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Sample records for dual bed photosystem

  1. Solar Photo Catalytic Hydrogen Production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florida Solar Energy Center

    2003-03-30

    A body of work was performed in which the feasibility of photocatalytically decomposing water into its constituent elements using a dual bed, or modular photosystem, under solar radiation was investigated. The system envisioned consists of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which microscopic photocatalytic particles are immobilized. The photocatalysts absorb light, generating free electrons and lattice vacancy holes, which are capable of performing reductive and oxidative chemistry, respectively. The photocatalysts would be chosen as to whether they specifically promote H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} evolution in their respective containers. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers in order to transfer electron equivalents from one reaction to the other.

  2. Solar photocatalytic H{sub 2} production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The authors are developing a dual stage, direct photoconversion scheme for water splitting. The overall system consists of an aqueous solution circulated through two modules, or beds, each of which contains a photochemically active surface layer below the solution. The idea is to divide the energy requirement for water decomposition between the two photosystems, so that more abundant, lower energy photons in the solar spectrum can be utilized, and that the H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} products can be evolved separately from each other. Catalyst-modified semiconductor powders, immobilized within a polymer binder are currently being employed as the photoactive layers. TiO{sub 2} and platinized-InP have been employed for the O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} evolution tasks, respectively. A major effort over the last year was identification of a suitable redox mediator that is responsible for transferring electron equivalents from one unit to the other. After testing more than a dozen candidates, spanning a wide range of electropotentials, under a variety of conditions, it was found that the bromide/bromate (Br{sup {minus}}/BrO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and iodide/iodate (I{sup {minus}}/IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) redox systems could function in both modules, necessary for closed cycle operation.

  3. Solar photocatalytic H{sub 2} production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A. [Univ. of Central Florida, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This work entails the use of photocatalytic particles in a dual bed configuration so as to effect the solar-driven decomposition of water to its constituent elements, particularly hydrogen. The system envisioned would consist of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which micron-sized photocatalytic particles are immobilized. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers. Different photoparticles and catalysts are chosen for their respective modules so as to effect oxidative water-splitting in one vessel to evolve oxygen gas, and reductive water-splitting in the other to evolve hydrogen. This is a direct photoconversion scheme that breaks down the energetic requirement for water decomposition into a 2-photon process, and enables separate production of hydrogen and oxygen. Various n-type and p-type semiconductors will be employed as photoparticles in the O{sub 2}- and H{sub 2}-evolving beds, respectively. Catalysts will also be evaluated to selectively promote the 4 half-cell reactions. On the microscopic level, there are many ways to configure the arrangement of catalyst and photoparticle. It is also important to determine whether the particles should be immobilized on an electronically conducting or insulating surface. Theoretical calculations of hydrogen production rates that include the energy band structure of free and immobilized particles are expected to provide guidance as to how the microstructure of the particles should be configured.

  4. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-09-11

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H{sub 2} via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown.

  5. Dual Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-30

    The dual fluidized bed reactor is a recirculating system in which one half of the unit operates as a steam pyrolysis device for biomass. The pyrolysis occurs by introducing biomass and steam to a hot fluidized bed of inert material such as coarse sand. Syngas is produced during the pyrolysis and exits the top of the reactor with the steam. A crossover arm, fed by gravity, moves sand and char from the pyrolyzer to the second fluidized bed. This sand bed uses blown air to combust the char. The exit stream from this side of the reactor is carbon dioxide, water and ash. There is a second gravity fed crossover arm to return sand to the pyrolysis side. The recirculating action of the sand and the char is the key to the operation of the dual fluidized bed reactor. The objective of the project was to design and construct a dual fluidized bed prototype reactor from literature information and in discussion with established experts in the field. That would be appropriate in scale and operation to measure the relative performance of the gasification of biomass and low ranked coals to produce a high quality synthesis gas with no dilution from nitrogen or combustion products.

  6. Application of CaO-Based Bed Material for Dual Fluidized Bed Steam Biomass Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppatz, S.; Pfeifer, C.; Kreuzeder, A.; Soukup, G.; Hofbauer, H.

    Gasification of biomass is a suitable option for decentralized energy supply based on renewable sources in the range of up to 50 MW fuel input. The paper presents the dual fluidized bed (DFB) steam gasification process, which is applied to generate high quality and nitrogen-free product gas. Essential part of the DFB process is the bed material used in the fluidized reactors, which has significant impact on the product gas quality. By the use of catalytically active bed materials the performance of the overall process is increased, since the bed material favors reactions of the steam gasification. In particular, tar reforming reactions are favored. Within the paper, the pilot plant based on the DFB process with 100kW fuel input at Vienna University of Technology, Austria is presented. Actual investigations with focus on CaO-based bed materials (limestone) as well as with natural olivine as bed material were carried out at the pilot plant. The application of CaO-based bed material shows mainly decreased tar content in the product gas in contrast to experiments with olivine as bed material. The paper presents the results of steam gasification experiments with limestone and olivine, whereby the product gas composition as well as the tar content and the tar composition are outlined.

  7. Pneumatic jet-control valve for dual circulating fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haibo; Dong, Pengfei; Zhu, Zhiping; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Yukui; Lu, Qinggang

    2015-11-01

    With the rapid development of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology in different fields, the disadvantages of conventional non-mechanical valves are becoming more apparent, and they are not suitable to be used in complex CFB systems. In this paper, a novel non-mechanical valve named the jet-control valve is presented which can avoid the fluidization of solid particles. The feasibility and performance characteristics of the new valve are investigated with a cold-model dual CFB. The results show that compared with the conventional non-mechanical valve, the jet-control valve can transfer solid particles steadily over a larger range, prevent artesian flow, and improve the leakage characteristics. The effects of the operating parameters and structural parameters on the minimum aeration velocity, solid flow rate, and maximum solid flow rate are studied. A two-valve model is proposed to explain the transport capacity of the valve for one jet pipe. A semi-theoretical expression is obtained based on the experimental data with a maximum deviation of 30% providing useful guide for scaling-up the design.

  8. Experimental Study on Coal Multi-generation in Dual Fluidized Beds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Xiaoxu; Lu Qinggang; Na Yongjie; Liu Qi

    2007-01-01

    An atmospheric test system of dual fluidized beds for coal multi-generation was built. One bubbling fluidized bed is for gasification and a circulating fluidized bed for combustion. The two beds are combined with two valves:one valve to send high temperature ash from combustion bed to the gasification bed and another valve to send char and ash from gasification bed to combustion bed. Experiments on Shenhua coal multi-generation were made at temperatures from 1112 K to 1191 K in the dual fluidized beds. The temperatures of the combustor are stable and the char combustion efficiency is about 98%. Increasing air/coal ratio to the fluidized bed leads to the increase of temperature and gasification efficiency. The maximum gasification efficiency is 36.7% and the calorific value of fuel gas is 10.7 MJ/Nm3. The tar yield in this work is 1.5%, much lower than that of pyrolysis.Carbon conversion efficiency to fuel gas and flue gas is about 90%.

  9. Experimental Study on a New Dual-Layer Granular Bed Filter for Removing Particulates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-hua; ZHOU Jiang-hua

    2007-01-01

    A new dual-layer granular bed filter for hot gas cleanup was invented and studied experimentally. Fine sand, 0.5-1 mm grain size and about 1350 kg/m3 bulk density, was used as the lower layer of the filter. Expanded perlite particles, 2-5 mm grain size and about 70 kg/m3 bulk density, was used for the upper layer of the filter in this study. It was confirmed that the sizes and densities of these two media matched well; the binary media remained in complete segregation during regeneration by fluidization. Test results show that the filtration of the expanded perlite particle layer was characterized as "deep bed filtration." Filtration of the fine sand layer was "surface cake filtration." The expanded perlite particle layer contributed about 90% to the bed dust capacity, but only about 20% to the total bed pressure drop, which increased the bed dust capacity ten fold compared to a single-layer bed of the same sand and the same total bed pressure drop. The dust cake on the surface of the fine sand layer raised the collection efficiencies to over 99.99%.

  10. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Gadd, Nichole E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  11. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Biomass Gasification in a Dual Chamber Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents work on hydrodynamics of several types of biomass mixture in a dual chamber circulating fluidized bed. In designing the CFBreactornecessary to know the distribution of solid particles radially and axially influenced by fluidizing gas velocity, particle size, solid circulation flux, reactor diameter and height of the reactor. These factors will affect pressure drop along the riser of the reaction chamber. Pressure drop is an important factor in the study of hydrodynamics of particle flow. The pressure drop was measured using mathematical model compared to experimental results done on a cold mode. Since it was found that both results were consistent which means that the model can be used to predict the operating parameters of CFB design.

  13. Antenna complexes protect Photosystem I from Photoinhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hienerwadel Rainer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photosystems are composed of two moieties, a reaction center and a peripheral antenna system. In photosynthetic eukaryotes the latter system is composed of proteins belonging to Lhc family. An increasing set of evidences demonstrated how these polypeptides play a relevant physiological function in both light harvesting and photoprotection. Despite the sequence similarity between antenna proteins associated with the two Photosystems, present knowledge on their physiological role is mostly limited to complexes associated to Photosystem II. Results In this work we analyzed the physiological role of Photosystem I antenna system in Arabidopsis thaliana both in vivo and in vitro. Plants depleted in individual antenna polypeptides showed a reduced capacity for photoprotection and an increased production of reactive oxygen species upon high light exposure. In vitro experiments on isolated complexes confirmed that depletion of antenna proteins reduced the resistance of isolated Photosystem I particles to high light and that the antenna is effective in photoprotection only upon the interaction with the core complex. Conclusion We show that antenna proteins play a dual role in Arabidopsis thaliana Photosystem I photoprotection: first, a Photosystem I with an intact antenna system is more resistant to high light because of a reduced production of reactive oxygen species and, second, antenna chlorophyll-proteins are the first target of high light damages. When photoprotection mechanisms become insufficient, the antenna chlorophyll proteins act as fuses: LHCI chlorophylls are degraded while the reaction center photochemical activity is maintained. Differences with respect to photoprotection strategy in Photosystem II, where the reaction center is the first target of photoinhibition, are discussed.

  14. Direct Synthesis of Renewable Dodecanol and Dodecane with Methyl Isobutyl Ketone over Dual-Bed Catalyst Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xueru; Li, Ning; Li, Guangyi; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Aiqin; Cong, Yu; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Tao

    2017-03-09

    For the first time, we demonstrated two integrated processes for the direct synthesis of dodecanol or 2,4,8-trimethylnonane (a jet fuel range C12 -branched alkane) using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) that can be derived from lignocellulose. The reactions were carried out in dual-bed continuous flow reactors. In the first bed, MIBK was selectively converted to a mixture of C12 alcohol and ketone. Over the Pd-modified magnesium- aluminium hydrotalcite (Pd-MgAl-HT) catalyst, a high total carbon yield (73.0 %) of C12 oxygenates can be achieved under mild conditions. In the second bed, the C12 oxygenates generated in the first bed were hydrogenated to dodecanol over a Ru/C catalyst or hydrodeoxygenated to 2,4,8-trimethylnonane over a Cu/SiO2 catalyst. The as-obtained dodecanol can be used as feedstock in the production of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), which are widely used as surfactants or detergents. The asobtained 2,4,8-trimethylnonane can be blended into conventional jet fuel without hydroisomerization. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Investigation of a dual-particle liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor for extractive fermentation of lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manoj; Bassi, Amarjeet S; Zhu, Jesse J-X; Gomaa, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    A dual-particle liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (DP-LSCFB) bioreactor has been constructed and investigated for the simultaneous production and extraction of lactic acid using immobilized Lactobacillus bulgaricus and ion-exchange resins. The apparatus consisted of a downer fluidized bed, 13 cm I.D. and 4.75 m tall, and a riser fluidized bed, 3.8 cm I.D. and 5.15 m in height. The lactic acid production and removal was carried out in the downer, while the riser was used for the recovery of lactic acid. A continuously recirculating bed of ion-exchange resin was used for adsorption of the produced acid as well as for maintaining optimum pH for bioconversion, thus eliminating the need for costly and complex chemical control approach used in conventional techniques. Studies using lactic acid aqueous solution as feed and sodium hydroxide solution as regeneration stream showed 93% lactic acid removal from the downer and 46% recovery in the riser under the conditions investigated. Such results prove the functionality of using the newly developed bioreactor design for the continuous production and recovery of products of biotechnological significance.

  16. Dual role for tomato heat shock protein 21: protecting photosystem II from oxidative stress and promoting color changes during fruit maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta-Sharir, Inbal; Isaacson, Tal; Lurie, Susan; Weiss, David

    2005-06-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) chloroplast small heat shock protein (sHSP), HSP21, is induced by heat treatment in leaves, but also under normal growth conditions in developing fruits during the transition of chloroplasts to chromoplasts. We used transgenic tomato plants constitutively expressing HSP21 to study the role of the protein under stress conditions and during fruit maturation. Although we did not find any effect for the transgene on photosystem II (PSII) thermotolerance, our results show that the protein protects PSII from temperature-dependent oxidative stress. In addition, we found direct evidence of the protein's role in fruit reddening and the conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts. When plants were grown under normal growth temperature, transgenic fruits accumulated carotenoids earlier than controls. Furthermore, when detached mature green fruits were stored for 2 weeks at 2 degrees C and then transferred to room temperature, the natural accumulation of carotenoids was blocked. In a previous study, we showed that preheat treatment, which induces HSP21, allowed fruit color change at room temperature, after a cold treatment. Here, we show that mature green transgenic fruits constitutively expressing HSP21 do not require the heat treatment to maintain the ability to accumulate carotenoids after cold storage. This study demonstrates that a sHSP plays a role in plant development under normal growth conditions, in addition to its protective effect under stress conditions.

  17. Potential approaches to improve gasification of high water content biomass rich in cellulose in dual fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Li; Xu, Guangwen [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex System, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Suda, Toshiyuki [Research Laboratory, IHI Corporation, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Murakami, Takahiro [National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Biomass containing water of 30-65 wt.% and rich in cellulose, such as various grounds of drinking materials and the lees of spirit and vinegar, is not suitable for biological digestion, and the thermal conversion approach has to be applied to its conversion into bioenergy. The authors have recently worked on converting such biomass into middle heating-value gas via dual fluidized bed gasification (DFBG) integrated with various process intensification technologies. This article is devoted to highlighting those technical ways, including the choice of the superior technical deployment for a DFBG system, the impregnation of Ca onto fuel in fuel drying, the integration of gas cleaning with fuel gasification via two-stage DFBG (T-DFBG), and the decoupling of fuel drying/pyrolysis and char gasification via the decoupled DFBG (D-DFBG). The attained results demonstrated that the superior deployment of bed combination for the DFBG should be a bubbling/turbulent fluidized bed gasifier integrated with a pneumatic riser combustor. In terms of improving efficiency of fuel conversion into combustible gas and suppressing tar generation during gasification, the impregnation of Ca onto fuel exhibited distinctively high upgrading effect, while both the T-DFBG and D-DFBG were also demonstrated to be effective to a certain degree. (author)

  18. Photosystem II and photoinhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feikema, Willem Onno

    2006-01-01

    Plants harvest light energy and convert it into chemical energy. Light absorption by photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) results in charge separations in their reaction centers (RCs), initiating a chain of redox reactions with PSI generating the reducing power for CO2 assimilation into sugars, and

  19. 双流化床生物质气化炉研究进展%Research progress of dual fluidized bed biomass gasifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓明; 肖显斌; 刘吉; 陈旭娇; 覃吴; 董长青; 李文艳

    2015-01-01

    生物质是重要的清洁可再生能源,双流化床生物质气化技术是将低品位的生物质能转化成高品位氢能的重要途径。本文阐明了双流化床气化过程的基本原理,从燃气中氢气浓度、焦油含量和装置热效率等角度,介绍了双流化床生物质气化技术的早期探索和发展现状,对目前几种典型双流化床生物质气化炉的炉型设计及相关试验研究进行了分析和总结。指出内循环双流化床气化炉结构虽然简单紧凑,但是难以避免气化室和燃烧室之间的气体串混问题;而外循环流化床通过外置返料器很好地解决了气体串混问题。分析了不同气化室优化设计方案对提升燃气品质的理论依据及其优缺点。最后对双流化床生物质气化技术的发展进行了总结和展望,指出双流化床生物质气化制氢具有非常广阔的工业化应用和发展前景。%Biomass is an important part of clean and renewable energy sources. Dual fluidized bed biomass gasification is an important technology that transforms low-quality biomass into high-quality hydrogen. This paper illustrates the basic principles of the dual fluidized bed gasification process,and summarizes the early exploration and development status of the dual fluidized bed biomass gasification technology from the perspective of hydrogen concentration,tar content and device thermal efficiency. The furnace design and related experimental studies of several typical dual fluidized bed biomass gasifiers are analyzed and summarized. Internal circulating dual fluidized bed gasification furnace has simple and compact structure,but it is difficult to prevent gas leakage between gasification chamber and combustion chamber. External circulating dual fluidized bed with external recycle device resolves the problem of gas leakage. The theoretical basis,advantages and disadvantages of different optimized gasification chamber designs are analyzed. The

  20. Light harvesting in photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, van H.; Croce, R.

    2013-01-01

    Water oxidation in photosynthesis takes place in photosystem II (PSII). This photosystem is built around a reaction center (RC) where sunlight-induced charge separation occurs. This RC consists of various polypeptides that bind only a few chromophores or pigments, next to several other cofactors. It

  1. Light harvesting in photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, van H.; Croce, R.

    2013-01-01

    Water oxidation in photosynthesis takes place in photosystem II (PSII). This photosystem is built around a reaction center (RC) where sunlight-induced charge separation occurs. This RC consists of various polypeptides that bind only a few chromophores or pigments, next to several other cofactors. It

  2. Design of Bunk Bed with Dual-purpose Ladder%学生双层床两用梯的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张西珠; 耿振香

    2016-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the bunk bed in a current student’s dormitory, a dual-purpose ladder of the bunk bed for students is designed to diversity the function of the ladder. This dual-propose ladder is more than a common one, it can be used as a table after being folded up by sliding and flipping. The ladder’s function can be improved as well as a guarantee of security. The designed ladder not only change the understanding of a bunk bed ladder, but also highlight its perfect innovation features.%通过对目前宿舍学生双层床梯子功能的分析,设计出一种新型的学生双层床两用梯。本文不仅介绍了梯子通过滑动和翻转,使两用梯在完成正常梯子功能后,又可折叠当作书桌使用功能;在保证安全性的同时,完成了结构性设计。本设计具有创新特性,让双层床的梯子功能实现了多样化。

  3. Multiple functions of photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, van J.J.S.; Curwiel, V.B.

    2000-01-01

    The most important function of photosystem II (PSII) is its action as a water-plastoquinone oxido-reductase. At the expense of light energy, water is split, and oxygen and plastoquinol are formed. In addition to this most important activity, PSII has additional functions, especially in the

  4. OZONE REACTION WITH N-ALDEHYDES (N=4-10), BENZALDEHYDE, ETHANOL, ISOPROPANOL, AND N-PROPANOL ADSORBED ON A DUAL-BED GRAPHITIZED CARBON/CARBON MOLECULAR SIEVE ADSORBENT CARTRIDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone reacts with n-aldehydes (n = 4 - 10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol, and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon/carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge. Destruction of n-aldehydes increases with n number and with ozone concentration. In some samp...

  5. Lipids in the Structure of Photosystem I, Photosystem II and the Cytochrome b6f Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Guskov, Albert; Krauss, Norbert; Wada, Hajime; Murata, Norio

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the data accumulated in the last decade regarding the specific function of lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis, based on crystal structures of at least 3.0 Å resolution of the main photosynthetic membrane protein—pigment complexes, photosystem I, photosystem II and cytochrome b6

  6. Lipids in the Structure of Photosystem I, Photosystem II and the Cytochrome b6f Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Guskov, Albert; Krauss, Norbert; Wada, Hajime; Murata, Norio

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the data accumulated in the last decade regarding the specific function of lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis, based on crystal structures of at least 3.0 Å resolution of the main photosynthetic membrane protein—pigment complexes, photosystem I, photosystem II and cytochrome

  7. Unraveling photosystems. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report highlights four main points. (1) A residue substitution in phosphoribulokinase of Synechocystis PCC 6803 renders the mutant light-sensitive. The authors isolated a light-sensitive mutant (BRLS) of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 that does not survive exposure to bright light; 70% of BRLS cells die upon exposure to light of > 3000 lux for 2 hr. (2) Excitation energy transfer from phycocyanin to chlorophyll in an apcA-defective mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. A greenish mutant of the normally bule-green cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PC 6803, designated UV6p, was isolated and characterized. UV6p possesses functional photosystems I and II but lacks normal light harvesting phycobilisomes because allophycocyanin is absent and core-specific linker proteins are almost entirely absent. (3) Deletion of the psbG1 gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 leads to the activation of the cryptic psbG2 gene. The genes psbG1 and psbG2 in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 are homologous. The psbG1 gene is located on the chromosome and is part of the ndhC-psbG1-ORF157 operon, while psbG2 is located on a plasmid and is not flanked by equivalent ndhC or ORF157 genes. (4) Deletion of the structural gene for the NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 4 of Synechocystis 6803 alters respiratory properties. Chloroplasts and cyanobacteria contain genes encoding polypeptides homologous to some subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinol oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase). Nothing is known of the role of the NADH dehydrogenase complex in photosynthesis, respiration, or other functions in chloroplasts, and little is known about their specific roles in the perhaps 42 subunits of this complex in the mitochondrion.

  8. Evidence for multiple photosystems in jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Ekström, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cnidarians are often used as model animals in studies of eye and photopigment evolution. Most cnidarians display photosensitivity at some point in their lifecycle ranging from extraocular photoreception to image formation in camera-type eyes. The available information strongly suggests that some...... cnidarians even possess multiple photosystems. The evidence is strongest within Cubomedusae where all known species posses 24 eyes of four morphological types. Physiological experiments show that each cubomedusan eye type likely constitutes a separate photosystem controlling separate visually guided...... had evolved already in early eumetazoans and that their original level of organization was discrete sets of special-purpose eyes and/or photosensory cells...

  9. Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  10. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  11. Analysis of Pressure Fluctuations in a Dual-leg Fluidized Bed Based on Recurrence Plot%双支腿流化床压力脉动的递归分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨春振; 段钰锋; 胡海韬

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence plot (RP) was used to study the effects of fluidization velocity and bed material inventory on chaotic characteristics in a dual-leg fluidized bed (DL-FB) with dimensions of 0.24 m width, 0.04m depth and 2.0 mm height. The height of dual-leg is 0.16 m. The glass beads with diameters of 0.25-0.28mm were adopted as bed material. The results show that the RP could be utilized effectively to explain the nonlinear dynamic performance in the DL-FB and the chaos of the DL-FB is higher than that of the single distributor FB because of the combination of bubbling actions and solids exchange behavior between two half beds. With the increase of fluidization velocity, entropy as a recurrence quantification parameter varies along with a M-type curve at different fluidization velocities. Four processes were shown for the gas-solids flow in the DL-FB with the increase of the fluidization velocity: lower fluidization velocity with no particles exchange, less solids exchange at lower fluidization velocity, solids exchange and particles dispersion. The trend of the effect of bed inventory on entropy is not obvious.%采用递归图系统研究了流化风速、床存量对双支腿流化床(DL-FB)内气固流动混沌特性的影响规律.DL-FB的宽、深和高分别为0.24、0.04和2.0 m,支腿高为0.16m,使用粒径范围为0.25~0.28的玻璃珠作为床料.结果表明递归图可用于描述DL-FB内的气固两相流动的混沌特性,且DL-FB内的气固流动较单布风板流化床复杂.DL-FB系统熵随着流化气速的增加呈“M”型曲线变化.DL-FB系统随气速的增加会出现低速颗粒未交换段、低速颗粒交换起始段、颗粒交换段和颗粒悬浮段.床存量对系统熵的影响较大且没有明显规律.DL-FB内的压力脉动包含气泡行为和颗粒交换在半床间交换行为.

  12. Multiple types of association of photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna in partially solubilized photosystem II membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, EJ; van Roon, H; Calkoen, F; Bassi, R; Dekker, JP; Dekker, Jan P.

    1999-01-01

    Photosystem II is a multisubunit pigment-protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. It utilizes light for photochemical energy conversion, and is heavily involved in the regulation of the energy flow. We investigated the structural organization of photosystem II and its ass

  13. Preliminary experimental study of bituminous coal gasification on dual fluidized beds%烟煤在双流化床中气化特性初步实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武小军; 范晓旭; 陈文义; 初雷哲

    2012-01-01

    利用一套高3m的双流化床煤气化实验系统,以烟煤为燃料进行了气化初步实验研究.烟煤在气化炉中进行热解气化,生成的半焦经下返料器送入燃烧炉进行燃烧,通过高温循环灰携带能量供给气化炉.通过调整气化炉内料层高度改变燃料在气化炉内的停留时间,从而影响气化效果,料层高度可以通过气化炉内压差进行监测.烟煤气化达到稳定工况时,燃烧炉和气化炉的温度和压差基本保持稳定.燃气热值为5.53 MJ/m3,尚未达到中热值标准,原因在于实验装置规模较小导致散热损失较大,同时返料器以空气为返料风降低了燃气品质.%Gasification experiments on bituminous coal were made in an experimental system of dual fluidized beds with 3 m in height. Gasifier was used for coal pyrolysis/gasification. Semicarbon was sent into burner for combustion by U-valve. Energy for gasification was carried by high temperature cycle ash. Status of gasification can be influenced by residence time of fuel which can be changed by adjusting the bed material level in gasifier. Differential pressures in gasifier were used for analyzed the bed material level. The temperature and differential pressure in gasifier and burner maintained stability when gasification condition operated steadily. The calorific value of gas was 5.53 MJ/Nm3 and didn't reach the standard of medium heat value. The cause is that the heat loss is bigger in small size and gas quality was decreased by the air which is used as return wind.

  14. Producer gas cleaning in a dual fluidized bed reformer - a comparative study of performance with ilmenite and a manganese oxide as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berguerand, Nicolas; Lind, Fredrik; Seemann, Martin; Thunman, Henrik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Secondary catalytic gas conditioning is one strategy to eliminate tars formed in a producer gas during biomass gasification. However, most catalysts tend to lose their tar reforming activity after a short period of operation due to carbon formation. A novel technique for catalytic gas cleaning based on two interconnected fluidized beds has been investigated; this technique can be applied to all types of gasifiers. The idea is to reform the tar components into useful molecules - even at high tar contents - by means of a circulating catalyst. More precisely, the producer gas is cleaned with catalyst in one of the reactors, referred to as the fuel reactor, while the catalyst is continuously regenerated in another reactor, the air reactor (AR). The system described here is coupled with the Chalmers 2-4 MW{sub th} biomass gasifier while the AR is fed with nitrogen-diluted air. The effect of different catalysts on both the tar content and the gas composition was investigated. Some of the tested materials do not only reform tars, they also influence the H{sub 2}/CO ratio in a beneficial manner; in particular, ratios closer to 3 in the reformed gas are favorable if subsequent methanation is implemented. In this paper, comparative results based on testing with manganese- and iron-based catalysts are presented. The former is a manufactured catalyst while the latter is a natural ore. Results suggest that both show satisfying ability for regeneration from carbon deposits. Higher temperature enhances tar decomposition during the experiment with both catalysts. Moreover, the iron-based catalyst enhances the water-gas shift activity, which in turn impacts the total amount of produced gas. On the other hand, the manganese-based catalyst seems to display a higher propensity for tar conversion. (orig.)

  15. Co-gasification of biomass and plastics: pyrolysis kinetics studies, experiments on 100 kW dual fluidized bed pilot plant and development of thermodynamic equilibrium model and balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narobe, M; Golob, J; Klinar, D; Francetič, V; Likozar, B

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) of volatilization reaction kinetics for 50 wt.% mixtures of plastics (PE) and biomass (wood pellets) as well as for 100 wt.% plastics was conducted to predict decomposition times at 850°C and 900°C using iso-conversional model method. For mixtures, agreement with residence time of dual fluidized bed (DFB) reactor, treated as continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), was obtained at large conversions. Mono-gasification of plastics and its co-gasification with biomass were performed in DFB pilot plant, using olivine as heterogeneous catalyst and heat transfer agent. It was found that co-gasification led to successful thermochemical conversion of plastics as opposed to mono-gasification. Unknown flow rates were determined applying nonlinear regression to energy and mass balances acknowledging combustion fuel, air, steam, feedstock, but also exiting char, tar, steam and other components in DFB gasification unit. Water-gas shift equilibrium and methanol synthesis requirements were incorporated into gasification model, based on measurements.

  16. Ozone reaction with n-aldehydes (n=4-10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol, and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon-carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenny, W A; Colón, M; Oliver, K D

    2001-09-21

    Ozone reacts with n-aldehydes (n=4-10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon-carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge. Destruction of n-aldehydes increases with n number and with ozone concentration. In some sampling experiments both generation and destruction of n-aldehydes by ozone are observed. In field experiments the results of sample analysis for n-aldehydes and benzaldehyde are frequently not proportional to sample volume whereas results for toluene and isoprene, and sometimes for total carbon, are. A simple theory is developed to simulate the net result of three processes: the adsorption of compounds from an air stream onto a solid adsorbent, the generation of compounds by reaction of ozone with materials upstream of or on the adsorbent, and the destruction by ozone of pre-existing compounds and compounds adsorbed from the sample stream. The use of distributed volume pairs is recommended as a way to identify loss of sample integrity during air monitoring experiments.

  17. [The Carnot efficiency and plant photosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, R C; Santabarbara, S; Belgio, E; Zucchelli, G

    2014-01-01

    The concept that the Carnot efficiency places an upper limit of 0.60-0.75 on the thermodynamic efficiency of photosynthetic primary photochemistry is examined using the PSI-LHCI preparation. The maximal quantum efficiency was determined approximately 0.99 which yielded a thermodynamic efficiency of 0.96, a value far above that predicted on the basis of the Carnot efficiency. The commonly presented reasoning leading to the Carnot efficiency idea was therefore critically examined. It is concluded that the crucial assumption that the pigment system, under illumination, is in equilibrium with the incident light field, at a black body temperature of Tr, is erroneous, as the temperature of the excited state pigments was experimentally shown to be that of the sample solvent (thermal bath), 280 K in this case. It is concluded that the classical reasoning used to describe the thermodynamics of heat systems is not applicable to "photonic" systems such as plant photosystems.

  18. Material science lesson from the biological photosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Lee, Jun Ho; Ha, Heonjin; Im, Sang Won; Nam, Ki Tae

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by photosynthesis, artificial systems for a sustainable energy supply are being designed. Each sequential energy conversion process from light to biomass in natural photosynthesis is a valuable model for an energy collection, transport and conversion system. Notwithstanding the numerous lessons of nature that provide inspiration for new developments, the features of natural photosynthesis need to be reengineered to meet man's demands. This review describes recent strategies toward adapting key lessons from natural photosynthesis to artificial systems. We focus on the underlying material science in photosynthesis that combines photosystems as pivotal functional materials and a range of materials into an integrated system. Finally, a perspective on the future development of photosynthesis mimetic energy systems is proposed.

  19. Photosystem II is a chimera of reaction centers

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona Londono, T

    2017-01-01

    A complete scenario for the evolution of photosynthesis must account for the origin and diversification of photochemical reaction centers. Two lively debated questions are how the distinct types of reaction centers evolved and how cyanobacteria acquired two distinct reaction centers???Photosystem I and Photosystem II???in the path towards the origin of light-driven water oxidation, or in other words, towards the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis (Hohmann-Marriott and Blankenship 2011; Fisc...

  20. Spectral hole burning studies of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.C.

    1995-11-01

    Low temperature absorption and hole burning spectroscopies were applied to the D1-D2-cyt b{sub 559} and the CP47 and CP43 antenna protein complexes of Photosystem H from higher plants. Low temperature transient and persistent hole-burning data and theoretical calculations on the kinetics and temperature dependence of the P680 hole profile are presented and provide convincing support for the linker model. Implicit in the linker model is that the 684-nm-absorbing Chl a serve to shuttle energy from the proximal antenna complex to reaction center. The stoichiometry of isolated Photosystem H Reaction Center (PSII RC) in several different preparations is also discussed. The additional Chl a are due to 684-nm-absorbing Chl a, some contamination by the CP47 complex, and non-native Chl a absorbing near 670 nm. In the CP47 protein complex, attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q{sub y}-states. High pressure hole-burning studies of PSII RC revealed for the first time a strong pressure effect on the primary electron transfer dynamics. The 4.2 K lifetime of P680*, the primary donor state, increases from 2.0 ps to 7.0 ps as pressure increases from 0.1 to 267 MPa. Importantly, this effect is irreversible (plastic) while the pressure induced effect on the low temperature absorption and non-line narrowed P680 hole spectra are reversible (elastic). Nonadiabatic rate expressions, which take into account the distribution of energy gap values, are used to estimate the linear pressure shift of the acceptor state energy for both the superexchange and two-step mechanisms for primary charge separation. It was found that the pressure dependence could be explained with a linear pressure shift of {approximately} 1 cm{sup -1}/MPa in magnitude for the acceptor state. The results point to the marriage of hole burning and high pressures as having considerable potential for the study of primary transport dynamics in reaction centers and antenna complexes.

  1. Interaction of ascorbate with photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitsin, Boris V; Mamedov, Mahir D; Semenov, Alexey Yu; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2014-11-01

    Ascorbate is one of the key participants of the antioxidant defense in plants. In this work, we have investigated the interaction of ascorbate with the chloroplast electron transport chain and isolated photosystem I (PSI), using the EPR method for monitoring the oxidized centers [Formula: see text] and ascorbate free radicals. Inhibitor analysis of the light-induced redox transients of P700 in spinach thylakoids has demonstrated that ascorbate efficiently donates electrons to [Formula: see text] via plastocyanin. Inhibitors (DCMU and stigmatellin), which block electron transport between photosystem II and Pc, did not disturb the ascorbate capacity for electron donation to [Formula: see text]. Otherwise, inactivation of Pc with CN(-) ions inhibited electron flow from ascorbate to [Formula: see text]. This proves that the main route of electron flow from ascorbate to [Formula: see text] runs through Pc, bypassing the plastoquinone (PQ) pool and the cytochrome b 6 f complex. In contrast to Pc-mediated pathway, direct donation of electrons from ascorbate to [Formula: see text] is a rather slow process. Oxidized ascorbate species act as alternative oxidants for PSI, which intercept electrons directly from the terminal electron acceptors of PSI, thereby stimulating photooxidation of P700. We investigated the interaction of ascorbate with PSI complexes isolated from the wild type cells and the MenB deletion strain of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In the MenB mutant, PSI contains PQ in the quinone-binding A1-site, which can be substituted by high-potential electron carrier 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (Cl2NQ). In PSI from the MenB mutant with Cl2NQ in the A1-site, the outflow of electrons from PSI is impeded due to the uphill electron transfer from A1 to the iron-sulfur cluster FX and further to the terminal clusters FA/FB, which manifests itself as a decrease in a steady-state level of [Formula: see text]. The addition of ascorbate promoted photooxidation

  2. Photoinduced changes in photosystem II pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Atanaska S.; Busheva, Mira C.; Stoitchkova, Katerina V.; Tzonova, Iren K.

    2010-11-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants performs two seemingly opposing tasks: efficient harvest of sunlight, but also rapid and harmless dissipation of excess light energy as heat to avoid deleterious photodamage. In order to study this process in pigment-protein supercomplexes of photosystem II (PSII), 77 K fluorescence and room temperature resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy were applied to investigate the changes in structure and spectral properties of the pigments in spinach PSII membranes. The high-light treatment results in a strong quenching of the fluorescence (being largest when the excitation is absorbed by carotenoids) and a red-shift of the main maximum. Decomposition of the fluorescence spectra into four bands revealed intensive quenching of F685 and F695 bands, possible bleaching of chlorophyll a, enhanced extent of light harvesting complexes (LHCII) aggregation and increased energy transfer to aggregated LHCII. The analysis of RR spectra revealed the predominant contribution of ß-carotene (ß-Car) upon 457.8 and 488 nm excitations and lutein (Lut) at 514.5 nm. During prolonged exposure to strong light no significant bleaching of ß-Car and weak photobleaching of Lut is observed. The results will contribute to the efforts to produce more efficient and robust solar cells when exposed to fluctuations in light intensity.

  3. Multistep organic synthesis of modular photosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Summary Quite extensive synthetic achievements vanish in the online supporting information of publications on functional systems. Underappreciated, their value is recognized by experts only. As an example, we here focus in on the recent synthesis of multicomponent photosystems with antiparallel charge-transfer cascades in co-axial hole- and electron-transporting channels. The synthetic steps are described one-by-one, starting with commercial starting materials and moving on to key intermediates, such as asparagusic acid, an intriguing natural product, as well as diphosphonate “feet”, and panchromatic naphthalenediimides (NDIs), to finally reach the target molecules. These products are initiators and propagators for self-organizing surface-initiated polymerization (SOSIP), a new method introduced to secure facile access to complex architectures. Chemoorthogonal to the ring-opening disulfide exchange used for SOSIP, hydrazone exchange is then introduced to achieve stack exchange, which is a “switching” technology invented to drill giant holes into SOSIP architectures and fill them with functional π-stacks of free choice. PMID:23015840

  4. Proton transfer pathways in Photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and the 1.9-Å crystal structure of Photosystem II (Umena, Y., Kawakami, K., Shen, J.-R., and Kamiya, N. (2011) Nature 473, 55-60), we investigated the H-bonding environment of the redox active tyrosine, TyrD and obtained insights that help explain its slow redox kinetics and the stability of TyrD radical. The water molecule distal to TyrD, 4 Å away from the phenolic O of TyrD (OTyrD) , corresponds to the presence of the tyrosyl radical state. The water molecule proximal to TyrD, in H-bonding distance to OTyrD, corresponds to the presence of the unoxidised tyrosine. The H+ released upon oxidation of TyrD is transferred to the proximal water, which shifts to the distal position, triggering a concerted proton transfer pathway involving D2-Arg180 and a series of waters, through which the proton reaches the aqueous phase at D2-His61. The water movement linked to the ejection of the proton from the hydrophobic environment near TyrD makes oxidation slow and quasi-irreversible, explaining the great stability of the TyrD radical. A symmetry-related proton pathway associated with TyrZ is pointed out and this is associated with one of the Cl- sites. This may represent a proton pathway functional in the water oxidation cycle.

  5. Observation of Coherence in the Photosystem II Reaction Center

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Franklin D; Senlik, S Seckin; Wilcox, Daniel E; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis powers life on our planet. The basic photosynthetic architecture comprises antenna complexes to harvest solar energy and reaction centers to convert the energy into a stable charge separated state. In oxygenic photosynthesis, the initial charge separation event occurs in the photosystem II reaction center; the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water. Energy transfer and charge separation in photosynthesis are rapid and have high quantum efficiencies. Recently, nonlinear spectroscopic experiments have suggested that electronic coherence may play a role in energy transfer efficiency in antenna complexes. Here we report the observation of coherence in the photosystem II reaction center by two dimensional electronic spectroscopy. The frequencies of the observed coherences match exciton difference frequencies and/or known vibrational modes of the photosystem II reaction center. These observations raise questions about the possible role of electronic and/or vibrational coheren...

  6. Representative Pathways of Excitation Migration in Photosystem I

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Lu, D; Schulten, K; Park, Sanghyun; Sener, Melih K.; Lu, Deyu; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Photosystem I is a protein-pigment complex that performs photosynthesis in plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. It contains an aggregate of chlorophylls that absorbs light and delivers the resulting electronic excitation to the special pair of chlorophylls where the excitation energy is used for producing charge separation across the cell membrane. The seemingly random arrangement of chlorophylls in photosystem I poses the question which pathways excitation migration follows towards the special pair after absorption of light at any of its chlorophylls. We employ a master equation to describe the process of excitation migration in photosystem I, and find representative paths of excitation migration based on the mean first-passage time from each chlorophyll to the special pair. The resulting paths, beginning at each of the chlorophylls and ending at the special pair, provide a complete yet distilled picture of the excitation migration towards the special pair.

  7. Simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ting; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-11-01

    The photosystem I/II ratio increased when antenna size was enlarged by transient induction of CAO in chlorophyll b -less mutants, thus indicating simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry. Regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry is an indispensable strategy for plants to acclimate to changes to light environments. When plants grown in high-light conditions are transferred to low-light conditions, the peripheral antennae of photosystems are enlarged. A change in the photosystem I/II ratio is also observed under the same light conditions. However, our knowledge of the correlation between antenna size modulation and variation in photosystem I/II stoichiometry remains limited. In this study, chlorophyll a oxygenase was transiently induced in Arabidopsis thaliana chlorophyll b-less mutants, ch1-1, to alter the antenna size without changing environmental conditions. In addition to the accumulation of chlorophyll b, the levels of the peripheral antenna complexes of both photosystems gradually increased, and these were assembled to the core antenna of both photosystems. However, the antenna size of photosystem II was greater than that of photosystem I. Immunoblot analysis of core antenna proteins showed that the number of photosystem I increased, but not that of photosystem II, resulting in an increase in the photosystem I/II ratio. These results clearly indicate that antenna size adjustment was coupled with changes in photosystem I/II stoichiometry. Based on these results, the physiological importance of simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry is discussed in relation to acclimation to light conditions.

  8. Quality control of Photosystem II: reversible and irreversible protein aggregation decides the fate of Photosystem II under excessive illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi eYamamoto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In response to excessive light, the thylakoid membranes of higher plant chloroplasts show dynamic changes including the degradation and reassembly of proteins, a change in the distribution of proteins, and large-scale structural changes such as unstacking of the grana. Here, we examined the aggregation of light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complexes and Photosystem II core subunits of spinach thylakoid membranes under light stress with 77K chlorophyll fluorescence; aggregation of these proteins was found to proceed with increasing light intensity. Measurement of changes in the fluidity of thylakoid membranes with fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene showed that membrane fluidity increased at a light intensity of 500–1,000 µmol photons m-2 s-1, and decreased at very high light intensity (1,500 µmol photons m-2 s-1. The aggregation of light-harvesting complexes at moderately high light intensity is known to be reversible, while that of Photosystem II core subunits at extremely high light intensity is irreversible. It is likely that the reversibility of protein aggregation is closely related to membrane fluidity: increases in fluidity should stimulate reversible protein aggregation, whereas irreversible protein aggregation might decrease membrane fluidity. When spinach leaves were pre-illuminated with moderately high light intensity, the qE component of non-photochemical quenching and the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II increased, indicating that Photosystem II/ light-harvesting complexes rearranged in the thylakoid membranes to optimize Photosystem II activity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the thylakoids underwent partial unstacking under these light stress conditions. Thus, protein aggregation is involved in thylakoid dynamics and regulates photochemical reactions, thereby deciding the fate of Photosystem II.

  9. Light-harvesting superstructures of green plant chloroplasts lacking photosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Ungerer, Petra; Ruban, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II (LHCII) is the major photosynthetic membrane component encoded by an entire family of homologous nuclear genes. On the contrary, the great majority of proteins of photosystems and electron transport components are encoded by the chloroplast genome. In this work, we succeeded in gradually inhibiting the expression of the chloroplast genes that led to the disappearance of the photosystem complexes, mimicking almost total photoinhibition. The treated plants, despite displaying only some early signs of senescence, sustained their metabolism and growth for several weeks. The only major remaining membrane component was LHCII antenna that formed superstructures - stacks of dozens of thylakoids or supergrana. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed specific organization, directly displaying frequently bifurcated membranes with reduced or totally absent photosystem II (PSII) reaction centre complexes. Our findings show that it is possible to accumulate large amounts of light-harvesting membranes, organized into three-dimensional structures, in the absence of reaction centre complexes. This points to the reciprocal role of LHCII and PSII in self-assembly of the three-dimensional matrix of the photosynthetic membrane, dictating its size and flexible adaptation to the light environment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Photosystem I from the unusual cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangels, D.; Kruip, J.; Berry, S.; Rögner, M.; Boekema, E.J.; Koenig, F.

    2002-01-01

    Photosystem I (PS I) from the primitive cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus has been purified and characterised. Despite the fact that the isolated complexes have the same subunit composition as complexes from other cyanobacteria, the amplitude of flash-induced absorption difference spectra

  11. Integration and modification of photosystem I for bio-photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordiichuk, Pavlo

    2016-01-01

    The photosystem I (PSI) from thermophilic cyanobacteria, which is able to harvest light and perform charge separation, was intensively studied in this thesis. It was shown how the PSI protein complex can be immobilized on a surface with the help of two different linker molecules, 2-mercaptoethanol

  12. Photosystem I from the unusual cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangels, D.; Kruip, J.; Berry, S.; Rögner, M.; Boekema, E.J.; Koenig, F.

    2002-01-01

    Photosystem I (PS I) from the primitive cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus has been purified and characterised. Despite the fact that the isolated complexes have the same subunit composition as complexes from other cyanobacteria, the amplitude of flash-induced absorption difference spectra indicat

  13. Role of bicarbonate at the acceptor side of photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, van J.J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Besides being the substrate for the carboxylation reaction of photosynthesis, CO2 (bicarbonate) is required for the activity of Photosystem II (water plastoquinone oxido-reductase). It plays a role on the electron donor side as well as the electron acceptor side. In this contribution, attention will

  14. Photosystem I-​based Biophotovoltaics on Nanostructured Hematite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocakoglu, K.; Krupnik, T.; van den Bosch, B.; Harputlu, E.; Gullo, M.P.; Olmos, J.D.J.; Yildirimcan, S.; Gupta, R.K.; Yakuphanoglu, F.; Barbieri, A.; Reek, J.N.H.; Kargul, J.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic coupling between a robust red algal photosystem I (PSI) associated with its light harvesting antenna (LHCI) and nanocrystalline n-​type semiconductors, TiO2 and hematite (α-​Fe2O3) is utilized for fabrication of the biohybrid dye-​sensitized solar cells (DSSC)​. PSI-​LHCI is immobiliz

  15. Functional properties of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van P.H.

    1996-01-01

    This Thesis presents the results of a study by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and measurements of oxygen evolution of the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem 11 (PS-II) in PS-II enriched membranes from spinach.The experimental part of this Thesis is preceded by a general introduction (Chap

  16. Recent progress in the crystallographic studies of photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Kern, Jan; Frank, Joachim; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-01-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) is the only known biochemical system that is able to oxidize water molecules and thereby generates almost all oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The elucidation of the structural and mechanistic aspects of PSII keeps scientists all over the wor

  17. PMS : Photosystem I electron donor or fluorescence quencher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Light energy harvested by the pigments in Photosystem I (PSI) is used for charge separation in the reaction center (RC), after which the positive charge resides on a special chlorophyll dimer called P700. In studies on the PSI trapping kinetics, P700(+) is usually chemically reduced to re-open the R

  18. Structure and membrane organization of photosystem II in green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankamer, B; Barber, J; Boekema, EJ

    1997-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria that uses solar energy to drive the photosynthetic water-splitting reaction. This chapter reviews the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of PSII as

  19. Operation of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Hamers, H.P.; Cobden, P.D.; Gallucci, F.; Sint Annaland, M. van

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion is an alternative technology for CO2 capture. While most systems utilize dual circulating fluidized-beds, this work shows that fixed-bed Chemical Looping Combustion is a feasible configuration for this technology. The inherent separation of the CO2 from the depleted air

  20. Operation of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Hamers, H.P.; Cobden, P.D.; Gallucci, F.; Sint Annaland, M. van

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion is an alternative technology for CO2 capture. While most systems utilize dual circulating fluidized-beds, this work shows that fixed-bed Chemical Looping Combustion is a feasible configuration for this technology. The inherent separation of the CO2 from the depleted air s

  1. Bed rest during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000581.htm Bed rest during pregnancy To use the sharing features on ... few days or weeks. This is called bed rest. Bed rest used to be recommended routinely for ...

  2. Structural response of photosystem 2 to iron deficiency : Characterization of a new photosystem 2-IdiA complex from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lax, Julia E. -M.; Arteni, Ana A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Pistorius, Elfriede K.; Michel, Klaus-Peter; Roegner, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency triggers various processes in cyanobacterial cells of which the synthesis of an additional antenna system (IsiA) around photosystem (PS) 1 is well documented [T.S. Bibby, J. Nield, J. Barber, Iron deficiency induces the formation of an antenna ring around trimeric photosystem I in cy

  3. Chloramphenicol Mediates Superoxide Production in Photosystem II and Enhances Its Photodamage in Isolated Membrane Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Kodru, Sandeesha; Vass, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which is frequently used to decouple photodamage and protein synthesis dependent repair of Photosystem II during the process of photoinhibition. It has been reported earlier that CAP is able to mediate superoxide production by transferring electrons from the acceptor side of Photosystem I to oxygen. Here we investigated the interaction of CAP with Photosystem II electron transport processes by oxygen uptake and variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Our data show that CAP can accept electrons at the acceptor side of Photosystem II, most likely from Pheophytin, and deliver them to molecular oxygen leading to superoxide production. In addition, the presence of CAP enhances photodamage of Photosystem II electron transport in isolated membrane particles, which effect is reversible by superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that CAP acts as electron acceptor in Photosystem II and mediates its superoxide dependent photodamage. This effect has potential implications for the application of CAP in photoinhibitory studies in intact systems. PMID:27092170

  4. Large photovoltages generated by plant photosystem I crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toporik, Hila; Carmeli, Chanoch; Nelson, Nathan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Carmeli, Itai [School of Chemistry, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Volotsenko, Irina; Molotskii, Michel; Rosenwaks, Yossi [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-06-12

    Micrometer-thick plant photosystem I crystals made of up to 1000 layers of serially arranged protein complexes generate unprecedented high photovoltages when placed on a conducting solid surface and measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The successive layers form serially photoinduced dipoles in the crystal that give rise to electric fields as large as 100 kV cm{sup -1}. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. A Hard Day's Night: Diatoms continue recycling Photosystem II in the dark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine diatoms are photosynthetic, and thrive in environments where light fluctuates. Like all oxygenic photosynthetic organisms diatoms face a light-dependent inactivation of the Photosystem II complexes that photooxidize water to generate biosynthetic reductant. To maintain photosynthesis this photoinactivation must be countered by slow and metabolically expensive protein turnover, which is light dependent in cyanobacteria and in plants. We tracked daily cycles of the content, synthesis and degradation of Photosystem II, in a small and in a large marine diatom, under low and high growth light levels. We show that, unlike plants, diatoms maintain extensive cycling of Photosystem II proteins even in the dark. Photosystem II protein cycling saturates at low light, and continued cycling in dark periods, using energy from respiration, allows the diatoms to catch up to excess photoinactivation accumulated over the preceding illuminated period. The large diatom suffers only limited photoinactivation of Photosystem II, but cycling of Photosystem II protein exceeds Photosystem II inactivation, so the large diatom recycles functional Photosystem II units before they are inactivated. Through the diel cycle the contents of active Photosystem II centers and Photosystem II proteins change predictably, but are not correlated, generating large changes in the fraction of total PSII that is active at a given time or growth condition. We propose that dark and steady cycling of Photosystem II proteins is driven by the tight integration of chloroplastic and mitochondrial metabolism in diatoms. This ability for baseline, continuous Photosystem II repair could contribute to the success of diatoms in mixed water environments that carry them from illumination to darkness and back.

  6. Wiring of Photosystem II to Hydrogenase for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersch, Dirk; Lee, Chong-Yong; Zhang, Jenny Zhenqi; Brinkert, Katharina; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-07-08

    In natural photosynthesis, light is used for the production of chemical energy carriers to fuel biological activity. The re-engineering of natural photosynthetic pathways can provide inspiration for sustainable fuel production and insights for understanding the process itself. Here, we employ a semiartificial approach to study photobiological water splitting via a pathway unavailable to nature: the direct coupling of the water oxidation enzyme, photosystem II, to the H2 evolving enzyme, hydrogenase. Essential to this approach is the integration of the isolated enzymes into the artificial circuit of a photoelectrochemical cell. We therefore developed a tailor-made hierarchically structured indium-tin oxide electrode that gives rise to the excellent integration of both photosystem II and hydrogenase for performing the anodic and cathodic half-reactions, respectively. When connected together with the aid of an applied bias, the semiartificial cell demonstrated quantitative electron flow from photosystem II to the hydrogenase with the production of H2 and O2 being in the expected two-to-one ratio and a light-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.4% under low-intensity red-light irradiation. We thereby demonstrate efficient light-driven water splitting using a pathway inaccessible to biology and report on a widely applicable in vitro platform for the controlled coupling of enzymatic redox processes to meaningfully study photocatalytic reactions.

  7. Cyclic electron flow around photosystem I is essential for photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munekage, Yuri; Hashimoto, Mihoko; Miyake, Chikahiro; Tomizawa, Ken-ichi; Endo, Tsuyoshi; Tasaka, Masao; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2004-06-03

    Photosynthesis provides at least two routes through which light energy can be used to generate a proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, which is subsequently used to synthesize ATP. In the first route, electrons released from water in photosystem II (PSII) are eventually transferred to NADP+ by way of photosystem I (PSI). This linear electron flow is driven by two photochemical reactions that function in series. The cytochrome b6f complex mediates electron transport between the two photosystems and generates the proton gradient (DeltapH). In the second route, driven solely by PSI, electrons can be recycled from either reduced ferredoxin or NADPH to plastoquinone, and subsequently to the cytochrome b6f complex. Such cyclic flow generates DeltapH and thus ATP without the accumulation of reduced species. Whereas linear flow from water to NADP+ is commonly used to explain the function of the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, the role of cyclic flow is less clear. In higher plants cyclic flow consists of two partially redundant pathways. Here we have constructed mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana in which both PSI cyclic pathways are impaired, and present evidence that cyclic flow is essential for efficient photosynthesis.

  8. 双质量飞轮式扭振减振器性能检测试验台的设计%A Test-bed Design for Performance Detection of Dual-mass Flywheel-type Torsional Damper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌; 曾荣; 赵光明

    2013-01-01

    The dual mass flywheel is a novel torsional damper in a position to depress effectively the torsional vibration and noise of the vehicle driveline. Domestic examination on dual mass flywheel is still in its infancy with no matured methods and means for performance testing. A design approach of performance testing station is put forward by analysis of vibration reduction principle of the dual mass flywheel and the establishment of a torsional oscillation model for the dual mass flywheel system. The test station features sound in adaptability, easy in testing process and high in detection efficiency, its application can effectively cut the danger in real vehicle detection of torsional oscillation reducer of dual mass flywheel. The outcome of the bench test reveals that it can detect effectively the torsional oscillation status of the transmission system to evaluate the damping effect of the dual mass flywheel and provide the references for the design of the dual mass flywheel and for the matching parameters in the design of engine-powertrain system.%双质量飞轮是一种新型的扭振减振器,能够有效地降低车辆传动系统的扭转振动和噪声.当前国内对双质量飞轮的研究处于起步阶段,尚无成熟的性能检测方法与手段.通过对双质量飞轮减振原理分析,建立了双质量飞轮系统的扭振模型,提出性能检测试验台的设计方法.试验台具有适应性强,试验过程易控制,检测效率高等特点,其应用可有效降低双质量飞轮式扭振减振器实车检测的危险.通过台架试验结果,验证其可以有效检测出传动系统的扭振状况,为双质量飞轮减振效果的评估、双质量飞轮的设计、发动机-动力传动系统参数的匹配性设计提供参考.

  9. Estimation of oxygen evolution by marine phytoplankton from measurement of the efficiency of Photosystem II electron flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, C.; Versluis, W.; Snel, J.F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relation between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and Photosystem II electron transport was investigated for the marine algae t Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Tetraselmis sp., t Isochrysis sp. and t Rhodomonas sp.. The rate of Photosystem II electron transport was estimated

  10. Supercomplexes of photosystem I and antenna proteins in cyanobacteria and green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouril, R.; Zygadlo, A.; Jensen, P. E.; Yeremenko, N.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; D'Haene, S.; Dekker, J.P.; Boekema, E.J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2005-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) can form supercomplexes with various types of antenna proteins. One such protein is Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII). In plants it is bound in its trimeric form to dimeric PSII. In spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana most dimers bind 2-4 LHCII trimers. W

  11. Bed Bugs - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bed Bugs URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Bed Bugs - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  12. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  13. Growth under Red Light Enhances Photosystem II Relative to Photosystem I and Phycobilisomes in the Red Alga Porphyridium cruentum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Francis X.; Dennenberg, Ronald J.; Jursinic, Paul A.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1990-01-01

    Acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light absorbed primarily by photosystem I (PSI) or by photosystem II (PSII) was studied in the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161). Cultures grown under green light of 15 microeinsteins per square meter per second (PSII light; absorbed predominantly by the phycobilisomes) exhibited a PSII/PSI ratio of 0.26 ± 0.05. Under red light (PSI light; absorbed primarily by chlorophyll) of comparable quantum flux, cells contained nearly five times as many PSII per PSI (1.21 ± 0.10), and three times as many PSII per cell. About 12% of the chlorophyll was attributed to PSII in green light, 22% in white light, and 39% in red light-grown cultures. Chlorophyll antenna sizes appeared to remain constant at about 75 chlorophyll per PSII and 140 per PSI. Spectral quality had little effect on cell content or composition of the phycobilisomes, thus the number of PSII per phycobilisome was substantially greater in red light-grown cultures (4.2 ± 0.6) than in those grown under green (1.6 ± 0.3) or white light (2.9 ± 0.1). Total photosystems (PSI + PSII) per phycobilisome remained at about eight in each case. Carotenoid content and composition was little affected by the spectral composition of the growth light. Zeaxanthin comprised more than 50% (mole/mole), β-carotene about 40%, and cryptoxanthin about 4% of the carotenoid pigment. Despite marked changes in the light-harvesting apparatus, red and green light-grown cultures have generation times equal to that of cultures grown under white light of only one-third the quantum flux. PMID:16667597

  14. Introduction to Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that there are ways to control bed bugs. Getting good, solid information is the first step in both prevention and control. While there is no chemical quick fix, there are effective strategies to control bed bugs involving both non-chemical and chemical methods. Bed bugs can be hard to find and ...

  15. Diversity of viral photosystem-I psaA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevroni, Gur; Enav, Hagay; Rohwer, Forest; Béjà, Oded

    2015-08-01

    Marine photosynthesis is one of the major contributors to the global carbon cycle and the world's oxygen supply. This process is largely driven by cyanobacteria, namely Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Genes encoding photosystem-II (PSII) reaction center proteins are found in many cyanophage genomes, and are expressed during the infection of their hosts. On the basis of metagenomics, cyanophage photosystem-I (PSI) gene cassettes were recently discovered with two gene arrangements psaJF→C→A→B→K→E→D and psaD→C→A→B. It was suggested that the horizontal transfer of PSII and PSI genes is increasing phage fitness. To better understand their diversity, we designed degenerate primers to cover a wide diversity of organisms, and using PCR we targeted the psaC→A arrangement, which is unique to cyanophages cassettes. We examined viral concentrates from four islands in the Pacific Ocean and found samples containing the psaC→A arrangement. Analyses of the amplified viral psaA gene revealed six subgroups varying in their level of similarity and %G+C content, suggesting that the diversity of cyanophage PSI genes is greater than originally thought.

  16. Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs was developed by the Federal Bed Bug Workgroup to clarify the federal role in bed bug control and highlight ways that government, community, academia and private industry can work together on bed bug issues.

  17. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero.

  18. Chlorophyll composition and photochemical activity of photosystems detached from chloroplast grana and stroma lamellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, R A; French, C S

    1973-07-01

    A stroma fraction that has photosystem 1 activity and grana lamellae fractions that have activities for both photosystems were isolated by differential centrifugation of a needle valve homogenate. Subsequent fractions, corresponding to photosystems 1 (F-1D) and 2 (F-2D) were isolated by digitonin treatment of the grana lamellae (P-10K) and compared with respect to their chlorophyll composition and electron transport activities.Fraction F-2D from grana lamellae having photosystem 2 activity is primarily active in photosystem 2 and contains only the four major forms of chlorophyll a with a predominance of chlorophyll a 677 nm. This fraction differs from the original grana membranes in the absence of the longwavelength form of chlorophyll a and in the widening of the absorption band of chlorophyll a 682 nm from 10.9 to 15.6 nm.Photosystem 1 particles from grana and stroma both have high photosystem 1 activity but differ from each other in the proportions of the four major forms of chlorophyll a. The short-wavelength forms of chlorophyll a and also chlorophyll b 650 nm in particles from grana lamellae comprise relatively more total area than these same forms in the particles from stroma. In addition, the fraction corresponding to photosystem 1 from grana lamellae is not shifted to the long-wavelength side of the main absorption maximum, as compared to the photosystem 2 particles from grana and the original grana membrane fraction; this is usually observed in fractions that have photosystem 1 activity. Furthermore, the longest wavelength form of chlorophyll a in the photosystem 1 particles from grana is at 700 nm, while in the same fraction from stroma, it is at 706 nm.The half-width of the four main forms of chlorophyll a and both forms of chlorophyll b in the photosystem 1 fraction from grana is narrower than that of the corresponding forms in the same fraction from stroma. This may indicate a different packing of pigment molecules that are aggregated on the surface

  19. Consequences of Modification of Photosystem Stoichiometry and Amount in Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Willem [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The proposed research seeks to address two interconnected, important questions that impact photosynthetic processes and that reflect key differences between the photosynthetic systems of cyanobacteria and plants or algae. The first question is what are the reasons and consequences of the high photosystem I / photosystem II (PS I/PS II) ratio in many cyanobacteria, vs. a ratio that is close to unity in many plants and algae. The corresponding hypothesis is that most of PS I functions in cyclic electron transport, and that reduction in PS I will result primarily in a shortage of ATP rather than reducing power. This hypothesis will be tested by reducing the amount of PS I by changing the promoter region of the psaAB operon in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and generating a range of mutants with different PS I content and thereby different PS I/PS II ratios, with some of the mutants having a PS II/PS I ratio closer to that in plants. The resulting mutants will be probed in terms of their growth rates, electron transfer rates, and P700 redox kinetics. A second question relates to a Mehler-type reaction catalyzed by two flavoproteins, Flv1 and Flv3, that accept electrons from PS I and that potentially function as an electron safety valve leading to no useful purpose of the photosynthesis-generated electrons. The hypothesis to be tested is that Flv1 and Flv3 use the electrons for useful purposes such as cyclic electron flow around PS I. This hypothesis will be tested by analysis of a mutant strain lacking flv3, the gene for one of the flavoproteins. This research is important for a more detailed understanding of the consequences of photosystem stoichiometry and amounts in a living system. Such an understanding is critical for not only insights in the regulatory systems of the organism but also to guide the development of biological or bio-hybrid systems for solar energy conversion into fuels.

  20. Wiring photosystem I for direct solar hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubner, Carolyn E; Grimme, Rebecca; Bryant, Donald A; Golbeck, John H

    2010-01-26

    The generation of H(2) by the use of solar energy is a promising way to supply humankind's energy needs while simultaneously mitigating environmental concerns that arise due to climate change. The challenge is to find a way to connect a photochemical module that harnesses the sun's energy to a catalytic module that generates H(2) with high quantum yields and rates. In this review, we describe a technology that employs a "molecular wire" to connect a terminal [4Fe-4S] cluster of Photosystem I directly to a catalyst, which can be either a Pt nanoparticle or the distal [4Fe-4S] cluster of an [FeFe]- or [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzyme. The keys to connecting these two moieties are surface-located cysteine residues, which serve as ligands to Fe-S clusters and which can be changed through site-specific mutagenesis to glycine residues, and the use of a molecular wire terminated in sulfhydryl groups to connect the two modules. The sulfhydryl groups at the end of the molecular wire form a direct chemical linkage to a suitable catalyst or can chemically rescue a [4Fe-4S] cluster, thereby generating a strong coordination bond. Specifically, the molecular wire can connect the F(B) iron-sulfur cluster of Photosystem I either to a Pt nanoparticle or, by using the same type of genetic modification, to the differentiated iron atom of the distal [4Fe-4S].(Cys)(3)(Gly) cluster of hydrogenase. When electrons are supplied by a sacrificial donor, this technology forms the cathode of a photochemical half-cell that evolves H(2) when illuminated. If such a device were connected to the anode of a photochemical half-cell that oxidizes water, an in vitro solar energy converter could be realized that generates only O(2) and H(2) in the light. A similar methodology can be used to connect Photosystem I to other redox proteins that have surface-located [4Fe-4S] clusters. The controlled light-driven production of strong reductants by such systems can be used to produce other biofuels or to provide

  1. Radiolytic mapping of solvent-contact surfaces in Photosystem II of higher plants: experimental identification of putative water channels within the photosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Laurie K; Sallans, Larry; Bellamy, Henry; Goettert, Jost S; Limbach, Patrick A; Bricker, Terry M

    2013-08-09

    Photosystem II uses water as an enzymatic substrate. It has been hypothesized that this water is vectored to the active site for water oxidation via water channels that lead from the surface of the protein complex to the Mn4O5Ca metal cluster. The radiolysis of water by synchrotron radiation produces amino acid residue-modifying OH(•) and is a powerful technique to identify regions of proteins that are in contact with water. In this study, we have used this technique to oxidatively modify buried amino acid residues in higher plant Photosystem II membranes. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was then used to identify these oxidized amino acid residues that were located in several core Photosystem II subunits (D1, D2, CP43, and CP47). While, as expected, the majority of the identified oxidized residues (≈75%) are located on the solvent-exposed surface of the complex, a number of buried residues on these proteins were also modified. These residues form groups which appear to lead from the surface of the complex to the Mn4O5Ca cluster. These residues may be in contact with putative water channels in the photosystem. These results are discussed within the context of a number of largely computational studies that have identified putative water channels in Photosystem II.

  2. Enhanced photocurrent production by photosystem I with modified viologen derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanoi, Yoshinori, E-mail: yamanoi@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Terasaki, Nao [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 807-1 Shuku-machi, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Miyachi, Mariko [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Yasunori [Department of Applied Biological Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Nishihara, Hiroshi, E-mail: nisihara@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the construction of a photogenerated electron transfer system based on photosystem I (PSI) and modified molecular wires. Gold electrode surfaces were functionalized with sodium 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate and the 2,2 Prime -dimethyl-4,4 Prime -bipyridine cation to form a self-assembled monolayer, which enabled the subsequent immobilization of PSI. A higher photocurrent was observed in the presence of sodium ascorbate as an electron donor under irradiation at 680 nm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular wire was prepared by stepwise alkylation of 2,2 Prime -dimethyl-4,4 Prime -bipridine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidation potentials of the modified molecular wire shifted negatively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified gold electrode showed a higher current density than that of previous system.

  3. Mechanisms of light harvesting by photosystem II in plants

    CERN Document Server

    Amarnath, Kapil; Schneider, Anna R; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    Light harvesting by photosystem II (PSII) in plants is highly efficient and acclimates to rapid changes in the intensity of sunlight. However, the mechanisms of PSII light harvesting have remained experimentally inaccessible. Using a structure-based model of excitation energy flow in 200 nanometer (nm) x 200 nm patches of the grana membrane, where PSII is located, we accurately simulated chlorophyll fluorescence decay data with no free parameters. Excitation movement through the light harvesting antenna is diffusive, but becomes subdiffusive in the presence of charge separation at reaction centers. The influence of membrane morphology on light harvesting efficiency is determined by the excitation diffusion length of 50 nm in the antenna. Our model provides the basis for understanding how nonphotochemical quenching mechanisms affect PSII light harvesting in grana membranes.

  4. Robustness and Optimality of Light Harvesting in Cyanobacterial Photosystem I

    CERN Document Server

    Sener, M K; Ritz, T; Park, S; Fromme, P; Schulten, K; Sener, Melih K.; Lu, Deyu; Ritz, Thorsten; Park, Sanghyun; Fromme, Petra; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    As most biological species, photosynthetic lifeforms have evolved to function optimally, despite thermal disorder and with fault tolerance. It remains a challenge to understand how this is achieved. To address this challenge the function of the protein-pigment complex photosystem I (PSI) of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is investigated theoretically. The recently obtained high resolution structure of this complex exhibits an aggregate of 96 chlorophylls that are electronically coupled to function as a light-harvesting antenna complex. This paper constructs an effective Hamiltonian for the chlorophyll aggregate to describe excitation transfer dynamics and spectral properties of PSI. For this purpose, a new kinetic expansion method, the sojourn expansion, is introduced. Our study shows that at room temperature fluctuations of site energies have little effect on the calculated excitation lifetime and quantum yield, which compare favorably with experimental results. The efficiency of the system is fo...

  5. Influence of calcium ion on photosystem Ⅱ oxygen evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜林方; 孙逊; 潘用华; 林宏辉; 梁厚果

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of photosystem Ⅱ particles with NaCl-washings,low-pH washings or detergentOG-solubilizings inhibited oxygen evolution and the inhibition was reversed by addition of exogenous Ca2+.Dynamic analysis with Ca2+reconstitution revealed two Ca2+binding sites with different affinities in theNaCl-washed PS Ⅱ particles or in the low-pH-treated ones.Oxygen-evolving PS Ⅱ core complex also con-tained the high and low affinity Ca2+binding sites.Ca2+enhanced the intensity of fluorescence emission of PSⅡ core complex.These results suggest that calcium play two roles in PS Ⅱ,the low affinity Ca2+is associ-ated with energy transfer while the high affinity Ca2+is concerned with water splitting reaction.

  6. Long-range coherent energy transport in Photosystem II

    CERN Document Server

    Roden, Jan J J; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the long-range inter-complex electronic energy transfer in Photosystem II -- from the antenna complex, via a core complex, to the reaction center -- using a non-Markovian (ZOFE) quantum master equation description that allows us to quantify the electronic coherence involved in the energy transfer. We identify the pathways of the energy transfer in the network of coupled chromophores, using a description based on excitation probability currents. We investigate how the energy transfer depends on the initial excitation -- localized, coherent initial excitation versus delocalized, incoherent initial excitation -- and find that the energy transfer is remarkably robust with respect to such strong variations of the initial condition. To explore the importance of vibrationally enhanced transfer and to address the question of optimization in the system parameters, we vary the strength of the coupling between the electronic and the vibrational degrees of freedom. We find that the original parameters lie in ...

  7. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50 over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m ', indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect

  8. Antenna entropy in plant photosystems does not reduce the free energy for primary charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the concept of the so-called "antenna entropy" of higher plant photosystems. Several interesting points emerge: 1. In the case of a photosystemwhich harbours an excited state, the “antenna entropy” is equivalent to the configurational (mixing) entropy of a thermodynamic canonical ensemble. The energy associated with this parameter has been calculated for a hypothetical isoenergetic photosystem, photosystem I and photosystem II, and comes out in the range of 3.5 - 8% of the photon energy considering 680 nm. 2. The “antenna entropy” seems to be a rather unique thermodynamic phenomenon, in as much as it does not modify the free energy available for primary photochemistry, as has been previously suggested. 3. It is underlined that this configurational (mixing) entropy, unlike heat dispersal in a thermal system, does not involve energy dilution. This points out an important difference between thermal and electronic energy dispersal.

  9. Molecular design of the photosystem II light-harvesting antenna: photosynthesis and photoprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Horton; Alexander Ruban

    The photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting system carries out two essential functions, the efficient collection of light energy for photosynthesis, and the regulated dissipation of excitation energy in excess of that which can be used...

  10. Photosystem 0, a proposed ancestral photosystem without reducing power that synthesizes ATP during light-dark cycling

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, A W J

    2005-01-01

    Photosystem 0 is a proposed membrane-based mechanism for free energy gain as ATP from fluctuating light. The PS0 reaction centers have no reducing power: charge transport is only temporary. Light induces within the reaction centers metastable dipoles that generate a membrane potential that drives ATP synthesis while protons move through the ATPsynthase enzyme. After the decay of the dipole potential in the dark, the protons either (1) return across the membrane by conduction or (2) are pumped back by ATPsynthase, backwards active as ATPase at a higher H+/ATP ratio. PS0 constitutes a link to previously proposed free energy sources for early evolution that work on thermal cycling. Several contemporary photosynthetic phenomena may be relics of PS0.

  11. Constitution and energetics of photosystem I and photosystem II in the chlorophyll d-dominated cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    This mini review presents current topics of discussion about photosystem (PS) I and PS II of photosynthesis in the Acaryochloris marina. A. marina is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium in which chlorophyll (Chl) d is the major antenna pigment (>95%). However, Chl a is always present in a few percent. Chl d absorbs light with a wavelength up to 30 nm red-shifted from Chl a. Therefore, the chlorophyll species of the special pair in PS II has been a matter of debate because if Chl d was the special pair component, the overall energetics must be different in A. marina. The history of this field indicates that a purified sample is necessary for the reliable identification and characterization of the special pair. In view of the spectroscopic data and the redox potential of pheophytin, we discuss the nature of special pair constituents and the localization of the enigmatic Chl a.

  12. Light saturation curves show competence of the water splitting complex in inactive Photosystem II reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbal, L; Gibas, C; Whitmarsh, J

    1991-12-01

    Photosystem II complexes of higher plants are structurally and functionally heterogeneous. While the only clearly defined structural difference is that Photosystem II reaction centers are served by two distinct antenna sizes, several types of functional heterogeneity have been demonstrated. Among these is the observation that in dark-adapted leaves of spinach and pea, over 30% of the Photosystem II reaction centers are unable to reduce plastoquinone to plastoquinol at physiologically meaningful rates. Several lines of evidence show that the impaired reaction centers are effectively inactive, because the rate of oxidation of the primary quinone acceptor, QA, is 1000 times slower than in normally active reaction centers. However, there are conflicting opinions and data over whether inactive Photosystem II complexes are capable of oxidizing water in the presence of certain artificial electron acceptors. In the present study we investigated whether inactive Photosystem II complexes have a functional water oxidizing system in spinach thylakoid membranes by measuring the flash yield of water oxidation products as a function of flash intensity. At low flash energies (less that 10% saturation), selected to minimize double turnovers of reaction centers, we found that in the presence of the artificial quinone acceptor, dichlorobenzoquinone (DCBQ), the yield of proton release was enhanced 20±2% over that observed in the presence of dimethylbenzoquinone (DMBQ). We argue that the extra proton release is from the normally inactive Photosystem II reaction centers that have been activated in the presence of DCBQ, demonstrating their capacity to oxidize water in repetitive flashes, as concluded by Graan and Ort (Biochim Biophys Acta (1986) 852: 320-330). The light saturation curves indicate that the effective antenna size of inactive reaction centers is 55±12% the size of active Photosystem II centers. Comparison of the light saturation dependence of steady state oxygen evolution

  13. Effects of light, food availability and temperature stress on the function of photosystem II and photosystem I of coral symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia O Hoogenboom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reef corals are heterotrophic coelenterates that achieve high productivity through their photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts. Excessive seawater temperature destabilises this symbiosis and causes corals to "bleach," lowering their photosynthetic capacity. Bleaching poses a serious threat to the persistence of coral reefs on a global scale. Despite expanding research on the causes of bleaching, the mechanisms remain a subject of debate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study determined how light and food availability modulate the effects of temperature stress on photosynthesis in two reef coral species. We quantified the activities of Photosystem II, Photosystem I and whole chain electron transport under combinations of normal and stressful growth temperatures, moderate and high light levels and the presence or absence of feeding of the coral hosts. Our results show that PS1 function is comparatively robust against temperature stress in both species, whereas PS2 and whole chain electron transport are susceptible to temperature stress. In the symbiotic dinoflagellates of Stylophora pistillata the contents of chlorophyll and major photosynthetic complexes were primarily affected by food availability. In Turbinaria reniformis growth temperature was the dominant influence on the contents of the photosynthetic complexes. In both species feeding the host significantly protected photosynthetic function from high temperature stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings support the photoinhibition model of coral bleaching and demonstrate that PS1 is not a major site for thermal damage during bleaching events. Feeding mitigates bleaching in two scleractinian corals, so that reef responses to temperature stresses will likely be influenced by the coinciding availabilities of prey for the host.

  14. Quality control of photosystem II: lipid peroxidation accelerates photoinhibition under excessive illumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie Chan

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses lower the efficiency of photosynthesis and sometimes cause irreversible damage to plant functions. When spinach thylakoids and Photosystem II membranes were illuminated with excessive visible light (100-1,000 µmol photons m(-1 s(-1 for 10 min at either 20°C or 30°C, the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II decreased as the light intensity and temperature increased. Reactive oxygen species and endogenous cationic radicals produced through a photochemical reaction at and/or near the reaction center have been implicated in the damage to the D1 protein. Here we present evidence that lipid peroxidation induced by the illumination is involved in the damage to the D1 protein and the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II. This is reasoned from the results that considerable lipid peroxidation occurred in the thylakoids in the light, and that lipoxygenase externally added in the dark induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity in the thylakoids, production of singlet oxygen, which was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping, and damage to the D1 protein, in parallel with lipid peroxidation. Modification of the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II by malondialdehyde as well as oxidation of the subunits was also observed. We suggest that mainly singlet oxygen formed through lipid peroxidation under light stress participates in damaging the Photosystem II subunits.

  15. Characterization of a Purified Photosystem II-Phycobilisome Particle Preparation from Porphyridium cruentum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereskin, Barbara M.; Clement-Metral, Jenny D.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1985-01-01

    Detergent preparations isolated from thylakoids of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, in a sucrose, phosphate, citrate, magnesium chloride medium consist of phycobilisomes and possess high rates of photosystem II activity. Characterization of these particles shows that the O2-evolving activity is stable for several hours and the pH optimum is about 6.5 to 7.2. Response of the system to light, electron donors and acceptors, and inhibitors verify that the observed activity, measured both as O2 evolution and 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reduction, is due to photosystem II. Furthermore, photosystem II is functionally coupled to the phycobilisome in this preparation since green light, absorbed by phycobilisomes of P. cruentum, is effective in promoting both O2 evolution and 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reduction. Photosystem II activity declines when light with wavelengths shorter than 665 nm is removed. Both 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and atrazine inhibit photosystem II activity in this preparation, indicating that the herbicide binding site is a component of the photosystem II-phycobilisome particle. PMID:16664110

  16. Fluidized bed calciner apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Thomas J.; Klem, Jr., Michael J.; Cash, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

  17. Dual diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Dual diagnosis denotes intertwining of intellectual disabilities with mental disorders. With the help of systematic examination of literature, intellectual disabilities are determined (they are characterized by subaverage intellectual activity and difficulties in adaptive skills), along side mental disorders. Their influence is seen in changes of thinking, perception, emotionality, behaviour and cognition. Mental disorders often occur with people with intellectual disabilities (data differs f...

  18. QCD Dual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We uncover a novel solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for QCD. Interestingly in the perturbative regime the new gauge theory, if interpreted as a possible QCD dual, predicts the critical number of flavors above which QCD in the nonperturbative regime, develops an infrared stable...... fixed point. Remarkably this value is identical to the maximum bound predicted in the nonpertubative regime via the all-orders conjectured beta function for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories.......We uncover a novel solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for QCD. Interestingly in the perturbative regime the new gauge theory, if interpreted as a possible QCD dual, predicts the critical number of flavors above which QCD in the nonperturbative regime, develops an infrared stable...

  19. Localization of cyanobacterial photosystem II donor-side subunits by electron microscopy and the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in the thylakoid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhl, Helena; Rögner, Matthias; Breemen, Jan F.L. van; Boekema, Egbert J.

    1999-01-01

    A large set of electron microscopy projections of photosystem II (PSII) dimers isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus was characterized by single particle image analysis. In addition to previously published maps at lower resolution [Boekema, E.J., Hankamer, B., Bald, D., Kruip, J.,

  20. (Unraveling photosystems): Progress report, July 1, 1982-June 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogorad, L.

    1983-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to identify and characterize genes for components of the photosynthetic apparatus - especially genes for components of photosystem II (PS II). During the past year two atrazine resistant mutants of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans R-2 have been isolated and partially characterized. Thylakoid membranes have been prepared from these cells as well as from wild type cells and their rates of oxygen evolution measured in the presence and absence of atrazine. The I/sub 50/ for the two mutants was approximately 2 x 10/sup -8/M whereas for wild type cells it was 7.5 x 10/sup -10/M. Visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the mutant and wild type cells have been compared. One of the mutants possesses spectra similar to the wild type while the second mutant does not. The latter mutant appears to have increased absorption peaks due to phycocyanin and allophycocyanin. DNA has been purified from both atrazine resistant mutants and used to transform wild type cells to atrazine resistance. Transformation of cells to the resistant phenotype is reproducible although the frequency of transformation varies. ''Mutant DNA'' subjected to restriction enzyme cleavage prior to use for transformation yields transformants but the frequency is generally about one order of magnitude lower than with uncut DNA. 54 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Structure/Function/Dynamics of Photosystem II Plastoquinone Binding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, Maya D.; Russo, Daniela; Polticelli, Fabio; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Antonacci, Amina; Zobnina, Veranika; Campi, Gaetano; Rea, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) continuously attracts the attention of researchers aiming to unravel the riddle of its functioning and efficiency fundamental for all life on Earth. Besides, an increasing number of biotechnological applications have been envisaged exploiting and mimicking the unique properties of this macromolecular pigment-protein complex. The PSII organization and working principles have inspired the design of electrochemical water splitting schemes and charge separating triads in energy storage systems as well as biochips and sensors for environmental, agricultural and industrial screening of toxic compounds. An intriguing opportunity is the development of sensor devices, exploiting native or manipulated PSII complexes or ad hoc synthesized polypeptides mimicking the PSII reaction centre proteins as bio-sensing elements. This review offers a concise overview of the recent improvements in the understanding of structure and function of PSII donor side, with focus on the interactions of the plastoquinone cofactors with the surrounding environment and operational features. Furthermore, studies focused on photosynthetic proteins structure/function/dynamics and computational analyses aimed at rational design of high-quality bio-recognition elements in biosensor devices are discussed. PMID:24678671

  2. Directed mutagenesis as a probe of photosystem II function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowlby, N.; Sithole, I.; McIntosh, L. (MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (USA)); James, J.; Babcock, G. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Several mutants of Synechocystis 6803 have been generated by site-directed mutagenesis of psbA and psbD in order to study the roles of the D1 and D2 proteins during H{sub 2}O oxidation. Of key importance to these studies is the analysis of PSII electron transfer components such as Y{sub Z}{sup +} and Y{sub D}{sup +}, and the identification of possible ligands to Mn and Ca. Detailed information can be gained through EPR spectroscopy, however, sensitivity is limited by the PSII concentration of the sample. A simple procedure for the purification of PSII from this cyanobacterium, in sufficient amounts for EPR studies, will be presented. Preliminary results from mutant analysis extend the characterization of the two tyrosine radicals and suggest an important structural role for Pro{sup 162} of D1 and Pro{sup 161} of D2 in the ability of the photosystem to form the radical species on the adjacent tyrosine residues Tyr{sup 161} and Tyr{sup 160} on D1 and D2 respectively.

  3. Origins of Water Molecules in the Photosystem II Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Ikeda, Takuya; Saito, Keisuke; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2017-06-20

    The cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) crystal structure includes more than 1300 water molecules in each monomer unit; however, their precise roles in water oxidation are unclear. To understand the origins of water molecules in the PSII crystal structure, the accessibility of bulk water molecules to channel inner spaces in PSII was investigated using the water-removed PSII structure and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The inner space of the channel that proceeds toward the D1-Glu65/D2-Glu312 pair (E65/E312 channel) was entirely filled with water molecules from the bulk region. In the same channel, a diamond-shaped cluster of water molecules formed near redox-active TyrZ in MD simulations. Reorientation of the D2-Leu352 side chain resulted in formation of a hexagonal water network at the Cl(-)2 binding site. Water molecules could not enter the main region of the O4-water chain, which proceeds from the O4 site of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. However, in the O4-water chain, the two water binding sites that are most distant from the protein bulk surface were occupied by water molecules that approached along the E65/E312 channel, one of which formed an H-bond with the O4 site. These findings provide key insights into the significance of the channel ends, which may utilize water molecules during the PSII photocycle.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Photosystem Ⅱ of Porphyra yezoensis Ueda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Quan GAO; Guang-Ce WANG; Cheng-Kui TSENG

    2004-01-01

    The thylakoid membranes were isolated and purified from gametophyte ofPorphyra yezoensis Ueda (P. yezoensis) by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. After P.yezoensis gametophyte thylakoid membranes were solubilized with SDS, the photosystem Ⅱ (PSII) particles were isolated and purified. The activity of PSII particles was determined with DCIP (2,6-dichloroindophenol) photoreduction reaction. The composition of purified PSII particles was detected by SDS-PAGE. As a result, seven proteins including 55 kD protein, 47 kD protein, 43 kD protein, 33 kD protein, 31 kD protein, 29 kD protein, and 18 kD protein were found. Compared with PSII particles of higher plants and other algae, they were identified as D1/D2 complex, CP47, CP43, 33 kD protein, D1, D2 and cyt c-550 respectively. Besides, other three new proteins of 20 kD, 16 kD and 14 kD respectively were found. Among these extrinsic proteins, the 16 kD and 14 kD proteins had not been reported previously, and the 20 kD protein was found for the first time in multicellular red algae.

  5. Dynamics of the Special Pair of Chlorophylls of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narzi, Daniele; Bovi, Daniele; De Gaetano, Pietro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2016-01-13

    Cholophylls are at the basis of the photosynthetic energy conversion mechanisms in algae, plants, and cyanobacteria. In photosystem II, the photoproduced electrons leave a special pair of chlorophylls (namely, P(D1) and P(D2)) that becomes cationic. This oxidizing pair [P(D1),P(D2)](+), in turn, triggers a cascade of oxidative events, eventually leading to water splitting and oxygen evolution. In the present work, using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we investigate the electronic structure and the dynamics of the P(D1)P(D2) special pair in both its oxidized and reduced states. In agreement with previously reported static calculations, the symmetry between the two chlorophylls was found to be broken, the positive charge being preferentially located on P(D1). Nevertheless, this study reveals for the first time that large charge fluctuations occur along dynamics, temporarily inverting the charge preference for the two branches. Finally, a vibrational analysis pinpointed that such charge fluctuations are strongly coupled to specific modes of the special pair.

  6. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  7. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  8. Protein film photoelectrochemistry of the water oxidation enzyme photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Zhang, Jenny Z; Paul, Nicholas; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-09-21

    Photosynthesis is responsible for the sunlight-powered conversion of carbon dioxide and water into chemical energy in the form of carbohydrates and the release of O2 as a by-product. Although many proteins are involved in photosynthesis, the fascinating machinery of Photosystem II (PSII) is at the heart of this process. This tutorial review describes an emerging technique named protein film photoelectrochemistry (PF-PEC), which allows for the light-dependent activity of PSII adsorbed onto an electrode surface to be studied. The technique is straightforward to use, does not require highly specialised and/or expensive equipment, is highly selective for the active fractions of the adsorbed enzyme, and requires a small amount of enzyme sample. The use of PF-PEC to study PSII can yield insights into its activity, stability, quantum yields, redox behaviour, and interfacial electron transfer pathways. It can also be used in PSII inhibition studies and chemical screening, which may prove useful in the development of biosensors. PSII PF-PEC cells also serve as proof-of-principle solar water oxidation systems; here, a comparison is made against PSII-inspired synthetic photocatalysts and materials for artificial photosynthesis.

  9. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  10. Bed Bugs FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bed bugs have been found in five-star hotels and resorts and their presence is not determined ... sleep. These areas include apartments, shelters, rooming houses, hotels, cruise ships, buses, trains, and dorm rooms. They ...

  11. Moving-bed sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, R.E.; Gupta, R.P.; Chuck, T.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to develop mixed-metal oxide sorbent formulations that are suitable for moving-bed, high-temperature, desulfurization of coal gas. Work continues on zinc titanates formulations and Z-sorb III sorbent.

  12. Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its purpose is to help states, communities, and consumers in efforts to prevent and control bed bug infestations. Currently includes only reviewed material from federal/state/local government agencies, extension services, and universities.

  13. Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    How to deal with bed bugs in one printable page. Ten tips include ensuring correct insect identification, reducing clutter, understand integrated pest management, using mattress and box spring encasements, and heat treatment.

  14. Developments in fluidized bed conversion of solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leckner Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary is given on the development of fluidized bed conversion (combustion and gasification of solid fuels. First, gasification is mentioned, following the line of development from the Winkler gasifier to recent designs. The combustors were initially bubbling beds, which were found unsuitable for combustion of coal because of various drawbacks, but they proved more useful for biomass where these drawbacks were absent. Instead, circulating fluidized bed boilers became the most important coal converters, whose design now is quite mature, and presently the increments in size and efficiency are the most important development tasks. The new modifications of these conversion devices are related to CO2 capture. Proposed methods with this purpose, involving fluidized bed, are single-reactor systems like oxy-fuel combustion, and dual-reactor systems, including also indirect biomass gasifiers.

  15. Ultraviolet-B induced damage to photosystem II in intact filaments of Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolli, B.K.; Tiwari, S.; Mohanty, P. [Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). Schoof of Life Sciences

    1998-05-01

    When Spirulina platensis filaments were exposed to 0.75 mW x m{sup -2} x s{sup -1} of ultraviolet-B radiation (the ultraviolet-B radiation under clear sky condition is {proportional_to}1.0 mW x m{sup -2} x s{sup -1}), an inhibition in photosystem II activity was observed, the inhibition being 90% after 90 min exposure. Upon exposure to ultraviolet-B, the room temperature emission characteristics of Spirulina cells were altered when excited with light primarily absorbed by chlorophyll a or phycobilisomes. When the cells were exposed for 3 h the emission at 685 nm (F{sub 685}), when excited at 440 nm (primarily chlorophyll a absorption), was enhanced compared to 715 nm (F{sub 715}) band of photosystem I suggesting a decrease in energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I. Similarly, when the cells were excited at 580 nm (primarily the phycobilisomes), the ratio of emission intensity at 685 nm (F{sub 685}) to that of 655 nm (F{sub 655}) was decreased in the exposed cells. This change in emission characteristics seems to be linked with the uncoupling of the energy transfer from all phycocyanin to chlorophyll a of photosystem II. A small shift in emission peak positions was also indicated when excited either at 440 nm or 580 nm. (orig./AJ)

  16. Estimation of oxygen evolution by marine phytoplankton from measurement of the efficiency of Photosystem II electron flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, C.; Versluis, W.; Snel, J.F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relation between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and Photosystem II electron transport was investigated for the marine algae t Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Tetraselmis sp., t Isochrysis sp. and t Rhodomonas sp.. The rate of Photosystem II electron transport was estimated fr

  17. Circular spectropolarimetric sensing of chiral photosystems in decaying leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patty, C. H. Lucas; Visser, Luuk J. J.; Ariese, Freek; Buma, Wybren Jan; Sparks, William B.; van Spanning, Rob J. M.; Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Snik, Frans

    2017-03-01

    Circular polarization spectroscopy has proven to be an indispensable tool in photosynthesis research and (bio)molecular research in general. Oxygenic photosystems typically display an asymmetric Cotton effect around the chlorophyll absorbance maximum with a signal ≤ 1 % . In vegetation, these signals are the direct result of the chirality of the supramolecular aggregates. The circular polarization is thus directly influenced by the composition and architecture of the photosynthetic macrodomains, and is thereby linked to photosynthetic functioning. Although ordinarily measured only on a molecular level, we have developed a new spectropolarimetric instrument, TreePol, that allows for both laboratory and in-the-field measurements. Through spectral multiplexing, TreePol is capable of fast measurements with a sensitivity of ∼ 1 *10-4 and is therefore suitable of non-destructively probing the molecular architecture of whole plant leaves. We have measured the chiroptical evolution of Hedera helix leaves for a period of 22 days. Spectrally resolved circular polarization measurements (450-900 nm) on whole leaves in transmission exhibit a strong decrease in the polarization signal over time after plucking, which we accredit to the deterioration of chiral macro-aggregates. Chlorophyll a levels measured over the same period by means of UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy showed a much smaller decrease. With these results we are able to distinguish healthy from deteriorating leaves. Hereby we indicate the potency of circular polarization spectroscopy on whole and intact leaves as a nondestructive tool for structural and plant stress assessment. Additionally, we underline the establishment of circular polarization signals as remotely accessible means of detecting the presence of extraterrestrial life.

  18. Consequences of Decreased Light Harvesting Capability on Photosystem II Function in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Aparna; Page, Lawrence E.; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria use large pigment-protein complexes called phycobilisomes to harvest light energy primarily for photosystem II (PSII). We used a series of mutants with partial to complete reduction of phycobilisomes to examine the effects of antenna truncation on photosystem function in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The antenna mutants CB, CK, and PAL expressed increasing levels of functional PSII centers to compensate for the loss of phycobilisomes, with a concomitant decrease in photosystem I (PSI). This increased PSII titer led to progressively higher oxygen evolution rates on a per chlorophyll basis. The mutants also exhibited impaired S-state transition profiles for oxygen evolution. Additionally, P700+ re-reduction rates were impacted by antenna reduction. Thus, a decrease in antenna size resulted in overall physiological changes in light harvesting and delivery to PSII as well as changes in downstream electron transfer to PSI. PMID:25513759

  19. Three-dimensional structure of photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongates in complex with terbutryn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G., E-mail: azat@vega.protes.ru; Dontsova, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Protein Research (Russian Federation); Saenger, W. [Free University of Berlin, Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry/Crystallography (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Photosystem II is a key component of the photosynthetic pathway producing oxygen at the thylakoid membrane of cyanobacteria, green algae, and plants. The three-dimensional structure of photosystem II from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongates in a complex with herbicide terbutryn (a photosynthesis inhibitor) was determined for the first time by X-ray diffraction and refined at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution (R{sub factor} = 26.9%, R{sub free} = 29.9%, rmsd for bond lengths is 0.013 Angstrom-Sign , and rmsd for bond angles is 2.2 Degree-Sign ). The terbutryn molecule was located in the binding pocket of the mobile plastoquinone. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of photosystem II in a complex with terbutryn were deposited in the Protein Data Bank.

  20. Ultrafast infrared observation of exciton equilibration from oriented single crystals of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaucikas, Marius; Maghlaoui, Karim; Barber, Jim; Renger, Thomas; van Thor, Jasper J.

    2016-12-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, two photosystems work in series. Each of them contains a reaction centre that is surrounded by light-harvesting antennae, which absorb the light and transfer the excitation energy to the reaction centre where electron transfer reactions are driven. Here we report a critical test for two contrasting models of light harvesting by photosystem II cores, known as the trap-limited and the transfer-to-the trap-limited model. Oriented single crystals of photosystem II core complexes of Synechococcus elongatus are excited by polarized visible light and the transient absorption is probed with polarized light in the infrared. The dichroic amplitudes resulting from photoselection are maintained on the 60 ps timescale that corresponds to the dominant energy transfer process providing compelling evidence for the transfer-to-the-trap limitation of the overall light-harvesting process. This finding has functional implications for the quenching of excited states allowing plants to survive under high light intensities.

  1. Flash-induced structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments of green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Jörg; Renger, Gernot

    2009-07-07

    Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation is a promising novel pump-probe approach, which opens up new perspectives for the study of protein-membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. This is demonstrated here for the case of photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer. In contrast to the case of the model system bacteriorhodopsin, a transient reduction of the dynamics is observed approximately 160 micros after the actinic laser flash. This effect is the first observation of a modulated structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments.

  2. Bed bug deterrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Kenneth F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study in BMC Biology has determined that the immature stage of the bed bug (the nymph signals its reproductive status to adult males using pheromones and thus avoids the trauma associated with copulation in this species. The success of this nymphal strategy of deterrence is instructive. Against the background of increasing problems with bed bugs, this research raises the question whether pheromones might be used to control them. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/121

  3. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  4. The Safety of Hospital Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K.; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients’ ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients’ use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated. PMID:28462302

  5. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S.; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A.; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T.; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M.; Glownia, James M.; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S.; Lane, Thomas J.; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E.; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Waterman, David G.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I.; Brunger, Axel T.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment-protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction center with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) (Fig. 1a, Extended Data Fig. 1). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4)1, where S1 is the dark stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution2,3. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and elucidating the structures of the OEC in the different S-states, as well as the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site4-6, is a prerequisite for this purpose. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage free, room temperature (RT) structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å structure of PS II7 at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, RT measurements are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions8,9, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analog, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states10. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site10-13. Thus, this approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms. PMID:27871088

  6. MULTISTAGE FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonke, A.A.; Graae, J.E.A.; Levitz, N.M.

    1959-11-01

    A multistage fluidized bed reactor is described in which each of a number of stages is arranged with respect to an associated baffle so that a fluidizing gas flows upward and a granular solid downward through the stages and baffles, whereas the granular solid stopsflowing downward when the flow of fluidizing gas is shut off.

  7. Fluidized bed combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullendorff, A.; Wikner, J.

    1985-03-25

    The chamber is confined in a pressure vessel. The lower part of the chamber has tilted parallel gutters up to the height of the fluidized bed. The slope of the gutter walls is 5 degrees-15 degrees and the top area of the gutters is 1.3 to 3 times larger than their bottom.

  8. Bed Bug Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the truth about bed bugs, such as how easy they are to see with the naked eye, their preferred habitat, whether they transmit diseases, their public health effects, and whether pesticides are the best way to deal with an infestation.

  9. Surviving Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pregnancy — and your bed rest start a family tree that you can share with your child someday firm up your baby-name choices; use books and websites for ideas organize photo albums read anything — ... people (friends and family) whom you know will probably give gifts build ...

  10. Copper Toxicity Affects Photosystem II Electron Transport at the Secondary Quinone Acceptor, QB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Narendranath; Vass, Imre; Demeter, Sándor

    1989-01-01

    The nature of Cu2+ inhibition of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in pea (Pisum sativum L.) thylakoids was investigated monitoring Hill activity and light emission properties of photosystem II. In Cu2+-inhibited thylakoids, diphenyl carbazide addition does not relieve the loss of Hill activity. The maximum yield of fluorescence induction restored by hydroxylamine in Tris-inactivated thylakoids is markedly reduced by Cu2+. This suggests that Cu2+ does not act on the donor side of PSII but on the reaction center of PSII or on components beyond. Thermoluminescence and delayed luminescence studies show that charge recombination between the positively charged intermediate in water oxidation cycle (S2) and negatively charged primary quinone acceptor of pSII (QA−) is largely unaffected by Cu2+. The S2QB− charge recombination, however, is drastically inhibited which parallels the loss of Hill activity. This indicates that Cu2+ inhibits photosystem II photochemistry primarily affecting the function of the secondary quinone electron acceptor, QB. We suggest that Cu2+ does not block electron flow between the primary and secondary quinone acceptor but modifies the QB site in such a way that it becomes unsuitable for further photosystem II photochemistry. PMID:16666731

  11. Filling the Green Gap of a Megadalton Photosystem I Complex by Conjugation of Organic Dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordiichuk, Pavlo I; Rimmerman, Dolev; Paul, Avishek; Gautier, Daniel A; Gruszka, Agnieszka; Saller, Manfred; de Vries, Jan Willem; Wetzelaer, Gert-Jan A H; Manca, Marianna; Gomulya, Widianta; Matmor, Maayan; Gloukhikh, Ekaterina; Loznik, Mark; Ashkenasy, Nurit; Blom, Paul W M; Rögner, Matthias; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Richter, Shachar; Herrmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is Natur&s major process for converting solar into chemical energy. One of the key players' in this process is the multiprotein complex photosystem I (PSI) that through absorption of incident,photons enables electron transfer, which makes this, protein attractive for applications in b

  12. Excitation Energy Transfer and Trapping in Higher Plant Photosystem II Complexes with Different Antenna Sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffarri, Stefano; Broess, Koen; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert; Brown, Leonid S.

    2011-01-01

    We performed picosecond fluorescence measurements on well-defined Photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes from Arabidopsis with largely varying antenna sizes. The average excited-state lifetime ranged from 109 ps for PSII core to 158 ps for the largest C(2)S(2)M(2) complex in 0.01% alpha-DM. Excitation

  13. Excitation energy transfer and trapping in higher plant photosystem II complexes with different antenna sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffarri, S.; Broess, K.; Croce, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2011-01-01

    We performed picosecond fluorescence measurements on well-defined Photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes from Arabidopsis with largely varying antenna sizes. The average excited-state lifetime ranged from 109 ps for PSII core to 158 ps for the largest C2S2M2 complex in 0.01% a-DM. Excitation energy

  14. Identification of a 32-34-kilodalton polypeptide as a herbicide receptor protein in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullet, J E; Arntzen, C J

    1981-04-13

    Photosystem II particles which retained high rates of herbicide-sensitive activity were used to examine the site(s) of action of various herbicides. A polypeptide of 32-34 kdaltons was identified as the triazine-herbicide binding site based upon: (a) parallel loss of atrazine activity and the polypeptide during either trypsin treatment or selective detergent depletion of protein in the Photosystem II complex, and (b) covalent labeling of the polypeptide by a 14C-labeled photoaffinity triazine. In Photosystem II particles depleted of the 32-34-kdalton polypeptide, electron transport was still active and was slightly sensitive to DCMU and largely sensitive to dinoseb (urea and nitrophenol herbicides, respectively). On the basis of this result it is proposed that the general herbicide binding site common to atrazine, DCMU and dinoseb is formed by a minimum of two polypeptides which determine affinity and/or mediate herbicide-induced inhibition of electron transport on the acceptor side of Photosystem II.

  15. Transcriptional response of two core photosystem genes in Symbiodinium spp. exposed to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P McGinley

    Full Text Available Mutualistic symbioses between scleractinian corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp. are the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. For many coral-algal symbioses, prolonged episodes of thermal stress damage the symbiont's photosynthetic capability, resulting in its expulsion from the host. Despite the link between photosynthetic competency and symbiont expulsion, little is known about the effect of thermal stress on the expression of photosystem genes in Symbiodinium. This study used real-time PCR to monitor the transcript abundance of two important photosynthetic reaction center genes, psbA (encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II and psaA (encoding the P(700 protein of photosystem I, in four cultured isolates (representing ITS2-types A13, A20, B1, and F2 and two in hospite Symbiodinium spp. within the coral Pocillopora spp. (ITS2-types C1b-c and D1. Both cultured and in hospite Symbiodinium samples were exposed to elevated temperatures (32°C over a 7-day period and examined for changes in photochemistry and transcript abundance. Symbiodinium A13 and C1b-c (both thermally sensitive demonstrated significant declines in both psbA and psaA during the thermal stress treatment, whereas the transcript levels of the other Symbiodinium types remained stable. The downregulation of both core photosystem genes could be the result of several different physiological mechanisms, but may ultimately limit repair rates of photosynthetic proteins, rendering some Symbiodinium spp. especially susceptible to thermal stress.

  16. Continuum probe two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the photosystem II reaction center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie J. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the photosystem II reaction center, collected in the pump-probe geometry employing a continuum probe. This enables observation of ion bands that report on intermediates in the charge separation process.

  17. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-01-01

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first c

  18. Photosystem I from plants as a bacterial cytochrome P450 surrogate electron donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz de;

    2012-01-01

    ) is a multifunctional electron carrier that in plants accepts electrons from photosystem I (PSI) and facilitates photoreduction of NADP+ to NADPH mediated by ferredoxin-NAD(P)H oxidoreductase (FdR). In bacteria, the electron flow is reversed and Fdx accepts electrons from NADPH via FdR and serves as the direct electron...

  19. Photosystem II inhibitor resistance in the Columbia Basin of Washington state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato and mint (peppermint and spearmint) are commonly produced in the irrigated regions of the Pacific Northwest and both crops rely heavily on photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor herbicides metribuzin (potato) and terbacil (mint) for weed management. Seed was collected in 2010 from Powell amaranth, r...

  20. Photosystem II Supercomplexes Of Higher Plants : Isolation And Determination Of The Structural And Functional Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffarri, Stefano; Broess, Koen L.; Kereiche, Sami; Trinkunas, Gediminas; Boekema, Egbert J.; Amerongen, Herbert van; Croce, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II is a supercomplex composed of 27-28 different subunits and it represents the most important machinery of the plants photosynthetic appara- tus, having the ability to split water into oxygen, protons and electrons. In the last few years the structures of most of the photosynthetic

  1. Photosystem II electron flow as a measure for phytoplankton gross primary production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, C.

    1997-01-01

    Saturating pulse fluorescence measurements, well known from studies of higher plants for determination of photosystem II (PS II) characteristics, were applied to cultures of the green alga Dunaliella teitiolecta (Chapter 2). The actual efficiency of PS II (φ PS II ), the maximal efficienc

  2. Structural basis of cyanobacterial photosystem II Inhibition by the herbicide terbutryn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the Q(B) site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B). Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3

  3. Evidence for a trimeric organization of the photosystem I complex from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, E.J.; Dekker, J.P.; Heel, M.G. van; Rögner, M.; Saenger, W.; Witt, I.; Witt, H.T.

    1987-01-01

    A photosystem I (PS I) reaction center complex was isolated and purified from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. The complex has a molecular mass of about 600 kDa and contains 120 Chl a molecules per photoactive Chl a1 (P-700). Electron micrographs show that the PS I complex has the shape of a dis

  4. Functional analysis of Photosystem I light-harvesting complexes (Lhca) gene products of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mozzo, Milena; Mantelli, Manuela; Passarini, Francesca; Caffarri, Stefano; Croce, Roberta; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The outer antenna system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Photosystem I is composed of nine gene products, but due to difficulty in purification their individual properties are not known. In this work, the functional properties of the nine Lhca antennas of Chlamydomonas, have been investigated upon expr

  5. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  6. Multiple LHCII antennae can transfer energy efficiently to a single Photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Inge; Bland, Kaitlyn M; Tian, Lijin; Croce, Roberta; Frankel, Laurie K; van Amerongen, Herbert; Bricker, Terry M; Wientjes, Emilie

    2017-02-22

    Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) work in series to drive oxygenic photosynthesis. The two photosystems have different absorption spectra, therefore changes in light quality can lead to imbalanced excitation of the photosystems and a loss in photosynthetic efficiency. In a short-term adaptation response termed state transitions, excitation energy is directed to the light-limited photosystem. In higher plants a special pool of LHCII antennae, which can be associated with either PSI or PSII, participates in these state transitions. It is known that one LHCII antenna can associate with the PsaH site of PSI. However, membrane fractions were recently isolated in which multiple LHCII antennae appear to transfer energy to PSI. We have used time-resolved fluorescence-streak camera measurements to investigate the energy transfer rates and efficiency in these membrane fractions. Our data show that energy transfer from LHCII to PSI is relatively slow. Nevertheless, the trapping efficiency in supercomplexes of PSI with ~2.4 LHCIIs attached is 94%. The absorption cross section of PSI can thus be increased with ~65% without having significant loss in quantum efficiency. Comparison of the fluorescence dynamics of PSI-LHCII complexes, isolated in a detergent or located in their native membrane environment, indicates that the environment influences the excitation energy transfer rates in these complexes. This demonstrates the importance of studying membrane protein complexes in their natural environment.

  7. The PsbW protein stabilizes the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Cerdan, Jose G.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Toth, Tuende; Kereiche, Sami; Aseeva, Elena; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mamedov, Fikret; Funk, Christiane; Schroder, Wolfgang P.; Tóth, Tünde; Kereïche, Sami; Schröder, Wolfgang P.

    2011-01-01

    P>PsbW, a 6.1-kDa low-molecular-weight protein, is exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, and associates with the photosystem II (PSII) protein complex. In vivo and in vitro comparison of Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type plants with T-DNA insertion knock-out mutants completely lacking the PsbW protei

  8. Photosystem II functionality in barley responds dynamically to changes in leaf manganese status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Powikrowska, Marta; Krogholm, Ken Suszkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    A catalytic manganese (Mn) cluster is required for the oxidation of water in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) in plants. Despite this essential role of Mn in generating the electrons driving photosynthesis, limited information is available on how Mn deficiency affects PSII...

  9. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth...

  10. Arctic Micromonas uses protein pools and non-photochemical quenching to cope with temperature restrictions on Photosystem II protein turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Guangyan; Zimbalatti, Gabrielle; Murphy, Cole D; Barnett, Audrey B; Arsenault, Christopher M; Li, Gang; Cockshutt, Amanda M; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-02-01

    Micromonas strains of small prasinophyte green algae are found throughout the world's oceans, exploiting widely different niches. We grew arctic and temperate strains of Micromonas and compared their susceptibilities to photoinactivation of Photosystem II, their counteracting Photosystem II repair capacities, their Photosystem II content, and their induction and relaxation of non-photochemical quenching. In the arctic strain Micromonas NCMA 2099, the cellular content of active Photosystem II represents only about 50 % of total Photosystem II protein, as a slow rate constant for clearance of PsbA protein limits instantaneous repair. In contrast, the temperate strain NCMA 1646 shows a faster clearance of PsbA protein which allows it to maintain active Photosystem II content equivalent to total Photosystem II protein. Under growth at 2 °C, the arctic Micromonas maintains a constitutive induction of xanthophyll deepoxidation, shown by second-derivative whole-cell spectra, which supports strong induction of non-photochemical quenching under low to moderate light, even if xanthophyll cycling is blocked. This non-photochemical quenching, however, relaxes during subsequent darkness with kinetics nearly comparable to the temperate Micromonas NCMA 1646, thereby limiting the opportunity cost of sustained downregulation of PSII function after a decrease in light.

  11. Bathing a patient in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000427.htm Bathing a patient in bed To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some patients cannot safely leave their beds to bathe. For ...

  12. VA National Bed Control System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  13. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-06-08

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained.

  14. Virtual Test Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    project is to develop a benchmark system for evaluating models for predicting the characteristics of ocean wind waves. SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES A...transformation-scale models (i.e. models which treat the physics of waves propagating from offshore areas into the coastline). Each phase is further divided...to be assembled within the virtual test bed. Wind fields for running these tests will be obtained from Oceanweather, Inc. from a separate ONR

  15. Carbon dioxide fixation and photoevolution of hydrogen and oxygen in a mutant of Chlamydomonas lacking Photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sustained photoassimilation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen has been observed in a Photosystem I deficient mutant B4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that contains only Photosystem II. The data indicate that Photosystem II alone is capable of spanning the potential difference between water oxidation/oxygen evolution and ferredoxin reduction. The rates of both CO{sub 2} fixation and hydrogen and oxygen evolution are similar in the mutant to that of the wild-type C. reinhardtii 137c containing both photosystems. The wild-type had stable photosynthetic activity, measured as CO{sub 2} fixation, under both air and anaerobic conditions, while the mutant was stable only under anaerobic conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the fundamental mechanisms and energetics of photosynthesis and possible implications for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  16. Domain organization of photosystem II in membranes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The supramolecular organization of photosystem II (PSII) complexes in the photosynthetic membrane of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 was studied by electron microscopy. After mild detergent solubilization, crystalline PSII arrays were extracted in which dimeric PSII particles associate in mult

  17. The Vitamin B12-Dependent Photoreceptor AerR Relieves Photosystem Gene Repression by Extending the Interaction of CrtJ with Photosystem Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxu Fang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purple nonsulfur bacteria adapt their physiology to a wide variety of environmental conditions often through the control of transcription. One of the main transcription factors involved in controlling expression of the Rhodobacter capsulatus photosystem is CrtJ, which functions as an aerobic repressor of photosystem genes. Recently, we reported that a vitamin B12 binding antirepressor of CrtJ called AerR is required for anaerobic expression of the photosystem. However, the mechanism whereby AerR regulates CrtJ activity is unclear. In this study, we used a combination of next-generation sequencing and biochemical methods to globally identify genes under control of CrtJ and the role of AerR in controlling this regulation. Our results indicate that CrtJ has a much larger regulon than previously known, with a surprising regulatory function under both aerobic and anaerobic photosynthetic growth conditions. A combination of in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation-DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq and ChIP-seq and exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo studies and in vitro biochemical studies demonstrate that AerR forms a 1:2 complex with CrtJ (AerR-CrtJ2 and that this complex binds to many promoters under photosynthetic conditions. The results of in vitro and in vivo DNA binding studies indicate that AerR-CrtJ2 anaerobically forms an extended interaction with the bacteriochlorophyll bchC promoter to relieve repression by CrtJ. This is contrasted by aerobic growth conditions where CrtJ alone functions as an aerobic repressor of bchC expression. These results indicate that the DNA binding activity of CrtJ is modified by interacting with AerR in a redox-regulated manner and that this interaction alters CrtJ’s function.

  18. The Vitamin B12-Dependent Photoreceptor AerR Relieves Photosystem Gene Repression by Extending the Interaction of CrtJ with Photosystem Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingxu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purple nonsulfur bacteria adapt their physiology to a wide variety of environmental conditions often through the control of transcription. One of the main transcription factors involved in controlling expression of the Rhodobacter capsulatus photosystem is CrtJ, which functions as an aerobic repressor of photosystem genes. Recently, we reported that a vitamin B12 binding antirepressor of CrtJ called AerR is required for anaerobic expression of the photosystem. However, the mechanism whereby AerR regulates CrtJ activity is unclear. In this study, we used a combination of next-generation sequencing and biochemical methods to globally identify genes under control of CrtJ and the role of AerR in controlling this regulation. Our results indicate that CrtJ has a much larger regulon than previously known, with a surprising regulatory function under both aerobic and anaerobic photosynthetic growth conditions. A combination of in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation-DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and ChIP-seq and exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) studies and in vitro biochemical studies demonstrate that AerR forms a 1:2 complex with CrtJ (AerR-CrtJ2) and that this complex binds to many promoters under photosynthetic conditions. The results of in vitro and in vivo DNA binding studies indicate that AerR-CrtJ2 anaerobically forms an extended interaction with the bacteriochlorophyll bchC promoter to relieve repression by CrtJ. This is contrasted by aerobic growth conditions where CrtJ alone functions as an aerobic repressor of bchC expression. These results indicate that the DNA binding activity of CrtJ is modified by interacting with AerR in a redox-regulated manner and that this interaction alters CrtJ’s function. PMID:28325764

  19. Understanding and predicting bed humidity in fluidized bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhui; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-04-01

    Bed humidity is a critical parameter that needs to be controlled in a fluidized bed granulation to ensure reliability. To predict and control the bed humidity during the fluidized bed granulation process, a simple model based on the mass conservation of moisture was developed. The moisture mass balance model quantitatively simulates the effects of spray rate, binder solution concentration, airflow rate, inlet air temperature, and dew point on the bed humidity. The model was validated by a series of granulations performed in different scale granulators including Glatt GPCG-1, GPCG-15, and GPCG-60. Good agreement was observed between the theoretical prediction and the measured loss on drying (LOD). The model developed in the current work enables us to choose the appropriate parameters for the fluidized bed granulation and can be used as a valuable tool in process scaling-up.

  20. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  1. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  2. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  3. Racing for the Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    No one knows when the people ofMacheng City began to employthe marriage custom of racingfor the bed, once a custom unique to theTujia ethnic minority. It is said that at the end of awedding, bride and bridegroom enter thebridal chamber together and race for thebed. The one who is the first to sit on thebed will be the master of the new familyIt sounds unreasonable, but quite anumber of people believe in it.Therefore, on the wedding night, manybrides and bridegrooms try their best to

  4. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  5. Optical and electrical measurement of energy transfer between nanocrystalline quantum dots and photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyeson; Gulis, Galina; Gupta, Subhadra; Redding, Kevin; Gosztola, David J; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Stroscio, Michael A; Dutta, Mitra

    2010-11-18

    In the natural photosynthesis process, light harvesting complexes (LHCs) absorb light and pass excitation energy to photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). In this study, we have used nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) as an artificial LHC by integrating them with PSI to extend their spectral range. We have performed photoluminescence (PL) and ultrafast time-resolved absorption measurements to investigate this process. Our PL experiments showed that emission from the NQDs is quenched, and the fluorescence from PSI is enhanced. Transient absorption and bleaching results can be explained by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the NQDs to the PSI. This nonradiative energy transfer occurs in ∼6 ps. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements on the composite NQD-PSI samples demonstrate a clear photoresponse.

  6. Optical and Electrical Measurement of Energy Transfer between Nanocrystalline Quantum Dots and Photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyeson [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Gulis, G. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gupta, S. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Redding, K. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Gosztola, D. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wiederrecht, Gary P [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stroscio, M. A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Dutta, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-08-31

    In the natural photosynthesis process, light harvesting complexes (LHCs) absorb light and pass excitation energy to photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). In this study, we have used nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) as an artificial LHC by integrating them with PSI to extend their spectral range. We have performed photoluminescence (PL) and ultrafast time-resolved absorption measurements to investigate this process. Our PL experiments showed that emission from the NQDs is quenched, and the fluorescence from PSI is enhanced. Transient absorption and bleaching results can be explained by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the NQDs to the PSI. This nonradiative energy transfer occurs in ~6 ps. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements on the composite NQD-PSI samples demonstrate a clear photoresponse.

  7. Physiological Functions of Cyclic Electron Transport Around Photosystem I in Sustaining Photosynthesis and Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-04-29

    The light reactions in photosynthesis drive both linear and cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (PSI). Linear electron transport generates both ATP and NADPH, whereas PSI cyclic electron transport produces ATP without producing NADPH. PSI cyclic electron transport is thought to be essential for balancing the ATP/NADPH production ratio and for protecting both photosystems from damage caused by stromal overreduction. Two distinct pathways of cyclic electron transport have been proposed in angiosperms: a major pathway that depends on the PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION 5 (PGR5) and PGR5-LIKE PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHENOTYPE 1 (PGRL1) proteins, which are the target site of antimycin A, and a minor pathway mediated by the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex. Recently, the regulation of PSI cyclic electron transport has been recognized as essential for photosynthesis and plant growth. In this review, we summarize the possible functions and importance of the two pathways of PSI cyclic electron transport.

  8. Excitation energy distribution between two photosystems in Porphyra yezoensis and its sig-nificance in photosynthesisevolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Comparative investigation on energy distribution between twophotosystems were carried out in the sporo- phytes and gametophytes of Porphyra yezoensis. By perfor- ming 77 K fluorescence spectra, we suggested that there probably existed a pathway for energy transfer from PSⅡ to PSⅠ to redistribute the absorbed energy in gametophytes, while no such a way or at minor level in sporophytes. Electron transfer inhibitor DCMU blocked the energy transfer from PSⅡ to PSⅠ in gametophytes, but no obvious effects on sporophytes. These indicated that excitation energy dis-tribution between two photosystems in gametophytes was more cooperative than that in sporophytes. These data in ontogenesis reflected the evolution process of photosynthetic organisms and supported the hypothesis of independent evolution of each photosystem.

  9. Concentric-flow electrokinetic injector enables serial crystallography of ribosome and photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E. Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S.; Young, Iris D.; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A.; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Puglisi, Elisabetta V.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Soltis, S. Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D.; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-11-30

    We describe a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector for efficiently delivering microcrystals for serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography analysis that enables studies of challenging biological systems in their unadulterated mother liquor. We used the injector to analyze microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2-Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (<3-Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin at ambient temperature (3.4-Å structure).

  10. Concentric-flow electrokinetic injector enables serial crystallography of ribosome and photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Raymond G; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S; Young, Iris D; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J; Hampton, Christina Y; Puglisi, Elisabetta V; Sauter, Nicholas K; Stan, Claudiu A; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K; Soltis, S Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D; DeMirci, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    We describe a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector for efficiently delivering microcrystals for serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography analysis that enables studies of challenging biological systems in their unadulterated mother liquor. We used the injector to analyze microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2-Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (<3-Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin at ambient temperature (3.4-Å structure).

  11. Probing the connection of PBSs to the photosystems in Spirulina platensis by artificially induced fluorescence fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Heng [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yang Shuzhen [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Xie Jie [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhao Jingquan [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)]. E-mail: zhaojq@iccas.ac.cn

    2007-01-15

    The molecular architecture and the structural connections of phycobilisomes (PBSs) to the photosystems in the intact cells of Spirulina platensis were studied by taking advantage of glycerol- and betaine-induced fluorescence fluctuations. Generally, with a selective excitation of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), glycerol could induce not only decoupling of PBSs from the photosystems but also of C-PC rods from allophycocyanin (APC) cores, while betaine could strengthen the connection of PBSs to the thylakoid membrane but induce a partial dissociation of PBS. On the other hand, glycerol did not exert an influence on the fluorescence spectra of the photosystems in isolated thylakoid membrane. Therefore, it was deduced that glycerol could provide a molecular environment to weaken the hydrophobic interactions of not only the L{sub CM} with the membrane but also the linker polypeptides to the water-soluble phycobiliproteins (C-PC and APC), while the betaine could strengthen the hydrophobic interaction of L{sub CM} with the membrane but weaken the electrostatic interaction of linker polypeptides to C-PC and/or APC.

  12. Characteristics of Photosystem II Behavior in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Bract and Capsule Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ya-li; LUO Hong-hai; HU Yuan-yuan; Reto J. Strasser; ZHANG Wang-feng

    2013-01-01

    Though bract and capsule wall of boll in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have different photosynthetic capacities, the features of photosystem II (PS II) in these organs are scarce. In this paper, chlorophyll a lfuorescence emission was measured to investigate the difference in the photosynthetic apparatus of dark-acclimated (JIP-test) and light-acclimated (light-saturation pulse method) bract and capsule wall. Compared with leaves, the oxygen evolving system of non-foliar organs had lower efifciency. The pool size of PS II electron acceptor of non-foliar organs was small, and the photochemical activity of leaves was higher than that of the bract and capsule wall. In regard to the photosystem I (PS I) electron acceptor side, the pool size of end electron acceptors of leaves was larger, and the quantum yield of electron transport from QA (PS II primary plastoquinone acceptor) further than the PS I electron acceptors of leaves was higher than that of bract and capsule wall. In all green organs, the actual quantum yield of photochemistry decreased with light. The thermal dissipation fraction of light absorbed by the PS II antennae was the highest in bract and the lowest in capsule wall relative to leaves. Compared with leaves, capsule wall was characterized by less constitutive thermal dissipation and via dissipation as lfuorescence emission. These results suggested that lower PS II photochemical activity in non-foliar organs may be result from limitations at the donor side of PS II and the acceptor sides of both photosystems.

  13. Light-harvesting features revealed by the structure of plant Photosystem I

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Shem, A; Nelson, N; 10.1023/B:PRES.0000036881.23512.42

    2004-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is driven by two multi-subunit membrane protein complexes, Photosystem I and Photosystem II. In plants and green algae, both complexes are composed of two moieties: a reaction center (RC), where light-induced charge translocation occurs, and a peripheral antenna that absorbs light and funnels its energy to the reaction center. The peripheral antenna of PS I (LHC I) is composed of four gene products (Lhca 1-4) that are unique among the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins in their pronounced long-wavelength absorbance and in their assembly into dimers. The recently determined structure of plant Photosystem I provides the first relatively high- resolution structural model of a super-complex containing a reaction center and its peripheral antenna. We describe some of the structural features responsible for the unique properties of LHC I and discuss the advantages of the particular LHC I dimerization mode over monomeric or trimeric forms. In addition, we delineate some of the interactions betw...

  14. Differential responses of photosystems I and II to seasonal drought in two Ficus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shubin; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jiaolin; Cao, Kunfang

    2016-05-01

    Hemiepiphytic Ficus species exhibit more conservative water use strategy and are more drought-tolerant compared with their non-hemiepiphytic congeners, but a difference in the response of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) to drought stress has not been documented to date. The enhancement of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and cyclic electron flow (CEF) have been identified as important mechanisms that protect the photosystems under drought conditions. Using the hemiepiphytic Ficus tinctoria and the non-hemiepiphytic Ficus racemosa, we studied the water status and the electron fluxes through PSI and PSII under seasonal water stress. Our results clearly indicated that the decline in the leaf predawn water potential (ψpd), the maximum photosynthetic rate (Amax) and the predawn maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) were more pronounced in F. racemosa than in F. tinctoria at peak drought. The Fv/Fm of F. racemosa was reduced to 0.69, indicating net photoinhibition of PSII. Concomitantly, the maximal photo-oxidizable P700 (Pm) decreased significantly in F. racemosa but remained stable in F. tinctoria. The fraction of non-photochemical quenching [Y(NPQ)] and the ratio of effective quantum yield of PSI to PSII [Y(I)/Y(II)] increased for both Ficus species at peak drought, with a stronger increase in F. racemosa. These results indicated that the enhancement of NPQ and the activation of CEF contributed to the photoprotection of PSI and PSII for both Ficus species under seasonal drought, particularly for F. racemosa.

  15. Cryo-imaging of photosystems and phycobilisomes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Gábor; Schubert, Félix; Kaňa, Radek

    2015-11-01

    Primary photosynthetic reactions take place inside thylakoid membrane where light-to-chemical energy conversion is catalyzed by two pigment-protein complexes, photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). Light absorption in cyanobacteria is increased by pigment-protein supercomplexes--phycobilisomes (PBSs) situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces that transfer excitation energy into both photosystems. We have explored the localization of PSI, PSII and PBSs in thylakoid membrane of native cyanobacteria cell Anabaena sp. 7120 by means of cryogenic confocal microscopy. We have adapted a conventional temperature controlling stage to an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope. The presence of red shifted emission of chlorophylls from PSI has been confirmed by spectral measurements. Confocal fluorescence images of PSI (in a spectral range 710-750 nm), PSII (in a spectral range 690-705 nm) and PBSs (in a spectral range 650-680 nm) were recorded at low temperature. Co-localization of images showed spatial heterogeneity of PSI, PSII and PBSs over the thylakoid membrane, and three dominant areas were identified: PSI-PSII-PBS supercomplex area, PSII-PBS supercomplex area and PSI area. The observed results were discussed with regard to light-harvesting regulation in cyanobacteria.

  16. Design of new strategy for green algal photo-hydrogen production: spectral-selective photosystem I activation and photosystem II deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Takanori; Johnson, Daniel J; Cuello, Joel L

    2012-09-01

    A new strategy in photosynthetic hydrogen (photo-H(2)) production from green algae was developed based on theory and successfully demonstrated. The new strategy applied a spectral-selective photosystem I (PSI) activating/photosystem II (PSII) deactivating radiation (or PSI light) that would drive a steady flow of electrons in the electron transport chain for delivery to hydrogenase for photo-H(2) production, but would reduce oxygen production through water photolysis below the respiratory oxygen consumption so that an anoxic condition would be maintained as required by hydrogenase. Implementing the strategy by using a PSI light (692 nm peak, 680-700 nm) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells resulted in relatively sustained photo-H(2) production (total of 0.108 mL H(2)mg(-1)Chl, exceeding 0.066 mL H(2)mg(-1)Chl under white light). The strategy also proved successful and convenient in allowing cells to alternately switch between photo-H(2) production and a recovery period by simply turning on or off the PSI light. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thin bed responses and correction methods for cased hole density logging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Wensheng; Zhang Yuling

    2008-01-01

    The study of the thin bed responses and correction methods in cased hole density logging can provide a theoretical basis for research to improve data processing methods. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP, the change of detector count from thin beds with the vertical depth was calculated at different casing thicknesses. The calculation showed that with the low density thin bed moving upward,detector count first increased to a maximum then decreased. The responses of a thin bed with a high density were opposite to those of a thin bed with a low density. The change curve was symmetrical, and the maximums or minimums appeared at the midpoint between the detector and source. Besides, detector count increased with increasing thin bed thickness. At a specific thin bed thickness, further increase of thin bed thickness resulted in a slow increase of detector count then the count rate leveled off. In actual logging, the influence of adjacent formations on density log measurements can be ignored. Finally, based on numerical simulation correction methods for the dual influence of casing and thin beds are discussed.

  18. Variability of Bed Drag on Cohesive Beds under Wave Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgar Safak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law, a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 - 4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  19. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  20. Ultrafast Primary Reactions in the Photosystems of Oxygen-Evolving Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzwarth, A. R.

    In oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms (plants, green algae, cyanobacteria), the primary steps of photosynthesis occur in two membrane-bound protein supercomplexes, Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II), located in the thylakoid membrane (c.f. Fig. 7.1) along with two other important protein complexes, the cytochrome b6/f complex and the ATP-synthase [1]. Each of the photosystems consists of a reaction center (RC) where the photoinduced early electron transfer processes occur, of a so-called core antenna consisting of chlorophyll (Chl) protein complexes responsible for light absorption and ultrafast energy transfer to the RC pigments, and additional peripheral antenna complexes of various kinds that increase the absorption cross-section. The peripheral complexes are Chl a/b-protein complexes in higher plants and green algae (LHC I or LHC II for PS I or PS II, respectively) and so-called phycobilisomes in cyanobacteria and red algae [2-4]. The structures and light-harvesting functions of these antenna systems have been extensively reviewed [2, 5-9]. Recently, X-ray structures of both PS I and PS II antenna/RC complexes have been determined, some to atomic resolution. Although many details of the pigment content and organization of the RCs and antenna systems of PS I and PS II have been known before, the high resolution structures of the integral complexes allow us for the first time to try to understand structure/function relationships in detail. This article covers our present understanding of the ultrafast energy transfer and early electron transfer processes occurring in the photosystems of oxygen-evolving organisms. The main emphasis will be on the electron transfer processes. However, in both photosystems the kinetics of the energy transfer processes in the core antennae is intimately interwoven with the kinetics of the electron transfer steps. Since both types of processes occur on a similar time scale, their kinetics cannot be considered

  1. Deletion of PsbM in tobacco alters the QB site properties and the electron flow within photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umate, Pavan; Schwenkert, Serena; Karbat, Izhar; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Mlcòchová, Lada; Volz, Stefanie; Zer, Hagit; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Ohad, Itzhak; Meurer, Jörg

    2007-03-30

    Photosystem II, the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthetic organisms, includes an intriguingly large number of low molecular weight polypeptides, including PsbM. Here we describe the first knock-out of psbM using a transplastomic, reverse genetics approach in a higher plant. Homoplastomic Delta psbM plants exhibit photoautotrophic growth. Biochemical, biophysical, and immunological analyses demonstrate that PsbM is not required for biogenesis of higher order photosystem II complexes. However, photosystem II is highly light-sensitive, and its activity is significantly decreased in Delta psbM, whereas kinetics of plastid protein synthesis, reassembly of photosystem II, and recovery of its activity are comparable with the wild type. Unlike wild type, phosphorylation of the reaction center proteins D1 and D2 is severely reduced, whereas the redox-controlled phosphorylation of photosystem II light-harvesting complex is reversely regulated in Delta psbM plants because of accumulation of reduced plastoquinone in the dark and a limited photosystem II-mediated electron transport in the light. Charge recombination in Delta psbM measured by thermoluminescence oscillations significantly differs from the 2/6 patterns in the wild type. A simulation program of thermoluminescence oscillations indicates a higher Q(B)/Q(-)(B) ratio in dark-adapted mutant thylakoids relative to the wild type. The interaction of the Q(A)/Q(B) sites estimated by shifts in the maximal thermoluminescence emission temperature of the Q band, induced by binding of different herbicides to the Q(B) site, is changed indicating alteration of the activation energy for back electron flow. We conclude that PsbM is primarily involved in the interaction of the redox components important for the electron flow within, outward, and backward to photosystem II.

  2. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  3. Bed Bug Laws and Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    21 states have some level of regulation with regard to bed bugs. Most of these requirements focus on hotels and landlords or other property managers. The Department of Housing and Urban Development has guidance on controlling bed bugs in public housing.

  4. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Oxidation-reduction signalling components in regulatory pathways of state transitions and photosystem stoichiometry adjustment in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Ibrahim, Iskander M; Allen, John F

    2012-02-01

    State transitions and photosystem stoichiometry adjustment are two oxidation-reduction (redox)-regulated acclimatory responses in photosynthesis. State transitions are short-term adaptations that, in chloroplasts, involve reversible post-translational modification by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II). Photosystem stoichiometry adjustments are long-term responses involving transcriptional regulation of reaction centre genes. Both responses are initiated by changes in light quality and are regulated by the redox state of plastoquinone (PQ). The LHC II kinase involved in the state 2 transition is a serine/threonine kinase known as STT7 in Chlamydomonas, and as STN7 in Arabidopsis. The phospho-LHC II phosphatase that produces the state 1 transition is a PP2C-type protein phosphatase currently termed both TAP38 and PPH1. In plants and algae, photosystem stoichiometry adjustment is governed by a modified two-component sensor kinase of cyanobacterial origin - chloroplast sensor kinase (CSK). CSK is a sensor of the PQ redox state. Chloroplast sigma factor 1 (SIG1) and plastid transcription kinase (PTK) are the functional partners of CSK in chloroplast gene regulation. We suggest a signalling pathway for photosystem stoichiometry adjustment. The signalling pathways of state transitions and photosystem stoichiometry adjustments are proposed to be distinct, with the two pathways sensing PQ redox state independently of each other.

  6. Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, George J.; Kydd, Paul H.

    1983-01-01

    Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

  7. Photosystem I shows a higher tolerance to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress than photosystem II in the intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Zheng, Zhenbing; Gu, Wenhui; Xie, Xiujun; Huan, Li; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic performance of the desiccation-tolerant, intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera was significantly affected by sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. Our results showed that photosynthetic activity decreased significantly with increases in sorbitol concentration. Although the partial activity of both photosystem I (PS I) and photosystem II (PS II) was able to recover after 30 min of rehydration, the activity of PS II decreased more rapidly than PS I. At 4 M sorbitol concentration, the activity of PS II was almost 0 while that of PS I was still at about one third of normal levels. Following prolonged treatment with 1 and 2 M sorbitol, the activity of PS I and PS II decreased slowly, suggesting that the effects of moderate concentrations of sorbitol on PS I and PS II were gradual. Interestingly, an increase in non-photochemical quenching occurred under these conditions in response to moderate osmotic stress, whereas it declined significantly under severe osmotic stress. These results suggest that photoprotection in U. prolifera could also be induced by moderate osmotic stress. In addition, the oxidation of PS I was significantly affected by osmotic stress. P700(+) in the thalli treated with high concentrations of sorbitol could still be reduced, as PS II was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), but it could not be fully oxidized. This observation may be caused by the higher quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PS I due to acceptor-side limitation (Y(NA)) during rehydration in seawater containing DCMU.

  8. Dual Income Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter Birch

    This paper discusses the principles and practices of dual income taxation in the Nordic countries. The first part of the paper explains the rationale and the historical background for the introduction of the dual income tax and describes the current Nordic tax practices. The second part...... of the paper focuses on the problems of taxing income from small businesses and the issue of corporate-personal tax integration under the dual income tax, considering alternative ways of dealing with these challenges. In the third and final part of the paper, I briefly discuss whether introducing a dual income...... tax could be relevant for New Zealand....

  9. Dual Income Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter Birch

    This paper discusses the principles and practices of dual income taxation in the Nordic countries. The first part of the paper explains the rationale and the historical background for the introduction of the dual income tax and describes the current Nordic tax practices. The second part...... of the paper focuses on the problems of taxing income from small businesses and the issue of corporate-personal tax integration under the dual income tax, considering alternative ways of dealing with these challenges. In the third and final part of the paper, I briefly discuss whether introducing a dual income...... tax could be relevant for New Zealand....

  10. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  11. Dual-fuel, dual-throat engine preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion system analysis of the dual fuel, dual throat engine for launch vehicle applications was conducted. Basic dual throat engine characterization data were obtained to allow vehicle optimization studies to be conducted. A preliminary baseline engine system was defined.

  12. KINETIC RESOLUTION OF DIFFERENT RECOVERY PHASES OF PHOTOINHIBITED PHOTOSYSTEM-II IN COLD-ACCLIMATED AND NON-ACCLIMATED SPINACH LEAVES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWIJK, KJ; VANHASSELT, PR

    Leaf discs from spinach were exposed to a photon flux density of 1 250 mumol m-2 s-1 at 5-degrees-C for 2 or 3 h in ambient air. Photoinhibition of photosystem II (PS II) was measured by means of chlorophyll fluorescence. Recovery of photosystem II was followed at 6-degrees-C and 20-degrees-C in low

  13. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  14. Quantitative Targeted Proteomics and Electrochromic Shift for Measuring Photosystem Content of Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. M.; Bailleul, B.; Melanson, J. R.; Campbell, D. A.; Cockshutt, A. M.; Cardol, P.

    2016-02-01

    Abundance and stoichiometry data for the photosystems, the intersystem electron transport complexes and the Calvin cycle enzymes are rich in information about light and nutrient acclimation. Quantifying these complexes is essential for understanding limitations on and capacities for photosynthesis. Targeted quantitative immunodetections of conserved subunits (eg. PsbA for PSII; PsaC for PSI) are becoming an established method for absolute measurement of these complexes. An advantage of protein measurements is that they can be done with non-living flash-frozen samples and processed post-field. A pitfall of physical versus functional measures is that in some scenarios, such as during photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII), physical and functional measures give different values, but such disparities are often meaningful, informing targeted studies of regulation, repair and enzyme kinetics. Electrochromic Shift (ECS) is an alternative, fast and noninvasive method which can be exploited to determine functional PSI:PSII ratios in living cells. The basis for ECS is that pigments in the photosynthetic membrane exhibit a shift in their absorption spectra when the electric component of the proton motive force is generated across the membrane in the light. Cross-validation of methods by independent measures builds confidence in results from both approaches and can be useful for ground truthing of underway or high-throughput optical measurements or functional measurements from bioassays. We present comparative data from immunoquantitation and ECS for an array of diatom taxa. The physical data fall within established ranges. The basis for similarities and disparities in the photosystem stoichiometries between the methods are discussed.

  15. Light and Heat Induced Denaturation of Photosystem Ⅱ Core Antenna Complex CP47

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Light and heat induced denaturation of CP47, the core antenna complex of photosystem Ⅱ purified from spinach, were investigated using absorption and circular dichroism spectra.Light caused the destruction of chlorophyll a and excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a in CP47, while the protein secondary structure was not apparently changed.Heat induced the destruction of protein secondary structure and excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a, but the chlorophyll a molecule was not damaged.The results suggest that both the chlorophyll a molecular structure and the protein native conformation are necessary for excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a and the energy transfer function of the chlorophyll a binding protein.

  16. Hydrogen ions directly regulating the oligomerization state of Photosystem I in intact Spirulina platensis cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    H+ concentration induced-monomerization or trimerization of photosystem I (PSI) in cyanobacteria has never been directly observed. In this work, taking characteristic spectra for the trimers and monomers as the indicators, it was experimentally demonstrated that H+ could induce the oligomeric changes of PSI reaction centers in the intact Spirulina ,platensis cells and also in the isolated thylakoid membrane complexes. Especially, the higher concentration of H+ would induce the monomerization while the lower the trimerization, suggesting the electrostatic interaction should be mainly responsible forchanges in the oligomeric state of PSI in Spirulina platensis.

  17. Isolation of monomeric photosystem II that retains the subunit PsbS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; De Sanctis, Daniele; Büchel, Claudia; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Loi, Maria Cecilia; Kieselbach, Thomas; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    Photosystem II has been purified from a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum according to two different protocols. Using the procedure described in Piano et al. (Photosynth Res 106:221-226, 2010) it was possible to isolate highly active PSII composed of monomers and dimers but depleted in their PsbS protein content. A "milder" procedure than the protocol reported by Fey et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1777:1501-1509, 2008) led to almost exclusively monomeric PSII complexes which in part still bind the PsbS protein. This finding might support a role for PSII monomers in higher plants.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of pathways of water movement in cyanobacterial photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G., E-mail: azat@vega.protres.ru; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Protein Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-induced generation of oxygen from water. The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the protein on the lumenal side of PSII, and water molecules need to pass through protein subunits to reach the active site—the manganese cluster. Previous studies on the elucidation of water channels in PSII were based on an analysis of the cavities in the static PSII structure determined by X-ray diffraction. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of the water movement in the transport system of PSII.

  19. A photosystem I reaction center driven by chlorophyll d in oxygenic photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Qiang; Miyashita, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Ikuko; Kurano, Norihide; Miyachi, Shigetoh; Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru

    1998-01-01

    A far-red type of oxygenic photosynthesis was discovered in Acaryochloris marina, a recently found marine prokaryote that produces an atypical pigment chlorophyll d (Chl d). The purified photosystem I reaction center complex of A. marina contained 180 Chl d per 1 Chl a with PsaA–F, -L, -K, and two extra polypeptides. Laser excitation induced absorption changes of reaction center Chl d that was named P740 after its peak wavelength. A midpoint oxidation reduction potential of P740 was determine...

  20. Effect of salt stress on photosystem Ⅱ heterogeneity in wheat leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴真明; 傅伟; 郭连旺; 汤章城

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the effects of salt stress on photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) heterogeneity, signal from the fluorometer was digitized via a microcomputer interface to record PSⅡ fluorescence induction kinetics. Changes of parameters (Fm, Fp1 and F0) from the fast phase of fluorescence induction curve showed that the percentage of QB-nonreducing PSⅡ reaction centers dropped at first, and then rose with the increase of stress intensity and time. This indicated that the electron transfer from QA to QB is one of the sites where the photochemical and photophysical processes of PSⅡ are damaged by the salt stress.

  1. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth......, and eventually substantial yield losses. It is well known, that genotypes within plant species differ considerably in tolerance to growth under Mn limiting conditions, a phenomenon designated as Mn efficiency. However, the physiological responses reflecting the underlying mechanisms of Mn efficiency are still...... is related to Mn efficiency in plants....

  2. Electron transport, Photosystem-2 reaction centers and chlorophyll-protein complexes of thylakoids of drought resistant and sensitive Lupin piants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, S; de Kouchkovsky, Y

    1993-07-01

    Two genotypes ofLupinus albus L., resistant and susceptible to drought, were subjected to water deficiency for up to two weeks. Such treatment progressively lowered the leaf water content from about 85% to about 60% (water potential from -0.8 to -4.3 MPa). Light-saturation curves of the uncoupled electron transport were analyzed according to a simple kinetic model of separated or connected reversible photoreactions. It gives an extrapolated maximum rate (Vmax) and the efficiency for capturing light (Im, which is the light intensity at Vmax/2). For Photosystem 2, Vmax and, less markedly, Im, declined with increasing severity of drought treatment; the artificial donor, diphenylcarbazide, could not restore the activity. One cause of this Photosystem 2 inhibition could be the loss of active Photosystem 2 centers. Indeed, their concentration relative to chlorophyll, estimated by flash-induced reduction of dimethylquinone, was halved by a medium stress. To the extent that it was still not restored by diphenylcarbazide, the site of Photosystem 2 inactivation must have been close to the photochemical trap, after water oxidation and before or at plastoquinone pool. By relating electron transport rate to active centers instead of chlorophyll, no inhibition by drought was detected. Therefore, water stress inactivates specifically Photosystem 2, without impairing a downhill thermal step of electron transport. On the other hand, the decrease of Im suggests that antennae connected to inactive centers may transfer their excitation energy to active neighbors, which implies that antenna network remains essentially intact. Gel electrophoresis confirmed that the apoproteins of the pigment complexes were well conserved. In conclusion, the inactivation of Photosystem 2 may not be a physical loss of its centers and core antennae but probably reflects protein alterations or conformational changes. These may result from the massive decrease of lipids induced by drought (Meyer et al. 1992

  3. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Stephen L.; Orton, Christopher J.; Lilly, David G.; Russell, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard ‘A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia’ that defines and promotes ‘best practice’ in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in ‘best practice’ while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia. PMID:26467616

  4. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... temperatures are necessary for successful heat treatment. Black plastic bags in the sun might work to kill bed ... Place the used bag in a tightly sealed plastic bag and in an outside garbage bin. 10. Turn ...

  5. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Russell

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard ‘A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia’ that defines and promotes ‘best practice’ in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in ‘best practice’ while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia.

  6. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Stephen L; Orton, Christopher J; Lilly, David G; Russell, Richard C

    2011-04-15

    Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard 'A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia' that defines and promotes 'best practice' in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in 'best practice' while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia.

  7. Print a Bed Bug Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  8. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple test method for determining the torsion strength of a single bed joint between two bricks and presents results from testing using this test method. The setup for the torsion test is well defined, require minimal preparation of the test specimen and the test can...... be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  9. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...... mattresses have a positive effect on LBP, and especially a hard mattress is commonly believed to have a positive effect. METHODS: One hundred sixty CLBP patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups, having a mattress/bed mounted in their sleeping room for 1 month. The beds were: (1) waterbed (Akva), (2) body......-conforming foam mattress (Tempur), and (3) a hard mattress (Innovation Futon). At baseline and after 4 weeks, a blinded observer interviewed the patients on LBP levels (0-10), daily function (activities of daily living, 0-30), and on the amount of sleeping hours/night. RESULTS: Because of dropout of 19 patients...

  10. Sea bed mapping and inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference has 24 presentations on the topics: Sea bed mapping, inspection, positioning, hydrography, marine archaeology, remote operation vehicles and computerized simulation technologies, oil field activities and plans, technological experiences and problems. (tk)

  11. Bed bugs in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Safdar, Nasia; Beier, John C; Doggett, Stephen L

    2012-11-01

    Infestations caused by bed bugs have resurfaced during the past decade across all continents. Even though bed bugs primarily cause skin manifestations in humans, a major stigma is placed upon people or institutions found to carry them. It is important for healthcare facilities to be prepared for this pest by implementing policies, carefully selecting materials used for hospital furniture, and educating providers on early identification and control.

  12. Bedømmelsens kompleksitet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Schmidt

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available I artiklen sammenholdes hverdagens bedømmelser af mennesker med de bedømmelser, der sker ved eksaminer. Der er forskelle på grund af det retlige grundlag, men også ligheder. Konkrete erfaringer med klage- og ankesager gennem 8 år fra faget psykologi på landsplan opsummeres. Nogle få praktiske løsninger beskrives.

  13. The Dual Career Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtin, Lee

    1980-01-01

    The dual career couple is forced to make a series of choices and compromises that impact the realms of marriage and career. The dilemmas that confront dual career marriages can be overcome only by compromise, accommodation, and mutual understanding on the part of the individuals involved. A revamping of human resources and recruitment programs is…

  14. Dual Credit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, legislation to improve access to dual-credit programs and to reduce disparities in access and completion--particularly for low income and underrepresented students--was enacted. The new law focused on expanding access to College in the High School but acknowledged issues in other dual-credit programs and reinforced the notion that cost…

  15. Dual Youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    A different aspect of using the parameterisation of all systems stabilised by a given controller, i.e. the dual Youla parameterisation, is considered. The relation between system change and the dual Youla parameter is derived in explicit form. A number of standard uncertain model descriptions are...

  16. Self-Dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Self-dual gravity is a diffeomorphism invariant theory in four dimensions that describes two propagating polarisations of the graviton and has a negative mass dimension coupling constant. Nevertheless, this theory is not only renormalisable but quantum finite, as we explain. We also collect various facts about self-dual gravity that are scattered across the literature.

  17. Optical dual self functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华建文; 刘立人; 王宁

    1997-01-01

    A recipe to construct the exact dual self-Fourier-Fresnel-transform functions is shown, where the Dirac comb function and transformable even periodic function are used. The mathematical proof and examples are given Then this kind of self-transform function is extended to the feasible optical dual self-transform functions.

  18. Dual doubled geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Riccioni, Fabio; Alvarez-Gaumé, L.

    2011-01-01

    We probe doubled geometry with dual fundamental branes. i.e. solitons. Restricting ourselves first to solitonic branes with more than two transverse directions we find that the doubled geometry requires an effective wrapping rule for the solitonic branes which is dual to the wrapping rule for fundam

  19. Research on Dual Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Li; Fucai Qian; Peilin Fu

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent progress by the authors in developing two solution frameworks for dual control. The first solution framework considers a class of dual control problems where there exists a parameter uncertainty in the observation equation of the LQG problem. An analytical active dual control law is derived by a variance minimization approach. The issue of how to determine an optimal degree of active learning is then addressed, thus achieving an optimality for this class of dual control problems. The second solution framework considers a general class of discrete-time LQG problems with unknown parameters in both state and observation equations. The best possible (partial) closed-loop feedback control law is derived by exploring the future nominal posterior probabilities, thus taking into account the effect of future learning when constructing the optimal nominal dual control.

  20. Dual ectopic thyroid gland: sonography and scintigraphy of lingual and sublingual thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Vinko; Glavina, Gordana; Eterović, Davor; Punda, Ante; Brdar, Dubravka

    2014-06-01

    Dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid gland is an extraordinarily rare condition. We present 1 patient with subclinical hypothyroidism. The clinical examination revealed that the thyroid gland was not palpable in its usual cervical location, whereas ultrasonography confirmed an empty thyroid bed without any ectopic thyroid tissue in the rest of the neck. The final diagnosis of dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid was established by ultrasound examination through the mouth floor and confirmed by scintigraphy and CT thereafter.

  1. 49 CFR 236.336 - Locking bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking bed. 236.336 Section 236.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Instructions § 236.336 Locking bed. The various parts of the locking bed, locking bed supports, and tappet...

  2. Time and spectral resolved phosphorescence of singlet oxygen and pigments in photosystem II particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedic, R.; Svoboda, A.; Psencik, J.; Lupinkova, L.; Komenda, J.; Hala, J. E-mail: hala@karlov.mff.cuni.cz

    2003-05-01

    Singlet oxygen generated via chlorophyll triplets in photosynthetic systems can destroy basic components of photosynthetic apparatus. In order to study this process a sensitive spectroscopic experimental set-up was built to detect both weak infrared (IR) chlorophyll phosphorescence (between 900 and 1000 nm) and singlet oxygen phosphorescence (at 1270 nm). The spectral and time resolution of the used monochromator and photon counting multiscaler are sufficient to provide two-dimensional matrix of temporally and spectrally resolved IR luminescence data. We have studied IR emission of photosystem II particles in D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O buffer including the effect of the sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) detergent. Both sub-microsecond lifetime of chlorophyll triplet states and microsecond lifetime of singlet oxygen were determined. The singlet oxygen lifetime in D{sub 2}O (of 18 {mu}s) was approximately five times longer than that in H{sub 2}O. Quantum efficiency of singlet oxygen generation in photosystem II particles was significantly lower than that in chlorophyll a in acetone, however, it could be substantially increased by addition of SDS.

  3. Detection of herbicide subclasses by an optical multibiosensor based on an array of photosystem II mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Guzzella, Licia; Euzet, Pierre; Rouillon, Regis; Esposito, Dania

    2005-07-15

    Massive use of herbicides in agriculture over the last few decades has become a serious environmental problem. The residual concentration of these compounds frequently exceeds the maximum admissible concentration in drinking water for human consumption and is a real environmental risk for the aquatic ecosystem. Herbicides inhibiting photosynthesis via targeting photosystem II function still represent the basic means of weed control. A multibiosensor was constructed for detecting herbicides using as biosensing elements photosynthetic preparations coupled to an optical fluorescence transduction system (Giardi et al. EU patent EP1134585, 01830148.1-2204); this paper is about its application in the detection of herbicide subclasses in river water. Photosynthetic material was immobilized on a silicio septum inside a series of flow cells, close to diodes so as to activate photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. The principle of the detection was based on the factthat herbicides selectively modify PSII fluorescence activity. The multibiosensor has the original feature of being able to distinguish the subclasses of the photosynthetic herbicides by using specific immobilized biomediators isolated from mutated organisms. This setup resulted in a reusable, portable multibiosensor for the detection of herbicide subclasses with a half-life of 54 h for spinach thylakoids and limit of detection of 3 x 10(-9) M for herbicides present in river water.

  4. Excitation energy transfer between Light-harvesting complex II and Photosystem I in reconstituted membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Lingvay, Mónika; Kiss, Teréz; Deák, Róbert; Bóta, Attila; Ughy, Bettina; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H

    2016-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the major peripheral antenna of Photosystem II in plants, participates in several concerted mechanisms for regulation of the excitation energy and electron fluxes in thylakoid membranes. In part, these include interaction of LHCII with Photosystem I (PSI) enhancing the latter's absorption cross-section - for example in the well-known state 1 - state 2 transitions or as a long-term acclimation to high light. In this work we examined the capability of LHCII to deliver excitations to PSI in reconstituted membranes in vitro. Proteoliposomes with native plant thylakoid membrane lipids and different stoichiometric ratios of LHCII:PSI were reconstituted and studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission from LHCII was strongly decreased in PSI-LHCII membranes due to trapping of excitations by PSI. Kinetic modelling of the time-resolved fluorescence data revealed the existence of separate pools of LHCII distinguished by the time scale of energy transfer. A strongly coupled pool, equivalent to one LHCII trimer per PSI, transferred excitations to PSI with near-unity efficiency on a time scale of less than 10ps but extra LHCIIs also contributed significantly to the effective antenna size of PSI, which could be increased by up to 47% in membranes containing 3 LHCII trimers per PSI. The results demonstrate a remarkable competence of LHCII to increase the absorption cross-section of PSI, given the opportunity that the two types of complexes interact in the membrane.

  5. Protein delivery of a Ni catalyst to photosystem I for light-driven hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Sunshine C; Niklas, Jens; Du, Pingwu; Poluektov, Oleg G; Tiede, David M; Utschig, Lisa M

    2013-09-11

    The direct conversion of sunlight into fuel is a promising means for the production of storable renewable energy. Herein, we use Nature's specialized photosynthetic machinery found in the Photosystem I (PSI) protein to drive solar fuel production from a nickel diphosphine molecular catalyst. Upon exposure to visible light, a self-assembled PSI-[Ni(P2(Ph)N2(Ph))2](BF4)2 hybrid generates H2 at a rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than rates reported for photosensitizer/[Ni(P2(Ph)N2(Ph))2](BF4)2 systems. The protein environment enables photocatalysis at pH 6.3 in completely aqueous conditions. In addition, we have developed a strategy for incorporating the Ni molecular catalyst with the native acceptor protein of PSI, flavodoxin. Photocatalysis experiments with this modified flavodoxin demonstrate a new mechanism for biohybrid creation that involves protein-directed delivery of a molecular catalyst to the reducing side of Photosystem I for light-driven catalysis. This work further establishes strategies for constructing functional, inexpensive, earth-abundant solar fuel-producing PSI hybrids that use light to rapidly produce hydrogen directly from water.

  6. Light driven CO2 fixation by using cyanobacterial photosystem I and NADPH-dependent formate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ihara

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of this research is to construct a new direct CO2 fixation system using photosystems in living algae. Here, we report light-driven formate production from CO2 by using cyanobacterial photosystem I (PS I. Formate, a chemical hydrogen carrier and important industrial material, can be produced from CO2 by using the reducing power and the catalytic function of formate dehydrogenase (FDH. We created a bacterial FDH mutant that experimentally switched the cofactor specificity from NADH to NADPH, and combined it with an in vitro-reconstituted cyanobacterial light-driven NADPH production system consisting of PS I, ferredoxin (Fd, and ferredoxin-NADP(+-reductase (FNR. Consequently, light-dependent formate production under a CO2 atmosphere was successfully achieved. In addition, we introduced the NADPH-dependent FDH mutant into heterocysts of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and demonstrated an increased formate concentration in the cells. These results provide a new possibility for photo-biological CO2 fixation.

  7. Comparison of the light-harvesting networks of plant and cyanobacterial photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih K; Jolley, Craig; Ben-Shem, Adam; Fromme, Petra; Nelson, Nathan; Croce, Roberta; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-09-01

    With the availability of structural models for photosystem I (PSI) in cyanobacteria and plants it is possible to compare the excitation transfer networks in this ubiquitous photosystem from two domains of life separated by over one billion years of divergent evolution, thus providing an insight into the physical constraints that shape the networks' evolution. Structure-based modeling methods are used to examine the excitation transfer kinetics of the plant PSI-LHCI supercomplex. For this purpose an effective Hamiltonian is constructed that combines an existing cyanobacterial model for structurally conserved chlorophylls with spectral information for chlorophylls in the Lhca subunits. The plant PSI excitation migration network thus characterized is compared to its cyanobacterial counterpart investigated earlier. In agreement with observations, an average excitation transfer lifetime of approximately 49 ps is computed for the plant PSI-LHCI supercomplex with a corresponding quantum yield of 95%. The sensitivity of the results to chlorophyll site energy assignments is discussed. Lhca subunits are efficiently coupled to the PSI core via gap chlorophylls. In contrast to the chlorophylls in the vicinity of the reaction center, previously shown to optimize the quantum yield of the excitation transfer process, the orientational ordering of peripheral chlorophylls does not show such optimality. The finding suggests that after close packing of chlorophylls was achieved, constraints other than efficiency of the overall excitation transfer process precluded further evolution of pigment ordering.

  8. Simulations of the polarisation-dependent Raman intensity of β-carotene in photosystem II crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brose, K., E-mail: katharina.brose@gmx.net [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Zouni, A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Müh, F. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mroginski, M.A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Maultzsch, J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • First polarisation-dependent Raman spectroscopy on photosystem II crystals. • Orientation-dependent Raman intensity simulations for di- and monomeric crystals. • Simulations account for all β-carotenes (β-Car) in the unit cell for the first time. • Prediction for identificationy of the β-Car cation in side-path electron transport. - Abstract: In order to clarify possibilities to identify the β-carotene (β-Car) radicals in secondary electron transfer (ET) reactions in the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc), Raman intensities of all 96 β-Car cofactors in the unit cell of PSIIcc-dimer crystals as a function of polarisation and crystal orientation were simulated based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure. The Raman-active symmetry A{sub g} in the C{sub 2h} group is assigned to the β-Car modes ν{sub 66} and ν{sub 67}. Simulations are in agreement with experiment for off-resonant excitation at 1064 nm. Resonant measurements at 476 and 532 nm excitation can not be explained, which is attributed to mode mixing in the excited state and the existence of different spectral pools. The identity of the β-Car oxidised in secondary ET can not be resolved by Raman measurements on PSIIcc-dimer crystals. Additional simulations show that similar measurements on PSIIcc-monomer crystals could provide a possible route to solve this issue.

  9. Isolated photosystem I reaction centers on a functionalized gated high electron mobility transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Sazia A; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, M Nance; Islam, Syed K

    2011-09-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale (~6 nm) reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  10. A protein dynamics study of photosystem II: the effects of protein conformation on reaction center function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study photosystem II structure and function. Structural information obtained from simulations was combined with ab initio computations of chromophore excited states. In contrast to calculations based on the x-ray structure, the molecular-dynamics-based calculations accurately predicted the experimental absorbance spectrum. In addition, our calculations correctly assigned the energy levels of reaction-center (RC) chromophores, as well as the lowest-energy antenna chlorophyll. The primary and secondary quinone electron acceptors, Q(A) and Q(B), exhibited independent changes in position over the duration of the simulation. Q(B) fluctuated between two binding sites similar to the proximal and distal sites previously observed in light- and dark-adapted RC from purple bacteria. Kinetic models were used to characterize the relative influence of chromophore geometry, site energies, and electron transport rates on RC efficiency. The fluctuating energy levels of antenna chromophores had a larger impact on quantum yield than did their relative positions. Variations in electron transport rates had the most significant effect and were sufficient to explain the experimentally observed multi-component decay of excitation in photosystem II. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of competing evolutionary selection pressures for RC structure and function.

  11. Herbicides affect fluorescence and electron transfer activity of spinach chloroplasts, thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela

    2010-08-01

    In this work, studies on the effects produced by atrazine, terbutryn or diuron onto spinach photosynthetic materials were performed by observing changes in fluorescence emission and in electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of such herbicides; chloroplasts, thylakoids, Photosystem II-enriched thylakoids (BBYs) and isolated Photosystem II (PSII) were employed. This approach evidenced differences in the herbicide-photosynthetic material interactions going up-down from chloroplasts to proteins. Rapid emission increments were detected for chloroplasts and thylakoids, in particular in the presence of terbutryn; no remarkable emission increment was recorded when BBYs or PSII were used for this assay. The dependences of the chloroplast and thylakoid emission intensities upon herbicide concentration were investigated with responses even at concentrations below 10(-7)M. The influence of lowering the temperature was also tested, and the stabilizing effects on the resistances of the bio-samples against herbicides were recorded. Furthermore, Hill Reaction-based colorimetric assays were performed to monitor the electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of herbicides, after brief incubations. As a result, chloroplasts and thylakoids resulted to be sensitive tools in responding to concentrations even lower than 10(-7)M of most herbicides; nevertheless, an interesting sensitivity to herbicides was also observed for PSII. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid ignition of fluidized bed boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Liman D.

    1976-12-14

    A fluidized bed boiler is started up by directing into the static bed of inert and carbonaceous granules a downwardly angled burner so that the hot gases cause spouting. Air is introduced into the bed at a rate insufficient to fluidize the entire bed. Three regions are now formed in the bed, a region of lowest gas resistance, a fluidized region and a static region with a mobile region at the interface of the fluidized and static regions. Particles are transferred by the spouting action to form a conical heap with the carbonaceous granules concentrated at the top. The hot burner gases ignite the carbonaceous matter on the top of the bed which becomes distributed in the bed by the spouting action and bed movement. Thereafter the rate of air introduction is increased to fluidize the entire bed, the spouter/burner is shut off, and the entire fluidized bed is ignited.

  13. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  14. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  15. Dual energy CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najami, Issam; Drue, Henrik Christian; Steele, Robert

    2017-01-01

    and inaccurate with existing methods. Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) enables qualitative tissue differentiation by simultaneous scanning with different levels of energy. We aimed to assess the feasibility of DECT in quantifying tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy in loco-advanced rectal cancer. METHODS...... to determine the average quantitative parameters; effective-Z, water- and iodine-concentration, Dual Energy Index (DEI), and Dual Energy Ratio (DER). These parameters were compared to the regression in the resection specimen as measured by the pathologist. RESULTS: Changes in the quantitative parameters...

  16. Consequences of state transitions on the structural and functional organization of Photosystem I in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drop, Bartlomiej; Yadav K.N., Sathish; Boekema, Egbert J.; Croce, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    State transitions represent a photoacclimation process that regulates the light-driven photosynthetic reactions in response to changes in light quality/quantity. It balances the excitation between photosystem I (PSI) and II (PSII) by shuttling LHCII, the main light-harvesting complex of green algae

  17. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment and the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in the thylakoid

  18. Mutation of Photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii under extreme environment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygenic photosynthesis involves capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process fundamental to life including plant productivity on Earth. Photosynthetic electron transport is catalyzed by two photochemical reaction centres in series, photosystem II (PS II) and photosytem I (...

  19. Cyanobacterial photosystem II at 2.9-A resolution and the role of quinones, lipids, channels and chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Kern, Jan; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Saenger, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large homodimeric protein-cofactor complex located in the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane that acts as light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. The crystal structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 2.9-A resolution allowed the unambiguous assignment

  20. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II - Consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, Koen; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial

  1. Supercomplexes of plant photosystem I with cytochrome b6f, light-harvesting complex II and NDH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yadav, K N Sathish; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Nosek, Lukáš; Kouřil, Roman; Fucile, Geoffrey; Boekema, Egbert J; Eichacker, Lutz A

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a pigment-protein complex required for the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis and participates in light-harvesting and redox-driven chloroplast metabolism. Assembly of PSI into supercomplexes with light harvesting complex (LHC) II, cytochrome b6f (Cytb6f) or NAD(P)H

  2. Photoprotection in higher plants : The putative quenching site is conserved in all outer light-harvesting complexes of Photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mozzo, Milena; Passarini, Francesca; Bassi, Roberto; van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    In bright sunlight, the amount of energy harvested by plants exceeds the electron transport capacity of Photosystem II in the chloroplasts. The excess energy can lead to severe damage of the photosynthetic apparatus and to avoid this, part of the energy is thermally dissipated via a mechanism called

  3. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Trinkunas, G.; Hoek, van A.; Croce, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial excited-s

  4. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II - Consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, Koen; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial excited-s

  5. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.F.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in

  6. Hydrogen Photoevolution Indicates an Increase in the Antenna Size of Photosystem I in Chlamydobotrys stellata during Transition from Autotrophic to Photoheterotrophic Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, V A; Wiessner, W; Klimov, V V; Mende, D; Demeter, S

    1992-09-01

    The changes in the light-harvesting antenna size of photosystem I were investigated in the green alga Chlamydobotrys stellata during transition from autotrophic to photoheterotrophic nutrition by measuring the light-saturation behavior of hydrogen evolution following single turnover flashes. It was found that during autotrophic-to-photoheterotrophic transition the antenna size of photosystem I increased from 180 to 250 chlorophyll. The chlorophyll (a + b)/P700 ratio decreased from 800 to 550. The electron transport of photosystem I measured from reduced 2,6-dichloro-phenolindophenol to methylviologen was accelerated 1.4 times. In the 77K fluorescence spectra, the photosystem II fluorescence yield was considerably lowered relative to the photosystem I fluorescence yield. It is suggested that the increased light-harvesting capacity and redistribution of absorbed excitation energy in favor of photosystem I is a response of photoheterotrophic algae to meet the ATP demand for acetate metabolism by efficient photosystem I cyclic electron transport when the noncyclic photophosphorylation is inhibited by CO(2) deficiency.

  7. Quality control of Photosystem II: the mechanisms for avoidance and tolerance of light and heat stresses are closely linked to membrane fluidity of the thylakoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi Yamamoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available When oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are exposed to excessive light and/or heat, Photosystem II is damaged and electron transport is blocked. In these events, reactive oxygen species, endogenous radicals and lipid peroxidation products generated by photochemical reaction and/or heat cause the damage. Regarding light stress, plants first dissipate excessive light energy captured by light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complexes as heat to avoid the hazards, but once light stress is unavoidable, they tolerate the stress by concentrating damage in a particular protein in photosystem II, i.e. the reaction-center binding D1 protein of Photosystem II. The damaged D1 is removed by specific proteases and replaced with a new copy produced through de novo synthesis (reversible photoinhibition. When light intensity becomes extremely high, irreversible aggregation of D1 occurs and thereby D1 turnover is prevented. Once the aggregated products accumulate in Photosystem II complexes, removal of them by proteases is difficult, and irreversible inhibition of Photosystem II takes place (irreversible photoinhibition. Important is that various aspects of both the reversible and irreversible photoinhibition are highly dependent on the membrane fluidity of the thylakoids. Heat stress-induced inactivation of photosystem II is an irreversible process, which may be also affected by the fluidity of the thylakoid membranes. Here I describe why the membrane fluidity is a key to regulate the avoidance and tolerance of Photosystem II on environmental stresses.

  8. Controlling thermal properties of dense gas fluidized beds for concentrated solar power by internal and external solids circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, Paola; Bareschino, Piero; Chirone, Riccardo; Salatino, Piero; Solimene, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    Fluidization technology displays a long record of success stories, mostly related to applications to thermal and thermochemical processes, which are fostering extension to novel and relatively unexplored fields. Application of fluidized beds to collection and thermal storage of solar radiation in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is one of the most promising, a field which poses challenging issues and great opportunities to fluidization scientists and technologists. The potential of this growing field calls for reconsideration of some of the typical design and operation guidelines and criteria, with the goal of exploiting the inherently good thermal performances of gas-fluidized beds at their best. "Creative" and non-conventional design and operation of fluidized beds, like those based on internal and external solids circulation, may be beneficial to the enhancement of thermal diffusivity and surface-to-bed heat transfer, improving the potential for application in the very demanding context of CSP with thermal energy storage. This paper investigated: i) a fluidized bed configuration with an uneven distribution of the fluidizing gas to promote vortices in the scale of bed height (internal solids circulation); ii) a dual fluidized bed configuration characterized by an external solids circulation achieved by the operation of a riser and a bubbling fluidized bed. CFD simulations showed the hydrodynamics conditions under which the internal solids circulation was established. The hydrodynamic characterization of the external solids circulation was achieved by an experimental study carried out with different cold models. The dual fluidized bed system was optimized in terms of operating conditions and geometrical features of the connections between two fluidized beds.

  9. Walkable dual emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Hai-Bing; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Kang, Bin; Deng, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Walkable dual emissions, in which the emission bands of the walker reversibly cross or leave those of the stationary ones depending on temperature and concentration, have been demonstrated in cyclic...

  10. Designing a CR Test bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Research on intelligent and reconfigurable wireless systems is in continuous evolution. Nevertheless, in order to fix some keystones, more and more researchers are entering the idea of research-oriented test beds. Unfortunately, it is very difficult for a wide number of research groups to start w...

  11. Laboratory rearing of bed bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The resurgence of bed bugs Cimex lectularius L. in the United States and worldwide has resulted in an increase in research by university, government, and industry scientists directed at the biology and control of this blood-sucking pest. A need has subsequently arisen for producing sufficient biolog...

  12. How to Find Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find and correctly identify an infestation early before it becomes widespread. Look for rusty or reddish stains and pinpoint dark spots on bed sheets or mattresses, and search for bugs near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring.

  13. Protein crystallization and initial neutron diffraction studies of the photosystem II subunit PsbO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommer, Martin; Coates, Leighton; Dau, Holger; Zouni, Athina; Dobbek, Holger

    2017-09-01

    The PsbO protein of photosystem II stabilizes the active-site manganese cluster and is thought to act as a proton antenna. To enable neutron diffraction studies, crystals of the β-barrel core of PsbO were grown in capillaries. The crystals were optimized by screening additives in a counter-diffusion setup in which the protein and reservoir solutions were separated by a 1% agarose plug. Crystals were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Initial neutron diffraction data were collected from a 0.25 mm(3) crystal at room temperature using the MaNDi single-crystal diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Effect of phosphatidylglycerol on conformation and microenvironment of tyrosyl residue in photosystem II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳振乐; 李良璧; 许亦农; 匡廷云

    2000-01-01

    The structural aspects in the interaction of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) with photosystem II (PSIl), mainly the effect of PQ on conformation and microenvironment of tyrosine residues of PSIl proteins were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that the binding of PG to PSIl particle induces changes in the conformation and micropolarity of phenol ring in the tyrosine residues. In other words, the PG effect on the PSIl results in blue shift of the stretch vibrational band in the phenol ring from 1620 to 1500 cm-1 with the enhancement of the absorb-ance intensity. Additionally, a new spectrum of hydrogen bond was also observed. The results imply that the hydrogen-bond formation between the OH group of phenol and one of PG might cause changes in the structures of tyrosine residues in PSIl proteins.

  15. Effect of phosphatidylglycerol on conformation and micro-environment of tyrosyl residue in photosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The structural aspects in the interaction of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) with photosystem II (PSII),mainly the effect of PG on conformation and microenvironment of tyrosine residues of PSII proteins were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.It was found that the binding of PG to PSII particle induces changes in the conformation and micropolarity of phenol ring in the tyrosine residues.In other words,the PG effect on the PSII results in blue shift of the stretch vibrational band in the phenol ring from 1620 to 1500 cm-1 with the enhancement of the absorbance intensity.Additionally,a new spectrum of hydrogen bond was also observed.The results imply that the hydrogen-bond formation between the OH group of phenol and one of PG might cause changes in the structures of tyrosine residues in PSII proteins.

  16. Effect of Mn cluster on the formation of superoxide radicals in photoinhibition of photosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To further realize the action of superoxide radicals (O-2) in photoinhibition of photosystem Ⅱ (PS Ⅱ),we employed 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap, associated with EPR spectroscopy, to study the effect of illumination time on O-*2 formation during high light photoinhibition in PS Ⅱ membranes and Mn-depleted PS Ⅱ membranes. Results indicated that the removal of Mn cluster from PSⅡmembranes has a strong influence on the dynamnics of superoxide formation.The relative mechanism was also discussed.These novel findings may further promote the studies of the structure and function of PSⅡand the mechanism of photoinhibition.

  17. Effect of Phosphatidylcholine on the Steady State Fluorescence of Chlorophyll in Photosystem Ⅱ Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) accounts for less than 1% of the total lipids in plant photosystem II (PSII) particles.In this experiment, PSII particles were reconstituted with PC to construct PSII-PC vesicles.The effect of PC on the steady state fluorescence of chlorophyll (Chl) in PSII particles was studied.The results show that PC significantly affected the fluorescence intensity, but did not obviously affect the fluorescence emission band peak position.PC also did not obviously affect the absorbance at 436 nm or the amide I band peak position in FT-IR spectroscopy of PSII particles.The results suggest that PC may affect the light energy transfer from the antenna chlorophyll molecules to the reaction center chlorophyll molecule (P680).

  18. The optoelectronic properties of a photosystem I-carbon nanotube hybrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaniber, Simone M; Holleitner, Alexander W [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Simmel, Friedrich C [LMU Munich, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 Muenchen (Germany); Carmeli, Itai, E-mail: holleitner@wsi.tum.d, E-mail: itai@post.tau.ac.i [Chemistry Department and NIBN, Ben Gurion University, 84105 Be' er Sheva (Israel)

    2009-08-26

    The photoconductance properties of photosystem I (PSI) covalently bound to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are measured. We demonstrate that the PSI forms active electronic junctions with the CNTs, enabling control of the CNTs' photoconductance by the PSI. In order to electrically contact the photoactive proteins, a cysteine mutant is generated at one end of the PSI by genetic engineering. The CNTs are covalently bound to this reactive group using carbodiimide chemistry. We detect an enhanced photoconductance signal of the hybrid material at photon wavelengths resonant to the absorption maxima of the PSI compared to non-resonant wavelengths. The measurements prove that it is feasible to integrate photosynthetic proteins into optoelectronic circuits at the nanoscale.

  19. Methodology of Pulsed Photoacoustics and Its Application to Probe Photosystems and Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey J.M. Hou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We review recent advances in the methodology of pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics and its application to studies of photosynthetic reaction centers and membrane receptors such as the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. The experimental parameters accessible to photoacoustics include molecular volume change and photoreaction enthalpy change. Light-driven volume change secondary to protein conformational changes or electrostriction is directly related to the photoreaction and thus can be a useful measurement of activity and function. The enthalpy changes of the photochemical reactions observed can be measured directly by photoacoustics. With the measurement of enthalpy change, the reaction entropy can also be calculated when free energy is known. Dissecting the free energy of a photoreaction into enthalpic and entropic components may provide critical information about photoactivation mechanisms of photosystems and photoreceptors. The potential limitations and future applications of time-resolved photoacoustics are also discussed.

  20. Effects of Exogenous Spermidine on Photosystem Ⅱ of Wheat Seedlings Under Water Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Guo Duan; Shu Yuan; Wen-Juan Liu; De-Hui Xi; Dong-Hong Qing; Hou-Guo Liang; Hong-Hui Lin

    2006-01-01

    The effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on lipid peroxidation, relative plasma membrane permeability,photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) gene expression and PSⅡ photochemical activity in water-stressed wheat seedlings were investigated. The decrease in relative water content (RWC), Chi content, and 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCIP) photoreduction of PSⅡ, and increases in electrolyte leakage of plasma membranes and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in water-stressed leaves was alleviated by Spd pretreatment. Furthermore, Western and Northern blot analysis showed that decreases in the PSⅡ major proteins D1, D2 and LHCⅡ and the transcripts of corresponding genes psbA, psbD and cab were also alleviated by Spd pretreatment under water stress. These results suggest that the application of exogenous Spd protects PSⅡ against water stress at both the transcriptional level and the translational level, and allows PSⅡ to retain a higher activity level during water stress. The protective role of Spd in the photosynthetic apparatus also is discussed.

  1. Efficiency of energy funneling in the photosystem II supercomplex of higher plants

    CERN Document Server

    Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of energy transfer properties in photosynthetic multi-protein networks gives insight into their underlying design principles.Here, we discuss excitonic energy transfer mechanisms of the photosystem II (PS-II) C$_2$S$_2$M$_2$ supercomplex, which is the largest isolated functional unit of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants.Despite the lack of a decisive energy gradient in C$_2$S$_2$M$_2$, we show that the energy transfer is directed by relaxation to low energy states. C$_2$S$_2$M$_2$ is not organized to form pathways with strict energetic downhill transfer, which has direct consequences on the transfer efficiency, transfer pathways and transfer limiting steps. The exciton dynamics is sensitive to small structural changes, which, for instance, are induced by the reorganization of vibrational coordinates. In order to incorporate the reorganization process in our numerical simulations, we go beyond rate equations and use the hierarchically coupled equation of motion approach (HEOM). Wh...

  2. Effects of Irregular Bimetallic Nanostructures on the Optical Properties of Photosystem I from Thermosynechococcus elongatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ashraf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence of photosystem I (PSI trimers in proximity to bimetallic plasmonic nanostructures have been explored by single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS at cryogenic temperature (1.6 K. PSI serves as a model for biological multichromophore-coupled systems with high potential for biotechnological applications. Plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by thermal annealing of thin metallic films. The fluorescence of PSI has been intensified due to the coupling with plasmonic nanostructures. Enhancement factors up to 22.9 and 5.1 are observed for individual PSI complexes coupled to Au/Au and Ag/Au samples, respectively. Additionally, a wavelength dependence of fluorescence enhancement is observed, which can be explained by the multichromophoric composition of PSI.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of photocurrents and H2O2 evolution from solvent exposed photosystem 2 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöpel, Tobias; Ning Saw, En; Hartmann, Volker; Williams, Rhodri; Müller, Frank; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Plumeré, Nicolas; Nowaczyk, Marc; Ebbinghaus, Simon; Rögner, Matthias

    2015-03-22

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem 2 (PS2) catalyzes the light driven oxidation of water. The main products of this reaction are protons and molecular oxygen. In vitro, however, it was demonstrated that reactive oxygen species like hydrogen peroxide are obtained as partially reduced side products. The transition from oxygen to hydrogen peroxide evolution might be induced by light triggered degradation of PS2's active center. Herein, the authors propose an analytical approach to investigate light induced bioelectrocatalytic processes such as PS2 catalyzed water splitting. By combining chronoamperometry and fluorescence microscopy, the authors can simultaneously monitor the photocurrent and the hydrogen peroxide evolution of light activated, solvent exposed PS2 complexes, which have been immobilized on a functionalized gold electrode. The authors show that under limited electron mediation PS2 displays a lower photostability that correlates with an enhanced H2O2 generation as a side product of the light induced water oxidation.

  4. Photosystem I in Langmuir-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaefer monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xun; Faulkner, Christopher J; Jennings, G Kane; Cliffel, David E

    2012-10-23

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a membrane protein complex that generates photoinduced electrons and transfers them across the thylakoid membrane during photosynthesis. The PSI complex, separated from spinach leaves, was spread onto the air-water interface as a monolayer and transferred onto a gold electrode surface that was precoated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The electrochemical properties of the transferred PSI monolayer, including cyclic voltammetry and photoinduced chronoamperometry, were measured. The results showed that PSI retained its bioactivity after the manipulation. Its capability of converting photoenergy into electrical potential was demonstrated by its reducing an electron acceptor, dichloroindophenol (DCIP), and by oxidizing an electron donor, sodium ascorbate (ASC). We have shown that the protein has two possible orientations at the water interface. The orientation distribution was determined by comparing the controlled reductive and oxidative photocurrents generated from Langmuir-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaefer monolayers.

  5. Methodology of Pulsed Photoacoustics and Its Application to Probe Photosystems and Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Harvey J.M.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    We review recent advances in the methodology of pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics and its application to studies of photosynthetic reaction centers and membrane receptors such as the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. The experimental parameters accessible to photoacoustics include molecular volume change and photoreaction enthalpy change. Light-driven volume change secondary to protein conformational changes or electrostriction is directly related to the photoreaction and thus can be a useful measurement of activity and function. The enthalpy changes of the photochemical reactions observed can be measured directly by photoacoustics. With the measurement of enthalpy change, the reaction entropy can also be calculated when free energy is known. Dissecting the free energy of a photoreaction into enthalpic and entropic components may provide critical information about photoactivation mechanisms of photosystems and photoreceptors. The potential limitations and future applications of time-resolved photoacoustics are also discussed. PMID:22219680

  6. Covalent immobilization of oriented photosystem II on a nanostructured electrode for solar water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Cardona, Tanai; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2013-07-24

    Photosystem II (PSII) offers a biological and sustainable route of photochemical water oxidation to O2 and can provide protons and electrons for the generation of solar fuels, such as H2. We present a rational strategy to electrostatically improve the orientation of PSII from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus , on a nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and to covalently immobilize PSII on the electrode. The ITO electrode was modified with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of phosphonic acid ITO linkers with a dangling carboxylate moiety. The negatively charged carboxylate attracts the positive dipole on the electron acceptor side of PSII via Coulomb interactions. Covalent attachment of PSII in its electrostatically improved orientation to the SAM-modified ITO electrode was accomplished via an amide bond to further enhance red-light-driven, direct electron transfer and stability of the PSII hybrid photoelectrode.

  7. Effects of CeCl3 on Energy Transfer and Oxygen Evolution in Spinach Photosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Due to 4f electron characteristics and alternation valence, cerium involved in an oxidation-reduction reaction in plant, closely relating to photosynthesis. Our studies proved that cerium could promote photosynthesis and greatly improve spinach growth. However, the mechanism of promoting energy transfer and conversion by cerium remains unclear. Here we reported that the effects of Ce3+ on energy transfer and oxygen evolution in photosystem Ⅱ(PSⅡ) isolated from spinach, which was related to 4f electron characteristics and alternation valence in Ce molecule. The methods of absorption spectrum, fluorescence spectrum were used in the research. Results showed that Ce3+ treatment at low concentration could suitably change PSⅡ microenvironment, increase the absorbance of visible light, improve the energy transfer among amino acids within PSⅡ protein-pigment complex, and accelerate energy transport from tyrosine residue to chlorophyll a. In summary, the photochemical activity of PSⅡ(fluorescence quantum yield) and its oxygen evolving rate were enhanced by Ce3+.

  8. Filling the Green Gap of a Megadalton Photosystem I Complex by Conjugation of Organic Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordiichuk, Pavlo I; Rimmerman, Dolev; Paul, Avishek; Gautier, Daniel A; Gruszka, Agnieszka; Saller, Manfred; de Vries, Jan Willem; Wetzelaer, Gert-Jan A H; Manca, Marianna; Gomulya, Widianta; Matmor, Maayan; Gloukhikh, Ekaterina; Loznik, Mark; Ashkenasy, Nurit; Blom, Paul W M; Rögner, Matthias; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Richter, Shachar; Herrmann, Andreas

    2016-01-20

    Photosynthesis is Nature's major process for converting solar into chemical energy. One of the key players in this process is the multiprotein complex photosystem I (PSI) that through absorption of incident photons enables electron transfer, which makes this protein attractive for applications in bioinspired photoactive hybrid materials. However, the efficiency of PSI is still limited by its poor absorption in the green part of the solar spectrum. Inspired by the existence of natural phycobilisome light-harvesting antennae, we have widened the absorption spectrum of PSI by covalent attachment of synthetic dyes to the protein backbone. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence reveal that energy transfer occurs from these dyes to PSI. It is shown by oxygen-consumption measurements that subsequent charge generation is substantially enhanced under broad and narrow band excitation. Ultimately, surface photovoltage (SPV) experiments prove the enhanced activity of dye-modified PSI even in the solid state.

  9. Mass transfer controlled reactions in packed beds at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedkiw, P.S.

    1978-12-01

    The a priori prediction and correlation of mass-transfer rates in transport limited, packed-bed reactors at low Reynolds numbers is examined. The solutions to the governing equations for a flow-through porous electrode reactor indicate that these devices must operate at a low space velocity to suppress a large ohmic potential drop. Packed-bed data for the mass-transfer rate at such low Reynolds numbers were examined and found to be sparse, especially in liquid systems. Prior models to simulate the solid-void structure in a bed are reviewed. Here the bed was envisioned as an array of sinusoidal periodically constricted tubes (PCT). Use of this model has not appeared in the literature. The velocity field in such a tube should be a good approximation to the converging-diverging character of the velocity field in an actual bed. The creeping flow velocity profiles were calculated. These results were used in the convective-diffusion equation to find mass transfer rates at high Peclet number for both deep and shallow beds, for low Peclet numbers in a deep bed. All calculations assumed that the reactant concentration at the tube surface is zero. Mass-transfer data were experimentally taken in a transport controlled, flow-through porous electrode to test the theoretical calculations and to provide data resently unavailable for deeper beds. It was found that the sinusoidal PCT model could not fit the data of this work or that available in the literature. However, all data could be adequately described by a model which incorporates a channelingeffect. The bed was successfully modeled as an array of dual sized straight tubes.

  10. Application of peptide gemini surfactants as novel solubilization surfactants for photosystems I and II of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeda, Shuhei; Umezaki, Katsunari; Noji, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kondo, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Taga, Keijiro; Dewa, Takehisa; Ito, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toshiki; Mizuno, Toshihisa

    2013-09-17

    We designed novel peptide gemini surfactants (PG-surfactants), DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D, which can solubilize Photosystem I (PSI) of Thermosynecoccus elongatus and Photosystem II (PSII) of Thermosynecoccus vulcanus in an aqueous buffer solution. To assess the detailed effects of PG-surfactants on the original supramolecular membrane protein complexes and functions of PSI and PSII, we applied the surfactant exchange method to the isolated PSI and PSII. Spectroscopic properties, light-induced electron transfer activity, and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that PSI and PSII could be solubilized not only with retention of the original supramolecular protein complexes and functions but also without forming aggregates. Furthermore, measurement of the lifetime of light-induced charge-separation state in PSI revealed that both surfactants, especially DKDKC12D, displayed slight improvement against thermal denaturation below 60 °C compared with that using β-DDM. This degree of improvement in thermal resistance still seems low, implying that the peptide moieties did not interact directly with membrane protein surfaces. By conjugating an electron mediator such as methyl viologen (MV(2+)) to DKDKC12K (denoted MV-DKDKC12K), we obtained derivatives that can trap the generated reductive electrons from the light-irradiated PSI. After immobilization onto an indium tin oxide electrode, a cathodic photocurrent from the electrode to the PSI/MV-DKDKC12K conjugate was observed in response to the interval of light irradiation. These findings indicate that the PG-surfactants DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D provide not only a new class of solubilization surfactants but also insights into designing other derivatives that confer new functions on PSI and PSII.

  11. What computational chemistry and magnetic resonance reveal concerning the oxygen evolving centre in Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrett, Richard; Petrie, Simon; Stranger, Rob; Pace, Ron J

    2016-09-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) computational studies of the Mn4/Ca Oxygen Evolving Complex (OEC) region of Photosystem II in the paramagnetic S2 and S3 states of the water oxdizing catalytic cycle are described. These build upon recent advances in computationally understanding the detailed S1 state OEC geometries, revealed by the recent high resolution Photosystem II crystal structures of Shen et al., at 1.90Å and 1.95Å (Petrie et al., 2015, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 54, 7120). The models feature a 'Low Oxidation Paradigm' assumption for the mean Mn oxidation states in the functional enzyme, with the mean oxidation levels being 3.0, 3.25 and 3.5 in S1, S2 and S3, respectively. These calculations are used to infer magnetic exchange interactions within the coupled OEC cluster, particularly in the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR)-visible S2 and S3 states. Detailed computational estimates of the intrinsic magnitudes and molecular orientations of the (55)Mn hyperfine tensors in the S2 state are presented. These parameters, together with the resultant spin projected hyperfine values are compared with recent appropriate experimental EPR data (Continuous Wave (CW), Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and ELDOR (Electron-Electron Double Resonance)-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EDNMR)) from the OEC. It is found that an effective Coupled Dimer magnetic organization of the four Mn in the OEC cluster in the S2 and S3 states is able to quantitatively rationalize the observed (55)Mn hyperfine data. This is consistent with structures we propose to represent the likely state of the OEC in the catalytically active form of the enzyme.

  12. A miniature bioassay for testing the acute phytotoxicity of photosystem II herbicides on seagrass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Photosystem II (PSII herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/F(m' was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/F(m' by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes, indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m(-2 s(-1. High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future.

  13. Photoinhibition of photosystem I in a pea mutant with altered LHCII organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A G; Morgan-Kiss, R M; Krol, M; Allakhverdiev, S I; Zanev, Yu; Sane, P V; Huner, N P A

    2015-11-01

    Comparative analysis of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) of leaves of the Costata 2/133 pea mutant with altered pigment composition and decreased level of oligomerization of the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complexes (LHCII) of PSII (Dobrikova et al., 2000; Ivanov et al., 2005) did not differ from that of WT. In contrast, photosystem I (PSI) activity of the Costata 2/133 mutant measured by the far-red (FR) light inducible P700 (P700(+)) signal exhibited 39% lower steady state level of P700(+), a 2.2-fold higher intersystem electron pool size (e(-)/P700) and higher rate of P700(+) re-reduction, which indicate an increased capacity for PSI cyclic electron transfer (CET) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than WT. The mutant also exhibited a limited capacity for state transitions. The lower level of oxidizable P700 (P700(+)) is consistent with a lower amount of PSI related chlorophyll protein complexes and lower abundance of the PsaA/PsaB heterodimer, PsaD and Lhca1 polypeptides in Costata 2/133 mutant. Exposure of WT and the Costata 2/133 mutant to high light stress resulted in a comparable photoinhibition of PSII measured in vivo, although the decrease of Fv/Fm was modestly higher in the mutant plants. However, under the same photoinhibitory conditions PSI photochemistry (P700(+)) measured as ΔA820-860 was inhibited to a greater extent (50%) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than in the WT (22%). This was accompanied by a 50% faster re-reduction rate of P700(+) in the dark indicating a higher capacity for CET around PSI in high light treated mutant leaves. The role of chloroplast thylakoid organization on the stability of the PSI complex and its susceptibility to high light stress is discussed.

  14. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaleo, R; Reyes-Díaz, M; Alberdi, M; Ivanov, A G; Krol, M; Hüner, N P A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50-1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as F(v)/F(m), although the characteristic peak temperature of the S(2/3)Q(B) (-) charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33 kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700(+)) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700(+) re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed.

  15. A miniature bioassay for testing the acute phytotoxicity of photosystem II herbicides on seagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O'Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/F(m)') was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/F(m)' by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future.

  16. Mechanism of interaction of Al3+ with the proteins composition of photosystem II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Hasni

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of Al3+on photosystem II (PSII electron transport was investigated using several biophysical and biochemical techniques such as oxygen evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence induction and emission, SDS-polyacrylamide and native green gel electrophoresis, and FTIR spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of its inhibitory action, we have analyzed the interaction of this toxic cation with proteins subunits of PSII submembrane fractions isolated from spinach. Our results show that Al 3+, especially above 3 mM, strongly inhibits oxygen evolution and affects the advancement of the S states of the Mn4O5Ca cluster. This inhibition was due to the release of the extrinsic polypeptides and the disorganization of the Mn4O5Ca cluster associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC of PSII. This fact was accompanied by a significant decline of maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm together with a strong damping of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. The energy transfer from light harvesting antenna to reaction centers of PSII was impaired following the alteration of the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII. The latter result was revealed by the drop of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature (77 K, increase of F0 and confirmed by the native green gel electrophoresis. FTIR measurements indicated that the interaction of Al 3+ with the intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of PSII induces major alterations of the protein secondary structure leading to conformational changes. This was reflected by a major reduction of α-helix with an increase of β-sheet and random coil structures in Al 3+-PSII complexes. These structural changes are closely related with the functional alteration of PSII activity revealed by the inhibition of the electron transport chain of PSII.

  17. Comparison of excitation energy transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I in solution and immobilized on conducting glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Sebastian; Giera, Wojciech; D'Haene, Sandrine; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Excitation energy transfer in monomeric and trimeric forms of photosystem I (PSI) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in solution or immobilized on FTO conducting glass was compared using time-resolved fluorescence. Deposition of PSI on glass preserves bi-exponential excitation decay of ~4-7 and ~21-25 ps lifetimes characteristic of PSI in solution. The faster phase was assigned in part to photochemical quenching (charge separation) of excited bulk chlorophylls and in part to energy transfer from bulk to low-energy (red) chlorophylls. The slower phase was assigned to photochemical quenching of the excitation equilibrated over bulk and red chlorophylls. The main differences between dissolved and immobilized PSI (iPSI) are: (1) the average excitation decay in iPSI is about 11 ps, which is faster by a few ps than for PSI in solution due to significantly faster excitation quenching of bulk chlorophylls by charge separation (~10 ps instead of ~15 ps) accompanied by slightly weaker coupling of bulk and red chlorophylls; (2) the number of red chlorophylls in monomeric PSI increases twice-from 3 in solution to 6 after immobilization-as a result of interaction with neighboring monomers and conducting glass; despite the increased number of red chlorophylls, the excitation decay accelerates in iPSI; (3) the number of red chlorophylls in trimeric PSI is 4 (per monomer) and remains unchanged after immobilization; (4) in all the samples under study, the free energy gap between mean red (emission at ~710 nm) and mean bulk (emission at ~686 nm) emitting states of chlorophylls was estimated at a similar level of 17-27 meV. All these observations indicate that despite slight modifications, dried PSI complexes adsorbed on the FTO surface remain fully functional in terms of excitation energy transfer and primary charge separation that is particularly important in the view of photovoltaic applications of this photosystem.

  18. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed...... rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected...... during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related...

  19. Impact of different discharge patterns on bed occupancy rate and bed waiting time: a simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhecheng

    2011-01-01

    Beds are one of the most important resources in a healthcare system. How to manage beds efficiently is an important indicator of the efficiency of the healthcare system. Bed management is challenging to many healthcare service providers in many aspects. In recent years, population growth and aging society impose extra pressure on bed requirement. There are usually two key performance indicators of a bed management system: bed occupancy rate and bed waiting time. In this paper, different discharge patterns and their impacts on the bed occupancy rate and bed waiting time are studied. A discrete event simulation model is constructed to evaluate the existing discharge pattern in a Singapore regional hospital using actual hospital admission and discharge transaction data. Then different discharge patterns are tested in the same context. Simulation results show that a proper discharge pattern significantly smoothes the fluctuation of bed occupancy rate and reduce the bed waiting time.

  20. Pulling a patient up in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving a patient in bed ... takes at least 2 people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can ... A slide sheet is the best way to prevent friction. If you do not have one, you ...

  1. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  2. Find a Bed Bug Pesticide Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduces the Bed Bug Product Search Tool, to help consumers find EPA-registered pesticides for bed bug infestation control. Inclusion in this database is not an endorsement. Always follow label directions carefully.

  3. Bed Bug Guidance for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    School nurses are often called upon to provide vital information to students, parents, teachers, and administrators. These tips on identifying, managing and preventing bed bugs will help you to effectively respond if bed bugs appear in your school.

  4. Videos, Webinars, Blogs Related to Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    These tools provide practical insight on issues such as integrated pest management (IPM) for schools, bed bug bites, how carpet beetles can help, bed bugs as hitchhikers, and preventing and controlling infestations.

  5. Chinese Bedding Technology Standard under Drafting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    National Home Textile Standardization Technology Committee(NHTSTC)set up its Bedding Branch Committee. This will promote the work of Chinese bedding technology standardization and a symbol that China step up to meet the

  6. [Historical analysis of the hospital bed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Fajardo-Dolci, Germán

    2010-01-01

    Until now the bed has been the basic physical resource in hospitals. This type of furniture has served to study and treat patients, through out the centuries it has undergone changes in the materials they are made of dimensions, functionality, accessories, aesthetic, and design. The hospital bed history is not well known, there are thousands of documents about the evolution of hospitals, but not enough is known about hospital beds, a link between the past and the present. The medical, anthropological, technological, social, and economic dynamics and knowledge have produced a variety of beds in general and hospital beds in particular. From instinctive, rustic, poor and irregular "sites" that have differed in shape and size they had evolved into ergonomic equipment. The history of the hospital bed reflects the culture, techniques and human thinking. Current hospital beds include several types: for adults, for children, for labor, for intensive therapy, emergency purposes, census and non census beds etc.

  7. Simulation of biomass-steam gasification in fluidized bed reactors: Model setup, comparisons and preliminary predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Linbo; Lim, C Jim; Yue, Guangxi; He, Boshu; Grace, John R

    2016-12-01

    A user-defined solver integrating the solid-gas surface reactions and the multi-phase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) approach is built based on the OpenFOAM software. The solver is tested against experiments. Then, biomass-steam gasification in a dual fluidized bed (DFB) gasifier is preliminarily predicted. It is found that the predictions agree well with the experimental results. The bed material circulation loop in the DFB can form automatically and the bed height is about 1m. The voidage gradually increases along the height of the bed zone in the bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) of the DFB. The U-bend and cyclone can separate the syngas in the BFB and the flue gas in the circulating fluidized bed. The concentration of the gasification products is relatively higher in the conical transition section, and the dry and nitrogen-free syngas at the BFB outlet is predicted to be composed of 55% H2, 20% CO, 20% CO2 and 5% CH4.

  8. Some Challenges Posed by Coal Bed Methane Regional Assessment Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catherine R; Doherty, John; Howell, Stephen; Erriah, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Coal measures (coal bearing rock strata) can contain large reserves of methane. These reserves are being exploited at a rapidly increasing rate in many parts of the world. To extract coal seam gas, thousands of wells are drilled at relatively small spacing to depressurize coal seams to induce desorption and allow subsequent capture of the gas. To manage this process effectively, the effect of coal bed methane (CBM) extraction on regional aquifer systems must be properly understood and managed. Groundwater modeling is an integral part of this management process. However, modeling of CBM impacts presents some unique challenges, as processes that are operative at two very different scales must be adequately represented in the models. The impacts of large-scale gas extraction may be felt over a large area, yet despite the significant upscaling that accompanies construction of a regional model, near-well conditions and processes cannot be ignored. These include the highly heterogeneous nature of many coal measures, and the dual-phase flow of water and gas that is induced by coal seam depressurization. To understand these challenges, a fine-scale model was constructed incorporating a detailed representation of lithological heterogeneity to ensure that near-well processes and conditions could be examined. The detail of this heterogeneity was at a level not previously employed in models built to assess groundwater impacts arising from CBM extraction. A dual-phase reservoir simulator was used to examine depressurization and water desaturation processes in the vicinity of an extractive wellfield within this fine-scale model. A single-phase simulator was then employed so that depressurization errors incurred by neglecting near-well, dual-phase flow could be explored. Two models with fewer lithological details were then constructed in order to examine the nature of depressurization errors incurred by upscaling and to assess the interaction of the upscaling process with the

  9. Characteristics of fluidized-packed beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, J. D.; Mecham, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Study of fluidized-packed bed includes investigation of heat transfer, solids-gas mixing, and elutriation characteristics. A fluidized-packed bed is a system involving the fluidization of small particles in the voids of a packed bed of larger nonfluidized particles.

  10. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, C. Stuart; Hawk, James A.

    1995-01-01

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence.

  11. Bed Bug Education for School Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Missy

    2012-01-01

    Bed bugs are a growing problem, not only in homes and hotels, but also in schools and colleges. Facility administrators and staff need to understand the bed bug resurgence and develop best practices to deal with an infestation. In this article, the author offers tips for preventing and treating bed bugs in school and university settings.

  12. Bed Bug Education for School Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Missy

    2012-01-01

    Bed bugs are a growing problem, not only in homes and hotels, but also in schools and colleges. Facility administrators and staff need to understand the bed bug resurgence and develop best practices to deal with an infestation. In this article, the author offers tips for preventing and treating bed bugs in school and university settings.

  13. 21 CFR 868.5180 - Rocking bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rocking bed. 868.5180 Section 868.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5180 Rocking bed. (a) Identification. A rocking bed is a...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6070 - Bed board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bed board. 880.6070 Section 880.6070 Food and... GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6070 Bed board. (a) Identification. A bed board is a device intended for medical purposes that consists...

  15. Effect of H2O2 injection patterns on catalyst bed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjae; Lee, Dahae; Kang, Shinjae; Kwon, Sejin

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition process of hydrogen peroxide can be applied to a bipropellant thruster, as well as to monopropellant thruster. To provide a framework for the optimal design of the injector and catalyst bed depending on a type of thruster, this research scrutinizes the effect of injection patterns of the propellant on the performance of the catalyst bed. A showerhead injector and impinging jet injector were tested with a 50 N monopropellant thruster. Manganese oxide/γ-alumina catalyst and manganese oxide/lanthanum-doped alumina catalyst were prepared and tested. The showerhead injector provided a fast response time, suitable for pulse mode operation. The impinging jet injector mitigated the performance instability and catalyst attrition that is favorable for large scale bipropellant thrusters. The design of a dual catalyst bed was conceptually proposed based on the data obtained from firing tests.

  16. Age dependent alterations in photosystem II acceptor side in Cucumis sativus cotyledonary leaf thylakoids: analysis of binding characteristics of herbicide [14C]-atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, J S; Baig, M A; Mohanty, P

    1999-02-01

    Senescence induced temporal changes in photosystems can be conveniently studied in cotyledonary leaves. We monitored the protein, chlorophyll and electron transport activities in Cucumis sativus cv Poinsette cotyledonary leaves and observed that by 20th day, there was a 50%, 41% and 30-33% decline in the chlorophyll, protein and photosystem II activity respectively when compared to 6th day cotyledonary leaves taken as control. We investigated the changes in photosystem II activity (O2 evolution) as a function of light intensity. The photosystem II functional antenna decreased by 27% and the functional photosystem II units decreased by 30% in 20-day old cotyledonary leaf thylakoids. The herbicide [14C]-atrazine binding assay to monitor specific binding of the herbicide to the acceptor side of photosystem II reaction centre protein, D1, showed an increase in the affinity for atrazine towards D1 protein and decrease in the QB binding sites in 20th day leaf thylakoids when compared to 6th day leaf thylakoids. The western blot analysis also suggested a decrease in steady state levels of D1 protein in 20th day cotyledonary leaf thylakoids as compared to 6th day sample which is in agreement with [14C]-atrazine binding assay and light saturation kinetics.

  17. Ascorbic Acid Alleviates Damage from Heat Stress in the Photosystem II of Tall Fescue in Both the Photochemical and Thermal Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available L-Ascorbate (Asc plays important roles in plant development, hormone signaling, the cell cycle and cellular redox system, etc. The higher content of Asc in plant chloroplasts indicates its important role in the photosystem. The objective of this study was to study the roles of Asc in tall fescue leaves against heat stress. After a heat stress treatment, we observed a lower value of the maximum quantum yield for primary photochemistry (φPo, which reflects the inhibited activity of the photochemical phase of photosystem II (PSII. Moreover, we observed a higher value of efficiency of electron transfer from QB to photosystem I acceptors (δR0, which reflects elevated activity of the thermal phase of the photosystem of the tall fescue. The addition of Asc facilitate the behavior of the photochemical phase of the PSII by lowering the ROS content as well as that of the alternative electron donor to provide electron to the tyrosine residue of the D1 protein. Additionally, exogenous Asc reduces the activity of the thermal phase of the photosystem, which could contribute to the limitation of energy input into the photosystem in tall fescue against heat stress. Synthesis of the Asc increased under heat stress treatment. However, under heat stress this regulation does not occur at the transcription level and requires further study.

  18. High-and low-intensity photosystems in Phycomyces phototropism: Effects of mutations in genes madA, madB, and madC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, A; Galland, P; Lipson, E D

    1989-04-01

    Sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus Burgeff that have been grown in darkness and are then suddenly exposed to unilateral light show a two-step bending response rather than a smooth, monotonic response found in light-adapted specimens (Galland and Lipson, 1987, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 104-108). The stepwise bending is controlled by two photosystems optimized for the low-and high-intensity ranges. These two photosystems have now been studied in phototropism mutants with defects in genes madA, madB, and madC. All three mutations raise the threshold of the low-intensity (low-fluence) photosystem by about 10(6)-fold and that of the high-intensity (high-fluence) system by about 10(3)-fold. Estimates for the light-adaptation time constants of the low-and high-intensity photosystems show that the mutants are affected in adaptation. In the mutants, the light-adaptation kinetics are only slightly affected in the low-intensity photosystem but, for the high-intensity photosystem, the kinetics are considerably slower than in the wild type.

  19. Dual phase evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Green, David G; Abbass, Hussein A

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how dual phase evolution operates in all these settings and provides a detailed treatment of the subject. The authors discuss the theoretical foundations for the theory, how it relates to other phase transition phenomena and its advantages in evolutionary computation and complex adaptive systems. The book provides methods and techniques to use this concept for problem solving. Dual phase evolution concerns systems that evolve via repeated phase shifts in the connectivity of their elements. It occurs in vast range of settings, including natural systems (species evolution, landscape ecology, geomorphology), socio-economic systems (social networks) and in artificial systems (annealing, evolutionary computing).

  20. Review of acute cancer beds.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Evans, D S

    2012-01-01

    A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.

  1. Review of acute cancer beds.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Evans, D S

    2012-01-01

    A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.

  2. THE BAUXITES AND JELAR - BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Sakač

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Minor bauxite deposits and occurrences were formed in technically disturbed environments in the middle part of the Adriatic geotectonic unit in Dinarides, contemporary with the clastic Jelar-beds in the Late Lutetian time. Uneven chemical composition of these Eocene bauxites, their sporadic occurrences in developed paleorelief as well as characteristic petrographic composition of the immediate overlying rocks point out at different genetical conditions (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Commuting Dual Toeplitz Operators on the Polydisk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Feng LU; Shu Xia SHANG

    2007-01-01

    On the polydisk, the commutativity of dual Toeplitz operators is studied. We obtain characterizations of commuting dual Toeplitz operators, essentially commuting dual Toeplitz operators and essentially semi-commuting dual Toeplitz operators.

  4. Agglomeration-Free Distributor for Fluidized Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, F.; Sinica, A.; Levenspiel, O.

    1986-01-01

    New gas distributor for fluidized beds prevents hot particles from reacting on it and forming hard crust. In reduction of iron ore in fluidized bed, ore particles do not sinter on distributor and perhaps clog it or otherwise interfere with gas flow. Distributor also relatively cool. In fluidized-bed production of silicon, inflowing silane does not decompose until within bed of hot silicon particles and deposits on them. Plates of spiral distributor arranged to direct incoming gas into spiral flow. Turbulence in flow reduces frequency of contact between fluidized-bed particles and distributor.

  5. Photoinduced hydrogen evolution in an artificial system containing photosystem I,hydrogenase,methyl viologen and mercaptoacetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Jin Qian; Ai Rong Liu; Chikashi Nakamura; Stephan Olav Wenk; Jun Miyake

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution was detected in an artificial system composed of light-harvesting unit of purified photosystem Ⅰ, catalyst ofhydrogenase, methyl viologen and electron donor under radiation. Absorption spectral features confirmed that electron transferfrom electron donors to proton was via a photoinduced reductive process of methyl viologen.2008 Dong Jin Qian. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Equilibrium bed-concentration of nonuniform sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the equilibrium bed-concentration is vital to mathematical modeling of the river-bed deformation associated with suspended load but previous investigations only dealt with the reference concentration of uniform sediment because of difficulties in observation of the bed-concentration. This work is a first attempt to develop a theoretical formula for the equilibrium bed-concentration of any fraction of nonuniform sediment defined at the bed-surface. The formula is based on a stochastic-mechanistic model for the exchange of nonuniform sediment near the bed, and described as a function of incipient motion probability, non-ceasing probability, pick-up probability, and the ratio of the average single-step continuous motion time to static time. Comparison of bed-concentration calculated from the proposed formula with the measured data showed satisfactory agreement, indicating the present formula can be used for solving the differential equation governing the motion of suspended load.

  7. Early Dual Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genesee, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Parents and child care personnel in English-dominant parts of the world often express misgivings about raising children bilingually. Their concerns are based on the belief that dual language learning during the infant-toddler stage confuses children, delays their development, and perhaps even results in reduced language competence. In this…

  8. Primary light harvesting system: the relationship of phycobilisomes to photosystem I and II. Progress report, September 1983-March 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, E.

    1984-01-01

    It has long been known that energy absorbed by phycobiliproteins is transferred to photosystem II and is then distributed to I. Consequently, it has been predicted that phycobilisomes would be in close association with photosystem II. Our laboratory has succeeded in isolating phycobilisomes which have photosystem II activity, as measured by oxygen evolution, and reduction of dichlorophenol indophenol. In a special medium (0.5 M phosphate buffer, 0.5 M sucrose, 0.3 M citrate, and 10 mM magnesium chloride) the phycobilisomes remain intact, and the PS II activity is preserved. These preparations are deficient in the PS I reaction center pigment P700, as well as in the PS I polypeptide CP 1. Preparations of this system are being further characterized to determine the P680 content, to ascertain the DCMU-binding protein, cytochromes, and other polypeptides which are specific for PS II, and also for PS I. In addition, the sidedness of thylakoid membranes of red algae and cyanobacteria are also being explored by immunocytochemistry (EM) and fractionation on acrylamide gels. Attachment of the phycobilisomes, and the location of the terminal emitter of phycobilisomes, are an integral part of these studies. Results from these studies will aid in our understanding of the energy transfer in the photosynthetic apparatus of these groups of organisms which appear to have a considerable convergence from green plants.

  9. EPR characterisation of the triplet state in photosystem II reaction centers with singly reduced primary acceptor Q(A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikema, W Onno; Gast, Peter; Klenina, Irina B; Proskuryakov, Ivan I

    2005-09-05

    The triplet states of photosystem II core particles from spinach were studied using time-resolved cw EPR technique at different reduction states of the iron--quinone complex of the reaction center primary electron acceptor. With doubly reduced primary acceptor, the well-known photosystem II triplet state characterised by zero-field splitting parameters |D|=0.0286 cm(-1), |E|=0.0044 cm(-1) was detected. When the primary acceptor was singly reduced either chemically or photochemically, a triplet state of a different spectral shape was observed, bearing the same D and E values and characteristic spin polarization pattern arising from RC radical pair recombination. The latter triplet state was strongly temperature dependent disappearing at T=100 K, and had a much faster decay than the former one. Based on its properties, this triplet state was also ascribed to the photosystem II reaction center. A sequence of electron-transfer events in the reaction centers is proposed that explains the dependence of the triplet state properties on the reduction state of the iron--quinone primary acceptor complex.

  10. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrine, Zoee [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Sayre, Richard [The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  11. Effects of ethylene on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity in Bermuda grass under low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone ethylene has been reported to mediate plant response to cold stress. However, it is still debated whether the effect of ethylene on plant response to cold stress is negative or positive. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of ethylene in the cold resistance of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.). Under control (warm) condition, there was no obvious effect of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) or the antagonist Ag(+) of ethylene signaling on electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Under cold stress conditions, ACC-treated plant leaves had a greater level of EL and MDA than the untreated leaves. However, the EL and MDA values were lower in the Ag(+) regime versus the untreated. In addition, after 3 days of cold treatment, ACC remarkably reduced the content of soluble protein and also altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Under control (warm) condition, there was no significant effect of ACC on the performance of photosystem II (PS II) as monitored by chlorophyll α fluorescence transients. However, under cold stress, ACC inhibited the performance of PS II. Under cold condition, ACC remarkably reduced the performance index for energy conservation from excitation to the reduction of intersystem electron acceptors (PI(ABS)), the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0), the quantum yield of electron transport flux from Q(A) to Q(B) (φE0), and the efficiency/probability of electron transport (ΨE0). Simultaneously, ACC increased the values of specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) and dissipation (DI0/RC) after 3 days of cold treatment. Additionally, under cold condition, exogenous ACC altered the expressions of several related genes implicated in the induction of cold tolerance (LEA, SOD, POD-1 and CBF1, EIN3-1, and EIN3-2). The present study thus suggests that ethylene affects the cold tolerance of Bermuda grass by impacting the antioxidant system

  12. Prevalence and evolution of core photosystem II genes in marine cyanobacterial viruses and their hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Sullivan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyanophages (cyanobacterial viruses are important agents of horizontal gene transfer among marine cyanobacteria, the numerically dominant photosynthetic organisms in the oceans. Some cyanophage genomes carry and express host-like photosynthesis genes, presumably to augment the host photosynthetic machinery during infection. To study the prevalence and evolutionary dynamics of this phenomenon, 33 cultured cyanophages of known family and host range and viral DNA from field samples were screened for the presence of two core photosystem reaction center genes, psbA and psbD. Combining this expanded dataset with published data for nine other cyanophages, we found that 88% of the phage genomes contain psbA, and 50% contain both psbA and psbD. The psbA gene was found in all myoviruses and Prochlorococcus podoviruses, but could not be amplified from Prochlorococcus siphoviruses or Synechococcus podoviruses. Nearly all of the phages that encoded both psbA and psbD had broad host ranges. We speculate that the presence or absence of psbA in a phage genome may be determined by the length of the latent period of infection. Whether it also carries psbD may reflect constraints on coupling of viral- and host-encoded PsbA-PsbD in the photosynthetic reaction center across divergent hosts. Phylogenetic clustering patterns of these genes from cultured phages suggest that whole genes have been transferred from host to phage in a discrete number of events over the course of evolution (four for psbA, and two for psbD, followed by horizontal and vertical transfer between cyanophages. Clustering patterns of psbA and psbD from Synechococcus cells were inconsistent with other molecular phylogenetic markers, suggesting genetic exchanges involving Synechococcus lineages. Signatures of intragenic recombination, detected within the cyanophage gene pool as well as between hosts and phages in both directions, support this hypothesis. The analysis of cyanophage psbA and psb

  13. Temperature dependence and polarization of fluorescence from Photosystem I in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmershaus, B P; Woolf, V M; Vermaas, W F

    1992-02-01

    To determine the fluorescence properties of cyanobacterial Photosystem I (PS I) in relatively intact systems, fluorescence emission from 20 to 295 K and polarization at 77 K have been measured from phycobilisomes-less thylakoids of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and a mutant strain lacking Photosystem II (PS II). At 295 K, the fluorescence maxima are 686 nm in the wild type from PS I and PS II and at 688 nm from PS I in the mutant. This emission is characteristic of bulk antenna chlorophylls (Chls). The 690-nm fluorescence component of PS I is temperature independent. For wild-type and mutant, 725-nm fluorescence increases by a factor of at least 40 from 295 to 20 K. We model this temperature dependence assuming a small number of Chls within PS I, emitting at 725 nm, with an energy level below that of the reaction center, P700. Their excitation transfer rate to P700 decreases with decreasing temperature increasing the yield of 725-nm fluorescence.Fluorescence excitation spectra of polarized emission from low-energy Chls were measured at 77 and 295 K on the mutant lacking PS II. At excitation wavelengths longer than 715 nm, 760-nm emission is highly polarized indicating either direct excitation of the emitting Chls with no participation in excitation transfer or total alignment of the chromophores. Fluorescence at 760 nm is unpolarized for excitation wavelengths shorter than 690 nm, inferring excitation transfer between Chls before 760-nm fluorescence occurs.Our measurements illustrate that: 1) a single group of low-energy Chls (F725) of the core-like PS I complex in cyanobacteria shows a strongly temperature-dependent fluorescence and, when directly excited, nearly complete fluorescence polarization, 2) these properties are not the result of detergent-induced artifacts as we are examining intact PS I within the thylakoid membrane of S. 6803, and 3) the activation energy for excitation transfer from F725 Chls to P700 is less than that of F735 Chls in green plants; F725

  14. Hospital Bed Type, the Electronic Medical Record, and Safe Bed Elevation in the Intensive Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Zachary W; Duquaine, Damon; Ohkuma, Rika; Schneider, Eric B; Whitman, Glenn J R

    2016-01-01

    In mechanically ventilated patients, head of bed (HOB) elevation above 30° decreases the risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The research team studied (a) compliance with proper HOB elevation in their cardiac surgical intensive care unit, (b) the accuracy of HOB angles recorded in the electronic medical record (EMR), and (c) the effect of bed type on (a) and (b). Nurses were polled to discover how HOB angles were measured in practice. HOB angles were compliant in 80% of observations. Compliance was more frequent in beds with side-of-bed angle indicators (SBI) than beds with under-bed angle indicators (UBI; 88% vs 77%, P = .04). Charting in the EMR was accurate in 50% of SBI bed observations but only 20% of UBI bed observations (P bed type. Bedside indicators are underutilized. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. The Safety of Hospital Beds: Ingress, Egress, and In-Bed Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Janice M; Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients' ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients' use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated.

  16. The Berlin emissivity database (BED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.

    2008-03-01

    Remote-sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to the solar system bodies include in their payload, instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. Apart from measuring the reflected radiance, more and more spacecrafts are equipped with instruments measuring directly the emitted radiation from the planetary surface. The emitted radiation is not only a function of the composition of the material but also of its texture and especially the grain size distribution. For the interpretation of the measured data an emissivity spectral library of planetary analogue materials in grain size fractions appropriate for planetary surfaces is needed. The Berlin emissivity database (BED) presented here is focused on relatively fine-grained size separates, providing thereby a realistic basis for the interpretation of thermal emission spectra of planetary regoliths. The BED is therefore complimentary to existing thermal emission libraries, like the ASU library for example. BED currently contains emissivity spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulfur, Martian analogue minerals and volcanic soils, and a lunar highland soil sample measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 μm as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from <25 to 250 μm. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer Bruker IFS 88 purged with dry air and equipped with a nitrogen-cooled MCT detector. All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm -1. We are currently working on upgrading our emissivity facility. A new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80 V) and new detectors will allow us to measure the emissivity of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 μm in a vacuum environment. This will be

  17. Designing a CR Test bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    with their own set up, since the potential costs and efforts could not pay back in term of expected research results. Software Defined Radio solutions offer an easy way to communication researchers for the development of customized research test beds. While several hardware products are commercially available......, the software is most of the times open source and ready to use for third party users. Even though the software solution developers claim complete easiness in the development of custom applications, in reality there are a number of practical hardware and software issues that research groups need to face, before...... inspiration to researchers on how to possibly build their own customized systems....

  18. [Special beds. Pulmonary therapy system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto Rodríguez, Joaquín; Rodríguez Martínez, Xavier; Marín i Vivó, Gemma; Paunellas Albert, Josep

    2008-10-01

    To be bedridden reduces one's capacity to move and produces muscular debility that affects the respiratory system leading to a decreased effectiveness in expectoration, the ability to spit up sputum. The pulmonary therapy system integrated in a bed is the result of applying motorized elements to the articulation points of the bad in order to achieve safe positions at therapeutic angles, which improve the breathing-perfusion (blood flow) relationship. This system also makes it possible to apply vibration waves to the patient which favor the elimination of bronchial-pulmonary secretions, the rehabilitation of the bedridden patient and decrease the work load for nursing personnel.

  19. Structural organization of an intact phycobilisome and its association with photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Leifu; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Yanbing; Liu, Cui-Cui; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jindong; Sui, Sen-Fang

    2015-06-01

    Phycobilisomes (PBSs) are light-harvesting antennae that transfer energy to photosynthetic reaction centers in cyanobacteria and red algae. PBSs are supermolecular complexes composed of phycobiliproteins (PBPs) that bear chromophores for energy absorption and linker proteins. Although the structures of some individual components have been determined using crystallography, the three-dimensional structure of an entire PBS complex, which is critical for understanding the energy transfer mechanism, remains unknown. Here, we report the structures of an intact PBS and a PBS in complex with photosystem II (PSII) from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 using single-particle electron microscopy in combination with biochemical and molecular analyses. In the PBS structure, all PBP trimers and the conserved linker protein domains were unambiguously located, and the global distribution of all chromophores was determined. We provide evidence that ApcE and ApcF are critical for the formation of a protrusion at the bottom of PBS, which plays an important role in mediating PBS interaction with PSII. Our results provide insights into the molecular architecture of an intact PBS at different assembly levels and provide the basis for understanding how the light energy absorbed by PBS is transferred to PSII.

  20. The plastoquinol-plastoquinone exchange mechanism in photosystem II: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobnina, Veranika; Lambreva, Maya D; Rea, Giuseppina; Campi, Gaetano; Antonacci, Amina; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Giardi, Maria Teresa; Polticelli, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In the photosystem II (PSII) of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, the reaction center (RC) core mediates the light-induced electron transfer leading to water splitting and production of reduced plastoquinone molecules. The reduction of plastoquinone to plastoquinol lowers PSII affinity for the latter and leads to its release. However, little is known about the role of protein dynamics in this process. Here, molecular dynamics simulations of the complete PSII complex embedded in a lipid bilayer have been used to investigate the plastoquinol release mechanism. A distinct dynamic behavior of PSII in the presence of plastoquinol is observed which, coupled to changes in charge distribution and electrostatic interactions, causes disruption of the interactions seen in the PSII-plastoquinone complex and leads to the "squeezing out" of plastoquinol from the binding pocket. Displacement of plastoquinol closes the second water channel, recently described in a 2.9 Å resolution PSII structure (Guskov et al. in Nat Struct Mol Biol 16:334-342, 2009), allowing to rule out the proposed "alternating" mechanism of plastoquinol-plastoquinone exchange, while giving support to the "single-channel" one. The performed simulations indicated a pivotal role of D1-Ser264 in modulating the dynamics of the plastoquinone binding pocket and plastoquinol-plastoquinone exchange via its interaction with D1-His252 residue. The effects of the disruption of this hydrogen bond network on the PSII redox reactions were experimentally assessed in the D1 site-directed mutant Ser264Lys.

  1. Molecular functions of PsbP and PsbQ proteins in the photosystem II supercomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Kentaro; Ido, Kunio; Sato, Fumihiko

    2011-01-01

    The PsbP and PsbQ proteins are extrinsic subunits of the photosystem II (PSII) supercomplex, which are found in green plants including higher plants and green algae. These proteins are thought to have evolved from their cyanobacterial homologs; cyanoP and cyanoQ respectively. It has been suggested that the functions of PsbP and PsbQ have largely changed from those of cyanoP and cyanoQ. In addition, multiple isoforms and homologs of PsbP and PsbQ were found in green plants, indicating that the acquisition of PsbP and PsbQ in PSII is not a direct path but a result of intensive functional divergence during evolution from cyanobacterial endosymbiont to chloroplast. In this review, we highlight newly introduced topics related to the functions and structures of both PsbP and PsbQ proteins. The present data suggest that PsbP together with PsbQ have specific and important roles in coordinating the activity of the donor and acceptor sides of PSII and stabilizing the active form of the PSII-light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) supercomplex.

  2. Structural changes of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-08-02

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry.

  3. Photoprotection and recovery of photosystem II in the Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Tomoyo; Makabe, Ryosuke; Sampei, Makoto; Hattori, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    The future shoaling of surface mixed layer depth due to global warming will expose natural assemblages of phytoplankton to increased mean light. Under these conditions, photoprotective acclimation against high light can determine ecological success. We investigated photoprotective responses to sunlight and recovery from photodamage of photosystem II (PSII) in natural assemblages north and south of the Polar Front (PF). The decrease in the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) of PSII during direct sunlight exposure for 2 h was moderated progressively by the enhancement of diatoxanthin synthesis. When the light-exposed cells were incubated under three reduced light conditions, Fv/Fm recovered to more than the initial values north of the PF but did not reach initial values south of the PF. Temperatures higher in the north than the south of the PF could have induced the faster recovery from photodamage of PSII in assemblages north of the PF. These northern assemblages may be able to acclimate to fast-changing light conditions.

  4. Excitation-energy transfer dynamics of higher plant photosystem I light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wientjes, Emilie; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2011-03-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) plays a major role in the light reactions of photosynthesis. In higher plants, PSI is composed of a core complex and four outer antennas that are assembled as two dimers, Lhca1/4 and Lhca2/3. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements on the isolated dimers show very similar kinetics. The intermonomer transfer processes are resolved using target analysis. They occur at rates similar to those observed in transfer to the PSI core, suggesting competition between the two transfer pathways. It appears that each dimer is adopting various conformations that correspond to different lifetimes and emission spectra. A special feature of the Lhca complexes is the presence of an absorption band at low energy, originating from an excitonic state of a chlorophyll dimer, mixed with a charge-transfer state. These low-energy bands have high oscillator strengths and they are superradiant in both Lhca1/4 and Lhca2/3. This challenges the view that the low-energy charge-transfer state always functions as a quencher in plant Lhc's and it also challenges previous interpretations of PSI kinetics. The very similar properties of the low-energy states of both dimers indicate that the organization of the involved chlorophylls should also be similar, in disagreement with the available structural data.

  5. Photosynthetic Properties of Photosystem Ⅱ in Arabidopsis thaliana Ipa1 Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Wei Peng; Jin-Kui Guo; Jin-Fang Ma; Wei Chi; Li-Xin Zhang

    2006-01-01

    In a previous study, we characterized a high chlorophyll fluorescence Ipa1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana,in which approximately 20% photosystem (PS) Ⅱ protein is accumulated. In the present study, analysis of fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence profiles demonstrated that the electron transfer reaction on either the donor or acceptor side of PSll remained largely unaffected in the Ipa1 mutant. In the mutant, maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm, where Fm is the maximum fluorescence yield and Fv is variable fluorescence) decreased with increasing light intensity and remained almost unchanged in wildtype plants under different light conditions. The Fv/Fm values also increased when mutant plants were transferred from standard growth light to low light conditions. Analysis of PSⅡ protein accumulation further confirmed that the amount of PSll reaction center protein is correlated with changes in Fv/Fm in Ipa1 plants.Thus, the assembled PSll in the mutant was functional and also showed increased photosensitivity compared with wild-type plants.

  6. Phosphatidylglycerol effect on oxygen-evolving activity in Ca2+-depleted photosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of anionic phosphatidylglycerol (PG) on oxygen evolution in a photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) particle depleted of Ca2+ (designated dCaPSⅡ) has been investigated. The major finding is the observation of a new role of PG in the PSⅡ function. That is, PG restores nearly the lost oxygen evolution in dCaPSⅡ particle owing to Ca2+ depletion to the levels in intact PSⅡ. Furthermore, there is a stimulation of oxygen-evolving activity in the dCaPSⅡ complexed with PG in the presence of exogenous CaCl2, which PG enhances increasingly oxygen evolution with increasing CaCl2 concentration. It is suggested that PG-induced oxygen evolution recovery of dCa PSⅡ particle results from resumption of normal structure in protein by PG effect, whereas the enhancement of oxygen evolution in complex subject to CaCl2 is ascribed to the optimization of such a structure due to coordination complex formation of Ca2+ ions with PG.

  7. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a photosystem I/detergent complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Bradley J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cheng, Xiaolin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Frymier, Paul [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-09-18

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to investigate the solution structure and dynamics of the photosynthetic pigment protein complex photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus embedded in a toroidal belt of n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) detergent. Evaluation of root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) relative to the known crystal structure show that the protein complex surrounded by DDM molecules is stable during the 200 ns simulation time, and root-mean-square fluctuation (RMSF) analysis indicates that regions of high local mobility correspond to solvent-exposed regions such as turns in the transmembrane α-helices and flexible loops on the stromal and lumenal faces. Comparing the protein detergent complex to a pure detergent micelle, the detergent surrounding the PSI trimer is found to be less densely packed but with more ordered detergent tails, contrary to what is seen in most lipid bilayer models. We also investigated any functional implications for the observed conformational dynamics and protein detergent interactions, discovering interesting structural changes in the psaL subunits associated with maintaining the trimeric structure of the protein. Moreover, we find that the docking of soluble electron mediators such as cytochrome c6 and ferredoxin to PSI is not significantly impacted by the solubilization of PSI in detergent.

  8. Endophytic infection alleviates Pb(2+) stress effects on photosystem II functioning of Oryza sativa leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Lihong

    2015-09-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the effect of Pb(2+) stress on the primary reaction of photosynthesis and to assess the potential benefits of endophytic infection on the Pb(2+) tolerance of rice seedlings. Rice inoculated with an endophytic fungus (E+) and non-inoculated (E-) were subjected to 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 μM Pb(2+). The responses to Pb(2+) stress were characterized by the analysis of Chl a fluorescence. A comparison of E- with E+ rice seedlings, as evaluated by their performance index (PI(ABS) and PI(tot)), revealed the inhibitory effects of Pb(2+) on photosystem II (PSII) connectivity, the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), and on the J step of the induction curves, which is associated with an inhibition of electron transport from the quinone acceptor Q(A) to Q(B). Furthermore, the changes of the donor and the acceptor parameters of PSII were greater in E- than in E+ under Pb(2+) stress. These observations suggest that the efficiency and stability of PSII are markedly affected by Pb(2+) stress, and the photosynthetic energy conservation in E+ was more effective than in E-. We showed that endophytic infection plays an important role in enhancing the photosynthetic mechanism of rice seedlings exposed to Pb(2+) stress.

  9. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  10. A supramolecular ruthenium macrocycle with high catalytic activity for water oxidation that mechanistically mimics photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Marcus; Kunz, Valentin; Frischmann, Peter D.; Würthner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the ingenuity of nature and exploiting the billions of years over which natural selection has developed numerous effective biochemical conversions is one of the most successful strategies in a chemist's toolbox. However, an inability to replicate the elegance and efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (OEC-PSII) in its oxidation of water into O2 is a significant bottleneck in the development of a closed-loop sustainable energy cycle. Here, we present an artificial metallosupramolecular macrocycle that gathers three Ru(bda) centres (bda = 2,2‧-bipyridine-6,6‧-dicarboxylic acid) that catalyses water oxidation. The macrocyclic architecture accelerates the rate of water oxidation via a water nucleophilic attack mechanism, similar to the mechanism exhibited by OEC-PSII, and reaches remarkable catalytic turnover frequencies >100 s-1. Photo-driven water oxidation yields outstanding activity, even in the nM concentration regime, with a turnover number of >1,255 and turnover frequency of >13.1 s-1.

  11. Effects of Iron Limitation on Photosystem II Composition and Light Utilization in Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, I. R.; Kolber, Z.; Wyman, K. D.; Mauzerall, D.; Shukla, V. K.; Falkowski, P. G.

    1995-11-01

    The effects of iron limitation on photosystem II (PSII) composition and photochemical energy conversion efficiency were studied in the unicellular chlorophyte alga Dunaliella tertiolecta. The quantum yield of photochemistry in PSII, inferred from changes in variable fluorescence normalized to the maximum fluorescence yield, was markedly lower in iron-limited cells and increased 3-fold within 20 h following the addition of iron. The decrease in the quantum yield of photochemistry was correlated with increased fluorescence emission from the antenna. In iron-limited cells, flash intensity saturation profiles of variable fluorescence closely followed a cumulative one-hit Poisson model, suggesting that PSII reaction centers are energetically isolated, whereas in iron-replete cells, the slope of the profile was steeper and the calculated probability of energy transfer between reaction centers increased to >0.6. Immunoassays revealed that in iron-limited cells the reaction center proteins, D1, CP43, and CP47, were markedly reduced relative to the peripheral light-harvesting Chl-protein complex of PSII, whereas the [alpha] subunit of cytochrome b559 was about 10-fold higher. Spectroscopic analysis established that the cytochrome b559 peptide did not contain an associated functional heme. We conclude that the photochemical conversion of absorbed excitation energy in iron-limited cells is limited by the number of photochemical traps per unit antenna.

  12. Detection of photosynthetic energy storage in a photosystem I reaction center preparation by photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, T G; Carpentier, R; Leblanc, R M

    1990-06-01

    Thermal emission and photochemical energy storage were examined in photosystem I reaction center/core antenna complexes (about 40 Chl a/P700) using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Satisfactory signals could only be obtained from samples bound to hydroxyapatite and all samples had a low signal-to-noise ratio compared to either PS I or PS II in thylakoid membranes. The energy storage signal was saturated at low intensity (half saturation at 1.5 W m(-2)) and predicted a photochemical quantum yield of >90%. Exogenous donors and acceptors had no effect on the signal amplitudes indicating that energy storage is the result of charge separation between endogenous components. Fe(CN)6 (-3) oxidation of P700 and dithionite-induced reduction of acceptors FA-FB inhibited energy storage. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that energy storage in PS I arises from charge separation between P700 and Fe-S centers FA-FB that is stable on the time scale of the photoacoustic modulation. High intensity background light (160 W m(-2)) caused an irreversible loss of energy storage and correlated with a decrease in oxidizable P700; both are probably the result of high light-induced photoinhibition. By analogy to the low fluorescence yield of PS I, the low signal-to-noise ratio in these preparations is attributed to the short lifetime of Chl singlet excited states in PS I-40 and its indirect effect on the yield of thermal emission.

  13. Reconstitution of Photosystem Ⅱ Reaction Center with Cu-Chlorophyll a

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Liu; Feng-Qin Dong; Chun-Hong Yang; Chong-Qin Tang; Ting-Yun Kuang

    2006-01-01

    An isolated photosystem (PS) Ⅱ reaction center (RC) with altered pigment content was obtained by chemical exchange of native chlorophyll a (Chl) with externally added Cu-Chl a (Cu-Chl). Pigment composition and spectroscopic properties of the RC exchanged with Cu-Chl were compared with native RC and RC treated with Chl in the same way. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed approximately 0.5 Cu-Chl per two pheophytin in the Cu-Chl-reconstituted RC preparation. Insertion of Cu-Chl resulted in a decrease in absorption at 670 nm and an increase at 660 nm, suggesting that the peripheral Chl may have been displaced. Fluorescence emission spectra of the Cu-Chl-reconstituted RC displayed a marked decrease in fluorescence yield and a blue shift of the band maximum, accompanied by the appearance of a broad peak at a shorter wavelength, indicating that energy transfer in the modified RC was disturbed by Cu-Chl, a quencher of the excited state. However, there were few differences in the circular dichroism (CD) spectra,suggesting that the arrangement of pigments and proteins responsible for the CD signal was not significantly affected. In addition, no obvious change in peptide components was found after the exchange procedure.

  14. Triplet state in photosystem II reaction centers as studied by 130 GHz EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashenko, S.V.; Proskuryakov, I.I.; Germano, M.; Gorkom, H.J. van; Gast, P

    2003-11-01

    The triplet state in the reaction centers of photosystem II was studied by high-field/high-frequency (130 GHz) EPR in the temperature range 50-90 K. At 50 K, the zero-field splitting parameters of the EPR spectrum correspond well to those of a chlorophyll monomer, in agreement with earlier studies. In the high magnetic field of 4.6 T employed in this study, the g-anisotropy of the triplet state becomes apparent and leads to a shift of the canonical positions of the triplet EPR spectrum. Assuming that triplet g- and zero-field tensors are coaxial, the principal values of the triplet g-tensor are determined to be 2.00324, 2.00306 and 2.00231 with an error of {+-}0.00004. Lifting this assumption results in higher g-anisotropy. At higher temperatures, the shape of the spectra changes significantly. Triplet excitation hopping involving the accessory chlorophyll B{sub A} and P{sub A} or P{sub B} (equivalents of the special pair bacteriochlorophylls of the bacterial reaction centers) can partially explain those changes, but the most prominent features indicate that also the electron acceptor I{sub A} (a pheophytin molecule) must be involved.

  15. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-08-20

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first crystallization and structural analysis of the monomeric form of PSIIcc with high oxygen evolution capacity, isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The crystals belong to the space group C222(1), contain one monomer per asymmetric unit, and diffract to a resolution of 3.6 A. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the PSIIcc-monomer crystals exhibit less anisotropy (dependence of resolution on crystal orientation) compared with crystals of dimeric PSIIcc, and the packing of the molecules within the unit cell is different. In the monomer, 19 protein subunits, 35 chlorophylls, two pheophytins, the non-heme iron, the primary plastoquinone Q(A), two heme groups, 11 beta-carotenes, 22 lipids, seven detergent molecules, and the Mn(4)Ca cluster of the water oxidizing complex could be assigned analogous to the dimer. Based on the new structural information, the roles of lipids and protein subunits in dimer formation of PSIIcc are discussed. Due to the lack of non-crystallographic symmetry and the orientation of the membrane normal of PSIIcc perpendicular ( approximately 87 degrees ) to the crystallographic b-axis, further information about the structure of the Mn(4)Ca cluster is expected to become available from orientation-dependent spectroscopy on this new crystal form.

  16. Thermal stability of oxygen evolution in photosystem Ⅱ core complex in the presence of digalactosyl diacylglycerol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), one of the photosynthetic membrane lipids, on heat inactivation of the process of oxygen evolution has been studied in vitro in photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) core complex. It was found that the temperature of semi-inactivation of oxygen evolution in the complex increased from 40.0 to about 43.0℃ in the presence of DGDG with 5-min heat treatment in the dark. Furthermore, when PSⅡ core complex was incubated for 5 min at 45.0℃, the oxygen evolution in the complex was completely lost, whilst the DGDG-complexed PSⅡ core complex still retained a 16% of activity (100% for 25.0℃). In addition, a 1-h incubation at 38.0℃ inactivated absolutely the oxygen evolution for the PSⅡ core complex. By contrast, there remained about 20% of activity (zero time for 100%) for the complex in the presence of DGDG under the same condition. These results indicate a new role of DGDG in the protection of PSⅡ core complex against the deleterious effects of temperature. It was most likely that DGDG-mediated stability toward thermal denaturation of oxygen evolution in PSⅡ core complex is due to the protective effect of DGDG on the release of the 33 kD protein from PSⅡ core complex.

  17. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm‧) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l-1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l-1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm‧.

  18. Interaction of polyamines with proteins of photosystem II: Cation binding and photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, R.; Harnois, J.; Rouillon, R.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Carpentier, R.

    2007-05-01

    Polyamines are organic cations that function in diverse physiological processes that share as a common thread a close relationship to cell proliferation and growth. Polyamines also affect photosynthetic oxygen evolution and therefore, this study was designed to investigate the interaction of 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine), and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) cations with proteins of photosystem II (PSII) using PSII-enriched submembrane fractions with diamine concentrations between 0.01 and 20 mM. Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy with its self-deconvolution and second derivative resolution enhancement, as well as curve-fitting procedures were applied in order to determine the diamine binding mode, the protein conformational changes, and the structural properties of diamine-protein complexes. Spectroscopic evidence showed that diamines interact with proteins (H-bonding) through polypeptide C dbnd O groups with no major perturbations of protein secondary structure. At very low diamine concentration (0.01 mM), no inhibition of oxygen-evolution occurred, while at higher diamine content (5-10 mM), 100% inhibition was observed. Chorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that the inhibition mainly affects the oxygen evolving complex of PSII. Comparisons of the effects of these dipositive organic cations with divalent metal cations on one hand and with polyvalent spermine and spermidine on the other hand, show major alterations of the protein secondary structure as positive charge increases.

  19. Long-wavelength chlorophylls in photosystem I of cyanobacteria: origin, localization, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, N V; Bolychevtseva, Yu V; Yurina, N P; Terekhova, I V; Shubin, V V; Brecht, M

    2014-03-01

    The structural organization of photosystem I (PSI) complexes in cyanobacteria and the origin of the PSI antenna long-wavelength chlorophylls and their role in energy migration, charge separation, and dissipation of excess absorbed energy are discussed. The PSI complex in cyanobacterial membranes is organized preferentially as a trimer with the core antenna enriched with long-wavelength chlorophylls. The contents of long-wavelength chlorophylls and their spectral characteristics in PSI trimers and monomers are species-specific. Chlorophyll aggregates in PSI antenna are potential candidates for the role of the long-wavelength chlorophylls. The red-most chlorophylls in PSI trimers of the cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis and Thermosynechococcus elongatus can be formed as a result of interaction of pigments peripherally localized on different monomeric complexes within the PSI trimers. Long-wavelength chlorophylls affect weakly energy equilibration within the heterogeneous PSI antenna, but they significantly delay energy trapping by P700. When the reaction center is open, energy absorbed by long-wavelength chlorophylls migrates to P700 at physiological temperatures, causing its oxidation. When the PSI reaction center is closed, the P700 cation radical or P700 triplet state (depending on the P700 redox state and the PSI acceptor side cofactors) efficiently quench the fluorescence of the long-wavelength chlorophylls of PSI and thus protect the complex against photodestruction.

  20. Two equilibration pools of chlorophylls in the Photosystem I core antenna of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Ramesh, V M; Lin, Su; Redding, Kevin; Woodbury, Neal W; Webber, Andrew N

    2007-04-01

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy was applied for a comparative study of excitation decay in several different Photosystem I (PSI) core preparations from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. For PSI cores with a fully interconnected network of chlorophylls, the excitation energy was equilibrated over a pool of chlorophylls absorbing at approximately 683 nm, independent of excitation wavelength [Gibasiewicz et al. J Phys Chem B 105:11498-11506, 2001; J Phys Chem B 106:6322-6330, 2002]. In preparations with impaired connectivity between chlorophylls, we have found that the spectrum of chlorophylls connected to the reaction center (i.e., with approximately 20 ps decay time) over which the excitation is equilibrated becomes excitation-wavelength-dependent. Excitation at 670 nm is finally equilibrated over chlorophylls absorbing at approximately 675 nm, whereas excitation at 695 nm or 700 nm is equilibrated over chlorophylls absorbing at approximately 683 nm. This indicates that in the vicinity of the reaction center there are two spectrally different and spatially separated pools of chlorophylls that are equally capable of effective excitation energy transfer to the reaction center. We propose that they are related to the two groups of central PSI core chlorophylls lying on the opposite sides of reaction center.

  1. Theoretical study on the role of Ca(2+) at the S2 state in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingxiu; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Ogata, Koji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Li, Can

    2014-12-11

    In photosynthesis, calcium is crucial for oxygen evolution. In the absence of Ca(2+), the Kok cycle has been proven to stop at S2 with Yz•. To explore the reason, photosystem II (PSII) S2 models (in total 32452 atoms) with different metal ions (Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and K(+)) or without Ca(2+) involved in the oxygen evolution complex (OEC) have been theoretically studied based on the previous dynamic study of PSII. It is found that the portion of the Mn1 d-orbital decreases in the highest occupied molecular orbitals for Ca(2+)-depleted PSII. This feature is unfavorable for the electron transfer from the OEC to the Yz•. Furthermore, the proton donor-acceptor distance was found elongated by the alternation of the binding water in the absence of Ca(2+). The isolated vibrational modes of the key water molecules along the path and their high frequency of the OH stretching modes also suggested the difficulty of the proton transfer from the OEC toward the proton exit channel. This work provides one mechanistic explanation for the inactivity of Ca(2+)-depleted PSII.

  2. Analysis of light-induced transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential in Photosystem I proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  3. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, Cristian P. [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Yoshida, Ken [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  4. Structural Coupling of Extrinsic Proteins with the Oxygen-Evolving Center in Photosystem II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro eIfuku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photosystem II (PSII, which catalyzes photosynthetic water oxidation, is composed of more than 20 subunits, including membrane-intrinsic and -extrinsic proteins. The PSII extrinsic proteins shield the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster from the outside bulk solution and enhance binding of inorganic cofactors, such as Ca2+ and Cl-, in the oxygen-evolving center (OEC of PSII. Among PSII extrinsic proteins, PsbO is commonly found in all oxygenic organisms, while PsbP and PsbQ are specific to higher plants and green algae, and PsbU, PsbV, CyanoQ, and CyanoP exist in cyanobacteria. In addition, red algae and diatoms have unique PSII extrinsic proteins, such as PsbQ’ and Psb31, suggesting functional divergence during evolution. Recent studies with reconstitution experiments combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have revealed how the individual PSII extrinsic proteins affect the structure and function of the OEC in different organisms. In this review, we summarize our recent results and discuss changes that have occurred in the structural coupling of extrinsic proteins with the OEC during evolutionary history.

  5. Protein synthesis is the primary target of reactive oxygen species in the photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Murata, Norio

    2011-05-01

    Photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII) occurs when the rate of photodamage to PSII exceeds the rate of the repair of photodamaged PSII. Recent examination of photoinhibition by separate determinations of photodamage and repair has revealed that the rate of photodamage to PSII is directly proportional to the intensity of incident light and that the repair of PSII is particularly sensitive to the inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS-induced inactivation of repair is attributable to the suppression of the synthesis de novo of proteins, such as the D1 protein, that are required for the repair of PSII at the level of translational elongation. Furthermore, molecular analysis has revealed that the ROS-induced suppression of protein synthesis is associated with the specific inactivation of elongation factor G via the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond. Impairment of various mechanisms that protect PSII against photoinhibition, including photorespiration, thermal dissipation of excitation energy, and the cyclic transport of electrons, decreases the rate of repair of PSII via the suppression of protein synthesis. In this review, we present a newly established model of the mechanism and the physiological significance of repair in the regulation of the photoinhibition of PSII.

  6. Limitations to photosynthesis by proton motive force-induced photosystem II photodamage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Geoffry A; Kanazawa, Atsuko; Schöttler, Mark Aurel; Kohzuma, Kaori; Froehlich, John E; Rutherford, A William; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Minhas, Deepika; Tietz, Stefanie; Dhingra, Amit; Kramer, David M

    2016-01-01

    The thylakoid proton motive force (pmf) generated during photosynthesis is the essential driving force for ATP production; it is also a central regulator of light capture and electron transfer. We investigated the effects of elevated pmf on photosynthesis in a library of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered rates of thylakoid lumen proton efflux, leading to a range of steady-state pmf extents. We observed the expected pmf-dependent alterations in photosynthetic regulation, but also strong effects on the rate of photosystem II (PSII) photodamage. Detailed analyses indicate this effect is related to an elevated electric field (Δψ) component of the pmf, rather than lumen acidification, which in vivo increased PSII charge recombination rates, producing singlet oxygen and subsequent photodamage. The effects are seen even in wild type plants, especially under fluctuating illumination, suggesting that Δψ-induced photodamage represents a previously unrecognized limiting factor for plant productivity under dynamic environmental conditions seen in the field. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16921.001 PMID:27697149

  7. Structural investigation of PsbO from plant and cyanobacterial photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Daria; Rossmann, Maxim; Konarev, Petr V; Irrgang, Klaus-D; Saenger, Wolfram

    2011-03-18

    The manganese-stabilizing protein PsbO is associated with the luminal side of thylakoids close to the redox-active Mn(4)Ca cluster at the catalytically active site of photosystem II (PSII). PsbO is believed to increase the efficiency of oxygen evolution and to stabilize the Mn(4)Ca cluster against photoinhibition. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, we investigated the low-resolution structure of wild-type spinach PsbO and that of chimeric spinach PsbO fused with maltose-binding protein. Small-angle X-ray scattering data revealed that both proteins are monomeric in solution, and that plant and cyanobacterial PsbO have similar structures. We show a highly efficient expression system that allows recombinant production of the active wild type and the chimeric PsbO from spinach and cyanobacteria, with yields compatible with biophysical and structural studies. The binding of spinach PsbO fused with maltose-binding protein to PSII depleted of extrinsic subunits (PSII-ΔpsbO,P,Q) was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The reconstituted PSII was shown to have similar oxygen evolution rates as obtained with wild-type spinach PsbO.

  8. Structural basis of cyanobacterial photosystem II Inhibition by the herbicide terbutryn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-05-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the Q(B) site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B). Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3.2 Å. The crystallized PSII core complexes were isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The used herbicide terbutryn is found to bind via at least two hydrogen bonds to the Q(B) site similar to photosynthetic reaction centers in anoxygenic purple bacteria. Herbicide binding to PSII is also discussed regarding the influence on the redox potential of Q(A), which is known to affect photoinhibition. We further identified a second and novel chloride position close to the water-oxidizing complex and in the vicinity of the chloride ion reported earlier (Guskov, A., Kern, J., Gabdulkhakov, A., Broser, M., Zouni, A., and Saenger, W. (2009) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 334-342). This discovery is discussed in the context of proton transfer to the lumen.

  9. Excitonic connectivity between photosystem II units: what is it, and how to measure it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirbet, Alexandrina

    2013-10-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, light energy is absorbed by a complex network of chromophores embedded in light-harvesting antenna complexes. In photosystem II (PSII), the excitation energy from the antenna is transferred very efficiently to an active reaction center (RC) (i.e., with oxidized primary quinone acceptor Q(A)), where the photochemistry begins, leading to O2 evolution, and reduction of plastoquinones. A very small part of the excitation energy is dissipated as fluorescence and heat. Measurements on chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and oxygen have shown that a nonlinear (hyperbolic) relationship exists between the fluorescence yield (Φ(F)) (or the oxygen emission yield, (Φ(O2)) and the fraction of closed PSII RCs (i.e., with reduced Q(A)). This nonlinearity is assumed to be related to the transfer of the excitation energy from a closed PSII RC to an open (active) PSII RC, a process called PSII excitonic connectivity by Joliot and Joliot (CR Acad Sci Paris 258: 4622-4625, 1964). Different theoretical approaches of the PSII excitonic connectivity, and experimental methods used to measure it, are discussed in this review. In addition, we present alternative explanations of the observed sigmoidicity of the fluorescence induction and oxygen evolution curves.

  10. Effects of Photosystem-II-Interfering Herbicides Atrazine and Bentazon on the Soybean Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine and bentazon are both photosystem-II (PSII–inhibiting herbicides that interfere with photosynthetic electron transport, provoking oxidative stress. While atrazine is lethal to soybean [ (L. Merr.], bentazon does not kill soybean because of the capability of soybeans to metabolize the herbicide. Gene expression profiling was conducted using cDNA microarrays to understand the responses of soybeans to PSII interruption and concomitant stress caused by atrazine and bentazon by monitoring expression at 1, 2, 4, and 8 h after treatment (HAT. The microarray study revealed that 6646 genes were differentially expressed with high statistical significance over the experiment, with 88% of them sharing similar expression pattern between the atrazine and bentazon treatments. Many genes related to xenobiotic detoxification and antioxidation, such as cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases, superoxide dismutases, catalases, and tocophero cyclases, were induced by the herbicides. The study also discovered plants treated with bentazon started to recover between 4 and 8 HAT as reflected in the decreased amplitude of fold changes of most genes from 4 to 8 HAT. The 12% of the genes that were differentially expressed between atrazine and bentazon were largely related to cell recovery, such as genes related to ribosomal components.

  11. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-11-30

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/F(m)') by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l(-1) (ametryn) to 132 μg l(-1) (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/F(m)'.

  12. Unequal allocation of excitation energy between photosystem II and I reduces cyanolichen photosynthesis in blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Xie, Li; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthesis was compared in two cyanobacterial lichens (Lobaria hallii and Peltigera praetextata) and two green algal lichens (Lobaria pulmonaria and Peltigera leucophlebia) exposed to red, green or blue light. Cyanolichens had substantially lower photosynthetic CO(2) uptake and O(2) evolution than the green algal lichens in blue light, but slightly higher photosynthesis in red and green light. The effective quantum yield of photosystem (PS) II (Φ(PSII)) decreased with increasing red and green light for all species, but in blue light this response occurred in green algal lichens only. Cyanolichen Φ(PSII) increased with increasing blue light at low irradiances, but decreased at stronger exposures. However, after adding red light the efficiency of blue light for photosynthetic O(2) evolution increased by 2.4 times. Because phycobilisomes associated with PSII have a low blue light absorption, our results are consistent with blue light absorption mainly by Chl in PSI. Thereby, unequal allocation of excitation energy between PSII and PSI results in low cyanolichen photosynthesis under blue light. This is new knowledge in the science of lichenology with important implications for e.g. the reliability of using Chl fluorometers with blue light for cyanolichens.

  13. Nanostructured photosystems for the generation of electricity and fuels from sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grätzel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Learning from the concepts used by green plants photosynthesis, we have developed nanostructured systems affording efficient solar light harvesting and conversion to electricity and fuels. Solar cells using dyes or semiconducting nanoparticles as light harvesters supported by mesoscopic oxide films have emerged as credible contenders to conventional p-n junction photovoltaic devices. Separating light absorption from charge carrier transport dye sensitized mesoscopic solar cells (DSCs) were the first to use a three-dimensional nanocrystalline junction for solar electricity production. The standard AM 1.5 solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) has reached 12.9% for laboratory cells and 9.9% for PV modules. Even higher efficiencies are attained under ambient and indoor light conditions. These features along with excellent long-term stability have fostered first commercial applications, the industrial production of DSC's attaining presently the MW/year scale. Very exciting results have recently been obtained with perovskites and quantum dot particles as light harvesters in mesoscopic solar cells. Striking advances in the direct generation of fuels such as hydrogen from water and sunlight have been achieved by the judicious design of photosystems composed of nanostructured Fe2O3 or Cu2O films.

  14. The Psb32 Protein Aids in Repairing Photodamaged Photosystem Ⅱ in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimberly M. Wegener; Stefan Bennewitz; Ralf Oelmüller; Himadri B. Pakrasi

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ),a membrane protein complex,catalyzes the photochemical oxidation of water to molecular oxygen.This enzyme complex consists of approximately 20 stoichiometric protein components.However,due to the highly energetic reactions it catalyzes as part of its normal activity,PSⅡ is continuously damaged and repaired.With advances in protein detection technologies,an increasing number of sub-stoichiometric PSⅡ proteins have been identified,many of which aid in the biogenesis and assembly of this protein complex.Psb32 (SⅡ1390) has previously been identified as a protein associated with highly active purified PSⅡ preparations from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803.To investigate its function,the subcellular localization of Psb32 and the impact of deletion of the psb32 gene on PSⅡ were analyzed.Here,we show that Psb32 is an integral membrane protein,primarily located in the thylakoid membranes.Although not required for cell viability,Psb32 protects cells from oxidative stress and additionally confers a selective fitness advantage in mixed culture experiments.Specifically,Psb32 protects PSⅡ from photodamage and accelerates its repair.Thus,the data suggest that Psb32 plays an important role in minimizing the effect of photoinhibition on PSⅡ.

  15. Photosystem II and terminal respiratory oxidases: molecular machines operating in opposite directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Mamedov, Mahir D

    2017-03-01

    In the thylakoid membrane of green plants, cyanobacteria and algae, photosystem II (PSII) uses light energy to split water and generate molecular oxygen. In the opposite process of the biochemical transformation of dioxygen, in heterotrophs, the terminal respiratory oxidases (TRO) are at the end of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and in plasma membrane of many aerobic bacteria reducing dioxygen back to water. Despite the different sources of free energy (light or oxidation of the substrates), energy conversion by these enzymes is based on the spatial organization of enzymatic reactions in which the conversion of water to dioxygen (and vice versa) involves the transfer of protons and electrons in opposite directions across the membrane, which is accompanied by generation of proton-motive force. Similar and distinctive features in structure and function of these important energy-converting molecular machines are described. Information about many fascinating parallels between the mechanisms of TRO and PSII could be used in the artificial light-driven water-splitting process and elucidation of energy conversion mechanism in protein pumps.

  16. Rapid Evolution of the Photosystem II Electronic Structure during Water Splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Katherine M; Palenik, Mark; Yan, Lifen; Purohit, Vatsal; Robison, Gregory; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation is a fundamental process that sustains the biosphere. A Mn$_{4}$Ca cluster embedded in the photosystem II protein environment is responsible for the production of atmospheric oxygen. Here, time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) was used to observe the process of oxygen formation in real time. These experiments reveal that the oxygen evolution step, initiated by three sequential laser flashes, is accompanied by rapid (within 50 $\\mu$s) changes to the Mn K$\\beta$ XES spectrum. However, no oxidation of the Mn$_{4}$Ca core above the all Mn$^{\\text{IV}}$ state was detected to precede O-O bond formation. A new mechanism featuring Mn$^{\\text{IV}}$=O formation in the S$_{3}$ state is proposed to explain the spectroscopic results. This chemical formulation is consistent with the unique reactivity of the S$_{3}$ state and explains facilitation of the following S$_{3}$ to S$_{0}$ transition, resolving in part the kinetic limitations associated with O-O bond formation. In the propo...

  17. Improved Gasifier Availability with Bed Material and Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootjes, A.J.; Van der Meijden, C.M.; Visser, H.J.M.; Van der Drift, A. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    In order to valorize several feedstock, gasification is one of the technologies developed over the past decades. ECN developed the MILENA gasifier. In order for MILENA to become a commercial success, the gasifier needs to be feedstock flexible, robust and economically sound, operating with high availability. One of the characteristics of MILENA is high efficiency but with a higher tar content, compared to some other Dual Fluidized Bed (DFB) gasifiers. In order to reduce the issues that are associated with high tar levels in the product gas, the effect of a number of primary measures was studied. This paper presents results obtained in the last two years, focused on improving the gasifier availability by conducting experiments in a 25 kWth lab scale MILENA gasifier. Amongst others, gas composition, tar content and calorific value of the product gas were compared. Scanning Electron Microscope analysis was used to investigate bed material changes. Results show that Austrian olivine can be activated by Fuel B as well as by Additive A and B. The water-gas shift reaction is enhanced and the tar content is reduced significantly, especially the heavy tars that dominate the tar dew point. Activated olivine has a calcium-rich layer. The results show that with MILENA, we are able to lower and control the tar dew point, which will possibly increase the availability of a MILENA gasifier.

  18. Identification and Characterization of Trichoderma Species Damaging Shiitake Mushroom Bed-Logs Infested by Camptomyia Pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Young; Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Yun, Yeo Hong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-05-28

    The shiitake mushroom industry has suffered from Camptomyia (gall midges) pest, which feeds on the mycelium of shiitake mushroom during its cultivation. It has been postulated that fungal damage of shiitake bed-logs is associated with infestation by the insect pest, but this is not well understood. To understand the fungal damage associated with Camptomyia pest, various Trichoderma species were isolated, identified, and characterized. In addition to two previously known Trichoderma species, T. citrinoviride and T. deliquescens, two other Trichoderma species, T. harzianum and T. atroviride, were newly identified from the pestinfested bed-log samples obtained at three mushroom farms in Cheonan, Korea. Among these four species, T. harzianum was the most evident. The results of a chromogenic media-based assay for extracellular enzymes showed that these four species have the ability to produce amylase, carboxyl-methyl cellulase, avicelase, pectinase, and β-glucosidase, thus indicating that they can degrade wood components. A dual culture assay on PDA indicated that T. harzianum, T. atroviride, and T. citrinoviride were antagonistic against the mycelial growth of a shiitake strain (Lentinula edodes). Inoculation tests on shiitake bed-logs revealed that all four species were able to damage the wood of bed-logs. Our results provide evidence that the four green mold species are the causal agents involved in fungal damage of shiitake bed-logs infested by Camptomyia pest.

  19. STUDY ON SIMILARITY LAWS OF A DISTORTED RIVER MODEL WITH A MOVABLE BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, by considering the scale ratio related to thespecific gravity of the submerged bed material,and introducing a degree of distortion, n the similarity laws for a distorted river model with a movable bed were derived under the conditions that the values of dual dimensionless parameters in a regime-criterion diagram for the bars are the same in a model as they are in a prototype, and that a resistance law such as the Manning-Strickler-type formula is to be valid for a model and a prototype. The usefulness of the similarity laws derived in this study was verified by comparing the bed forms from the distroted model experiments with the bed forms from the 1/50-scale undistorted model experiments, which were performed by the Hokkaido Development Bureau (H. D.B. ), Japan, to examine the tentative plan for the improvement of a low-flow channel in the Chubetsu River, which is a tributary of the Ishikari River. It is considered that the distorted model experiments to be valid with either sand or lightweight bed material.

  20. Wave trapping by dual porous barriers near a wall in the presence of bottom undulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Manisha; Sahoo, T.

    2017-09-01

    Trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by dual porous barriers near a wall is studied in the presence of step type varying bottom bed that is connected on both sides by water of uniform depths. The porous barriers are assumed to be fixed at a certain distance in front of a vertical rigid wall. Using linear water wave theory and Darcy's law for flow past porous structure, the physical problem is converted into a boundary value problem. Using eigenfunction expansion in the uniform bottom bed region and modified mild-slope equation in the varying bottom bed region, the mathematical problem is handled for solution. Moreover, certain jump conditions are used to account for mass conservation at slope discontinuities in the bottom bed profile. To understand the effect of dual porous barriers in creating tranquility zone and minimum load on the sea wall, reflection coefficient, wave forces acting on the barrier and the wall, and surface wave elevation are computed and analyzed for different values of depth ratio, porous-effect parameter, incident wave angle, gap between the barriers and wall and slope length of undulated bottom. The study reveals that with moderate porosity and suitable gap between barriers and sea wall, using dual barriers an effective wave trapping system can be developed which will exert less wave force on the barriers and the rigid wall. The proposed wave trapping system is likely to be of immense help for protecting various facilities/ infrastructures in coastal environment.

  1. Dual-readout Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; De Pedis, D.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Genova, P.; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Moggi, A.; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sill, A.; Venturelli, T.; Wigmans, R.

    2013-01-01

    The RD52 Project at CERN is a pure instrumentation experiment whose goal is to un- derstand the fundamental limitations to hadronic energy resolution, and other aspects of energy measurement, in high energy calorimeters. We have found that dual-readout calorimetry provides heretofore unprecedented information event-by-event for energy resolution, linearity of response, ease and robustness of calibration, fidelity of data, and particle identification, including energy lost to binding energy in nuclear break-up. We believe that hadronic energy resolutions of {\\sigma}/E $\\approx$ 1 - 2% are within reach for dual-readout calorimeters, enabling for the first time comparable measurement preci- sions on electrons, photons, muons, and quarks (jets). We briefly describe our current progress and near-term future plans. Complete information on all aspects of our work is available at the RD52 website http://highenergy.phys.ttu.edu/dream/.

  2. Higher Representations Duals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We uncover novel solutions of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for scalarless gauge theories with matter transforming according to higher dimensional representations of the underlying gauge group. We argue that, if the duals exist, they are gauge theories with fermions transforming...... according to the defining representation of the dual gauge group. The resulting conformal windows match the one stemming from the all-orders beta function results when taking the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass to be unity which are also very close to the ones obtained using the Schwinger......-Dyson approximation. We use the solutions to gain useful insight on the conformal window of the associated electric theory. A consistent picture emerges corroborating previous results obtained via different analytic methods and in agreement with first principle lattice explorations....

  3. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  4. Dual Double Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Penas, Victor A; Riccioni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    We present the dual formulation of double field theory at the linearized level. This is a classically equivalent theory describing the duals of the dilaton, the Kalb-Ramond field and the graviton in a T-duality or O(D,D) covariant way. In agreement with previous proposals, the resulting theory encodes fields in mixed Young-tableau representations, combining them into an antisymmetric 4-tensor under O(D,D). In contrast to previous proposals, the theory also requires an antisymmetric 2-tensor and a singlet, which are not all pure gauge. The need for these additional fields is analogous to a similar phenomenon for "exotic" dualizations, and we clarify this by comparing with the dualizations of the component fields. We close with some speculative remarks on the significance of these observations for the full non-linear theory yet to be constructed.

  5. Dual-comb MIXSEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, S. M.; Zaugg, C. A.; Klenner, A.; Mangold, M.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Keller, U.

    2015-03-01

    We present a single semiconductor disk laser simultaneously emitting two different gigahertz modelocked pulse trains. A birefringent crystal inside a modelocked integrated external-cavity surface-emitting laser (MIXSEL) separates the cavity beam into two spatially separated beams with perpendicular polarizations on the MIXSEL chip. This MIXSEL then generates two orthogonally polarized collinear modelocked pulse trains from one simple straight cavity. Superimposing the beams on a photo detector creates a microwave beat signal, representing a strikingly simple setup to down-convert the terahertz optical frequencies into the electronically accessible microwave regime. This makes the dual-comb MIXSEL scheme an ultra-compact and cost-efficient candidate for dual-comb spectroscopy applications.

  6. Dual-readout Calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; Pedis, D.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; P. Genova; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.(INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia, Italy)

    2013-01-01

    The RD52 Project at CERN is a pure instrumentation experiment whose goal is to understand the fundamental limitations to hadronic energy resolution, and other aspects of energy measurement, in high energy calorimeters. We have found that dual-readout calorimetry provides heretofore unprecedented information event-by-event for energy resolution, linearity of response, ease and robustness of calibration, fidelity of data, and particle identification, including energy lost to binding energy in n...

  7. Suicide following an infestation of bed bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Stephanie; Perron, Stéphane; Susser, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Male, 62. Bipolar disorder. Bordeline personality disorder. - Bed bug infestation. Psychiatry. Unusual clinical course. In the past decade, bed bug infestations have been increasingly common in high income countries. Psychological consequences of these infestations are rarely examined in the scientific literature. We present a case, based on a coroner's investigation report, of a woman with previous psychiatric morbidity who jumped to her death following repeated bed bug infestations in her apartment. Our case report shows that the bed bug infestations were the likely trigger for the onset a negative psychological state that ultimately led to suicide. Given the recent surge in infestations, rapid action needs to be taken not only in an attempt to control and eradicate the bed bugs but also to adequately care for those infested by bed bugs.

  8. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  9. Dual-Schemata Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tadahiro; Sawaragi, Tetsuo

    In this paper, a new machine-learning method, called Dual-Schemata model, is presented. Dual-Schemata model is a kind of self-organizational machine learning methods for an autonomous robot interacting with an unknown dynamical environment. This is based on Piaget's Schema model, that is a classical psychological model to explain memory and cognitive development of human beings. Our Dual-Schemata model is developed as a computational model of Piaget's Schema model, especially focusing on sensori-motor developing period. This developmental process is characterized by a couple of two mutually-interacting dynamics; one is a dynamics formed by assimilation and accommodation, and the other dynamics is formed by equilibration and differentiation. By these dynamics schema system enables an agent to act well in a real world. This schema's differentiation process corresponds to a symbol formation process occurring within an autonomous agent when it interacts with an unknown, dynamically changing environment. Experiment results obtained from an autonomous facial robot in which our model is embedded are presented; an autonomous facial robot becomes able to chase a ball moving in various ways without any rewards nor teaching signals from outside. Moreover, emergence of concepts on the target movements within a robot is shown and discussed in terms of fuzzy logics on set-subset inclusive relationships.

  10. Unusual snail species involved in the transmission of Fasciola hepatica in watercress beds in central France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyfuss G.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Four freshwater pulmonate species (Lymnaea ovata, L. stagnalis, Physa acuta, Planorbis leucostomawere living in several watercress beds known for their relationships with human cases of fasciolosis, whereas L. truncatula was never found. The aims of these studies were to determine the prevalence of natural infections with Fasciola hepatica in snails and to verify if these species might ensure the full larval development of this trematode (with cercarial shedding] when they were experimentally subjected to F. hepatica only, or to co-infections with an other trematode species. Investigations were so carried out in six snail populations living in watercress beds (including three for P. acuta and in four others originating from three brooks or a pond (as controls. Snails naturally infected with F. hepatica were found in two watercress beds inhabited by L. ovata (prevalence of infection: 1.4 % and P. leucostoma (0.1 %, respectively. The L. ovata from the watercress bed could be infected at a higher size than those from the control population and the prevalence of this infection was greater in the bed population. Similar findings were noted for L. stagnalis. Despite single or dual infections, the results obtained with the four populations of P. acuta were unsuccessful. In contrast, the co-infections of young P. leucostoma with Paramphistomum daubneyi and F. hepatica resulted in the shedding of some F. hepatica cercariae. According to the authors, the occurrence of fasciolosis in these watercress beds would be the consequence of frequent natural encounters between parasite and snails (L. ovata, L. stagnalis, or of co-infections with P. daubneyi and F. hepatica (P. leucostoma. In watercress beds only colonized by P. acuta, a lymnaeid species would have ensured the larval development of F. hepatica but it would have been eliminated by P. acuta, as this last species was known to be invasive and could colonize open drainage ditches on siliceous soil.

  11. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  12. Packed fluidized bed blanket for fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, John W. H.

    1984-01-01

    A packed fluidized bed blanket for a fusion reactor providing for efficient radiation absorption for energy recovery, efficient neutron absorption for nuclear transformations, ease of blanket removal, processing and replacement, and on-line fueling/refueling. The blanket of the reactor contains a bed of stationary particles during reactor operation, cooled by a radial flow of coolant. During fueling/refueling, an axial flow is introduced into the bed in stages at various axial locations to fluidize the bed. When desired, the fluidization flow can be used to remove particles from the blanket.

  13. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

    2009-06-18

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field

  14. C. elegans BED domain transcription factor BED-3 controls lineage-specific cell proliferation during organogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Takao; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The control of cell division is critical to organogenesis, but how this control is achieved is not fully understood. We found that mutations in bed-3, encoding a BED Zn-finger domain transcription factor, confer a phenotype where a specific set of cell divisions during vulval organogenesis is lost. Unlike general cell cycle regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans, the function of bed-3 is restricted to specific lineages. Transcriptional reporters suggest that bed-3 is expressed in a limited numb...

  15. Fluidized-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudjoi, A.; Heinolainen, A.; Hippinen, I.; Lu, Y. [Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Hybrid combined cycle processes have been presented as possibilities for power generation in the future. In the processes based on partial gasification of coal, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed char) contain unburned fuel, which is burned either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. Pressurised fluidised-bed (PFB) combustion of gasification residues were studied experimentally by Helsinki University of Technology. The gasification residues, i.e. cyclone fines and bed chars, came from pilot scale PFB gasification tests of bituminous coals. The combustion efficiency was high in cyclone fines combustion. The calcium sulphide oxidised effectively to calcium sulphate in the combustion of cyclone fines. In bed char combustion the residual sulphide contents in solids after combustion were still relatively high. In general, sulphur dioxide emissions in residue combustion were low. The recarbonation of calcium oxide was observed in bed char combustion. Fuel-N conversion to NO{sub x} during bed char combustion and in most of the test runs with cyclone fines was higher than in bituminous coal combustion. In bed char combustion the conversion was significantly higher than in cyclone fines combustion. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing excess air for both residues, as was expected. In bed char combustion the highest NO{sub x} emissions were measured at higher pressure. Calculated mass reactivity values of equal particle size of all bed chars studied had similar trends with burnout. The biggest particles had the lowest reactivity values throughout the combustion, while reactivity for finer particles was at considerably higher level and sharply increases with burnout. In the constant combustion conditions used in the tests, no significant differences were observed in rate-controlling mechanisms for bed char fractions studied. 25 refs., 13 figs., 15 tab.

  16. Flue gas desulfurization by rotating beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, N.; Keyvani, M.; Coskundeniz, A.

    1992-01-01

    The operating and mass transfer characteristics of rotating foam metal beds were studied to determine the potential for flue gas desulfurization. This is a final technical report on the work supported by DOE [number sign]FG22-87-PC79924. The report is divided into two sections, Part 1 deals primarily with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, and Part 2 covers the mass transfer characteristics of S0[sub 2] absorption in water-lime slurries. Rotating foam metal beds are in essence packed towers operated in high gravitational fields. The foam metal bed is in the form of a cylindrical donut, or torus, and is rotated to produced the high centrifugal forces. The liquid phase enters the bed at the inner surface of the torus and is pulled by the field through the bed. Gas flows countercurrent to the liquid. The bed packing can have a very large specific surface areas and not flood. Possible benefits include much smaller height of a transfer unit resulting in smaller equipment and supporting structures, reduced solvent inventory, faster response with improved process control, reduced pressure drop, and shorter startup and shut-down times. This work is concerned broadly with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, the objectives being to (1) determine the pressure drop through the rotating bed; (2) determine the power required to operate the beds, (3) investigate the residence time distribution of the liquid phase in the beds; and (4) determine the mass transfer coefficients of S0[sub 2] absorption. Three packings of differing specific surface areas were studied, with areas ranging from 656 to 2952 m[sub 2]/m[sub 3]. Liquid flow rates to 36 kg/s*m[sub 2], gas flow rate to 2.2 kg/s*m[sub 2], and gravitational fields to 300 g were covered in this study.

  17. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ETO, J.; LASSETER, R.; SCHENKMAN, B.; STEVENS, J.; KLAPP, D.; VOLKOMMER, H.; LINTON, E.; HURTADO, H.; ROY, J.

    2010-06-08

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1 a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2 an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3 a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources.

  18. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc. through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  19. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Praveen; Jones, Susan C; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2011-03-18

    Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc.) through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases) towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance) with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  20. Fluidized bed coal combustion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, P. I.; Young, D. L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed coal reactor includes a combination nozzle-injector ash-removal unit formed by a grid of closely spaced open channels, each containing a worm screw conveyor, which function as continuous ash removal troughs. A pressurized air-coal mixture is introduced below the unit and is injected through the elongated nozzles formed by the spaces between the channels. The ash build-up in the troughs protects the worm screw conveyors as does the cooling action of the injected mixture. The ash layer and the pressure from the injectors support a fluidized flame combustion zone above the grid which heats water in boiler tubes disposed within and/or above the combustion zone and/or within the walls of the reactor.

  1. Physician-patient communication in single-bedded versus four-bedded hospital rooms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glind, I. van de; Dulmen, S. van; Goossensen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether physician-patient communication in multi-bedded rooms differs from communication in single rooms during ward rounds. Methods: Ward rounds in single bedded patient rooms and ward rounds in four bedded rooms were audiotaped and analyzed with an adapted version of MIARS.

  2. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  3. Alexander Duals of Multipermutohedron Ideals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajay Kumar; Chanchal Kumar

    2014-02-01

    An Alexander dual of a multipermutohedron ideal has many combinatorial properties. The standard monomials of an Artinian quotient of such a dual correspond bijectively to some -parking functions, and many interesting properties of these Artinian quotients are obtained by Postnikov and Shapiro (Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 356 (2004) 3109–3142). Using the multigraded Hilbert series of an Artinian quotient of an Alexander dual of multipermutohedron ideals, we obtained a simple proof of Steck determinant formula for enumeration of -parking functions. A combinatorial formula for all the multigraded Betti numbers of an Alexander dual of multipermutohedron ideals are also obtained.

  4. How does the QB site influence propagate to the QA site in photosystem II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Koji; Noguchi, Takumi

    2011-06-21

    The redox potential of the primary quinone Q(A) [E(m)(Q(A))] in photosystem II (PSII) is lowered by replacement of the native plastoquinone (PQ) with bromoxynil (BR) at the secondary quinone Q(B) binding site. Using the BR-bound PSII structure presented in the previous Fourier transform infrared and docking calculation studies, we calculated E(m)(Q(A)) considering both the protein environment in atomic detail and the protonation pattern of the titratable residues. The calculated E(m)(Q(A)) shift in response to the replacement of PQ with deprotonated BR at the Q(B) binding site [ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR)] was -55 mV when the three regions, Q(A), the non-heme iron complex, and Q(B) (Q(B) = PQ or BR), were treated as a conjugated supramolecule (Q(A)-Fe-Q(B)). The negative charge of BR apparently contributes to the downshift in ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR). This downshift, however, is mostly offset by the influence of the residues near Q(B). The charge delocalization over the Q(A)-Fe-Q(B) complex and the resulting H-bond strength change between Q(A) and D2-His214 are crucial factors that yield a ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR) of -55 mV by (i) altering the electrostatic influence of the H-bond donor D2-His214 on E(m)(Q(A)) and (ii) suppressing the proton uptake events of the titratable residues that could otherwise upshift ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR) during replacement of PQ with BR at the Q(B) site.

  5. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  6. Detergent-protein interactions in aqueous buffer suspensions of Photosystem I (PS I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Dibyendu; May, Mark; Khomami, Bamin

    2011-06-15

    Systematic and uniform monolayer formation of Photosystem I (PS I) onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) substrates to enable unidirectional electron transfer is crucial for its successful use in the fabrication of bio-hybrid solid-state electronic or photovoltaic devices. Yet, our recent studies (Mukherjee et al., 2010) indicate that surface self-assembly of PS I from aqueous buffer suspensions onto alkanethiolate SAM/Au substrates frequently leads to complex columnar structures due to solution phase protein aggregations. We investigate the effect of two prototypical non-ionic detergents, n-Dodecyl-β-D-Maltoside (DM) and Triton X-100 (TX-100), on protein-protein interactions via the protein-detergent interfacial chemistry. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments are used to demonstrate the impact of relative protein/detergent concentrations on aggregation dynamics of PS I suspensions. In turn, the surface attachment characteristics of PS I adsorbed from the aforementioned suspensions onto SAM/Au substrate is examined by atomic force (AFM) microscopy. Our results indicate that relative concentration of PS I and detergents (DM or, TX-100) with respect to their critical micelle concentrations (CMC) determines the extent of self-association between PS I complexes driven by the screening induced by detergent micelles and/or, inter-protein distances. Such interfacial phenomena during the PS I-detergent complexation process drives the colloidal system through various regimes of phase separations, suspension and/or, de-aggregation, wherein individual PS I complexes can exist in a frustrated state that prevents favorable orientations for PS I-PS I interactions. The present study presents a novel strategy, heretofore not considered, for tailoring inter-protein distances and protein-protein interactions in solution phase, thereby allowing a superior control on the surface attachment of PS I onto SAM/Au substrates.

  7. Interruption of the Calvin cycle inhibits the repair of Photosystem II from photodamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shunichi; Murata, Norio

    2005-07-15

    In photosynthetic organisms, impairment of the activities of enzymes in the Calvin cycle enhances the extent of photoinactivation of Photosystem II (PSII). We investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for this phenomenon in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. When the Calvin cycle was interrupted by glycolaldehyde, which is known to inhibit phosphoribulokinase, the extent of photoinactivation of PSII was enhanced. The effect of glycolaldehyde was very similar to that of chloramphenicol, which inhibits protein synthesis de novo in chloroplasts. The interruption of the Calvin cycle by the introduction of a missense mutation into the gene for the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) also enhanced the extent of photoinactivation of PSII. In such mutant 10-6C cells, neither glycolaldehyde nor chloramphenicol has any additional effect on photoinactivation. When wild-type cells were incubated under weak light after photodamage to PSII, the activity of PSII recovered gradually and reached a level close to the initial level. However, recovery was inhibited in wild-type cells by glycolaldehyde and was also inhibited in 10-6C cells. Radioactive labelling and Northern blotting demonstrated that the interruption of the Calvin cycle suppressed the synthesis de novo of chloroplast proteins, such as the D1 and D2 proteins, but did not affect the levels of psbA and psbD mRNAs. Our results suggest that the photoinactivation of PSII that is associated with the interruption of the Calvin cycle is attributable primarily to the inhibition of the protein synthesis-dependent repair of PSII at the level of translation in chloroplasts.

  8. Azide as a competitor of chloride in oxygen evolution by Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddy, A; Hatchell, J A; Kimel, R A; Thomas, R

    1999-05-11

    Oxygen evolution by higher plants requires chloride, which binds to a site associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII). In this study, the inhibitory effect of the anion azide was characterized using steady state measurements of oxygen evolution activity in PSII-enriched thylakoid membranes. N3- (7.8 mM) inhibited O2 evolution activity by 50% when a standard buffer containing chloride was used. By considering Cl- as the substrate in O2 evolution assays, we found azide to be primarily competitive with Cl- with an inhibitor dissociation constant Ki of about 0.6 mM. An uncompetitive component with a Ki ' of 11 mM was also found. Removal of the 17 and 23 kDa polypeptides resulted in a decrease in each inhibition constant. A pH dependence study of O2 evolution activity showed that the pH maximum became narrower and shifted to a higher pH in the presence of azide. Analysis of the data indicated that an acidic residue defined the low side of the pH maximum with an apparent pKa of 6.7 in the presence of azide compared with 5.5 for the control. A basic residue was also affected, exhibiting an apparent pKa of 7.1 compared with a value of 7.6 for the control. This result can be explained by a simple model in which azide binding to the chloride site moves negative charge of the anion away from the basic residue and toward the acidic residue relative to chloride. As a competitor of chloride, azide may provide an interesting probe of the oxygen-evolving complex in future studies.

  9. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of /sup 14/C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated.

  10. Self-assembling peptide detergents stabilize isolated photosystem ion a dry surface for an extended time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We used a class of designed peptide detergents to stabilize photosystem I (PS-I upon extended drying under N2 on a gold-coated-Ni-NTA glass surface. PS-I is a chlorophyll-containing membrane protein complex that is the primary reducer of ferredoxin and the electron acceptor of plastocyanin. We isolated the complex from the thylakoids of spinach chloroplasts using a chemical detergent. The chlorophyll molecules associated with the PS-I complex provide an intrinsic steady-state emission spectrum between 650 and 800 nm at -196.15 degrees C that reflects the organization of the pigment-protein interactions. In the absence of detergents, a large blue shift of the fluorescence maxima from approximately 735 nm to approximately 685 nm indicates a disruption in light-harvesting subunit organization, thus revealing chlorophyll-protein interactions. The commonly used membrane protein-stabilizing detergents, N-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside and N-octyl-beta-D-glucoside, only partially stabilized the approximately 735-nm complex with approximately 685-nm spectroscopic shift. However, prior to drying, addition of the peptide detergent acetyl-AAAAAAK at increasing concentration significantly stabilized the PS-I complex. Moreover, in the presence of acetyl-AAAAAAK, the PS-I complex is stable in a dried form at room temperature for at least 3 wk. Another peptide detergent, acetyl-VVVVVVD, also stabilized the complex but to a lesser extent. These observations suggest that the peptide detergents may effectively stabilize membrane proteins in the solid-state. These designed peptide detergents may facilitate the study of diverse types of membrane proteins.

  11. Manganese containing protein complex isolated from Photosystem II preparations of spinach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, W.D.; Bowlby, N.R.

    1986-05-01

    By using a ligand-receptor crosslinking method the authors have stabilized Mn associated with Photosystem II (PSII) in a protein complex with an apparent molecular weight of 75,000 and with 3-4 Mn per complex. To crosslink the proteins, purified 33 kDa protein (33) was modified to contain about 8 adducts of the heterobifunctional photoaffinity reagent N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl-dithio)-propionate (SADP). The SADP-33 was reconstituted into PSII membranes which had been depleted of 33 by a 1M CaCl/sub 2/ wash and crosslinking was initiated by ultraviolet illumination. The crosslinked membranes were solubilized in lauryl sulfate (SDS) and the constituent proteins were identified by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Evidence which supports the hypothesis that the Mn associated with the crosslinked proteins has been retained at the site of the photosynthetic oxygen evolving system includes: 1, Scatchard analysis of (/sup 125/I)-33 binding to CaCl/sub 2/-washed PSII preparations revealed one tight binding site and several lower affinity sites; 2, reconstitution of O/sub 2/ evolving activity and binding to the tight site had the same concentration dependence on 33; 3, the SADP-33 was able to reconstitute O/sub 2/ evolution in CaCl/sub 2/ washed PSII membranes; 4, the percent of Mn retained by the crosslinked membranes after treatment with edetic acid (EDTA) was approximately equal to the percent reconstitution of O/sub 2/ evolving activity by SADP-33 before photoactivation of SADP.

  12. Kinetic analyses and mathematical modeling of primary photochemical and photoelectrochemical processes in plant photosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenberg, Wim

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the model and simulation of primary photochemical and photo-electrochemical reactions in dark-adapted intact plant leaves is presented. A descriptive algorithm has been derived from analyses of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence and P700 oxidation kinetics upon excitation with multi-turnover pulses (MTFs) of variable intensity and duration. These analyses have led to definition and formulation of rate equations that describe the sequence of primary linear electron transfer (LET) steps in photosystem II (PSII) and of cyclic electron transport (CET) in PSI. The model considers heterogeneity in PSII reaction centers (RCs) associated with the S-states of the OEC and incorporates in a dark-adapted state the presence of a 15-35% fraction of Q(B)-nonreducing RCs that probably is identical with the S₀ fraction. The fluorescence induction algorithm (FIA) in the 10 μs-1s excitation time range considers a photochemical O-J-D, a photo-electrochemical J-I and an I-P phase reflecting the response of the variable fluorescence to the electric trans-thylakoid potential generated by the proton pump fuelled by CET in PSI. The photochemical phase incorporates the kinetics associated with the double reduction of the acceptor pair of pheophytin (Phe) and plastoquinone Q(A) [PheQ(A)] in Q(B) nonreducing RCs and the associated doubling of the variable fluorescence, in agreement with the three-state trapping model (TSTM) of PS II. The decline in fluorescence emission during the so called SMT in the 1-100s excitation time range, known as the Kautsky curve, is shown to be associated with a substantial decrease of CET-powered proton efflux from the stroma into the chloroplast lumen through the ATPsynthase of the photosynthetic machinery.

  13. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-03-11

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionary relationships. Here we report the structure of PSII from a red alga Cyanidium caldarium at 2.76 Å resolution, which revealed the structure and interaction sites of PsbQ', a unique, fourth extrinsic protein required for stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex in the lumenal surface of PSII. The PsbQ' subunit was found to be located underneath CP43 in the vicinity of PsbV, and its structure is characterized by a bundle of four up-down helices arranged in a similar way to those of cyanobacterial and higher plant PsbQ, although helices I and II of PsbQ' were kinked relative to its higher plant counterpart because of its interactions with CP43. Furthermore, two novel transmembrane helices were found in the red algal PSII that are not present in cyanobacterial PSII; one of these helices may correspond to PsbW found only in eukaryotic PSII. The present results represent the first crystal structure of PSII from eukaryotic oxygenic organisms, which were discussed in comparison with the structure of cyanobacterial PSII.

  14. Light saturation response of inactive photosystem II reaction centers in spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylla, R A; Whitmarsh, J

    1990-07-01

    The effective absorption cross section of inactive photosystem II (PS II) centers, which is the product of the effective antenna size and the quantum yield for photochemistry, was investigated by comparing the light saturation curves of inactive PS II and active reaction centers in intact chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Inactive PS II centers are defined as the impaired PS II reaction centers that require greater than 50 ms for the reoxidation of QA (-) subsequent to a single turnover flash. Active reaction centers are defined as the rapidly turning over PS II centers (recovery time less than 50 ms) and all of the PS I centers. The electrochromic shift, measured by the flash-induced absorbance increase at 518 nm, was used to probe the activity of the reaction centers. Light saturation curves were generated for inactive PS II centers and active reaction centers by measuring the extent of the absorbance increase at 518 nm induced by red actinic flashes of variable energy. The light saturation curves show that inactive PS II centers required over twice as many photons as active reaction centers to achieve the same yield. The ratio of the flash energy required for 50% saturation for active reaction centers (PS II active + PS I) compared to inactive PS II centers was 0.45±0.04 in intact chloroplasts, and 0.54±0.11 in thylakoid membranes. Analysis of the light saturation curves using a Poisson statistical model in which the ratio of the antenna size of active PS II centers to that of PS I is considered to range from 1 to 1.5, indicates that the effective absorption cross section of inactive PS II centers was 0.54-0.37 times that of active PS II centers. If the quantum yield for photochemistry is assumed to be one, we estimate that the antenna system serving the inactive PS II centers contains approx. 110 chlorophyll molecules.

  15. Fluorescence property of photosystem II protein complexes bound to a gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Kazuki; Mohamed, Ahmed; Kawahara, Kousuke; Nagao, Ryo; Kato, Yuki; Fukumura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yutaka; Noguchi, Takumi

    2017-03-08

    Development of an efficient photo-anode system for water oxidation is key to the success of artificial photosynthesis. We previously assembled photosystem II (PSII) proteins, which are an efficient natural photocatalyst for water oxidation, on a gold nanoparticle (GNP) to prepare a PSII-GNP conjugate as an anode system in a light-driven water-splitting nano-device (Noji et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2011, 2, 2448-2452). In the current study, we characterized the fluorescence property of the PSII-GNP conjugate by static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and compared with that of free PSII proteins. It was shown that in a static fluorescence spectrum measured at 77 K, the amplitude of a major peak at 683 nm was significantly reduced and a red shoulder at 693 nm disappeared in PSII-GNP. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements showed that picosecond components at 683 nm decayed faster by factors of 1.4-2.1 in PSII-GNP than in free PSII, explaining the observed quenching of the major fluorescence peak. In addition, a nanosecond-decay component arising from a 'red chlorophyll' at 693 nm was lost in time-resolved fluorescence of PSII-GNP, probably due to a structural perturbation of this chlorophyll by interaction with GNP. Consistently with these fluorescence properties, degradation of PSII during strong-light illumination was two times slower in PSII-GNP than in free PSII. The enhanced durability of PSII is an advantageous property of the PSII-GNP conjugate in the development of an artificial photosynthesis device.

  16. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems.

  17. The role of calcium in the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latimer, Matthew John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (OEC) contains a cluster of four manganese atoms and requires both Ca and Cl for activity. Ca can be replaced by Sr with retention of activity. The role of Ca in the OEC has been investigated by performing Mn X-ray absorption experiments on Ca-depleted samples of photosystem II (PS II) and on PS II samples depleted of Ca and reconstituted by either Ca or Sr. Mn X-ray K-edge spectra exhibit no significant differences in oxidation state or symmetry between Ca- and Sr-reactivated preparations, but differences are observed in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The amplitude of a Fourier transform peak arising from scatterers at distances greater than 3 A is larger for samples reactivated with strontium relative to calcium. Curve-fitting analyses of the EXAFS data using FEFF 5-calculated parameters favor a model where both manganese and calcium (or strontium) scatterers contribute to the ~3 Å Fourier peak (Mn-Mn at 3.3Å and Mn-Ca(Sr) at 3.4--3.5 Å). Possible structural arrangements for a calcium binding site are discussed. Analysis of Mn K-edge spectra from Ca-depleted samples in the S1, S2, and S3 states shows an edge shift on the S1-S2 transition, but no edge shift on the S2-S3 transition, supporting a model where the oxidizing equivalent from the S2 to S3 transition is stored on a ligand or nearby protein residue rather than on the Mn cluster. Parallels between Ca-depleted and native samples are discussed.

  18. Cadmium-zinc accumulation and photosystem II responses of Noccaea caerulescens to Cd and Zn exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayçu, Gülriz; Gevrek-Kürüm, Nurbir; Moustaka, Julietta; Csatári, István; Rognes, Sven Erik; Moustakas, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A population of the metallophyte Noccaea (Thlaspi) caerulescens originating from a Zn-enriched area at Røros Copper Mine (Norway) was studied. N. caerulescens tolerance to accumulate Cd and Zn was evaluated in hydroponic experiments by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging analysis. In the field-collected N. caerulescens mother plants, Zn shoot concentrations were above Zn hyperaccumulation threshold while, in hydroponic experiments under 40-μM Cd exposure, shoot Cd concentrations were clearly above Cd hyperaccumulation threshold. Cadmium ions and, to a less extent, Zn were mainly retained in the roots. Exposure to Cd enhanced Zn translocation to the shoot, while decreased significant total Ca(2+) uptake, suggesting that Cd uptake occurs through Ca(2+) transporters. Nevertheless, it increased Ca(2+) translocation to the leaf, possibly for photoprotection of photosystem II (PSII). Exposure to 800 μM Zn or 40 μM Cd resulted in increased Fe(3+) uptake suggesting that in N. caerulescens, Cd uptake does not take place through the pathway of Fe(3+) uptake and that conditions that lead to Cd and Zn accumulation in plants may also favor Fe accumulation. Despite the significant high toxicity levels of Zn and Cd in leaves, under Zn and Cd exposure, respectively, the allocation of absorbed light energy at PSII did not differ compared to controls. The results showed that N. caerulescens keep Cd and Zn concentrations in the mesophyll cells in non-toxic forms for PSII and that the increased Ca and Fe accumulation in leaves alleviates the toxicity effects. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that PSII of N. caerulescens resisted better the phytotoxic effects of 20 times higher Zn than Cd exposure concentration. Overall, it is concluded that the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging constitutes a promising basis for investigating heavy metal tolerance of plants.

  19. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  20. Effects of polyaromatic hydrocarbons on photosystem II activity in pea leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Lankin, Anton V; Vasilyeva, Galina K; Luybimov, Valery Yu; Semenova, Galina N; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Thomas; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The acute effects of three typical polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene (Naph), phenanthrene (Phen) and fluoranthene (Flu) on photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) in detached leaves of 3-week-old pea plants were studied. The leaves were exposed in water with PAHs under white light for 0.5-72 h. The activity of PSII was examined by prompt and delayed chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence. The effects of PAHs depended on their concentration and exposure time. This dependency was more significant in the presence of chemical stressors (Triton X-100 or acetone) or under high intensity irradiance. Increased content of PAHs and long-term exposure (24-72 h) led to significant reduction of the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm) of PS II, changes in the polyphasic fluorescence induction (OJIP), and to decreasing amplitudes of fast and slow components of delayed Chl a fluorescence. The damage of PSII depended on water solubility of a given type of PAHs, their concentration and exposure time. During short-time exposure the compound with highest water-solubility - naphthalene - revealed the strongest effect. During long-time exposure the compounds with low water-solubility -Phen, Flu-revealed the strongest effect as the corresponding PAH accumulates in the thylakoids especially when the solution is oversaturated containing a solid phase. The reduction of PSII activity at the presence of naphthalene (30 mg L(-1)) was accompanied by transient generation of H2O2 as well as swelling of thylakoids and distortion of cell plasma membranes, which was indicated by electron microscopy images. Distortion of thylakoid membranes due to accumulation of PAHs as well as the development of oxidative stress seems to be the main pathways of PAHs influencing the photochemical activity of PS II.

  1. Evolution of the acceptor side of photosystem I: ferredoxin, flavodoxin, and ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierella Karlusich, Juan José; Carrillo, Néstor

    2017-02-01

    The development of oxygenic photosynthesis by primordial cyanobacteria ~2.7 billion years ago led to major changes in the components and organization of photosynthetic electron transport to cope with the challenges of an oxygen-enriched atmosphere. We review herein, following the seminal contributions as reported by Jaganathan et al. (Functional genomics and evolution of photosynthetic systems, vol 33, advances in photosynthesis and respiration, Springer, Dordrecht, 2012), how these changes affected carriers and enzymes at the acceptor side of photosystem I (PSI): the electron shuttle ferredoxin (Fd), its isofunctional counterpart flavodoxin (Fld), their redox partner ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR), and the primary PSI acceptors F x and F A/F B. Protection of the [4Fe-4S] centers of these proteins from oxidative damage was achieved by strengthening binding between the F A/F B polypeptide and the reaction center core containing F x, therefore impairing O2 access to the clusters. Immobilization of F A/F B in the PSI complex led in turn to the recruitment of new soluble electron shuttles. This function was fulfilled by oxygen-insensitive [2Fe-2S] Fd, in which the reactive sulfide atoms of the cluster are shielded from solvent by the polypeptide backbone, and in some algae and cyanobacteria by Fld, which employs a flavin as prosthetic group and is tolerant to oxidants and iron limitation. Tight membrane binding of FNR allowed solid-state electron transfer from PSI bridged by Fd/Fld. Fine tuning of FNR catalytic mechanism led to formidable increases in turnover rates compared with FNRs acting in heterotrophic pathways, favoring Fd/Fld reduction instead of oxygen reduction.

  2. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionary relationships. Here we report the structure of PSII from a red alga Cyanidium caldarium at 2.76 Å resolution, which revealed the structure and interaction sites of PsbQ′, a unique, fourth extrinsic protein required for stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex in the lumenal surface of PSII. The PsbQ′ subunit was found to be located underneath CP43 in the vicinity of PsbV, and its structure is characterized by a bundle of four up-down helices arranged in a similar way to those of cyanobacterial and higher plant PsbQ, although helices I and II of PsbQ′ were kinked relative to its higher plant counterpart because of its interactions with CP43. Furthermore, two novel transmembrane helices were found in the red algal PSII that are not present in cyanobacterial PSII; one of these helices may correspond to PsbW found only in eukaryotic PSII. The present results represent the first crystal structure of PSII from eukaryotic oxygenic organisms, which were discussed in comparison with the structure of cyanobacterial PSII. PMID:26757821

  3. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  4. Investigating the Early Stages of Photosystem II Assembly in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Marko; Romero, Elisabet; Reisinger, Veronika; Yu, Jianfeng; Komenda, Josef; Eichacker, Lutz A.; Dekker, Jan P.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical characterization of intermediates involved in the assembly of the oxygen-evolving Photosystem II (PSII) complex is hampered by their low abundance in the membrane. Using the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we describe here the isolation of the CP47 and CP43 subunits, which, during biogenesis, attach to a reaction center assembly complex containing D1, D2, and cytochrome b559, with CP47 binding first. Our experimental approach involved a combination of His tagging, the use of a D1 deletion mutant that blocks PSII assembly at an early stage, and, in the case of CP47, the additional inactivation of the FtsH2 protease involved in degrading unassembled PSII proteins. Absorption spectroscopy and pigment analyses revealed that both CP47-His and CP43-His bind chlorophyll a and β-carotene. A comparison of the low temperature absorption and fluorescence spectra in the QY region for CP47-His and CP43-His with those for CP47 and CP43 isolated by fragmentation of spinach PSII core complexes confirmed that the spectroscopic properties are similar but not identical. The measured fluorescence quantum yield was generally lower for the proteins isolated from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and a 1–3-nm blue shift and a 2-nm red shift of the 77 K emission maximum could be observed for CP47-His and CP43-His, respectively. Immunoblotting and mass spectrometry revealed the co-purification of PsbH, PsbL, and PsbT with CP47-His and of PsbK and Psb30/Ycf12 with CP43-His. Overall, our data support the view that CP47 and CP43 form preassembled pigment-protein complexes in vivo before their incorporation into the PSII complex. PMID:21339295

  5. The response of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I to changes in photorespiration and nitrate assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Berkley J; Strand, Deserah D; Kramer, David M; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-05-01

    Photosynthesis captures light energy to produce ATP and NADPH. These molecules are consumed in the conversion of CO2 to sugar, photorespiration, and NO3(-) assimilation. The production and consumption of ATP and NADPH must be balanced to prevent photoinhibition or photodamage. This balancing may occur via cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (CEF), which increases ATP/NADPH production during photosynthetic electron transport; however, it is not clear under what conditions CEF changes with ATP/NADPH demand. Measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and dark interval relaxation kinetics were used to determine the contribution of CEF in balancing ATP/NADPH in hydroponically grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) supplied different forms of nitrogen (nitrate versus ammonium) under changes in atmospheric CO2 and oxygen. Measurements of CEF were made under low and high light and compared with ATP/NADPH demand estimated from CO2 gas exchange. Under low light, contributions of CEF did not shift despite an up to 17% change in modeled ATP/NADPH demand. Under high light, CEF increased under photorespiratory conditions (high oxygen and low CO2), consistent with a primary role in energy balancing. However, nitrogen form had little impact on rates of CEF under high or low light. We conclude that, according to modeled ATP/NADPH demand, CEF responded to energy demand under high light but not low light. These findings suggest that other mechanisms, such as the malate valve and the Mehler reaction, were able to maintain energy balance when electron flow was low but that CEF was required under higher flow.

  6. Growing green electricity: progress and strategies for use of photosystem I for sustainable photovoltaic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Bruce, Barry D

    2014-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is driven via sequential action of Photosystem II (PSII) and (PSI)reaction centers via the Z-scheme. Both of these pigment-membrane protein complexes are found in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants. Unlike PSII, PSI is remarkably stable and does not undergo limiting photo-damage. This stability, as well as other fundamental structural differences, makes PSI the most attractive reaction centers for applied photosynthetic applications. These applied applications exploit the efficient light harvesting and high quantum yield of PSI where the isolated PSI particles are redeployed providing electrons directly as a photocurrent or, via a coupled catalyst to yield H₂. Recent advances in molecular genetics, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology have merged to allow PSI to be integrated into a myriad of biohybrid devices. In photocurrent producing devices, PSI has been immobilized onto various electrode substrates with a continuously evolving toolkit of strategies and novel reagents. However, these innovative yet highly variable designs make it difficult to identify the rate-limiting steps and/or components that function as bottlenecks in PSI-biohybrid devices. In this study we aim to highlight these recent advances with a focus on identifying the similarities and differences in electrode surfaces, immobilization/orientation strategies, and artificial redox mediators. Collectively this work has been able to maintain an annual increase in photocurrent density (Acm⁻²) of ~10-fold over the past decade. The potential drawbacks and attractive features of some of these schemes are also discussed with their feasibility on a large-scale. As an environmentally benign and renewable resource, PSI may provide a new sustainable source of bioenergy. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  7. Dual antiplatelet therapy after noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik

    2014-07-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy simultaneously blocks different platelet activation pathways and might thus be more potent at inhibiting platelet activation and more effective at reducing major ischemic vascular events compared to antiplatelet monotherapy. Aspirin plus clopidogrel dual therapy is now the standard therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, dual antiplatelet therapy carries an increased risk of bleeding. Patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are generally older and likely to have a fragile cerebrovascular bed, which further increases the risk of systemic major bleeding events and intracranial hemorrhage. Clinical trials and meta-analyses suggest that in comparison to antiplatelet monotherapy, dual antiplatelet therapy initiated early after noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA further reduces the rate of recurrent stroke and major vascular events without significantly increasing the rate of major bleeding events. In contrast, studies of long-term therapy in patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA have yielded inconsistent data regarding the benefit of dual antiplatelet therapy over monotherapy. However, the harm associated with major bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, which is generally more disabling and more fatal than ischemic stroke, is likely to increase with dual antiplatelet therapy. Physicians should carefully assess the benefits and risks of dual antiplatelet therapy versus antiplatelet monotherapy when managing patients with ischemic stroke or TIA.

  8. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-15

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  9. Variations in constitutive and inducible UV-B tolerance; dissecting photosystem II protection in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Marcel A K; Martret, Bénedicte Le; Koornneef, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    The rise in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) (280-315 nm) radiation levels, that is a consequence of stratospheric ozone layer depletion, has triggered extensive research on the effects of UV-B on plants. Plants raised under natural sunlight conditions are generally well protected from the potentially harmful effects of UV-B radiation. However, it is mostly unknown to which extent UV protection is constitutive and/or induced. In this study, we have analysed the role of constitutive and inducible protection responses in avoiding UV-B damage to photosystem II of photosynthesis. We have assayed the UV susceptibility of photosystem II in 224 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from across the Northern hemisphere, and found a continuum of constitutive UV-protection levels, with some accessions being UV sensitive and others UV tolerant. Statistical analysis showed only very weak associations between constitutive UV tolerance and the geographic origin of accessions. Instead, most of the variance in constitutive UV-B protection of photosynthesis is present at the level of local Arabidopsis populations originating in the same geographic and climatic area. The variance in constitutive UV protection is, however, small compared to the amplitude of environmentally induced changes in UV protection. Thus, our data emphasise the importance of inducible responses for the protection of photosystem II against UV-B. Remarkably, the conditions that induce UV-protective responses vary; accessions from lower latitudes were found to switch-on UV defences more readily than those of higher latitudes. Such altered regulation of induction may comprise a suitable adaptation response when levels of a stressor are fluctuating in the short term, but predictable over longer periods.

  10. Dual massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Kevin, E-mail: Kevin.Morand@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2012-08-29

    The linearized massive gravity in three dimensions, over any maximally symmetric background, is known to be presented in a self-dual form as a first order equation which encodes not only the massive Klein-Gordon type field equation but also the supplementary transverse-traceless conditions. We generalize this construction to higher dimensions. The appropriate dual description in d dimensions, additionally to a (non-symmetric) tensor field h{sub {mu}{nu}}, involves an extra rank-(d-1) field equivalently represented by the torsion rank-3 tensor. The symmetry condition for h{sub {mu}{nu}} arises on-shell as a consequence of the field equations. The action principle of the dual theory is formulated. The focus has been made on four dimensions. Solving one of the fields in terms of the other and putting back in the action one obtains two other equivalent formulations of the theory in which the action is quadratic in derivatives. In one of these representations the theory is formulated entirely in terms of a rank-2 non-symmetric tensor h{sub {mu}{nu}}. This quadratic theory is not identical to the Fierz-Pauli theory and contains the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of h{sub {mu}{nu}}. Nevertheless, the only singularity in the propagator is the same as in the Fierz-Pauli theory so that only the massive spin-2 particle is propagating. In the other representation, the theory is formulated in terms of the torsion rank-3 tensor only. We analyze the conditions which follow from the field equations and show that they restrict to 5 degrees of freedom thus producing an alternative description to the massive spin-2 particle. A generalization to higher dimensions is suggested.

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  12. Gruppebaseret behandling af BED - et faseopdelt behandlingstilbud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laust, Jakob; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Waaddegaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    konsekvenser. BED blev i 2013 optaget i DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) som en selvstændig diagnose og BED forventes medtaget i den forestående revision af det internationale diagnose system, ICD-11. Sundhedsstyrelsen gav på denne baggrund satspuljemidler til erfaringsopsamling...

  13. Particle Pressures in Fluidized Beds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction): they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, we inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined)and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  14. Hipparions of the Laetolil Beds, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Laetolil Beds in Tanzania, 20-30 miles south of Olduvai Gorge, have been extensively sampled by parties under the leadership of Mrs. Dr. Mary D. Leakey, who very kindly sent me Hipparion material collected in 1974, 1975, and 1976. In a restudy of proboscidean material from these beds described

  15. Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction), they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, the authors inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds; the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined) and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  16. Bed-levelling experiments with suspended load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talmon, A.M.; De Graaff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Bed-levelling experiments are conducted in a straight laboratory channel. The experiments involve a significant fraction of suspended sediment transport. The purpose of the experiments is to provide data for modelling of the direction of sediment transport on a transverse sloping alluvial river bed,

  17. Nonlinear dynamical characteristics of bed load motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Yuchuan; XU; Haijue; XU; Dong

    2006-01-01

    Bed forms of various kinds that evolve naturally on the bottom of sandy coasts and rivers are a result of the kinematics of bed load transport. Based on the group motion of particles in the bed load within the bottom layer, a study on the nonlinear dynamics of bed load transport is presented in this paper. It is found that some development stages, such as the initiation, the equilibrium sediment transport, and the transition from a smooth bed to sand dunes, can be accounted for by different states in the nonlinear system of the bed load transport. It is verified by comparison with experimental data reported by Laboratoire Nationae D'Hydraulique, Chatou, France, that the evolution from a smooth bed to sand dunes is determined by mutation in the bed load transport. This paper presents results that may offer theoretical explanations to the experimental observations. It is also an attempt to apply the state-of-the-art nonlinear science to the classical sediment transport mechanics.

  18. Bed-levelling experiments with suspended load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talmon, A.M.; De Graaff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Bed-levelling experiments are conducted in a straight laboratory channel. The experiments involve a significant fraction of suspended sediment transport. The purpose of the experiments is to provide data for modelling of the direction of sediment transport on a transverse sloping alluvial river bed,

  19. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Single Cards)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and the signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  20. Bed bugs: clinical relevance and control options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Stephen L; Dwyer, Dominic E; Peñas, Pablo F; Russell, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations.

  1. Prevalence, Knowledge, and Concern About Bed Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaylor, Mary Beth; Wenning, Paul; Eddy, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that the resurgence of bed bugs in the U.S. has occurred at an alarming rate. Assumptions have been made that socioeconomic status is not associated with the prevalence of bed bug infestations. Little information is available at the local level, however, about the prevalence of bed bugs in private homes. The authors' pilot study aimed to identify prevalence, knowledge, and concern about bed bugs in one higher income village in Ohio utilizing survey methodology. Responses from 96 individuals who completed the Prevalence, Knowledge, and Concern About Bed Bugs survey were utilized for analysis. The majority of the sample respondents were white and 95% reported that they owned their residence. Only 6% knew someone with bed bugs. Additionally, 52% reported they were somewhat concerned about bed bugs. About 46% reported that they had changed their behavior. For a higher income area, the prevalence was dissimilar to the rate reported in the general public (about 20%). This suggests that bed bugs may be an environmental issue effecting low-income populations disproportionately. Further research is needed in areas of differing socioeconomic levels.

  2. Hipparions of the Laetolil Beds, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Laetolil Beds in Tanzania, 20-30 miles south of Olduvai Gorge, have been extensively sampled by parties under the leadership of Mrs. Dr. Mary D. Leakey, who very kindly sent me Hipparion material collected in 1974, 1975, and 1976. In a restudy of proboscidean material from these beds described b

  3. International Standardization of Bed Rest Standard Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the standardization of bed rest measures. The International Countermeasures Working Group attempted to define and agree internationally on standard measurements for spaceflight based bed rest studies. The group identified the experts amongst several stakeholder agencys. It included information on exercise, muscle, neurological, psychological, bone and cardiovascular measures.

  4. Determination of true bed thickness using folded bed model and borehole data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.S.; Velasquillo-Martinez, L.G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J.M.; Murillo-Muneton, G. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico); Garcia-Hernandez, J. [Petroleos Mexicanos Exploracion y Produccion, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Nieto-Samaniego, A.F. [Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Univ., Veracruz (Mexico). Centro de Geociencias

    2007-11-15

    The actual thickness of a given formation perpendicular to the bedding plane is known as the true bed thickness. Petroleum engineers rely on information regarding true bed thickness, particularly in dipping beds and in deviated holes because reservoir volume and isochore maps depend on these properties and not on the measured thickness. True bed thickness can be estimated from information gathered from well logs such as the dipmeter and borehole images. However, when deviations and dips exceed 10 degrees, corrections are needed. In this paper, a folded bed model was proposed to calculate the true bed thickness in the subsurface utilizing well log data. The value of true bed thickness (t) was shown to depend on the angle and the direction of the dip of the measured formation, as well as the drift angle and azimuth of the borehole. A case study from the Cantarell oil field in the southern Gulf of Mexico, offshore Campeche, was used to test the folded bed method. The model was shown to yield more uniform spatial change of the values of t, compared to the monoclinal bed model that often overestimates the average value of t. The maximum relative deviation of t from the monoclinal bed model reached 22.3 per cent and the maximum absolute deviation of t reached 34.5 m. The key factors that influence the values of t were found to be the bed dip, the dip difference between the top and base of the bed and the deviated angle of the well. The folded bed model yielded fewer changed values of the true bed thickness. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  5. Towards a Dual Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holli, Anne Maria; Harder, Mette Marie Stæhr

    2016-01-01

    countries acknowledged as forerunners in gender equality, which also have ‘fairly strong’ parliamentary standing committees. The results show that both committees on gender equality can be regarded as ‘feminist’ in character and both interact with relevant civil society organisations. Their impact......Drawing on insights from state feminism and legislative studies on parliamentary committees, this article develops a dual approach for the comparative analysis of committees on gender equality. Empirically, it compares the standing committees on gender equality in Denmark and Finland, two Nordic...

  6. Dual cure photocatalyst systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVoe, R.J.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Spurgeon, K.M. (Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (USA). Corporate Research Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    A family of dual cure photocatalyst systems is being developed to be used in the solventless processing of organic coatings. The photocatalyst systems consist of organometallic compounds often in combination with other agents. Upon photolysis, the photocatalyst system generates a Lewis acid and a free radical. The Lewis acid can initiate the polymerization of epoxies or the addition of isocyanates and polyols to form polyurethanes while the free radical can initiate the polymerization of acrylates. The performance of the various photocatalyst systems will be compared on the basis of the physical properties of the cured compositions they produce. 17 figs.

  7. Peering inside the granular bed: illuminating feedbacks between bed-load transport and bed-structure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssais, M.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The threshold of motion is perhaps the most important quantity to determine for understanding rates of bed load transport, however it is a moving target. Decades of research show that it changes in space and in time within a river, and is highly variable among different systems; however, these differences are not mechanistically understood. Recent researchers have proposed that the critical Shields stress is strongly dependent on the local configuration of the sediment bed [Frey and Church, 2011]. Critical Shields stress has been observed to change following sediment-transporting flood events in natural rivers [e.g., Turowski et al., 2011], while small-scale laboratory experiments have produced declining bed load transport rates associated with slow bed compaction [Charru et al., 2004]. However, no direct measurements have been made of the evolving bed structure under bed load transport, so the connection between granular controls and the threshold of motion remains uncertain. A perspective we adopt is that granular effects determine the critical Shields stress, while the fluid supplies a distribution of driving stresses. In order to isolate the granular effect, we undertake laminar bed load transport experiments using plastic beads sheared by a viscous oil in a small, annular flume. The fluid and beads are refractive index matched, and the fluid impregnated with a fluorescing powder. When illuminated with a planar laser sheet, we are able to image slices of the granular bed while also tracking the overlying sediment transport. We present the first results showing how bed load transport influences granular packing, and how changes in packing influence the threshold of motion to feed back on bed load transport rates. This effect may account for much of the variability observed in the threshold of motion in natural streams, and by extension offers a plausible explanation for hysteresis in bed load transport rates observed during floods. Charru, F., H. Mouilleron, and

  8. Does Bedding Affect the Airway and Allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Crane

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Various cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that synthetic bedding is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema while feather bedding seems to be protective. Synthetic bedding items have higher house dust mite allergen levels than feather bedding items. This is possibly the mechanism involved although fungal and bacterial proinflammatory compounds and volatile organic compounds may play a role. In this review we present and discuss the epidemiological evidence and suggest possible mechanisms. Primary intervention studies are required to show whether feather bedding is protective for the development of childhood asthma and allergic diseases while secondary intervention studies are required to potentially reduce symptoms and medication use in subjects with established disease.

  9. Incipient motion of gravel and coal beds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhasish Dey; Uddaraju V Raju

    2002-10-01

    An experimental study on incipient motion of gravel and coal beds under unidirectional steady-uniform flow is presented. Experiments were carried out in a flume with various sizes of gravel and coal samples. The critical bed shear stresses for the experimental runs determined using side-wall correction show considerable disagreement with the standard curves. The characteristic parameters affecting the incipient motion of particles in rough-turbulent regime, identified based on physical reasoning and dimensional analysis, are the Shields parameter, particle Froude number, non-dimensional particle diameter and non-dimensional flow depth. Equations of critical bed shear stress for the initial movement of gravel and coal beds were obtained using experimental data. The method of application of critical bed shear stress equations is also mentioned.

  10. Use of protein cross-linking and radiolytic footprinting to elucidate PsbP and PsbQ interactions within higher plant Photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummadisetti, Manjula P.; Frankel, Laurie K.; Bellamy, Henry D.; Sallans, Larry; Goettert, Jost S.; Brylinski, Michal; Limbach, Patrick A.; Bricker, Terry M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein cross-linking and radiolytic footprinting coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry were used to examine the structure of PsbP and PsbQ when they are bound to Photosystem II. In its bound state, the N-terminal 15-amino-acid residue domain of PsbP, which is unresolved in current crystal structures, interacts with domains in the C terminus of the protein. These interactions may serve to stabilize the structure of the N terminus and may facilitate PsbP binding and function. These interactions place strong structural constraints on the organization of PsbP when associated with the Photosystem II complex. Additionally, amino acid residues in the structurally unresolved loop 3A domain of PsbP (90K–107V), 93Y and 96K, are in close proximity (≤11.4 Å) to the N-terminal 1E residue of PsbQ. These findings are the first, to our knowledge, to identify a putative region of interaction between these two components. Cross-linked domains within PsbQ were also identified, indicating that two PsbQ molecules can interact in higher plants in a manner similar to that observed by Liu et al. [(2014) Proc Natl Acad Sci 111(12):4638–4643] in cyanobacterial Photosystem II. This interaction is consistent with either intra-Photosystem II dimer or inter-Photosystem II dimer models in higher plants. Finally, OH• produced by synchrotron radiolysis of water was used to oxidatively modify surface residues on PsbP and PsbQ. Domains on the surface of both protein subunits were resistant to modification, indicating that they were shielded from water and appear to define buried regions that are in contact with other Photosystem II components. PMID:25349426

  11. Bed bugs: they are back! The role of the school nurse in bed bug management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciscione, Patricia

    2012-09-01

    Recently there has been a resurgence of bed bugs in all facets of our society. Bed bugs have even been found in schools, causing unnecessary exclusion of students and unfounded hysteria. School nurses are again called upon to be front-line sources of information to quell the hysteria and confusion related to this unsavory condition. By arming themselves with the best evidence regarding proper identification of bed bugs and their bites and information about integrated prevention measures to control transmission of infestations, school nurses can contribute to the control and management of bed bugs and aid in the overall battle against this "new and improved" invasion of the bed bugs.

  12. Preliminary Flight Results of the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed: NASA DR1773 Fiber Optic Data Bus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl; Barth, Janet; Seidleck, Christina; Marshall, Paul

    1998-01-01

    NASA Goddard Spare Flight Center's (GSFC) Dual Rate 1773 (DR1773) Experiment on the Microelectronic and Photonic Test Bed (MPTB) has provided valuable information on the performance of the AS 1773 fiber optic data bus in the space radiation environment. Correlation of preliminary experiment data to ground based radiation test results show the AS 1773 bus is employable in future spacecraft applications requiring radiation tolerant communication links.

  13. Innovative Bed Load Measurement System for Large Alpine Gravel-Bed Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, H.; Habersack, H. M.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the work is to figure out the bed load transport processes using direct and surrogate measurement methods for the free flowing reach of the Drau River and its most important tributary Isel River, both large Alpine gravel-bed rivers, situated in the south western part of Austria. There are some techniques for bed load measurements in natural streams; we used collecting moving particles and indirectly determining transport intensity at the study sites. Former measurements in the study reach were performed also using mobile bed load samplers and fixed bed load samplers. Individually they all are adequate bed load measurement instruments - used in combination they are complementing one another, whereas each applied separately leads to specific deficits. The investigation payed special attention on results out of the geophone installations, whereas steel plate vibrations (the plates are mounted on top of concrete structures even with the river bed surface) caused by bed load particles with a diameter larger than about 20 mm are inducing a signal into the geophones. The signal above a defined threshold voltage than is recorded in a computer system as the sum of impacts during one minute intervals. The spatio-temporal distribution of the transported bed load material, its amount and the transport processes itself could be figured out for the first time out of continuous data collection since 2006 for large alpine gravel-bed rivers. Before building up the gauging stations there were no continuous recordings of bed load transport processes in large alpine rivers over their entire cross section, hence the investigation promises a better process understanding and the possibility to determine bed load transport rates and a rough approximation of the grain size distributions of the transported bed load material under different flow conditions. A relation between detected geophone records, the flow discharge and direct bed load sampling methods (Large Helley Smith

  14. Absence of lutein, violaxanthin and neoxanthin affects the functional chlorophyll antenna size of photosystem-II but not that of photosystem-I in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polle, J E; Niyogi, K K; Melis, A

    2001-05-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii double mutant npq2 lor1 lacks the beta, epsilon-carotenoids lutein and loroxanthin as well as all beta,beta-epoxycarotenoids derived from zeaxanthin (e.g. violaxanthin and neoxanthin). Thus, the only carotenoids present in the thylakoid membranes of the npq2 lor1 cells are beta-carotene and zeaxanthin. The effect of these mutations on the photochemical apparatus assembly and function was investigated. In cells of the mutant strain, the content of photosystem-II (PSII) and photosystem-I (PSI) was similar to that of the wild type, but npq2 lor1 had a significantly smaller PSII light-harvesting Chl antenna size. In contrast, the Chl antenna size of PSI was not truncated in the mutant. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis qualitatively revealed the presence of all LHCII and LHCI apoproteins in the thylakoid membrane of the mutant. The results showed that some of the LHCII and most of the LHCI were assembled and functionally connected with PSII and PSI, respectively. Photon conversion efficiency measurements, based on the initial slope of the light-saturation curve of photosynthesis and on the yield of Chl a fluorescence in vivo, showed similar efficiencies. However, a significantly greater light intensity was required for the saturation of photosynthesis in the mutant than in the wild type. It is concluded that zeaxanthin can successfully replace lutein and violaxanthin in most of the functional light-harvesting antenna of the npq2 lor1 mutant.

  15. On different regime relations between bed load transport and bed topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Ma, H.; Fu, X.; Duan, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Bed load transport is determined by the effective part of the total shear stress subtracting the form drag that arises from bed topography. Wang et al. (2004) quantified the overall topographic roughness of the channel bed with the parameter Sp and claimed that the increasing Sp corresponds with increasing flow resistance and decreasing bed load transport rate due to increasing form drag and decreasing skin friction. However, the flume experiments for non-uniform sediment transport on steep slope at the University of Arizona show opposite results that bed load transport increases with Sp. We investigate the physical reason of the contrasting results for the full understanding of the different regimes between bed load transport and bed topography. We develop the energy conveyance equation for water flow and bed load transport and apply it to the development of the equilibrium relation between bed load transport and energy dissipation due to the form drag. The energy theory for bed load transport shows that since our flume experiments achieved the equilibrium transport state with water and sediment circulating supplying, the bed topography Sp is determined by the flow and sediment grain size, and the bed load transport is positively related to the energy dissipation rate which is thus positively related to Sp. However, in the field experiment of Wang et al. (2004), at first, the referenced Sp is determined by the most recent significant flood whereas the bed load transport is always below the transport capacity with insufficient sediment supply. After one-time sediment feed, the bed load transport rapidly varies from ephemeral full capacity state to sediment starving state. In this process, the removal of relative fine sediment results in the rapid increment of Sp from the instant equilibrium state to the referenced Sp whereas the coarsen bed leads to decrement of bed load transport. Eventually, the sediment starving state results in the increasing Sp and decreasing

  16. Robust dual-response optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanikoglu, Ihsan; den Hertog, Dick; Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a robust optimization reformulation of the dual-response problem developed in response surface methodology. The dual-response approach fits separate models for the mean and the variance and analyzes these two models in a mathematical optimization setting. We use metamodels esti

  17. Dual-Credit in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Credit-based transition programs provide high school students with opportunities to jump start their college education. The Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) offers college credit through dual-credit programs. While KCTCS dual-credit offerings have been successful in helping high school students start their college education…

  18. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  19. Dual Card,Double Happiness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As Christmas Day and New Year Day draw near, why not treat yourself with a smart digital gizmo. Then, the Samsung Dual-card Cellphone is what you are longing for. Samsung B5712C, the first dual-card model released by Samsung,

  20. Asymmetry in Dual Language Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Amrein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for dual-language programs to deliver specific benefits to students with different primary and secondary language skills continues to be debated. Individuals favoring dual language assert that as it relies upon a reciprocal approach, dual language students acquire dual language proficiency without the need for teachers to translate from one language to another. By utilizing and conserving the language skills that students bring, dual language students also gain cross-cultural understandings and an expanded opportunity to realize academic success in the future. Research that explores whether these programs meet the needs of monolingual and bilingual students is limited. The intent of this study is not to criticize dual language practice. Instead, it is to describe a newly implemented dual language immersion program that exists and operates in Phoenix, Arizona. In particular, this study examines the practices of dual language teachers at Leigh Elementary School and the challenges encountered as school personnel worked to provide students with different primary and secondary language skills increased opportunities to learn.

  1. Benefits of Dual Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallstrum, Kiara

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper examines how dual language education (DLE) programs are valuable. The literature shows that children do much more than just thrive in a dual language environment. According to research, children who are bilingual are cognitively, academically, intellectually, socially and verbally more advantaged than their monolingual…

  2. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  3. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasseter, R. H.; Eto, J. H.; Schenkman, B.; Stevens, J.; Volkmmer, H.; Klapp, D.; Linton, E.; Hurtado, H.; Roy, J.

    2010-06-08

    CERTS Microgrid concept captures the emerging potential of distributed generation using a system approach. CERTS views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a 'microgrid'. The sources can operate in parallel to the grid or can operate in island, providing UPS services. The system can disconnect from the utility during large events (i.e. faults, voltage collapses), but may also intentionally disconnect when the quality of power from the grid falls below certain standards. CERTS Microgrid concepts were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resynchronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults.

  4. Mix bed type desalting device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanaoka, Shuichi; Shiozawa, Yoshihiro; Kazama, Seiichi

    1998-12-18

    The present invention provides a condensate desalting device of a BWR type reactor capable of preventing degradation of ion exchange resins by water containing oxidative materials such as hydrogen peroxide thereby keeping reactor water at high purity. Namely, a mixed bed type desalting device comprises a desalting tower for removing impurities in water by ion exchange resins and a regeneration device for cleaning/regenerating the ion exchange resins. Means for loading iron cruds into water is disposed in the desalting tower. With such a constitution, oxidative materials such as hydrogen peroxide react with the iron cruds thereby enabling to suppress oxidative reaction during ion exchange. Since passage or cleaning/regeneration of water is conducted while loading the iron cruds between ion exchange resin particles and on the surface layer of an ion exchange resin layer by using the above-mentioned reaction, degradation of ion exchange performance of the ion exchange resins by hydrogen peroxide can be prevented upon condensate cleaning operation or resin cleaning/regeneration. As a result, degradation of quality of reactor water can be suppressed. (I.S.)

  5. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  6. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  7. Factors Associated With Infant Bed-Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heere, Megan; Moughan, Beth; Alfonsi, Joseph; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Aronoff, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Bed-sharing is associated with sudden infant death syndrome and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for newborn bed-sharing. Methods: Postpartum mothers from a university maternity service were contacted by phone to complete a survey. Demographic and environmental data were collected; newborn bed-sharing and sleep environment were self-reported. Results: A total of 1261 mothers completed surveys; bed-sharing was reported by 79 mothers (6.3%). Multivariate logistic regression identified referral to a nurse (odds ratio [OR] = 10; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5-30) and sleep location “other” than a crib, bassinet, or Pack and Play (OR = 7.1; 95% CI = 1.9-25.9) as factors associated with an increased risk of bed-sharing; formula feeding (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.77) and crib sleeping (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.26-0.86) reduced this risk. Conclusion: Infants with no identifiable places to sleep, significant health issues, and who are breastfed are more likely to bed-share. Interventional studies should be directed at these factors. PMID:28229101

  8. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-09-15

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults.

  9. Heat and Mass Transfer Enforcement of Vibrating Fluidized Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChuZhide; YangJunhong; 等

    1994-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the development of vibrating fluidized bed at home and abroad,elaborates the vibration properties of vibrating fluidized bed.the fluidizing velocity and pressure drop of the bed layer,it also deduces the non-steady state drying dynamic equations of vibrating fluidized bed,analyzes main factors which influence the drying rate and inquires into drying rules of fixed bed and vibrating fluidized bed.

  10. SAR Indicators for Morphological Changes and Bivalve Beds on Intertidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina; Kemme, Linnea

    2016-08-01

    We analysed a large amount of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of four test areas acquired from 2008 to 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Multi-temporal analyses of series of SAR images allow detecting bivalve beds, since the radar backscattering from those beds is generally high, whereas that from sediments may vary with imaging geometry and environmental conditions. Our results further show evidence that also single-acquisition, dual- polarization SAR imagery can be used in this respect. The polarization coefficient (i.e., the ratio of the difference and the sum of both co-polarizations) can be used to infer indicators for oyster and blue-mussel beds.

  11. O2 evolution and cyclic electron flow around photosystem I in long-term ground batch culture of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yanjun; Wang, Suqin; Hao, Zongjie; Zhou, Yiyong; Liu, Yongding

    2014-12-01

    Based on the purpose of better exploring the function of green producers in the closed aquatic biological life support system, the condition of dynamic O2 evolution and performance of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (CEF-PSI) in long-term ground batch culture of Euglena gracilis were studied, the relationship between linear electron flow (LEF) and CEF-PSI was revealed, the function of CEF-PSI was investigated. Excellent consistency in O2 evolution pattern was observed in cultures grown in both closed and open containers, O2 evolution was strictly suppressed in phase 1, but the rate of it increased significantly in phase 2. CEF-PSI was proposed to be active during the whole course of cultivation, even in the declining phase 3, it still operated at the extent of 47-55%. It is suggested that the relationship between LEF and CEF-PSI is not only competition but also reciprocity. CEF-PSI was proposed to contribute to the considerable growth in phase 1; it was also suggested to play an important protective role against photosystem II (PSII) photoinhibition at the greatly enhanced level (approximately 80-95%) on the 2nd day. Our results in this research suggest that E. gracilis had very particular photosynthetic characteristics, the strict O2 evolution suppression in the initial culture phase might be a special light acclimation behavior, and CEF-PSI could be an important mechanism involved in this kind of adaptation to the changeable light environment.

  12. Effects of Chlorophyll Availability on Fluorescence Components of Photosystems in the ORF469-Deletion Mutant of Cyanobacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    PCR-amplified ORF469 fragment from Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 was cloned into pUC118 and a construct was made in which part of ORF469 was deleted and replaced by erythromycin resistance cassette.Transformation of wild type strain of Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 with this construct yielded a mutant in which ORF469 was deleted.In the resulting mutant, the light-independent pathway of chlorophyll biosynthesis was inactivated and availability of chlorophyll was fully dependent on light.When propagated the mutant in dark, the chlorophyll was non-detectable and protochlorophyllide with 645 nm fluorescence emission peak was accumulated.Meanwhile, the fluorescence emission peaks (excited at 435 nm) of thylakoids at 685 nm, 695 nm and 725 nm, which represented relative chlorophyll-binding proteins, disappeared.Upon return of dark-grown ORF469 mutant to the light, greening occurred and chlorophyll was synthesized to assembly fluorescence emission components in photosystems.Newly synthesized chlorophyll combined the fluorescence component of 685 nm at first, then 725 nm and 695 nm at last, which indicates a pecking order for biogenesis of chlorophyll-binding proteins when availability of chlorophyll is limited.The mutant lacking ORF469 in Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 was suggested as an excellent cyanobacterial system for studies on the interactions between chlorophyll and chlorophyll-binding proteins in photosystems.

  13. Crystallization of Photosystem II for Time-Resolved Structural Studies Using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jesse; Kupitz, Christopher; Basu, Shibom; Conrad, Chelsie E; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane protein supercomplex that executes the initial reaction of photosynthesis in higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. It captures the light from the sun to catalyze a transmembrane charge separation. In a series of four charge separation events, utilizing the energy from four photons, PSII oxidizes two water molecules to obtain dioxygen, four protons, and four electrons. The light reactions of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) result in the formation of an electrochemical transmembrane proton gradient that is used for the production of ATP. Electrons that are subsequently transferred from PSI via the soluble protein ferredoxin to ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase that reduces NADP(+) to NADPH. The products of photosynthesis and the elemental oxygen evolved sustain all higher life on Earth. All oxygen in the atmosphere is produced by the oxygen-evolving complex in PSII, a process that changed our planet from an anoxygenic to an oxygenic atmosphere 2.5 billion years ago. In this chapter, we provide recent insight into the mechanisms of this process and methods used in probing this question. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Light-driven hydrogen production by a hybrid complex of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase and the cyanobacterial photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masaki; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Bärbel; Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Kojima, Kouji; Honma, Daisuke; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Okura, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to generate renewable and clean fuels, increasing efforts are focused on the exploitation of photosynthetic microorganisms for the production of molecular hydrogen from water and light. In this study we engineered a 'hard-wired' protein complex consisting of a hydrogenase and photosystem I (hydrogenase-PSI complex) as a direct light-to-hydrogen conversion system. The key component was an artificial fusion protein composed of the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from the beta-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 and the peripheral PSI subunit PsaE of the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The resulting hydrogenase-PsaE fusion protein associated with PsaE-free PSI spontaneously, thereby forming a hydrogenase-PSI complex as confirmed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifuge and immunoblot analysis. The hydrogenase-PSI complex displayed light-driven hydrogen production at a rate of 0.58 mumol H(2).mg chlorophyll(-1).h(-1). The complex maintained its accessibility to the native electron acceptor ferredoxin. This study provides the first example of a light-driven enzymatic reaction by an artificial complex between a redox enzyme and photosystem I and represents an important step on the way to design a photosynthetic organism that efficiently converts solar energy and water into hydrogen.

  15. Economic photoprotection in photosystem II that retains a complete light-harvesting system with slow energy traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Kapitonova, Ekaterina; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Duffy, Christopher D P; Ungerer, Petra; Valkunas, Leonas; Ruban, Alexander V

    2014-07-11

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II has an intrinsic capability for self-defence against intense sunlight. The thermal dissipation of excess energy can be measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. It has recently been proposed that the transition between the light-harvesting and self-defensive modes is associated with a reorganization of light-harvesting complexes. Here we show that despite structural changes, the photosystem II cross-section does not decrease. Our study reveals that the efficiency of energy trapping by the non-photochemical quencher(s) is lower than the efficiency of energy capture by the reaction centres. Consequently, the photoprotective mechanism works effectively for closed rather than open centres. This type of defence preserves the exceptional efficiency of electron transport in a broad range of light intensities, simultaneously ensuring high photosynthetic productivity and, under hazardous light conditions, sufficient photoprotection for both the reaction centre and the light-harvesting pigments of the antenna.

  16. Economic photoprotection in photosystem II that retains a complete light-harvesting system with slow energy traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Kapitonova, Ekaterina; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Duffy, Christopher D. P.; Ungerer, Petra; Valkunas, Leonas; Ruban, Alexander V.

    2014-07-01

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II has an intrinsic capability for self-defence against intense sunlight. The thermal dissipation of excess energy can be measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. It has recently been proposed that the transition between the light-harvesting and self-defensive modes is associated with a reorganization of light-harvesting complexes. Here we show that despite structural changes, the photosystem II cross-section does not decrease. Our study reveals that the efficiency of energy trapping by the non-photochemical quencher(s) is lower than the efficiency of energy capture by the reaction centres. Consequently, the photoprotective mechanism works effectively for closed rather than open centres. This type of defence preserves the exceptional efficiency of electron transport in a broad range of light intensities, simultaneously ensuring high photosynthetic productivity and, under hazardous light conditions, sufficient photoprotection for both the reaction centre and the light-harvesting pigments of the antenna.

  17. Heat stress and recovery of photosystem II efficiency in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars acclimated to different growth temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Sabibul; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on photosystem II (PS II) efficiency and post-stress recovery was studied in four wheat cultivars using chlorophyll fluorescence. The main aim was to examine the cultivar differences in relation to inhibition and recovery of PSII functionality after heat stress at differ......The effect of heat stress on photosystem II (PS II) efficiency and post-stress recovery was studied in four wheat cultivars using chlorophyll fluorescence. The main aim was to examine the cultivar differences in relation to inhibition and recovery of PSII functionality after heat stress...... and 25 °C) and subjected to heat stress (40 °C) for two days at early tillering and three days at anthesis and early grain development stages. The plants were returned to their original growth conditions after heat stress and recovery was observed for three days. The maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv....../Fm) and the quantum yield of PSII (F′q/F′m) were measured before, during and after the heat stress. The heat stress significantly inhibited the Fv/Fm and F′q/F′m in all wheat cultivars at all growth stages. There were significant differences in Fv/Fm among the cultivars at anthesis and at early grain development...

  18. Free running droplets on packed powder beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Catherine P.; Bian, Xun; Sedev, Rossen

    2013-06-01

    We observed that water drops placed on horizontal beds of fine molybdenite particles move freely over the bed surface for about 1 second. The drops collect an irregular coating of unevenly distributed particles as they bounce and roll. We manipulated the distance that the drops travel, and hence the area of the droplet surface coated with particles, by varying the water surface tension and the kinetic energy of the initial droplet impact on the bed surface. Our results highlight the role of contact angle hysteresis in particle encapsulation of liquid drops.

  19. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  20. Modelling the bed characteristics in fluidised-beds for top-spray coating processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike Vanderroost; Frederik Ronsse; Koen Dewettinck; Jan G.Pieters

    2012-01-01

    A particle sub-model describing the bed characteristics of a bubbling fluidised bed is presented.Atomisation air,applied at high pressures via a nozzle positioned above the bed for s pray formation,is incorporated in the model since its presence has a profound influence on the bed characteristics,though the spray itself is not yet considered.A particle sub-model is developed using well-known empirical relations for particle drag force,bubble growth and velocity and particle distribution above the fluidised-bed surface.Simple but effective assumptions and abstractions were made concerning bubble distribution,particle ejection at the bed surface and the behaviour of atomisation air flow upon impacting the surface of a bubbling fluidised bed.The model was shown to be capable of predicting the fluidised bed characteristics in terms of bed heights,voidage distributions and solids volume fractions with good accuracy in less than 5 min of calculation time on a regular desktop PC.It is therefore suitable for incorporation into general process control models aimed at dynamic control for process efficiency and product quality in top-spray fluidised bed coating processes.

  1. Passive acoustic monitoring of bed load discharge in a large gravel bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geay, T.; Belleudy, P.; Gervaise, C.; Habersack, H.; Aigner, J.; Kreisler, A.; Seitz, H.; Laronne, J. B.

    2017-02-01

    Surrogate technologies to monitor bed load discharge have been developed to supplement and ultimately take over traditional direct methods. Our research deals with passive acoustic monitoring of bed load flux using a hydrophone continuously deployed near a river bed. This passive acoustic technology senses any acoustic waves propagated in the river environment and particularly the sound due to interparticle collisions emitted during bed load movement. A data set has been acquired in the large Alpine gravel-bedded Drau River. Analysis of the short-term frequency response of acoustic signals allows us to determine the origin of recorded noises and to consider their frequency variations. Results are compared with ancillary field data of water depth and bed load transport inferred from the signals of a geophone array. Hydrophone and geophone signals are well correlated. Thanks to the large network of deployed geophones, analysis of the spatial resolution of hydrophone measurements shows that the sensor is sensitive to bed load motion not only locally but over distances of 5-10 m (10-20% of river width). Our results are promising in terms of the potential use of hydrophones for monitoring bed load transport in large gravel bed rivers: acoustic signals represent a large river bed area, rather than being local; hydrophones can be installed in large floods; they can be deployed at a low cost and provide continuous monitoring at high temporal resolution.

  2. Growth inhibition and effect on photosystem by three imidazolium chloride ionic liquids in rice seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huijun, E-mail: lhj@mail.zjgsu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhang, Shuxian [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang Province (China); Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Caidong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The three ILs have phytotoxic on rice growth. • The antioxidant enzyme activities increased first and then declined with ILs concentration increased. • The Hill reaction activity decreased and the PS II of leaves was damaged by ILs. • The toxicity of ILs increased as the alkyl chain length increased as the order: [OMIM]Cl < [DMIM]Cl < [C{sub 12}MIM]Cl. - Abstract: The effects of three imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs) including 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([OMIM]Cl), 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([DMIM]Cl) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([C{sub 12}MIM]Cl) were studied in hydroponically grown rice seedlings. The growth inhibition rate increased and the Hill reaction activity of isolated rice chloroplasts decreased with increasing ILs concentrations. The IC{sub 50,5d} for stem length was 0.70 mg/L of [OMIM]Cl, 0.15 mg/L of [DMIM]Cl, and 0.055 mg/L of [C{sub 12}MIM]Cl, respectively. The SOD, POD and CAT activities of chloroplast exhibited initial increases followed by decreases in activity with increasing ILs concentrations. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as the maximum effective quantum yield of PSII(F{sub v}/F{sub m}), the potential activity of PSII(F{sub v}/F{sub 0}), the yield of photochemical quantum [Y(II)], the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), the non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) and the relative electron transport ratio (rETR) were affected, showing that ILs will damage the PSII. The results demonstrated that imidazolium chloride ILs are phytotoxic to rice growth and their photosystem, the toxicity increased as the alkyl chain length increased with the following order: [OMIM]Cl < [DMIM]Cl < [C{sub 12}MIM]Cl. The results will help to better understand the possible role of the defense mechanism in rice caused by ILs exposure.

  3. 'Photosystem II: the water splitting enzyme of photosynthesis and the origin of oxygen in our atmosphere'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James

    2016-01-01

    About 3 billion years ago an enzyme emerged which would dramatically change the chemical composition of our planet and set in motion an unprecedented explosion in biological activity. This enzyme used solar energy to power the thermodynamically and chemically demanding reaction of water splitting. In so doing it provided biology with an unlimited supply of reducing equivalents needed to convert carbon dioxide into the organic molecules of life while at the same time produced oxygen to transform our planetary atmosphere from an anaerobic to an aerobic state. The enzyme which facilitates this reaction and therefore underpins virtually all life on our planet is known as Photosystem II (PSII). It is a pigment-binding, multisubunit protein complex embedded in the lipid environment of the thylakoid membranes of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. Today we have detailed understanding of the structure and functioning of this key and unique enzyme. The journey to this level of knowledge can be traced back to the discovery of oxygen itself in the 18th-century. Since then there has been a sequence of mile stone discoveries which makes a fascinating story, stretching over 200 years. But it is the last few years that have provided the level of detail necessary to reveal the chemistry of water oxidation and O-O bond formation. In particular, the crystal structure of the isolated PSII enzyme has been reported with ever increasing improvement in resolution. Thus the organisational and structural details of its many subunits and cofactors are now well understood. The water splitting site was revealed as a cluster of four Mn ions and a Ca ion surrounded by amino-acid side chains, of which seven provide direct ligands to the metals. The metal cluster is organised as a cubane structure composed of three Mn ions and a Ca2+ linked by oxo-bonds with the fourth Mn ion attached to the cubane. This structure has now been synthesised in a non-protein environment suggesting that it is a totally

  4. Thermostability of photosystem I trimers and monomers from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Vladimir V.; Terekhova, Irina V.; Bolychevtseva, Yulia V.; El-Mohsnawy, Eithar; Rögner, Matthias; Mäntele, Werner; Kopczak, Marta J.; Džafić, Enela

    2017-05-01

    The performance of solar energy conversion into alternative energy sources in artificial systems highly depends on the thermostability of photosystem I (PSI) complexes Terasaki et al. (2007), Iwuchukwu et al. (2010), Kothe et al. (2013) . To assess the thermostability of PSI complexes from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus heating induced perturbations on the level of secondary structure of the proteins were studied. Changes were monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra in the mid-IR region upon slow heating (1 °C per minute) of samples in D2O phosphate buffer (pD 7.4) from 20 °C to 100 °C. These spectra showed distinct changes in the Amide I region of PSI complexes as a function of the rising temperature. Absorbance at the Amide I maximum of PSI monomers (centered around 1653 cm- 1), gradually dropped in two temperature intervals, i.e. 60-75 and 80-90 °C. In contrast, absorbance at the Amide I maximum of PSI trimers (around 1656 cm- 1) dropped only in one temperature interval 80-95 °C. The thermal profile of the spectral shift of α-helices bands in the region 1656-1642 cm- 1 confirms the same two temperature intervals for PSI monomers and only one interval for trimers. Apparently, the observed absorbance changes at the Amide I maximum during heating of PSI monomers and trimers are caused by deformation and unfolding of α-helices. The absence of absorbance changes in the interval of 20-65 °C in PSI trimers is probably caused by a greater stability of protein secondary structure as compared to that in monomers. Upon heating above 80 °C a large part of α-helices both in trimers and monomers converts to unordered and aggregated structures. Spectral changes of PSI trimers and monomers heated up to 100 °C are irreversible due to protein denaturation and non-specific aggregation of complexes leading to new absorption bands at 1618-1620 cm- 1. We propose that monomers shield the denaturation sensitive sides at the

  5. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  6. Photosystem II function and dynamics in three widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Yin

    Full Text Available Columbia-0 (Col-0, Wassilewskija-4 (Ws-4, and Landsberg erecta-0 (Ler-0 are used as background lines for many public Arabidopsis mutant collections, and for investigation in laboratory conditions of plant processes, including photosynthesis and response to high-intensity light (HL. The photosystem II (PSII complex is sensitive to HL and requires repair to sustain its function. PSII repair is a multistep process controlled by numerous factors, including protein phosphorylation and thylakoid membrane stacking. Here we have characterized the function and dynamics of PSII complex under growth-light and HL conditions. Ws-4 displayed 30% more thylakoid lipids per chlorophyll and 40% less chlorophyll per carotenoid than Col-0 and Ler-0. There were no large differences in thylakoid stacking, photoprotection and relative levels of photosynthetic complexes among the three accessions. An increased efficiency of PSII closure was found in Ws-4 following illumination with saturation flashes or continuous light. Phosphorylation of the PSII D1/D2 proteins was reduced by 50% in Ws-4 as compared to Col-0 and Ler-0. An increase in abundance of the responsible STN8 kinase in response to HL treatment was found in all three accessions, but Ws-4 displayed 50% lower levels than Col-0 and Ler-0. Despite this, the HL treatment caused in Ws-4 the lagest extent of PSII inactivation, disassembly, D1 protein degradation, and the largest decrease in the size of stacked thylakoids. The dilution of chlorophyll-protein complexes with additional lipids and carotenoids in Ws-4 may represent a mechanism to facilitate lateral protein traffic in the membrane, thus compensating for the lack of a full complement of STN8 kinase. Nevertheless, additional PSII damage occurs in Ws-4, which exceeds the D1 protein synthesis capacity, thus leading to enhanced photoinhibition. Our findings are valuable for selection of appropriate background line for PSII characterization in Arabidopsis

  7. Protein film voltammetry and co-factor electron transfer dynamics in spinach photosystem II core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2014-05-01

    Direct protein film voltammetry (PFV) was used to investigate the redox properties of the photosystem II (PSII) core complex from spinach. The complex was isolated using an improved protocol not used previously for PFV. The PSII core complex had high oxygen-evolving capacity and was incorporated into thin lipid and polyion films. Three well-defined reversible pairs of reduction and oxidation voltammetry peaks were observed at 4 °C in the dark. Results were similar in both types of films, indicating that the environment of the PSII-bound cofactors was not influenced by film type. Based on comparison with various control samples including Mn-depleted PSII, peaks were assigned to chlorophyll a (Chl a) (Em = -0.47 V, all vs. NHE, at pH 6), quinones (-0.12 V), and the manganese (Mn) cluster (Em = 0.18 V). PFV of purified iron heme protein cytochrome b-559 (Cyt b-559), a component of PSII, gave a partly reversible peak pair at 0.004 V that did not have a potential similar to any peaks observed from the intact PSII core complex. The closest peak in PSII to 0.004 V is the 0.18 V peak that was found to be associated with a two-electron process, and thus is inconsistent with iron heme protein voltammetry. The -0.47 V peak had a peak potential and peak potential-pH dependence similar to that found for purified Chl a incorporated into DMPC films. The midpoint potentials reported here may differ to various extents from previously reported redox titration data due to the influence of electrode double-layer effects. Heterogeneous electron transfer (hET) rate constants were estimated by theoretical fitting and digital simulations for the -0.47 and 0.18 V peaks. Data for the Chl a peaks were best fit to a one-electron model, while the peak assigned to the Mn cluster was best fit by a two-electron/one-proton model.

  8. Paediatric burn unit in Portugal: Beds needed using a bed-day approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João V; Viana, João; Amarante, José; Freitas, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high burden of children with burns, there is not a paediatric burn unit (PBU) in Portugal. We aimed to estimate the Portuguese health care providing needs on paediatric burns. We performed a nation-wide retrospective study, between 2009 and 2013, among less than 16 years-old inpatients with burns that met the transfer criteria to a burn unit in Portugal. A bed-day approach was used, targeting an occupancy rate of 70-75%, and possible locations were studied. The primary outcome was the number of beds needed, and secondary outcomes were the overload and revenue for each possible number of beds in a PBU. A total of 1155 children met the transfer criteria to a burn unit, representing a total of 17,371 bed-days. Occupancy rates of 11-bed, 12-bed, 13-bed and 14-bed PBU were, respectively, 79.7%, 75.3%, 71.0% and 66.8%. The 13-bed PBU scenario would represent an overload of 523 bed-days, revenue of more than 5 million Euros and a ratio of 1 PBU bed per 123,409 children. Using a groundbreaking approach, the optimal number of PBU beds needed in Portugal is 13. However, as half of the patients who met burn transfer criteria are not transferred, this bed number might be overestimated if this pattern maintains, despite the underestimation with our method approach. If a PBU is to be created the preferable location is Porto. Cost-effectiveness studies should be performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Dual-horizon Peridynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Huilong; Cai, Yongchang; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new Peridynamic approach that naturally includes varying horizon sizes and completely solves the "ghost force" issue. Therefore, the concept of dual-horizon is introduced to consider the unbalanced interactions between the particles with different horizon sizes. The present formulation is proved to fulfill both the balances of linear momentum and angular momentum. Neither the "partial stress tensor" nor the "`slice" technique are needed to ameliorate the ghost force issue in \\cite{Silling2014}. The consistency of reaction forces is naturally fulfilled by a unified simple formulation. The method can be easily implemented to any existing peridynamics code with minimal changes. A simple adaptive refinement procedure is proposed minimizing the computational cost. The method is applied here to the three Peridynamic formulations, namely bond based, ordinary state based and non-ordinary state based Peridynamics. Both two- and three- dimensional examples including the Kalthof-Winkler experi...

  10. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel;

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...... risk and utility that economists traditionally assume, allowance for rank-dependent decision weights, and consideration of income thresholds. We examine the issues involved in full maximum likelihood estimation of the model using observed choice data. We propose a general method for integrating...... the multiple criteria, using the logic of mixture models, which we believe is attractive from a decision-theoretic and statistical perspective. The model is applied to observed choices from a major natural experiment involving intrinsically dynamic choices over highly skewed outcomes. The evidence points...

  11. Bed Bug Infestations and Control Practices in China: Implications for Fighting the Global Bed Bug Resurgence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlu Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The bed bug resurgence in North America, Europe, and Australia has elicited interest in investigating the causes of the widespread and increasing infestations and in developing more effective control strategies. In order to extend global perspectives on bed bug management, we reviewed bed bug literature in China by searching five Chinese language electronic databases. We also conducted telephone interviews of 68 pest control firms in two cities during March 2011. In addition, we conducted telephone interviews to 68 pest control companies within two cities in March 2011. Two species of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F. are known to occur in China. These were common urban pests before the early1980s. Nationwide “Four-Pest Elimination” campaigns (bed bugs being one of the targeted pests were implemented in China from 1960 to the early 1980s. These campaigns succeeded in the elimination of bed bug infestations in most communities. Commonly used bed bug control methods included applications of hot water, sealing of bed bug harborages, physical removal, and applications of residual insecticides (mainly organophosphate sprays or dusts. Although international and domestic travel has increased rapidly in China over the past decade (2000–2010, there have only been sporadic new infestations reported in recent years. During 1999–2009, all documented bed bug infestations were found in group living facilities (military dormitories, worker dormitories, and prisons, hotels, or trains. One city (Shenzhen city near Hong Kong experienced significantly higher number of bed bug infestations. This city is characterized by a high concentration of migratory factory workers. Current bed bug control practices include educating residents, washing, reducing clutter, putting items under the hot sun in summer, and applying insecticides (pyrethroids or organophosphates. There have not been any studies or reports on bed bug insecticide

  12. Ultra high temperature particle bed reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, Otto; Ludewig, Hans; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.

    1990-01-01

    A direct nuclear propulsion engine which could be used for a mission to Mars is designed. The main features of this reactor design are high values for I(sub sp) and very efficient cooling. This particle bed reactor consists of 37 cylindrical fuel elements embedded in a cylinder of beryllium which acts as a moderator and reflector. The fuel consists of a packed bed of spherical fissionable fuel particles. Gaseous H2 passes over the fuel bed, removes the heat, and is exhausted out of the rocket. The design was found to be neutronically critical and to have tolerable heating rates. Therefore, this particle bed reactor design is suitable as a propulsion unit for this mission.

  13. Is bed rest following embryo transfer necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, K; Afnan, M; Lashen, H; Elgendy, M; Morgan, C; Sinclair, L

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of no bed rest following ET on the results of an IVF program. Historical cohort-control study. A University-based assisted conception unit. One thousand and nineteen (1019) IVF cycles were performed at our unit from June 1994 to August 1996. The historical control consisted of all the 19,697 IVF cycles reported in the United Kingdom national database from April 1994 to March 1995. No bed rest following ET in our patients. Pregnancy rate (PR) and clinical PR per cycles started and per ET procedure. The clinical PR per ET was significantly higher in our patients than in the national data (30% versus 22.9%), as was the clinical PR per cycle (23.5% versus 18.6%). The implantation rate in our patients was 17.2%. The favorable PR in our patients despite no bed rest following ET suggests the bed rest is not necessary.

  14. D7 debris-bed experiment. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, G W; Ottinger, C A; Lipinski, R J

    1983-08-01

    The D7 experiment investigated heat removal from a shallow, stratified bed of UO/sub 2/ particulate in sodium. The particle diameters ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, with the largest particles at the bottom. The bed thickness was 74 mm and the average porosity was 41%. The incipient dryout power varied from 0.43 W/g to 0.25 W/g as the sodium subcooling (saturation temperature minus overlying pool temperature) was reduced from 390/sup 0/C to 170/sup 0/C. These powers were only slighlty above the incipient boiling powers. Such low dryout powers are believed due to the interaction of capillary force with bed stratification. With a subccoling of 130/sup 0/C several sudden decreases in the saturation temperature occurred. These are believed due to channel formation, which causes a reduction in the capillary pressure in the bed.

  15. Modular Electric Propulsion Test Bed Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An all electric aircraft test bed is proposed to provide a dedicated development environment for the rigorous study and advancement of electrically powered aircraft....

  16. Protecting Your Home from Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bed bugs easier to see. Be sure to purchase a high quality encasement that will resist tearing ... Contact Us Hotlines FOIA Requests Frequent Questions Follow. Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Instagram Last updated on December ...

  17. IceBridge BedMachine Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains bed topography beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet based on mass conservation derived from airborne radar tracks and satellite radar. The data...

  18. Bed Bug Clearinghouse Publications in Other Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    This information is intended to help states, communities, and consumers prevent and control bed bug infestations. These outreach materials are available in Spanish, Chinese, and French; and include action plans based on an IPM approach.

  19. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D. Bed-wetting that starts in adulthood (secondary enuresis) is uncommon and requires medical evaluation. Causes of ... Erik P. Castle, M.D. References Adult nocturnal enuresis. National Association for Continence. http://www.nafc.org/ ...

  20. Bed Bugs are Public Health Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a joint statement on the public health impacts of bed bugs, which are blood-sucking ectoparasites (external parasites). EPA also has a pesticide registration notice on this topic.

  1. Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlling bed bugs is complex. Using an integrated pest management (IPM) approach incorporates both non-chemical and pesticide methods. Success depends on the extent of the infestation, clutter on site, and resident participation.

  2. Modular Electric Propulsion Test Bed Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A hybrid electric aircraft simulation system and test bed is proposed to provide a dedicated development environment for the rigorous study and advancement of hybrid...

  3. PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS IN GAS-SOLIDS FLUIDIZED BEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiaotao Bi; Aihua Chen

    2003-01-01

    Pressure fluctuation data measured in a series of fluidized beds with diameters of 0.05, 0.1, 0.29, 0.60 and 1.56 m showed that the maximum amplitude or standard deviation increased with increasing the superficial gas velocity and static bed height for relatively shallow beds and became insensitive to the increase in static bed height in relatively deep beds. The amplitude appeared to be less dependent on the measurement location in the dense bed. Predictions based on bubble passage, bubble eruption at the upper bed surface and bed oscillation all failed to explain all observed trends and underestimated the amplitude of pressure fluctuations, suggesting that the global pressure fluctuations in gas-solids bubbling fluidized beds are the superposition of local pressure variations, bed oscillations and pressure waves generated from the bubble formation in the distributor region, bubble coalescence during their rise and bubble eruption at the upper bed surface.

  4. The influence of fibrous bed bulk density on the bed properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šećerov-Sokolović Radmila M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean properties of seven different fibrous materials and the properties of their different bed bulk densities were investigated. The morphology of the surface, size and geometry were measured by optical microscopy. The bed porosity was measured by the weighing method. The experimental bed permeability, in a high range of bulk density, was calculated from the values of the sanitary water pressure drop at a constant temperature of 15°C, since the data followed Darcy's law. The Reynolds number for a fibrous bed was calculated using a relation from the literature. The Reynolds number was less than 1 for all ranges of fluid velocity. Three empirical relations for fibrous bed permeability were used and compared with the experimental data. It was determined that the empirical data depended on the fiber diameter and fraction of solid in the bed. The relative error linearly increased with increasing fiber diameter.

  5. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s{sup -1}), amplitude (0 mm-1 mm), bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m) as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups). The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within {+-}15%, was proposed. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Bed dynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed with rod promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a gas-solid fluidized bed with different rod promoters have been investigated in terms of bed expansion and fluctuation, minimum fluidization velocity and distributor-to-bed pressure drop ratio at minimum fluidization velocity. Experimentation based on statistical design has been carried out and model equations using factorial design of experiments have been developed for the above mentioned quantities for a promoted gas-solid fluidized bed. The model equations have been tested with additional experimental data. The system variables include four types of rod promoters of varying blockage volume, bed particles of four sizes and four initial static bed heights. A comparison between the predicted values of the output variables using the proposed model equation with their corresponding experimental ones shows fairly good agreement.

  7. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s-1, amplitude (0 mm-1 mm, bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups. The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within ±15%, was proposed.

  8. Photosystem I light-harvesting complex Lhca4 adopts multiple conformations : Red forms and excited-state quenching are mutually exclusive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarini, Francesca; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the origin of the multi-exponential fluorescence decay and of the short excited-state lifetime of Lhca4. Lhca4 is the antenna complex of Photosystem I which accommodates the red-most chlorophyll forms and it has been proposed that these chlorophylls can play a role

  9. Photosystem I light-harvesting complex Lhca4 adopts multiple conformations: red forms and excited-state quenching are mutually exclusive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarini, F.; Wientjes, E.; Amerongen, van H.; Croce, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the origin of the multi-exponential fluorescence decay and of the short excited-state lifetime of Lhca4. Lhca4 is the antenna complex of Photosystem I which accommodates the red-most chlorophyll forms and it has been proposed that these chlorophylls can play a role

  10. Evidence for the semireduced primary quinone electron acceptor of photosystem II being a photosensitizer for UVB damage to the photosynthetic apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, G.C.; Jansen, M.A.K.; Noort, van den M.E.; Rensen, van J.J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) radiation affects plants in multiple ways, including effects on the photosynthetic apparatus. The carbon dioxide reduction reactions are affected as well as the light reactions, especially those of photosystem II. In the literature several UVB chromophores a

  11. If photoinhibition of soybean photosystem II enhances the hypersensitive response, it is not solely due to blockage of electron transfer flow at D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have suggested that photoinhibition, through inactivation of photosystem II (PSII), could be beneficial to plants during defense to pathogens through enhanced reactive oxygen (ROS), especially during the hypersensitive response (HR). In this study, we addressed this question by focu...

  12. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB (-) mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950-1100 cm(-1) in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, "Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I" Makita and Hastings (2016) [1].

  13. Probing the accessibility of the Mn(4)Ca cluster in photosystem II : Channels calculation, noble gas derivatization, and cocrystallization with DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Broser, Matthias; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Using the 2.9 A resolution structure of the membrane-intrinsic protein-cofactor complex photosystem II (PSII) from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, we calculated and characterized nine possible substrate/product channels leading to/away from the Mn(4)Ca cluster, where water is oxidi

  14. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Makita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB− mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950–1100 cm−1 in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, “Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I” Makita and Hastings (2016 [1].

  15. The light-harvesting complexes of higher-plant Photosystem I : Lhca1/4 and Lhca2/3 form two red-emitting heterodimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    The outer antenna of higher-plant PSI (Photosystem I) is composed of four complexes [Lhc (light-harvesting complex) al-Lhca4] belonging to the light-harvesting protein family. Difficulties in their purification have so far prevented the determination of their properties and most of the knowledge abo

  16. Pressure fluctuations in gas fluidized beds

    OpenAIRE

    Leckner Bo.; Palchonok Genadij I.; Johnsson Filip

    2002-01-01

    The pressure fluctuations in a fluidized bed are a result of the actions of the bubbles. However, the bubbles may be influenced by the air supply system and by the pressure drop of the air distributor. These interactions are treated for low as well as for high velocity beds by means of a simple model of the principal frequency of the pressure fluctuations. The model includes the interaction with the air supply system and describes qualitatively two important bubbling regimes: the single bubbl...

  17. BNNT Growth in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    fluidized bed and plasma assisted nanotube synthesis for the growth of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Within this context, we established new...bed and plasma assisted nanotube synthesis for the growth of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Within this context, we established new laboratories to...the path of using plasma assistance to growth BNNT in a manner similar to that of researchers at the Canadian Research Council. With our combined

  18. Water produced with coal-bed methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Natural gas produced from coal beds (coal-bed methane, CBM) accounts for about 7.5 percent of the total natural gas production in the United States. Along with this gas, water is also brought to the surface. The amount of water produced from most CBM wells is relatively high compared to conventional natural gas wells because coal beds contain many fractures and pores that can contain and transmit large volumes of water. In some areas, coal beds may function as regional or local aquifers and important sources for ground water. The water in coal beds contributes to pressure in the reservoir that keeps methane gas adsorbed to the surface of the coal. This water must be removed by pumping in order to lower the pressure in the reservoir and stimulate desorption of methane from the coal (fi g. 1). Over time, volumes of pumped water typically decrease and the production of gas increases as coal beds near the well bore are dewatered.

  19. Calculating the need for intensive care beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Gale A; Reynolds, Fiona; Stickley, John

    2012-11-01

    Prompted by high refused admission rates, we sought to model demand for our 20 bed paediatric intensive care unit. We analysed activity (admissions) and demand (admissions plus refused admissions). The recommended method for calculating the required number of intensive care beds assumes a Poisson distribution based upon the size of the local catchment population, the incidence of intensive care admission and the average length of stay. We compared it to the Monte Carlo method which would also include supra-regional referrals not otherwise accounted for but which, due to their complexity, tend to have a longer stay than average. For the new method we assigned data from randomly selected emergency admissions to the refused admissions. We then compared occupancy scenarios obtained by random sampling from the data with replacement. There was an increase in demand for intensive care over time. Therefore, in order to provide an up-to-date model, we restricted the final analysis to data from the two most recent years (2327 admissions and 324 refused admissions). The conventional method suggested 27 beds covers 95% of the year. The Monte Carlo method showed 95% compliance with 34 beds, with seasonal variation quantified as 30 beds needed in the summer and 38 in the winter. Both approaches suggest that the high refused admission rate is due to insufficient capacity. The Monte Carlo analysis is based upon the total workload (including supra-regional referrals) and predicts a greater bed requirement than the current recommended approach.

  20. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.