimulate reflection on what kind of archival resources could benefit the work of present and future epistemic

  3. Synthesis of Hymecromone Derivatives Containing Chiral 1,1'-Bi-2-naphthyl Moiety for Dual-mode Molecular Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi Xing SHAN; Chun Guang XIAO

    2004-01-01

    Some hymecromone derivatives containing chiral 1,1(-bi-2-naphthyl moiety were synthesized and their photodimerizations were investigated.It was found that fluorescence intensity and optical rotation of the new chiral hymecromone derivatives could be regulated by light.This property has potential significance for developing a new type of dual-mode molecular switch.

  4. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  5. Spray-Wall Impingement of Diesel-CNG Dual Fuel Jet using Schlieren Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Mhadi Abaker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas is a low cost fuel with high availability in nature. However, it cannot be used by itself in conventional diesel engines due to its low flame speed and high ignition temperature. The addition of a secondary fuel to enhance the mixture formation and combustion process facilitate its wider use as an alternative fuel. An experimental study was performed to investigate the diesel-CNG dual fuel jet-wall impingement. A constant volume optical chamber was designed to facilitate maximum optical access for the study of the jet-wall impingement at different injection pressures, temperatures and injector-wall distances. The bottom plate of the test rig was made of aluminum (piston material and it was heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. An injector driver was used to control the single-hole nozzle diesel injector combined with a natural gas injector. The injection timing of both injectors was synchronized with a camera trigger. The jet-wall impingement of diesel and diesel-CNG dual fuel jets was recorded with a high speed camera using Schlieren imaging technique and associated image processing software. The measurements of the jet radial penetration were higher in diesel-CNG dual fuel while the jet height travel along were higher in the case of diesel single fuel.

  6. Small hepatocellular carcinoma with peripheral enhancement:pathological correlation with dual phase images by helical CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ke-guo; SHEN Jing-xian; WANG Gen-shu; XU Da-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Background The peripheral enhancement of small hepatocellular carcinoma (SHCC) is a rare appearance in dual phase images by helical computed tomography (CT). This study discusses this phenomenon and its correlative histopathology.Methods The helical CT dual phase appearance of peripheral enhancement in SHCC was analyzed in 21 cases (22 lesions). All lesions were confirmed as SHCC by histopathological examination.Results In these 22 lesions, enhanced peripheral ring in 20 lesions was incomplete, the thickness of enhanced peripheral ring varied and mural node could be found in hepatic arterial phase; only 2 lesions had complete peripheral ring enhancement and ring of uniform thickness in hepatic arterial phase. The enhancement of some peripheral rings and mural nodes dropped to very low density in portal venous phase. The tumour cells were grade Ⅰ in 3 lesions, Ⅱ in 16, Ⅲ in 2 and Ⅳ in 1. The vascular supply was more abundant at the border than in the centre of 15 lesions and the vascular supply was deficient in both centre and border of the remaining 7 lesions. In 3 lesions, the pseudocapsule showed in the border of the lesion. In 12 lesions, flecks of necrosis were found in the border and/or centre of the lesion.Conclusions The characteristic peripheral enhancement in helical CT dual phase images of small hepatocellular carcinoma correlates with different vascular supplies, fibrous capsule and necrosis of the lesion.

  7. Preliminary Research on Dual-Energy X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption. While X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method is aiming to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretic ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for future precise and lo...

  8. Bone images from dual-energy subtraction chest radiography in the detection of rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt, E-mail: zsolt.szuecs@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Lautenschlager, Katrin, E-mail: katrin@students.unibe.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.unibe.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Ott, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.ott@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Strautz, Tamara, E-mail: tamara.strautz@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Vock, Peter, E-mail: peter.vock@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Ruder, Thomas D., E-mail: thomas.ruder@irm.unibe.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the sensitivity and image quality of chest radiography (CXR) with or without dual-energy subtracted (ES) bone images in the detection of rib fractures. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, 39 patients with 204 rib fractures and 24 subjects with no fractures were examined with a single exposure dual-energy subtraction digital radiography system. Three blinded readers first evaluated the non-subtracted posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs alone, and 3 months later they evaluated the non-subtracted images together with the subtracted posteroanterior bone images. The locations of rib fractures were registered with confidence levels on a 3-grade scale. Image quality was rated on a 5-point scale. Marks by readers were compared with fracture localizations in CT as a standard of reference. Results: The sensivity for fracture detection using both methods was very similar (34.3% with standard CXR and 33.5% with ES-CXR, p = 0.92). At the patient level, both sensitivity (71.8%) and specificity (92.9%) with or without ES were identical. Diagnostic confidence was not significantly different (2.61 with CXR and 2.75 with ES-CXR, p = 0.063). Image quality with ES was rated higher than that on standard CXR (4.08 vs. 3.74, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite a better image quality, adding ES bone images to standard radiographs of the chest does not provide better sensitivity or improved diagnostic confidence in the detection of rib fractures.

  9. Differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism using dual phase F 18 FP CIT PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, So Young; Oh, Min Young; Ok, Seung Jun; Oh, Jung Su; Lee, Sang Ju; Chung, Sun Ju; Lee, Chong Sik; Kim, Jae Seung [Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging can demonstrate presynaptic dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, differentiating atypical parkinsonism (APD) from PD is often difficult. We investigated the usefulness of dual phase F 18 FP CIT positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism. Ninety eight subjects [five normal, seven drug induced parkinsonism (DIP), five essential tremor (ET), 24 PD, 20 multiple system atrophy parkinson type (MSA-P), 13 multiple system atrophy cerebellar type (MSA-C), 13 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 11 dementia with Lewy bodies(DLB)] underwent F 18 FP CIT PET. PET images were acquired at 5 min (early phase) and 3 h (late phase) after F 18 FP CIT administration (185MBq). Regional uptake pattern of cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres was assessed on early phase images, using visual, quantitative, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analyses. Striatal DAT binding was normal in normal, ET, DIP, and MSA C groups, but abnormal in PD, MSA P PSP, and DLB groups. No difference was found in regional uptake on early phase images among normal DAT binding groups, except in the MSA C group. Abnormal DAT binding groups showed different regional uptake pattern on early phase images compared with PD in SPM analysis (FDR<0.05). When discriminating APD from PD, visual interpretation of the early phase image showed high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity (75.4% and 100%, respectively). Regarding the ability to distinguish specific APD, sensitivities were 81% for MSA P, 77% for MSA C, 23% for PSP, and 54.5% for DLB. Dual phase F 18 FP CIT PET imaging is useful in demonstrating striatal DAT loss in neurodegenerative parkinsonism, and also in differentiating APD, particularly MSA, from PD.

  10. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  11. Comparison of Virtual Unenhanced Images Derived From Dual-Energy CT With True Unenhanced Images in Evaluation of Gallstone Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han A; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Bang, Dong-Ho; Park, Dong Eun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare gallstones on virtual unenhanced images and true unenhanced images acquired with dual-energy CT (DECT). We enrolled 112 patients with right upper quadrant pain and clinically suspected acute cholecystitis or gallstone who underwent DECT--including unenhanced, arterial, and portal phases. Eighty-three gallstones with composition proven by semiquantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy from 45 patients who had undergone cholecystectomy (40 cholesterol gallstones from 21 patients, 43 calcium gallstones from 24 patients) were included. CT images were retrospectively evaluated for stone size, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of gallstone to bile, and visibility and density of gallstones for each image set. The visibility of each type of stone was compared with a paired t test. Both cholesterol and calcium stones measured smaller on virtual unenhanced images than on true unenhanced images, yielding a lower sensitivity of virtual unenhanced images for detecting small gallstones. Mean CNR of cholesterol stones was 2.45 ± 1.32 versus 1.67 ± 1.55 (p gallstones, but true unenhanced images allow better visualization of calcium and small gallstones.

  12. Nanomedicine: Perspective and promises with ligand-directed molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Dipanjan [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States)], E-mail: dipanjan@wustl.edu; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA (United States)], E-mail: scaruthers@cmrl.wustl.edu

    2009-05-15

    Molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery play an important role toward personalized medicine, which is the future of patient management. Of late, nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary area, which shows promises to understand the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The unprecedented potential of nanoplatforms for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases, have found application in every biomedical imaging modality. Biological and biophysical barriers are overcome by the integration of targeting ligands, imaging agents and therapeutics into the nanoplatform which allow for theranostic applications. In this article, we have discussed the opportunities and potential of targeted molecular imaging with various modalities putting a particular emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion-based platform technology.

  13. Image analysis using a dual-tree M-band wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Caroline; Duval, Laurent; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe

    2006-08-01

    We propose a two-dimensional generalization to the M-band case of the dual-tree decomposition structure (initially proposed by Kingsbury and further investigated by Selesnick) based on a Hilbert pair of wavelets. We particularly address: 1) the construction of the dual basis and 2) the resulting directional analysis. We also revisit the necessary pre-processing stage in the M-band case. While several reconstructions are possible because of the redundancy of the representation, we propose a new optimal signal reconstruction technique, which minimizes potential estimation errors. The effectiveness of the proposed M-band decomposition is demonstrated via denoising comparisons on several image types (natural, texture, seismics), with various M-band wavelets and thresholding strategies. Significant improvements in terms of both overall noise reduction and direction preservation are observed.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  15. Combined analysis of intracellular calcium with dual excitation fluorescence photometry and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1995-10-01

    We have developed an integrated microscopy system combining fast dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and digital image analysis with high spatial resolution, based mainly on standard components. With the combination of these well-established techniques in one setup it is possible to monitor intracellular calcium with both sufficiently high temporal and high spatial resolution on the same preparation for many biological applications. Our system consists of a commercially available dual-excitation photometric system, an attached ICCD camera, and a frame grabber board. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode and the imaging mode. We used the system to record Fura-2 calcium images (340/380 nm ratios), which were correlated with the faster spot measurements and were analyzed by means of image processing. As an example for its application we reconstructed caffeine-induced calcium transient released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of isolated and permeabilized skeletal muscle fiber preparations. Such a combined technique will also be important for cellular studies using other fluorescence indicators. Additionally, the described system has an external trigger facility that enables combination with other cell physiological methods, e.g., electrophysiological techniques.

  16. Color and Rotated M-Band Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform Features for Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Prasanthi Jasmine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel algorithm which integrates the RGB color histogram and texture features for content based image retrieval. A new set of two-dimensional (2-D M-band dual tree complex wavelet transform (M_band_DT_CWT and rotated M_band_DT_CWT are designed to improve the texture retrieval performance. Unlike the standard dual tree complex wavelet transform (DT_CWT, which gives a logarithmic frequency resolution, the M-band decomposition gives a mixture of a logarithmic and linear frequency resolution. Most texture image retrieval systems are still incapable of providing retrieval result with high retrieval accuracy and less computational complexity. To address this problem, we propose a novel approach for image retrieval using M_band_DT_CWT and rotated M_band_DT_CWT (M_band_DT_RCWT by computing the energy, standard deviation and their combination on each subband of the decomposed image. To check the retrieval performance, two texture databases are used. Further, it is mentioned that the databases used are Brodatz gray scale database and MIT VisTex Color database. The retrieval efficiency and accuracy using proposed features is found to be superior to other existing methods.

  17. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  18. Phenological tracking og agricultural feilds investigated by using dual polarimetry tanDEM-X images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaee, S.; Motagh, M.; Arefi, H.; Nooryazdan, A.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing plays a key role in monitoring and assessing environmental changes. Because of its special imaging characteristics such as high-resolution, capabilities to obtain data in all weather conditions and sensitivity to geometrical and dielectric properties of the features, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology has become a powerful technique to detect small scale changes related to earth surface.SAR images contain the information of both phase and intensity in different modes like single, dual and full polarimetric states which are important in order to extract information about various targets. In this study we investigate phenological changes in an agricultural region using high-resolution X-band SAR data. The case study is located in Doroud region of Lorestan province, west of Iran. The purpose is to investigate the ability of copolar and interferometric coherence extracted from TanDEM-X dual polarimetry (HH/VV) in bistatic StripMap mode for tracking the phenological changes of crops during growing season. The data include 11 images acquired between 12.06.2012 and 02.11.2012 and 6 images acquired between 30.05.2013 and 04.08.2013 in the CoSSC format. Results show that copolar coherence is almost able to follow phenological changes but interferometric coherence has a near constant behaviour with fluctuations mainly related to baseline variations.

  19. Dual-Branch Deep Convolution Neural Network for Polarimetric SAR Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Gao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The deep convolution neural network (CNN, which has prominent advantages in feature learning, can learn and extract features from data automatically. Existing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR image classification methods based on the CNN only consider the polarization information of the image, instead of incorporating the image’s spatial information. In this paper, a novel method based on a dual-branch deep convolution neural network (Dual-CNN is proposed to realize the classification of PolSAR images. The proposed method is built on two deep CNNs: one is used to extract the polarization features from the 6-channel real matrix (6Ch which is derived from the complex coherency matrix. The other is utilized to extract the spatial features of a Pauli RGB (Red Green Blue image. These extracted features are first combined into a fully connected layer sharing the polarization and spatial property. Then, the Softmax classifier is employed to classify these features. The experiments are conducted on the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR data of Flevoland and the results show that the classification accuracy on 14 types of land cover is up to 98.56%. Such results are promising in comparison with other state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Dual modality of non-contact photoacoustic tomography and fluorescence imaging using double cladding fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jonghyun; Park, Seong Jun; Kim, Ju Wan; Park, Soongho; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2015-03-01

    We present a fiber-based dual-modal imaging system that combines non-contact photoacoustic tomography (NCPAT) and fluorescence imaging by using double cladding fiber (DCF). The NCPAT system utilizing an all-fiber heterodyne interferometer as an ultrasound detector measures the photoacoustic signal at the sample surface without physical contact. Fluorescence imaging system is composed of fiber-optics to deliver the excitation light and the emission light. For combined system the probe consists of a specially fabricated DCF coupler and a lensed fiber so that we can simultaneously acquire the signals of two systems with the same probe. The DCF has a core and two claddings, inner and outer, which allows two concentric light-guiding channels via the core and the inner cladding. The lensed fiber of the DCF probe is compactly fabricated to focus the interferometer light and the excitation light, and to efficiently collect the fluorescence signal. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed dual-modal system, we have conducted phantom experiments using tissue mimicking phantoms which contained a couple of tubes filled with fluorescein solution and black ink, respectively. The proposed imaging system is implanted with fiber-optic configurations so that it has the potential for minimally invasive and improved diagnosis and guided treatment of diseases.

  1. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers.

  2. Dual-energy-CT of hypervascular liver lesions in patients with HCC: investigation of image quality and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenbernd, Jens [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Heusner, Till A.; Ringelstein, Adrian; Ladd, Susanne C.; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    To investigate dual-energy CT of hypervascular liver lesions in patients with HCC. Forty patients with hepatocellular carcinomas were investigated with abdominal dual-energy CT. In each patient unenhanced and contrast-enhanced imaging with arterial und portovenous delay were performed. Hypervascular lesions were documented on arterial phase 80-kVp images, 140-kVp images, and the averaged arterial images by two radiologists. Subjective image quality (5-point scale, from 5 [excellent] to 1 [not interpretable]) was rated on all images. The mean number of hypervascular HCC lesions detected was 3.37 {+-} 1.28 on 80-kVp images (p < 0.05), 1.43 {+-} 1.13 on 140-kVp images (p < 0.05), and 2.57 {+-} 1.2 on averaged images. The image quality was 0.3 {+-} 0.5 for 80-kVp (p < 0.05), 1.6 {+-} 0.5 for 140-kVp (p < 0.05) and 3.2 {+-} 0.4 for the averaged images. Low-kVp images of dual-energy datasets are more sensitive in detecting hypervascular liver lesions. However, this increase in sensitivity goes along with a decrease in the subjective image quality of low-kVp images. (orig.)

  3. Motion correction for improving the accuracy of dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Jed D.; Yin, Zhye; Xiong, Guanglei; Mittal, Priya; Dunham, Simon; Elmore, Kimberly; Edic, Peter M.; Min, James K.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death globally [1]. Modern cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly effective at identifying and assessing coronary blockages associated with CAD. The diagnostic value of this anatomical information can be substantially increased in combination with a non-invasive, low-dose, correlative, quantitative measure of blood supply to the myocardium. While CT perfusion has shown promise of providing such indications of ischemia, artifacts due to motion, beam hardening, and other factors confound clinical findings and can limit quantitative accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of applying a novel motion correction algorithm to correct for motion in the myocardium. This motion compensation algorithm (originally designed to correct for the motion of the coronary arteries in order to improve CCTA images) has been shown to provide substantial improvements in both overall image quality and diagnostic accuracy of CCTA. We have adapted this technique for application beyond the coronary arteries and present an assessment of its impact on image quality and quantitative accuracy within the context of dual-energy CT perfusion imaging. We conclude that motion correction is a promising technique that can help foster the routine clinical use of dual-energy CT perfusion. When combined, the anatomical information of CCTA and the hemodynamic information from dual-energy CT perfusion should facilitate better clinical decisions about which patients would benefit from treatments such as stent placement, drug therapy, or surgery and help other patients avoid the risks and costs associated with unnecessary, invasive, diagnostic coronary angiography procedures.

  4. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Our objective is to develop an arsenic- based radiopharmaceutical platform for IGF1R-targeted imaging and therapy of PCa. The hypothesis is that...arsenic- based , IGF1R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals can allow for PET imaging, IRT, and monitoring the therapeutic response of PCa. Specific Aims: Aim 1: To...models with PET imaging. Aim 3: To monitor the efficacy of 76As- based IRT of PCa with multimodality imaging.

  5. Inversion of Strong Field Photoelectron Spectra for Molecular Orbital Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R; Peters, M; Nguyen-Dang, T T; Atabek, O; Charron, E

    2016-01-01

    Imaging structures at the molecular level is a fast developing interdisciplinary research field that spans across the boundaries of physics and chemistry. High spatial resolution images of molecules can be obtained with photons or ultrafast electrons. In addition, images of valence molecular orbitals can be extracted via tomographic techniques based on the coherent XUV radiation emitted by a molecular gas exposed to an intense ultra-short infrared laser pulse. In this paper, we demonstrate that similar information can be obtained by inverting energy resolved photoelectron spectra using a simplified analytical model.

  6. A DWT based Dual Image Watermarking Technique for Authenticity and Watermark Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Tripathi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a DWT based dual watermarking technique wherein both blind and non-blind algorithms are used for the copyright protection of the cover/host image and the watermark respectively. We use the concept of embedding two watermarks into the cover image by actually embedding only one, to authenticate the source image and protect the watermark simultaneously. Here the DWT coefficients of the primary watermark (logo are modified using another smaller secondary binary image (sign and the midfrequency coefficients of the cover/host image. Since the watermark has some features of host image embedded in it, the security is increased two-fold and it also protects the watermark from any misuse or copy attack. For this purpose a new pseudorandom generator based on the mathematical constant π has been developed and used successfully in various stages of the algorithm. We have also proposed a new approach of applying pseudo-randomness in selecting the watermark pixel values for embedding in the cover image. In all the existing techniques the randomness is incorporated in selecting the location to embed the watermark. This makes the embedding process more unpredictable. The cover image which is watermarked with the signed-logo is subjected to various attacks like cropping, rotation, JPEG compression, scaling and noising. From the results it has been found that it is very robust and has good invisibility as well

  7. kV x-ray dual digital tomosynthesis for image guided lung SBRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partain, Larry; Boyd, Douglas; Kim, Namho; Hernandez, Andrew; Daly, Megan; Boone, John

    2016-03-01

    Two simulated sets of digital tomosynthesis images of the lungs, each acquired at a 90 degree angle from the other, with 19 projection images used for each set and SART iterative reconstructed, gives dual tomosynthesis slice image quality approaching that of spiral CT, and with a data acquisition time that is 3% of that of cone beam CT. This fast kV acquisition, should allow near real time tracking of lung tumors in patients receiving SBRT, based on a novel TumoTrakTM multi-source X-ray tube design. Until this TumoTrakTM prototype is completed over the next year, its projected performance was simulated from the DRR images created from a spiral CT data set from a lung cancer patient. The resulting dual digital tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the lung tumor were exceptional and approached that of the gold standard Feldkamp CT reconstruction of breath hold, diagnostic, spiral, multirow, CT data. The relative dose at 46 mAs was less than 10% of what it would have been if the digital tomosynthesis had been done at the 472 mAs of the CT data set. This is for a 0.77 fps imaging rate sufficient to resolve respiratory motion in many free breathing patients during SBRT. Such image guidance could decrease the magnitudes of targeting error margins by as much as 20 mm or more in the craniocaudal direction for lower lobe lesions while markedly reducing dose to normal lung, heart and other critical structures. These initial results suggest a wide range of topics for future work.

  8. Lipid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jinying Liang,1–3 Xinxin Zhang,2 Yunqiu Miao,2 Juan Li,1 Yong Gan2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Pharmacy, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The development of noninvasive imaging techniques for the accurate diagnosis of progressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is of great clinical significance and has always been desired. Herein, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell-targeting fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle (NP was obtained by conjugating near-infrared fluorescence to the surface of Fe3O4 (NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs, followed by coating the lipids consisting of tumoral hepatocytes-targeting polymer (Gal-P123. This magnetic NP (GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 with superparamagnetic behavior showed high stability and safety in physiological conditions. In addition, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 achieved more specific uptake of human liver cancer cells than free Fe3O4 NPs. Importantly, with superparamagnetic iron oxide and strong NIR absorbance, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs demonstrate prominent tumor-contrasted imaging performance both on fluorescent and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR imaging modalities in a living body. The relative MR signal enhancement of GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs achieved 5.4-fold improvement compared with NIR-Fe3O4 NPs. Therefore, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs may be potentially used as a candidate for dual-modal imaging of tumors with information covalidated and directly compared by combining fluorescence and MR imaging. Keywords: dual-imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatocellular carcinoma, tumor-targeting

  9. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Boerman, O.C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life th

  10. Fluorescence monitoring of riboswitch transcription regulation using a dual molecular beacon assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnappan, Raja; Dubé, Audrey; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A

    2013-05-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA elements that specifically bind cellular metabolites and control gene expression by modifying their structure. As riboswitches often control essential genes in pathogenic bacteria, riboswitches have been proposed as new targets for antibiotics. High-throughput screening provides a powerful approach to identify riboswitch ligand analogs that could act as powerful antibacterial drugs. Biochemical assays have already been used to find riboswitch-binding analogs, but those methods do take into account the transcriptional context for riboswitch regulation. As the importance of co-transcriptional ligand binding has been shown for several riboswitches, it is vital to develop an assay that screens riboswitch-binding analogs during the transcriptional process. Here, we describe the development of a dual molecular beacon system monitoring the transcriptional regulation activity of the Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch. This system relies on two molecular beacons that enable the monitoring of transcription efficiency, as well as the regulatory activity of the riboswitch. Different analogs were tested using our system, and a good correlation was observed between riboswitch activity and reported metabolite affinities. This method is specific, reliable and could be applied at the high-throughput level for the identification of new potential antibiotics targeting any riboswitch-regulating gene expression at the mRNA level.

  11. A dual adaptive watermarking scheme in contourlet domain for DICOM images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbani Hossein

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, medical imaging equipments produce digital form of medical images. In a modern health care environment, new systems such as PACS (picture archiving and communication systems, use the digital form of medical image too. The digital form of medical images has lots of advantages over its analog form such as ease in storage and transmission. Medical images in digital form must be stored in a secured environment to preserve patient privacy. It is also important to detect modifications on the image. These objectives are obtained by watermarking in medical image. Methods In this paper, we present a dual and oblivious (blind watermarking scheme in the contourlet domain. Because of importance of ROI (region of interest in interpretation by medical doctors rather than RONI (region of non-interest, we propose an adaptive dual watermarking scheme with different embedding strength in ROI and RONI. We embed watermark bits in singular value vectors of the embedded blocks within lowpass subband in contourlet domain. Results The values of PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratio and SSIM (structural similarity measure index of ROI for proposed DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine images in this paper are respectively larger than 64 and 0.997. These values confirm that our algorithm has good transparency. Because of different embedding strength, BER (bit error rate values of signature watermark are less than BER values of caption watermark. Our results show that watermarked images in contourlet domain have greater robustness against attacks than wavelet domain. In addition, the qualitative analysis of our method shows it has good invisibility. Conclusions The proposed contourlet-based watermarking algorithm in this paper uses an automatically selection for ROI and embeds the watermark in the singular values of contourlet subbands that makes the algorithm more efficient, and robust against noise attacks than other transform

  12. Design of visible/long-wave infrared dual-band imaging optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Lai, Jianjun; Huang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    An efficient small size and low weight optical lens system covering the visible and long-wave infrared dual-band is designed. The chromatic aberration caused by the wide bands from visible to long-wave infrared is one of the tough problems though large efforts have been done in the related communities. In this paper, for materials used as the base of the achromatic design, we choose two suitable materials (Zns and Kbr) that allow transmission both of visible and long-wave infrared (LWIR) light. Though the two materials have proved the ability to correct three wavelengths for each spectral range, the correction from the materials compensation is not enough and aspheric even diffractive surface was selected to join this optical system for reducing the aberration. The design results show a good image quality for infrared band imaging while the corresponding visible imaging is acceptable to be used to extract the outline of objects.

  13. Classification of agricultural fields using time series of dual polarimetry TerraSAR-X images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mirzaee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its special imaging characteristics, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR has become an important source of information for a variety of remote sensing applications dealing with environmental changes. SAR images contain information about both phase and intensity in different polarization modes, making them sensitive to geometrical structure and physical properties of the targets such as dielectric and plant water content. In this study we investigate multi temporal changes occurring to different crop types due to phenological changes using high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagers. The dataset includes 17 dual-polarimetry TSX data acquired from June 2012 to August 2013 in Lorestan province, Iran. Several features are extracted from polarized data and classified using support vector machine (SVM classifier. Training samples and different features employed in classification are also assessed in the study. Results show a satisfactory accuracy for classification which is about 0.91 in kappa coefficient.

  14. Imaging fall Chinook salmon redds in the Columbia River with a dual-frequency identification sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffan, K.F.; Rondorf, D.W.; Skalicky, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) for imaging and enumeration of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds in a spawning area below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The DIDSON uses sound to form near-video-quality images and has the advantages of imaging in zero-visibility water and possessing a greater detection range and field of view than underwater video cameras. We suspected that the large size and distinct morphology of a fall Chinook salmon redd would facilitate acoustic imaging if the DIDSON was towed near the river bottom so as to cast an acoustic shadow from the tailspill over the redd pocket. We tested this idea by observing 22 different redds with an underwater video camera, spatially referencing their locations, and then navigating to them while imaging them with the DIDSON. All 22 redds were successfully imaged with the DIDSON. We subsequently conducted redd searches along transects to compare the number of redds imaged by the DIDSON with the number observed using an underwater video camera. We counted 117 redds with the DIDSON and 81 redds with the underwater video camera. Only one of the redds observed with the underwater video camera was not also documented by the DIDSON. In spite of the DIDSON's high cost, it may serve as a useful tool for enumerating fall Chinook salmon redds in conditions that are not conducive to underwater videography.

  15. The homogeneous and dual-medium cell's refractive index decoupling method and entropy tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Z. D.; Xu, Y. Y.; Ji, Y.; Jin, W. F.; Zheng, H. R.; Zhang, L.; Wang, Y. W.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, a decoupling method for homogeneous and dual-medium cells' refractive index, and the entropy tomographic phase imaging method are proposed. Based on the decoupling method, the 3D morphology of sample can be obtained by the imaging method, which only needs two phase images of the cell. Thus the information about 3D refractive index distribution is given, and the 3D structure image of the model is reconstructed as well based on the relationship between the refractive index and thickness. In order to verify these methods, we set up the typical models after analysing the characteristic of blood cells, and the related orthogonal phase images are obtained by simulation experiment. Thus the 3D reconstructed structure images of the models are presented in this paper. Finally, the feasibility of this method is verified by simulating on a red blood cell and a monocyte model. The results show that subsurface imaging of samples can be achieved based on this method with a good accuracy.

  16. Influence of Rotation Increments on Imaging Performance for a Rotatory Dual-Head PET System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanzhen Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For a rotatory dual-head positron emission tomography (PET system, how to determine the rotation increments is an open problem. In this study, we simulated the characteristics of a rotatory dual-head PET system. The influences of different rotation increments were compared and analyzed. Based on this simulation, the imaging performance of a prototype system was verified. A reconstruction flowchart was proposed based on a precalculated system response matrix (SRM. The SRM made the relationships between the voxels and lines of response (LORs fixed; therefore, we added the interpolation method into the flowchart. Five metrics, including spatial resolution, normalized mean squared error (NMSE, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR, contrast-to-noise (CNR, and structure similarity (SSIM, were applied to assess the reconstructed image quality. The results indicated that the 60° rotation increments with the bilinear interpolation had advantages in resolution, PSNR, NMSE, and SSIM. In terms of CNR, the 90° rotation increments were better than other increments. In addition, the reconstructed images of 90° rotation increments were also flatter than that of 60° increments. Therefore, both the 60° and 90° rotation increments could be used in the real experiments, and which one to choose may depend on the application requirement.

  17. Multimodality molecular imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fangfang; Shen, Yehua; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke.

  18. Agents described in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database for imaging carbonic anhydrase IX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is selectively expressed in a range of hypoxic tumours and is a validated endogenous hypoxia marker with prognostic significance; hence, CA IX is of great interest as a molecular imaging target in oncology. In this review, we present an overview of the different imaging agents and imaging modalities that have been applied for the in vivo detection of CA IX. The imaging agents reviewed are all entries in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) and comprise antibody, antibody fragments and small molecule imaging agents. The effectiveness of these agents for imaging CA IX in vivo gave variable performance; however, a number of agents proved very capable. As molecular imaging has become indispensable in current medical practice we anticipate that the clinical significance of CA IX will see continued development and improvements in imaging agents for targeting this enzyme.

  19. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  20. CaRuby-Nano: a novel high affinity calcium probe for dual color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Mayeul; Wilms, Christian D; Bentkhayet, Asma; Marcaggi, Païkan; Couchman, Kiri; Charpak, Serge; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Häusser, Michael; Feltz, Anne; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2015-03-31

    The great demand for long-wavelength and high signal-to-noise Ca(2+) indicators has led us to develop CaRuby-Nano, a new functionalizable red calcium indicator with nanomolar affinity for use in cell biology and neuroscience research. In addition, we generated CaRuby-Nano dextran conjugates and an AM-ester variant for bulk loading of tissue. We tested the new indicator using in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrating the high sensitivity of CaRuby-Nano as well as its power in dual color imaging experiments.

  1. Rare-Earth doped particles as dual-modality contrast agent for minimally-invasive luminescence and dual-wavelength photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-09

    Multi-modal imaging is an emerging area that integrates multiple imaging modalities to simultaneously capture visual information over many spatial scales. Complementary contrast agents need to be co-developed in order to achieve high resolution and contrast. In this work, we demonstrated that rare-earth doped particles (REDPs) can be employed as dual-modal imaging agents for both luminescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to achieve intrinsic high contrast, temporal and spatial resolution, reaching deeper depth. REDPs synthesized with different surfactants (citric acid, polyacrylic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium citrate) exhibit tunable emission properties and PA signal amplitudes. Amongst these samples, sodium citrate-modified REDPs showed the strongest PA signals. Furthermore, since REDPs have multiple absorption peaks, they offer a unique opportunity for multi-wavelength PA imaging (e.g. PA signals were measured using 520 and 975 nm excitations). The in vivo PA images around the cortical superior sagittal sinus (SSS) blood vessel captured with enhanced signal arising from REDPs demonstrated that in addition to be excellent luminescent probes, REDPs can also be used as successful PA contrast agents. Anisotropic polyacrylic acid-modified REDPs were found to be the best candidates for dual-modal luminescence and PA imaging due to their strong luminescence and PA signal intensities.

  2. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  3. Molecular aspects of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, C

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well known diagnostic tool in radiology that produces unsurpassed images of the human body, in particular of soft tissue. However, the medical community is often not aware that MRI is an important yet limited segment of magnetic resonance (MR) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as this method is called in basic science. The tremendous morphological information of MR images sometimes conceal the fact that MR signals in general contain much more information, especially on processes on the molecular level. NMR is successfully used in physics, chemistry, and biology to explore and characterize chemical reactions, molecular conformations, biochemical pathways, solid state material, and many other applications that elucidate invisible characteristics of matter and tissue. In medical applications, knowledge of the molecular background of MRI and in particular MR spectroscopy (MRS) is an inevitable basis to understand molecular phenomenon leading to macroscopic effects visible in diagnostic images or spectra. This review shall provide the necessary background to comprehend molecular aspects of magnetic resonance applications in medicine. An introduction into the physical basics aims at an understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms without extended mathematical treatment. The MR typical terminology is explained such that reading of original MR publications could be facilitated for non-MR experts. Applications in MRI and MRS are intended to illustrate the consequences of molecular effects on images and spectra.

  4. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kuchenbecker@dkfz.de; Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU), Erlangen 91054 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  5. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...

  6. Advances of molecular imaging in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Galovic, M.; Koepp, M.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the loc...

  7. Advances of Molecular Imaging in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Galovic, Marian; Koepp, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the loc...

  8. Imaging of Dual Ophthalmic Arteries: Identification of the Central Retinal Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Louw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the origin of the central retinal artery (CRA is imperative in tailoring angiographic studies to resolve a given clinical problem. A case with dual ophthalmic arteries (OAs, characterized by different origins and distinct branching patterns, is documented for training purposes. Pre-clinical diagnosis of a 9-year-old child who presented with a sharp wire in the left-side eyeball was primarily corneal laceration. For imaging, a selected six-vessel angiographic study with the transfemoral approach was performed. Embolization was not required and the wire could be successfully removed. Right-side OA anatomy was normal, while left-side dual OAs with external carotid artery (ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA origins were seen. The case presented with a left-side meningo-ophthalmic artery (M-OA anomaly via the ECA, marked by a middle meningeal artery (MMA (origin: Maxillary artery; course: Through foramen spinosum with normal branches (i.e. anterior and posterior branches, and an OA variant (course: Through superior orbital fissure with a distinct orbital branching pattern. A smaller OA (origin: ICA; course: Through optic foramen with a distinct ocular branching pattern presented with the central retinal artery (CRA. The presence of the dual OAs and the M-OA anomaly can be explained by disturbed evolutionary changes of the primitive OA and stapedial artery during development. The surgical interventionist must be aware of dual OAs and M-OA anomalies with branching pattern variations on retinal supply, because of dangerous extracranial-intracranial anastomotic connections. It is of clinical significance that the origin of the CRA from the ICA or ECA must be determined to avoid complications to the vision.

  9. Dual-camera system for high-speed imaging in particle image velocimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, K; Hara, T; Onogi, S; Mouri, H

    2012-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry is an important technique in experimental fluid mechanics, for which it has been essential to use a specialized high-speed camera. However, the high speed is at the expense of other performances of the camera, i.e., sensitivity and image resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the high-speed imaging is also possible with a pair of still cameras.

  10. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  11. 7.5 MHz dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuling; Nguyen, Man; Yen, Jesse T

    2011-07-01

    The difficulties associated with fabrication and interconnection have limited the development of 2-D ultrasound transducer arrays with a large number ofelements (>5000). In previous work, we described a 5 MHz center frequency PZT-P[VDF-TrFE] dual-layer transducer that used two perpendicular 1-D arrays for 3-D rectilinear imaging. This design substantially reduces the channel count as well as fabrication complexity, which makes 3-D imaging more realizable. Higher frequencies (>5 MHz) are more commonly used in clinical applications or imaging targets near transducers, such as the breast, carotid and musculoskeletal tissue. In this paper, we present a 7.5 MHz dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging. A modified acoustic stack model was designed and fabricated. PZT elements were sub-diced to eliminate lateral coupling. This sub-dicing process made the PZT into a 2-2 composite material, which could help improve transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. Full synthetic-aperture 3-D data sets were acquired by interfacing the transducer with a Verasonics data-acquisition system (VDAS). Offline 3-D beamforming was then performed to obtain volumes of a multiwire phantom and a cyst phantom. The generalized coherence factor (GCF) was applied to improve the contrast of cyst images. The measured -6 dB fractional bandwidth of the transducer was 71% with a center frequency of 7.5 MHz. The measured lateral beamwidths were 0.521 mm and 0.482 mm in azimuth and elevation, respectively, compared with a simulated beamwidth of 0.43 mm.

  12. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  13. Post-Processing Enhancement of Reverberation-Noise Suppression in Dual-Frequency SURF Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Nasholm, Sven Peter; Angelsen, Bjørn A J; 10.1109/TUFFC.2011.1811

    2013-01-01

    A post-processing adjustment technique which aims for enhancement of dual-frequency SURF (Second order UltRasound Field) reverberation-noise suppression imaging in medical ultrasound is analyzed. Two variant methods are investigated through numerical simulations. They both solely involve post-processing of the propagated high-frequency (HF) imaging wave fields, which in real-time imaging corresponds to post-processing of the beamformed receive radio-frequency signals. Hence the transmit pulse complexes are the same as for the previously published SURF reverberation-suppression imaging method. The adjustment technique is tested on simulated data from propagation of SURF pulse complexes consisting of a 3.5 MHz HF imaging pulse added to a 0.5 low-frequency sound-speed manipulation pulse. Imaging transmit beams are constructed with and without adjustment. The post-processing involves filtering, e.g., by a time-shift, in order to equalize the two SURF HF pulses at a chosen depth. This depth is typically chosen to ...

  14. Cerenkov imaging - a new modality for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Thorek, Daniel LJ; Robertson, Robbie; Bacchus, Wassifa A; Hahn, Jaeseung; Rothberg, Julie; Bradley J Beattie; Grimm, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is an emerging hybrid modality that utilizes the light emission from many commonly used medical isotopes. Cerenkov radiation (CR) is produced when charged particles travel through a dielectric medium faster than the speed of light in that medium. First described in detail nearly 100 years ago, CR has only recently applied for biomedical imaging purposes. The modality is of considerable interest as it enables the use of widespread luminescence imaging equipm...

  15. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information.

  16. Optical Molecular Imaging of Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derieppe, M.P.P.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop optical molecular imaging methods to study drug delivery facilitated by ultrasound waves (US) and hyperthermia. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), together with dedicated image analysis, was used in vitro on a cell monolayer, and in vivo at

  17. Dual-force ISOMAP: a new relevance feedback method for medical image retrieval.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualei Shen

    Full Text Available With great potential for assisting radiological image interpretation and decision making, content-based image retrieval in the medical domain has become a hot topic in recent years. Many methods to enhance the performance of content-based medical image retrieval have been proposed, among which the relevance feedback (RF scheme is one of the most promising. Given user feedback information, RF algorithms interactively learn a user's preferences to bridge the "semantic gap" between low-level computerized visual features and high-level human semantic perception and thus improve retrieval performance. However, most existing RF algorithms perform in the original high-dimensional feature space and ignore the manifold structure of the low-level visual features of images. In this paper, we propose a new method, termed dual-force ISOMAP (DFISOMAP, for content-based medical image retrieval. Under the assumption that medical images lie on a low-dimensional manifold embedded in a high-dimensional ambient space, DFISOMAP operates in the following three stages. First, the geometric structure of positive examples in the learned low-dimensional embedding is preserved according to the isometric feature mapping (ISOMAP criterion. To precisely model the geometric structure, a reconstruction error constraint is also added. Second, the average distance between positive and negative examples is maximized to separate them; this margin maximization acts as a force that pushes negative examples far away from positive examples. Finally, the similarity propagation technique is utilized to provide negative examples with another force that will pull them back into the negative sample set. We evaluate the proposed method on a subset of the IRMA medical image dataset with a RF-based medical image retrieval framework. Experimental results show that DFISOMAP outperforms popular approaches for content-based medical image retrieval in terms of accuracy and stability.

  18. Cascaded systems analysis of noise reduction algorithms in dual-energy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Samuel; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2008-02-01

    An important aspect of dual-energy (DE) x-ray image decomposition is the incorporation of noise reduction techniques to mitigate the amplification of quantum noise. This article extends cascaded systems analysis of imaging performance to DE imaging systems incorporating linear noise reduction algorithms. A general analytical formulation of linear DE decomposition is derived, with weighted log subtraction and several previously reported noise reduction algorithms emerging as special cases. The DE image noise-power spectrum (NPS) and modulation transfer function (MTF) demonstrate that noise reduction algorithms impart significant, nontrivial effects on the spatial-frequency-dependent transfer characteristics which do not cancel out of the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ). Theoretical predictions were validated in comparison to the measured NPS and MTF. The resulting NEQ was integrated with spatial-frequency-dependent task functions to yield the detectability index, d', for evaluation of DE imaging performance using different decomposition algorithms. For a 3 mm lung nodule detection task, the detectability index varied from d' 2.5 (i.e., nodule clearly visible) for "anti-correlated noise reduction" (ACNR) or "simple-smoothing of the high-energy image" (SSH) algorithms applied to soft-tissue or bone-only decompositions, respectively. Optimal dose allocation (A*, the fraction of total dose delivered in the low-energy projection) was also found to depend on the choice of noise reduction technique. At fixed total dose, multi-function optimization suggested a significant increase in optimal dose allocation from A* = 0.32 for conventional log subtraction to A* = 0.79 for ACNR and SSH in soft-tissue and bone-only decompositions, respectively. Cascaded systems analysis extended to the general formulation of DE image decomposition provided an objective means of investigating DE imaging performance across a broad range of acquisition and decomposition algorithms in a manner that

  19. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm......Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...

  20. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Dementia and Movement Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Atul K; Drzezga, Alexander; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine (PM) has been defined as "prevention and treatment strategies that take individual variability into account." Molecular imaging (MI) is an ideally suited tool for PM approaches to neurodegenerative dementia and movement disorders (MD). Here we review PM approaches and discuss how they may be applied to other associated neurodegenerative dementia and MD. With ongoing major therapeutic research initiatives that include the use of molecular imaging, we look forward to established interventions targeted to specific molecular pathophysiology and expect the potential benefit of MI PM approaches in neurodegenerative dementia and MD will only increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers...... for malignant thyroid lesions, in FTC133 thyroid tumors subcutaneously implanted in nude mice. The imaging agent used to visualize tumors was MMP activatable photoacoustic probe, Alexa750-CXeeeeXPLGLAGrrrrrXK-BHQ3. Cleavage of the MMP activatable agent was imaged after intratumoral and intravenous injections...... With the combination of high spatial resolution and signal specificity, targeted photoacoustic imaging holds great promise as a noninvasive method for early diagnosis of follicular thyroid carcinomas....

  2. Dual Functional Roles of Molecular Beacon as a MicroRNA Detector and Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wai Ming; Chan, Ching-Man; Miller, Andrew L; Lee, Chow H

    2017-03-03

    MicroRNAs are essential in many cellular processes. The ability to detect microRNAs is important for understanding its function and biogenesis. This study is aimed at using a molecular beacon to detect miR-430 in developing zebrafish embryos as a proof of principle. miR-430 is crucial for the clearance of maternal mRNA during maternal zygotic transition in embryonic development. Despite its known function, the temporal and spatial expression of miR-430 remains unclear. We used various imaging techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, spinning disk, and lightsheet microscopy, to study the localization of miR-430 and any developmental defects possibly caused by the molecular beacon. Our results show that miR-430 is expressed early in development and is localized in distinct cytoplasmic granules where its target mRNA can be detected. We also show that the designed molecular beacon can inhibit the function of miR-430 and cause developmental defect in the brain, notochord, heart, and kidney, depending on the delivery site within the embryo, suggesting that miR-430 plays a diverse role in embryonic morphogenesis. When compared with morpholino, molecular beacon is 2 orders of magnitude more potent in inhibiting miR-430. Thus, our results reveal that in addition to being used as a valuable tool for the detection of microRNAs in vivo, molecular beacons can also be employed to inhibit microRNAs in a specific manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jesse T; Seo, Chi Hyung; Awad, Samer I; Jeong, Jong S

    2009-01-01

    Very large element counts (16,000-65,000) are required for 2-D arrays for 3-D rectilinear imaging. The difficulties in fabricating and interconnecting 2-D arrays with a large number of elements (>5,000) have limited the development of suitable transducers for 3-D rectilinear imaging. In this paper, we propose an alternative solution to this problem by using a dual-layer transducer array design. This design consists of 2 perpendicular 1-D arrays for clinical 3-D imaging of targets near the transducer. These targets include the breast, carotid artery, and musculoskeletal system. This transducer design reduces the fabrication complexity and the channel count, making 3-D rectilinear imaging more realizable. With this design, an effective N x N 2-D array can be developed using only N transmitters and N receivers. This benefit becomes very significant when N becomes greater than 128, for example. To demonstrate feasibility, we constructed a 4 x 4 cm prototype dual-layer array. The transmit array uses diced PZT-5H elements, and the receive array is a single sheet of undiced P[VDF-TrFE] copolymer. The receive elements are defined by the copper traces on the flexible interconnect circuit. The measured -6 dB fractional bandwidth was 80% with a center frequency of 4.8 MHz. At 5 MHz, the nearest neighbor crosstalk of the PZT array and PVDF array was -30.4 +/- 3.1 dB and -28.8 +/- 3.7 dB, respectively. This dual-layer transducer was interfaced with an Ultrasonix Sonix RP system, and a synthetic aperture 3-D data set was acquired. We then performed offline 3-D beamforming to obtain volumes of nylon wire targets. The theoretical lateral beamwidth was 0.52 mm compared with measured beamwidths of 0.65 mm and 0.67 mm in azimuth and elevation, respectively. Then, 3-D images of an 8 mm diameter anechoic cyst phantom were also acquired.

  4. Operational algorithm for ice-water classification on dual-polarized RADARSAT-2 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhvatkina, Natalia; Korosov, Anton; Muckenhuber, Stefan; Sandven, Stein; Babiker, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from RADARSAT-2 (RS2) in dual-polarization mode provide additional information for discriminating sea ice and open water compared to single-polarization data. We have developed an automatic algorithm based on dual-polarized RS2 SAR images to distinguish open water (rough and calm) and sea ice. Several technical issues inherent in RS2 data were solved in the pre-processing stage, including thermal noise reduction in HV polarization and correction of angular backscatter dependency in HH polarization. Texture features were explored and used in addition to supervised image classification based on the support vector machines (SVM) approach. The study was conducted in the ice-covered area between Greenland and Franz Josef Land. The algorithm has been trained using 24 RS2 scenes acquired in winter months in 2011 and 2012, and the results were validated against manually derived ice charts of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. The algorithm was applied on a total of 2705 RS2 scenes obtained from 2013 to 2015, and the validation results showed that the average classification accuracy was 91 ± 4 %.

  5. Cat-eye target imaging system research and dual-channel DSP implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Haiyang; Shi, Guang; Han, Lei; Zhao, Changming

    2013-09-01

    In modern warfare, well-equipped and trained snipers have become a mortal malady for the combat troops. How to accurately, timely and quickly find and destroy snipers becomes a research focus of national military experts. In order to effectively detect faint echo signal of cat-eye target and get the snipers' position information in the detection area, a small size of dual-channel active laser detection system with monochrome and color Charge-couple Devices(CCD) is designed, which is based on the laser imaging principle of cat-eye effect, associated tests are also conducted. The dual-channel video capture can obtain more information of target area, while taking advantage of the high sensitivity of monochrome CCD will also provide more accurate grayscale information for the video image processing. In order to achieve the miniaturization of system, we choose a video processing board whose size is only 54mm*90mm as hardware platform to complete the algorithm. For verifying the feasibility and accuracy of algorithm, we ultimately build a full set of experimental detection system. The test results show that the system can accurately detect and mark typical cat-eye target from background under different distances, which verifies the rationality and validity of the proposed system and has certain practicality and promotion in the active laser detection system research areas.

  6. Tunable dual-band subwavelength imaging with a wire medium slab loaded with nanostructured graphene metasurfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Forouzmand

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate that a wire medium slab loaded with graphene-nanopatch metasurfaces (GNMs enables the enhancement of evanescent waves for the subwavelength imaging at terahertz (THz frequencies. The analysis is based on the nonlocal homogenization model for wire medium with the additional boundary condition at the connection of wires to graphene. The physical mechanism behind this lens can be described as the surface plasmons excitement at the lower and upper GNMs which are coupled by an array of metallic wires. The dual nature (capacitive/inductive of the GNM is utilized in order to design a dual-band lens in which the unique controllable properties of graphene and the structural parameters of wire medium (WM slab provide more degrees of freedom in controlling two operating frequency bands. The lens can support the subwavelength imaging simultaneously at two tunable distinct frequencies with the resolution better than λ/6 even if the distance between GNMs is a significant fraction of wavelength (>λ/5.5. The major future challenges in the fabrication of the lens have been demonstrated and a promising approach for the practical configuration of the lens has been proposed.

  7. Dual-Energy Subtraction Imaging for Diagnosing Vocal Cord Paralysis with Flat Panel Detector Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yoda, Keiko; Arai, Yasuko [Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo (Japan)] (and others)

    2010-06-15

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of dual energy subtraction (DES) imaging to improve the delineation of the vocal cord and diagnostic accuracy of vocal cord paralysis as compared with the anterior-posterior view of flat panel detector (FPD) neck radiography. For 122 consecutive patients who underwent both a flexible laryngoscopy and conventional/DES FPD radiography, three blinded readers retrospectively graded the radiographs during phonation and inspiration on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) for the delineation of the vocal cord, and in consensus, reviewed the diagnostic accuracy of vocal cord paralysis employing the laryngoscopy as the reference. We compared vocal cord delineation scores and accuracy of vocal cord paralysis diagnosis by both conventional and DES techniques using ({kappa}statistics and assessing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Vocal cord delineation scores by DES (mean, 4.2 {+-} 0.4) were significantly higher than those by conventional imaging (mean, 3.3 {+-} 0.5) (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for diagnosing vocal cord paralysis by the conventional technique was 25%, whereas the specificity was 94%. Sensitivity by DES was 75%, whereas the specificity was 96%. The diagnostic accuracy by DES was significantly superior (({kappa}= 0.60, AUC = 0.909) to that by conventional technique ({kappa}= 0.18, AUC = 0.852) (p = 0.038). Dual energy subtraction is a superior method compared to the conventional FPD radiography for delineating the vocal cord and accurately diagnosing vocal cord paralysis.

  8. IRDIS, the dual-band imager camera of SPHERE: testing the performances in laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Zurlo, A; Moutou, C; Mesa, D; Gratton, R; Langlois, M; Beuzit, J -L; Costille, A; Desidera, S; Dolhen, K; Gry, C; Madec, F; Mignant, D Le; Mouillet, D; Sauvage, J -F

    2013-01-01

    Next year the second generation instrument SPHERE will begin science operations at the Very Large Telecope (ESO). This instrument will be dedicated to the search for exoplanets through the direct imaging techniques, with the new generation extreme adaptive optics. In this poster, we present the performances of one of the focal instruments, the Infra-Red Dual-beam Imaging and Spectroscopy (IRDIS). All the results have been obtained with tests in laboratory, simulating the observing conditions in Paranal. We tested several configurations using the sub-system Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) in parallel and simulating long coronographic exposures on a star, calibrating instrumental ghosts, checking the performance of the adaptive optics system and reducing data with the consortium pipeline. The contrast one can reach with IRDIS is of the order of 2\\times 10^{-6}$ at 0.5 arcsec separation from the central star.

  9. Detection of buried objects by fusing dual-band infrared images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Sherwood, R.J.; Buhl, M.R.; Schaich, P.C.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; Fields, D.J.; Carter, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate the enhanced detectability of buried land mines using sensor fusion techniques. Multiple sensors, including visible imagery, infrared imagery, and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been used to acquire data on a number of buried mines and mine surrogates. Because the visible wavelength and GPR data are currently incomplete. This paper focuses on the fusion of two-band infrared images. We use feature-level fusion and supervised learning with the probabilistic neural network (PNN) to evaluate detection performance. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced target recognition algorithms, the fusion of dual-band infrared images and evaluation of the techniques using two real data sets.

  10. Error Estimation and Unambiguous Reconstruction for Chinese First Dual-Channel Spaceborne SAR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, T.; Qiu, X.; Hu, D.; Ding, C.

    2017-09-01

    Multichannel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a significant breakthrough to the inherent limitation between high-resolution and wide-swath (HRWS) faced with conventional SAR. Error estimation and unambiguous reconstruction are two crucial techniques for obtaining high-quality imagery. This paper demonstrates the experimental results of the two techniques for Chinese first dualchannel spaceborne SAR imaging. The model of Chinese Gaofen-3 dual-channel mode is established and the mechanism of channel mismatches is first discussed. Particularly, we propose a digital beamforming (DBF) process composed of the subspace-based error estimation algorithm and the reconstruction algorithm before imaging. The results exhibit the effective suppression of azimuth ambiguities with the proposed DBF process, and indicate the feasibility of this technique for future HRWS SAR systems.

  11. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...... is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small...

  12. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Wilson, Christy; Grant, Gerald; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging holds a pivotal role in medicine due to its ability to provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms at molecular and cellular levels. To this end, various techniques have been developed for molecular imaging, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, fluorescence imaging achieves micrometre-scale resolution, but has low penetration depths and is mostly limited to exogenous agents. Here, we demonstrate molecular imaging of endogenous and exogenous chromophores using a novel form of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Our approach consists of using a wide spectral bandwidth laser source centred in the visible spectrum, thereby allowing facile assessment of haemoglobin oxygen levels, providing contrast from readily available absorbers, and enabling true-colour representation of samples. This approach provides high spectral fidelity while imaging at the micrometre scale in three dimensions. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (METRiCS OCT) has significant implications for many biomedical applications including ophthalmology, early cancer detection, and understanding fundamental disease mechanisms such as hypoxia and angiogenesis.

  13. A Curve-based Material Recognition Method in MeV Dual-energy X-ray Imaging System

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhi-qiang; Li, Liang

    2014-01-01

    High energy dual-energy X-ray Digital Radiography(DR) imaging is mainly used in material recognition of the cargo inspection. We introduce the development history and the principle of the technology and describe the data process flow of our system. The system corrects original data to get the dual-energy transparence image. Material categories of all points in the image are identified by the classification curve which is related to the X-ray energy spectrum. For the calibration of classification curve, our strategy involves a basic curve calibration and a real-time correction devoted to enhance the classification accuracy. Image segmentation and denoising methods are applied to smooth the image. The image contains more information after colorization. Some results show that our methods achieve the desired effect.

  14. Learning-Based Object Identification and Segmentation Using Dual-Energy CT Images for Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Limor; Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Karl, W Clem; Ishwar, Prakash

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, baggage screening at airports has included the use of dual-energy X-ray computed tomography (DECT), an advanced technology for nondestructive evaluation. The main challenge remains to reliably find and identify threat objects in the bag from DECT data. This task is particularly hard due to the wide variety of objects, the high clutter, and the presence of metal, which causes streaks and shading in the scanner images. Image noise and artifacts are generally much more severe than in medical CT and can lead to splitting of objects and inaccurate object labeling. The conventional approach performs object segmentation and material identification in two decoupled processes. Dual-energy information is typically not used for the segmentation, and object localization is not explicitly used to stabilize the material parameter estimates. We propose a novel learning-based framework for joint segmentation and identification of objects directly from volumetric DECT images, which is robust to streaks, noise and variability due to clutter. We focus on segmenting and identifying a small set of objects of interest with characteristics that are learned from training images, and consider everything else as background. We include data weighting to mitigate metal artifacts and incorporate an object boundary field to reduce object splitting. The overall formulation is posed as a multilabel discrete optimization problem and solved using an efficient graph-cut algorithm. We test the method on real data and show its potential for producing accurate labels of the objects of interest without splits in the presence of metal and clutter.

  15. Added value of 80 kVp images to averaged 120 kVp images in the detection of hepatocellular carcinomas in liver transplantation candidates using dual-source dual-energy MDCT: Results of JAFROC analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Hoon [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim@radcom.snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Sun [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Hyeon [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Background: To assess the added value of 80 kVp images to weighted average 120 kVp images for detecting hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) using dual-source, dual-energy MDCT. Materials and methods: Forty-one HCCs in 42 patients who underwent liver transplantation (LT) were included. All patients underwent quadruple-phase CT using a 64-row dual-source, dual-energy MDCT with 80 kVp and 140 kVp. For 120 kVp, a linear blending ratio of 0.3 was chosen. Interval reviews for both simulated 120 kVp images without and with pure 80 kVp data were performed independently by two radiologists. They detected HCCs using a 4-point confidence scale. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated and compared between the 80 kVp and simulated 120 kVp images. The additional diagnostic value of 80 kVp images was evaluated by jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis. Results: There were 41 HCCs on pathology and 37 of the 41 HCCs were depicted on CT scan. The mean CNR of the 37 HCCs in late arterial and portal-phase images was significantly better in the 80 kVp images than in 120 kVp images. The average JAFROC figure of merit, however, was not significantly improved when 80 kVp was added. Furthermore, the number of false-positives was significantly increased in reader 1 when adding 80 kVp data. Conclusion: The addition of 80 kVp CT images to simulated 120 kVp images did not significantly improve the detection of HCCs despite of the significantly better CNR of 80 kVp images.

  16. Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging for bridge inspection. Phase II, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Schaich, P.C.

    1996-03-01

    Developing and implementing methods of effective bridge rehabilitation is a major issue for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The nation spends $5 billion annually to replace, rehabilitate or construct new bridges. According to the National Bridge Inventory, over 100,000 U.S. bridges are structurally deficient. About 40,000 of these bridges have advanced deck deterioration. The most common causes of serious deck deterioration is delamination. Delaminations result when steel reinforcements within the bridge deck corrode, creating gaps that separate the concrete into layers. A reliable inspection technology, capable of identifying delaminations, would represent a power new tool in bridge maintenance. To date, most bridge inspections rely on human interpretation of surface visual features of chain dragging. These methods are slow, disruptive, unreliable and raise serious safety concerns. Infrared thermal imaging detects subsurface delaminations and surface clutter, which is introduced by foreign material on the roadway. Typically, foreign material which is not always evident on a video tape image, produces a unique IR reflectance background unlike the thermal response of a subsurface delamination. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging to identify and remove nonthermal IR reflectance backgrounds from foreign material on the roadway. DBIR methods improve the performance of IR thermal imaging by a factor of ten, compared to single-band infrared (SBIR) methods. DBIR thermal imaging allows precise temperature measurement to reliably locate bridge deck delaminations and remove wavelength-dependent emissivity variations due to foreign material on the roadway.

  17. Adaptive Nonlocal Sparse Representation for Dual-Camera Compressive Hyperspectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhi; Xiong, Zhiwei; Shi, Guangming; Wu, Feng; Zeng, Wenjun

    2016-10-25

    Leveraging the compressive sensing (CS) theory, coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) provides an efficient solution to recover 3D hyperspectral data from a 2D measurement. The dual-camera design of CASSI, by adding an uncoded panchromatic measurement, enhances the reconstruction fidelity while maintaining the snapshot advantage. In this paper, we propose an adaptive nonlocal sparse representation (ANSR) model to boost the performance of dualcamera compressive hyperspectral imaging (DCCHI). Specifically, the CS reconstruction problem is formulated as a 3D cube based sparse representation to make full use of the nonlocal similarity in both the spatial and spectral domains. Our key observation is that, the panchromatic image, besides playing the role of direct measurement, can be further exploited to help the nonlocal similarity estimation. Therefore, we design a joint similarity metric by adaptively combining the internal similarity within the reconstructed hyperspectral image and the external similarity within the panchromatic image. In this way, the fidelity of CS reconstruction is greatly enhanced. Both simulation and hardware experimental results show significant improvement of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art.

  18. Dual-frequency magnetic particle imaging of the Brownian particle contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Thilo; Kuhlmann, Christian; Draack, Sebastian; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging medical imaging modality based on the non-linear response of magnetic nanoparticles to an exciting magnetic field. MPI has been recognized as a fast imaging technique with high spatial resolution in the mm range. For some applications of MPI, especially in the field of functional imaging, the determination of the particle mobility (Brownian rotation) is of great interest, as it enables binding detection in MPI. It also enables quantitative imaging in the presence of Brownian-dominated particles, which is otherwise implausible. Discrimination of different particle responses in MPI is possible via the joint reconstruction approach. In this contribution, we propose a dual-frequency acquisition scheme to enhance sensitivity and contrast in the detection of different particle mobilities compared to a standard single-frequency MPI protocol. The method takes advantage of the fact, that the magnetization response of the tracer is strongly frequency-dependent, i.e. for low excitation frequencies a stronger Brownian contribution is observed.

  19. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  20. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  1. Iterative reconstruction for dual energy CT with an average image-induced nonlocal means regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Houjin; Zeng, Dong; Lin, Jiahui; Zhang, Hao; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Gao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shanli; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-07-01

    Reducing radiation dose in dual energy computed tomography (DECT) is highly desirable but it may lead to excessive noise in the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstructed DECT images, which can inevitably increase the diagnostic uncertainty. To obtain clinically acceptable DECT images from low-mAs acquisitions, in this work we develop a novel scheme based on measurement of DECT data. In this scheme, inspired by the success of edge-preserving non-local means (NLM) filtering in CT imaging and the intrinsic characteristics underlying DECT images, i.e. global correlation and non-local similarity, an averaged image induced NLM-based (aviNLM) regularization is incorporated into the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) framework. Specifically, the presented NLM-based regularization is designed by averaging the acquired DECT images, which takes the image similarity within the two energies into consideration. In addition, the weighted least-squares term takes into account DECT data-dependent variance. For simplicity, the presented scheme was termed as ‘PWLS-aviNLM’. The performance of the presented PWLS-aviNLM algorithm was validated and evaluated on digital phantom, physical phantom and patient data. The extensive experiments validated that the presented PWLS-aviNLM algorithm outperforms the FBP, PWLS-TV and PWLS-NLM algorithms quantitatively. More importantly, it delivers the best qualitative results with the finest details and the fewest noise-induced artifacts, due to the aviNLM regularization learned from DECT images. This study demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of the presented PWLS-aviNLM algorithm to improve the DECT reconstruction and resulting material decomposition.

  2. The edge-driven dual-bootstrap iterative closest point algorithm for multimodal retinal image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Ling; Li, Chun-Yi; Yang, Gehua

    2008-03-01

    Red-free (RF) fundus retinal images and fluorescein angiogram (FA) sequence are often captured from an eye for diagnosis and treatment of abnormalities of the retina. With the aid of multimodal image registration, physicians can combine information to make accurate surgical planning and quantitative judgment of the progression of a disease. The goal of our work is to jointly align the RF images with the FA sequence of the same eye in a common reference space. Our work is inspired by Generalized Dual-Bootstrap Iterative Closest Point (GDB-ICP), which is a fully-automatic, feature-based method using structural similarity. GDB-ICP rank-orders Lowe keypoint matches and refines the transformation computed from each keypoint match in succession. Albeit GDB-ICP has been shown robust to image pairs with illumination difference, the performance is not satisfactory for multimodal and some FA pairs which exhibit substantial non-linear illumination changes. Our algorithm, named Edge-Driven DBICP, modifies generation of keypoint matches for initialization by extracting the Lowe keypoints from the gradient magnitude image, and enriching the keypoint descriptor with global-shape context using the edge points. Our dataset consists of 61 randomly selected pathological sequences, each on average having two RF and 13 FA images. There are total of 4985 image pairs, out of which 1323 are multimodal pairs. Edge-Driven DBICP successfully registered 93% of all pairs, and 82% multimodal pairs, whereas GDB-ICP registered 80% and 40%, respectively. Regarding registration of the whole image sequence in a common reference space, Edge-Driven DBICP succeeded in 60 sequences, which is 26% improvement over GDB-ICP.

  3. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life than those used for PET. In addition, SPECT is a less expensive technique than PET. Commonly used gamma emitters are: {sup 99m}Tc (E{sub max} 141 keV, T{sub 1/2} 6.02 h), {sup 123}I (E{sub max} 529 keV, T{sub 1/2} 13.0 h) and {sup 111}In (E{sub max} 245 keV, T{sub 1/2} 67.2 h). Compared to clinical SPECT, PET has a higher spatial resolution and the possibility to more accurately estimate the in vivo concentration of a tracer. In preclinical imaging, the situation is quite different. The resolution of microSPECT cameras (<0.5 mm) is higher than that of microPET cameras (>1.5 mm). In this report, studies on new radiolabelled tracers for SPECT imaging of angiogenesis in tumours are reviewed. (orig.)

  4. Molecular breast imaging. An update; Molekulare Brustbildgebung. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K.; Helbich, T.H.; Magometschnigg, H.; Baltzer, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Molekulare Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Fueger, B. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Molekulare Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of molecular imaging is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. Molecular imaging using various techniques has recently become established in breast imaging. Currently molecular imaging techniques comprise multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRSI), nuclear imaging by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission mammography (PEM) and combinations of techniques (e.g. PET-CT and multiparametric PET-MRI). Recently, novel techniques for molecular imaging of breast tumors, such as sodium imaging ({sup 23}Na-MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRSI) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as specific radiotracers have been developed and are currently under investigation. It can be expected that molecular imaging of breast tumors will enable a simultaneous assessment of the multiple metabolic and molecular processes involved in cancer development and thus an improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring of response to treatment will become possible. (orig.) [German] Die molekulare Bildgebung zielt auf die Darstellung, Beschreibung und Quantifizierung biologischer, physiologischer und pathologischer Prozesse auf zellulaerer und molekularer Ebene ab. In den letzten Jahren hat sich die molekulare Bildgebung mit ihren verschiedenen Modalitaeten in der Brustdiagnostik etabliert. Die molekularen Brustbildgebung umfasst derzeit die multiparametrische(MP)-MRT mit funktioneller und morphologischer kontrastmittelverstaerkter MRT (KM-MRT), molekularer diffusionsgewichteter Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) und metabolischer Protonenspektroskopie ({sup 1}H-MRSI) sowie nuklearmedizinische Verfahren (brustspezifische Gammakamerabildgebung [BSGI], Positronenemissionstomographie [PET], PET

  5. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T.

    2016-11-01

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  6. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T., E-mail: dosin@trialphaenergy.com [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  7. Advances of Molecular Imaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovic, Marian; Koepp, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the location of the epileptic focus. PET studies have examined the role of opioids, cannabinoids, acetylcholine, and dopamine in modulating neuronal hyperexcitability and seizure termination. In vivo analyses of drug transporters, e.g., P-glycoprotein, have increased our understanding of pharmacoresistance that could inform new therapeutic strategies. Finally, PET experiments targeting neuroinflammation and glutamate receptors might guide the development of novel biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  8. Feasibility study to demonstrate cardiac imaging using fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography: phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhav, Priti; Imai, Yasuhiro; Narayanan, Suresh; Dutta, Sandeep; Chandra, Naveen; Hsieh, Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography is a novel imaging tool that has the potential to reduce beam hardening artifacts and enhance material separation over conventional imaging techniques. Dual-energy acquisitions can be performed by using a fast kVp technology to switch between acquiring adjacent projections at two distinct x-ray spectra (80 and 140 kVp). These datasets can be used to further compute material density and monochromatic images for better material separation and beam hardening reduction by virtue of the projection domain process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using dual-energy in cardiac imaging for myocardial perfusion detection and coronary artery lumen visualization. Data was acquired on a heart phantom, which consisted of the chambers and aorta filled with Iodine density solution (500 HU @ 120 kVp), a defect region between the aorta and chamber (40 HU @ 120 kVp), two Iodinefilled vessels (400 HU @ 120 kVp) of different diameters with high attenuation (hydroxyapatite) plaques (HAP), and with a 30-cm water equivalent body ring around the phantom. Prospective ECG-gated single-energy and prospective ECG-gated dual-energy imaging was performed. Results showed that the generated monochromatic images had minimal beam hardening artifacts which improved the accuracy and detection of the myocardial defect region. Material density images were useful in differentiating and quantifying the actual size of the plaque and coronary artery lumen. Overall, this study shows that dual-energy cardiac imaging will be a valuable tool for cardiac applications.

  9. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  10. Determination of liquid's molecular interference function based on X-ray diffraction and dual-energy CT in security screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; YangDai, Tianyi

    2016-08-01

    A method for deriving the molecular interference function (MIF) of an unknown liquid for security screening is presented. Based on the effective atomic number reconstructed from dual-energy computed tomography (CT), equivalent molecular formula of the liquid is estimated. After a series of optimizations, the MIF and a new effective atomic number are finally obtained from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile. The proposed method generates more accurate results with less sensitivity to the noise and data deficiency of the XRD profile.

  11. Supplementary Golay pair for range side lobe suppression in dual-frequency tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wu, Chi; Peng, Jun-Kai

    2015-02-01

    In dual-frequency (DF) harmonic imaging, the second harmonic signal at second harmonic (2f0) frequency and the inter-modulation harmonic signal at fundamental (f0) frequency are simultaneously imaged for spectral compounding. When the phase-encoded Golay pair is utilized to improve the harmonic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), however, the DF imaging suffers from range side lobe artifacts due to spectral cross-talk with other harmonic components at DC and third harmonic (3f0) frequency. In this study, a supplementary Golay pair is developed to suppress the range side lobes in combination with the original Golay pair. Since the phase code of the DC interference cannot be manipulated, the supplementary Golay is designed to reverse the polarity of the 3f0 interference and the f0 signal while keeping the 2f0 signal unchanged. For 2f0 imaging, the echo summation of the supplementary and the original Golay can cancel the 3f0 interference. On the contrary, the echo difference between the two Golay pairs can eliminate the DC interference for f0 imaging. Hydrophone measurements indicate that the range side lobe level (RSLL) increases with the signal bandwidth of DF harmonic imaging. By using the combination of the two Golay pairs, the achievable suppression of RSLL can be 3 and 14 dB, respectively for the f0 and 2f0 harmonic signal. B-mode phantom imaging also verifies the presence of range side lobe artifacts when only the original Golay pair is utilized. In combination with the supplementary Golay pair, the artifacts are effectively suppressed. The corresponding range side lobe magnitude reduces by about 8 dB in 2f0 imaging but remains unchanged in f0 imaging. Meanwhile, the harmonic SNR improves by 8-10 dB and the contrast-to-noise ratio of harmonic image increases from about 1 to 1.2 by spectral compounding. For DF tissue harmonic imaging, the spectral cross-talk in Golay excitation results in severe range side lobe artifacts. To restore the image quality, two particular

  12. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Răzvan; Muller, Serge [GE Healthcare, 283 rue de la Minière, Buc 78530 (France); Jong, Roberta A. [Breast Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulin, Villejuif 94805 (France)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters α and β. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, α and β, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers β to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing β by about 0.07 compared to DM, with α unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases α by about 2

  13. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/99mTc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Yamaguchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG and technetium-99m (99mTc radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with 99mTc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner.

  14. The impact of single and dual hydrothermal modifications on the molecular structure and physicochemical properties of normal corn starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Jung; Hoover, Ratnajothi; Liu, Qiang

    2009-03-01

    Effect of single and dual hydrothermal modifications with annealing (ANN) and heat-moisture treatment (HMT) on molecular structure and physicochemical properties of corn starch was investigated. Normal corn starch was modified by ANN at 70% moisture at 50 degrees C for 24h and HMT at 30% moisture at 120 degrees C for 24h as well as by the combination of ANN and HMT. The apparent amylose content and swelling factor (SF) decreased on ANN and HMT, but amylose leaching (AML) increased. These changes were more pronounced on dual modification. The crystallinity (determined by X-ray diffraction), the gelatinization enthalpy (determined by differential scanning calorimetry) and ratio of 1047 cm(-1)/1022 cm(-1) (determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) slightly increased on ANN and decreased on HMT. The ANN and subsequent HMT (ANN-HMT) resulted in the lowest crystallinity, gelatinization enthalpy and ratio of 1047 cm(-1)/1022 cm(-1). The gelatinization temperature range decreased on ANN but increased on HMT. However, the gelatinization range of dually modified starches (ANN-HMT and HMT-ANN) was between ANN starch and HMT starch. Birefringence remained unchanged on ANN but slightly decreased on HMT as well as dual modification. Average chain length and amount of longer branch chains (DP> or =37) remained almost unchanged on ANN but decreased on HMT and dual modifications (ANN-HMT and HMT-ANN). HMT and dual modifications resulted in highly reduced pasting viscosity. ANN and HMT as well as dual modifications increased RDS content and decreased SDS and RS content.

  15. Dual-frequency super harmonic imaging piezoelectric transducers for transrectal ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwook; Li, Sibo; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a 2/14 MHz dual-frequency single-element transducer and a 2/22 MHz sub-array (16/48-elements linear array) transducer were developed for contrast enhanced super-harmonic ultrasound imaging of prostate cancer with the low frequency ultrasound transducer as a transmitter for contrast agent (microbubble) excitation and the high frequency transducer as a receiver for detection of nonlinear responses from microbubbles. The 1-3 piezoelectric composite was used as active materials of the single-element transducers due to its low acoustic impedance and high coupling factor. A high dielectric constant PZT ceramic was used for the sub-array transducer due to its high dielectric property induced relatively low electrical impedance. The possible resonance modes of the active elements were estimated using finite element analysis (FEA). The pulse-echo response, peak-negative pressure and bubble response were tested, followed by in vitro contrast imaging tests using a graphite-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom. The single-element dual frequency transducer (8 × 4 × 2 mm3) showed a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 56.5% for the transmitter, and 41.8% for the receiver. A 2 MHz-transmitter (730 μm pitch and 6.5 mm elevation aperture) and a 22 MHz-receiver (240 μm pitch and 1.5 mm aperture) of the sub-array transducer exhibited -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 51.0% and 40.2%, respectively. The peak negative pressure at the far field was about -1.3 MPa with 200 Vpp, 1-cycle 2 MHz burst, which is high enough to excite microbubbles for nonlinear responses. The 7th harmonic responses from micro bubbles were successfully detected in the phantom imaging test showing a contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of 16 dB.

  16. Myocardial ischemia evaluation with dual-source computed tomography: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Carlos; Vázquez, María; Oca, Roque; Vilar, Manuel; Trinidad, Carmen; Sanmartin, Marcelo

    2013-11-01

    Computed tomography does not accurately determine which coronary lesions lead to myocardial ischemia and consequently further tests are required to evaluate ischemia induction. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy between dual-energy computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability in patients suspected of coronary artery disease. A prospective study was performed in 56 consecutive patients (39 men [69.6%]; mean age [standard deviation], 63 [10]; range, 23-81). Computed tomography was performed with the following protocol: 1, adenosine stress perfusion; 2, coronary angiography; and 3, delayed enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of stress perfusion and delayed enhancement was performed within 30 days. Two observers in consensus analyzed the perfusion and delayed enhancement images. We studied 952 myocardial segments and 168 vascular territories. In a per-segment analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of computed tomography compared with magnetic resonance were 76%, 99%, 89%, and 98% for perfusion defects, and 64%, 99%, 82%, and 99% for delayed enhancement, respectively. In a per-vascular territory analysis, the same measures were 78%, 97%, 86%, and 95% for perfusion defects, and 72%, 99%, 93%, and 97% for delayed enhancement, respectively. The mean radiation dose was 8.2 (2) mSv. Dual-source computed tomography may allow accurate and concomitant evaluation of perfusion defects and myocardial viability and analysis of coronary anatomy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Handheld probe integrating laser diode and ultrasound transducer array for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, K; van den Berg, P J; Rabot, O; Kohl, A; Tisserand, S; Brands, P; Steenbergen, W

    2014-10-20

    Ultrasound and photoacoustics can be utilized as complementary imaging techniques to improve clinical diagnoses. Photoacoustics provides optical contrast and functional information while ultrasound provides structural and anatomical information. As of yet, photoacoustic imaging uses large and expensive systems, which limits their clinical application and makes the combination costly and impracticable. In this work we present and evaluate a compact and ergonomically designed handheld probe, connected to a portable ultrasound system for inexpensive, real-time dual-modality ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging. The probe integrates an ultrasound transducer array and a highly efficient diode stack laser emitting 130 ns pulses at 805 nm wavelength and a pulse energy of 0.56 mJ, with a high pulse repetition frequency of up to 10 kHz. The diodes are driven by a customized laser driver, which can be triggered externally with a high temporal stability necessary to synchronize the ultrasound detection and laser pulsing. The emitted beam is collimated with cylindrical micro-lenses and shaped using a diffractive optical element, delivering a homogenized rectangular light intensity distribution. The system performance was tested in vitro and in vivo by imaging a human finger joint.

  18. Range side lobe inversion for chirp-encoded dual-band tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Peng, Jun-Kai; Wu, Chi

    2014-02-01

    Dual-band (DB) harmonic imaging is performed by transmitting and receiving at both fundamental band (f0) and second-harmonic band (2f0). In our previous work, particular chirp excitation has been developed to increase the signal- to-noise ratio in DB harmonic imaging. However, spectral overlap between the second-order DB harmonic signals results in range side lobes in the pulse compression. In this study, a novel range side lobe inversion (RSI) method is developed to alleviate the level of range side lobes from spectral overlap. The method is implemented by firing an auxiliary chirp to change the polarity of the range side lobes so that the range side lobes can be suppressed in the combination of the original chirp and the auxiliary chirp. Hydrophone measurements show that the RSI method reduces the range side lobe level (RSLL) and thus increases the quality of pulse compression in DB harmonic imaging. With the signal bandwidth of 60%, the RSLL decreases from -23 dB to -36 dB and the corresponding compression quality improves from 78% to 94%. B-mode images also indicate that the magnitude of range side lobe is suppressed by 7 dB when the RSI method is applied.

  19. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-01

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL-1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  20. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-07

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL(-1) were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  1. High-efficiency broadband meta-hologram with polarization-controlled dual images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei Ting; Yang, Kuang-Yu; Wang, Chih-Ming; Huang, Yao-Wei; Sun, Greg; Chiang, I-Da; Liao, Chun Yen; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Lin, Hao Tsun; Sun, Shulin; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Ai Qun; Tsai, Din Ping

    2014-01-01

    Holograms, the optical devices to reconstruct predesigned images, show many applications in our daily life. However, applications of hologram are still limited by the constituent materials and therefore their working range is trapped at a particular electromagnetic region. In recent years, the metasurfaces, an array of subwavelength antenna with varying sizes, show the abilities to manipulate the phase of incident electromagnetic wave from visible to microwave frequencies. Here, we present a reflective-type and high-efficiency meta-hologram fabricated by metasurface for visible wavelength. Using gold cross nanoantennas as building blocks to construct our meta-hologram devices with thickness ∼ λ/4, the reconstructed images of meta-hologram show polarization-controlled dual images with high contrast, functioning for both coherent and incoherent light sources within a broad spectral range and under a wide range of incidence angles. The flexibility demonstrated here for our meta-hologram paves the road to a wide range of applications related to holographic images at arbitrary electromagnetic wave region.

  2. Direct Imaging of Laser-driven Ultrafast Molecular Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuse, Kenta; Fujimoto, Romu; Mizutani, Nobuo; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-04

    We present a method for visualizing laser-induced, ultrafast molecular rotational wave packet dynamics. We have developed a new 2-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging setup in which a hitherto-impractical camera angle is realized. In our imaging technique, diatomic molecules are irradiated with a circularly polarized strong laser pulse. The ejected atomic ions are accelerated perpendicularly to the laser propagation. The ions lying in the laser polarization plane are selected through the use of a mechanical slit and imaged with a high-throughput, 2-dimensional detector installed parallel to the polarization plane. Because a circularly polarized (isotropic) Coulomb exploding pulse is used, the observed angular distribution of the ejected ions directly corresponds to the squared rotational wave function at the time of the pulse irradiation. To create a real-time movie of molecular rotation, the present imaging technique is combined with a femtosecond pump-probe optical setup in which the pump pulses create unidirectionally rotating molecular ensembles. Due to the high image throughput of our detection system, the pump-probe experimental condition can be easily optimized by monitoring a real-time snapshot. As a result, the quality of the observed movie is sufficiently high for visualizing the detailed wave nature of motion. We also note that the present technique can be implemented in existing standard ion imaging setups, offering a new camera angle or viewpoint for the molecular systems without the need for extensive modification.

  3. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Put, Stéphanie; Westhovens, René; Lahoutte, Tony; Matthys, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ₃ integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein.

  4. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven (United States). Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis.

  5. Experience of Dual Time Point Brain F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Infections Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Weung; Kim, Chang Guhn; Park, Soon Ah; Jung, Sang Ah [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Dual time point FDG PET imaging (DTPI) has been considered helpful for discrimination of benign and malignant disease, and staging lymph node status in patients with pulmonary malignancy. However, DTPI for benign disease has been rarely reported, and it may show a better description of metabolic status and extent of benign infection disease than early imaging only. The authors report on the use F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging with additional delayed imaging on a 52-year-old man with sparganosis and a 70-year-old man with tuberculous meningitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on dual time point PET/CT imaging in patients with cerebral sparganosis and tuberculous meningitis.

  6. Emerging applications of conjugated polymers in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junwei; Liu, Jie; Wei, Chen-Wei; Liu, Bin; O'Donnell, Matthew; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-10-28

    In recent years, conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention from the imaging community as a new class of contrast agent due to their intriguing structural, chemical, and optical properties. Their size and emission wavelength tunability, brightness, photostability, and low toxicity have been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro sensing and cellular imaging applications, and have just begun to show impact in in vivo settings. In this Perspective, we summarize recent advances in engineering conjugated polymers as imaging contrast agents, their emerging applications in molecular imaging (referred to as in vivo uses in this paper), as well as our perspectives on future research.

  7. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  8. A nanocomposite of Au-AgI core/shell dimer as a dual-modality contrast agent for x-ray computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orza, Anamaria; Wu, Hui; Li, Yuancheng; Mao, Hui, E-mail: hmao@emory.edu, E-mail: Xiangyang.Tang@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Center for Systems Imaging, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang, E-mail: hmao@emory.edu, E-mail: Xiangyang.Tang@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Feng, Ting; Wang, Xueding [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Yang, Lily [Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a core/shell nanodimer of gold (core) and silver iodine (shell) as a dual-modal contrast-enhancing agent for biomarker targeted x-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) applications. Methods: The gold and silver iodine core/shell nanodimer (Au/AgICSD) was prepared by fusing together components of gold, silver, and iodine. The physicochemical properties of Au/AgICSD were then characterized using different optical and imaging techniques (e.g., HR- transmission electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Z-potential, and UV-vis). The CT and PAI contrast-enhancing effects were tested and then compared with a clinically used CT contrast agent and Au nanoparticles. To confer biocompatibility and the capability for efficient biomarker targeting, the surface of the Au/AgICSD nanodimer was modified with the amphiphilic diblock polymer and then functionalized with transferrin for targeting transferrin receptor that is overexpressed in various cancer cells. Cytotoxicity of the prepared Au/AgICSD nanodimer was also tested with both normal and cancer cell lines. Results: The characterizations of prepared Au/AgI core/shell nanostructure confirmed the formation of Au/AgICSD nanodimers. Au/AgICSD nanodimer is stable in physiological conditions for in vivo applications. Au/AgICSD nanodimer exhibited higher contrast enhancement in both CT and PAI for dual-modality imaging. Moreover, transferrin functionalized Au/AgICSD nanodimer showed specific binding to the tumor cells that have a high level of expression of the transferrin receptor. Conclusions: The developed Au/AgICSD nanodimer can be used as a potential biomarker targeted dual-modal contrast agent for both or combined CT and PAI molecular imaging.

  9. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-07

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images.Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable.The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  10. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging system facilitated with graphics processing unit and code parallel optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Carson, Paul L; Wang, Xueding; Liu, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with highly sensitive optical absorption contrast and excellent spatial resolution comparable to medical ultrasound (US) imaging. We report the development of a fully integrated PAT and US dual-modality imaging system, which performs signal scanning, image reconstruction, and display for both photoacoustic (PA) and US imaging all in a truly real-time manner. The back-projection (BP) algorithm for PA image reconstruction is optimized to reduce the computational cost and facilitate parallel computation on a state of the art graphics processing unit (GPU) card. For the first time, PAT and US imaging of the same object can be conducted simultaneously and continuously, at a real-time frame rate, presently limited by the laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. Noninvasive PAT and US imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo were achieved, demonstrating the satisfactory image quality realized with this system. Another experiment, simultaneous PAT and US imaging of contrast agent flowing through an artificial vessel, was conducted to verify the performance of this system for imaging fast biological events. The GPU-based image reconstruction software code for this dual-modality system is open source and available for download from http://sourceforge.net/projects/patrealtime.

  11. [Research of dual-photoelastic-modulator-based beat frequency modulation and Fourier-Bessel transform imaging spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yao-Li; Huang, Yan-Fei; Chen, You-Hua; Wang, Li-Fu; Yang, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    As the existing photoelastic-modulator(PEM) modulating frequency in the tens of kHz to hundreds of kHz between, leading to frequency of modulated interference signal is higher, so ordinary array detector cannot effectively caprure interference signal..A new beat frequency modulation method based on dual-photoelastic-modulator (Dual-PEM) and Fourier-Bessel transform is proposed as an key component of dual-photoelastic-modulator-based imaging spectrometer (Dual-PEM-IS) combined with charge coupled device (CCD). The dual-PEM are operated as an electro-optic circular retardance modulator, Operating the PEMs at slightly different resonant frequencies w1 and w2 respectively, generates a differential signal at a much lower heterodyne frequency that modulates the incident light. This method not only retains the advantages of the existing PEM, but also the frequency of modulated photocurrent decreased by 2-3 orders of magnitude (10-500 Hz) and can be detected by common array detector, and the incident light spectra can be obtained by Fourier-Bessel transform of low frequency component in the modulated signal. The method makes the PEM has the dual capability of imaging and spectral measurement. The basic principle is introduced, the basic equations is derived, and the feasibility is verified through the corresponding numerical simulation and experiment. This method has' potential applications in imaging spectrometer technology, and analysis of the effect of deviation of the optical path difference. This work provides the necessary theoretical basis for remote sensing of new Dual-PEM-IS and for engineering implementation of spectra inversion.

  12. Dual release and molecular mechanism of bilayered aceclofenac tablet using polymer mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nguyen, Hien; Nguyen, Van Hong; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-12-30

    The objectives of the present study were to develop a controlled-release bilayered tablet of aceclofenac (AFN) 200mg with dual release and to gain a mechanistic understanding of the enhanced sustained release capability achieved by utilizing a binary mixture of the sustained release materials. Different formulations of the sustained-release layer were formulated by employing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) as the major retarding polymers. The in vitro dissolution studies of AFN bilayered tablets were carried out in intestinal fluid (pH 6.8 buffer). The mechanism of the synergistic rate-retarding effect of the polymer mixture containing HPC and carbomer was elucidated by the rate of swelling and erosion in intestinal fluid and the molecular interactions in the polymer network. The optimized bilayered tablets had similar in vitro dissolution profiles to the marketed tablet Clanza(®)CR based on the similarity factor (f2) in combination with their satisfactory micromeritic, physicochemical properties, and stability profiles. Drug release from HPMC-based matrix was controlled by non-Fickian transport, while drug release from HPC-based matrix was solely governed by drug diffusion. The swelling and erosion data exhibited a dramatic increase of water uptake and a reduction of weight loss in the polymer mixture-loaded tablet. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed strong hydrogen bonding between HPC and carbomer in the polymer mixture. Regarding spatial distribution of polymers in the polymer mixture-loaded tablet, carbomer was found to be the main component of the gel layer during the first 2h of the hydration process, which was responsible for retarding drug release at initial stage. This process was then followed by a gradual transition of HPC from the glassy core to the gel layer for further increasing gel strength. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy Spectrum Extraction and Optimal Imaging via Dual-Energy Material Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2015-01-01

    Inferior soft-tissue contrast resolution is a major limitation of current CT scanners. The aim of the study is to improve the contrast resolution of CT scanners using dual-energy acquisition. Based on dual-energy material decomposition, the proposed method starts with extracting the outgoing energy spectrum by polychromatic forward projecting the material-selective images. The extracted spectrum is then reweighted to boost the soft-tissue contrast. A simulated water cylinder phantom with inserts that contain a series of six solutions of varying iodine concentration (range, 0-20 mg/mL) is used to evaluate the proposed method. Results show the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean energy difference between the extracted energy spectrum and the spectrum acquired using an energy-resolved photon counting detector(PCD), are 0.044 and 0.01 keV, respectively. Compared to the method using the standard energy-integrating detectors, dose normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) for the proposed method are improved fro...

  14. Molecular imaging probes spy on the body's inner workings: miniaturized microscopes, microbubbles, 7- and 15-T scanners, diffusion-tensor MRI, and other molecular-imaging technologies are pushing molecular imaging into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is one of the hot-button areas within medical imaging. This technology employs imaging techniques in concert with molecular probes, or biomarkers, that together noninvasively spy on cellular function and molecular processes. In some cases, this technology may be able to detect the very earliest stages of diseases and eliminate them on the spot. This paper discusses how miniaturized microscopes, microbubbles, 7T and 15T scanners, diffusion-tensor MRI and other molecular imaging technologies are pushing molecular imaging into the future.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  16. Dual hairpin-like molecular beacon based on coralyne-adenosine interaction for sensing melamine in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangfeng; Zhu, Yanhong; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a novel dual hairpin-like molecular beacon (MB) for the selective and sensitive detection of melamine (MA) based on the conjugation of MA and thymine. In this protocol, the coordination between coralyne and adenosine (A) leaded a dual hairpin-like MB and the fluorophore-quencher pair is close proximity resulting in the fluorescence quenching. With the addition of MA, it conjugated with thymine in the loop part of dual hairpin-like MB by triple H-bonds, triggering the dissociation of the dual hairpin-like MB. The resulting spatial separation of the fluorophore from quencher induced the enhancement in fluorescence emission. Under the optimized conditions, the sensor exhibited a wide linear range of 8×10(-9)-1.6×10(-5) M (R(2)=0.9969) towards MA, with a low detection limit of 5 nM, approximately 4000 times lower than the Drug Administration and the US Food estimated MA safety limit. The real milk samples were also investigated with a satisfying result.

  17. Evaluation of dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence imaging of colorectal tumours with a high-sensitivity CMOS imager: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Tanaka, Shinji; Miyaki, Rie; Sanomura, Yoji; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Yamada, Kenji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-09-02

    It is important to devise efficient and easy methods of detecting colorectal tumours to reduce mortality from colorectal cancer. Dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence intensity can be used to visualize colorectal tumours. Therefore, we evaluated dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence images of colorectal tumours obtained with a newly developed, high-sensitivity complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) imager. A total 107 colorectal tumours (44 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas with intramucosal invasion, and 20 sessile serrated adenoma/polyps [SSA/Ps]) in 98 patients who underwent endoscopic tumour resection were included. The specimens were irradiated with excitation light at 365 nm and 405 nm, and autofluorescence images measured with a 475 ± 25-nm band pass filter were obtained using a new, high-sensitivity CMOS imager. Ratio images (F365ex/F405ex) were created to evaluate the lesion brightness compared with that of normal mucosa, and specimens were categorized into a no signal or high signal group. Adenomas and adenocarcinomas were depicted in 87 ratio images, with 86.2% (n = 75) in the High signal group. SSA/P was depicted in 20 ratio images, with 70.0% (n = 14) in the High signal group. Dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence images of colorectal tumours can be acquired using our high-sensitivity CMOS imager, and are useful in detecting colorectal tumours.

  18. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Yoel [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases.

  19. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells Therapy for Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Chao; Yehua Shen; Hong Zhang; Mei Tian

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longit...

  20. Recognition Properties and Competitive Assays of a Dual Dopamine/Serotonin Selective Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatcharee Seechamnanturakit

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP with dual dopamine/serotonin-like binding sites (DS-MIP was synthesized for use as a receptor model of study the druginteraction of biological mixed receptors at a molecular level. The polymer material was produced using methacrylic acid (MAA and acrylamide (ACM as functional monomers, N,N′-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAA as cross-linker, methanol/water mixture (4:1, v/v as porogen and a mixture of dopamine (D and serotonin (S as templates. The prepared DS-MIP exhibited the greatest rebinding of the template(s in aqueous methanol solution with decreased recognition in acetonitrile, water and methanol solvent. The binding affinity and binding capacity of DS-MIP with S were found to be higher than those of DS-MIP with D. The selectivity profiles of DS-MIP suggest that the D binding site of DS-MIP has sufficient integrity to discriminate between species of non-optimal functional group orientation, whilst the S binding site of DS-MIP is less selective toward species having structural features and functional group orientations different from S. The ligand binding activities of a series of ergot derivatives (ergocryptine, ergocornine, ergocristine, ergonovine, agroclavine, pergolide and terguride have been studied with the DS-MIP using a competitive ligand binding assay protocol. The binding affinities of DSMIP were demonstrated in the micro- or submicro-molar range for a series of ergot derivatives, whereas the binding affinities were considerably greater to natural receptors derived from the rat hypothalamus. The DS-MIP afforded the same pattern of differentiation as the natural receptors, i.e. affinity for the clavines > lysergic acid derivatives > ergopeptines. The results suggest that the discrimination for the ergot derivatives by the dopamine and serotonin sites of DS-MIP is due to the structural features and functional orientation of the phenylethylamine and indolylethylamine entities at the

  1. Dual-Modal Nanoprobes for Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplant by MRI and Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Chang Kyu; Hong, Kyung Ah; Lin, Shun Mei [Seoul Metropolitan Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2009-12-15

    To determine the feasibility of labeling human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with bifunctional nanoparticles and assessing their potential as imaging probes in the monitoring of hMSC transplantation. The T1 and T2 relaxivities of the nanoparticles (MNP SiO{sub 2}[RITC]-PEG) were measured at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance scanner. Using hMSCs and the nanoparticles, labeling efficiency, toxicity, and proliferation were assessed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to specify the intracellular localization of the endocytosed iron nanoparticles. We also observed in vitro and in vivo visualization of the labeled hMSCs with a 3T MR scanner and optical imaging. MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG showed both superparamagnetic and fluorescent properties. The r{sub 1} and r{sub 2} relaxivity values of the MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG were 0.33 and 398 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 1.5T, respectively, and 0.29 and 453 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 3T, respectively. The effective internalization of MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG into hMSCs was observed by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. The transmission electron microscopy images showed that MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG was internalized into the cells and mainly resided in the cytoplasm. The viability and proliferation of MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were not significantly different from the control cells. MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were observed in vitro and in vivo with optical and MR imaging. MNP SiO{sub 2}(RITC)-PEG can be a useful contrast agent for stem cell imaging, which is suitable for a bimodal detection by MRI and optical imaging.

  2. Molecular imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A., E-mail: k.a.miles@bsms.ac.u [Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a quantitative technique that employs rapid sequences of CT images after bolus administration of intravenous contrast material to measure a range of physiological processes related to the microvasculature of tissues. By combining knowledge of the molecular processes underlying changes in vascular physiology with an understanding of the relationship between vascular physiology and CT contrast enhancement, DCE-CT can be redefined as a molecular imaging technique. Some DCE-CT derived parameters reflect tissue hypoxia and can, therefore, provide information about the cellular microenvironment. DCE-CT can also depict physiological processes, such as vasodilatation, that represent the physiological consequences of molecular responses to tissue hypoxia. To date the main applications have been in stroke and oncology. Unlike some other molecular imaging approaches, DCE-CT benefits from wide availability and ease of application along with the use of contrast materials and software packages that have achieved full regulatory approval. Hence, DCE-CT represents a molecular imaging technique that is applicable in clinical practice today.

  3. India ink incorporated multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets for photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality imaging and photoacoustic effect based tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms-conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy.

  4. MIPortal: A High Capacity Server for Molecular Imaging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha Pivovarov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of novel molecular tools in research and clinical medicine has created a need for more refined information management systems. This article describes the design and implementation of such a new information platform: the Molecular Imaging Portal (MIPortal. The platform was created to organize, archive, and rapidly retrieve large datasets using Web-based browsers as access points. The system has been implemented in a heterogeneous, academic research environment serving Macintosh, Unix, and Microsoft Windows clients and has been shown to be extraordinarily robust and versatile. In addition, it has served as a useful tool for clinical trials and collaborative multi-institutional small-animal imaging research.

  5. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  6. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging using a dual stage beamformer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ye; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A new method for directional synthetic aperture flow imaging using a dual stage beamformer approach is presented. The velocity estimation is angle independent and the amount of calculations is reduced compared to full synthetic aperture, but still maintains all the advantages at the same time....... In the second stage, focal points are considered as virtual sources and data is beamformed along the flow direction. Then the velocities are estimated by finding the spatial shift between two signals. In the experimental measurements the angle between the transmit beam and flow vessel was 70 and a laminar flow...... with a parabolic profile was generated by a flow rig. The flow with a peak velocity of 0.1 m/s was sampled at a pulse repetition frequency of 4 kHz. The signals were transmitted and received by the experimental scanner SARUS (Synthetic Aperture Realtime Ultrasound System). A relative standard deviation of 2...

  7. A randomised primal-dual algorithm for distributed radio-interferometric imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Onose, Alexandru; McEwen, Jason D; Wiaux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Next generation radio telescopes, like the Square Kilometre Array, will acquire an unprecedented amount of data for radio astronomy. The development of fast, parallelisable or distributed algorithms for handling such large-scale data sets is of prime importance. Motivated by this, we investigate herein a convex optimisation algorithmic structure, based on primal-dual forward-backward iterations, for solving the radio interferometric imaging problem. It can encompass any convex prior of interest. It allows for the distributed processing of the measured data and introduces further flexibility by employing a probabilistic approach for the selection of the data blocks used at a given iteration. We study the reconstruction performance with respect to the data distribution and we propose the use of nonuniform probabilities for the randomised updates. Our simulations show the feasibility of the randomisation given a limited computing infrastructure as well as important computational advantages when compared to state...

  8. Dynamic Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging without Complications in a Patient with Dual-Chamber Demand Pacemaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F.; Lupo, P.; Esseridou, A.; Fausto, A.; Quarenghi, M. [Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy). Depts. of Radiology, Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Center

    2006-02-15

    Mammography and ultrasound indicated a cancer of the right breast in a 77-year-old woman with a dual-chamber demand pacemaker. The patient was not pacemaker-dependent. She underwent breast 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (dynamic gradient echo sequence with Gd-DOTA 0.1 mmol/kg). Before the patient entered the MR room, the configuration of the device was changed (the response to magnet was switched from asynchronous to off and the rate-responsive algorithm was disabled). No relevant modifications of heart rhythm or rate were observed during the MR examination. No symptom was reported. Immediately after the examination, the pacemaker interrogation showed neither program changes nor alert warnings. MRI detected a bifocal cancer in the right breast which allowed tailored breast-conserving treatment to be initiated. Histopathology confirmed a bifocal invasive ductal carcinoma.

  9. Temperature measurement of supercooled droplet in icing phenomenon by means of dual-luminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M.; Morita, K.; Mamori, H.; Fukushima, N.; Yamamoto, M.

    2017-08-01

    The collision of a supercooled water droplet with a surface result an object creates ice accretion on the surface. The icing problem in any cold environments leads to severe damages on aircrafts, and a lot of studies on prevention and prediction techniques for icing have been conducted so far. Therefore, it is very important to know the detail of freezing mechanism of supercooled water droplets to improve the anti-and de-icing devices and icing simulation codes. The icing mechanism of a single supercooled water droplet impacting on an object surface would give us great insights for the purpose. In the present study, we develop a dual-luminescent imaging technique to measure the time-resolved temperature of a supercooled water droplet impacting on the surface under different temperature conditions. We apply this technique to measure the exact temperature of a water droplet, and to discuss the detail of the freezing process.

  10. Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Bio-Imaging with Dual-Color Carbon Nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhik, Anna M; Stein, Simon; Dekaliuk, Mariia O; Battle, Christopher; Li, Weixing; Huss, Anja; Platen, Mitja; Schaap, Iwan A T; Gregor, Ingo; Demchenko, Alexander P; Schmidt, Christoph F; Enderlein, Jörg; Chizhik, Alexey I

    2016-01-13

    Success in super-resolution imaging relies on a proper choice of fluorescent probes. Here, we suggest novel easily produced and biocompatible nanoparticles-carbon nanodots-for super-resolution optical fluctuation bioimaging (SOFI). The particles revealed an intrinsic dual-color fluorescence, which corresponds to two subpopulations of particles of different electric charges. The neutral nanoparticles localize to cellular nuclei suggesting their potential use as an inexpensive, easily produced nucleus-specific label. The single particle study revealed that the carbon nanodots possess a unique hybrid combination of fluorescence properties exhibiting characteristics of both dye molecules and semiconductor nanocrystals. The results suggest that charge trapping and redistribution on the surface of the particles triggers their transitions between emissive and dark states. These findings open up new possibilities for the utilization of carbon nanodots in the various super-resolution microscopy methods based on stochastic optical switching.

  11. High-Frequency Oscillations in a Solar Active Region observed with the Rapid Dual Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Mathioudakis, M; Bloomfield, D S; Keenan, F P

    2007-01-01

    High-cadence, synchronized, multiwavelength optical observations of a solar active region (NOAA 10794) are presented. The data were obtained with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak using a newly developed camera system : the Rapid Dual Imager. Wavelet analysis is undertaken to search for intensity related oscillatory signatures, and periodicities ranging from 20 to 370 s are found with significance levels exceeding 95%. Observations in the H-alpha blue wing show more penumbral oscillatory phenomena when compared to simultaneous G-band observations. The H-alpha oscillations are interpreted as the signatures of plasma motions with a mean velocity of 20 km/s. The strong oscillatory power over H-alpha blue-wing and G-band penumbral bright grains is an indication of the Evershed flow with frequencies higher than previously reported.

  12. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare kardiovaskulaere MRT-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botnar, R.M. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Imaging Sciences; St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, H. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Noerenberg, D. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Radiology; and others

    2015-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  13. Molecular Histopathology by Spectrally Reconstructed Nonlinear Interferometric Vibrational Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, Praveen D.; Jiang, Zhi; Chaney, Eric J.; Benalcazar, Wladimir A.; Marks, Daniel L.; Gruebele, Martin; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Sensitive assays for rapid quantitative analysis of histologic sections, resected tissue specimens, or in situ tissue are highly desired for early disease diagnosis. Stained histopathology is the gold standard but remains a subjective practice on processed tissue taking from hours to days. We describe a microscopy technique that obtains a sensitive and accurate color-coded image from intrinsic molecular markers. Spectrally reconstructed nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging can differentiate cancer versus normal tissue sections with greater than 99% confidence interval in a preclinical rat breast cancer model and define cancer boundaries to ±100 μm with greater than 99% confidence interval, using fresh unstained tissue sections imaged in less than 5 minutes. By optimizing optical sources and beam delivery, this technique can potentially enable real-time point-of-care optical molecular imaging and diagnosis. PMID:21098699

  14. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  15. Composite nanoparticle of Au and quantum dots for X-ray computed tomography and fluorescence dual-mode imaging in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Yan, Dong-Mei; Yao, Ming-Hao; Qin, Meng-Yao; Zhao, Yuan-Di, E-mail: zydi@mail.hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics - Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2015-12-15

    In this study, composite nanoparticles comprising Au nanoparticle and quantum dots were built and used for contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging (CT) and fluorescence dual-mode imaging in vivo. The nanoparticle exhibited good monodispersity and good biocompatibility, and had excellent CT contrast-enhancement effect and fluorescence imaging capability. They were appropriate for being used as dual-mode imaging probe in vivo.

  16. Assessing validation of dual fluoroscopic image matching method for measurement of in vivo spine kinematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Jian-qiang; HU Yong-cheng; DU Li-qing; HE Jing-liang; LIU Kai; LIU Zhong-jun; XIA Qun

    2011-01-01

    Background Accurate knowledge of the spinal structural functions is critical to understand the biomechanical factors that affect spinal pathology. Many studies have investigated the human vertebral motion both in vitro and in vivo.However, determination of in vivo motion of the vertebrae under physiologic loading conditions remains a challenge in biomedical engineering because of the limitations of current technology and the complicated anatomy of the spine.Methods For in vitro validation, a human lumbar specimen was imbedded with steel beads and moved to a known distance by an universal testing machine (UTM). The dual fluoroscopic system was used to capture the spine motion and reproduce the moving distance. For in vivo validation, a living subject moved the spine in various positions while bearing weight. The fluoroscopes were used to reproduce the in vivo spine positions 5 times. The standard deviations in translation and orientation of the five measurements were used to evaluate the repeatability of technique. The accuracy of vertebral outline matching with metallic marks matching technology was compared.Results The translation positions of the human lumbar specimen could be determined with a mean accuracy less than 0.35 mm and a mean repeatability 0.36 mm for the image matching technique. The repeatability of the method in reproducing in vivo human spine six degrees of freedom (6DOF) kinematics was less than 0.43 mm in translation and less than 0.65° in rotation. The accuracy of metallic marks and vertebral outline matching did not show significant difference.Conclusions Combining a dual fluoroscopic and computerized tomography imaging technique was accurate and reproduceable for noninvasive measurement of spine vertebral motion. The vertebral outline matching technique could be a useful technique for matching of vertebral positions and orientations which can evaluate and improve the efficacy of the various surgical treatments.

  17. Rigid motion correction of dual opposed planar projections in single photon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, G. I.; Ryder, W. J.; Gillam, J. E.; Boisson, F.; Kyme, A. Z.; Fulton, R. R.; Meikle, S. R.; Kench, P. L.

    2017-05-01

    Awake and/or freely moving small animal single photon emission imaging allows the continuous study of molecules exhibiting slow kinetics without the need to restrain or anaesthetise the animals. Estimating motion free projections in freely moving small animal planar imaging can be considered as a limited angle tomography problem, except that we wish to estimate the 2D planar projections rather than the 3D volume, where the angular sampling in all three axes depends on the rotational motion of the animal. In this study, we hypothesise that the motion corrected planar projections estimated by reconstructing an estimate of the 3D volume using an iterative motion compensating reconstruction algorithm and integrating it along the projection path, will closely match the true, motion-less, planar distribution regardless of the object motion. We tested this hypothesis for the case of rigid motion using Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental phantom data based on a dual opposed detector system, where object motion was modelled with 6 degrees of freedom. In addition, we investigated the quantitative accuracy of the regional activity extracted from the geometric mean of opposing motion corrected planar projections. Results showed that it is feasible to estimate qualitatively accurate motion-corrected projections for a wide range of motions around all 3 axes. Errors in the geometric mean estimates of regional activity were relatively small and within 10% of expected true values. In addition, quantitative regional errors were dependent on the observed motion, as well as on the surrounding activity of overlapping organs. We conclude that both qualitatively and quantitatively accurate motion-free projections of the tracer distribution in a rigidly moving object can be estimated from dual opposed detectors using a correction approach within an iterative reconstruction framework and we expect this approach can be extended to the case of non-rigid motion.

  18. WE-D-BRF-05: Quantitative Dual-Energy CT Imaging for Proton Stopping Power Computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Williamson, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the two-parameter separable basis-vector model (BVM) to estimation of proton stopping power from dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. Methods: BVM assumes that the photon cross sections of any unknown material can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding quantities for two bracketing basis materials. We show that both the electron density (ρe) and mean excitation energy (Iex) can be modeled by BVM, enabling stopping power to be estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation. We have implemented an idealized post-processing dual energy imaging (pDECT) simulation consisting of monogenetic 45 keV and 80 keV scanning beams with polystyrene-water and water-CaCl2 solution basis pairs for soft tissues and bony tissues, respectively. The coefficients of 24 standard ICRU tissue compositions were estimated by pDECT. The corresponding ρe, Iex, and stopping power tables were evaluated via BVM and compared to tabulated ICRU 44 reference values. Results: BVM-based pDECT was found to estimate ρe and Iex with average and maximum errors of 0.5% and 2%, respectively, for the 24 tissues. Proton stopping power values at 175 MeV, show average/maximum errors of 0.8%/1.4%. For adipose, muscle and bone, these errors result range prediction accuracies less than 1%. Conclusion: A new two-parameter separable DECT model (BVM) for estimating proton stopping power was developed. Compared to competing parametric fit DECT models, BVM has the comparable prediction accuracy without necessitating iterative solution of nonlinear equations or a sample-dependent empirical relationship between effective atomic number and Iex. Based on the proton BVM, an efficient iterative statistical DECT reconstruction model is under development.

  19. Online industrial thermography of die casting tooling using dual-wavelength IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourous, Helen E.; Shabestari, Behrouz N.; Luster, Spencer D.; Sacha, Jaroslaw P.

    1998-03-01

    Recent advances in IR system technology coupled with significant reduction sin cost are making thermography a viable tool for on-line monitoring of industrial processes. This paper describes the implementation of a novel rugged thermal imaging system based on a dual-wavelength technique for a large intelligent process monitoring project. The objective of the portion described herein is to deploy a non-contact means of monitoring die cast tooling surface thermal conditions and analyzing the data in the context of the process monitor. The technical and practical challenges of developing such a non-contact thermal measurement system for continuous inspection in an industrial environment are discussed, and methods of resolving them are presented. These challenges include implementation of a wavelength filter system for quantitative determination of the surface temperature. Additionally, emissivity variations of the tooling surface as well as IR reflections are discussed. The primary issues that are addressed, however, are compensation for ambient temperature conditions and optimization of the calibration process. Other issues center on remote camera control, image acquisition, data synchronization, and data interpretation. An example application of this system, along with in-plant images and thermal data, is described.

  20. Accelerating image reconstruction in dual-head PET system by GPU and symmetry properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ying Chou

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an important imaging modality in both clinical usage and research studies. We have developed a compact high-sensitivity PET system that consisted of two large-area panel PET detector heads, which produce more than 224 million lines of response and thus request dramatic computational demands. In this work, we employed a state-of-the-art graphics processing unit (GPU, NVIDIA Tesla C2070, to yield an efficient reconstruction process. Our approaches ingeniously integrate the distinguished features of the symmetry properties of the imaging system and GPU architectures, including block/warp/thread assignments and effective memory usage, to accelerate the computations for ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM image reconstruction. The OSEM reconstruction algorithms were implemented employing both CPU-based and GPU-based codes, and their computational performance was quantitatively analyzed and compared. The results showed that the GPU-accelerated scheme can drastically reduce the reconstruction time and thus can largely expand the applicability of the dual-head PET system.

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis: feasibility of a prolonged dual-phase imaging protocol with tracer kinetics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Tong San; Hartono, Septian [Nanyang Technological University, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Singapore (Singapore); National Cancer Centre, Department of Oncologic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Thng, Choon Hua; Lee, Puor Sherng [National Cancer Centre, Department of Oncologic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Choo, Su Pin; Poon, Donald Y.H.; Toh, Han Chong [National Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); Bisdas, Sotirios [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT imaging of four patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was performed using a dual-phase imaging protocol designed with initial rapid dynamic imaging to capture the initial increase in contrast medium enhancement in order to assess perfusion, followed by a delayed imaging phase with progressively longer intervals to monitor subsequent tissue enhancement behaviour in order to assess tissue permeability. The DCE CT images were analysed using a dual-input two-compartment distributed parameter model to yield separate estimates for blood flow and permeability, as well as fractional intravascular and extravascular volumes. The HCCs and surrounding cirrhotic liver tissues were found to exhibit enhancement curves that can be appropriately described by two distinct compartments separated by a semipermeable barrier. Early contrast arrival was also found for HCC as compared with background liver. These findings are consistent with the current understanding of sinusoidal capillarization and hepatocarcinogenesis. (orig.)

  2. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Endres, Christopher J. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Foss, Catherine A. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Goddard, James S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; McKisson, John [JLAB; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland; Stolin, Alexander V. [West Virginia University; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Pomper, Martin G. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Endres, Christopher [Johns Hopkins University; Foss, Catherine [Johns Hopkins University; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins University; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins University; Goddard Jr, James Samuel [ORNL; Lee, Seung Joon [Jefferson Lab; McKisson, John [Jefferson Lab; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Stolin, Alexander [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Jefferson Lab; Pomper, Martin [Johns Hopkins University

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  4. Absolute measurement of the effective atomic number and the electron density by using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Soo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-12-01

    Material decomposition using dual-energy and material-selective techniques was performed using computed-tomography (CT)-generated reconstructed images. Previous work using the dual-energy method focused on extracting the effective atomic number and the electron density of materials to confirm the dosimetric accuracy in radiation therapy. Dual-energy methods mostly depend on the device generating the X-rays, such as a synchrotron, and on dose verification for radiation treatment planning. Information obtained from CT imaging is important both in diagnosis and in planning radiation therapy. In a clinical setting, CT images are usually displayed as Houndsfield units (HU), which are extracted from the attenuation coefficient of a material. The attenuation coefficient is calculated using the effective atomic number and the electron density of a material; thus, information expressed in HU can be converted into the effective atomic number and the electron density by using the dual-energy equation. This study was performed using realistic Xray spectra to differentiate between the contrast media and plaque in vascular images. Our results suggest that the effective atomic number and electron density are useful in distinguishing between two adjacent materials with similar HUs.

  5. Retinal optical coherence tomography image enhancement via shrinkage denoising using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Mayer, Markus A; Boretsky, Adam R; van Kuijk, Frederik J; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT. Image enhancement of retinal structures, in optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans through denoising, has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of several eye diseases. In this paper, a locally adaptive denoising algorithm using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform, a combination of the double-density wavelet transform and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform, is applied to reduce speckle noise in OCT images of the retina. The algorithm overcomes the limitations of commonly used multiple frame averaging technique, namely the limited number of frames that can be recorded due to eye movements, by providing a comparable image quality in significantly less acquisition time equal to an order of magnitude less time compared to the averaging method. In addition, improvements of image quality metrics and 5 dB increase in the signal-to-noise ratio are attained.

  6. A lanthanide complex with dual biosensing properties: CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) and BIRDS (biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts) with europium DOTA-tetraglycinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Daniel; Kiefer, Garry E; Rothman, Douglas L; Sherry, A Dean; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2011-12-01

    Responsive contrast agents (RCAs) composed of lanthanide(III) ion (Ln3R) complexes with a variety of1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTA4S) derivatives have shown great potential as molecular imaging agents for MR. A variety of LnDOTA–tetraamide complexes have been demonstrated as RCAs for molecular imaging using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). The CEST method detects proton exchange between bulk water and any exchangeable sites on the ligand itself or an inner sphere of bound water that is shifted by a paramagnetic Ln3R ion bound in the core of the macrocycle. It has also been shown that molecular imaging is possible when the RCA itself is observed (i.e. not its effect on bulk water) using a method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS). The BIRDS method utilizes redundant information stored in the nonexchangeable proton resonances emanating from the paramagnetic RCA for ambient factors such as temperature and/or pH.Thus, CEST and BIRDS rely on exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons, respectively, for biosensing. We posited that it would be feasible to combine these two biosensing features into the same RCA (i.e. dual CEST and BIRDS properties). A complex between europium(III) ion (Eu3R) and DOTA–tetraglycinate [DOTA–(gly)S4] was used to demonstrate that its CEST characteristics are preserved, while its BIRDS properties are also detectable. The in vitro temperature sensitivity of EuDOTA–(gly)S4 was used to show that qualitative MR contrast with CEST can be calibrated using quantitative MR mapping with BIRDS, thereby enabling quantitative molecular imaging at high spatial resolution.

  7. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  8. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  9. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  10. Dual optimization based prostate zonal segmentation in 3D MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Ukwatta, Eranga; Sun, Yue; Rajchl, Martin; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and accurate segmentation of the prostate and two of its clinically meaningful sub-regions: the central gland (CG) and peripheral zone (PZ), from 3D MR images, is of great interest in image-guided prostate interventions and diagnosis of prostate cancer. In this work, a novel multi-region segmentation approach is proposed to simultaneously segment the prostate and its two major sub-regions from only a single 3D T2-weighted (T2w) MR image, which makes use of the prior spatial region consistency and incorporates a customized prostate appearance model into the segmentation task. The formulated challenging combinatorial optimization problem is solved by means of convex relaxation, for which a novel spatially continuous max-flow model is introduced as the dual optimization formulation to the studied convex relaxed optimization problem with region consistency constraints. The proposed continuous max-flow model derives an efficient duality-based algorithm that enjoys numerical advantages and can be easily implemented on GPUs. The proposed approach was validated using 18 3D prostate T2w MR images with a body-coil and 25 images with an endo-rectal coil. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is capable of efficiently and accurately extracting both the prostate zones: CG and PZ, and the whole prostate gland from the input 3D prostate MR images, with a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 89.3±3.2% for the whole gland (WG), 82.2±3.0% for the CG, and 69.1±6.9% for the PZ in 3D body-coil MR images; 89.2±3.3% for the WG, 83.0±2.4% for the CG, and 70.0±6.5% for the PZ in 3D endo-rectal coil MR images. In addition, the experiments of intra- and inter-observer variability introduced by user initialization indicate a good reproducibility of the proposed approach in terms of volume difference (VD) and coefficient-of-variation (CV) of DSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, Amy V; Mankoff, David A

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine, basing treatment approaches on patient traits and specific molecular features of disease processes, has an important role in the management of patients with breast cancer as targeted therapies continue to improve. PET imaging offers noninvasive information that is complementary to traditional tissue biomarkers, including information about tumor burden, tumor metabolism, receptor status, and proliferation. Several PET agents that image breast cancer receptors can visually demonstrate the extent and heterogeneity of receptor-positive disease and help predict which tumors are likely to respond to targeted treatments. This review presents applications of PET imaging in the targeted treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Indocyanine Green Loaded Reduced Graphene Oxide for In Vivo Photoacoustic/Fluorescence Dual-Modality Tumor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingqin; Liu, Chengbo; Zeng, Guang; You, Yujia; Wang, Huina; Gong, Xiaojing; Zheng, Rongqin; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Chulhong; Song, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Multimodality imaging based on multifunctional nanocomposites holds great promise to fundamentally augment the capability of biomedical imaging. Specifically, photoacoustic and fluorescence dual-modality imaging is gaining much interest because of their non-invasiveness and the complementary nature of the two modalities in terms of imaging resolution, depth, sensitivity, and speed. Herein, using a green and facile method, we synthesize indocyanine green (ICG) loaded, polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated, reduced nano-graphene oxide nanocomposite (rNGO-PEG/ICG) as a new type of fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-modality imaging contrast. The nanocomposite is shown to have minimal toxicity and excellent photoacoustic/fluorescence signals both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with free ICG, the nanocomposite is demonstrated to possess greater stability, longer blood circulation time, and superior passive tumor targeting capability. In vivo study shows that the circulation time of rNGO-PEG/ICG in the mouse body can sustain up to 6 h upon intravenous injection; while after 1 day, no obvious accumulation of rNGO-PEG/ICG is found in any major organs except the tumor regions. The demonstrated high fluorescence/photoacoustic dual contrasts, together with its low toxicity and excellent circulation life time, suggest that the synthesized rNGO-PEG/ICG can be a promising candidate for further translational studies on both the early diagnosis and image-guided therapy/surgery of cancer.

  13. Melanin-originated carbonaceous dots for triple negative breast cancer diagnosis by fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-mode imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chuan; Huang, Yuan; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2017-07-01

    Carbonaceous dots exhibit increasing applications in diagnosis and drug delivery due to excellent photostability and biocompatibility properties. However, relative short excitation and emission of melanin carbonaceous dots (MCDs) limit the applicability in fluorescence bioimaging. Furthermore, the generally poor spatial resolution of fluorescence imaging limits potential in vivo applications. Due to a variety of beneficial properties, in this study, MCDs were prepared exhibiting great potential in fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-mode bioimaging. The MCDs exhibited a long excitation peak at 615nm and emission peak at 650nm, further highlighting the applicability in fluorescence imaging, while the absorbance peak at 633nm renders MCDs suitable for photoacoustic imaging. In vivo, the photoacoustic signal of MCDs was linearly correlated with the concentration of MCDs. Moreover, the MCDs were shown to be taken up into triple negative breast cancer cell line 4T1 in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In vivo fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of subcutaneous 4T1 tumor demonstrated that MCDs could passively target triple negative breast cancer tissue by enhanced permeability and retention effects and may therefore be used for tumor dual-mode imaging. Furthermore, fluorescence distribution in tissue slices suggested that MCDs may distribute in 4T1 tumor with high efficacy. In conclusion, the MCDs studied offer potential application in fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-mode imaging.

  14. Indocyanine Green Loaded Reduced Graphene Oxide for In Vivo Photoacoustic/Fluorescence Dual-Modality Tumor Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingqin; Liu, Chengbo; Zeng, Guang; You, Yujia; Wang, Huina; Gong, Xiaojing; Zheng, Rongqin; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Chulhong; Song, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Multimodality imaging based on multifunctional nanocomposites holds great promise to fundamentally augment the capability of biomedical imaging. Specifically, photoacoustic and fluorescence dual-modality imaging is gaining much interest because of their non-invasiveness and the complementary nature of the two modalities in terms of imaging resolution, depth, sensitivity, and speed. Herein, using a green and facile method, we synthesize indocyanine green (ICG) loaded, polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated, reduced nano-graphene oxide nanocomposite (rNGO-PEG/ICG) as a new type of fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-modality imaging contrast. The nanocomposite is shown to have minimal toxicity and excellent photoacoustic/fluorescence signals both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with free ICG, the nanocomposite is demonstrated to possess greater stability, longer blood circulation time, and superior passive tumor targeting capability. In vivo study shows that the circulation time of rNGO-PEG/ICG in the mouse body can sustain up to 6 h upon intravenous injection; while after 1 day, no obvious accumulation of rNGO-PEG/ICG is found in any major organs except the tumor regions. The demonstrated high fluorescence/photoacoustic dual contrasts, together with its low toxicity and excellent circulation life time, suggest that the synthesized rNGO-PEG/ICG can be a promising candidate for further translational studies on both the early diagnosis and image-guided therapy/surgery of cancer.

  15. Highly undersampled MR image reconstruction using an improved dual-dictionary learning method with self-adaptive dictionaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiansen; Song, Ying; Zhu, Zhen; Zhao, Jun

    2016-08-18

    Dual-dictionary learning (Dual-DL) method utilizes both a low-resolution dictionary and a high-resolution dictionary, which are co-trained for sparse coding and image updating, respectively. It can effectively exploit a priori knowledge regarding the typical structures, specific features, and local details of training sets images. The prior knowledge helps to improve the reconstruction quality greatly. This method has been successfully applied in magnetic resonance (MR) image reconstruction. However, it relies heavily on the training sets, and dictionaries are fixed and nonadaptive. In this research, we improve Dual-DL by using self-adaptive dictionaries. The low- and high-resolution dictionaries are updated correspondingly along with the image updating stage to ensure their self-adaptivity. The updated dictionaries incorporate both the prior information of the training sets and the test image directly. Both dictionaries feature improved adaptability. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently and significantly improve the quality and robustness of MR image reconstruction.

  16. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Joshi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research.

  17. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  18. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  19. Image quality analysis to reduce dental artifacts in head and neck imaging with dual-source computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, D.; Werner, M.K.; Thomas, C.; Tsiflikas, I.; Reimann, A.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Koitschev, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Important oropharyngeal structures can be superimposed by metallic artifacts due to dental implants. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of multiplanar reconstructions and an angulated spiral in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) of the neck. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two patients were included for neck imaging with DSCT. MPRs from an axial dataset and an additional short spiral parallel to the mouth floor were acquired. Leading anatomical structures were then evaluated with respect to the extent to which they were affected by dental artifacts using a visual scale, ranging from 1 (least artifacts) to 4 (most artifacts). Results: In MPR, 87.1 % of anatomical structures had significant artifacts (3.12 {+-} 0.86), while in angulated slices leading anatomical structures of the oropharynx showed negligible artifacts (1.28 {+-} 0.46). The diagnostic growth due to primarily angulated slices concerning artifact severity was significant (p < 0.01). Conclusion: MPRs are not capable of reducing dental artifacts sufficiently. In patients with dental artifacts overlying the anatomical structures of the oropharynx, an additional short angulated spiral parallel to the floor of the mouth is recommended and should be applied for daily routine. As a result of the static gantry design of DSCT, the use of a flexible head holder is essential. (orig.)

  20. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  1. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Neural Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Kevin R.

    Molecular imaging is a form of nanotechnology that enables the noninvasive examination of biological processes in vivo. Radiopharmaceutical agents are used to selectively target biochemical markers, which permits their detection and evaluation. Early visualization of molecular variations indicative of pathophysiological processes can aid in patient diagnoses and management decisions. Molecular imaging is performed by introducing molecular probes into the body. Molecular probes are often contrast agents that have been nanoengineered to selectively target and tether to molecules, enabling their radiologic identification. Ultrasound contrast agents have been demonstrated as an effective method of detecting perfusion at the tissue level. Through a nanoengineering process, ultrasound contrast agents can be targeted to specific molecules, thereby extending ultrasound's capabilities from the tissue to molecular level. Molecular ultrasound, or targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (TCEUS), has recently emerged as a popular molecular imaging technique due to its ability to provide real-time anatomical and functional information in the absence of ionizing radiation. However, molecular ultrasound represents a novel form of molecular imaging, and consequently remains largely preclinical. A review of the TCEUS literature revealed multiple preclinical studies demonstrating its success in detecting inflammation in a variety of tissues. Although, a gap was identified in the existing evidence, as TCEUS effectiveness for detection of neural inflammation in the spinal cord was unable to be uncovered. This gap in knowledge, coupled with the profound impacts that this TCEUS application could have clinically, provided rationale for its exploration, and use as contributory evidence for the molecular ultrasound body of literature. An animal model that underwent a contusive spinal cord injury was used to establish preclinical evidence of TCEUS to detect neural inflammation. Imaging was

  2. Molecular imaging of apoptosis: from micro to macro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Gang; Eden, Henry S; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is involved in numerous human conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemic damage, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer, and is often confused with other types of cell death. Therefore strategies that enable visualized detection of apoptosis would be of enormous benefit in the clinic for diagnosis, patient management, and development of new therapies. In recent years, improved understanding of the apoptotic machinery and progress in imaging modalities have provided opportunities for researchers to formulate microscopic and macroscopic imaging strategies based on well-defined molecular markers and/or physiological features. Correspondingly, a large collection of apoptosis imaging probes and approaches have been documented in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we mainly discuss microscopic imaging assays and macroscopic imaging probes, ranging in complexity from simple attachments of reporter moieties to proteins that interact with apoptotic biomarkers, to rationally designed probes that target biochemical changes. Their clinical translation will also be our focus.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Apoptosis: From Micro to Macro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Gang; Eden, Henry S.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is involved in numerous human conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemic damage, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer, and is often confused with other types of cell death. Therefore strategies that enable visualized detection of apoptosis would be of enormous benefit in the clinic for diagnosis, patient management, and development of new therapies. In recent years, improved understanding of the apoptotic machinery and progress in imaging modalities have provided opportunities for researchers to formulate microscopic and macroscopic imaging strategies based on well-defined molecular markers and/or physiological features. Correspondingly, a large collection of apoptosis imaging probes and approaches have been documented in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we mainly discuss microscopic imaging assays and macroscopic imaging probes, ranging in complexity from simple attachments of reporter moieties to proteins that interact with apoptotic biomarkers, to rationally designed probes that target biochemical changes. Their clinical translation will also be our focus. PMID:25825597

  4. The next few years: nuclear medicine and molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eil, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital Mortimer Street, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    Nuclear medicine in the future will be integrated in best practice in diagnosis, staging and re-staging of disease, treatment monitoring and indeed specific new therapy. Routine multi modality imaging has clearly arrived whilst some image fusion is still required. Intra and inter modality special registration is in progress. The impact of image fusion especially PET/CT on radiotherapy planning will be major. There are major developments in therapy and especially the treatment of lymphoma with new tracers such as yttrium-90 and iodine 131 labelled anti-CD monoclonal antibodies. New registered tracers are impacting. Cancer profiling will be improved with molecular phenotype with biopsy and imaging and organ staging via imaging technology. (N.C.)

  5. Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors for Radio-Molecular Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of low-noise CMOS image sensors for radio-molecular imaging. The development is described in two directions: firstly, from the technology point of view to reduce the pixel noise level, and secondly from the design point of view to reduce the pixel readout circuit

  6. In vivo molecular and genomic imaging: new challenges for imaging physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R

    2004-02-07

    The emerging and rapidly growing field of molecular and genomic imaging is providing new opportunities to directly visualize the biology of living organisms. By combining our growing knowledge regarding the role of specific genes and proteins in human health and disease, with novel ways to target these entities in a manner that produces an externally detectable signal, it is becoming increasingly possible to visualize and quantify specific biological processes in a non-invasive manner. All the major imaging modalities are contributing to this new field, each with its unique mechanisms for generating contrast and trade-offs in spatial resolution, temporal resolution and sensitivity with respect to the biological process of interest. Much of the development in molecular imaging is currently being carried out in animal models of disease, but as the field matures and with the development of more individualized medicine and the molecular targeting of new therapeutics, clinical translation is inevitable and will likely forever change our approach to diagnostic imaging. This review provides an introduction to the field of molecular imaging for readers who are not experts in the biological sciences and discusses the opportunities to apply a broad range of imaging technologies to better understand the biology of human health and disease. It also provides a brief review of the imaging technology (particularly for x-ray, nuclear and optical imaging) that is being developed to support this new field.

  7. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of Isotopically Enhanced Molecular Targeting Agents Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, J N

    2004-02-19

    The goal of this project is to develop experimental and computational protocols to use SIMS to image the chemical composition of biological samples, focusing on optimizing sample preparation protocols and developing multivariate data analysis methods. Our results on sample preparation, molecular imaging, and multivariate analysis have been presented at several meeting abstracts (UCRL151797ABS, UCRL151797ABSREV1, UCRL151426ABS, UCRL201277, UCRL154757). A refereed paper describing our results for sample preparation and molecular imaging of various endogenous biomolecules as well as the mutagen PhIP has been accepted for publication (UCRL-JC-151797). We are also preparing two additional papers describing our multivariate analysis methods to analyze spectral data. As these papers have not been submitted, their content is included in this final report.

  9. Pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: insights from molecular and metabolic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Bodini, Benedetta; De Stefano, Nicola; Golay, Xavier; Nicolay, Klaas; Pelletier, Daniel; Pouwels, Petra J W; Smith, Seth A; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Stankoff, Bruno; Yousry, Tarek; Miller, David H

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis induce the changes that underpin relapse-associated and progressive disability. Disease mechanisms can be investigated in preclinical models and patients with multiple sclerosis by molecular and metabolic imaging techniques. Many insights have been gained from such imaging studies: persisting inflammation in the absence of a damaged blood-brain barrier, activated microglia within and beyond lesions, increased mitochondrial activity after acute lesions, raised sodium concentrations in the brain, increased glutamate in acute lesions and normal-appearing white matter, different degrees of demyelination in different patients and lesions, early neuronal damage in grey matter, and early astrocytic proliferation and activation in lesions and white matter. Clinical translation of molecular and metabolic imaging and extension of these techniques will enable the assessment of novel drugs targeted at these disease mechanisms, and have the potential to improve health outcomes through the stratification of patients for treatments.

  10. Cardiac gating with a pulse oximeter for dual-energy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkumat, N A; Siewerdsen, J H [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Dhanantwari, A C; Williams, D B [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Paul, N S [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Yorkston, J; Van Metter, R [Carestream Health Inc., Rochester, NY 14650 (United States)], E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@uhn.on.ca

    2008-11-07

    The development and evaluation of a prototype cardiac gating system for double-shot dual-energy (DE) imaging is described. By acquiring both low- and high-kVp images during the resting phase of the cardiac cycle (diastole), heart misalignment between images can be reduced, thereby decreasing the magnitude of cardiac motion artifacts. For this initial implementation, a fingertip pulse oximeter was employed to measure the peripheral pulse waveform ('plethysmogram'), offering potential logistic, cost and workflow advantages compared to an electrocardiogram. A gating method was developed that accommodates temporal delays due to physiological pulse propagation, oximeter waveform processing and the imaging system (software, filter-wheel, anti-scatter Bucky-grid and flat-panel detector). Modeling the diastolic period allowed the calculation of an implemented delay, t{sub imp}, required to trigger correctly during diastole at any patient heart rate (HR). The model suggests a triggering scheme characterized by two HR regimes, separated by a threshold, HR{sub thresh}. For rates at or below HR{sub thresh}, sufficient time exists to expose on the same heartbeat as the plethysmogram pulse [t{sub imp}(HR) = 0]. Above HR{sub thresh}, a characteristic t{sub imp}(HR) delays exposure to the subsequent heartbeat, accounting for all fixed and variable system delays. Performance was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision of diastole-trigger coincidence and quantitative evaluation of artifact severity in gated and ungated DE images. Initial implementation indicated 85% accuracy in diastole-trigger coincidence. Through the identification of an improved HR estimation method (modified temporal smoothing of the oximeter waveform), trigger accuracy of 100% could be achieved with improved precision. To quantify the effect of the gating system on DE image quality, human observer tests were conducted to measure the magnitude of cardiac artifact under conditions of successful and

  11. Cardiac gating with a pulse oximeter for dual-energy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2008-11-01

    The development and evaluation of a prototype cardiac gating system for double-shot dual-energy (DE) imaging is described. By acquiring both low- and high-kVp images during the resting phase of the cardiac cycle (diastole), heart misalignment between images can be reduced, thereby decreasing the magnitude of cardiac motion artifacts. For this initial implementation, a fingertip pulse oximeter was employed to measure the peripheral pulse waveform ('plethysmogram'), offering potential logistic, cost and workflow advantages compared to an electrocardiogram. A gating method was developed that accommodates temporal delays due to physiological pulse propagation, oximeter waveform processing and the imaging system (software, filter-wheel, anti-scatter Bucky-grid and flat-panel detector). Modeling the diastolic period allowed the calculation of an implemented delay, timp, required to trigger correctly during diastole at any patient heart rate (HR). The model suggests a triggering scheme characterized by two HR regimes, separated by a threshold, HRthresh. For rates at or below HRthresh, sufficient time exists to expose on the same heartbeat as the plethysmogram pulse [timp(HR) = 0]. Above HRthresh, a characteristic timp(HR) delays exposure to the subsequent heartbeat, accounting for all fixed and variable system delays. Performance was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision of diastole-trigger coincidence and quantitative evaluation of artifact severity in gated and ungated DE images. Initial implementation indicated 85% accuracy in diastole-trigger coincidence. Through the identification of an improved HR estimation method (modified temporal smoothing of the oximeter waveform), trigger accuracy of 100% could be achieved with improved precision. To quantify the effect of the gating system on DE image quality, human observer tests were conducted to measure the magnitude of cardiac artifact under conditions of successful and unsuccessful diastolic gating. Six observers

  12. Dual-mode ultrasound arrays for image-guided targeting of atheromatous plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, John R.; Casper, Andrew J.; Liu, Dalong; Haritonova, Alyona; Shehata, Islam A.; Troutman, Mitchell; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-11-01

    A feasibility study was undertaken in order to investigate alternative noninvasive treatment options for atherosclerosis. In particular, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays (DMUAs) for image guided treatment of atheromatous plaques. DMUAs offer a unique treatment paradigm for image-guided surgery allowing for robust image-based identification of tissue targets for localized application of HIFU. In this study we present imaging and therapeutic results form a 3.5 MHz, 64-element fenestrated prototype DMUA for targeting lesions in the femoral artery of familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine. Before treatment, diagnostic ultrasound was used to verify the presence of plaque in the femoral artery of the swine. Images obtained with the DMUA and a diagnostic (HST 15-8) transducer housed in the fenestration were analyzed and used for guidance in targeting of the plaque. Discrete therapeutic shots with an estimated focal intensity of 4000-5600 W/cm2 and 500-2000 msec duration were performed at several planes in the plaque. During therapy, pulsed HIFU was interleaved with single transmit focus imaging from the DMUA and M2D imaging from the diagnostic transducer for further analysis of lesion formation. After therapy, the swine's were recovered and later sacrificed after 4 and 7 days for histological analysis of lesion formation. At sacrifice, the lower half of the swine was perfused and the femoral artery with adjoining muscle was fixed and stained with H&E to characterize HIFU-induced lesions. Histology has confirmed that localized thermal lesion formation within the plaque was achieved according to the planned lesion maps. Furthermore, the damage was confined to the plaque tissue without damage to the intima. These results offer the promise of a new treatment potentially suited for vulnerable plaques. The results also provide the first real-time demonstration of DMUA technology in targeting fine tissue structures for

  13. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD. Data to be displayed are geometrically transformed before written into a memory cell to cancel optical artifacts coming from the diamond-like shaped structure of the micromirror array. The 24-bit color depth of the display is fully exploited to increase the frame rate by a factor of 24, which makes the technique practicable for real samples. Our commercial DMD-based LED-illumination is cost effective and can be easily coupled as an add-on module for already existing inverted microscopes. The reflection and transmission information provided by our dual microscope complement each other and can be useful for imaging non-uniform samples and to prevent self-shadowing effects.

  14. Design of an Image-Servo Mask Alignment System Using Dual CCDs with an XXY Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jer Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mask alignment of photolithography technology is used in many applications, such as micro electro mechanical systems’ semiconductor process, printed circuits board, and flat panel display. As the dimensions of the product are getting smaller and smaller, the automatic mask alignment of photolithography is becoming more and more important. The traditional stacked XY-Θz stage is heavy and it has cumulative flatness errors due to its stacked assembly mechanism. The XXY stage has smaller cumulative error due to its coplanar design and it can move faster than the traditional XY-Θz stage. However, the relationship between the XXY stage’s movement and the commands of the three motors is difficult to compute, because the movements of the three motors on the same plane are coupling. Therefore, an artificial neural network is studied to establish a nonlinear mapping from the desired position and orientation of the stage to three motors’ commands. Further, this paper proposes an image-servo automatic mask alignment system, which consists of a coplanar XXY stage, dual GIGA-E CCDs with lens and a programmable automatic controller (PAC. Before preforming the compensation, a self-developed visual-servo provides the positioning information which is obtained from the image processing and pattern recognition according to the specified fiducial marks. To obtain better precision, two methods including the center of gravity method and the generalize Hough Transformation are studied to correct the shift positioning error.

  15. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, S; Lechtman, E; Lai, P; Keller, B M; Karotki, A; Beachey, D J; Pignol, J P

    2014-09-21

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 [Formula: see text] formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  16. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  17. Gold Nanocage-Photosensitizer Conjugates for Dual-Modal Image-Guided Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, Avinash; Jenkins, Samir V.; Jeon, Mansik; Wu, Zhijin; Kim, Chulhong; Chen, Jingyi; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that gold nanocage-photosensitizer conjugates can enable dual image-guided delivery of photosensitizer and significantly improve the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in a murine model. The photosensitizer, 3-devinyl-3-(1'-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide (HPPH), was noncovalently entrapped in the poly(ethylene glycol) monolayer coated on the surface of gold nanocages. The conjugate is stable in saline solutions, while incubation in protein rich solutions leads to gradual unloading of the HPPH, which can be monitored optically by fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. The slow nature of the release in turn results in an increase in accumulation of the drug within implanted tumors due to the passive delivery of gold nanocages. Furthermore, the conjugate is found to generate more therapeutic singlet oxygen and have a lower IC50 value than the free drug alone. Thus the conjugate shows significant suppression of tumor growth as compared to the free drug in vivo. Short-term study showed neither toxicity nor phenotypical changes in mice at therapeutic dose of the conjugates or even at 100-fold higher than therapeutic dose of gold nanocages. PMID:24465274

  18. Embryonic stem cell biology: insights from molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Karim; Wu, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have therapeutic potential in disorders of cellular loss such as myocardial infarction, type I diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. ES cell biology in living subjects was largely poorly understood until incorporation of molecular imaging into the field. Reporter gene imaging works by integrating a reporter gene into ES cells and using a reporter probe to induce a signal detectable by normal imaging modalities. Reporter gene imaging allows for longitudinal tracking of ES cells within the same host for a prolonged period of time. This has advantages over postmortem immunohistochemistry and traditional imaging modalities. The advantages include expression of reporter gene is limited to viable cells, expression is conserved between generations of dividing cells, and expression can be linked to a specific population of cells. These advantages were especially useful in studying a dynamic cell population such as ES cells and proved useful in elucidating the biology of ES cells. Reporter gene imaging identified poor integration of differentiated ES cells transplanted into host tissue as well as delayed donor cell death as reasons for poor long-term survival in vivo. This imaging technology also confirmed that ES cells indeed have immunogenic properties that factor into cell survival and differentiation. Finally, reporter gene imaging improved our understanding of the neoplastic risk of undifferentiated ES cells in forming teratomas. Despite such advances, much remains to be understood about ES cell biology to translate this technology to the bedside, and reporter gene imaging will certainly play a key role in formulating this understanding.

  19. Dual-Phase 99MTc-MIBI Parathyroid Imaging Reveals Synchronous Parathyroid Adenoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Chang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of a coincidental appearance of hyperparathyroidism and thyroid cancer is not often considered because of its low incidence. Here, we present a case of a 49-year-old woman with a parathyroid adenoma coexisting with two sites of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Dual-phase 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI parathyroid imaging before the operation correctly visualized the site of the parathyroid adenoma. In addition, two papillary thyroid carcinomas showed faint uptake of 99mTc-MIBI on delayed image. Total thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy of a solitary parathyroid adenoma were performed. The patient subsequently underwent radioiodine-131 ablation and was treated with T4 suppression. This case illustrates the need for clinical awareness of concomitant hyperparathyroidism and thyroid cancer. Dual-phase 99mTc-MIBI parathyroid imaging may be useful for detecting indolent thyroid cancer before it becomes a distinct disease.

  20. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauwens, Matthias [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Research School NUTRIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Royen, Bart van; Backes, Walter [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University, Research School CARIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to {sup 18}F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 18}F-fluorodopa and {sup 18}F-14(R,S)-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of Aortic Valve Area Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruder, O.; Jochims, M.; Jensen, C.; Sabin, G.V. (Dept. of Cardiology and Angiology, Elisabeth Hospital Essen (Germany)); Hunold, P.; Forsting, M.; Barkhausen, J.; Schlosser, T. (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany))

    2009-07-15

    Background: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valve lesion in Europe and North America. Patient treatment is based on disease severity, which is classified by determining the aortic valve area (AVA). Purpose: To compare dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for quantifying AVA. Material and Methods: Thirty-two patients, 28 with normal aortic valve function and four with aortic valve stenosis, who underwent DSCT coronary angiography (Somatom Definition; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), were included in this study. Retrospective ECG-gated contrast-enhanced DSCT scans with dose-reducing tube current modulation were performed, and data sets were reconstructed in 3% steps of the R-R interval (slice thickness 0.75 mm, increment 0.6 mm). Planimetry of the AVA in systole was assessed on cross-sectional images by multiplanar reformations. Within 48 hours, MR was performed with a 1.5T scanner (Magnetom Sonata; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a balanced steady-state free-precession cine sequence (repetition/echo time 3/1.5 ms, flip angle 60 deg, spatial resolution 1.4x1.4 mm2). Cine sequences of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) were obtained in two orthogonal planes, and MR planimetry was performed on cross-sectional images of the aortic valve perpendicular to the LVOT images. Results: AVA assessment by DSCT and MR was feasible in all 32 patients. Mean AVA values determined by DSCT and MR were 4.73+-1.5 cm2 and 4.69+-1.4 cm2, respectively. A strong positive correlation was found between both imaging modalities (R=0.98, P<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated an excellent intermodality agreement, with a slight underestimation of AVA by DSCT. The mean difference was -0.04 cm2, with a standard deviation of 0.32 cm2. Conclusion: Retrospective ECG-gated contrast-enhanced DSCT with tube current modulation provides an accurate imaging technique for the assessment of the AVA. Further studies are required to determine

  2. Chirp-encoded excitation for dual-frequency ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Lin, Chin-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Dual-frequency (DF) transmit waveforms comprise signals at two different frequencies. With a DF transmit waveform operating at both fundamental frequency (f(0)) and second-harmonic frequency (2f(0)), tissue harmonic imaging can be simultaneously performed using not only the conventional 2f(0) second-harmonic signal but also using the f(0 )frequency-difference harmonic signal. Nonetheless, when chirp excitation is incorporated into the DF transmit waveform for harmonic SNR improvement, a particular waveform design is required to maintain the bandwidth of the f(0) harmonic signal. In this study, two different DF chirp waveforms are proposed to produce equal harmonic bandwidth at both the f(0) and 2f(0) frequencies to achieve speckle reduction by harmonic spectral compounding and to increase harmonic SNR for enhanced penetration and sensitivity. The UU13 waveform comprises an up-sweeping f(0) chirp and an up-sweeping 2f(0) chirp with triple bandwidth, whereas the UD11 waveform includes an up-sweeping f(0) chirp and a down-sweeping 2f(0) chirp with equal bandwidth. Experimental results indicate that the UU13 tends to suffer from a high range side lobe level resulting from 3f(0) interference. Consequently, the 2f(0) harmonic envelopes of the UD11 and the UU13 waveforms have compression qualities of 87% and 77%, respectively, when the signal bandwidth is 30%. When the bandwidth increases to 50%, the compression quality of the 2f(0) harmonic envelope degrades to 78% and 54%, respectively, for the UD11 and the UU13 waveforms. The compression quality value of the f0 harmonic envelope remains similar between the two DF transmit waveforms for all signal bandwidths. B-mode harmonic images also show that the UD11 is less contaminated by range side lobe artifacts than is the UU13. Compared with a short pulse with equal bandwidth, the UD11 waveform not only preserves the same spatial resolution after compression but also improves the image SNR by about 10 dB. Moreover, the image

  3. SU-C-18C-03: Dual-Energy X-Ray Fluoroscopy Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virshup, G; Richmond, M; Mostafavi, H; Ganguly, A [Ginzton Technology Center, Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Fu, D [Ruier Medical, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work studies the clinical utility of dual energy (DE) subtraction fluoroscopy for fiducial-free tumor tracking in lung radiation therapy (RT). Improvement in tumor visualization and quantification of tumor shift within a breathing cycle were analyzed. Methods: Twenty subjects who were undergoing RT for lung cancer were recruited following institutional review board approval. The subjects had a range of tumor sizes, locations in the lungs, and body sizes. An x-ray imaging system was setup with the following components: (a) x-ray tube (Varian G-242, Varian Medical Systems (VMS), CA) (b) flat panel detector (4030CB, VMS, CA) and (c) x-ray generator (EPS 50RF, EMD, Canada). Firmware and software modifications were made to the generator to allow 10 x-ray pulse pairs with alternating low/high kV, 100 ms apart for ∼4s (one breathing cycle). Images were obtained at 4 angles: 0°, 45°, 90° and 135°. Weighted subtraction of a kV-pair image set was used to create a “bone-free” image of the lungs. The 2D tumor-shift in each subtracted image and the 3D shift during a breathing cycle was calculated using all views. Results: The subjects enrolled had the following statistics: average age 62.3±7.1 years, 5 female/15 male, 11 had tumors on the right and 9 on the left and the average tumor size was ∼31.4±10.8 mm. X-ray imaging conditions for the pulse pairs were: 70/120 kVp, 280/221 mA and 65/8 ms. For views where these parameters were insufficient 80/130 kVp, 280/221 mA and 60/12 ms was used. Tumor visibility improved for 0°, 45°, 90° and 135° in 100%, 55%, 75% and 80% of the cases respectively. Tumor shift during a breathing cycle was: 2.4±1.0 mm AP, 2.7±1.4 mm LR and 7.6±4.8 mm IS. Conclusion: DE subtraction fluoroscopy allowed improved visualization and quantification of movement of tumors in the lungs during a breathing cycle. This study was entirely funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  4. Effects of Molecular Oxygen, Solvent, and Light on Iridium-Photoredox/Nickel Dual-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderinde, Martins S; Varela-Alvarez, Adrian; Aquila, Brian; Robbins, Daniel W; Johannes, Jeffrey W

    2015-08-07

    In order to achieve reproducibility during iridium-photoredox and nickel dual-catalyzed sp(3)-sp(2) carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, we investigated the role that molecular oxygen (O2), solvent and light-source (CF lamp or blue LED) play in a variety of Ir-photoredox mediated transformations. The presence of O2 was discovered to be important for catalyst activation when air-stable Ni(II) precatalysts were used in DMF under CF lamp irradiation; however, O2 was not required for catalysis when conducted with Ni(COD)2 in the same reaction system. O2 is believed to promote rapid reduction of the Ni(II) precatalyst by Ir(II) to Ni(0). In addition to O2, the effects that solvent and light-source have on the dual-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reactions will be discussed. These findings have enabled us to develop a more robust dual-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling protocol.

  5. Imprints of Molecular Clouds in Radio Continuum Images

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2012-01-01

    We show radio continuum images of several molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy and report the presence of dark features that coincide with dense molecular clouds. Unlike infrared dark clouds, these features which we call "radio dark clouds" are produced by a deficiency in radio continuum emission from molecular clouds that are embedded in a bath of UV radiation field or synchrotron emitting cosmic ray particles. The contribution of the continuum emission along different pathlengths results in dark features that trace embedded molecular clouds. The new technique of identifying cold clouds can place constraints on the depth and the magnetic field of molecular clouds when compared to those of the surrounding hot plasma radiating at radio wavelengths. The study of five molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy, Sgr A, Sgr B2, radio Arc, the snake filament and G359.75-0.13 demonstrate an anti--correlation between the distributions of radio continuum and molecular line and dust emission. Radio dark clouds are iden...

  6. Engineering imaging probes and molecular machines for nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sheng; Cradick, Thomas J; Ma, Yan; Dai, Zhifei; Bao, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging field that integrates nanotechnology, biomolecular engineering, life sciences and medicine; it is expected to produce major breakthroughs in medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Due to the size-compatibility of nano-scale structures and devices with proteins and nucleic acids, the design, synthesis and application of nanoprobes, nanocarriers and nanomachines provide unprecedented opportunities for achieving a better control of biological processes, and drastic improvements in disease detection, therapy, and prevention. Recent advances in nanomedicine include the development of functional nanoparticle based molecular imaging probes, nano-structured materials as drug/gene carriers for in vivo delivery, and engineered molecular machines for treating single-gene disorders. This review focuses on the development of molecular imaging probes and engineered nucleases for nanomedicine, including quantum dot bioconjugates, quantum dot-fluorescent protein FRET probes, molecular beacons, magnetic and gold nanoparticle based imaging contrast agents, and the design and validation of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) for gene targeting. The challenges in translating nanomedicine approaches to clinical applications are discussed.

  7. Impact of an advanced image-based monoenergetic reconstruction algorithm on coronary stent visualization using third generation dual-source dual-energy CT: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Cannao, Paola M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Milan, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Fuller, Stephen R.; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the impact of an advanced monoenergetic (ME) reconstruction algorithm on CT coronary stent imaging in a phantom model. Three stents with lumen diameters of 2.25, 3.0 and 3.5 mm were examined with a third-generation dual-source dual-energy CT (DECT). Tube potential was set at 90/Sn150 kV for DE and 70, 90 or 120 kV for single-energy (SE) acquisitions and advanced modelled iterative reconstruction was used. Overall, 23 reconstructions were evaluated for each stent including three SE acquisitions and ten advanced and standard ME images with virtual photon energies from 40 to 130 keV, respectively. In-stent luminal diameter was measured and compared to nominal lumen diameter to determine stent lumen visibility. Contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated. Advanced ME reconstructions substantially increased lumen visibility in comparison to SE for stents ≤3 mm. 130 keV images produced the best mean lumen visibility: 86 % for the 2.25 mm stent (82 % for standard ME and 64 % for SE) and 82 % for the 3.0 mm stent (77 % for standard ME and 69 % for SE). Mean DLP for SE 120 kV and DE acquisitions were 114.4 ± 9.8 and 58.9 ± 2.2 mGy x cm, respectively. DECT with advanced ME reconstructions improves the in-lumen visibility of small stents in comparison with standard ME and SE imaging. (orig.)

  8. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  9. Feasibility study of a dual detector configuration concept for simultaneous megavoltage imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Shrikant, E-mail: shrikant.Deshpande@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Sydney NSW 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2170 (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2170 (Australia); McNamara, Aimee L. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2170, Australia and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Sydney NSW 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2170 (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2170 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Metcalfe, Peter [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2170 (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2170 (Australia); Vial, Philip [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Sydney NSW 2170 (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2170 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a dual detector concept for comprehensive verification of external beam radiotherapy. Specifically, the authors test the hypothesis that a portal imaging device coupled to a 2D dosimeter provides a system capable of simultaneous imaging and dose verification, and that the presence of each device does not significantly detract from the performance of the other. Methods: The dual detector configuration comprised of a standard radiotherapy electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioned directly on top of an ionization-chamber array (ICA) with 2 cm solid water buildup material (between EPID and ICA) and 5 cm solid backscatter material. The dose response characteristics of the ICA and the imaging performance of the EPID in the dual detector configuration were compared to the performance in their respective reference clinical configurations. The reference clinical configurations were 6 cm solid water buildup material, an ICA, and 5 cm solid water backscatter material as the reference dosimetry configuration, and an EPID with no additional buildup or solid backscatter material as the reference imaging configuration. The dose response of the ICA was evaluated by measuring the detector’s response with respect to off-axis position, field size, and transit object thickness. Clinical dosimetry performance was evaluated by measuring a range of clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams in transit and nontransit geometries. The imaging performance of the EPID was evaluated quantitatively by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Images of an anthropomorphic phantom were also used for qualitative assessment. Results: The measured off-axis and field size response with the ICA in both transit and nontransit geometries for both dual detector configuration and reference dosimetry configuration agreed to within 1%. Transit dose response as a function of object thickness agreed to within 0.5%. All

  10. Contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-11-01

    The cellular immune response plays an important role in almost every major form of cardiovascular disease. The ability to image the key aspects of the immune response in the clinical setting could be used to improve diagnostic information, to provide important prognostic or risk information, and to customize therapy according to disease phenotype. Accordingly, targeted imaging probes for assessing inflammation have been developed for essentially all forms of medical imaging. Molecular imaging of inflammation with contrast ultrasound relies on the detection of targeted microbubble or other gas-filled particle contrast agents. These agents are confined to the vascular space and, hence, have been targeted to either activated leucocytes or endothelial cell adhesion molecules that are upregulated in inflammation and mediate leucocyte recruitment and adhesion. This review focuses on the inflammation-targeting strategies for ultrasound contrast agents and how they have been matched to cardiovascular disease states such as myocardial ischaemia, infarction, atherosclerosis, transplant rejection, and arteriogenesis.

  11. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis: optimization of beam quality for dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S

    2011-10-07

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis is a promising technique to obtain three-dimensional functional information from the breast with high resolution and speed. To optimize this new method, this study searched for the beam quality that maximized image quality in terms of mass detection performance. A digital tomosynthesis system was modeled using a fast ray-tracing algorithm, which created simulated projection images by tracking photons through a voxelized anatomical breast phantom containing iodinated lesions. The single-energy images were combined into dual-energy images through a weighted log subtraction process. The weighting factor was optimized to minimize anatomical noise, while the dose distribution was chosen to minimize quantum noise. The dual-energy images were analyzed for the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) of iodinated masses. The fast ray-tracing explored 523 776 dual-energy combinations to identify which yields optimum mass SdNR. The ray-tracing results were verified using a Monte Carlo model for a breast tomosynthesis system with a selenium-based flat-panel detector. The projection images from our voxelized breast phantom were obtained at a constant total glandular dose. The projections were combined using weighted log subtraction and reconstructed using commercial reconstruction software. The lesion SdNR was measured in the central reconstructed slice. The SdNR performance varied markedly across the kVp and filtration space. Ray-tracing results indicated that the mass SdNR was maximized with a high-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 92.5 µm of copper filtration and a low-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 95 µm of tin filtration. This result was consistent with Monte Carlo findings. This mammographic technique led to a mass SdNR of 0.92 ± 0.03 in the projections and 3.68 ± 0.19 in the reconstructed slices. These values were markedly higher than those for non-optimized techniques. Our findings indicate that dual

  12. Ultrafast Molecular Imaging by Laser Induced Electron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Cornaggia, Christian; Saugout, Sébastien; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2010-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structure of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time-scale using the Laser Induced Electron Diffraction, LIED, technique [T. Zuo \\textit{et al.}, Chem. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{259}, 313 (1996)]. We present numerical results obtained for the CO$_2$ molecule using a single active electron model. The molecular geometry (bond-lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  13. Quantification and confocal imaging of protein specific molecularly imprinted polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, DM; Trache, A; Ellis, EA; Stevenson, D.; Holzenburg, A.; Meininger, GA; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2006-01-01

    We have employed FITC-albumin as the protein template molecule in an aqueous phase molecular imprinted polymer (HydroMIP) strategy. For the first time, the use of a fluorescently labelled template is reported, with subsequent characterisation of the smart material to show that the HydroMIP possess a significant molecular memory in comparison to that of the nonimprinted control polymer (HydroNIP). The imaging of the FITC-albumin imprinted HydroMIP using confocal microscopy is described, with t...

  14. Luminescence-based Imaging Approaches in the Field of Interventional Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; Hardwick, James C H; van Erkel, Arian R

    2015-07-01

    Luminescence imaging-based guidance technologies are increasingly gaining interest within surgical and radiologic disciplines. Their promise to help visualize molecular features of disease in real time and with microscopic detail is considered desirable. Integrating luminescence imaging with three-dimensional radiologic- and/or nuclear medicine-based preinterventional imaging may overcome limitations such as the limited tissue penetration of luminescence signals. At the same time, the beneficial features of luminescence imaging may be used to complement the routinely used radiologic- and nuclear medicine-based modalities. To fully exploit this integrated concept, and to relate the largely experimental luminesce-based guidance approaches into perspective with routine imaging approaches, it is essential to understand the advantages and limitations of this relatively new modality. By providing an overview of the available luminescence technologies and the various clinically evaluated exogenous luminescent tracers (fluorescent, hybrid, and theranostic tracers), this review attempts to place luminescence-based interventional molecular imaging technologies into perspective to the available radiologic- and/or nuclear medicine-based imaging technologies. At the same time, the transition from anatomic to physiologic and even molecular interventional luminescence imaging is illustrated.

  15. Optimizing window settings for improved presentation of virtual monoenergetic images in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wanyi; Marin, Daniele; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Solomon, Justin; Schabel, Christoph; Patel, Bhavik N; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-08-04

    Dual-energy computed tomography virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI) at 40 keV exhibits superior contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), although practicing radiologists do not consistently prefer it over VMI at 70 keV due to high perceivable noise. We hypothesize that the presentation of 40 keV VMI may be compromised using window settings (i.e., window-and-level values [W-L values]) designed for conventional single-energy CT. This study aimed to devise optimum window settings that reduce the apparent noise and utilize the high CNR of 40 keV VMI, in order to improve the conspicuity of hypervascular liver lesions. Three W-L value adjustment methods were investigated to alter the presentation of 40 keV VMI. To harness the high CNR of 40 keV VMI, the methods were designed to achieve (a) liver histogram distribution, (b) lesion-to-liver contrast, or (c) liver background noise comparable to those perceived in 70 keV VMI. This IRB-approved study included 18 patient abdominal datasets reconstructed at 40 and 70 keV. For each patient, the W-L values were determined using the three methods. For each of the images with default or adjusted W-L values, the noise, contrast, and CNR were calculated in terms of both display space and native CT number (referred to as HU) space. An observer study was performed to compare the 40 keV images with the three adjusted W-L values, and 40 and 70 keV images with default W-L values in terms of noise, contrast, and diagnostic preference. A comparison was also made in terms of the applicability of using patient-specific or patient-averaged W-L values. Using the default W-L values, 40 keV VMI exhibited higher HU CNR than 70 keV VMI by 24.6 ± 14.9% (P VMI dataset image quality by improving the actual display CNR. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Imaging molecular shapes with molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions from core hole ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, C. S.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate, for a class of molecules containing a single heavy atom, the striking result that molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions resulting from core-level ionization can be used to obtain three-dimensional images of the target molecule at low photoelectron energies. We demonstrate this finding with the results of theoretical calculations on methane, ammonia and water.

  17. Displaced dual-mode imaging with desorption electrospray ionization for simultaneous mass spectrometry imaging in both polarities and with several scan modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janfelt, Christian; Wellner, Niels; Hansen, Harald S

    2013-01-01

    Displaced dual-mode imaging (DDI) is introduced as a method for simultaneous imaging in positive and negative-ion mode on the same sample with desorption electrospray ionization imaging, as well as a method for simultaneous imaging in full-scan and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) mode. DDI...... is performed by using a smaller row distance in the y-direction than the desired image resolution and recording for example every second row in positive-ion mode and the other half of the rows in negative-ion mode, thus resulting in two separate images. This causes some degree of oversampling, which is thus...... utilized to obtain complementary mass spectrometric of the sample. Imaging with both polarities is exemplified on an imprint of a Hypericum perforatum leaf containing secondary metabolites which ionize in both polarites and a mouse kidney containing phospholipids which ionize in positive or negative mode...

  18. A 16-channel receive, forced current excitation dual-transmit coil for breast imaging at 7T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha By

    Full Text Available To enable high spatial and temporal breast imaging resolution via combined use of high field MRI, array coils, and forced current excitation (FCE multi channel transmit.A unilateral 16-channel receive array insert was designed for use in a transmit volume coil optimized for quadrature operation with dual-transmit RF shimming at 7 T. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR maps, g-factor maps, and high spatial and temporal resolution in vivo images were acquired to demonstrate the utility of the coil architecture.The dual-transmit FCE coil provided homogeneous excitation and the array provided an increase in average SNR of 3.3 times (max 10.8, min 1.5 compared to the volume coil in transmit/receive mode. High resolution accelerated in vivo breast imaging demonstrated the ability to achieve isotropic spatial resolution of 0.5 mm within clinically relevant 90 s scan times, as well as the ability to perform 1.0 mm isotropic resolution imaging, 7 s per dynamics, with the use of bidirectional SENSE acceleration of up to R = 9.The FCE design of the transmit coil easily accommodates the addition of a sixteen channel array coil. The improved spatial and temporal resolution provided by the high-field array coil with FCE dual-channel transmit will ultimately be beneficial in lesion detection and characterization.

  19. Application of dual phase imaging of 11C-acetate positron emission tomography on differential diagnosis of small hepatic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previously we observed that dual phase 11C-acetate positron emission tomography (AC-PET could be employed for differential diagnosis of liver malignancies. In this study, we prospectively evaluated the effect of dual phase AC-PET on differential diagnosis of primary hepatic lesions of 1-3 cm in size. METHODS: 33 patients having primary hepatic lesions with size of 1-3 cm in diameter undertook dual phase AC-PET scans. Procedure included an early upper-abdomen scan immediately after tracer injection and a conventional scan in 11-18 min. The standardized uptake value (SUV was calculated for tumor (SUVT and normal tissue (SUVB, from which 11C-acetate uptake ratio (as lesion against normal liver tissue, SUVT/SUVB in early imaging (R1, conventional imaging (R2, and variance between R2 and R1 (ΔR were derived. Diagnoses based on AC-PET data and histology were compared. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 19.0. RESULTS: 20 patients were found to have HCC and 13 patients had benign tumors. Using ΔR>0 as criterion for malignancy, the accuracy and specificity were significantly increased comparing with conventional method. The area under ROC curve (AUC for R1, R2, and ΔR were 0.417, 0.683 and 0.831 respectively. Differential diagnosis between well-differentiated HCCs and benign lesions of FNHs and hemangiomas achieved 100% correct. Strong positive correlation was also found between R1 and R2 in HCC (r2 = 0.55, P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Dual phase AC-PET scan is a useful procedure for differential diagnosis of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma and benign lesions. The dynamic changes of 11C-acetate uptake in dual phase imaging provided key information for final diagnosis.

  20. Nuclear molecular imaging with nanoparticles: radiochemistry, applications and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou, D S; Pickett, J E; Thorek, D L J

    2015-10-01

    Molecular imaging provides considerable insight into biological processes for greater understanding of health and disease. Numerous advances in medical physics, chemistry and biology have driven the growth of this field in the past two decades. With exquisite sensitivity, depth of detection and potential for theranostics, radioactive imaging approaches have played a major role in the emergence of molecular imaging. At the same time, developments in materials science, characterization and synthesis have led to explosive progress in the nanoparticle (NP) sciences. NPs are generally defined as particles with a diameter in the nanometre size range. Unique physical, chemical and biological properties arise at this scale, stimulating interest for applications as diverse as energy production and storage, chemical catalysis and electronics. In biomedicine, NPs have generated perhaps the greatest attention. These materials directly interface with life at the subcellular scale of nucleic acids, membranes and proteins. In this review, we will detail the advances made in combining radioactive imaging and NPs. First, we provide an overview of the NP platforms and their properties. This is followed by a look at methods for radiolabelling NPs with gamma-emitting radionuclides for use in single photon emission CT and planar scintigraphy. Next, utilization of positron-emitting radionuclides for positron emission tomography is considered. Finally, recent advances for multimodal nuclear imaging with NPs and efforts for clinical translation and ongoing trials are discussed.

  1. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Esther; Thippsandra, Shwetha; Yanamadala, Anusha; Redy, Siddaling; Pattanayak, Puskar; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using tumor genomic profiling information has revolutionized personalized cancer treatment. Head and neck (HN) cancer management is being influenced by recent discoveries of activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and related targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, targeted therapies for Kristen Rat Sarcoma, and MET proto-oncogenes. Molecular imaging using PET plays an important role in assessing the biologic behavior of HN cancer with the goal of delivering individualized cancer treatment. This review summarizes recent genomic discoveries in HN cancer and their implications for functional PET imaging in assessing response to targeted therapies, and drug resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how th...... that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels....