WorldWideScience

Sample records for drilling program core

  1. A Mentoring Program Drills down on the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Emily; Sinclair, Steve; Gschwend, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Santa Cruz/Silicon Valley New Teacher Project--under the aegis of the New Teacher Center--devised a program to train teacher mentors to help new teachers incorporate the Common Core standards into their teaching. The three-year program yielded five critical lessons: Mentors need ongoing support to develop their readiness and willingness to…

  2. Archive of Core and Site/Hole Data and Photographs from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) operated the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution from 1984-2003 for over 100 cruises worldwide. The ODP was funded by the U.S....

  3. First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)/thermal regimes core hole project at Valles Caldera, New Mexico (VC-1): Drilling report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.; Hawkins, W.; Gardner, J. (comps.)

    1987-02-01

    This report is a review and summary of the core drilling operations of the first Valles Caldera research borehole (VC-1) under the Thermal Regimes element of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). The project is a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental scientific questions about magma, rock/water interactions, and volcanology through shallow (<1-km) core holes at Long Valley, California; Salton Sea, California; and the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and performance. It is intended to guide future research on the core and in the borehole, as well as have applications to other areas and scientific problems in the Valles Caldera. The primary objectives of this Valles Caldera coring effort were (1) to study the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from intracaldera rock formations in the southern ring-fracture zone, and (3) to obtain continuous core samples through the youngest volcanic unit in Valles Caldera, the Banco Bonito rhyolite (approximately 0.1 Ma). All objectives were met. The high percentage of core recovery and the excellent quality of the samples are especially notable. New field sample (core) handling and documentation procedures were successfully utilized. The procedures were designed to provide consistent field handling of the samples and logs obtained through the national CSDP.

  4. Advances in core drilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, G.

    Some notable technical advances in drill design were reported at the meeting, held in Canada August 30-September 1, 1982, at the University of Calgary. Chief amongst these was a battery powered, computer assisted electromechanical core drill which has recently been used by the Danes in Greenland to continuously core to the base of the ice sheet at 2038 m. This is the deepest coring operation so far on the Greenland ice sheet. (The record for deep glacier drilling is held by the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory for the continuous coring through 2164 m of ice to bedrock at Byrd Station, Antarctica, in 1968). In early 1982, a current Soviet core drilling operation was reported to be at a depth of 2000 m at Vostok station, Antarctica, where the total ice thickness is about 4000 m; the goal of core drilling the entire ice thickness there could be achieved before the end of 1983.

  5. Drilling history core hole DC-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    Core hole DC-8 was completed in August, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Scisson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the core drilling activities, and geologic core logging for hole DC-8. Core hole DC-8 is located on the Hanford Site near the Wye Barricade and 50 feet northwest of rotary hole DC-7. The Hanford Site vation coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 mean sea level. The purpose of core hole DC-8 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing and cross-hole seismic shear and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-7. The total depth of core hole DC-8 was 4100.5 feet. Core recovery exceeded 97 percent of the total footage cored.

  6. Archive of Historic Core Data from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 101-129 (Pre-JANUS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) operated the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution from 1984-2003 for over 100 cruises worldwide. The ODP was funded by the U.S....

  7. Archive of Core and Site/Hole Data and Photographs from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Science Operator for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) operated the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution from 2004-2013 for worldwide expeditions...

  8. Drilling history core hole DC-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    Core hole DC-4 was completed at a depth of 3998 feet in December, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Sicsson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the cable tool and core drilling activities, and geological core logging for DC-4. Core hole DC-4 is located on the Hanford Site about 3 miles east of the Yakima Barricade and approximately 103 feet southwest of rotary hole DC-5, which was completed to 3990 feet in February, 1978. Hanford Site coordinates reported for hole DC-4 are north 49,385.62 feet and west 85,207.63 feet, and Washington State coordinates are north 454,468.73 feet and east 2,209,990.87 feet. No elevation survey is available for hole DC-4, but it is approximately 745 feet above mean sea level based upon the survey of hole DC-5, which has a reported elevation of 745.16 feet on the top of the 3-inch flange. The purpose of core hole DC-4 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing, cross-hole seismic shear, and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-5. Hole DC-4 was drilled through the overburden into basalt bedrock by cable tool methods (0-623 feet) and continuously cored through the final interval (623 to 3998 feet).Core recovery was 95.8 percent of the total footage cored.

  9. FY 79 Lava Lake Drilling Program: results of drilling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, R.R.; Striker, R.P.; Curlee, R.M.

    1979-12-01

    A drilling program was conducted in December 1978 and January and February 1979 to continue the characterization of the solid and liquid rock components of the Kilauea Iki lava lake. Six holes were drilled from the surface and two previously drilled holes were reentered and deepened for the purposes of measuring downhole temperature profiles, recovering samples of solid, plastic, and molten rock, measuring crust permeability, and determining the performance of conventional and special drilling techniques. Conventional HQ-size (3.78 inches diameter) core drilling equipment using water for cooling and cuttings removal was used to successfully drill during initial entry into 1052/sup 0/C formations. Conventional drilling in reentering flow-back rock was less reliable. The specially designed water jet-augmented drag bit or water jet-augmented core bit was needed to drill reliably into the plastic flow-back rock and through liquid rock veins. This document contains the drill performance data which were recorded during drilling in the crust and the plastic and molten rock zones using both conventional and special drilling procedures and equipment.

  10. Instrumentation for the PICO deep ice coring drill

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    An electronic data collection and control system has been developed for the PICO 13.2cm deep ice coring drill. It monitors a variety of drilling parameters including inclination, depth, temperature, pressure, RPM, weight and others. It also displays this data for the drill operator and allows the operator to control speed and direction of the drill motor. The display program allows setting limits on all parameters so an alarm sounds if anything goes wrong. This instrumentation package will be...

  11. Teaching Marine Geoscience at Sea: Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's School of Rock Explores Cascadia Subduction Zone - Cores, Logs, and ACORKs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, M.; Collins, J.; Ludwig, K. A.; Slough, S.; Delaney, M. L.; Hovan, S. A.; Expedition 328 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    For twelve days this past September, seventeen formal and informal educators from the US, UK, and France joined six instructors and a small science party on the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)’s Cascadia ACORK Expedition. The educators were part of the annual “School of Rock (SOR)” education program. SOR is coordinated by the U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) of IODP and is designed to engage participants in seagoing Earth systems research and education workshops onboard the JOIDES Resolution and on shore at the Gulf Coast Core Repository in Texas. The scientific objective of the Cascadia ACORK expedition was to install a new permanent hydrologic observatory at ODP Site 889 to provide long-term monitoring of the pressure at the frontal part of the Cascadia accretionary prism. This year’s SOR workshop focused on how cores, logs, and ACORKs shed light on the hydrology and geology of the Cascadia subduction zone in the Northeast Pacific. In addition to observing the deployment of the ACORK, the SOR participants conducted daily hands-on analyses of archived sediment and hard-rock cores with scientists and technicians who specialize in IODP research using the lab facilities on the ship. Throughout the expedition, participants engaged in different activities and lessons designed to explore the deep biosphere, methane hydrates, paleoceanography, sedimentology, biostratigraphy, seafloor spreading, and drilling technology. The workshop also provided participants with “C3” time; time to communicate their experience using the successful joidesresolution.org website and other tools, make connections to their prior knowledge and expertise, and to be creative in developing and planning new education and outreach activities based on their new knowledge and research. As part of participating in the expedition, participants committed to further developing and testing their education and outreach products after

  12. Quaternary paleoceanography of the central Arctic based on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Arctic Coring Expedition 302 foraminiferal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Smith, S.A.; Eynaud, F.; O'Regan, M.; King, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) Hole 4C from the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean recovered a continuous 18 in record of Quaternary foraminifera yielding evidence for seasonally ice-free interglacials during the Matuyama, progressive development of large glacials during the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) ???1.2-0.9 Ma, and the onset of high-amplitude 100-ka orbital cycles ???500 ka. Foraminiferal preservation in sediments from the Arctic is influenced by primary (sea ice, organic input, and other environmental conditions) and secondary factors (syndepositional, long-term pore water dissolution). Taking these into account, the ACEX 4C record shows distinct maxima in agglutinated foraminiferal abundance corresponding to several interglacials and deglacials between marine isotope stages (MIS) 13-37, and although less precise dating is available for older sediments, these trends appear to continue through the Matuyama. The MPT is characterized by nearly barren intervals during major glacials (MIS 12, 16, and 22-24) and faunal turnover (MIS 12-24). Abundant calcareous planktonic (mainly Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sin.) and benthic foraminifers occur mainly in interglacial intervals during the Brunhes and very rarely in the Matuyama. A distinct faunal transition from calcareous to agglutinated foraminifers 200-300 ka in ACEX 4C is comparable to that found in Arctic sediments from the Lomonosov, Alpha, and Northwind ridges and the Morris Jesup Rise. Down-core disappearance of calcareous taxa is probably related to either reduced sea ice cover prior to the last few 100-ka cycles, pore water dissolution, or both. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project Completes Coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the Scientific Staff of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project (CBIS Project completed its coring operations during September–December 2005 and April–May 2006. Cores were collected continuously to a total depth of 1766 m. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of impactites beneath 444 m of post-impact continental shelf sediments.The CBIS Project is a joint venture of the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS. Project activities began with a planning workshop in September 2003 attended by sixtythree scientists from ten countries. Field operations began with site preparation in July 2005, and coring began in September 2005. Drilling, Observation and Sampling of theEarth’s Continental Crust (DOSECC was the general contractor for the drilling operations throughout 2005.

  14. Drilling the Thuringian Syncline, Germany: core processing during the INFLUINS scientific deep drilling campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abratis, Michael; Methe, Pascal; Aehnelt, Michaela; Kunkel, Cindy; Beyer, Daniel; Kukowski, Nina; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Deep drilling of the central Thuringian Syncline was carried out in order to gather substantial knowledge of subsurface fluid dynamics and fluid rock interaction within a sedimentary basin. The final depth of the borehole was successfully reached at 1179 m, just a few meters above the Buntsandstein - Zechstein boundary. One of the aspects of the scientific drilling was obtaining sample material from different stratigraphic units for insights in genesis, rock properties and fluid-rock interactions. Parts of the section were cored whereas cuttings provide record of the remaining units. Coring was conducted in aquifers and their surrounding aquitards, i.e. parts of the Upper Muschelkalk (Trochitenkalk), the Middle Muschelkalk, the Upper Buntsandstein (Pelitrot and Salinarrot) and the Middle Buntsandstein. In advance and in cooperation with the GFZ Potsdam team "Scientific Drilling" core handling was discussed and a workflow was developed to ensure efficient and appropriate processing of the valuable core material and related data. Core curation including cleaning, fitting, marking, measuring, cutting, boxing, photographing and unrolled scanning using a DMT core scanner was carried out on the drilling site in Erfurt. Due care was exercised on samples for microbiological analyses. These delicate samples were immediately cut when leaving the core tube and stored within a cooling box at -78°C. Special software for data input was used developed by smartcube GmbH. Advantages of this drilling information system (DIS) are the compatibility with formats of international drilling projects from the IODP and ICDP drilling programs and thus options for exchanges with the international data bases. In a following step, the drill cores were brought to the national core repository of the BGR in Berlin Spandau where the cores were logged for their physical rock properties using a GeoTek multi sensor core logger (MSCL). After splitting the cores into a working and archive half, the

  15. Continental Scientific Drilling Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Resource Priorities in Continental Drilling J. J. Hemley 12 Aspects of Continental Crustal Structure and Growth Scott Smithson 13 Deep-Drilling Targets...Time of Workshop Allen F. Agnew Library of Congress Clarence R. Allen California Institute of Technology Orson L. Anderson University of California at...Skinner Yale University Norman H. Sleep Northwestern University Laurence L. Sloss Northwestern University Scott B. Smithson University of Wyoming

  16. Drilling history core hole DC-6 Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    Core hole DC-6 was completed in May 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scisson, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Scisson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the core drilling activities, and geologic core logging for hole DC-6. Core hole DC-6 is located within the boundary of the Hanford Site at the old Hanford town site. The Hanford Site coordinates for DC-6 are North 54,127.17 feet and West 17,721.00 feet. The surface elevation is approximately 402 feet above sea level. The purpose of core hole DC-6 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing. The total depth of core hole DC-6 was 4336 feet. Core recovery was 98.4% of the total footage cored.

  17. Establishing nuclear facility drill programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

  18. Buckling and dynamic analysis of drill strings for core sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziada, H.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-15

    This supporting document presents buckling and dynamic stability analyses of the drill strings used for core sampling. The results of the drill string analyses provide limiting operating axial loads and rotational speeds to prevent drill string failure, instability and drill bit overheating during core sampling. The recommended loads and speeds provide controls necessary for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic field operations.

  19. NanoDrill: 1 Actuator Core Acquisition System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test a 1 kg, single actuator, sample acquisition drill. The drill uses a novel method of core or powder acquisition. The core...

  20. NanoDrill: 1 Actuator Core Acquisition System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build, and test a sample acquisition drill weighing less than 1 kg. The drill uses a novel method of core or powder acquisition, and is...

  1. An innovative optical and chemical drill core scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, A. S. L.; Arthursson, M.; Lundström, A.; Calderón Estrada, E.; Inerfeldt, A.; Lorenz, H.

    2015-05-01

    We describe a new innovative drill core scanner that semi-automatedly analyses drill cores directly in drill core trays with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the need for much sample preparation or operator intervention. The instrument is fed with entire core trays, which are photographed at high resolution and scanned by a 3-D profiling laser. Algorithms recognise the geometry of the core tray, number of slots, location of the drill cores, calculate the optimal scanning path, and execute a continuous XRF analysis of 2 cm width along the core. The instrument is equipped with critical analytical components that allow an effective QA/QC routine to be implemented. It is a mobile instrument that can be manoeuvred by a single person with a manual pallet jack.

  2. Alteration and diffusion profiles in two drill cores from Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landstrom, O.; Tullborg, E.L. [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2001-08-01

    The effect of hydrothermal and subsequent low temperature alteration/diffusion, and glacial/post-glacial weathering and diffusion have been studied in two cores of quartz monzodiorite. One core (YA 1192) was drilled into the hydrothermally altered wall rock of a water conducting fracture exposed at 170 m depth in the access tunnel to the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The other one (BAS 1) was drilled from an outcrop with a glacially polished surface, 1 km north of the YA 1192 site. Both drill cores were sectioned into mm thick slices perpendicular to the core axis. The fracture filling of the YA 1192 core, the weathered surface of the BAS 1 core and the different slices were analysed for major and trace elements and isotopes of U and Th.

  3. Permeability testing of drilling core sample from pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suda WANG; Zhengguang TANG; Xiaojun NING; Peiguan WU; Pingyi XING

    2008-01-01

    The permeability coefficient of pavement material is a very important parameter in designing the drainage of pavement structures and is also used to evalu-ate the quality of road construction. New equipment is used to measure the permeability coefficient of the pave-ment drilling core sample and relevant testing methods are introduced. Testing drilling core samples from a certain highway of Yunnan province has been proven to be feas-ible. The test results are also analyzed.

  4. Scientific Drilling of Impact Craters - Well Logging and Core Analyses Using Magnetic Methods (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Velasco-Villarreal, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drilling projects of impact structures provide data on the structure and stratigraphy of target, impact and post-impact lithologies, providing insight on the impact dynamics and cratering. Studies have successfully included magnetic well logging and analyses in core and cuttings, directed to characterize the subsurface stratigraphy and structure at depth. There are 170-180 impact craters documented in the terrestrial record, which is a small proportion compared to expectations derived from what is observed on the Moon, Mars and other bodies of the solar system. Knowledge of the internal 3-D deep structure of craters, critical for understanding impacts and crater formation, can best be studied by geophysics and drilling. On Earth, few craters have yet been investigated by drilling. Craters have been drilled as part of industry surveys and/or academic projects, including notably Chicxulub, Sudbury, Ries, Vredefort, Manson and many other craters. As part of the Continental ICDP program, drilling projects have been conducted on the Chicxulub, Bosumtwi, Chesapeake, Ries and El gygytgyn craters. Inclusion of continuous core recovery expanded the range of paleomagnetic and rock magnetic applications, with direct core laboratory measurements, which are part of the tools available in the ocean and continental drilling programs. Drilling studies are here briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the Chicxulub crater formed by an asteroid impact 66 Ma ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. Chicxulub crater has no surface expression, covered by a kilometer of Cenozoic sediments, thus making drilling an essential tool. As part of our studies we have drilled eleven wells with continuous core recovery. Magnetic susceptibility logging, magnetostratigraphic, rock magnetic and fabric studies have been carried out and results used for lateral correlation, dating, formation evaluation, azimuthal core orientation and physical property contrasts. Contributions of magnetic studies on impact

  5. Study on the ocean drilling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Ho; Han, Hyun Chul; Chin, Jae Wha; Lee, Sung Rok; Park, Kwan Soon; Lee, Young Joo; Park, Young Soo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Geoscience research trend of the world nations is focusing on the study of climate changes and preventing people from the natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic activities. For this study, it is necessary for scientists to interpret ancient climate changes preserved in ocean sediments, and to observe plate motions. Thus, geological and geophysical studies should be proceeded for the core samples recovered from the deep sea sediments and basement. It is essential to join the ODP(Ocean Drilling Program) that drills ocean basins and crusts using the drilling vessel with the ability of deploying almost 9 km of drilling string. The first year (1995) was focused on the analyzing the appropriateness Korea to join the ODP. The second year (1996) has been stressed on being an ODP member country based on results of the first year study, and planning the future activities as a member. The scope of study is joining the ODP as a Canada-Australia Consortium member and to set up the Korean ODP organization and future activities. The results and suggestions are as follows. 1) Necessities of Korea joining the ODP: If Korea becomes a member of the ODP, the benefits could be obtained based on the activities of other ODP members through academic, social and economic sectors. 2) Korean membership of ODP: Korea becomes a member of the Australia-Canada Consortium for ODP. AGSO (Austrian Geological Survey Organization), GSC (Geological Survey of Canada), and KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geology, Mining and Materials) on behalf of their own countries will each pay a share of the full member financial contribution to the ODP. AGSO and GSC will pay one third of the full member financial contribution, and KIGAM will pay one twelfth. 3) Korean ODP structure and future activities: To enhance the efficiency of initial activities after joining the ODP, it has been decided to have a relatively simple organization. The primary governing arm of the Korean ODP organizations is the Korean ODP

  6. Initial Feasibility Study to Drill and Core the Ocean Mantle

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    An initial feasibility study (Pilisi and Whitney, 2011) of drilling through the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) into the oceanic mantle specifically focused on future requirements for planning, drilling and coring a hole 500 m into the oceanic mantle from three candidate locations in the Pacific Ocean (Cocos Plate, Baja California, and offshore Hawaii). The study points out some of the critical issues that need to be resolved before embarking upon such a challengingproject. It was conducted ...

  7. Initial Feasibility Study to Drill and Core the Ocean Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pilisi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An initial feasibility study (Pilisi and Whitney, 2011 of drilling through the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho into the oceanic mantle specifically focused on future requirements for planning, drilling and coring a hole 500 m into the oceanic mantle from three candidate locations in the Pacific Ocean (Cocos Plate, Baja California, and offshore Hawaii. The study points out some of the critical issues that need to be resolved before embarking upon such a challengingproject. It was conducted on the basis of data provided by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program–Management International (IODP-MI, the Center for Deep Earth Exploration (CDEX operating the drilling vessel Chikyu within IODP, public domain information, and past experience that Blade Energy Partners (hereafter mentioned as “Blade”; http://www.blade-energy.com/ has had with frontier projects in the offshore deepwater oil and gas and geothermal industries.

  8. Coring to the West Antarctic ice sheet bed with a new Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C. R.; Taylor, K. C.; Shturmakov, A. J.; Mason, W. P.; Emmel, G. R.; Lebar, D. A.

    2005-05-01

    As a contribution to IPY 2007-2008, the U.S. ice core research community, supported by the National Science Foundation, plans to core through the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) at the ice-flow divide between the Ross Sea and Amundsen Sea drainage systems. The aim is to develop a unique series of interrelated climatic, ice-dynamic, and biologic records focused on understanding interactions among global earth systems. There will be approximately 15 separate but synergistic projects to analyze the ice and interpret the records. The most significant expected outcome of the WAIS Divide program will be climate records for the last ~40,000 years with an annually resolved chronology (through layer counting), comparable to the records from central Greenland. The data will also extend, at lower temporal resolution, to approximately 100,000 BP. These records will permit comparison of environmental conditions between the northern and southern hemispheres, and study of greenhouse gas concentrations in the paleoatmosphere, with unprecedented detail. To accomplish the coring, an innovative new Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill is being built at the University of Wisconsin. The modular design of the bore-hole assembly (sonde) provides high flexibility for producing a 122 mm diameter ice core to depths of 4,000 m with maximum core lengths of 4 m. The DISC drill has a rotating outer barrel that can be used with or without an inner barrel designed to improve core recovery in brittle ice. Separate and independent motors for the drill and pump allow cutter speeds from 0 to 150 rpm and pump rates from 0 to 140 gpm. The high pumping rate should alleviate problems drilling in warm ice near the bed; it also helps make tripping speeds several times faster than with the old US drill. Other innovations include vibration and acoustic sensors for monitoring the drilling process, a segmented core barrel to avoid the formerly persistent problem of bent core barrels, and a high-speed data

  9. Trace elements in a North Sea drill core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Gwozdz, R.; Svendsen, N.

    1986-01-01

    space is filled mainly by hydrocarbons. A significant decrease of Mn with depth probably suggests diagenesis of chalk prior to, or with, hydrocarbon emplacement. Investigations of drilling fluids and cuttings reveal a strong contamination of the latter, mainly by Ba. Chalk data from comparable onshore......Chalk samples, systematically taken along a drill core from one of the hydrocarbon producing fields of the North Sea (Tyra field), were analysed by a neutron activation technique involving measurement of radioisotopes with relatively short half-lives. Elements determined include Na, Al, Cl, Ca, Mn......, V, Sr, Dy, Mg, Ti, Ba and Eu. The major elements Ca and Al could be related to petrophysical parameters, particularly Al which shows a correlation with the silicification/argillaceous content. Na (and Cl) has a low content in the hydrocarbon-bearing section of the drill core suggesting that the pore...

  10. Heave Compensation Evaluation and Formation Strength Estimation from Drill String Acceleration Measurements While Coring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, G.; Goldberg, D.; Meltser, A.

    2001-05-01

    One of the recurring challenges in deep-sea drilling has been to maintain a precise control of coring depths, and to limit the influence of surface heave on drill bit motion. Operating in water depths between 1 and 6 km, the Ocean Drilling Program has relied on a drill string heave compensator to collect more than 200 km of cores, with maximum penetration of 2km. To evaluate the efficiency of the heave compensation, a device was developed to measure downhole acceleration from the top of the core barrel. This probe records three-axis acceleration and pressure at up to 100 samples per second. The first deployments of this instrument on ODP Legs 185 and 191 show that the heave compensator limits the bit motion to about 10% of the surface heave. This device could prove most useful to monitor heave compensation on shallow water drilling platforms where heave is a primary concern. The high-resolution downhole acceleration data can also be used to determine some of the mechanical properties of the formation. When deployed on piston cores, a maximum vertical acceleration of up to 3G is recorded as the coring shoe penetrates the formation. This maximum value is characteristic of the sediment strength and its degree of consolidation and can be used to identify formations that are typically difficult to recover, such as hard layers or hydrate-bearing sediments. With rotary coring, downhole acceleration signals decrease in magnitude and frequency content with the increasing hardness of the formation. High amplitude is observed in uncompacted sediments and low amplitudes in low-porosity oceanic basalt. Comparison between acceleration records and geophysical logs show that this relationship can be observed at a dm-scale within an individual core. Easy to deploy and adding almost no time to coring operations, the downhole accelerometer tool offers a way to characterize formations continuously while coring, which is particularly useful in the event of poor core recovery.

  11. Application of the IGSN for improved data - sample - drill core linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Andree; Wallrabe-Adams, Hans-Joachim; Röhl, Ursula; Krysiak, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The large number of samples resulting from geoscientific research creates a need for a system that has the ability to allocate unique identifiers for individual samples (cores, core sections, rock samples...). In this abstract we present a solution that utilises the IGSN (1) Registry Metadata Store (2) to automatically register unique IGSN's for samples and submit corresponding metadata. An automated workflow has been set up to register IGSN's and submit metadata for cores stored for example at the IODP (3) Bremen Core Repository (BCR) in Bremen and the BGR National Core Repository for Research Drilling in Berlin, and partly transfer the core information to the GESEP (4) Virtual Core Repository (5). Detailed metadata for these cores are stored in a DIS (6), from which xml files containing all necessary information for IGSN and metadata submission are automatically generated. These files are automatically processed to extract and register the unique IGSN as well as the corresponding metadata. After this parsing process, the IGSN registration and metadata submission processes are triggered by posting the appropriate IGSN API (7) service calls. 1. International Geo Sample Number 2. https://doidb.wdc-terra.org/igsn/ 3. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program / International Ocean Discovery Program 4. German Scientific Earth Probing Consortium 5. http://www.gesep.org/infrastruktur/kernlager/portal/ 6. Drilling Information System 7. https://doidb.wdc-terra.org/igsn/static/apidoc

  12. Method of monitoring core sampling during borehole drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, A.; Barnes, D.; Gennings, T.L.

    1991-04-30

    This paper describes a method of monitoring the acquisition of a core sample obtained from a coring tool on a drillstring in a borehole. It comprises: measuring the weight of a portion of the drillstring at a pre-selected borehole depth when the drillstring is off bottom to define a first measurement; drilling to acquire a core sample; measuring the weight of a portion of the drillstring at a pre-selected borehole depth when the drillstring is off-bottom to define a second measurement; determining the difference between the first and second measurements, the difference corresponding to the weight of the core sample; and comparing the measured core sample weight to a calculated weight of a full core sample to determine if the core sample has been acquired.

  13. Methane Hydrate Field Program. Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Tim [U.S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States); Bahk, Jang-Jun [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea); Frye, Matt [U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Sterling, VA (United States); Goldberg, Dave [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Husebo, Jarle [Statoil ASA, Stavenger (Norway); Koh, Carolyn [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Malone, Mitch [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, Craig [Shell International Exploration and Production Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Torres, Marta [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Myers, Greg [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Divins, David [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Morell, Margo [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these efforts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these efforts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and offers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate “Science Challenges” and linking them with “Technical Challenges” and potential field program locations.

  14. Density of basalt core from Hilo drill hole, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James G.

    2001-12-01

    Density measurements of 1600 samples of core from 889 to 3097 m depth below sea level in the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Program hole near Hilo, Hawaii show marked differences between the basaltic rock types and help define stratigraphy in the hole. Water-saturated densities of subaerial lava flows (occurring above 1079 m depth) have the broadest range because of the large density variation within a single lava flow. Water-saturated densities commonly range from 2.0 to 3.0 with an average of 2.55±0.24 g/cc. Dikes and sills range from 2.8 to 3.1 g/cc). Densities of hyaloclastite commonly range from 2.3 to 2.7, with an overall average of about 2.5 g/cc. The low-density of most hyaloclastite is due primarily to palagonitization of abundant glass and presence of secondary minerals in the interstices between fragments. Four principal zones of pillow lava, separated by hyaloclastite, occur in the drill core. The shallowest (1983-2136 m) is paradoxically the densest, averaging 3.01±0.10 g/cc. The second (2234-2470 m) is decidedly the lightest, averaging 2.67±0.13 g/cc. The third (2640-2790 m) and fourth (2918-bottom at 3097 m) are high, averaging 2.89±0.17 and 2.97±0.08 g/cc, respectively. The first pillow zone includes degassed pillows i.e. lava erupted on land that flowed into the sea. These pillows are poor in vesicles, because the subaerial, one-atmosphere vesicles were compressed when the flow descended to deeper water and higher pressure. The second (low-density, non-degassed) pillow zone is the most vesicle-rich, apparently because it was erupted subaqueously at a shallow depth. The higher densities of the third and fourth zones result from a low vesicularity of only a few percent and an olivine content averaging more than 5% for the third zone and about 10% for the fourth zone. The uppermost hyaloclastite extending about 400 m below the bottom of the subaerial basalt is poorly cemented and absorbs up to 6 wt% of water when immersed. Progressing downward the

  15. Modeling of Drilling Forces Based on Twist Drill Point Angles Using Multigene Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myong-Il Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model was developed for predicting the influence of the drill point angles on the cutting forces in drilling with the twist drills, which was used to optimize those angles for reducing drilling forces. The approach was based on multigene genetic programming, for the training data, the grinding tests of twist drill were firstly conducted for the different drill point angles in Biglide parallel machine, and then drilling tests were performed on carbon fiber reinforced plastics using the grinded drills. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was verified through comparing with published data. It was found that the proposed model agreed well with the experimental data and was useful for improving the performance of twist drill.

  16. Core drilling of hydco drillholes ONK-PP262 and ONK-PP274 in ONKALO at Olkiluoto 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropainen, V. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-10-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled two drillholes for HYDCO-program in ONKALO at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto in 2010. The drillhole ONK-PP262 was drilled in May 2010 and the drillhole ONK-PP274 in December 2010. The lengths of the drillholes are 25.02 and 23.88 m respectively. The drillholes are 75.7 mm by diameter. The drillholes were drilled in the investigation niche 4 at the access tunnel chainage 3747. The hydraulic DE 130 drilling rig was used. The drilling water was taken from the ONKALO drilling water pipeline and premixed sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The drillholes were measured with EMS deviation survey tool. In addition to drilling the drillcores were logged and reported by geologist. Geological logging included the following parameters: lithology, foliation, fracture parameters, fractured zones, core loss, weathering, fracture frequency, RQD and rock quality. The main rock types in the drillholes are veined gneiss and pegmatitic granite. The average fracture frequencies in both drill cores are 1.4 pcs/m. The average RQD values in the drillcores are 97.2 % (ONK-PP262) and 98.6 % (ONK-PP274). (orig.)

  17. Relevance of East African Drill Cores to Human Evolution: the Case of the Olorgesailie Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, R.

    2016-12-01

    Drill cores reaching the local basement of the East African Rift were obtained in 2012 south of the Olorgesailie Basin, Kenya, 20 km from excavations that document key benchmarks in the origin of Homo sapiens. Sediments totaling 216 m were obtained from two drilling locations representing the past 1 million years. The cores were acquired to build a detailed environmental record spatially associated with the transition from Acheulean to Middle Stone Age technology and extensive turnover in mammalian species. The project seeks precise tests of how climate dynamics and tectonic events were linked with these transitions. Core lithology (A.K. Behrensmeyer), geochronology (A. Deino), diatoms (R.B. Owen), phytoliths (R. Kinyanjui), geochemistry (N. Rabideaux, D. Deocampo), among other indicators, show evidence of strong environmental variability in agreement with predicted high-eccentricity modulation of climate during the evolutionary transitions. Increase in hominin mobility, elaboration of symbolic behavior, and concurrent turnover in mammalian species indicating heightened adaptability to unpredictable ecosystems, point to a direct link between the evolutionary transitions and the landscape dynamics reflected in the Olorgesailie drill cores. For paleoanthropologists and Earth scientists, any link between evolutionary transitions and environmental dynamics requires robust evolutionary datasets pertinent to how selection, extinction, population divergence, and other evolutionary processes were impacted by the dynamics uncovered in drill core studies. Fossil and archeological data offer a rich source of data and of robust environment-evolution explanations that must be integrated into efforts by Earth scientists who seek to examine high-resolution climate records of human evolution. Paleoanthropological examples will illustrate the opportunities that exist for connecting evolutionary benchmarks to the data obtained from drilled African muds. Project members: R. Potts, A

  18. Facies And Bedding Analysis of Deep-Marine, Arc-Related, Sediementary Rocks Cored on International Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 351.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. E.; Marsaglia, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc System, south of Japan, hosts a multitude of active and extinct (remnant) arc volcanic sediment sources. Core extracted adjacent to the proto-IBM arc (Kyushu-Palau Ridge; KPR) in the Amami-Sankaku Basin on International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 351 contains evidence of the variety of sediment sources that have existed in the area as a result of changing tectonic regimes through arc development, backarc basin formation and remnant arc abandonment. Approximately 1000 meters of Eocene to Oligocene volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks were analyzed via shipboard core photos, core descriptions, and thin sections with the intention of understanding the depositional history at this site. These materials contain a crucial record of arc development complementary to the Neogene history preserved in the active reararc (Expedition 350) and compressed whole-arc record in the current forearc (Expedition 352). A database of stratigraphic columns was created to display grain size trends, facies changes, and bedding characteristics. Individual beds (depositional events) were classified using existing and slightly modified classification schemes for muddy, sandy and gravel-rich gravity flow deposits, as well as muddy debris flows and tuffs. Utilizing the deep marine facies classes presented by Pickering et al. (1986), up section changes are apparent. Through time, as the arc developed, facies and bedding types and their proportions change dramatically and relatively abruptly. Following arc initiation facies are primarily mud-rich with intercalated tuffaceous sand. In younger intervals, sand to gravel gravity-flow deposits dominate, becoming more mud-rich. Muddy gravity flow deposits, however, dominate farther upsection. The overall coarsening-upward pattern (Unit III) is consistent with building of the arc edifice. Farther upsection (Unit II) an abrupt fining-upward trend represents the onset of isolation of the KPR as backarc spreading

  19. Deep Drilling with the ANDRILL Program in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pyne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing is a new international, multi-disciplinary drilling program that targets geological records that lie hidden beneath the icy blanket of Antarctica. The primary objective is to investigate Antarctica’s role in global environmental change over the past sixty-fi ve million years, at various scales of age resolution, and thereby enhance our understanding of Antarctica’s potential response to future global changes. Efforts to understand the infl uence of Antarctica on global climate change require a fundamental knowledge of how the Antarctic cryosphere (ice sheets, ice shelves, and sea ice has evolved, not only in recent times but also during earlier geological periods when global temperature and atmospheric CO2 levels were similar to what might be reached by the end of this century. ANDRILL’s integrated science approach willuse stratigraphic drilling, coring, and multi-proxy core analysis combined with geophysical surveys and numerical modeling to study the Cenozoic history of Antarctic climate and ice sheets, the evolution of polar biota, Antarctic tectonism, and Antarctica’s role in the evolution of Earth’s ocean–climate system.

  20. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-06-15

    The second meeting of Federal agency representatives interested in the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program took place on June 15, 1993. The Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted the meeting at the Washington, D.C., offices of DOE. Representatives from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Bureau of Mines, National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and various offices within the Department of Energy attended. For a complete list of attendees see Attachment A. The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to cover the status of efforts to gain formal approval for NADET, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, especially two recent workshops that explored research needs in drilling and excavation, (3) to review some recent technological advances, and (4) to solicit statements of the importance of improving drilling and excavation technologies to the missions of the various agencies. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  1. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  2. Linking downhole logging data with geology and drilling /coring operations - Example from Chicxulub Expedition 364.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofi, Johanna; Smith, Dave; Delahunty, Chris; Le Ber, Erwan; Mellet, Claire; Brun, Laurent; Henry, Gilles; Paris, Jehanne

    2017-04-01

    faults, as evidenced from borehole wall images. Both form conduits probably open at a large scale as suggested by associated anomalies in the borehole fluid temperature profiles. When coring the basement, pieces of metal trapped outside the drill bit apparently led to an increase of the borehole tilt as well as to an enlargement of the hole, although this later remained sub-circular. In the post impact carbonates, 6-7 m long apparent cyclic oscillations in the magnetic field coupled to a spiral shape trajectory of the same wavelength suggest drilling induced artifacts and formation re-magnetization. Acknowledgements: Expedition 364 was funded by IODP with co-funding from ICDP and implemented by ECORD, with contributions and logistical support from the Yucatán state government and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Drilling Services were provided by DOSECC Exploration Services. The downhole logging program was coordinated by EPC, as part of ESO. Expedition 364 Scientists: S. Gulick, J.V. Morgan, E. Chenot, G. Christeson, P. Claeys, C. Cockell, M.J. L. Coolen, L. Ferrière, C. Gebhardt, K. Goto, H. Jones, D.A. Kring, J. Lofi, X. Long, C. Lowery, C. Mellett, R. Ocampo-Torres, L. Perez-Cruz, A. Pickersgill, M. Poelchau, A. Rae, C. Rasmussen, M. Rebolledo-Vieyra, U. Riller, H. Sato, J. Smit, S. Tikoo, N. Tomioka, M. Whalen, A. Wittmann, J. Urrutia-Fucugauchi, K.E. Yamaguchi, W. Zylberman.

  3. Geothermal well technology: drilling and completions program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, M.M.; Barnett, J.H.; Baker, L.E.; Varnado, S.G.; Polito, J.

    1978-03-01

    The drilling and completion portion of the long-range Geothermal Well Technology Program is presented. A nine-year program is outlined based upon an objective of reducing the cost of geothermal energy development and providing a major stimulus to meeting the power-on-line goals established by the Department of Energy. Major technological challenges to be addressed in this program include improvements in geothermal drilling fluids, downhole drilling motors, rock bits and the development of high flow rate, high temperature completion and reinjection techniques. In addition, fundamental studies will be conducted in drilling energetics to improve the understanding of drilling mechanics. This will lead to advanced development of high performance, low cost geothermal drilling systems.

  4. Fifteen years of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqin; Yang, Jingsui; Wang, Chengshan; An, Zhisheng; Li, Haibing; Wang, Qin; Su, Dechen

    2017-05-01

    Continental scientific drilling can be regarded as a telescope into the Earth's interior because it provides process insight and uncompromised samples of rocks, fluids, and even sampled from the deep biosphere from the Earth's surface to great depths. As one of the three founding members of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), ICDP China has made great achievements in many scientific drilling-related research fields. Based on the ICDP participation it attracted global attention of scientists and set up not only the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) Program in 2001 but also a growing number of ambitious drilling projects in the country. The 5158 m deep borehole of the CCSD project at Donghai County in the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terrain demonstrates that large amounts of crustal rocks of the South China Block have been subducted to at least 120 km, followed by rapid uplift. After successful completion of drilling at Donghai, several continental scientific drilling projects were conducted with funding of the Chinese government and partially with support of ICDP, resulting in a total drilling depth of more than 35 000 m. These projects encompass the Continental Environmental Scientific Drilling Program of China, the Scientific Drilling Project of Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone, the Continental Scientific Drilling Project of Cretaceous Songliao Basin, and the Program of Selected Continental Scientific Drilling and Experiments. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the ICDP and the 15th anniversary of the CCSD Program, this paper reviews the history and major progress of the CCSD Program.

  5. Organic Matter and δ 13C Throughout a Sub-Basement Red Soil Unit in Hole 1206A Cored During Ocean Drilling Program Leg 197 (Koko Seamount): First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.

    2002-12-01

    Although the discovery of deep red-brown paleosols during Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) legs dates back to the 80's [1-3], the potential for preservation of organic matter in these igneous-derived silty-claystone units has been overlooked, and depositional settings have been inferred from only petrologic observations. This work aims to present the first geochemical (TOC, N total) and carbon isotope (δ 13C) data of a metre-thick paleosol Unit (Core 197-1206A-40R-1, 101 cm, to 40R-3, 77 cm; Subunits 18A and 18B, 307.5 to 309.9 mbsf) cored at Site 1206 (Koko Seamount) during ODP Leg 197 (Emperor Seamounts, north Pacific transect)[4-5]. Study of the sources and variation with depth of organic matter in sub-basement Fe-oxide-rich paleosol units from Leg 197 contributes to understanding the palaeoenvironmental history of the Emperor Seamounts prior to, during and after their burial and subsidence (ca. >48 to 56 Ma). Furthermore, preserved organic traces in such an isolated deep Earth system make them a useful test bed for future deep Earth's biosphere-relevant investigations [5-6]. Throughout Core 197-1206A-40R soil unit, Corg (TOC = 0.03-0.07%; 0.049 \\pm 0.011, n=7) and total nitrogen (Ntot = 0.00-0.06 %) are within the range (TOC = 0.05% to 0.12%, n=38) measured for the sub-basement paleosoil/rock units found at Site 1205 [4-5]. The δ 13C (bulk organic matter) values for the paleosol regularly decrease downcore from -25.3 \\permil (Sample 197-1206-40R-1, 103-104, at 307.54 mbsf) to -26.2 \\permil (Sample 197-1206A-40R-2, 130-131; at 308.92 mbsf) in contrast to an exposed Hawaiian oxisol sample (e.g., Ohau-2, 100-105 cm-depth with δ 13C = -23.0 \\permil). Typical uncertainties for these measurements were preserved in the paleosol interbed from Core 197-1206A-40R. Thus, providing additional evidence for red claystone units as soil horizons subaerially formed on the top of Koko and Nintoku Seamounts, and buried by erupted lava

  6. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth exposures'' in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  7. Alteration in Hawaiian Drill Core: An analog for Martian basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Fraeman, A.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Lautze, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (HGRP) drilled their first continuously-cored hole in the saddle region of the big island of Hawaii in March of 2013. Temperatures at the bottom of the hole were unexpectedly high and reached over 100C. The core traverses various lava flows, representing the shield-building phase of the island and the lithology is dominantly basalt with varying amounts of plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts. Logging of the core noted that discontinuous alteration became prevalent starting at ~ 1 km depth. In May of 2015 we collected 780 infrared spectra of the core from depths of 0.97 to 1.76 km using our portable field spectrometer with a contact probe and field of view of 10 mm. Many of the spectra are unaltered, showing mafic mineralogy (augite or augite with olivine). Minerals from aqueous alteration include clinochlore, micaceous minerals likely mixed with other common phyllic alteration products, and three groups of spectral types associated with zeolites. This suite of minerals suggests alteration was initiated from higher temperature and moderate pH fluids. Based on the field reconnaissance spectroscopy, 25 sections were cut that represent the alteration diversity for thin section and subsequent detailed petrologic analyses. Eight of these sections were examined using the Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) prototype instrument at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. UCIS collects spectra at 80 μm / pixel and identifies the same alteration mineralogy as the bulk samples, but clearly shows that the alteration occurs in veins and vugs. Unaltered olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts occur in the groundmass adjacent to highly altered vugs, and are preserved throughout the section surveyed. Given the limited alteration and abundant preservation of olivine to depths of 1.5 km, the core may be representative of alteration in moderate pH environments on Mars, where unaltered basaltic materials occur in close proximity to alteration products

  8. Experimental study on large diameter drilling in hard rock annular coring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinzhu WU; Guochun YANG; Wenchen WANG

    2008-01-01

    Based on analyzing method of large diameter hard rock drilling at home and abroad, the authors proposed a set of drilling of large diameter hard rock annular coring in low energy consumption, low cost and high efficiency. The prototype of drilling tools was designed and was made. The experimental result of the prototype indicates that this plan and technology are feasible and reach the anticipated object of design. A set of drilling tools has been offered for the constructs of large diameter hard rock coring.

  9. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  10. Preliminaries on core image analysis using fault drilling samples; Core image kaiseki kotohajime (danso kussaku core kaisekirei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, T.; Ito, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper introduces examples of image data analysis on fault drilling samples. The paper describes the following matters: core samples used in the analysis are those obtained from wells drilled piercing the Nojima fault which has moved in the Hygoken-Nanbu Earthquake; the CORESCAN system made by DMT Corporation, Germany, used in acquiring the image data consists of a CCD camera, a light source and core rotation mechanism, and a personal computer, its resolution being about 5 pixels/mm in both axial and circumferential directions, and 24-bit full color; with respect to the opening fractures in core samples collected by using a constant azimuth coring, it was possible to derive values of the opening width, inclination angle, and travel from the image data by using a commercially available software for the personal computer; and comparison of this core image with the BHTV record and the hydrophone VSP record (travel and inclination obtained from the BHTV record agree well with those obtained from the core image). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Open Core Data: Connecting scientific drilling data to scientists and community data resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fils, D.; Noren, A. J.; Lehnert, K.; Diver, P.

    2016-12-01

    Open Core Data (OCD) is an innovative, efficient, and scalable infrastructure for data generated by scientific drilling and coring to improve discoverability, accessibility, citability, and preservation of data from the oceans and continents. OCD is building on existing community data resources that manage, store, publish, and preserve scientific drilling data, filling a critical void that currently prevents linkages between these and other data systems and tools to realize the full potential of data generated through drilling and coring. We are developing this functionality through Linked Open Data (LOD) and semantic patterns that enable data access through the use of community ontologies such as GeoLink (geolink.org, an EarthCube Building Block), a collection of protocols, formats and vocabularies from a set of participating geoscience repositories. Common shared concepts of classes such as cruise, dataset, person and others allow easier resolution of common references through shared resource IDs. These graphs are then made available via SPARQL as well as incorporated into web pages following schema.org approaches. Additionally the W3C PROV vocabulary is under evaluation for use for documentation of provenance. Further, the application of persistent identifiers for samples (IGSNs); datasets, expeditions, and projects (DOIs); and people (ORCIDs), combined with LOD approaches, provides methods to resolve and incorporate metadata and datasets. Application Program Interfaces (APIs) complement these semantic approaches to the OCD data holdings. APIs are exposed following the Swagger guidelines (swagger.io) and will be evolved into the OpenAPI (openapis.org) approach. Currently APIs are in development for the NSF funded Flyover Country mobile geoscience app (fc.umn.edu), the Neotoma Paleoecology Database (neotomadb.org), Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC; earthref.org/MagIC), and other community tools and data systems, as well as for internal OCD use.

  12. Drilling on Mars---Mathematical Model for Rotary-Ultrasonic Core Drilling of Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Mera Fayez

    The results from the Phoenix mission led scientists to believe it is possible that primitive life exists below the Martian surface. Therefore, drilling in Martian soil in search for organisms is the next logical step. Drilling on Mars is a major engineering challenge due to the drilling depth requirement. Mars lacks a thick atmosphere and a continuous magnetic field that shield the planet's surface from solar radiation and solar flares. As a result, the Martian surface is sterile and if life ever existed, it must be found below the surface. In 2001, NASA's Mars Exploration Payload Advisory Group proposed that drilling should be considered as a priority investigation on Mars in an effort of finding evidence of extinct or extant life. On August 6, 2012, the team of engineers landed the spacecraft Curiosity on the surface of Mars by using a revolutionary hovering platform. The results from the Curiosity mission suggested the next logical step, which is drilling six meters deep in the red planet in search of life. Excavation tools deployed to Mars so far have been able to drill to a maximum depth of 6.5 cm. Thus, the drilling capabilities need to be increased by a factor or approximately 100 to achieve the goal of drilling six meters deep. This requirement puts a demand on developing a new and more effective technologies to reach this goal. Previous research shows evidence of a promising drilling mechanism in rotary-ultrasonic for what it offers in terms of high surface quality, faster rate of penetration and higher material removal rate. This research addresses the need to understand the mechanics of the drill bit tip and rock interface in rotary-ultrasonic drilling of brittle materials. A mathematical model identifying all contributing independent parameters, such as drill bit design parameters, drilling process parameters, ultrasonic wave amplitude and rocks' material properties, that have effect on rate of penetration is developed. Analytical and experimental

  13. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Design and testing of coring bits on drilling lunar rock simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Jiang, Shengyuan; Tang, Dewei; Xu, Bo; Ma, Chao; Zhang, Hui; Qin, Hongwei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-02-01

    Coring bits are widely utilized in the sampling of celestial bodies, and their drilling behaviors directly affect the sampling results and drilling security. This paper introduces a lunar regolith coring bit (LRCB), which is a key component of sampling tools for lunar rock breaking during the lunar soil sampling process. We establish the interaction model between the drill bit and rock at a small cutting depth, and the two main influential parameters (forward and outward rake angles) of LRCB on drilling loads are determined. We perform the parameter screening task of LRCB with the aim to minimize the weight on bit (WOB). We verify the drilling load performances of LRCB after optimization, and the higher penetrations per revolution (PPR) are, the larger drilling loads we gained. Besides, we perform lunar soil drilling simulations to estimate the efficiency on chip conveying and sample coring of LRCB. The results of the simulation and test are basically consistent on coring efficiency, and the chip removal efficiency of LRCB is slightly lower than HIT-H bit from simulation. This work proposes a method for the design of coring bits in subsequent extraterrestrial explorations.

  15. Exploring ice core drilling chips from a cold Alpine glacier for cosmogenic radionuclide (10Be) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Lars; Merchel, Silke; Bohleber, Pascal; Rugel, Georg; Scharf, Andreas

    Ice cores offer unique multi-proxy paleoclimate records, but provide only very limited sample material, which has to be carefully distributed for various proxy analyses. Beryllium-10, for example, is analysed in polar ice cores to investigate past changes of the geomagnetic field, solar activity, and the aerosol cycle, as well as to more accurately date the material. This paper explores the suitability of a drilling by-product, the so-called drilling chips, for 10Be-analysis. An ice core recently drilled at a cold Alpine glacier is used to directly compare 10Be-data from ice core samples with corresponding drilling chips. Both sample types have been spiked with 9Be-carrier and identically treated to chemically isolate beryllium. The resulting BeO has been investigated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 10Be/9Be-ratios to calculate 10Be-concentrations in the ice. As a promising first result, four out of five sample-combinations (ice core and drilling chips) agree within 2-sigma uncertainty range. However, further studies are needed in order to fully demonstrate the potential of drilling chips for 10Be-analysis in alpine and shallow polar ice cores.

  16. Results of multiple drilling compared with those of conventional methods of core decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won Seok; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Hee Joong

    2007-01-01

    We performed multiple drilling as a femoral head-preserving procedure for osteonecrosis of the femoral head thinking the therapeutic effects of core decompression could be achieved by this simpler procedure than core decompression. We retrospectively reviewed 136 patients (163 hips) who had multiple drilling using 9/64-inch Steinmann pins for treatment of nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The mean followup for patients who did not require additional surgery (113 hips) was 87 months (range, 60-134 months). We defined failure as the need for additional surgery or a Harris hip score less than 75. After a minimum 5-year followup, 79% (31/39) of patients with Stage I disease and 77% (62/81) of patients with Stage II disease had no additional surgery. All (15/15) small lesions (drill entry holes. Multiple drilling is straightforward with few complications and produces results comparable to results of other core decompression techniques.

  17. The Apollo 16 drill core - Modal petrology and characterization of the mineral and lithic component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Lellis, S. F.; Cameron, K. L.; Papike, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A string of 59 polished thin sections covering the length of the Apollo 16 deep drill core has been examined. A modal analysis, involving the optical classification of 116,000 points was made, and over 500 mineral and lithic fragments from the core were chemically analyzed using an electron microprobe. These data were used to identify and characterize the source areas of the core material and to reconstruct the accumulation history of the core.

  18. A soil flowing characteristics monitoring method in planetary drilling and coring verification experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junyue; Quan, Qiquan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Chen, Chongbin; Yuan, Fengpei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-03-01

    Some type of piercing into the subsurface formation is required in future planetary explorations to enhance the understanding of early stars' geological evolution and the origin of life. Compared with other technical methods, drilling & coring, only utilizing the compound locomotion of rotation and penetration, can sample the subsurface soil relatively efficient and convenient. However, given the uncertain mechanical properties of planetary soil, drilling state signals should be monitored online to improve the robustness of drilling system and avoid potential drilling faults. Since the flowing characteristics of interacted soil, such as removal volume, coring height, removal velocity and accumulation angle, directly reveal the drilling conditions, they are enhancing resources to comprehend the sampling phenomenon and can be used to help control the drill tool. This paper proposed a novel soil flowing characteristics (SFC) monitoring method by applying an industrial camera to record the flowing characteristics of removed cuttings and by utilizing an ultrasonic sensor into the hollow auger to monitor the sampled core. Experiments in one typical lunar regolith simulant indicate that the monitored SFC accurately reflects the interaction between the drill tool and soil.

  19. Drill-Core Scanning for Radioelements by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Wollenberg, H.; Rose-Hansen, J.

    1972-01-01

    A system has been developed for the continuous and stepwise scanning of rock drill cores for gamma-ray spectrometric determinations of uranium, thorium, and potassium. The apparatus accomodates 3- to 4-cm-diameter core as it passes two opposing 2-inch diameter by 3-inch- thick NaI(Tl) detectors......, disclosing detailed variations of U and Th. Contents of U and Th determined by scanning of drill core were consistent with the gross gamma-ray counting rates measured in the boreholes. ©1972 Society of Exploration Geophysicists...

  20. Alteration of Crystalline and Glassy Basaltic Protolith by Seawater as Recorded by Drill Core and Drill Cutting Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, A. P.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.

    2015-12-01

    The major and trace element composition of hydrothermally altered basaltic drill core and drill cutting samples from the seawater recharged Reykjanes geothermal system in Iceland are compared to unaltered surface flows from the Reykjanes Peninsula compiled from the literature. Trace element characteristics of deep (>2000 m) core samples record bimodal compositions similar to trace element enriched and trace element depleted Reykjanes Ridge basalts. Drill cuttings (350-3000 m) overwhelmingly reflect the more common trace element enriched igneous precursor. Crystalline protoliths (dolerite dykes and pillow lava cores) are depleted in Cs, Rb, K, and Ba (± Pb and Th) relative to an unaltered equivalent, despite variations in the extent of alteration ranging from from minor chloritization with intact igneous precursor minerals through to extensive chloritization and uralitization. Glassy protoliths (dyke margins, pillow edges, and hyaloclastites) show similar depletions of Cs, Rb, K, and Ba, but also show selective depletions of the light rare earth elements (LREE) La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Eu due to extensive recrystallization to hydrothermal hornblende. Lower grade alteration shows less pronounced decoupling of LREE and is likely controlled by a combination of Cl complexation in the seawater-derived recharge fluid, moderated by anhydrite and epidote precipitation. These results suggest that alteration of glassy protolith in seawater-recharged systems is an important contribution to the consistently light rare earth and Eu enriched patterns observed in seafloor hydrothermal fluids from basaltic systems. An important conclusion of this study is that that drill cuttings samples are strongly biased toward unaltered rock and more resistant alteration minerals including epidote and quartz potentially resulting in misidentification of lithology and extent of alteration.

  1. Core drilling of REPRO drillholes in ONKALO at Olkiluoto 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropainen, V. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-05-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled ten drillholes for the Posiva's Experiments to investigate Rock Matrix Retention Properties (REPRO) in ONKALO at Eurajoki, 2010 - 2011. The drillholes are used for geological characterization, hydrological and geophysical studies and instrumenting in research for retention of radionuclides to rock matrix. The drillhole ONK-PP240 was drilled in March 2010 and the drillholes ONKPP318... 324 and ONK-PP326...327 in October - December 2011. The lengths of the drillholes range from 4.90 to 21.65 metres. The drillholes are 56.5 mm by diameter. The drillhole ONK-PP240 was drilled for pretesting in the investigation niche 4 at access tunnel chainage 3747 and the rest of the drillholes in the investigation niche 5 at access tunnel chainage 4219. The hydraulic DE 130 drilling rig was used. The starting directions of the close spaced drillholes were controlled with an aligner assembly to be as parallel as possible. The drilling water was taken from the ONKALO drilling water pipeline and premixed sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The drillholes were measured with EMS deviation survey tool. In addition to drilling the drillcores were logged and reported by geologist. Geological logging included the following parameters: lithology, foliation, fracture parameters, fractured zones, core loss, weathering, fracture frequency, RQD and rock quality. The main rock types in the drillholes are veined gneiss, pegmatitic granite and quartz gneiss (skarn rock). The average fracture frequency in drill cores is 1.2 pcs/m and the average RQD value 98.6 %. (orig.)

  2. Engineering report on drilling in the Sand Wash Basin, Colorado. [In support of NURE program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callihan, M C

    1980-01-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of 27 drill holes ranging in depth from 110 feet (33.5 m) to 1,995 feet (608.1 m). A total of 25,514 feet (7,471.9 m) was rotary drilled, and 1,593.5 feet (485.7 m) were cored resulting in a total of 26,107.5 feet (7,957.6 m) drilled for the project. The objective of the project was to provide comprehensive subsurface geologic data relevant to uranium mineralization. This was accomplished by drilling in major outcrop areas of the Browns Park Formation in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado. The project began May 18, 1979; drilling was completed November 4, 1979. Most site restoration and cleanup was completed during the fall of 1979 with the remainder to be completed during the spring of 1980.

  3. Application program of CRUST-1 10km continental scientific drilling rig in SK-2 scientific drilling well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Gao, Ke; Yu, Ping; Liu, Baochang; Guo, Wei; Ma, Yinlong; Yang, Yang

    2014-05-01

    SK-2 Well is located in DaQing city,where is site of the largest oil field in China,Heilongjiang province, north-east of China.The objective of SK-2 well is to obtain full cores of cretaceous formation in Song Liao basin,and to build the time tunnel of Cretaceous greenhouse climate change,and to clarify the causes,processes and results of the formations of DaQing oil field. This will ensure to achieve our ultimate goals,to test the CRUST-1 drilling rig and improve China's deep scientific drilling technology,to form the scientific drilling technology,method and system with independent intellectual property rights,and to provide technical knowledge and information for China's ten kilometers super-deep scientific drilling technical resources.SK-2 Well is at 6400 meter depth, where the drilling inclination is 90 degree and the continuous coring length is 3535 meter that from 2865 to 6400 meter,the recovery rate of the core is greater or equal to 95 percent with 100 millimeters core diameter and 3.9 degree per 100 meter geothermal gradient.The CRUST-1 rig is designated with special drilling equipment for continental scientific drilling combined to the oil drilling equipment ability with advanced geological drilling technology which is highly automatic and intelligent. CRUST-1 drilling ability is 10000 meter with the maximum hook load 700 tons, the total power is 4610 Kilowatt.CRUST-1 will be integrated with a complete set of automation equipment,including big torque hydraulic top drive,high accuracy automatic drilling rod feeding system, suspended automatic drill string discharge device,hydraulic intelligent iron roughneck,and hydraulic automatic catwalk to fully meet the drilling process requirements of SK-2.Designed with advanced drilling technique for 260 degree in the bottom of SK-2 well and hard rock,including the drilling tools of high temperature hydraulic hammer,high temperature resistance and high strength aluminum drill pipe,high temperature preparation of mud

  4. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  5. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-06-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

  6. Preliminary petrographic and geophysical interpretations of the exploratory geothermal drill hole and core, Redstone, New Hampshire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoag, R.B. Jr.; Stewart, G.W.

    1977-06-30

    A 3000 foot diamond drill hole was drilled in the Conway Granite in Redstone, New Hampshire. A comprehensive detailed petrographic and physical study of this core was made. The purpose of this study is to supply a sound data base for future geothermal and uranium-thorium studies of the drill core. An estimate of the heat flow potential of the Redstone drill hole gives a heat flow of 1.9 HFU. If only the red phase of the Conway Granite had been intersected the heat flow may have been as much as 2.7 HFU, reaching a temperature of 260/sup 0/C at 6 km. The drill hole intersected four lithologies; the green and red phase of the Conway Granite, the Albany quartz syenite and a medium-grained, hastingsite-biotite granite. The red phase has the highest and most irregular radioactivity. The irregularity is mainly due to minor variations in lithology. The drill core intersected several alteration zones up to a thickness of 150 feet. These alteration zones represent passage of low to medium temperature fluids which might have been mineralized. The Conway Granite has the physical and chemical characteristics necessary for the formation of vein type uranium deposits. The presence of unexplained radiometric anomalies lends support to the existence of such deposits.

  7. Open Core Data: Semantic driven data access and distribution for terrestrial and marine scientific drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fils, D.; Noren, A. J.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Open Core Data (OCD) is a science-driven, innovative, efficient, and scalable infrastructure for data generated by scientific drilling and coring projects across all Earth sciences. It is designed to make make scientific drilling data semantically discoverable, persistent, citable, and approachable to maximize their utility to present and future geoscience researchers. Scientific drilling and coring is crucial for the advancement of the Earth Sciences, unlocking new frontiers in the geologic record. Open Core Data will utilize and link existing data systems, services, and expertise of the JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO), the Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO), the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA) data facility, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (OL). Open Core Data will leverage efforts currently taking place under the EarthCube GeoLink Building Block and other previous efforts in Linked Open Data around ocean drilling data coordinated by OL. The OCD architecture for data distribution blends Linked Data Platform approaches with web services and schema.org use. OCD will further enable integration and tool development by assigning and using vocabularies, provenance, and unique IDs (DOIs, IGSN, URIs) in scientific drilling resources. A significant focus of this effort is to enable large scale automated access to the data by domain specific communities such as MagIC and Neotoma. Providing them a process to integrate the facility data into their data models, workflows and tools. This aspect will encompass methods to maintain awareness of authority information enabling users to trace data back to the originating facility. Initial work on OCD is taking place under a supplemental awarded to IEDA. This talk gives an overview of that work to date and planned future directions for the distribution of scientific drilling data by this effort.

  8. Core drilling of deep drillhole OL-KR56 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2011 - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropainen, V. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-07-15

    As a part of the confirming site investigations at Olkiluoto, Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled a 1201.65 m deep drillhole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in October 2011 - January 2012. The identification number of the drillhole is OL-KR56. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the returning and drilling water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and the computer recorded drilling parameters during drilling. The objective of the measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volume of the used drilling, washing and flushing water was 1628 m{sup 3}. The measured volume of the returning water in the drillhole was 1142 m{sup 3}. The deviation of the drillhole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments Reflex EMS and Reflex Gyro. The main rock types are veined and diatexitic gneisses, pegmatitic granite and mica gneiss. The average fracture frequency is 2.4 pcs/m and the average RQD value is 96.2 %. Fifty fractured zones were penetrated by the drillhole. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength was 120.0 MPa, the average Young's Modulus was 38.3 GPa and the average Poisson's ratio was 0.22. (orig.)

  9. An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TerraTek

    2007-06-30

    A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Variations in the Geomagnetic Field Determined From the Paleomagnetism of Sediment Cores From Scientific Ocean Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, G.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the main geomagnetic field at Earth's surface is important for understanding underlying geodynamo processes and conditions near the core-mantle boundary. Much of the geomagnetic variability, known as secular variation, occurs on timescales of tens of years to many thousands of years, requiring the use of paleomagnetic observations to derive continuous records of the ancient field, referred to as paleosecular variation (PSV) records. Marine depositional systems where thick sedimentary sections accumulate at high sedimentation rates provide some of the best locations for obtaining long continuous PSV records that can reveal both the short- and long-term changes in the field. Scientific ocean drilling has been successful at recovering many such sections and the paleomagnetic records from these reveal how the amplitude of PSV differs between sites and through time. In this study, several such records cored during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), and other cruises from high, mid, and low latitudes will be used to quantify time intervals of low and high PSV, to examine time-average properties of the field, to map spatial variations in the angular dispersion of the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP), and to assess whether the spatial variation in angular dispersion changes with time.

  11. Core Ideas and Topics: Building Up or Drilling Down?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how and why core ideas can serve as the framework upon which chemistry curricula and assessment items are developed. While there are a number of projects that have specified "big ideas" or "anchoring concepts", the ways that these ideas are subsequently developed may inadvertently lead to fragmentation…

  12. Analysis of Core Drilling Method Detection Technology of Pile Foundation%浅析桩基础钻芯法检测技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张巧慧

    2014-01-01

    钻芯法检测是检测方法中应用最为普遍的一种方法。本文从抽芯检测方案的制定、钻孔抽芯的施工要点、钻孔抽芯检测的质量评定等方面详细介绍了桩基础钻芯法检测技术,对于同类工程的检测具有一定的参考价值。%Core drilling detection method is the most common method. This paper introduces core drilling method detection technology from the development of core pulling detection programs, the construction elements of borehole core, and the quality assessment of borehole core testing, which has some reference value for the detection of similar projects.

  13. Subsetting hyperspectral core imaging data using a graphic-identification-based IDL program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Chuan; Yu, Zhang-Fa; Xu, Qing-Jun; Wu, Ding; Li, Wei-Wei; Yao, Jia-Lei

    2017-09-01

    This study presents an IDL program to subset hyperspectral drill core imagery automatically based on graphic identification. A HySpex SWIR-320m-e imager and drill cores from the Xiangshan uranium deposit were used to do an application test. Based on the HySpex images, we found that the ratio variation tolerance of 75%, minimum marker size of 37 pixel × 37 pixel (28 mm × 28 mm), and wavelength of 1141.3 nm (band #30) are preferences for the IDL program. The results indicate that the IDL program subsets hyperspectral images with high accuracy and efficiency without consuming additional time during the scanning process. Additionally, deformation of the core box, the material from which the core box is made, and variation in the diameter of the drill core do not significantly affect the quality of the results.

  14. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  15. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  16. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  17. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR43 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application to the Finnish Government in May 1999 for the Decision in Principle to choose Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki as the site of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 1000.26 m and 45.01 m deep boreholes with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in July - October 2006. The identification numbers of the boreholes are OL-KR43 and OL-KR43B, respectively. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded drilling parameters. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling and flushing water were 1103 m{sup 3} and 16 m{sup 3} in boreholes OL-KR43 and OL-KR43B, respectively. Measured volumes of the returning water were 916m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR43 and 13m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR43B. The deviation of the boreholes was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 131 MPa, the average Young's Modulus is 37 GPa and the average Poisson's ratio is 0.19. The main rock types are veined gneiss, diatexitic gneiss

  18. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR37 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application to the Finnish Government in May 1999 for the Decision in Principle to choose Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki as the site of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 350.00 m and 45.10 m deep boreholes with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in June- August 2005. The identification numbers of the boreholes are OL-KR37 and OL-KR37B, respectively. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling and flushing water were 273 m{sup 3} and 21m{sup 3} and the measured volumes of the returning water were 221m{sup 3} and 16m{sup 3} in boreholes OL-KR37 and OL-KR37B, respectively. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 106 MPa, the average Young's modulus is 40 GPa and the average Poisson's ratio is 0.20. The main rock types are migmatitic mica gneiss, granite and tonalite. Filled

  19. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR39 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application to the Finnish Government in May 1999 for the Decision in Principle to choose Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki as the site of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 502.97 m and 45.11 m deep boreholes with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in August- October 2005. The identification numbers of the boreholes are OL-KR39 and OL-KR39B, respectively. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded drilling parameters. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling and flushing water were 415m{sup 3} and 25 m{sup 3} and the measured volumes of the returning water were 175 m{sup 3} and 7 m{sup 3} in boreholes OLKR39 and OL-KR39B, respectively. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 110 MPa, the average Young's Modulus is 49 GP a and the average Poisson' s ratio is 0.25. The main rock types are migmatitic mica gneiss and granite. Filled fracture is the most common

  20. Pervasive, high temperature hydrothermal alteration in the RN-17B drill core, Reykjanes Geothermal System-Iceland Deep Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Marks, N. E.; Reed, M. H.; Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2010-12-01

    In November 2008, 9.5 m of core were recovered from Reykjanes production well RN-17B at a depth of 2800m. The core consists mainly of hyaloclastite breccias, hetrolithic breccias with clasts of crystalline basalt, and volcaniclastic sandstones/siltstones. Much of the material appears to have been transported and redeposited, but homolithic breccias and hyaloclastites, some with upright flow lobes of basalt with quenched rims, are interpreted to have erupted in situ. Fine-scale features (glass rims, quench crystals, vesicles, phenocrysts) are well preserved, but all lithologies are pervasively hydrothermally altered such that primary clinopyroxene is ubiquitously uralitized and primary plagioclase (An42-80) is replaced by albite and/or more calcic plagioclase. In contrast, cuttings of similar lithologies, recovered by rotary drilling in intervals immediately above and below the core, exhibit much lesser degrees of hydrothermal alteration and commonly contain igneous plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Vitric clasts in the core are recrystallized into aggregates of chlorite and actinolite. In some breccias, cm-scale metadomains are composed of patchy albite or actinolite/magnesiohornblende giving the core a green and white spotted appearance. Minor amounts (<1%) of disseminated pyrite occur throughout the core, but two intervals with more abundant sulfide contain chalcopyrite and sphalerite in addition to pyrite. Amygdales and vugs in the breccias, initially filled with chlorite, actinolite, epidote, and/or albite, have been partly overprinted with hornblende and anorthite. The core is cut in places by < 1 cm- wide veins composed of early epidote + actinolite + titanite and later anorthite + magnesiohornblende/pargasite. Quartz is not present in any alteration domains observed in the core, although it is reported from virtually all of the cutting intervals above and below the cored section. Seawater-basalt reaction calculations suggest that albite formed during early

  1. Hyaloclastites and the slope stability of Hawaiian volcanoes: Insights from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project's 3-km drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Peter; Watters, Robert J.; Thompson, Nick; Walton, Anthony W.

    2006-03-01

    Core samples recovered during the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) drilling project reveal that the upper 1 km of the submarine flank of Mauna Kea is comprised mainly of hyaloclastites. Progressive, very low-temperature alteration of these hyaloclastites has been accompanied by systematic transformations in physical properties of these deposits. Hyaloclastite deposits which directly underlie ca. 1 km of subaerially-emplaced lavas are very poorly consolidated. But over a depth interval of ca. 500 m, compaction and, especially, precipitation of zeolitic, pore-filling cements associated with palagonitization of sideromelane, have eliminated porosity as well as promoted the consolidation of these hyaloclastites. The latter is reflected in unconfined compressive strengths which increase from mean values, respectively, of 2.5 and 4.6 MPa in weakly consolidated, smectite-rich hyaloclastites from the incipient (1080 to 1335 mbsl) and smectitic (1405-1573 mbsl) alteration zones, to a mean value of 10.0 MPa in the more highly consolidated hyaloclastites of the palagonitic zone of alteration (from 1573 mbsl to the bottom of the drill hole). Conversely, overlying, intercalated, and underlying lava flows are generally much less altered, and have mean compressive strengths which are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater then hyaloclastites at equivalent depths. The shear strengths of the hyaloclastites also increase with depth and grade of alteration, but are uniformly and substantially lower in the lavas. Those hyaloclastites exhibiting the highest grade of alteration (i.e., palagonitic) also exhibit the highest measured strengths, and thus the alteration of hyaloclastites appears to strengthen as opposed to weaken the flanks of the edifice. However, the contrast in strength between hyaloclastites and lavas may be a primary factor in localizing destabilization, and the zones of weak and poorly consolidated hyaloclastites may facilitate slumping by servings as hosts for

  2. Determination of the neutron activation profile of core drill samples by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, D; Boden, S; Sima, O; Stanga, D

    2017-08-04

    This paper provides guidance for determining the neutron activation profile of core drill samples taken from the biological shield of nuclear reactors using gamma spectrometry measurements. Thus, it provides guidance for selecting a model of the right form to fit data and using least squares methods for model fitting. The activity profiles of two core samples taken from the biological shield of a nuclear reactor were determined. The effective activation depth and the total activity of core samples along with their uncertainties were computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR3B at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-10-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 530.60 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in summer 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock in the area, where a new shaft with a diameter of 3 m is planned to be located. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR38. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 473m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 38m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR38. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Devitool Peewee. The results of the EMS measurements indicate that borehole OL-KR38 deviates 1.02 m south and 0.58 m west from the target point at the borehole depth of 525 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 106

  4. Core drilling of deep drillhole OL-KR57 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2011-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropainen, V. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-07-15

    As a part of the confirming site investigations at Olkiluoto, Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 401.71 m and 45.01 m deep drillholes, OL-KR57 and OL-KR57B, at Olkiluoto in September 2011 - January 2012. The diameter of the drillholes is 75.7 mm. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the returning and drilling water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and the computer recorded drilling parameters during drilling. The objective of the measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling, flushing and washing water were 350 m3 and 30 m3 in the drillholes OL-KR57 and OL-KR57B, respectively. The measured volumes of the returning water in the drillholes were 328 m{sup 3} and 16.8 m{sup 3}, respectively. The deviations of the drillholes were measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Gyro. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength was 123.9 MPa, the average Young's Modulus was 42.6 GPa and the average Poisson's ratio was 0.23. The main rock types are veined and diatexitic gneisses, mica gneiss and tonaliticgranodioritic- granitic gneiss. The average fracture frequency is 2.5 pcs/m in drillhole OL-KR57 and 3.3 pcs/m in the drillhole OL-KR57B. The average RQD values are 95.0 % and 93.0 %. Seven separate fractured zones were interpreted from OL-KR57 and three fractured zones from OL-KR57B. (orig.)

  5. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR36 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R.; Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-07-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 205.17 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in May 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock and the anomalous part of the bedrock and quality and the location of the fractured zones R19A and R19B. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR36. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling measurements. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 117 m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 51m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR36. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. The results of the Maxibor measurements indicate that borehole OL-KR36 deviates 10.34 m left and 7.11 m up at the borehole depth of 204 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 126

  6. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR34 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-07-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 100.07 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in April 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock and the anomalous part of the bedrock and quality and the location of the fractured zones R19A and R19B. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR34. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of all measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 37m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 18m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR34. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. The results of the Maxibor measurements indicate that borehole OLKR34 deviates 0.84 m right and 0.15 m up at the borehole depth of 99 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 142 MPa, the

  7. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR35 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-07-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 100.87 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in May 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock and the anomalous part of the bedrock and quality and the location of the fractured zones R19A and R19B. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR35. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of all measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 53 m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 25 m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR35. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. The results of the Maxibor measurements indicate that borehole OL-KR35 deviates 0.49 m right and 0.30 m up at the borehole depth of 99 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 90 MPa, the

  8. Use of tracers to investigate drilling-fluid invasion and oil flushing during coring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.; Marriott, F.T. (Texaco, Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1988-11-01

    This work develops a method in which chemical tracers in the drilling fluid help determine mud filtrate invasion and the degree of oil flushing during coring of steamed and unsteamed heavy-oil formations. Salts of iodide and bromide were added to the drilling fluid while Well TO3 was cored through the Lombardi and Aurignac zones at San Ardo field in California. Vertical core plugs, taken from the periphery to the center of the retrieved whole core, were analyzed for tracer concentration. Tracer analyses indicated minimal filtrate invasion in the not-yet-steamflooded Lombardi zone and complete filtrate invasion in the steamflooded Aurignac zone. Tracer and oil saturation analyses showed the Lombardi zone to be uniform from top to bottom with an average oil saturation of 42.5% and an average porosity of 31.1%. Interpretation of tracer and oil saturation data permitted the construction of a layered model for the Aurignac zone. The layers ranged from an average oil saturation of 8% in the steamflooded layer to 37% in the bottom layer. The data showed that significant oil flushing (6%) occurred only in cores taken from the hot-waterflooded layer just below the steam zone. Vertical core-plug porosities and saturations, as determined by a unique calculating scheme, were compared with conventional and Elkins-corrected values. The comparison indicated that misapplication of the Elkins method in high-temperature formations may result in significant errors.

  9. Core drilling of drillholes ONK-PVA9 and ONK-PVA10 in ONKALO at Olkiluoto 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropainen, V. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-10-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled two drillholes for groundwater monitoring stations in ONKALO at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto in 2011. The groundwater monitoring stations are used for monitoring changes in groundwater conditions. The drillhole ONK-PVA9 was drilled in March 2011 and the drillhole ONK-PVA10 in June 2011. The lengths of the drillholes are 15.95 and 20.10 m respectively. The drillholes are 75.7 mm by diameter. The drillhole ONK-PVA9 was drilled in a niche of the access tunnel at chainage 4366 and the ONK-PVA10 in the access tunnel wall at chainage 3851. The hydraulic DE 130 drilling rig was used. The drilling water was taken from the ONKALO drilling water pipeline and premixed sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The drillholes were measured with EMS deviation survey tool. In addition to drilling the drillcores were logged and reported by geologist. Geological logging included the following parameters: lithology, foliation, fracture parameters, fractured zones, core loss, weathering, fracture frequency, RQD and rock quality. The main rock types in the drillholes are veined gneiss and pegmatitic granite. The average fracture frequencies in drill cores are 2.9 pcs/m (ONK-PVA9) and 2.3 pcs/m (ONK-PVA10) and the average RQD values 81.6 % and 96.2 % respectively. (orig.)

  10. Mineralogic variation in drill core UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipera, S.J.; Vaniman, D.T.; Carlos, B.A.; Bish, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    Quantitative X-ray powder diffraction methods have been used to analyze 108 samples from drill core UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This drill hole, located within the imbricate fault zone east of the potential Yucca Mountain repository site, confirms the authors` previous knowledge of gross-scale mineral distributions at Yucca Mountain and provides insight into possible shallow pathways for hydrologic recharge into the potential host rock. Analyses of samples from UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 have shown that the distribution of major zeolitized horizons, of silica phases, and of glassy tuffs are similar to those noted in nearby drill cores. However, the continuous core and closer sample spacing in UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 provide a more exact determination of mineral stratigraphy, particularly in hydrologically important units such as the Paintbrush bedded tuffs above the Topopah Spring Tuff and in the upper vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Tuff. The discovery of matrix zeolitization in the devitrified Topopah Spring Tuff of UE25 UZ{number_sign}16 shows that some unexpected mineralogic features can still be encountered in the exploration of Yucca Mountain and emphasizes the importance of obtaining a more complete three-dimensional model of Yucca Mountain mineralogy.

  11. Integrated core-log interpretation of Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project borehole 4 (WFSD-4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, Ahmed Amara; Pan, Heping; Ma, Huolin; Qin, Zhen; Traoré, Alhouseiny

    2017-07-01

    Understanding slip behavior of active fault is a fundamental problem in earthquake investigations. Well logs and cores data provide direct information of physical properties of the fault zones at depth. The geological exploration of the Wenchuan earthquake Scientific Fault drilling project (WFSD) targeted the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault and the Guanxian Anxian fault, respectively. Five boreholes (WFSD-1, WFSD-2, WFSD-3P WFSD-3 and WFSD-4) were drilled and logged with geophysical tools developed for the use in petroleum industry. WFSD-1, WFSD-2 and WFSD-3 in situ logging data have been reported and investigated by geoscientists. Here we present for the first time, the integrated core-log studies in the Northern segment of Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (WFSD-4) thereby characterizing the physical properties of the lithologies(original rocks), fault rocks and the presumed slip zone associated with the Wenchuan earthquake. We also present results from the comparison of WFSD-4 to those obtained from WFSD-1, WFSD-3 and other drilling hole in active faults. This study show that integrated core-log study would help in understanding the slip behavior of active fault.

  12. Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

  13. Comparative evaluation of the indigenous microbial diversity vs. drilling fluid contaminants in the NEEM Greenland ice core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteva, Vanya; Burlingame, Caroline; Sowers, Todd; Brenchley, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Demonstrating that the detected microbial diversity in nonaseptically drilled deep ice cores is truly indigenous is challenging because of potential contamination with exogenous microbial cells. The NEEM Greenland ice core project provided a first-time opportunity to determine the origin and extent of contamination throughout drilling. We performed multiple parallel cultivation and culture-independent analyses of five decontaminated ice core samples from different depths (100-2051 m), the drilling fluid and its components Estisol and Coasol, and the drilling chips collected during drilling. We created a collection of diverse bacterial and fungal isolates (84 from the drilling fluid and its components, 45 from decontaminated ice, and 66 from drilling chips). Their categorization as contaminants or intrinsic glacial ice microorganisms was based on several criteria, including phylogenetic analyses, genomic fingerprinting, phenotypic characteristics, and presence in drilling fluid, chips, and/or ice. Firmicutes and fungi comprised the dominant group of contaminants among isolates and cloned rRNA genes. Conversely, most Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria originating from the ice were identified as intrinsic. This study provides a database of potential contaminants useful for future studies of NEEM cores and can contribute toward developing standardized protocols for contamination detection and ensuring the authenticity of the microbial diversity in deep glacial ice.

  14. The first microbiological contamination assessment by deep-sea drilling and coring by the D/V Chikyu at the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough (IODP Expedition 331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori eYanagawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 331 at the Iheya North hydrothermal system in the Mid-Okinawa Trough by the D/V Chikyu, we conducted microbiological contamination tests of the drilling and coring operations. The contamination from the drilling mud fluids was assessed using both perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT and fluorescent microsphere beads. PFT infiltration was detected from the periphery of almost all whole round cores. By contrast, fluorescent microspheres were not detected in hydrothermally active core samples, possibly due to thermal decomposition of the microspheres under high-temperature conditions. Microbial contamination from drilling mud fluids to the core interior subsamples was further characterized by molecular-based evaluation. The microbial 16S rRNA gene phylotype compositions in the drilling mud fluids were mainly composed of sequences of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and not archaeal sequences. The phylotypes that displayed more than 97% similarity to the sequences obtained from the drilling mud fluids were defined as possible contaminants in this study and were detected as minor components of the bacterial phylotype compositions in 13 of 37 core samples. The degree of microbiological contamination was consistent with that determined by the PFT and/or microsphere assessments. This study suggests a constructive approach for evaluation and eliminating microbial contamination during riser-less drilling and coring operations by the D/V Chikyu.

  15. The first microbiological contamination assessment by deep-sea drilling and coring by the D/V Chikyu at the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough (IODP Expedition 331).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Nunoura, Takuro; McAllister, Sean M; Hirai, Miho; Breuker, Anja; Brandt, Leah; House, Christopher H; Moyer, Craig L; Birrien, Jean-Louis; Aoike, Kan; Sunamura, Michinari; Urabe, Tetsuro; Mottl, Michael J; Takai, Ken

    2013-01-01

    During the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 331 at the Iheya North hydrothermal system in the Mid-Okinawa Trough by the D/V Chikyu, we conducted microbiological contamination tests of the drilling and coring operations. The contamination from the drilling mud fluids was assessed using both perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) and fluorescent microsphere beads. PFT infiltration was detected from the periphery of almost all whole round cores (WRCs). By contrast, fluorescent microspheres were not detected in hydrothermally active core samples, possibly due to thermal decomposition of the microspheres under high-temperature conditions. Microbial contamination from drilling mud fluids to the core interior subsamples was further characterized by molecular-based evaluation. The microbial 16S rRNA gene phylotype compositions in the drilling mud fluids were mainly composed of sequences of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and not archaeal sequences. The phylotypes that displayed more than 97% similarity to the sequences obtained from the drilling mud fluids were defined as possible contaminants in this study and were detected as minor components of the bacterial phylotype compositions in 13 of 37 core samples. The degree of microbiological contamination was consistent with that determined by the PFT and/or microsphere assessments. This study suggests a constructive approach for evaluation and eliminating microbial contamination during riser-less drilling and coring operations by the D/V Chikyu.

  16. A Preliminary Paleomagnetic Rsult of Quaternary Drilling Core form Southern Leizhou Peninsula,Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊达; 梁池生; 等

    1999-01-01

    313 orientated samples were collected from Drilling Core ZK1 in southern Leizhou Peninsula for the study of Quaternary paleomagnetic strato-chronology.Te polarity measurement results indicate that the core recorded paleomagnetic information in three main parts:the upper one of the core,from the ground surface to the depth of 39m ,is normally magnetized in polarity,the middle one,from 39m 59 210m in depth,mainly shows reversed polarity and the lower one recorded normal polarity again.They correspond to the Brunhes normal chron,the Matuyama reversed chron and the Guass normal chron in the geomagnetic polarity time scale,respectively.The age of he core could be over 3.4Ma.Meanwhile,the magnetic susceptibility was measured and its result is significant for stratigraphic division and paleoclimatic research.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy for Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Kratt, C.; Kruse, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    Water geochemistry can vary with depth and location within a geothermal reservoir, owing to natural factors such as changing rock type, gas content, fluid source and temperature. The interaction of these variable fluids with the host rock will cause well known changes in alteration mineral assemblages that are commonly factored into the exploration of hydrothermal systems for economic metals, but are less utilized with regard to mapping borehole geology for geothermal energy production. Chemistry of geothermal fluids and rock alteration products can impact production factors such as pipeline corrosion and scaling and early studies explored the use of both silica and chlorites as geothermometers. Infrared spectroscopy is particularly good at identifying a wide variety of alteration minerals, especially in discrimination among clay minerals, with no sample preparation. The technique has been extensively used in the remote identification of materials, but is not commonly used on drill core or chips. We have performed several promising pilot studies that suggest the power of the technique to sample continuously and provide mineral logs akin to geophysical ones. We have surveyed a variety of samples, including drill chip boards, boxed core, and drill cuttings from envelopes, sample bottles and chip trays. This work has demonstrated that core and drill chips can be rapidly surveyed, acquiring spectra every few to tens of cm of section, or the vertical resolution of the chip tray (typically 10 feet). Depending on the sample type we can acquire spectral data over thousands of feet depth at high vertical resolution in a fraction of the time that is needed for traditional analytical methods such as XRD or TEM with better accuracy than traditional geologic drill or chip logging that uses visual inspection alone. We have successfully identified layered silicates such as illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite chlorite and prehnite, zeolites, opal, calcite, jarosite and iron oxides

  18. From field to database : a user-oriented approche to promote cyber-curating of scientific drilling cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, C.; Arnaud, F.; Godinho, E.; Galabertier, B.; Caillo, A.; Billy, I.; Augustin, L.; Calzas, M.; Rousseau, D. D.; Crosta, X.

    2016-12-01

    Managing scientific data is probably one the most challenging issues in modern science. In plaeosciences the question is made even more sensitive with the need of preserving and managing high value fragile geological samples: cores. Large international scientific programs, such as IODP or ICDP led intense effort to solve this problem and proposed detailed high standard work- and dataflows thorough core handling and curating. However many paleoscience results derived from small-scale research programs in which data and sample management is too often managed only locally - when it is… In this paper we present a national effort leads in France to develop an integrated system to curate ice and sediment cores. Under the umbrella of the national excellence equipment program CLIMCOR, we launched a reflexion about core curating and the management of associated fieldwork data. Our aim was then to conserve all data from fieldwork in an integrated cyber-environment which will evolve toward laboratory-acquired data storage in a near future. To do so, our demarche was conducted through an intimate relationship with field operators as well laboratory core curators in order to propose user-oriented solutions. The national core curating initiative proposes a single web portal in which all teams can store their fieldwork data. This portal is used as a national hub to attribute IGSNs. For legacy samples, this requires the establishment of a dedicated core list with associated metadata. However, for forthcoming core data, we developed a mobile application to capture technical and scientific data directly on the field. This application is linked with a unique coring-tools library and is adapted to most coring devices (gravity, drilling, percussion etc.) including multiple sections and holes coring operations. Those field data can be uploaded automatically to the national portal, but also referenced through international standards (IGSN and INSPIRE) and displayed in international

  19. Geochemistry of drill core headspace gases and its significance in gas hydrate drilling in Qilian Mountain permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengquan; Rao, Zhu; He, Jiaxiong; Zhu, Youhai; Zhang, Yongqin; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ting; Xue, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Headspace gases from cores are sampled in the gas hydrate drilling well DK-8 in the Qilian Mountain permafrost. Gas components and carbon isotopes of methane from headspace gas samples are analyzed. The geochemical features of the headspace gases along the well profile are compared with occurrences of gas hydrate, and with the distribution of faults or fractures. Their geochemical significance is finally pointed out in gas hydrate occurrences and hydrocarbon migration. Results show high levels of hydrocarbon concentrations in the headspace gases at depths of 149-167 m, 228-299 m, 321-337 m and 360-380 m. Visible gas hydrate and its associated anomalies occur at 149-167 m and 228-299 m; the occurrence of high gas concentrations in core headspace gases was correlated to gas hydrate occurrences and their associated anomalies, especially in the shallow layers. Gas compositions, gas ratios of C1/ΣC1-5, C1/(C2 + C3), iC4/nC4, and iC5/nC5, and carbon isotopic compositions of methane (δ13C1, PDB‰) indicate that the headspace gases are mainly thermogenic, partly mixed with biodegraded thermogenic sources with small amounts derived from microbial sources. Faults or fracture zones are identified at intervals of 149-167 m, 228-299 m, 321-337 m, and near 360-380 m; significantly higher gas concentrations and lower dryness ratio were found in the headspace gases within the fault or fracture zones compared with areas above these zones. In the shallow zones, low dryness ratios were observed in headspace gases in zones where gas hydrate and faults or fracture zones were found, suggesting that faults or fracture zones serve as migration paths for gases in the deep layers and provide accumulation space for gas hydrate in the shallow layers of the Qilian Mountain permafrost.

  20. The Chicxulub impact structure: What does the Yaxcopoil-1 drill core reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbra, T.

    2013-05-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure, one of the largest impact structures on Earth, was formed 65 Ma by hypervelocity impact which led to the large mass-extinction at K-Pg boundary. This well preserved but buried structure has undergone numerous drillings and studies aimed to understand the formation mechanism, structure and age of the crater. The Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) drill core, located in the southern sector of the Chicxulub crater, in the outer part of an annular trough, 62 km from the crater center, was drilled by ICDP in 2001-2002. Petrophysical, rock- and paleomagnetic studies of Yax-1 (Elbra and Pesonen, 2011) showed that physical properties characterize the various lithological units. Dependence on mineral composition rather than fabric was observed in pre-impact lithologies contrarily to the post-impact and impact rocks where the physical properties were dominated by porosity and reflected, in case of impactites, the impact formation mechanism with its numerous features resulting from melting, brecciation and fracturing. Furthermore, while the pre- and post-impact lithologies in Yax-1 are mostly dia- or paramagnetic, the impactite units indicated enhanced magnetizations and the presence of ferromagnetic, probably hydrothermally deposited magnetite and pyrrhotite. The sharp contrast of the impactites to the target and to post-impact lithologies allowed establishing the contact (especially the K-Pg boundary) between. The anisotropy, shape and orientation of the magnetic fraction illustrated the fabric randomization and showed the influence of impact-related redeposition and hydrothermal activity. The paleomagnetic data suggested that the Chicxulub impact occurred during the reverse polarity geomagnetic chron 29R, which is in agreement with the isotopic dates of the Chicxulub impact as well as with expected K-Pg boundary polarity. Reference Elbra, T. and Pesonen, L.J., 2011. Physical properties of the Yaxcopoil-1 deep drill core, Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico

  1. Carbon chemistry of the Apollo 15 and 16 deep drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wszolek, P. C.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    The carbon chemistry of the Apollo 15 and 16 deep drill cores is a function of the surface exposure plus the chemical and mineralogical composition of the individual samples. The depth profiles of carbide and methane yields in the Apollo 15 core show a general decline with depth and correlate with the solar wind noble gas content, percentage agglutinates, track densities, and metallic iron. All horizons examined were exposed for a considerable time on the lunar surface. The Apollo 16 core samples show that chemical and mineralogical composition plays an important role in determining the nature of carbide-like material present in the fines. The higher aluminum and calcium contents and lower iron contents of highlands material result in carbide-like material yielding less CD4 and more C2D2 (deuteroacetylene) upon DF acid dissolution.

  2. Site investigation SFR. Boremap mapping of core drilled borehole KFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winell, Sofia (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    This report presents the result from the Boremap mapping of the core drilled borehole KFR106, drilled from an islet ca 220 m southeast of the pier above SFR. The borehole has a length of 300.13 m, and a bearing and inclination of 195.1 deg and -69.9 deg, respectively. The purpose of the location and orientation of the borehole is to investigate the possible occurrence of gently dipping, water-bearing structures in the area. The geological mapping is based on simultaneous study of drill core and borehole image (BIPS). The two lowermost meters of the drill core was mapped in Boremap without access to complementary BIPS-image. The dominating rock type, which occupies 72% of KFR106, is fine- to medium-grained, metagranite granodiorite (rock code 101057), which is foliated with a medium to strong intensity. Pegmatite to pegmatitic granite (rock code 101061) is the second most common rock type and it occupies 16% of the mapped interval. It is also frequent as smaller rock occurrences (< 1 m) in other rock types throughout the borehole. Subordinate rock types are fine- to medium-grained granite (rock code 111058), felsic to intermediate meta volcanic rock (rock code 103076), fine- to medium-grained metagranitoid (rock code 101051) and amphibolite (rock code 102017). Totally 49% of the rock in KFR106 has been mapped as altered, where muscovitization and oxidation is the two most common. Additional shorter intervals of alterations are in decreasing order of abundance quartz dissolution, epidotization, argillization, albitization, chloritization, laumontization and carbonatization. A total number of 2801 fractures are registered in KFR106. Of these are 1059 open, 1742 sealed and 84 partly open. This result in the following fracture frequencies: 6.0 sealed fractures/m, 3.7 open fractures/m and 0.3 partly open fractures/m. In addition there are 5 narrow brecciated zones, and 20 sealed networks with a total length of 18 m. The most frequent fracture fillings in KFR106 are

  3. Anniversaries of Innovative Drilling Technologies. Reference Review Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Кozhevnikov, А.А.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Processes of formation of diamond rock cutting tools, namely big diamond drilling crown; small diamond drilling crown; crown equipped with synthetic diamonds; reinforced by composite materials using diamonds are considered. Stages of innovative development of drilling technologies are presented.

  4. Procedures for use of, and drill cores and cuttings available for study at, the Lithologic Core Storage Library, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.C.; Hannula, S.R.; Bowers, B.

    1997-03-01

    In 1990, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, established the Lithologic Core Storage Library at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The facility was established to consolidate, catalog, and permanently store nonradioactive drill cores and cuttings from investigations of the subsurface conducted at the INEL, and to provide a location for researchers to examine, sample, and test these materials. The facility is open by appointment to researchers for examination, sampling, and testing of cores and cuttings. This report describes the facility and cores and cuttings stored at the facility. Descriptions of cores and cuttings include the well names, well locations, and depth intervals available. Most cores and cuttings stored at the facility were drilled at or near the INEL, on the eastern Snake River Plain; however, two cores drilled on the western Snake River Plain are stored for comparative studies. Basalt, rhyolite, sedimentary interbeds, and surficial sediments compose the majority of cores and cuttings, most of which are continuous from land surface to their total depth. The deepest core stored at the facility was drilled to 5,000 feet below land surface. This report describes procedures and researchers` responsibilities for access to the facility, and examination, sampling, and return of materials.

  5. Secondary mineralization and hydrothermal alteration in the Reydarfjordur drill core, eastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehegan, James M.; Robinson, Paul T.; Delaney, John R.

    1982-08-01

    Deep crustal drilling in eastern Iceland has allowed study of a fossil hydrothermal system at a constructive plate margin. The drilled sequence consists of partly to completely altered subaerial lava flows, basaltic dikes, and minor clastic material. Alteration and secondary mineralization are most intense in the flow top breccias where water/rock ratios are presumed to have been the highest. In the upper portion of the cored sequence (to a depth of about 1200 m) alteration is characterized by the deposition of clay minerals ± calcite ± quartz ± laumontite into open spaces such as vugs and vesicles. Low-temperature zeolites, such as stilbite, epistilbite, mordenite, and heulandite, are also present but are restricted to the upper 500 m of the drill core. Below 1200 m, alteration is characterized by the dissolution and replacement of both primary minerals and earlier authigenic minerals, followed by partial filling of dissolution cavities. Early mineral assemblages consist of epidote ± quartz ± prehnite ± chlorite ± albite, and a later superimposed assemblage consists of calcite + laumontite ± anhydrite. Authigenic sphene, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pumpellyite, actinolite, and wairakite also occur sporadically in the cored sequence. Secondary mineral assemblages and temperature measurements of fluid inclusions suggest a maximum temperature of alteration of about 300°C. Fluid inclusion compositions indicate that the geothermal fluid was meteoric water with very low salinities and high calcium activities. Iron activities and oxygen fugacities were highest in the deeper portions of the systems. The mineral paragenesis suggests that the fluid composition, temperature, and PCO2 varied significantly with time. The thermal energy for the geothermal system was probably derived from a high-level magma chamber associated with nearby Thingmuli volcano. Local contact metamorphism, indicated by the formation of garnet, occurred during late stage emplacement of dikes into

  6. Initial Report on MexiDrill: The Basin of Mexico Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erik; Werne, Josef; Caballero, Margarita; Cabral, Enrique; Fawcett, Peter; Lozano, Socorro; Morales, Eric; Myrbo, Amy; Noren, Anders; O'Grady, Ryan; Ortega, Beatriz; Perez, Liseth; Schnurrenberger, Doug; Schwalb, Antje; Smith, Victoria; Steinman, Byron; Stockhecke, Mona; Valero, Blas; Watt, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The Basin of Mexico (19°30'N, 99°W, 9600 km2, 2240 m asl) is a hydrologically-closed basin in the TransMexican Volcanic Belt. The emergence of the Chichinautzin volcanic field after ~780 ka is linked to basin closure and initiation of the development of a lake system within the basin. Continued subsidence accommodated accumulation of a long lacustrine sediment sequence. Radiocarbon chronologies indicate sedimentation rates of ~40 cm/kyr since ~40ka; application of this rate to the entire lacustrine sequence suggests a basal age of ~800 ka, consistent with the Chichinautzin volcanic age. To investigate the environmental history contained in Basin of Mexico sediments, the MexiDrill Program recovered a long lacustrine sedimentary sequence contained in the Lake Chalco basin on the southern outskirts of Mexico City. These sediments have the potential to provide a >500,000 year record of North American climate. Chalco is well suited for reconstruction and investigation of interannual through orbital-scale variations in the North American Monsoon and hydrologic variations of the neotropics. Ongoing work suggests that the system records environmental responses to both Milankovitch- and millennial-scale climate forcing.

  7. The Olorgesailie Drilling Project (ODP): a high-resolution drill core record from a hominin site in the East African Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommain, R.; Potts, R.; Behrensmeyer, A. K.; Deino, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    The East African rift valley contains an outstanding record of hominin fossils that document human evolution over the Plio-Pleistocene when the global and regional climate and the rift valley itself changed markedly. The sediments of fossil localities typically provide, however, only short time windows into past climatic and environmental conditions. Continuous, long-term terrestrial records are now becoming available through core drilling to help elucidate the paleoenvironmental context of human evolution. Here we present a 500,000 year long high-resolution drill core record obtained from a key fossil and archeological site - the Olorgesailie Basin in the southern Kenya Rift Valley, well known for its sequence of archeological and faunal sites for the past 1.2 million years. In 2012 two drill cores (54 and 166 m long) were collected in the Koora Plain just south of Mt. Olorgesailie as part of the Olorgesailie Drilling Project (ODP) to establish a detailed climate and ecological record associated with the last evidence of Homo erectus in Africa, the oldest transition of Acheulean to Middle Stone Age technology, and large mammal species turnover, all of which are documented in the Olorgesailie excavations. The cores were sampled at the National Lacustrine Core Facility. More than 140 samples of tephra and trachytic basement lavas have led to high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating. The cores are being analyzed for a suite of paleoclimatic and paleoecological proxies such as diatoms, pollen, fungal spores, phytoliths, ostracodes, carbonate isotopes, leaf wax biomarkers, charcoal, and clay mineralogy. Sedimentological analyses, including lithological descriptions, microscopic smear slide analysis (242 samples), and grain-size analysis, reveal a highly variable sedimentary sequence of deep lake phases with laminated sediments, diatomites, shallow lake and near shore phases, fluvial deposits, paleosols, interspersed carbonate layers, and abundant volcanic ash deposits. Magnetic

  8. 30 CFR 250.455 - What are the general requirements for a drilling fluid program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... well control. This program must address drilling fluid safe practices, testing and monitoring equipment... drilling fluid program? 250.455 Section 250.455 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil...

  9. Geological factors of core destruction in drilling tensioned rocks of the Donbas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabigailo, V.E.; Belyi, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of scientific investigations in study of the geological conditions of the manifestation of ejections of rocks are set forth. Information on ejection of rocks, characteristics of the main genetic types of ejected rocks, their post-diagenetic changes, mineral composition of the structure of sandstones, collector, stability and elastic properties, gas content, and also characteristics of the tensioned state is presented. A geological model of the ejection hazard of rocks is proposed. A method of investigating the division of the core into disks as one of the factors of the danger of ejection of rocks is presented. The technological and natural factors of disking of the core are studied: tensioned state of the rocks, their structure, physical and mechanical properties, degree of saturability with moisture, surface-active substances and gas. A method of assessing the degree of danger of ejection of rocks according to results of drilling of samples in modelled conditions of the mountain (rock) mass is worked out.

  10. Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala geothermal gradient core hole drilling, operations, and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, S.; Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Gardner, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Duffield, W. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (USA)); Martinelli, L.; Aycinena, S. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

    1990-01-01

    A geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to a depth of 700+ m at the Tecuamburro geothermal site, Guatemala during February and March, 1990. The core hole is located low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro Volcano complex. Preliminary analysis of cores (>98% core recovery) indicates that the hydrothermal system may be centered in the 4-km-diameter Chupadero Crater, which has been proposed as the source of pyroxene pumice deposits in the Tecuamburro area. TCB-1 is located 300 m south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco; the core hole penetrates the thin edge of a tuff ring surrounding Ixpaco and zones of hydrothermal brecciation within the upper 150 m may be related to the phreatic blast, dated at 2,910 {sup 14}C years. At the time of this writing, the unequilibrated temperature at a depth of 570m was 180{degree}C. Data on fracturing, permeability, hydrothermal alteration, and temperature will be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Paleoenvironmental Interpretation of drill core from Tugen Hills, Kenya through X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkara, K. E.; Rabideaux, N. M.; Deocampo, D.; Kingston, J.; Cohen, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Paleoenvironmental reconstruction in regions of significant archeological and paleontological discoveries can be used to help better understand early hominin history in relation to environmental changes. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of lacustrine sediments obtained from core material recovered during the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) campaign at the Tugen Hills drilling site in central Kenya we can reconstruct a high-resolution record of paleoclimate and tectonics from the lake sediments during the Plio-Pleistocene. XRD analysis enables us to identify the mineralogical trends from the 227m core, which can be employed to understand the geochemical evolution of the basin. We want to test whether 23-kyr precessional cyclicity is the primary driver of environmental change at Lake Baringo, and how that change influenced vertebrate and hominin evolution. Our goals are to understand how the paleolake geochemically evolved over time and how the mineralogical characteristics are related to climate change. Preliminary results indicate discrete zones of carbonate and zeolite mineral occurrence, suggesting possible paleoclimate indicators of humidity versus aridity. Geochemical and sedimentological analysis will be required to distinguish primary lacustrine carbonate versus secondary or pedogenic carbonate, which does not carry a lacustrine signal. Quartz-rich intervals and diatomaceous sequences are distinct from zeolitic zones, suggesting variable salinities. Furthermore, hkl reflections of clay-rich bulk samples suggest varying relative abundances of kaolinite and smectite. As we extract clay fractions and analyze the clay mineralogy in further detail, this ratio may provide an indicator of paleoweathering intensity within the basin.

  12. UNAM Scientific Drilling Program of Chicxulub Impact Structure-Evidence for a 300 kilometer crater diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, L.; Trejo-Garcia, A.

    As part of the UNAM drilling program at the Chicxulub structure, two 700 m deep continuously cored boreholes were completed between April and July, 1995. The Peto UNAM-6 and Tekax UNAM-7 drilling sites are ˜150 km and 125 km, respectively, SSE of Chicxulub Puerto, near the crater's center. Core samples from both sites show a sequence of post-crater carbonates on top of a thick impact breccia pile covering the disturbed Mesozoic platform rocks. At UNAM-7, two impact breccia units were encountered: (1) an upper breccia, mean magnetic susceptibility is high (˜55 × 10-6 SI units), indicating a large component of silicate basement has been incorporated into this breccia, and (2) an evaporite-rich, low susceptibility impact breccia similar in character to the evaporite-rich breccias observed at the PEMEX drill sites further out. The upper breccia was encountered at ˜226 m below the surface and is ˜125 m thick; the lower breccia is immediately subjacent and is >240 m thick. This two-breccia sequence is typical of the suevite-Bunte breccia sequence found within other well preserved impact craters. The suevitic upper unit is not present at UNAM-6. Instead, a >240 m thick evaporite-rich breccia unit, similar to the lower breccia at UNAM-7, was encountered at a depth of ˜280 m. The absence of an upper breccia equivalent at UNAM-6 suggests some portion of the breccia sequence has been removed by erosion. This is consistent with interpretations that place the high-standing crater rim at 130-150 km from the center. Consequently, the stratigraphic observations and magnetic susceptibiity records on the upper and lower breccias (depth and thickness) support a ˜300 km diameter crater model.

  13. Radiocarbon dating of silica sinter deposits in shallow drill cores from the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hurwitz, Shaul; McGeehin, John

    2016-01-01

    To explore the timing of hydrothermal activity at the Upper Geyser Basin (UGB) in Yellowstone National Park, we obtained seven new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon 14C ages of carbonaceous material trapped within siliceous sinter. Five samples came from depths of 15–152 cm within the Y-1 well, and two samples were from well Y-7 (depths of 24 cm and 122 cm). These two wells, at Black Sand and Biscuit Basins, respectively, were drilled in 1967 as part of a scientific drilling program by the U.S. Geological Survey (White et al., 1975). Even with samples as small as 15 g, we obtained sufficient carbonaceous material (a mixture of thermophilic mats, pollen, and charcoal) for the 14C analyses. Apparent time of deposition ranged from 3775 ± 25 and 2910 ± 30 14C years BP at the top of the cores to about 8000 years BP at the bottom. The dates are consistent with variable rates of sinter formation at individual sites within the UGB over the Holocene. On a basin-wide scale, though, these and other existing 14C dates hint that hydrothermal activity at the UGB may have been continuous throughout the Holocene.

  14. Core Drilling of shallow drillholes OL-PP72...OL-PP89 at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropainen, V. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-05-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled eighteen drillholes to survey the ground and bedrock conditions in the encapsulation plant building site at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki 2011. Soil quality, bedrock depth and quality of near surface bedrock were investigated in this project. The drillholes were drilled between 19th of October and 8th of November 2011. The lengths of the drillholes are mostly between 7 to 9 metres, except for the drillhole OL-PP79, which is 15 metres by length. The drillholes are 76 mm by diameter, and the core diameter is 60.2 mm. The lightweight GM75 drilling rig with rubber tracks was used. The drilling water was taken from the ONKALO area research building freshwater pipeline and sodium fluorescein was added as a label agent in the drilling water. The drillholes were not left open. In addition to drilling the drillcores were logged and reported by geologist. Geological logging included the following parameters: lithology, foliation, fracture parameters, fractured zones, core loss, weathering, fracture frequency, RQD and rock quality. The average natural fracture frequencies of the drillcores range from 2.5 pc/m (OL-PP77) to 11.8 pc/m (OL-PP86). The average RQD ranges from 55.1 % (OL-PP86) to 96.4 % (OL-PP77). The penetrated soils are mostly ground fill (blast rock), but some clays and sands are lying below the fill layer. (orig.)

  15. A first chronology for the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, S. O.; Abbott, P. M.; Blunier, T.; Bourne, A. J.; Brook, E.; Buchardt, S. L.; Buizert, C.; Chappellaz, J.; Clausen, H. B.; Cook, E.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Davies, S. M.; Guillevic, M.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Laepple, T.; Seierstad, I. K.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Steffensen, J. P.; Stowasser, C.; Svensson, A.; Vallelonga, P.; Vinther, B. M.; Wilhelms, F.; Winstrup, M.

    2013-12-01

    A stratigraphy-based chronology for the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core has been derived by transferring the annual layer counted Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) and its model extension (GICC05modelext) from the NGRIP core to the NEEM core using 787 match points of mainly volcanic origin identified in the electrical conductivity measurement (ECM) and dielectrical profiling (DEP) records. Tephra horizons found in both the NEEM and NGRIP ice cores are used to test the matching based on ECM and DEP and provide five additional horizons used for the timescale transfer. A thinning function reflecting the accumulated strain along the core has been determined using a Dansgaard-Johnsen flow model and an isotope-dependent accumulation rate parameterization. Flow parameters are determined from Monte Carlo analysis constrained by the observed depth-age horizons. In order to construct a chronology for the gas phase, the ice age-gas age difference (Δage) has been reconstructed using a coupled firn densification-heat diffusion model. Temperature and accumulation inputs to the Δage model, initially derived from the water isotope proxies, have been adjusted to optimize the fit to timing constraints from δ15N of nitrogen and high-resolution methane data during the abrupt onset of Greenland interstadials. The ice and gas chronologies and the corresponding thinning function represent the first chronology for the NEEM core, named GICC05modelext-NEEM-1. Based on both the flow and firn modelling results, the accumulation history for the NEEM site has been reconstructed. Together, the timescale and accumulation reconstruction provide the necessary basis for further analysis of the records from NEEM.

  16. Composition of breccia matrices from the Manson M-1 drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracher, A.; Anderson, R. R.; Koeberl, C.

    1994-07-01

    Eleven drill cores were recently recovered from the Manson, Iowa, impact structure. Core M-1, which was drilled at the edge of the large central uplift, contains three major impact rock types: sedimentary clast breccia, melt matrix breccia, and fragmental breccia. Breccia matrices from different depths in the M-1 core were investigated by defocused beam electron probe microanalysis. To obtain average compositions, matrix areas free of lithic and mineral clasts were covered with an orthogonal grid of analyses points. Variations in composition have two main causes: differences in source lithology and postimpact processes. With increasing depth distinct changes in composition can be observed. All compositions are highly feldspathic and surprisingly low in SiO2 for putative source lithologies of mostly granitic composition. Within the lithological units containing melt matrix breccia increasing recrystallization can be observed with depth. Compositions in this interval are marginally corundum normative and not as high in normative feldspar as other matrices. The thoroughly recrystallized matrices from the lowest intervals of the melt matrix breccia are more feldpathic, higher in Na/K ratio, and not corundum normative. Unlike the chemical variation between rock types, we tentatively ascribe the chemical changes within the melt matrix breccia to reaction of matrix with clasts. In particular, quartz clasts in breccias with highly recrystallized matrices develop fringes of K-spar, cpx, and ilmenite. The formation of these minerals is presumably accompanied by complementary changes in matrix composition. Factor analysis on data sets of individual melt matrix analyses provides further clues to the influence of source lithology and post impact processes respectively in the chemical makeup of the breccia matrices. The most significant factors are a mafic component and a plagioclase component.

  17. Results of core drilling for uranium-bearing lignite, Mendenhall area, Harding County, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James R.

    1954-01-01

    Core drilling for data on uranium-bearing lignite in the Mendenhall area, Harding County, S. Dak. , was conducted by the U. S. Bureau of Mines during the period October 1952 to July 1953. Forty-two core holes totaling 9, 683 feet drilled in an area of about six square miles indicate a reserve of about 127/000,000 tons of lignite of which about 49,000,000 tons contain an average of 0.005 percent uranium or more. The Mendenhall area is near the center of the Slim Buttes, which are about 30 miles long from north to south. The uranium-bearing lignite averages, 5. 4 feet in thickness and occurs in the Ludlow member of the Fort Union formation of Paleocene age. Fuel analyses of about 130 samples indicate that the lignite contains about 15 percent ash, 36.7 percent moisture, 24r percent fixed carbon, 23.9 percent volatile matter, and 1.5 percent sulfur and has heating values of about 5,800 btu (as received). Uranium analyses of about 700 samples of lignite core indicate that about 2, 790 tons of uranium are present in the Mendenhall area. Inferred uranium reserves of 2,335 and .1. 050 tons are indicated by grade cutoffs of 0. 005 and 0. 01 percent uranium in the lignites, and 2, 065 and l s 35Stons are indicated by grade cutoffs of 0.03 and 0.05 percent uranium in the lignite ash. The above grade cutoffs have been incorporated on maps showing areal distribution:

  18. HSDP II Drill Core: Preliminary Rock Strength Results and Implications to Flank Stability, Mauna Kea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, N.; Watters, R. J.; Schiffman, P.

    2004-12-01

    Selected portions of the 3-km HSDP II core were tested to provide unconfined rock strength data from hyaloclastite alteration zones and pillow lavas. Though the drilling project was not originally intended for strength purpose, it is believed the core can provide unique rock strength insights into the flank stability of the Hawaiian Islands. The testing showed that very weak rock exists in the hyaloclastite abundant zones in the lower 2-km of the core with strength dependent on the degree of consolidation and type of alteration. Walton and Schiffman identified three zones of alteration, an upper incipient alteration zone (1080-1335m), a smectitic zone (1405-1573m) and a lower palagonitic zone from about 1573 m to the base of the core. These three zones were sampled and tested together with pillow lava horizons for comparison. Traditional cylindrical core was not available as a consequence of the entire core having been split lengthwise for archival purposes. Hence, point load strength testing was utilized which provides the unconfined compressive strength on irregular shaped samples. The lowest unconfined strengths were recorded from incipient alteration zones with a mean value of 9.5 MPa. Smectitic alteration zones yielded mean values of 16.4 MPa, with the highest measured alteration strengths from the palagonite zones with a mean value of 32.1 MPa. As anticipated, the highest strengths were from essentially unaltered lavas with a mean value of 173 MPa. Strength variations of between one to two orders of magnitude were identified in comparing the submarine hyaloclastite with the intercalated submarine lavas. The weakest zones within the hyaloclastites may provide horizons for assisting flank collapse by serving as potential thrust zones and landslide surfaces.

  19. Drilling, Coring and Sampling Using Piezoelectric Actuated Mechanisms: From the USDC to a Piezo-Rotary-Hammer Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    NASA exploration missions are increasingly including sampling tasks but with the growth in engineering experience (particularly, Phoenix Scout and MSL) it is now very much recognized that planetary drilling poses many challenges. The difficulties grow significantly with the hardness of sampled material, the depth of drilling and the harshness of the environmental conditions. To address the requirements for samplers that could be operated at the conditions of the various bodies in the solar system, a number of piezoelectric actuated drills and corers were developed by the Advanced Technologies Group of JPL. The basic configuration that was conceived in 1998 is known as the Ultrasonic/Sonic Driller/Corer (USDC), and it operates as a percussive mechanism. This drill requires as low preload as 10N (important for operation at low gravity) allowing to operate with as low-mass device as 400g, use an average power as low as 2- 3W and drill rocks as hard as basalt. A key feature of this drilling mechanism is the use of a free-mass to convert the ultrasonic vibrations generated by piezoelectric stack to sonic impacts on the bit. Using the versatile capabilities f the USDC led to the development of many configurations and device sizes. Significant improvement of the penetration rate was achieved by augmenting the hammering action by rotation and use of a fluted bit to remove cuttings. To reach meters deep in ice a wireline drill was developed called the Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher and it was demonstrated in 2005 to penetrate about 2-m deep at Antarctica. Jointly with Honeybee Robotics, this mechanism is currently being modified to incorporate rotation and inchworm operation forming Auto-Gopher to reach meters deep in rocks. To take advantage of the ability of piezoelectric actuators to operate over a wide temperatures range, piezoelectric actuated drills were developed and demonstrated to operate at as cold as -200oC and as hot as 500oC. In this paper, the developed mechanisms

  20. Optimization of Mud Hammer Drilling Performance--A Program to Benchmark the Viability of Advanced Mud Hammer Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnis Judzis

    2006-03-01

    Operators continue to look for ways to improve hard rock drilling performance through emerging technologies. A consortium of Department of Energy, operator and industry participants put together an effort to test and optimize mud driven fluid hammers as one emerging technology that has shown promise to increase penetration rates in hard rock. The thrust of this program has been to test and record the performance of fluid hammers in full scale test conditions including, hard formations at simulated depth, high density/high solids drilling muds, and realistic fluid power levels. This paper details the testing and results of testing two 7 3/4 inch diameter mud hammers with 8 1/2 inch hammer bits. A Novatek MHN5 and an SDS Digger FH185 mud hammer were tested with several bit types, with performance being compared to a conventional (IADC Code 537) tricone bit. These tools functionally operated in all of the simulated downhole environments. The performance was in the range of the baseline ticone or better at lower borehole pressures, but at higher borehole pressures the performance was in the lower range or below that of the baseline tricone bit. A new drilling mode was observed, while operating the MHN5 mud hammer. This mode was noticed as the weight on bit (WOB) was in transition from low to high applied load. During this new ''transition drilling mode'', performance was substantially improved and in some cases outperformed the tricone bit. Improvements were noted for the SDS tool while drilling with a more aggressive bit design. Future work includes the optimization of these or the next generation tools for operating in higher density and higher borehole pressure conditions and improving bit design and technology based on the knowledge gained from this test program.

  1. Characteristics of chlorites in seismogenic fault zones: the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hashimoto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The iron content and the asymmetry of iron and magnesium ions in chlorites are examined for the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan, which is a seismogenic fault. The samples are collected from the cores drilled for the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP. Three fault zones are recognized as candidates for the source of seismogenic materials. The fault zones are composed of fractured-damaged rocks, breccia, gray gouge, black gouge, and black material. Chlorite from each type of rock was analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD. The iron content and asymmetry of the iron and magnesium ions in the chlorites were estimated from the XRD peak ratios. The hydroxide and silicate layers in the black gouge and black material have low iron contents. Many studies have suggested that a temperature rise occurred at the fault zones. In addition, the temperature rise can result in the production of iron oxides such as magnetite or maghemite, as reported by other studies. However, the temperature rise cannot explain the low value of iron content in the chlorites. Another reason for the low value of iron content is the variation in the pH of the fluid, which can be controlled by radical reactions. Therefore, the reactions at the seismogenic fault are due to not only the thermal decomposition resulting from the temperature rise and but also rock-fluid interactions based on the chlorite characteristics.

  2. National advanced drilling and excavation technologies program: Summary of third meeting of interested Federal agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-07

    The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to discuss a proposal by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) outlining a National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, and (3) to hear about drilling research activities funded by the Department of Energy. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  3. Characterization of tuyere-level core-drill coke samples from blast furnace operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dong; N. Paterson; S.G. Kazarian; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-12-15

    A suite of tuyere-level coke samples have been withdrawn from a working blast furnace during coal injection, using the core-drilling technique. The samples have been characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-RS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) extracts of the cokes sampled from the 'bosh', the rear of the 'bird's nest', and the 'dead man' zones were found by SEC to contain heavy soot-like materials (ca. 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} apparent mass units). In contrast, NMP extracts of cokes taken from the raceway and the front of the 'bird's nest' only contained a small amount of material of relatively lower apparent molecular mass (up to ca. 10{sup 5} u). Since the feed coke contained no materials extractable by the present method, the soot-like materials are thought to have formed during the reactions of volatile matter released from the injectant coal, probably via dehydrogenation and repolymerization of the tars. The Raman spectra of the NMP-extracted core-drilled coke samples showed variations reflecting their temperature histories. Area ratios of D-band to G-band decreased as the exposure temperature increased, while intensity ratios of D to G band and those of 2D to G bands increased with temperature. The graphitic (G), defect (D), and random (R) fractions of the carbon structure of the cokes were also derived from the Raman spectra. The R fractions decreased with increasing temperature, whereas G fractions increased, while the D fractions showed a more complex variation with temperature. These data appear to give clues regarding the graphitization mechanism of tuyere-level cokes in the blast furnace. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Geologic, geotechnical, and geophysical properties of core from the Acme Fire-Pit-1 drill hole, Sheridan County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Donley S.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary core study from the Acme Fire-Pit-1 drill hole, Sheridan County, Wyoming, revealed that the upper portion of the core had been baked by a fire confined to the underlying Monarch coal bed. The baked (clinkered) sediment above the Monarch coal bed was determined to have higher point-load strength values (greater than 2 MPa) than the sediment under the burned coal

  5. Integrating multi-scale geophysical and drill-core data to improve hydraulic characterization of continental sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukowski, Nina; Methe, Pascal; Goepel, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Physical properties of rocks in the uppermost continental crust e.g. sedimentary basins are very heterogeneously distributed and anisotropic making it necessary to perform advanced post processing techniques on geophysical data. Whereas e.g. electrical resistivity or seismic tomography allow only for identifying physical properties' variability on a scale from roughly several tens of metres to several hundred metres, drill cores reveal physical heterogeneity on the cm-scale. To study the impact of small scale acoustic and hydraulic heterogeneity on fluid flow in a sedimentary basin we use combined data sets from the Thuringian Basin in Germany, a small southern extension of the North German Basin characterised by Permian to Triassic sediments. Our data sets consist of three reflection seismic lines acquired within the framework of the multidisciplinary project INFLUINS (INtegrated FLUid dynamics IN Sedimentary basins) and as site survey for deep drilling, geophysical logging data from a 1,179 m deep drill hole in the centre of the Thuringian Basin, and Multi Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) data of the cores recovered from this drill hole. Geophysical borehole logging was performed immediate after drilling on the highest vertical resolution (about 10 cm) possible using state of the art commercial logging tools. MSCL-data were acquired at an even higher resolution of about 1 to 2 cm , which enables both, calibrating logging data and zooming in the spatial heterogeneity of physical properties. These measurements are complemented with laboratory measurements of rock physical properties (e.g. thermal conductivity, permeability) using selected core samples. Here, we mainly focus on seismic (sonic velocity, density) and hydraulic (porosity, permeability) parameters. This multi-methodological approach allows us on the one hand to estimate improved local to regional average values for physical parameters but most importantly also to highlight the role of thin layers, the physical

  6. Hundreds of Cruises, Thousands of People, Endless Discoveries - Education and Outreach in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, L.; Niemitz, M.; Boa, S.; Corsiglia, J.; Klaus, A.; Petronotis, K.; Iturrino, G.

    2005-12-01

    For 37 years, scientific ocean drilling programs have sponsored hundreds of expeditions, drilled at over 1,800 sites and recovered over 200 miles of core. The discoveries of these programs have led to important realizations of how our earth works. Past expeditions have validated the theory of plate tectonics, provided unparalleled ancient climate records and recovered evidence of the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago - and new discoveries occur with every expedition. By producing education materials and programs and encouraging mass media journalists' interest in our news, we strive to fulfill our commitment to communicate our programs' scientific discoveries to the public, in a way that people - not just other scientists - understand. With the advent of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), education and outreach efforts have expanded to pursue new opportunities and engage wider audiences. Through our strategy of Teaching for Science, Learning for LifeTM, our education efforts seek to utilize the interdisciplinary nature of scientific ocean drilling to teach career awareness, scientific methods, teamwork, and problem solving techniques for a lifetime of learning, decision making and good citizenship. In pursuit of this goal, we have implemented professional and resource development programs and expanded our outreach at education-focused conferences to help teachers use IODP science to satiate the student's need to learn the methods of science that apply to everyday life. We believe that this message also applies to life-long learners and thus we have focused our efforts on news media outreach and education opportunities surrounding ports of call of the JOIDES Resolution, permanent and traveling museum exhibits. In addition, our outreach to undergraduate and graduate audiences, through a lecture series, research fellowships and internships, helps to create future generations of science leaders.

  7. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth ``exposures`` in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  8. Analysis of hydrologic structures within Mauna Kea volcano using diamond wireline core drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Haskins, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project was undertaken on the Island of Hawaii in an effort to characterize the hydrologic structures controlling groundwater movement and storage within the dry (~430 mm/year annual rainfall) saddle region between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes. The project drilled a 1764 m, continuously-cored, borehole from an elevation of 1946 m amsl. The shallow stratigraphy consisted of alluvial outwash of clastic debris, of both volcanic and glacial origin, from the upper slopes of Mauna Kea, and was underlain by highly permeable post-shield lavas to depths of a few hundred meters. Below this depth, shield stage lavas were dominated by highly-fractured and permeable pahoehoe lavas and (less common) a'a flows and occasional soil and ash accumulations at flow boundaries. As depths increased below 1000 m, progressive compaction of fragmental material was found at the flow boundaries and, by depths of ~1500 m, much of the void space in the flow boundaries had been collapsed and compacted. Increasing secondary mineralization was observed below about 1000 m depth that was exacerbated by rising temperatures and temperature gradients toward the bottom of the hole. Hydrologic conditions were strikingly different from those predicted by conventional models for ocean islands: the formation was dry down to only ~150 m where the first, thin, perched aquifer was encountered; a second, more substantial, perched aquifer was reached at only ~220 m depth that extended to ~360 m where a sequence of (remarkably thin) perching formations were recovered in the core down to about 420 m where unsaturated rocks were again encountered. Saturated conditions resumed at 550 m depth that continued to the total depth drilled; this latter zone is inferred to be the basal aquifer for Mauna Kea within this region of the island. Our initial analysis of the core suggests that thin, clay-rich, perching formations in the shallow stratigraphic column play a much larger role in

  9. Surface elevation change artifact at the NEEM ice core drilling site, North Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg Larsen, Lars; Schøtt Hvidberg, Christine; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Lilja Buchardt, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    The NEEM deep drilling site (77.45°N 51.06°W) is located at the main ice divide in North Greenland. For the ice core drilling project, a number of buildings was erected and left on the snow surface during the five-year project period. The structures created snowdrifts that formed accordingly to the predominant wind direction on the lee side on the buildings and the overwintering cargo. To get access to the buildings, the snowdrifts and the accumulated snow were removed and the surface in the camp was leveled with heavy machinery each summer. In the camp a GPS reference pole was placed as a part of the NEEM strain net, 12 poles placed in three diamonds at distances of 2,5 km, 7,5 km and 25 km they were all measured with high precision GPS every year. Around the reference pole, a 1 km x 1 km grid with a spacing of 100 m was measured with differential GPS each year. In this work, we present results from the GPS surface topography measurements in and around the campsite. The mapping of the topography in and around the campsite shows how the snowdrifts evolve and are the reason for the lift of the camp site area. The accumulated snowdrifts are compared to the dominant wind directions from year to year. The annual snow accumulation at the NEEM site is 0.60 m. The reference pole in the camp indicates an additional snow accumulation of 0.50 m per year caused by collected drifting snow. The surface topography mapping shows that this artificially elevated surface extends up to several kilometers out in the terrain. This could have possible implications on other glaciological and geophysical measurements in the area i.e. pit and snow accumulation studies.

  10. Faulting processes in active faults - Evidences from TCDP and SAFOD drill core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Wenk, H. -R.; Morales, L.; Naumann, R.; Kienast, M.; Song, S. -R.; Dresen, G. [UCB; (GFZ); (NTU)

    2014-08-20

    The microstructures, mineralogy and chemistry of representative samples collected from the cores of the San Andreas Fault drill hole (SAFOD) and the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling project (TCDP) have been studied using optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, XRD and XRF analyses. SAFOD samples provide a transect across undeformed host rock, the fault damage zone and currently active deforming zones of the San Andreas Fault. TCDP samples are retrieved from the principal slip zone (PSZ) and from the surrounding damage zone of the Chelungpu Fault. Substantial differences exist in the clay mineralogy of SAFOD and TCDP fault gouge samples. Amorphous material has been observed in SAFOD as well as TCDP samples. In line with previous publications, we propose that melt, observed in TCDP black gouge samples, was produced by seismic slip (melt origin) whereas amorphous material in SAFOD samples was formed by comminution of grains (crush origin) rather than by melting. Dauphiné twins in quartz grains of SAFOD and TCDP samples may indicate high seismic stress. The differences in the crystallographic preferred orientation of calcite between SAFOD and TCDP samples are significant. Microstructures resulting from dissolution–precipitation processes were observed in both faults but are more frequently found in SAFOD samples than in TCDP fault rocks. As already described for many other fault zones clay-gouge fabrics are quite weak in SAFOD and TCDP samples. Clay-clast aggregates (CCAs), proposed to indicate frictional heating and thermal pressurization, occur in material taken from the PSZ of the Chelungpu Fault, as well as within and outside of the SAFOD deforming zones, indicating that these microstructures were formed over a wide range of slip rates.

  11. Challenges for rescuing drill core from volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits in northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, V.; Schoephoester, P.; Lodge, R. W. D.

    2016-12-01

    Providing adequate physical care for unique lithologies can be a challenge for rock core repositories. The purpose of a repository is to preserve its collections such that they will be available and useful for current and future research. Preservation requires both documentation and physical care, including the state of the facility housing the collections, as specimens can be endangered by environmental factors. Digital documentation is a crucial first step in rescuing at-risk samples as it allows the collection to be monitored through time. Exploratory drill core from the Flambeau copper-gold mine in Ladysmith, WI was donated to the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS). The collection includes over 4.7 km of irreplaceable core from 50 sites. The ore body is situated in the Ladysmith-Rhinelander Volcanic Complex, an Early Proterozoic greenstone belt that hosts at least 13 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (DeMatties, 1996), including Flambeau. Mineral assemblages include up to 50% sulfide minerals, mainly pyrite and marcasite (May and Dinkowitz, 1996). These lithologies present a unique preservation challenge - storage conditions must be temperature and humidity controlled to prevent pyrite oxidation (Newman 1998), which chemically and physically degrades the samples as well as labels, containers, and shelving. Once initiated, pyrite oxidation cannot be stopped or reversed, but may be stabilized (Howie, 1992). Although protecting these materials is a vital part of the WGNHS mission, climate-control modifications to the facility are cost-prohibitive. In order to rescue the samples, we documented the collection's present state. We developed and implemented a new database schema including IGSNs to improve metadata records, track samples, and link data. Although preservation of the physical samples remains a challenge, digital workflows and data management improvements will allow WGNHS to monitor the condition of these samples while also

  12. Lithological Conditions at the Box Canyon Site: Results of Drilling, Coring and Open Borehole Measurements 1995-1997 Data Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, D.; Faybishenko, B.; Holland, P.; Knutson, C.; Mesa, M.; Sisson, B.

    1998-09-01

    DOE faces the remediation of several contaminated sites in unsaturated fractured basalt where organic and radioactive wastes have migrated downward through fracture pathways that are difficult, if not impossible, to detect. Perched water zones located above zones of low permeability (massive basalt) create a complicated system of hydraulic baffles. Because of these large scale heterogeneities, the characterization of the lithology of the rock and the geometry of the subsurface fracture pattern is a crucial step in the development of a conceptual model of fluid flow and chemical transport, and eventually the design of a remediation system. The purpose of this data report is to compile and document the results of drilling and lithological studies conducted in open boreholes at the Box Canyon site. Lithological templates are included for each well and contain data such as drilling date, drilling method, logging method, well coordinates, Lithological log, gamma measurements, caliper measurements, core run and recovery depth, vesicular intervals, single fracture depths and descriptions, fracture zone depth and descriptions, and general comments about the borehole lithology. The lithological features were mapped for each borehole. The gamma and caliper measurements are presented as separate plots using greater resolution. Color core photos and core descriptions are also included. TV logging was used to map the lithology of the boreholes that were not cored (E, R, and T wells). This information will be further used to create a comprehensive lithological model of the subsurface. The TV logging of cored wells was viewed to compare the resolution and accuracy of TV logging to core logging. The TV logging method accurately showed large scale features such as zones of vesicularity, large fractures, fracture zones, rubble zones, and massive basalt zones, but it was difficult to detect hairline fractures, fracture orientation, and mineralization of fractures. Also, all depth

  13. A reindeer footprint in a drilling core from the Allerød-Bølling age succession of Lille Slotseng basin, south-eastern Jylland, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe-Nygaard, Nanna; Milàn, Jesper; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt

    2005-01-01

    A Subfossil reindeer track was localised in a drilled core from the Late Glacial Slotseng lacustrine basin, located in the south eastern part of Jylland near the town of Jels. It was dated to 11,795 ±80 14C yr BP or around 13,780 cal yr BP. During an earlier excavation of the site four skeletons...... shore woody peat from the Boreal and onset of the Atlantic Time, cover the basin. Hitherto, no convincing tracks have been recognized and described from drill cores. The reindeer track from the Slotseng Basin is the first convincing track recognized from a drill core section. 89...

  14. ROP MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ROTARY-ULTRASONIC CORE DRILLING OF BRITTLE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mera Fayez Horne

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The results from the Phoenix mission led scientists to believe it is possible that primitive life exists below the Martian surface. Therefore, drilling in Martian soil in search for organisms is the next logical step. Drilling on Mars is a major engineering challenge due to the drilling depth requirement and extreme environment condition. Mars lacks a thick atmosphere and a continuous magnetic field that shield the planet’s surface from solar radiation and solar flares. As a result, the Martian surface is sterile and if life ever existed, it must be found below the surface. NASA’s Mars Exploration Payload Advisory Group proposed that drilling should be considered as a priority investigation on Mars in an effort of finding evidence of extinct or extant life. The results from the Curiosity mission suggested drilling six meters deep in the red planet in search for life. Excavation tools deployed to Mars so far have been able to drill to a maximum depth of 6.5 cm. Thus, the drilling capabilities need to be increased by a factor of approximately 100 to achieve the goal of drilling six meters deep. This requirement puts a demand on developing new and more effective technologies to reach this goal. Previous research shows evidence of a promising drilling mechanism in rotary-ultrasonic for what it offers in terms of high surface quality, faster rate of penetration and higher material removal rate. This research addresses the need to understand the mechanics of the drill bit tip and rock interface in rotary-ultrasonic drilling performance of one drill bit at a time drilling in three types of rocks that vary in strength. A mathematical model identifying all contributing independent parameters, such as drill bit design parameters, drilling process parameters, ultrasonic wave amplitude and rocks’ material properties, that have effect on rate of penetration is developed. Analytical and experimental results under ambient condition are presented to show

  15. Alteration of hyaloclastites in the HSDP 2 Phase 1 Drill Core 1. Description and paragenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Anthony W.; Schiffman, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The core from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project 2 Phase 1 provides a unique opportunity for studying the low-temperature alteration processes affecting basalt in suboceanic-island environments. In hyaloclastites, which make up about one half of the lower 2 km of this core (the portion that accumulated below sea level), these processes have resulted in zones of incipient, smectitic, and palagonitic alteration. The alteration of sideromelane in these hyaloclastites has four distinct outcomes: dissolution, replacement by two different textural varieties of smectite (i.e., reddened and green grain-replacive), and conversion to palagonite. All samples show evidence of the incipient stage of alteration, suggesting that every sample passed through that zone. However, most samples that show palagonitic alteration do not also show evidence of smectitic alteration and vice versa, suggesting these two outcomes represent divergent paths of alteration. Incipient alteration (1080 to 1335 m depth) includes fracturing and mechanical reduction of porosity from 40-45% to about 20-30%; growth of one form of pore-lining smectite; dissolution of sideromelane; and formation of sideromelane-grain replacements consisting of Fe-hydroxide-strained smectite, titaniferous nodules, and tubules. DNA-specific stains and morphological features indicate that tubules are the result of microbial activity. Smectitic alteration (1405 to 1573 m) includes growth of a second variety of pore-lining smectite, pore-filling and grain-replacing smectite, and cements of phillipsite and Ca-silicate minerals. Palagonitic alteration (1573 m to the deepest samples) includes replacement of margins of shards with palagonite and growth of pore-filling chabazite. The porosity is reduced by cementation to less than 4% at 1573 m. Porosity does not decrease further down hole, nor does the thickness of palagonite rims on shards increase through the zone of palagonitic alteration. In these samples, palagonite is not

  16. Improvement of the Vertical Spindle Speed Detecting Method for Vertical Spindle-type Core Drill%立轴式岩心钻机转速检测方法的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹崧宇; 赵大军; 郭威; 孙友宏; 刘华南; 孙梓航

    2013-01-01

    立轴式岩心钻机是岩心钻探工程中应用最广泛的钻机。对立轴式岩心钻机转速检测方法进行改进,并且研制了以传感器、计数器模块和采集机为核心的钻机转速检测系统。对转速检测系统中的计数器模块进行优化设计,提高了转速测量的准确性。经漠河盆地天然气水合物钻探试验井的应用,系统工作准确可靠,满足使用要求。%Spindle-type core drill is the most popular drill in geological core drilling engineering.This article presents the improvement of the vertical spindle speed detecting method for spindle-type core drill and introduces the development of speed detecting system based on the key technologies of the sensor, counter module and acquisition machine.The counter module design is optimized to improve the accuracy of the speed measurement.The system has been examined by the NGH drilling program in Mohe, which can surely meet the requirement.

  17. Nondestructive spectroscopic and petrochemical investigations of Paleoarchean spherule layers from the ICDP drill core BARB5, Barberton Mountain Land, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jörg; Tagle, Roald; Ashworth, Luisa; Schmitt, Ralf Thomas; Hofmann, Axel; Luais, Béatrice; Harris, Phillip D.; Hoehnel, Desirée; Özdemir, Seda; Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-12-01

    A Paleoarchean impact spherule-bearing interval of the 763 m long International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) drill core BARB5 from the lower Mapepe Formation of the Fig Tree Group, Barberton Mountain Land (South Africa) was investigated using nondestructive analytical techniques. The results of visual observation, infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging, and micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) of drill cores are presented. Petrographic and sedimentary features, as well as major and trace element compositions of lithologies from the micrometer to kilometer-scale, assisted in the localization and characterization of eight spherule-bearing intervals between 512.6 and 510.5 m depth. The spherule layers occur in a strongly deformed section between 517 and 503 m, and the rocks in the core above and below are clearly less disturbed. The μXRF element maps show that spherule layers have similar petrographic and geochemical characteristics but differences in (1) sorting of two types of spherules and (2) occurrence of primary minerals (Ni-Cr spinel and zircon). We favor a single impact scenario followed by postimpact reworking, and subsequent alteration. The spherule layers are Al2O3-rich and can be distinguished from the Al2O3-poor marine sediments by distinct Al-OH absorption features in the short wave infrared (SWIR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Infrared images can cover tens to hundreds of square meters of lithologies and, thus, may be used to search for Al-OH-rich spherule layers in Al2O3-poor sediments, such as Eoarchean metasediments, where the textural characteristics of the spherule layers are obscured by metamorphism.

  18. Continental scientific drilling program. [Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 17-21, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics, structure, evolution, and genesis of the continents offer a major scientific challenge. At the same time, society faces many problems that require information about the continental crust for solution. A workshop on continental drilling for scientific purposes addressed the questions of how to maximize the scientific value of current and planned efforts of federal agencies and industry and how to supplement these efforts with holes drilled solely for scientific purpoes. Four panels addressed the scientific and associated societal problems relating to basement structures and deep continental basins, thermal regimes, mineral resources, and earthuqakes. These panels identified the main problems in each area that could be solved by information obtained from drill holes. A fifth panel considered needs for technological developments. The importance of a communications and coordinating mechanism to maximize the scientific results was noted. To this end, a Continental Scientific Drilling Program is outlined, including two advisory and guiding committees, one concerned with scientific objectives, the other with operations. (RWR)

  19. Stochastic programming of drilling rigs supplies; Programacao estocastica de suprimentos de sondas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Bruno Ferreira; Ferreira Filho, Virgilio Jose Martins [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this work is to use techniques of stochastic programming to reduce logistic costs regarding offshore drilling rigs. This theme is of great interest to Brazilian oil industry since there is an increasing number of wells that need to be perforated so that Brazilian oil production can reach its expected growth over the next ten years (PETROBRAS in particular has an ambitious strategy in this respect). Proper treatment of the uncertainties involved in the deliveries of supplies to offshore drilling rigs is essential, namely, these uncertainties need to be included in the models used in logistic models. Delays in the deliveries of products such as chemicals, perforation fluids and tubes may force drilling rigs to stop their operations what highly increases costs. The daily hiring rates of drilling rigs represent the highest cost in the perforation and completion of a well. (author)

  20. Exploring Subseafloor Life with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sobecky

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep drilling of marine sediments and igneous crust offers a unique opportunity to explore how life persists and evolves in the Earth’s deepest subsurface ecosystems. Resource availability deep beneath the seafloor may impose constraints on microbial growth and dispersal patterns that differ greatly from those in the surface world. Processes that mediate microbial evolution and diversity may also be very different in these habitats, which approach and probably passthe extreme limits of life. Communities in parts of the deep subsurface may resemble primordial microbial ecosystems, and may serve as analogues of life on other planetary bodies, such as Mars or Europa, that have or once had water.

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE--A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnis Judzis

    2004-07-01

    This document details the progress to date on the ''OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE--A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING'' contract for the quarter starting April 2004 through June 2004. The DOE and TerraTek continue to wait for Novatek on the optimization portion of the testing program (they are completely rebuilding their fluid hammer). The latest indication is that the Novatek tool would be ready for retesting only 4Q 2004 or later. Smith International's hammer was tested in April of 2004 (2Q 2004 report). Accomplishments included the following: (1) TerraTek re-tested the ''optimized'' fluid hammer provided by Smith International during April 2004. Many improvements in mud hammer rates of penetration were noted over Phase 1 benchmark testing from November 2002. (2) Shell Exploration and Production in The Hague was briefed on various drilling performance projects including Task 8 ''Cutter Impact Testing''. Shell interest and willingness to assist in the test matrix as an Industry Advisor is appreciated. (3) TerraTek participated in a DOE/NETL Review meeting at Morgantown on April 15, 2004. The discussions were very helpful and a program related to the Mud Hammer optimization project was noted--Terralog modeling work on percussion tools. (4) Terralog's Dr. Gang Han witnessed some of the full-scale optimization testing of the Smith International hammer in order to familiarize him with downhole tools. TerraTek recommends that modeling first start with single cutters/inserts and progress in complexity. (5) The final equipment problem on the impact testing task was resolved through the acquisition of a high data rate laser based displacement instrument. (6) TerraTek provided Novatek much engineering support for the future re-testing of their optimized tool. Work was conducted on slip ring [electrical] specifications and tool collar sealing in the

  2. Multipolarity remanences in lower oceanic crustal gabbros recovered by drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Antony; Horst, Andrew; Friedman, Sarah; Nozaka, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  3. Predicting the density of structural timber members in service. The combine use of wood cores and drill resistance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Condea, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Drilling devices is used to get information about the cross-section properties and internal defects of structural members. Drill resistance is correlated with density which is often used to predict the mechanical properties of timber elements. However in situ a regression curve cannot be obtained and pre-existent curves provides unreliable predictions. The present paper proposes a procedure for in situ “calibration” of drill resistance data. The “calibration” is based on density values from wood cores taken in the close vicinity of drill holes. Two approaches were tested. One approach based on a regression curve built using wood cores density and drill resistance values obtained from a limited number of members. The other approach uses the information of one wood core to “calibrate” the drill resistance profile taken at the same member. Following this procedure a density prediction is obtained showing a low mean percentage error and a medium coefficient of determination.Los dispositivos de perforación se utilizan a menudo para obtener información sobre las propiedades de la sección transversal y defectos internos de los elementos estructurales de madera. La resistencia a la perforación se correlaciona con la densidad que, a menudo, se utiliza para obtener la predicción de las propiedades mecánicas de los elementos de madera. Sin embargo, una curva de regresión no puede ser obtenida in situ y las curvas de preexistentes proporcionan predicciones poco fiables. En el presente trabajo se propone un procedimiento de “calibración” in situ de los datos de resistencia de perforación obtenidos en cada caso. La “calibración” se basa en los valores de densidad de pequeñas probetas de madera tomadas en las inmediaciones de los taladros. Para ello se plantean 2 métodos: Un primer enfoque basado en obtener una curva de regresión a partir de los valores de densidad de pequeñas probetas de madera y los valores de resistencia a

  4. Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) Technology and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. G. Cai; X. N. Wang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 What is Horizontal Directional Drilling? Horizontal Directional Drilling, accurately steered drilling, has become state -of- the -art drilling technique in the world. Specially- designed directionsteerable corebarrel and accurate direction measurement tool are available for the use together with wire line core drilling machine. That makes it feasible to extract cores and to measure the drill travel line &length while drilling in a curve.

  5. Hawaiian Volcano Flank Stability Appraised From Strength Testing the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project's (HSDP) 3.1-km Drill Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, N.; Watters, R. J.; Schiffman, P.

    2005-12-01

    Strength results from limited testing of HSDP core samples reveal significant differences in their unconfined compressive and shear strength. The median strength values show a progressive increase from the incipient (2.4 MPa) to smectitic (4.2 MPa) to palagonitic (9.4 MPa) alteration zones. The strength differences include differences among hyaloclastites as a function of their alteration, as well as differences between hyaloclastites and the various forms of lava flows and intrusive bodies. The unconfined compressive strengths of extrusive submarine and subaerial lavas and intrusive rocks from the HSDP core samples are much greater than that of any of the hyaloclastites, and range from 82 to 150 MPa. The cohesive shear strengths of hyaloclastites increase successively with depth and type of alteration (from 0.9 MPa for the incipient zone to 3.2 MPa for the palagonite zone). Conversely, the frictional strengths of the hyaloclastites show a decrease with increasing depth and alteration zone (from 17.6° for hyaloclastites from the incipient zone to 13.7° for the palagonitic zone). The Mohr strength envelope changes from a linear relationship at shallow depth to become curvilinear with increasing depth and consequently shows higher cohesion and lower friction. Comparison of the three groups of the altered hyaloclastites showed that they had p values < 0.05, and that the mean strength results from the incipient, smectitic and palagonitic altered hyaloclastites were significantly different from each other. The greatest difference was calculated between the mean value of the palagonitic alteration and the mean values from the smectitic and incipient alteration though subsequent statistical testing showed that the means of the incipient and smectitic alteration were not significantly different from each other. The palagonitic mean remains significantly different from both the incipient and smectitic means. No statistically significant difference was found in comparing

  6. Nuclear gas core propulsion research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.; Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the nuclear gas core propulsion research program are presented. The objectives of this research are to develop models and experiments, systems, and fuel elements for advanced nuclear thermal propulsion rockets. The fuel elements under investigation are suitable for gas/vapor and multiphase fuel reactors. Topics covered include advanced nuclear propulsion studies, nuclear vapor thermal rocket (NVTR) studies, and ultrahigh temperature nuclear fuels and materials studies.

  7. Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity ({phi}) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and {phi} are known, we define the hysteresis factor {lambda} to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and {phi} are unknown, {lambda} also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Physical-Property Measurements on Core samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, David A.; Watt, Janet T.; Casteel, John; Logsdon, Grant

    2009-01-01

    From May to June 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and measured physical properties on 36 core samples from drill-hole Deep Blue No. 1 (DB-1) and 46 samples from drill-hole Deep Blue No. 2 (DB-2) along the west side of Blue Mountain about 40 km west of Winnemucca, Nev. These data were collected as part of an effort to determine the geophysical setting of the Blue Mountain geothermal prospect as an aid to understanding the geologic framework of geothermal systems throughout the Great Basin. The physical properties of these rocks and other rock types in the area create a distinguishable pattern of gravity and magnetic anomalies that can be used to infer their subsurface geologic structure. Drill-holes DB-1 and DB-2 were spudded in alluvium on the western flank of Blue Mountain in 2002 and 2004, respectively, and are about 1 km apart. Drill-hole DB-1 is at a ground elevation of 1,325 m and was drilled to a depth of 672 m and drill-hole DB-2 is at a ground elevation of 1,392 m and was drilled to a depth of 1522 m. Diameter of the core samples is 6.4 cm. These drill holes penetrate Jurassic and Triassic metasedimentary rocks predominantly consisting of argillite, mudstone, and sandstone; Tertiary diorite and gabbro; and younger Tertiary felsic dikes.

  9. Fischer Assays of Oil-Shale Drill Cores and Rotary Cuttings from the Greater Green River Basin, Southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Chapter 1 of this CD-ROM is a database of digitized Fischer (shale-oil) assays of cores and cuttings from boreholes drilled in the Eocene Green River oil shale deposits in southwestern Wyoming. Assays of samples from some surface sections are also included. Most of the Fischer assay analyses were made by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) at its laboratory in Laramie, Wyoming. Other assays, made by institutional or private laboratories, were donated to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and are included in this database as well as Adobe PDF-scanned images of some of the original laboratory assay reports and lithologic logs prepared by USBM geologists. The size of this database is 75.2 megabytes and includes information on 971 core holes and rotary-drilled boreholes and numerous surface sections. Most of these data were released previously by the USBM and the USGS through the National Technical Information Service but are no longer available from that agency. Fischer assays for boreholes in northeastern Utah and northwestern Colorado have been published by the USGS. Additional data include geophysical logs, groundwater data, chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, and other data. These materials are available for inspection in the office of the USGS Central Energy Resources Team in Lakewood, Colorado. The digitized assays were checked with the original laboratory reports, but some errors likely remain. Other information, such as locations and elevations of core holes and oil and gas tests, were not thoroughly checked. However, owing to the current interest in oil-shale development, it was considered in the public interest to make this preliminary database available at this time. Chapter 2 of this CD-ROM presents oil-yield histograms of samples of cores and cuttings from exploration drill holes in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Great Divide, Green River, and Washakie Basins of southwestern Wyoming. A database was compiled that includes about 47

  10. Analysis and Testing of Load Characteristics for Rotary-Percussive Drilling of Lunar Rock Simulant with a Lunar Regolith Coring Bit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on an optimized lunar regolith coring bit (LRCB configuration, the load characteristics of rotary-percussive drilling of lunar rock simulant in a laboratory environment are analyzed to determine the effects of the drilling parameters (the rotational velocity, the penetration rate, and the percussion frequency on the drilling load. The process of rotary drilling into lunar rock using an LRCB is modeled as an interaction between an elemental blade and the rock. The rock’s fracture mechanism during different stages of the percussive mechanism is analyzed to create a load forecasting model for the cutting and percussive fracturing of rock using an elemental blade. Finally, a model of the load on the LRCB is obtained from the analytic equation for the bit’s cutting blade distribution; experimental verification of the rotary-impact load characteristics for lunar rock simulant with different parameters is performed. The results show that the penetrations per revolution (PPR are the primary parameter influencing the drilling load. When the PPR are fixed, increasing the percussion frequency reduces the drilling load on the rock. Additionally, the variation pattern of the drilling load of the bit is in agreement with that predicted by the theoretical model. This provides a research basis for subsequent optimization of the drilling procedure and online recognition of the drilling process.

  11. Sample application to test site No. 1, Kenedy Co. [Offset well information, drilling fluids program, cost estimates, and data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podio, A.L.; Gray, K.E.; Isokrari, O.F.; Knapp, R.M.; Silberberg, I.H.; Thompson, T.W.

    1976-01-01

    In order to satisfy the objective of outlining the preliminary plan and schedules as well as obtaining representative costs for drilling a geopressured geothermal well the guidelines have been applied to one of the possible test sites identified by the Resource Assessment Phase I of the project. The specific site is the Armstrong lease in the Candelaria Field in Kenedy County, Texas. Offset well information including bit records, drilling fluid programs, formation pressure encountered and casing programs for the Armstrong No. 20 and No. 22 wells are presented. Based on this information a preliminary drilling program has been prepared. Well completion and production considerations were taken into account in the preparation of the drilling program. A brief description of drilling operations is also included to clarify the terminology used.

  12. 套管跟进与绳索取心组合钻探技术的应用%Application of the Combined Drilling Technology of Drilling with Casing and Wire-line Coring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥虹

    2014-01-01

    针对贵州省清镇市犁倭乡红花寨、白浪坝铝土矿破碎、漏孔、坍塌掉块的灰岩地层,采用了套管跟进与绳索取心组合钻探技术,克服了常规钻探技术方法钻进困难的问题,顺利完成了ZK3369孔钻探任务,取得了良好的效果。在分析施工难点的基础上,介绍了在破碎、漏失、坍塌掉快地层中套管跟进与绳索取心组合钻探技术施工工艺。%According to the broken, leaking, clasping and block falling limestone formations of the bauxite in Guizhou, the combined drilling technology of drilling with casing and wire-line coring was used to overcome the difficulties of conventional drilling methods, ZK3369 hole drilling was successfully completed with good result.On the basis of the analysis on the con-struction difficulties, the paper introduces the combined drilling technology of drilling with casing and wire-line coring in the broken, leaking, clasping and block falling formations.

  13. Whole-rock analyses of core samples from the 1988 drilling of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind Tuthill; Taggart, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and evaluates 64 major-element analyses of previously unanalyzed Kilauea Iki drill core, plus three samples from the 1959 and 1960 eruptions of Kilauea, obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis during the period 1992 to 1995. All earlier major-element analyses of Kilauea Iki core, obtained by classical (gravimetric) analysis, were reported and evaluated in Helz and others (1994). In order to assess how well the newer data compare with this earlier suite of analyses, a subset of 24 samples, which had been analyzed by classical analysis, was reanalyzed using the XRF technique; those results are presented and evaluated in this report also. The XRF analyses have not been published previously. This report also provides an overview of how the chemical variations observed in these new data fit in with the chemical zonation patterns and petrologic processes inferred in earlier studies of Kilauea Iki.

  14. Description and results of test-drilling program at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, 1982-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, P.T.; Sargent, B.P.; Vowinkel, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Picatinny Arsenal, located in north-central New Jersey, has a long history of explosives manufacturing. Past industrial activities and past waste-disposal practices have caused some groundwater contamination problems. In 1982, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army, began a water resources investigation of the Arsenal. The test drilling program is designed to define the hydrogeology and install observation wells. Twenty-two boreholes were drilled and 21 observation wells installed in these holes. All drilling was done in a glaciated valley. The report includes lithologic and gamma-ray logs, results of grain-size analyses, well-construction data, and some groundwater levels. The generalized stratigraphic sequence of geologic units penetrated from the test-drilling program are from lower to upper: (1) pre-dominantly dolomitic Leithsville Formation, (2) in the upper part of bedrock, a weathered dolomite zone, (3) a thin discontinuous mantle of till, and (4) stratified drift deposit up to 208 ft thick. (USGS)

  15. The Oman Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J.; Kelemen, P. B.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2014-12-01

    With seed funds from the Sloan Foundation, the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) approved a proposal by 39 international proponents for scientific drilling in the Oman ophiolite. Via observations on core, geophysical logging, fluid sampling, hydrological measurements, and microbiological sampling in a series of boreholes, we will address long-standing, unresolved questions regarding melt and solid transport in the mantle beneath oceanic spreading ridges, igneous accretion of oceanic crust, mass transfer between the oceans and the crust via hydrothermal alteration, and recycling of volatile components in subduction zones. We will undertake frontier exploration of subsurface weathering processes in mantle peridotite, including natural mechanisms of carbon dioxide uptake from surface waters and the atmosphere, and the nature of the subsurface biosphere. Societally relevant aspects include involvement and training of university students, including numerous students from Sultan Qaboos University in Oman. Studies of natural mineral carbonation will contribute to design of engineered systems for geological carbon dioxide capture and storage. Studies of alteration will contribute to fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of reaction-driven cracking, which could enhance geothermal power generation and extraction of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. We hope to begin drilling in late 2015. Meanwhile, we are seeking an additional $2M to match the combined Sloan and ICDP funding from national and international funding agencies. Matching funds are needed for operational costs of drilling, geophysical logging, downhole fluid sampling, and core description. Information on becoming part of the named investigator pool is in Appendix 14 (page 70) of the ICDP proposal, available at https://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/gpg/projects/icdp-workshop-oman-drilling-project. This formal process should begin at about the time of the 2014 Fall AGU Meeting. Meanwhile, potential

  16. The use of drilling by the U.S. Antarctic program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.C.; Webb, J.W.; Hedberg, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    This report on drilling in the Antarctic has been prepared by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) to assist principal investigators and others in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Antarctic Treaty of 1961. Implementing regulations for NEPA are spelled out in 40 CFR 1500-1508. Environmental protection under the Antarctic Treaty is addressed in the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty (hereafter referred to as the Protocol), which was adopted by 26 countries in 1991. In the United States, responsibility for compliance with these requirements rests with the NSF Office of Polar Programs (OPP), which manages the U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP). The USAP recognizes the potentially profound impacts that its presence and activities can have on the antarctic environment. In its extensive support of operations and research in Antarctica, the USAP uses all practical means to foster and maintain natural conditions while supporting scientific endeavors in a safe and healthful manner. Reducing human impacts on the antarctic environment is a major goal of the USAP. The USAP`s operating philosophy is based on broad yet reasonable and practical assumptions concerning environmental protection. The USAP maintains three year-round stations on the continent to support scientific research. Research and associated support operations at these stations and camps sometimes involve drilling into ice, soil, or ocean sediments. In order to comply with NEPA and the Protocol, it is necessary for principal investigators and others to assess the environmental effects of drilling. This report has been prepared to assist in this process by describing various drilling technologies currently available for use in Antarctica, generally characterizing the potential environmental impacts associated with these drilling techniques, and identifying possible mitigation measures to reduce impacts.

  17. CASING DRILLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Casing drilling is an alternative option to conventional drilling and uses standard oilfield casing instead of drillstring. This technology is one of the greatest developments in drilling operations. Casing drilling involves drilling and casing a well simultaneously. In casing driling process, downhole tools can be retrieved, through the casing on wire-line, meaning tool recovery or replacement of tools can take minutes versus hours under conventional methods. This process employs wireline-retrievable tools and a drill-lock assembly, permitting bit and BHA changes, coring, electrical logging and even directional or horizontal drilling. Once the casing point is reached, the casing is cemented in place without tripping pipe.

  18. ASRL core research program 2010 - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-01-15

    This article summarized the core research program of Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd. The high-priority projects are improved liquid sulfur degassing technologies, improved tail gas treatment processes, oxygen consumption in amine systems, formation of hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) in shale gas reservoirs and during the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) recovery of heavy oil and bitumen, designer hydrocarbon sulfur solvents for sour gas production, determination of the kinetics of H{sub 2}S oxidation in compression systems, H{sub 2}S and sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) solubility in liquid sulfur updating and checking FTIR calibrations, low tonnage sulfur recovery, the effect of BTX on reduction catalysts used in Claus tail gas processing, measurement of acid gas properties at high pressure, catalytic tail gas incineration, and sulfur dust properties. The projects identified as important areas of research are acid gas injection water holding capacity for acid gas mixtures; rate of decomposition of polymeric sulfur; ammonium salt plugging in the Claus Converter Train; re-examination of catalytic partial oxidation for sulfur recovery from low H{sub 2}S content hydrocarbon contaminated acid gas; primary upgrading of oil sands bitumen; prediction of sulfur deposition in sour gas reservoirs; and new extended uses of elemental sulfur. There are two fundamental research programs, which include ongoing research and partial external funding: production of C{sub 3} - C{sub 6} olefins, high octane alkylate, and valuable petrochemicals and computational modeling of catalytic systems. The commercial and specific objectives of each project were described. Two special projects, which aim to take Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd. (ASRL) core research to the commercial demonstration phase, involve injection of SO{sub 2} into disposal reservoirs and above-ground sulfur storage. 1 tab., 22 figs.

  19. Results of core drilling for uranium-bearing carbonaceous shale and lignite in the Goose Creek district, Cassia County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, William J.; Hail, William J.

    1954-01-01

    Thirteen core holes, totaling 2,023 feet, were drilled during the fall of 1953 to explore the grade and extent of uranium-bearing beds of carbonaceous shale and lignite in the east-central part of the Goose Creek district, Cassia County, Idaho. The beds tested are interbedded with volcanic ash, bentonite, greenish-gray shale, sandstone, and conglomerate in two fairly well defined zones in the lower part of the Salt Lake formation of lower Pliocene age. Nine holes penetrated carbonaceous shale beds in the Barrett zone, and one hole penetrated carbonaceous shale and lignite beds in zone B, 160 feet stratigraphically below the Barrett zone. The highest concentration of uranium found by drilling is 0.10 percent in the upper part of a 4-foot bed of carbonaceous shale and lignite in zone B. The grade of carbonaceous shale beds in the Barrett zone ranges from 0.044 percent to less than 0.003 percent uranium. Inferred reserves in the district are estimated to be 790,000 tons in beds 1 foot or more thick containing an average of 0.014 percent or 120 tons of uranium.

  20. The Hans Tausen drill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Sigfus Johann; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, excellent results from the GRIP and GISP2 deep drilling projects in Greenland opened up funding for continued ice-coring efforts in Antarctica (EPICA) and Greenland (NorthGRIP). The Glaciology Group of the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, was assigned the task...... of providing drilling capability for these projects, as it had done for the GRIP project. The group decided to further simplify existing deep drill designs for better reliability and ease of handling. The drill design decided upon was successfully tested on Hans Tausen Ice Cap, Peary Land, Greenland, in 1995....... The 5.0 m long Hans Tausen (HT) drill was a prototype for the ~11 m long EPICA and NorthGRIP versions of the drill which were mechanically identical to the HT drill except for a much longer core barrel and chips chamber. These drills could deliver up to 4 m long ice cores after some design improvements...

  1. Ideas to Design an in situ Diamond Drilling Core Splitter within Soft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... challenges in core splitting are imperfect division, time consuming, ... or saprolite (with hardness of less than 5 on the Mohr's scale) when a resultant feed force is applied. ..... of Geoscientists and Geological Society of Africa.

  2. Characterization of exposures to nanoscale particles and fibers during solid core drilling of hybrid carbon nanotube advanced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Dhimiter; Wardle, Brian L; Zhang, Jie; Yamamoto, Namiko; Santeufemio, Christopher; Hallock, Marilyn; Virji, M Abbas

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated exposures to nanoparticles and nanofibers during solid core drilling of two types of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT)-hybrid composites: (1) reinforced plastic hybrid laminates (alumina fibers and CNT); and (2) graphite-epoxy composites (carbon fibers and CNT). Multiple real-time instruments were used to characterize the size distribution (5.6 nm to 20 microm), number and mass concentration, particle-bound polyaromatic hydrocarbons (b-PAHs), and surface area of airborne particles at the source and breathing zone. Time-integrated samples included grids for electron microscopy characterization of particle morphology and size resolved (2 nm to 20 microm) samples for the quantification of metals. Several new important findings herein include generation of airborne clusters of CNTs not seen during saw-cutting of similar composites, fewer nanofibers and respirable fibers released, similarly high exposures to nanoparticles with less dependence on the composite thickness, and ultrafine (composite material.

  3. Lithostratigraphy of the impactite and bedrock section of ICDP drill core D1c from the El'gygytgyn impact crater, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, Ulli; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Zaag, Patrice Tristan; Pittarello, Lidia; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-07-01

    In 2008/2009, the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) obtained drill cores from the El'gygytgyn impact structure located on the Chukotka Peninsula (Russia). These cores provide the most complete geological section ever obtained from an impact structure in siliceous volcanic rock. The lithostratigraphy comprises a thick sequence of lacustrine sediments overlying impact breccias and deformed target rock. The interval from 316 m (below lake floor—blf) to the end of the core at 517 m depth can be subdivided into four lithological sequences. At 316 m depth, the first mesoscopic clasts of shocked target rock occur in lacustrine sediments. The growing abundance of target rock clasts with increasing depth and corresponding decrease of lacustrine sediment components indicate the extent of this transition zone to 328 m depth. It constitutes a zone of mixed reworked impact breccia and lacustrine sediments. Volcanic clasts in this reworked suevite section show all stages of shock metamorphism, up to melting. The underlying unit (328-390 m depth) represents a suevite package, a polymict impact breccia, with considerable evidence of shock deformation in a wide variety of volcanic clasts. This includes fragments with quartz that exhibit planar fractures and planar deformation features (PDF). In addition, at three depths, several centimeter-sized clasts with shatter cones were detected. Due to microanalytical identification of relatively rare, microscopic impact melt particles in the matrix of this breccia, this material can be confidently labeled a suevite. Also in this sequence, three unshocked, <1 m thick intersections of volcanic blocks occur at 333.83, 351.52, and 383.00 m depths. The upper bedrock unit begins at 390.74 m depth, has a thickness of 30.15 m, and represents a sequence of different volcanic rocks—an upper part with basaltic composition from 390.74 to 391.79 m depth overlying a lower, rhyodacitic part from 391.79 to 420.27 m depth

  4. Cretaceous shallow drilling, U.S. Western Interior: Core research. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1998-07-08

    The primary objective of the project is to construct a subsurface transect of Cretaceous strata that were deposited in the Kansas-Colorado-Utah corridor, going from marine sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich hydrocarbon source rocks in Kansas and eastern Colorado to nearshore coal-bearing units in western Colorado and Utah. The drilling transect will provide continuous, unweathered samples for inorganic, organic, and isotopic geochemical studies and mineralogical investigations to determine the characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient. In addition, the eastern Colorado hole will provide characteristics of an important fractured reservoir (the Pierre Shale) in the Florence oil field, the oldest continuously producing field in the United States (>100 years; 600 wells; >14 Mbbls).

  5. Creating Research Experiences in Ocean Science for Two Year College (2YC) Students Using Resources Available through the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    One of the best and simple ways to increase enthusiasm for ocean sciences is by getting 2YC students connected with data and tools available through IODP. IODP is one of the world's largest international marine research programs that is dedicated to advancing understanding of Earth's processes through scientific drilling of the ocean floor. Few of the activities proposed here can be easily integrated into any 2YC geoscience class. These include, live video conferencing with JOIDES Resolution Ocean Drilling research vessel which provides a unique opportunity for the students to ask questions from the shipboard scientists and learn about their research as well as their experience onboard. In class, students will be introduced to search and use data available through scientific drilling to answer scientific questions. Furthermore, organizing field trips to the IODP Gulf Coast repository will provide hands on experience to describe and analyze cores from the ocean floor. These simple additions to the curriculum will provide wide range of unique experiences to the students at 2YC which will encourage them to pursue advanced studies in ocean sciences and/or careers in scientific ocean drilling.

  6. Dynamics of the late Plio-Pleistocene West Antarctic Ice Sheet documented in subglacial diamictites, AND-1B drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Ellen A.; Christoffersen, Poul; Powell, Ross D.; Talarico, Franco M.

    2014-08-01

    Geologic studies of sediment deposited by glaciers can provide crucial insights into the subglacial environment. We studied muddy diamictites in the ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) AND-1B drill core, acquired from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf in McMurdo Sound, with the aim of identifying paleo-ice stream activity in the Plio-Pleistocene. Glacial advances were identified from glacial surfaces of erosion (GSEs) and subglacial diamictites within three complete sequences were investigated using lithofacies associations, micromorphology, and quartz sand grain microtextures. Whereas conditions in the Late Pliocene resemble the modern Greenland Ice Sheet where fast flowing glaciers lubricated by surface meltwater terminate directly in the sea (interval 201-212 mbsl) conditions in the Late Pleistocene are similar to modern West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) ice streams (38-49 mbsl). We identify the latter from ductile deformation and high pore-water pressure, which resulted in pervasive rotation and formation of till pellets and low relief, rounded sand grains dominated by abrasion. In the transitional period during the Mid-Pleistocene (55-68 mbsf), a slow moving inland ice sheet deposited tills with brittle deformation, producing lineations and bi-masepic and unistrial plasma fabric, along with high relief, conchoidally fractured quartz grains. Changes in the provenance of gravel to cobble-size clasts support a distant source area of Byrd Glacier for fast-flowing paleo-ice streams and a proximal area between Darwin and Skelton Glaciers for the slow-moving inland ice sheet. This difference in till provenance documents a shift in direction of glacial flow at the core site, which indirectly reflects changes in the size and thickness of the WAIS. Hence, we found that fast ice streaming motion is a consequence of a thicker WAIS pushing flow lines to the west and introducing clasts from the Byrd Glacier source area to the drill site. The detailed analysis of diamictites in

  7. Core Description and Characteristics of Fault Zones from Hole-A of the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Chao Yeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project was conducted in drill site Dakeng, Taichung City of central western Taiwan during 2004 - 2005 principally to investigate the rupture mechanism in the northern segment of the Chi-Chi earthquake of 21 September 1999, and also to examine regional stratigraphy and tectonics. Core examination (500 - 1800 m of Hole-A gave profound results aiding in illustrating the lithologic column, deformation structure, and architectural pattern of fault zones along the borehole. Lithology column of Hole-A was identified downward as the Cholan Formation (500 - 1027 m, Chinshui Shale (1027 - 1268 m, Kueichulin Formation (1268 - 1712 m, and back to the Cholan Formation (1712 - 2003 m again. A dramatic change is observed regarding sedimentation age and deformation structure around 1712 m. Along the core, most bedding dips _ _ Around 1785 m, bedding dip jumps up to _ the bottom of borehole. Five structure groups of different orientations (dip direction/dip are observed throughout the core. Based on the orientation and sense of shear, they are categorized as thrust (105/30, left-lateral fault (015/30 - 80, right-lateral fault (195/30 - 80, normal fault (105/5 - 10, and backthrust (285/40 - 50. Ten fault zones have been recognized between 500 and 2003 m. We interpret the fault zone located at around 1111 m as being the most likely candidate for rupture deformation during Chi-Chi earthquake. The fault zone seated around 1712 m is recognized as the Sanyi fault zone which is 600 m beneath the Chelungpu fault zone. Ten fault zones including thrust faults, strike-slip faults and backthrust are classified as the Chelungpu Fault System (1500 m. According to the deformation textures within fault zones, the fault zones can be categorized as three types of deformation: distinct fracture deformation, clayey-gouge deformation, and soft-rock deformation. Fracture deformation is dominant within the Chelungpu Fault System and abother two

  8. 深孔绳索取心钻杆质量控制措施%Quality Control Measures of Wire-line Coring Drill Pipe for Deep Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽君; 彭莉; 吕红军

    2012-01-01

      在优化深孔绳索取心钻杆结构设计、选用优质钢材基础上,制定合理的加工工艺和检测规程,配齐相应的检测器具。通过严格的工艺控制,确保钻杆质量稳定,满足深孔绳索取心钻进需要。%  On the basis of the optimization of structure design for deep hole wire-line coring drill pipe and the selection of high quality steel, rational processing technology and detecting rules are established with relative detecting appliances.By the strict process control, the quality of drill pipe is ensured to satisfy the requirements of wire-line coring drilling.

  9. Visible-near infrared point spectrometry of drill core samples from Río Tinto, Spain: results from the 2005 Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) drilling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Brown, Adrian J; Stoker, Carol R

    2008-10-01

    Sampling of subsurface rock may be required to detect evidence of past biological activity on Mars. The Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) utilized the Río Tinto region, Spain, as a Mars analog site to test dry drilling technologies specific to Mars that retrieve subsurface rock for biological analysis. This work examines the usefulness of visible-near infrared (VNIR) (450-1000 nm) point spectrometry to characterize ferric iron minerals in core material retrieved during a simulated Mars drilling mission. VNIR spectrometry can indicate the presence of aqueously precipitated ferric iron minerals and, thus, determine whether biological analysis of retrieved rock is warranted. Core spectra obtained during the mission with T1 (893-897 nm) and T2 (644-652 nm) features indicate goethite-dominated samples, while relatively lower wavelength T1 (832-880 nm) features indicate hematite. Hematite/goethite molar ratios varied from 0 to 1.4, and within the 880-898 nm range, T1 features were used to estimate hematite/goethite molar ratios. Post-mission X-ray analysis detected phyllosilicates, which indicates that examining beyond the VNIR (e.g., shortwave infrared, 1000-2500 nm) will enhance the detection of other minerals formed by aqueous processes. Despite the limited spectral range of VNIR point spectrometry utilized in the MARTE Mars drilling simulation project, ferric iron minerals could be identified in retrieved core material, and their distribution served to direct core subsampling for biological analysis.

  10. Detrital dating on drill-core records from McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattin, M.; Andreucci, B.; Balestrieri, M.; Olivetti, V.; Pace, D.; Reiners, P. W.; Rossetti, F.; Talarico, F.; Thomson, S. N.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of Antarctic ice sheets on the global climate system during the Cenozoic has been intensely investigated in the last years, especially after the successful drilling projects off-shore the western Ross Sea. While the role of the Western Ice Sheet (WAIS) during the Miocene it is not clear, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) has been suggested to be more or less stable and cold for the last 14 Ma. Records from drilling projects in syn-tectonic basins located on the continental shelf along the western margin of the West Antarctica Rift System (DSDP, CIROS, CRP and ANDRILL projects) may provide crucial information on the tectonic and paleo-climatic evolution of that region during Cenozoic. The drilled sedimentary records have been therefore investigated by detrital geochronology which, integrated by sandstone and gravel petrography, can provide valuable information on the dynamics of the ice sheets as provenance data are sensitive to variations in the ice-flow patterns. Apatite fission-track (AFT) data from ANDRILL and CRP records show multiple peaks in most of the samples. In the AND-2A well, whose stratigraphic record spans the last 20 Ma, the grain-age distributions are dominated by grains between 20 and 40 Ma. A young peak with a comparable age has been also episodically detected in CRP wells where conversely the most relevant population is made by grain ages between 45 and 70 Ma. Samples from Late Miocene-Pleistocene sediments of AND-1B well show a completely different AFT age distribution as a single peak is usually detected and ages are younger than 20 Ma. The AFT age range is well represented in bedrock data along the entire Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). The main denudation phase in the TAM began at 55-50 Ma but the occurrence of a young peak in the detrital data at ca. 35 Ma indicates the presence of an Oligocene pulse, as testified also by the small gap between AFT and some (U-Th-Sm)/He ages that have been detected on AND-2A samples. Such

  11. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of hydrothermal minerals from Yellowstone drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, N. C.; Keith, T. E. C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface ( in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The δ 18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰ . About one third of the silica 7samples have δ 18O values that are consistent with isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters; most of the other silica samples appear to have precipitated from water enriched in 18O (up to 4.7‰) relative to present thermal water, assuming precipitation at present in situ temperatures. Available data on fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures in hydrothermal quartz indicate that silica precipitation occurred mostly at temperatures above those measured during drilling and imply that 15O enrichments in water during silica precipitation were generally larger than those estimated from present conditions. Similarly, clay minerals (celadonite and smectite) have δ 18O values higher (by 3.5 to 7.9‰) than equilibrium values under present conditions. In contrast, all eight analyzed calcite samples are close to isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters. The frequent incidence of apparent 18O enrichment in thermal water from which the hydrothermal minerals precipitated may indicate that a higher proportion of strongly 18O-enriched deep hydrothermal fluid once circulated through shallow portions of the Yellowstone system, or that a recurring transient 18O-enrichment effect occurs at shallow depths and is caused either by sudden decompressional boiling or by isotopic exchange at low water/rock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are consistent with

  12. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Chan, K.M.; Kerr, D.; Sunda, W.

    1970-01-01

    Eleven samples of fluids which had been squeezed on board ship, and four, packaged sediment samples were received in our laboratories. As in Leg 2, the volumes of fluid available were scanty and did not permit multiple determinations of constituents in many of the samples; in Hole 21 the fluid available sufficed only for refractometer readings (a few tenths of a milliliter). Therefore, analytical scatter is again responsible for partially obscuring variations (and constancy) in the conservative constituents such as sodium. However, on the whole the results confirm the features which appeared in Legs 1 and 2. Central oceanic sediments display a remarkable constancy in total salinity, chlorinity and sodium concentration to the greatest depths and ages yet penetrated in the project drillings. Variations attributable to postburial reactions do occur in the remaining major ions, but they usually show little systematic trend with depth--with the exception of potassium, which will be discussed later. Methods remain similar to those employed for Leg 2; the detailed techniques are now being prepared for submission, but a brief description may be obtained from the previous Leg reports (Manheim and Sayles, 1969; Chan and Manheim, 1970). Results from four unsqueezed samples are not complete and, therefore, do not appear here.

  13. Multiple sulfur isotope characteristics of 3.46-2.7 Ga sedimentary rocks from drill cores of the Archean Biosphere Drilling Project (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y.; Ohmoto, H.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Archean Biosphere Drilling Project (ABDP), we have determined the multiple sulfur isotope ratios and examined the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the sulfur-bearing minerals (e.g., pyrite, sphalerite, barite) and the host rocks (e.g., major and trace element chemistry; Corg, Ccarb and S contents; δ13Corg and δ13Ccarb) of >100 samples of sedimentary rocks from five ABDP drill cores in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. The total ranges of Δ33S and δ34S values of the studied samples are -0.9 to +1.2‰ and -4 to +8‰, respectively. We have found that the Δ33S and δ34S relationships show unique values depending on their depositional environment: (1) Pyrites in the 3.46 Ga Marble Bar Chert Member (ABDP #1), which were formed by submarine hydrothermal fluids, show no AIF-S (anomalously fractionated sulfur isotope) signatures: Δ33S = -0.08 to +0.08‰ and δ34S = -3.3 to +0.6‰ (n = 5). This indicates that the H2S presented in the submarine hydrothermal fluid, which was partly generated through seawater sulfate reduction by Fe2+, did not possess AIF-S signatures. (2) Pyrites in organic C-poor lacustrine shales of the 2.76 Ga Hardey Formation (ABDP #3) also show no or very little AIF-S signatures: Δ33S = -0.38 to +0.25‰ and δ34S = -2.7 to +1.9‰ (n = 18). (3) Pyrites in organic C-poor marine shales of the 2.92 Ga Mosquito Creek Formation (ABDP#5) show no or small negative AIF-S signatures: Δ33S = -0.59 to 0.19 ‰ and all positive δ34S = +1.4 to +7.7‰ (n = 24). (4) Pyrites in organic C-rich (> 1 wt%) and hydrothermally altered marine shales in the 3.46 Ga Panorama Formation (ABDP #2) show constant and small positive AIF-S signatures (+0.44 to +0.61‰) and the smallest variation in δ34S (-1.1 to +1.6‰) (n = 35). In contrast, pyrites in organic C-rich shales in the 2.72 Ga Mt. Roe Basalt show negative Δ33S = -0.50 to -0.10‰ and δ34S = -3.7 to 1.8‰ (n = 10). (5) Pyrites in stromatolitic carbonates of the 2.7 Ga

  14. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilled cores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System. The Chelungpu Fault System in Hole-A was encountered at a depth of between 1050 - 1250 m where deformation structures increased. Three major fault zone structures were found at approximate depths of 1111, 1153, and 1221 m. The presence of wide fault rock regions were mostly concentrated in these 3 fault zones. The fault zone at 1111 m mainly consists of a nearly brecciated fracture zone and a clayey fault gouge zone of about 1.05 m in thickness. Fault rocks from the fault zone at 1153 m are characterized by the presence of sand grains in the matrix content, consisting of a 1.1-m thick fault breccia zone and a 0.35-m thick fault gouge zone. The fault zone at 1221 m consists of fault breccia and fault gouge of 1.15 m in total thickness. These are relatively harder and darker in color than the previous 2 fault zones. Each of the 3 fault zones contains a few layers of dark colored rocks of approximately 5 - 80 mm in thickness within the fault breccia and fault gouge zones. These dark colored rocks were found distinctively within the fault rocks. However, there relation to the process of faulting is not clearly understood and shall be discussed in detail with the aid of microscopic observations.

  15. New drilling of the early Aptian OAE1a: the Cau core (Prebetic Zone, south-eastern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Ruiz-Ortiz, Pedro; Castro, José Manuel; de Gea, Ginés Alfonso; Jarvis, Ian; Molina, José Miguel; Nieto, Luis Miguel; Pancost, Richard David; Quijano, María Luisa; Reolid, Matías; Skelton, Peter William; Jürg Weissert, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    The Cretaceous was punctuated by several episodes of accelerated global change, defined as Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs), that reflect abrupt changes in global carbon cycling. The Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE1a; 120 Ma) represents an excellent example, recorded in all major ocean basins, and associated with massive burial of organic matter in marine sediments. The OAE1a is concomitant with the "nannoconid crisis", which is characterized by a major biotic turnover, and a widespread demise of carbonate platforms. Many studies have been published over the last decades on OAE1a's from different sections in the world, and provide a detailed C-isotope stratigraphy for the event. Nevertheless, new high-resolution studies across the event are essential to shed light on the precise timing and rates of the multiple environmental and biotic changes that occurred during this critical period of Earth history. Here we present a new drill core recovering an Aptian section spanning the OAE1a in southern Spain. The so-called Cau section was drilled in the last quarter of 2015. The Cau section is located in the easternmost part of the Prebetic Zone (Betic Cordillera), which represents platform deposits of the southern Iberian palaeomargin. The lower Aptian deposits of the Cau section belong to a hemipelagic unit (Almadich Formation), deposited in a highly subsident sector of the distal parts of the Prebetic Platform. Previous work on the early Aptian of the Cau succession has focused on stratigraphy, bioevents, C-isotope stratigraphy, and organic and elemental geochemistry. A more recent study based on biomarkers has presented a detailed record of the pCO2 evolution across the OAE1a (Naafs et al., 2016). All these studies reveal that the Cau section represents an excellent site to further investigate the OAE1a, based on its unusually high sedimentation rate and stratigraphic continuity, the quality and preservation of fossils, and the well-expressed geochemical signatures.

  16. Experiences and Results from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Teacher at Sea Program, Expedition 301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J.; Iturrino, G. J.; Klaus, A.

    2004-12-01

    The IODP US implementing organization began a Teacher at Sea Program (TASP) during Expedition 301 to the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The main scientific objectives of this expedition were to establish borehole observatories as part of a series of multidisciplinary experiments that will help evaluate the hydrogeologic properties of the oceanic crust, including the distribution of fluid pathways within an active hydrothermal system as well as the linkages between fluid circulation, alteration, and microbiological processes. The goals of the U.S. sponsored IODP TASP were to provide the participant with seagoing research experiences, working side-by-side with scientists, using current state-of-the-art approaches to solve scientific problems pertinent to this expedition, and gaining first-hand knowledge of the results of seagoing science. In addition, the participating teacher will use these experiences for translating scientific results into useful teaching resources, such as expedition information materials and help disseminating these resources into classrooms across the country. During IODP Expedition 301, the participating teacher spent 2 months working with shipboard scientists in processing core data and learning the different techniques used for the shipboard laboratory analyses. Several laboratory briefs targeted for middle to high school student audiences were developed during the cruise including the microbiology, chemistry, paleomagnetics, and physical properties laboratories and educational classroom activities are currently being developed. In addition, other laboratory briefs and educational activities for the underway geophysics, core, downhole measurements, and paleontology laboratories are being developed as part of the post-expedition curriculum development initiatives. The teacher also kept a daily journal detailing life at sea experiences as well as all the science and operational developments that took place during the expedition. The

  17. Tephrochronology of the East African Baringo-Tugen Hills Cores: Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garello, D.; Deino, A. L.; Campisano, C. J.; Kingston, J.; Arrowsmith, R.; Hill, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Baringo/Tugen Hills basin (BTB) in central Kenya is one of five Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) localities targeting lacustrine sediments associated with key fossil hominin sites. The fossiliferous Plio-Pliestocene Chemeron Formation, within the BTB, contains geochemically analyzed outcrop tephras, 8 of which have 40Ar/39Ar dates of 3.2-2.35Ma. Tephras have been crucial in developing chronologies in human evolution, paleontology, archaeology, and rift basin development. The HSPDP paleo-lake cores provide a high resolution and continuous record of sedimentation, as well as additional tephras not found in outcrop. For BTB, approximately 20 vitric tephras have been logged in the cores, including several previously unobserved tephras, providing a more complete record of volcanic activity. Major element geochemical analyses of the BTB tephras collected from the cores are critical for establishing chronostratigraphic links to the outcrop stratigraphy of the Chemeron Formation, as well as correlations outside of BTB. The Chemeron Formation, composed of alternating fluvial and lacustrine sediments, is associated with the onset and intensification of the Cenozoic Northern Hemisphere glaciation and encompasses the period of great hominin diversification of Paranthropus and Homo, as well as the earliest evidence for stone toolmaking. Within the Chemeron stratigraphy, there are sequences of diatomites that record a 23kyr-processional periodicity indicating a dominant climatic forcing. By correlating the BTB tephras, and thereby the BTB climate-forced lacustrine cycles, with other East African rift basins' stratigraphy, we can determine if this climatic wet/dry pattern observed at BTB had occurred in other East African rift basins. This knowledge can help in understanding the influence of climate and tectonics on the evolution of hominins during the Plio-Pleistocene.

  18. 钎焊金刚石套料钻CFRP制孔研究%Analysis on CFRP Hole Making with Brazed Diamond Core Drill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐九华; 牟娟; 陈燕; 傅玉灿; 王伟锋

    2012-01-01

    The high hardness of carbon fiber in carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) leads to quick wear, low durability of drills, and poor machining quality in drilling process. Appling brazed diamond core drill to drilling CFRP can improve drill durability and increase machining quality. In order to optimize the setting of diamond grits on core drill, the diamond grits are orderly set to make core drill, and the maximum undeformed chip thickness are changed through changing the diamond quantity. The influences of maximum undeformed chip thickness on thrust force, surface roughness of hole wall and quality of hole entrance and exit are compared under the same machining parameters. The moving model of diamond grits is set up to analyze the forming process of machined surface. The results and analysis show that the drilling quality is influenced by chip storage space and the maximum undeformed chip thickness. If the chip storage space is sufficient, the thrust force decreases and the drilling quality improves with the decreasing maximum undeformed chip thickness.%碳纤维增强复合材料(Carbon fiber reinforced plastics,CFRP)中高硬度碳纤维易加速孔加工钻头的磨损,导致加工质量变差.采用钎焊金刚石套料钻加工CFRP不仅可提高钻头的耐磨性,加工质量也得到了改善.为更好地优化提高套料钻加工性能,试验采用有序排布的金刚石磨粒制作钎焊套料钻,尝试通过改变磨粒数量来调整单颗磨粒切厚大小,对相同工艺参数下不同单颗磨粒切厚对钻削轴向力、孔壁粗糙度以及出入口质量的影响进行了研究.建立了金刚石磨粒的运动模型,并分析了套料钻制孔中已加工表面的形成过程.试验结果与分析表明:制孔质量与容屑空间和单颗磨粒切厚有关.在容屑空间充足的情况下,随着单颗磨粒切厚的减小,轴向力减小,制孔质量提高.

  19. Journey to the centre of the ice: narrating ice-core drillings in northern Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvenegård-Lassen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    to the Eemian period. This time travel ultimately aims at predicting the climate of the future. While the heroic polar expeditions of the past ventured into unknown spaces horizontally, the secrets of the frontier are now vertically stored in the ice cores. In Secrets of the Ice, five videos produced for public...... dissemination, Greenland is displayed as an empty, frozen space, waiting to be conquered by scientists. Resonating with classical Arctic explorer myths, this conquest has to overcome the difficulties presented by a harsh wilderness landscape. The article situates the glaciological project in Greenland within...

  20. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (February-April 1998) drilled two sites (Sites 1097 and 1103) on the outer Antarctic Peninsula Pacific continental shelf. Recovered strata are no older than late Miocene or early Pliocene (<4.6 Ma). Recovery at shallow depths in loosely consolidated and iceberg-turbated bouldery sediment was poor but improved with increasing depth and consolidation to allow description of lithofacies and biofacies and interpretation of depositional environment. Site 1097 lies on the outer shelf within Marguerite Trough which is a major outlet for ice expanding seaward from the Antarctic Peninsula and reached a maximum depth drilled of 436.6 m below the sea floor (mbsf). Seismic stratigraphic data show flat-lying upper strata resting on strata that dip gently seaward. Uppermost strata, to a depth of 150 mbsf, were poorly recovered, but data suggest they consist of diamictites containing reworked and abraded marine microfauna. This interval is interpreted as having been deposited largely as till produced by subglacial cannibalization of marine sediments (deformation till) recording ice sheet expansion across the shelf. Underlying gently dipping strata show massive, stratified and graded diamictite facies with common bioturbation and slump stuctures that are interbedded with laminated and massive mudstones with dropstones. The succession contains a well-preserved in situ marine microfauna typical of open marine and proglacial marine environments. The lower gently dipping succession at Site 1097 is interpreted as a complex of sediment gravity flows formed of poorly sorted glacial debris. Site 1103 was drilled in that part of the continental margin that shows uppermost flat-lying continental shelf topsets overlying steeper dipping slope foresets seaward of a structural mid-shelf high. Drilling reached a depth of 363 mbsf with good recovery in steeply dipping continental slope foreset strata. Foreset strata are dominated by massive and chaotically

  1. Preliminary evidence indicating Dome A(Antarctica) satisfying preconditions for drilling the oldest ice core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Lowest temperature and snow accumulation rate are preconditions for retrieving the oldest ice core from the polar ice sheets.The 10-m depth firn temperature at Dome A,the summit of the Antaretie Ice Sheet,recorded by an automatic weather station(AWS)was-58.3℃in 2005 and-58.2℃in 2006,respectively.The 10-m firn temperature is an approximation of the annual mean air temperature(AMAT),and this is the lowest AMAT that has been recorded on the surface of the Earth.The stable isotopic ratios(δ18O and δD)of surface snow at Dome A are also lower than at other ice sheet domes along the East Antarctic Ice Divide such as Dome C,Dome F,Dome B and Vostok.These facts indicate that Dome A is the"pole of cold"on the Earth.The total amount of snow accumulation rate in 2005 and 2006 was only 0.16 cm,equaling 0.016 m water equivalent per year,the lowest precipitation ever recorded from Antarctica.Preliminary evidences indicate that Dome A is a candidate site for recovering the oldest ice core.

  2. Drilling and data acquisition programs for the methane hydrate offshore production test in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fujii, T.

    2013-12-01

    Marine methane hydrates are a matter of scientific interests from various viewpoints such as a key player of global carbon cycle, effects on climate change, cause of seafloor instability, and a possible future energy resource. Under the Japanese national research program, the MH21 research consortium (Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation and National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology) has conducted survey operations and subsequent analyses of data and samples from methane hydrate-bearing sediments in the Eastern Nankai Trough. The goal of the project was a gas production test from a methane hydrate deposits in sandy intervals of Pleistocene turbidite sediments. The test location was set in Daini Atsumi Knoll that is a ridge between forearc basin and accretionary prism, and the sediments cover the flank of the knoll. The water depth at the test location is approximately 1000m, and 50m thick methane hydrate concentrated zone exists around 300m below seafloor. The main interest of the MH21 research team is to know physical (thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical) parameters of sediments that are necessary to understand gas hydrate dissociation processes during the production test. Core samples and geophysical logging data obtained during past surveys are utilized for this purpose. Sedimentation and tectono-geophysical conditions govern such material properties, so the samples were analyzed from those viewpoints, too. The first drilling at the location was done in 2004 with logging and coring operation including pressure-conserved core sampling. In 2011, shallow geotechnical survey holes were drilled in the area for geo-hazard assessment, and core samples were taken in the holes, along with some in-situ mechanical and hydraulic testings. In early 2012, a well construction operation for the gas production test was conducted with logging operations that contains neutron porosity data using pulse-neutron devices, magnetic resonance log, etc. A

  3. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II, task B: deep drilling system demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-15

    The effort included the design, fabrication and Systems Verification Testing of the Deep Drilling System. The Systems Verification Test was conducted during October 1978 in a test well located on the premises of Brown Oil Tools Inc., Houston, Texas. In general, the Systems Verification test program was an unqualified success. All of the system elements of the Deep Drilling System were exercised and evaluated and in every instance the system can be declared ready for operational well demonstration. The motor/bit shaft combination operated very well and seal performance exceeds the design goals. The rig floor system performed better than expected. The power cable flexural characteristics are much better than anticipated and longitudinal stability is excellent. The prototype production connectors have functioned without failure. The cable reels and drive skid have also worked very well during the test program. The redesigned and expanded instrumentation subsystem also functioned very well. Some electronic component malfunctions were experienced during the early test stages, but they were isolated quickly and repaired. Subsequent downhole instrumentation deployments were successfully executed and downhole data was displayed both in the Electrodril instrumentation trailer and on the remote control and display unit.

  4. Mid-Pliocene Planktic Foraminifer Census Data from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 847C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Harry; Caballero, Rocio

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a long-term study of mid-Pliocene climatic and oceanographic conditions. One of the key elements of the study involves the use of quantitative composition of planktic foraminifer assemblages in conjunction with other proxies to constrain estimates of sea-surface temperature (SST) and to identify major oceanographic boundaries and water masses. Raw census data are made available as soon as possible after analysis through a series of reports that provide the basic data for future work. In this report we present raw census data (table 1) for planktic foraminifer assemblages in 25 samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 847C. Ocean Drilling Program Hole 847C is located at 0.19?N., 95.32?W., in 3334.3 meters of water (fig. 1). A variety of statistical methods have been developed to transform foraminiferal census data in Pliocene sequences into quantitative estimates of Pliocene SST. Details of statistical techniques, taxonomic groupings, and oceanographic interpretations are presented in more formal publications (Dowsett and Poore, 1990, 1991; Dowsett, 1991, 2007; Dowsett and Robinson, 1998, 2007; Dowsett and others, 1996, 1999).

  5. The Auto-Gopher Deep Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface penetration by coring, drilling or abrading is of great importance for a large number of space and earth applications. An Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) has been in development at JPL's Nondestructive Evaluation and Advanced Actuators (NDEAA) lab as an adaptable tool for many of these applications. The USDC uses a novel drive mechanism to transform the high frequency ultrasonic or sonic vibrations of the tip of a horn into a lower frequency sonic hammering of a drill bit through an intermediate free-flying mass. The USDC device idea has been implemented at various scales from handheld drills to large diameter coring devices. A series of computer programs that model the function and performance of the USDC device were developed and were later integrated into an automated modeling package. The USDC has also evolved from a purely hammering drill to a rotary hammer drill as the design requirements increased form small diameter shallow drilling to large diameter deep coring. A synthesis of the Auto-Gopher development is presented in this paper.

  6. A Model of the Chicxulub Impact Basin Based on Evaluation of Geophysical Data, Well Logs, and Drill Core Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, Virgil L.; Marin, Luis E.; Carney, John D.; Lee, Scott; Ryder, Graham; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Sikora, Paul; Spudis, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    Abundant evidence now shows that the buried Chicxulub structure in northern Yucatan, Mexico, is indeed the intensely sought-after source of the ejecta found world-wide at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. In addition to large-scale concentric patterns in gravity and magnetic data over the structure, recent analyses of drill-core samples reveal a lithological assemblage similar to that observed at other terrestrial craters. This assemblage comprises suevite breccias, ejecta deposit breccias (Bunte Breccia equivalents), fine-grained impact melt rocks, and melt-matrix breccias. All these impact-produced lithologies contain diagnostic evidence of shock metamorphism, including planar deformation features in quartz, feldspar, and zircons; diaplectic glasses of quartz and feldspar; and fused mineral melts and whole-rock melts. In addition, elevated concentrations of Ir, Re, and Os, in meteoritic relative proportions, have been detected in some melt-rock samples from the center of the structure. Isotopic analyses, magnetization of melt-rock samples, and local stratigraphic constraints identify this crater as the source of K/T boundary deposits.

  7. Drilling, processing and first results for Mount Johns ice core in West Antarctica Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Schwanck

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: An ice core, 92.26 m in length, was collected near the ice divide of the West Antarctica ice sheet during the 2008/2009 austral summer. This paper described the fieldwork at the Mount Johns site (79º55'S; 94º23'W and presented the first results of the upper 45.00 m record covering approximately 125 years (1883 - 2008, dated by annual layer counting and volcanic reference horizons. Trace element concentrations in 2,137 samples were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The concentrations obtained for Al, Ba, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Sr and Ti are controlled by climate variations, the transport distance, and the natural sources of these aerosols. Natural dust contributions, mainly derived from the arid areas of Patagonia and Australia, are important sources for aluminum, barium, iron, manganese and titanium. Marine aerosols from sea ice and transported by air masses are important sources of sodium and magnesium. Calcium, potassium and strontium showed considerable inputs of both continental dust and marine aerosols.

  8. Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  9. Newberry exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1997-11-01

    During July--November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 feet exploratory slimhole (3.895 inch diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  10. Stratigraphy of the Hawai'i Scientific Drilling Project core (HSDP2): Anatomy of a Hawaiian shield volcano

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Michael O.; Haskins, Eric H.; Stolper, Edward M.; Baker, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Hawai'i Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP2) successfully drilled ∼3.1 km into the island of Hawai'i. Drilling started on Mauna Loa volcano, drilling 247 m of subaerial lavas before encountering 832 m of subaerial Mauna Kea lavas, followed by 2019 m of submarine Mauna Kea volcanic and sedimentary units. The 2.85 km stratigraphic record of Mauna Kea volcano spans back to ∼650 ka. Mauna Kea subaerial lavas have high average olivine contents (13 vol.%) and low average vesicle abundances (10 v...

  11. Application of SJ75 Wire-line Coring Drilling Tools in Western Henan Coalfield Drilling%SJ75绳索取心钻具在豫西地区煤田钻探中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆拴喜

    2015-01-01

    豫西地区岩层倾角大,岩石软硬互层较多,特别是金斗山砂岩、平顶山砂岩,可钻性级别高,裂隙发育,地层破碎,掉块、漏水,钻孔易斜,造成孔内事故增多甚至钻孔报废,钻探施工效率低。针对该区地层特点,采用SJ75绳索取心钻具进行钻探施工,首先,对其配套设备进行了改进,将4135G型柴油机皮带轮由Φ350 mm加大至Φ396mm,以提高立轴的转速;在立根箱里面垫上了一层厚30 mm左右的木板,木板上面又垫了一层厚15 mm的橡胶皮,以有效地保护丝扣。其次,在钻进过程中,先后对平底、齿形、复合片钻头进行试验。试验表明,齿形钻头是比较适合该地区绳索取心钻进的金刚石钻头。再次,结合绳索也取心对钻井液的要求,应用非分散低固相、无固相和堵漏低固相钻井液对不同地层进行钻进。各种措施的采取,很好地解决了钻进中遇到的问题,减少了孔内事故,提高了钻孔质量。%The strata in western Henan have characteristics of large dip angle, frequent alternating soft and hard beds, especially the Jindoushan sandstone and Pingdingshan sandstone have higher drillability level with developed fissures, fragmentation of rock, easy to off the blocks, current loss and deviation, thus caused increasing of drilling accidents even to discard, low drilling efficiency. In allu⁃sion to strata characteristics in the area, the SJ75 wire-line coring drilling tools have been used. Firstly, improved associated facilities, enlarged 4135G diesel engine belt pulley fromΦ350mm toΦ396mm to increase vertical shaft rotation rate;a layer of wood board about 30mm thick filled up on the pipe rack, than a 15mm thick layer of rubber on wood board to protect screw thread effectively. Secondly, during the drilling process, has tested the flat bottom, jagged and PDC bits successively. The test has shown that the jagged diamond bit is rather

  12. 极地冰层取心钻进超低温钻井液理论与试验研究%Theoretical and Experimental Research on the Ultra-low Temperature Drilling Fluids for the Polar Ice Coring Drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩俊杰; 韩丽丽; 徐会文; 于达慧; 曹品鲁; Pavel・ Tatalay

    2013-01-01

      南极冰层取心钻进的关键之一是钻井液的耐温能力。根据南极冰层钻进的特点及对钻井液的特殊要求,在综合分析国内外冰层钻进钻井液应用经验的基础上,对有机硅、氟代烃、一元脂肪酸酯及二元脂肪酸酯进行了理论上的分析研究,测试了各自在不同温度条件下的粘度和密度,分析了粘度与密度变化的机理。确定出分子间相互作用中无氢键形成的物质的粘温系数最小,脂肪酸酯的粘温系数受到分子间氢键的数量影响最大,指出了介质密度的增加是由于体积收缩所致,与介质的分子结构与形态无关。所得到的结论对于极地冰层取心钻进钻井液的选择与确定具有重要的理论与实际意义。%  The low temperature resistance of drilling fluid is one of the keys for core drilling in Antarctica ice sheet.Ac-cording to the characteristics of ice core drilling and the special requirements for drilling fluids in Antarctic, based on the comprehensive analysis on the application experience of ice drilling fluids both in China and abroad, theoretical study was made on organosilicon, fluohydrocarbon, aliphatic monocarboxylic acid ester and aliphatic dibasic acid ester, their viscosity and density were tested under different temperatures and the mechanism of changes in viscosity and density were also ana-lyzed.The result indicates that the hydrogen bond strongly influences the viscosity temperature coefficient of the fatty acid ester, and the lowest viscosity temperature coefficient of drilling fluid could be obtained if there is no hydrogen bond forma-tion.Besides, the increase of the density mainly depends on the shrinking volume of the drilling fluid;the chemical struc-ture and morphology have nothing to do with the change of density.These results have theoretical and practical significance for the selection and optimization of the ultra-low temperature drilling fluid system for ice

  13. 饱71 mm 绳索取心铝合金钻杆的研制%Development of ?71mm Aluminum Alloy Wire-line Coring Drill Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张喜超

    2015-01-01

    The paper introduces the development situation of aluminum alloy drill pipe both in China and abroad and analy-zes the advantages of aluminum alloy wire-line coring drill pipe in geological drilling.?71mm ×5.5mm aluminum alloy co-ring drill pipe body and steel connection structure were designed in detail, the main technical parameters were obtained by the static tension and torque tests on the rods.%介绍了国内外铝合金钻杆的研制现状,分析了绳索取心铝合金钻杆在地质钻探中的优势。对饱71 mm ×5.5 mm绳索取心铝合金钻杆体与钢接头连接结构进行了详细设计。通过对试验钻杆进行静拉力、扭矩试验,得出了铝合金钻杆体与钢接头主要技术参数。

  14. 30 CFR 250.456 - What safe practices must the drilling fluid program follow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling... and pull drill pipe and downhole tools at controlled rates so you do not swab or surge the well; (e... operations. You must maintain this equipment throughout the drilling of the well; (h) Before pulling...

  15. Description of Tessaracoccus profundi sp.nov., a deep-subsurface actinobacterium isolated from a Chesapeake impact crater drill core (940 m depth)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Cockell, C.S.; Voytek, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated CB31T, was isolated from a 940 m depth sample of a drilling core obtained from the Chesapeake meteor impact crater. The strain was isolated aerobically on R2A medium agar plates supplemented with NaCl (20 g l-1) and MgCl2·6H2O (3 g l-1). The colonies were...

  16. Drill Core Mineral Analysis by Means of the Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer HySpex, XRD and Asd in Proximity of the MÝTINA Maar, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerting, F.; Rogass, C.; Kaempf, H.; Lubitz, C.; Harms, U.; Schudack, M.; Kokaly, R.; Mielke, C.; Boesche, N.; Altenberger, U.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is increasingly used for surface mapping. Therefore different expert systems are being utilized to identify surface cover materials. Those expert systems mainly rely on the spectral comparison between unknown and library spectra, but their performances were only limited qualified. This study aims on the comparative analysis of drill core samples from the recently discovered maar system in the Czech Republic. Drill core samples from the surrounding area of the Mýtina maar were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and the hyperspectral spectrometer HySpex. Additionally, soil samples were measured in-situ by the ASD FieldSpec4 and in the laboratory by the HySpex VNIR/SWIR spectrometer system. The data was then analyzed by the MICA-algorithm and the results were compared to the results of the XRD -analysis. The XRD-analysis served here as validation basis. The results of the hyperspectral and the XRD analyses were used to densify a volcanic map that also integrates in-situ soil measurements in the surrounding area of Mýtina. The comparison of the XRD- and solaroptical remote sensing results showed a good correlation of qualified minerals if the soil organic carbon content was significantly low. Contrary to XRD, smectites and muscovites were also straightforward identified that underlines the overall performance of the approach to identify minerals. Basically, in this work an operable approach is proposed that enables the fast, repeatable and detailed analysis of drill cores, drill core samples and soil samples and, hence, provides a higher performance than state-of-the-art XRD-analyses.

  17. Archive of Core and Site/Hole Data and Photographs from the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) operated the D/V GLOMAR CHALLENGER from 1968-1983, drilling 1,112 holes at 624 sites worldwide. The DSDP was funded by the US...

  18. The top of the Olduvai subchron in a high-resolution magnetostratigraphy from the West Turkana core WTK13, Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sier, Mark; Langereis, Cor; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Feibel, Craig; Jordeens, Jose; van der Lubbe, Jeroen; Beck, Catherine; Olago, Daniel; Cohen, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding the evolution of our own species is identifying the role climate change has played in the evolution of earlier hominin species. To clarify the influence of climate, we need long and continuous high-resolution paleoclimate records, preferably obtained from hominin-bearing sediments, that are well-dated by tephro- and magnetostratigraphy and other methods. This is hindered, however, by the fact that fossil-bearing sediments are often discontinuous, and subject to weathering, which may lead to oxidation and remagnetization. To obtain fresh, unweathered sediments, the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) collected a 216- meter core (WTK13) in 2013 from deposits of Early Pleistocene paleolake Lorenyang in the western Turkana Basin (Kenya). Here, we present the magnetostratigraphy of the core. Rock magnetic analyses reveal the presence of iron sulphides carrying the remanent magnetizations. To recover polarity orientation from the near-equatorial WTK13 core drilled at 5°N, we developed and successfully applied two independent drill-core reorientation methods taking advantage of (1) the sedimentary fabric as expressed in the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) and (2) the occurrence of a viscous component oriented in the present day field. The reoriented directions reveal a normal to reversed polarity reversal identified as the top of the Olduvai subchron. From this excellent record, we find no evidence for the 'Vrica subchron' previously reported in the area. We suggest that outcrop-based interpretations supporting the presence of the Vrica subchron have been affected by the oxidation of iron sulphides initially present in the sediments as evident in the core record, and by subsequent remagnetization. Based on our new high-resolution magnetostratigraphy and stratigraphic markers, we provide constraints for an initial age model of the WTK13 core. We discuss the implications of the observed geomagnetic

  19. Distributed Memory Programming on Many-Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Jost; Dieterle, Mischa; Lobachev, Oleg;

    2009-01-01

    Eden is a parallel extension of the lazy functional language Haskell providing dynamic process creation and automatic data exchange. As a Haskell extension, Eden takes a high-level approach to parallel programming and thereby simplifies parallel program development. The current implementation is ...

  20. Subduction and thrust emplacement of the Lower Seve Nappe in the Scandinavian Caledonides: a pressure profile along the COSC-1 drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Johanna; Klonowska, Iwona; Majka, Jarosław; Lorenz, Henning; Kośmińska, Karolina; Korhonen, Sofia

    2017-04-01

    Determining the pressure and temperature history of continental crustal rocks is crucial for our understanding of mountain building processes. For that purpose, a deeply eroded, major Paleozoic mountain belt was drilled in 2014 by the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC)-1 scientific drilling project. A continuous c. 2.4 km long drill core through the high grade metamorphic Lower Seve Nappe of the Middle Allochthon was retrieved. The Seve Nappe is considered to have been still hot when emplaced and, thus, the COSC-1 profile provides a unique opportunity to relate the pressure and temperature conditions of this critical allochthon to observed structures that formed during emplacement at mid-crustal depth. COSC research does not only provide insights into the development of orogens in the Paleozoic but gives important clues about mountain building processes that operate in modern orogens, like the Himalayas, at unreachable depth. Our goal is to construct a complete pressure profile along the COSC-1 drill core using quartz-in-garnet (QuiG) Raman based barometry, an innovative in situ method based on Raman-band shift of quartz inclusions preserved in garnet. For the complementary analysis of temperatures, the TitaniQ (titanium in quartz thermometry) coupled with quartz fabric analysis will be employed. The drill core comprises a diversity of calc-silicates, mica schists and gneisses that record different degrees of deformation. Where the lithology does not allow the use of QuiG (i.e. lack of garnet and/or garnet with quartz inclusions), conventional barometry based on Si content in phengite is used. At the time of abstract submission, preliminary results indicate a pressure range between 5-11 kbar, calculated with an assumed temperature in the range of 450-550°C, which is based on mineral assemblages observed in the studied samples. Our preliminary results do not show a clear trend along the drill core, which might be the result of tectonic

  1. Rescuing the Cahoon Mine drill cores: Opportunities for modern mapping of the ca. 1.7 Ga Freedom Formation in southern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, V.; Stewart, E.

    2016-12-01

    Rock cores collected during historic mineral exploration can provide invaluable data for modern analyses, but only if the samples are properly curated. The Cahoon Mine operated in Baraboo, WI during the 1910's and produced iron ore from the ca. 1.7 Ga Freedom Formation. The Freedom Formation is part of the well-known Baraboo-interval stratigraphy and is only present in the subsurface of Wisconsin (Weidman, 1904). Seventeen exploratory drill cores were rescued by Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) from the original drying house at the mine site. The condition of the containers endangered the stratigraphic context of the collection; identifiers and depth markings were often obscured or lost. The individual core pieces were coated in residue and dust. Most of what is known about the Freedom Formation is from core logs and master's theses from the early 1900's (Leith, 1935; Schmidt, 1951). Ongoing subsurface mapping of the Baraboo-interval sediments and underlying basement of southern Wisconsin integrates new and existing subsurface and regional geophysical datasets. Mapping involves calibrating unique signals in regional aeromagnetic data to known lithology from drill core and cuttings. The Freedom Formation is especially important in this process as its iron-rich composition and regional continuity causes it to have a somewhat unique signal in regional aeromagnetic data. The Cahoon Mine cores in the WGNHS repository are the most extensive collection of physical samples from the Freedom Formation still in existence. We are in the process of curating the cores to facilitate their use in ongoing bedrock mapping. Today the cost and logistics of extensive sampling of this unit makes the existing core collection irreplaceable. We transferred the material to new containers, digitally recorded metadata, and created archival labels. As a result of this effort, the Cahoon Mine cores are now stored in a format that is physically and digitally accessible.

  2. Anthropogenic-enhanced erosion following the Neolithic Revolution in the Southern Levant: Records from the Dead Sea deep drilling core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Waldmann, Nicolas; Nadel, Dani; Marco, Shmuel

    2017-04-01

    In addition to tectonics and climatic changes, humans have exerted a significant impact on surface erosion over timescales ranging from years to centuries. However, such kind of impact over millennial timescales remains unsubstantiated. The Dead Sea drainage basin offers a rare combination of well-documented substantial climate change, intense tectonics and abundant archaeological evidence for past human activity in the Southern Levant. It serves as a natural laboratory for understanding how sedimentation rates in a deep basin are related to climate change, tectonics, and anthropogenic impacts on the landscape. Here we show how basin-wide erosion rates are recorded by thicknesses of rhythmic detritus laminae and clastic sediment accumulation rates in a long core retrieved by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project in the Dead Sea depocenter. During the last 11.5 kyr the average detrital accumulation rate is 3-4 times that during the last two glacial cycles (MIS 7c-2), and the average thickness of detritus laminae in the last 11.6 kyr is 4.5 times that between 21.7 and 11.6 ka, implying an increased erosion rate on the surrounding slopes during the Holocene. We estimate that this intensified erosion is incompatible with tectonic and climatic regimes during the corresponding time interval and further propose a close association with the Neolithic Revolution in the Levant (beginning at 11.5 ka). We thus suggest that human impact on the landscape was the primary driver causing the intensified erosion and that the Dead Sea sedimentary record serves as a reliable recorder of this impact since the Neolithic Revolution.

  3. Summary of micrographic analysis of fracture coating phases on drill cores from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The flow path between Pahute Mesa and the groundwater discharge area in Oasis Valley (approximately 18 miles to the southwest) is of concern due to the relatively short travel distance between a recharge area where underground nuclear testing has been conducted and the off-site water users. Groundwater flow and transport modeling by IT Corporation (IT) has shown rapid tritium transport in the volcanic rock aquifers along this flow path. The resultant estimates of rapid transport were based on water level data, limited hydraulic conductivity data, estimates of groundwater discharge rates in Oasis Valley, assumed porosities, and estimated retardation rates. Many of these parameters are poorly constrained and may vary considerably. Sampling and analytical techniques are being applied as an independent means to determine transport rates by providing an understanding of the geochemical processes that control solute movement along the flow path. As part of these geochemical investigations, this report summarizes the analysis of fracture coating mineral phases from drill core samples from the Pahute mesa area of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Archived samples were collected based on the presence of natural fractures and on the types and abundance of secondary mineral phases present on those fracture surfaces. Mineral phases present along fracture surfaces are significant because, through the process of water-rock interaction, they can either contribute (as a result of dissolution) or remove (as a result of precipitation or adsorption) constituents from solution. Particular attention was paid to secondary calcite occurrences because they represent a potential source of exchangeable carbon and can interact with groundwater resulting in a modified isotopic signature and apparent water age.

  4. On reconfigurable tiled multi-core programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovers, Kenneth C.; Burgwal, van de Marcel D.; Kuper, Jan; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Smit, Gerard J.M.

    2009-01-01

    For a generic flexible efficient array antenna receiver platform a hierarchical reconfigurable tiled architecture has been proposed. The architecture provides a flexible reconfigurable solution, but partitioning, mapping, modelling and programming such systems remains an issue. A semantic model has

  5. Miocene Antarctic ice dynamics in the Ross Embayment (Western Ross Sea, Antarctica): Insights from provenance analyses of sedimentary clasts in the AND-2A drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornamusini, Gianluca; Talarico, Franco M.

    2016-11-01

    A detailed study of gravel-size sedimentary clasts in the ANDRILL-2A (AND-2A) drill core reveals distinct changes in provenance and allows reconstructions to be produced of the paleo ice flow in the McMurdo Sound region (Ross Sea) from the Early Miocene to the Holocene. The sedimentary clasts in AND-2A are divided into seven distinct petrofacies. A comparison of these with potential source rocks from the Transantarctic Mountains and the coastal Southern Victoria Land suggests that the majority of the sedimentary clasts were derived from formations within the Devonian-Triassic Beacon Supergroup. The siliciclastic-carbonate petrofacies are similar to the fossiliferous erratics found in the Quaternary Moraine in the southern McMurdo Sound and were probably sourced from Eocene strata that are currently hidden beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. Intraformational clasts were almost certainly reworked from diamictite and mudstone sequences that were originally deposited proximal to the drill site. The distribution of sedimentary gravel clasts in AND-2A suggests that sedimentary sequences in the drill core were deposited under two main glacial scenarios: 1) a highly dynamic ice sheet that did not extend beyond the coastal margin and produced abundant debris-rich icebergs from outlet glaciers in the central Transantarctic Mountains and South Victoria Land; 2) and an ice sheet that extended well beyond the coastal margin and periodically advanced across the Ross Embayment. Glacial scenario 1 dominated the early to mid-Miocene (between ca. 1000 and 225 mbsf in AND-2A) and scenario 2 the early Miocene (between ca. 1138 and 1000 mbsf) and late Neogene to Holocene (above ca. 225 mbsf). This study augments previous research on the clast provenance and highlights the added value that sedimentary clasts offer in terms of reconstructing past glacial conditions from Antarctic drill core records.

  6. Evolution of fluid-rock interaction in the Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland: Evidence from Iceland Deep Drilling Project core RN-17B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Schiffman, Peter; Marks, Naomi; Friðleifsson, Guðmundur Ómar

    2015-09-01

    We describe the lithology and present spatially resolved geochemical analyses of samples from the hydrothermally altered Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) drill core RN-17B. The 9.3 m long RN-17B core was collected from the seawater-dominated Reykjanes geothermal system, located on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. The nature of fluids and the location of the Reykjanes geothermal system make it a useful analog for seafloor hydrothermal processes, although there are important differences. The recovery of drill core from the Reykjanes geothermal system, as opposed to drill cuttings, has provided the opportunity to investigate evolving geothermal conditions by utilizing in-situ geochemical techniques in the context of observed paragenetic and spatial relationships of alteration minerals. The RN-17B core was returned from a vertical depth of ~ 2560 m and an in-situ temperature of ~ 345 °C. The primary lithologies are basaltic in composition and include hyaloclastite breccia, fine-grained volcanic sandstone, lithic breccia, and crystalline basalt. Primary igneous phases have been entirely pseudomorphed by calcic plagioclase + magnesium hornblende + chlorite + titanite + albitized plagioclase + vein epidote and sulfides. Despite the extensive hydrothermal metasomatism, original textures including hyaloclastite glass shards, lithic clasts, chilled margins, and shell-fragment molds are superbly preserved. Multi-collector LA-ICP-MS strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) measurements of vein epidote from the core are consistent with seawater as the dominant recharge fluid. Epidote-hosted fluid inclusion homogenization temperature and freezing point depression measurements suggest that the RN-17B core records cooling through the two-phase boundary for seawater over time to current in-situ measured temperatures. Electron microprobe analyses of hydrothermal hornblende and hydrothermal plagioclase confirm that while alteration is of amphibolite-grade, it is in disequilibrium

  7. Age and compositional data of zircon from sepiolite drilling mud to identify contamination of ocean drilling samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Graham D. M.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Busby, Cathy J.; Brown, Sarah R.; Blum, Peter; Harvey, Janet. C.

    2016-08-01

    Zircon extracted from drilled oceanic rocks is increasingly used to answer geologic questions related to igneous and sedimentary sequences. Recent zircon studies using samples obtained from marine drill cores revealed that drilling muds used in the coring process may contaminate the samples. The JOIDES Resolution Science Operator of the International Ocean Discovery Program has been using two types of clays, sepiolite and attapulgite, which both have salt water viscosifier properties able to create a gel-like slurry that carries drill cuttings out of the holes several hundred meters deep. The dominantly used drilling mud is sepiolite originating from southwestern Nevada, USA. This sepiolite contains abundant zircon crystals with U-Pb ages ranging from 1.89 to 2889 Ma and continental trace element, δ18O, and ɛHf isotopic compositions. A dominant population of 11-16 Ma zircons in sepiolite drilling mud makes identification of contamination in drilled Neogene successions particularly challenging. Interpretation of zircon analyses related to ocean drilling should be cautious of zircon ages in violation of independently constrained age models and that have age populations overlapping those in the sepiolite. Because individual geochronologic and geochemical characteristics lack absolute discriminatory power, it is recommended to comprehensively analyze all dated zircon crystals from cores exposed to drill mud for trace element, δ18O, and ɛHf isotopic compositions. Zircon analyzed in situ (i.e., in petrographic sections) are assumed to be trustworthy.

  8. Study on Particular Coring Bit for Lunar Soil Drilling%月球钻探取心特种钻头研制与试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大佛; 雷艳; 许少宁

    2013-01-01

      对月壤形成过程和物质组成进行了介绍,并将实际月壤基本物理力学指标与CUG-1型模拟月壤和普通干砂进行对比,认为在月球钻探取样过程中可能遇到具有一定胶结强度的硬质团块。为保证钻探取样顺利进行,需要研制月球钻探用特种取心PDC钻头。基于PDC钻头的碎岩机理,对钻头的负前角、旁通角、出露高度、钻头保径和PDC切削齿的钎焊工艺分别进行了设计,并对钻杆和钻头装配体在钻进过程中的受力过程进行有限元分析。最后,采用所设计的特种取心PDC钻头进行岩石干钻试验,试验结果表明,该钻头能钻进可钻性级别小于或等于6级的岩石,能满足月球钻探需要。%Forming process and composition of lunar soil were introduced in this paper, and the actual lunar soil physical and mechanical indexes were compared with and simulated CUG-1 lunar soil and normal dry sand, it was suggested that hard clods with certain cementing strength might be encountered in lunar coring drilling.To ensure the successful lunar co-ring drilling, a special polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) coring bit should be developed.Based on the breaking rock mechanism of PDC bit, the negative rake angle, bypass angle, exposure height, gauge protection of PDC bit and brazing technologies of PDC cutters were designed respectively;and finite element analysis was made on the force of bit and drill stem assembly during drilling process.At last, the dry drilling test was made by special designed PDC bit, it indicated that the bit would be effective when rock drillability was less than or equal toⅥ, and it could stratify the requirements for lunar soil drilling.

  9. Results of the second phase of the drought-disaster test-drilling program near Morristown, N. J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchioli, John; Nichols, William D.; Nemickas, Bronius

    1967-01-01

    The continued drought in northeastern New Jersey through the summer of 1966 with its attendant water-supply problems resulted in an extension of the drought-disaster test-drilling program originally requested by the Office of Emergency Planning on August 30, 1965. Authorization to continue test drilling was fiven by the Office of Emergency Planning on September 26, 1966, with the stipulation that all field work be complete by January 31, 1977. Contractural costs were paid by the Office of Emergency Planning, whereas personnel costs were shared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Jersey Department of Conservation and Economic Development, Division of Water Policy and Supply.

  10. Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip J; Mannava, Sandeep; Seyler, Thorsten M; Plate, Johannes F; Van Sikes, Charles; Stitzel, Joel D; Lang, Jason E

    2016-10-26

    Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (pcore decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

  11. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  12. Melt layer statistic of two firn cores recently drilled at Dye3 and South dome in the dry snow zone of Southern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Johannes; Kipfstsuhl, Sepp; Hoerz, Sebastian; Eling, Lukas; Vinther, Bo; Popp, Trevor

    2014-05-01

    In the last couple of years remote sensing data have shown large areas of wet snow in the Southern part of the Greenland ice sheet. These melt features are attributed to the overall warming trend. Persistent warming implies changes in the firn layer as well. Even in areas of the dry snow zone one can observe sporadically a few ice lenses within the firn column indicating refrozen meltwater from warm events in the past. In our contribution we want to close the gap between investigations of firn cores drilled in the 70's and the observational record of remote sensing data over the last decade in South Greenland. The focus lies on firn of the dry snow zone which is sensitive against changes in a warming atmosphere and cold enough to prevent a longway percolation path of meltwater to several firn layers. To this end we had drilled two 45m-long firn cores at the former drilling sites of DYE3 (65°11'N, 43°49'W) and South Dome (SD) (63°32'N, 44°34'W) during a aircraft-supported field campaign 2012. The retrieved 3inch-firn core segments of 1m length are measured by a X-ray-scanning routine with the means of the core-scale AWI-ICE-CT. The 2d-density fields are calculated and allow to distinguish between refreezing meltwater and compacted firn. The depth-scales are converted to time-scales by using DEP (dielectric profiling) and (in case of DYE3) discrete sampled d18O measurements. Number density of melt layers and relative amount of melt show an synchronized behavior with an general increase over the last 30 years. Local maxima are observed in both sites at around 6-9m and 25m at DYE3 and 5-8m, 22m and 40m at SD.

  13. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  14. Core stability training: applications to sports conditioning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, fitness practitioners have increasingly recommended core stability exercises in sports conditioning programs. Greater core stability may benefit sports performance by providing a foundation for greater force production in the upper and lower extremities. Traditional resistance exercises have been modified to emphasize core stability. Such modifications have included performing exercises on unstable rather than stable surfaces, performing exercises while standing rather than seated, performing exercises with free weights rather than machines, and performing exercises unilaterally rather than bilaterally. Despite the popularity of core stability training, relatively little scientific research has been conducted to demonstrate the benefits for healthy athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to critically examine core stability training and other issues related to this topic to determine useful applications for sports conditioning programs. Based on the current literature, prescription of core stability exercises should vary based on the phase of training and the health status of the athlete. During preseason and in-season mesocycles, free weight exercises performed while standing on a stable surface are recommended for increases in core strength and power. Free weight exercises performed in this manner are specific to the core stability requirements of sports-related skills due to moderate levels of instability and high levels of force production. Conversely, during postseason and off-season mesocycles, Swiss ball exercises involving isometric muscle actions, small loads, and long tension times are recommended for increases in core endurance. Furthermore, balance board and stability disc exercises, performed in conjunction with plyometric exercises, are recommended to improve proprioceptive and reactive capabilities, which may reduce the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  15. Element/Calcium ratios in middle Eocene samples of Oridorsalis umbonatus from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Dawber

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Culturing studies and empirical-based calibrations suggest that elemental ratios in benthic foraminifera can be used as proxies to reconstruct past variations in bottom water temperature and saturation state (Δ[CO32−]. However the mechanism(s linking elemental ratios to Δ[CO32−] are poorly constrained. We present middle Eocene records of Oridorsalis umbonatus Li/Ca, B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1209. We apply calibrations developed from core top samples to estimate middle Eocene variations in intermediate water Δ[CO32−]. The fidelity of bottom water Δ[CO32−] reconstructions based on single element ratios are assessed by comparing the X/Ca-based reconstructions to each other and to carbon cycle proxy records (benthic foraminifera δ13C, organic carbon content, foraminifera dissolution indices, and a seawater δ18O reconstruction for Site 1209. Discrepancies in the reconstructed Δ[CO32−] values for the middle Eocene based on these different metal ratios suggests that there are still gaps in our understanding of the parameters influencing X/Ca. The downcore record of O. umbonatus Mg/Ca does not exhibit any similarities with the Li/Ca, B/Ca and Sr/Ca records, suggesting that bottom water Δ[CO32−] is not the dominant influence on Mg/Ca ratios for this species. This hypothesis is supported by the coefficients of multiple linear regression models on new and published Mg/Ca data.

  16. Fugitive methane leak detection using mid-infrared hollow-core photonic crystal fiber containing ultrafast laser drilled side-holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jason; Challener, William; Kasten, Matthias; Choudhury, Niloy; Palit, Sabarni; Pickrell, Gary; Homa, Daniel; Floyd, Adam; Cheng, Yujie; Yu, Fei; Knight, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    The increase in domestic natural gas production has brought attention to the environmental impacts of persistent gas leakages. The desire to identify fugitive gas emission, specifically for methane, presents new sensing challenges within the production and distribution supply chain. A spectroscopic gas sensing solution would ideally combine a long optical path length for high sensitivity and distributed detection over large areas. Specialty micro-structured fiber with a hollow core can exhibit a relatively low attenuation at mid-infrared wavelengths where methane has strong absorption lines. Methane diffusion into the hollow core is enabled by machining side-holes along the fiber length through ultrafast laser drilling methods. The complete system provides hundreds of meters of optical path for routing along well pads and pipelines while being interrogated by a single laser and detector. This work will present transmission and methane detection capabilities of mid-infrared photonic crystal fibers. Side-hole drilling techniques for methane diffusion will be highlighted as a means to convert hollow-core fibers into applicable gas sensors.

  17. Tectonics and geology of spreading ridge subduction at the Chile Triple Junction: a synthesis of results from Leg 141 of the Ocean Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, J.H.; Lewis, S.D.; Cande, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    An active oceanic spreading ridge is being subducted beneath the South American continent at the Chile Triple Junction. This process has played a major part in the evolution of most of the continental margins that border the Pacific Ocean basin. A combination of high resolution swath bathymetric maps, seismic reflection profiles and drillhole and core data from five sites drilled during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 141 provide important data that define the tectonic, structural and stratigraphic effects of this modern example of spreading ridge subduction. A change from subduction accretion to subduction erosion occurs along-strike of the South American forearc. This change is prominently expressed by normal faulting, forearc subsidence, oversteepening of topographic slopes and intensive sedimentary mass wasting, overprinted on older signatures of sediment accretion, overthrusting and uplift processes in the forearc. Data from drill sites north of the triple junction (Sites 859-861) show that after an important phase of forearc building in the early to late Pliocene, subduction accretion had ceased in the late Pliocene. Since that time sediment on the downgoing oceanic Nazca plate has been subducted. Site 863 was drilled into the forearc in the immediate vicinity of the triple junction above the subducted spreading ridge axis. Here, thick and intensely folded and faulted trench slope sediments of Pleistocene age are currently involved in the frontal deformation of the forearc. Early faults with thrust and reverse kinematics are overprinted by later normal faults. The Chile Triple Junction is also the site of apparent ophiolite emplacement into the South American forearc. Drilling at Site 862 on the Taitao Ridge revealed an offshore volcanic sequence of Plio-Pleistocene age associated with the Taitao Fracture Zone, adjacent to exposures of the Pliocene-aged Taitao ophiolite onshore. Despite the large-scale loss of material from the forearc at the triple junction

  18. Integration of Deep Biosphere Research into the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Kallmeyer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An international workshop on the Integration of Deep Biosphere Research into the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP was held on 27–29 September 2009 in Potsdam. It was organized by the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centrefor Geosciences and the University of Potsdam (Germany. Financial support was provided by ICDP. This workshop brought together the expertise of thirty-three microbiologists, biogeochemists, and geologists from seven countries (Finland, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Sweden, U.K., U.S.A.. Over the last two decades, microbiological and biogeochemical investigations have demonstrated the occurrence of microbial life widely disseminated within the deep subsurface of the Earth (Fredrickson and Onstott, 1996; Parkes et al., 2000; Pedersen, 2000; Sherwood Lollar et al., 2006. Considering the large subsurface pore space available as a life habitat, it has been estimated that the biomass of the so-called deep biosphere might be equal to or even larger than that of the surface biosphere (Whitman et al., 1998.

  19. Mid-Pliocene Planktic Foraminifer Census Data from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1237C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Rocio; Dowsett, Harry

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a long-term study of mid-Pliocene climatic and oceanographic conditions. One of the key elements of the study involves the use of quantitative composition of planktic foraminifer assemblages in conjunction with other proxies to constrain estimates of sea-surface temperature (SST) and to identify major oceanographic boundaries and water masses. Raw census data are made available as soon as possible after analysis through a series of reports that provide the basic data for future work. In this report we present raw census data (table 1) for planktic foraminifer assemblages in 19 samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1237C. ODP Hole 1237C is located on the Peruvian margin at 16? 0.4216'S., 76? 22.6854'W., in 3211.9 meters of water (fig. 1). A variety of statistical methods have been developed to transform foraminiferal census data in Pliocene sequences into quantitative estimates of Pliocene SST. Details of statistical techniques, taxonomic groupings, and oceanographic interpretations are presented in more formal publications (Dowsett and Poore, 1990, 1991; Dowsett, 1991, 2007; Dowsett and Robinson, 1998, 2007; Dowsett and others, 1996, 1999).

  20. The accurate location of the injection- induced microearthquakes in German Continental Deep Drilling Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂毅敏; 陈运泰

    2002-01-01

    From August 21, 2000 to October 20, 2000,a fluid injection-induced seismicity experiment has been carried out in the KTB (German Continental Deep Drilling Program). The KTB seismic network recorded more than 2 700 events. Among them 237 events were of high signal-to-noise ratio, and were processed and accurately located. When the events were located, non KTB events were weeded out by Wadati(s method. The standard deviation, mean and median were obtained by Jackknife's technique, and finally the events were accurately located by Geiger(s method so that the mean error is about 0.1 km. No earthquakes with focal depth greater than 9.3 km, which is nearly at the bottom of the hole, were detected. One of the explanation is that at such depths the stress levels may not close to the rock(s frictional strength so that failure could not be induced by the relatively small perturbation in pore pressure. Or at these depths there may be no permeable, well-oriented faults. This depth may be in close proximity to the bottom of the hole to the brittle-ductile transition, even in this relatively stable interior of the interaplate. This phenomenon is explained by the experimental results and geothermal data from the superdeep borehole.

  1. The accurate location of the injection-induced microearthquakes in German Continental Deep Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yi-Min; Chen, Yun-Tai

    2002-11-01

    From August 21, 2000 to October 20, 2000 a fluid injection-induced seismicity experiment has been carried out in the KTB (German Continental Deep Drilling Program). The KTB seismic network recorded more than 2 700 events. Among them 237 events were of high signal-to-noise ratio, and were processed and accurately located. When the events were located, non KTB events were weeded out by Wadati’s method. The standard deviation, mean and median were obtained by Jackknife’s technique, and finally the events were accurately located by Geiger’s method so that the mean error is about 0.1 km. No earthquakes with focal depth greater than 9.3 km, which is nearly at the bottom of the hole, were detected. One of the explanation is that at such depths the stress levels may not close to the rock’s frictional strength so that failure could not be induced by the relatively small perturbation in pore pressure. Or at these depths there may be no permeable, well-oriented faults. This depth may be in close proximity to the bottom of the hole to the brittle-ductile transition, even in this relatively stable interior of the interaplate. This phenomenon is explained by the experimental results and geothermal data from the superdeep borehole.

  2. Palaeo-earthquake events during the late Early Palaeozoic in the central Tarim Basin (NW China: evidence from deep drilling cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Bizhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Various millimetre-, centimetre- and metre-scale soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS have been identified in the Upper Ordovician and Lower-Middle Silurian from deep drilling cores in the Tarim Basin (NW China. These structures include liquefied-sand veins, liquefaction-induced breccias, boudinage-like structures, load and diapir- or flame-like structures, dish and mixed-layer structures, hydroplastic convolutions and seismic unconformities. The deformed layers are intercalated by undeformed layers of varying thicknesses that are petrologically and sedimentologically similar to the deformed layers.

  3. Resource-agnostic programming for many-core microgrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A.M. Bernard; C. Grelck; M.A. Hicks; C.R. Jesshope; R. Poss

    2010-01-01

    Many-core architectures are a commercial reality, but programming them efficiently is still a challenge, especially if the mix is heterogeneous. Here granularity must be addressed, i.e. when to make use of concurrency resources and when not to. We have designed a data-driven, fine-grained concurrent

  4. Drilling comparison in "warm ice" and drill design comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, L.; Motoyama, H.; Wilhelms, F.

    2007-01-01

    at each site, the drilling rate dropped and the drilling teams had to deal with refrozen ice on cutters and drill heads. Drills have different limits and perform differently. In this comparative study, we examine depth, pressure, temperature, pump flow and cutting speed. Finally, we compare a few......For the deep ice-core drilling community, the 2005/06 Antarctic season was an exciting and fruitful one. In three different Antarctic locations, Dome Fuji, EPICA DML and Vostok, deep drillings approached bedrock (the ice-water interface in the case of Vostok), emulating what had previously been...... achieved at NorthGRIP, Greenland, (summer 2003 and 2004) and at EPICA Dome C2, Antarctica (season 2004/05). For the first time in ice-core drilling history, three different types of drill (KEMS, JARE and EPICA) simultaneously reached the depth of 'warm ice' under high pressure. After excellent progress...

  5. Polar organic compounds in pore waters of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Eyreville core hole: Character of the dissolved organic carbon and comparison with drilling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Sanford, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Pore waters from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure cores recovered at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, were analyzed to characterize the dissolved organic carbon. After squeezing or centrifuging, a small volume of pore water, 100 ??L, was taken for analysis by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Porewater samples were analyzed directly without filtration or fractionation, in positive and negative mode, for polar organic compounds. Spectra in both modes were dominated by low-molecular-weight ions. Negative mode had clusters of ions differing by -60 daltons, possibly due to increasing concentrations of inorganic salts. The numberaverage molecular weight and weight-average molecular weight values for the pore waters from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure are higher than those reported for other aquatic sources of natural dissolved organic carbon as determined by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. In order to address the question of whether drilling mud fluids may have contaminated the pore waters during sample collection, spectra from the pore waters were compared to spectra from drilling mud fluids. Ions indicative of drilling mud fluids were not found in spectra from the pore waters, indicating there was no detectable contamination, and highlighting the usefulness of this analytical technique for detecting potential contamination during sample collection. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  6. Environmental health research recommendations from the Inter-Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Working Group on unconventional natural gas drilling operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Trevor M; Breysse, Patrick N; Gray, Kathleen; Howarth, Marilyn; Yan, Beizhan

    2014-11-01

    Unconventional natural gas drilling operations (UNGDO) (which include hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling) supply an energy source that is potentially cleaner than liquid or solid fossil fuels and may provide a route to energy independence. However, significant concerns have arisen due to the lack of research on the public health impact of UNGDO. Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHSCCs), funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), formed a working group to review the literature on the potential public health impact of UNGDO and to make recommendations for needed research. The Inter-EHSCC Working Group concluded that a potential for water and air pollution exists that might endanger public health, and that the social fabric of communities could be impacted by the rapid emergence of drilling operations. The working group recommends research to inform how potential risks could be mitigated. Research on exposure and health outcomes related to UNGDO is urgently needed, and community engagement is essential in the design of such studies.

  7. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  8. Interpretation of core and well log physical property data from drill hole UPH-3, Stephenson County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Olhoeft, Gary R.; Scott, James H.

    1983-09-01

    Laboratory and well log physical property measurements show variations in the mineralogy with depth in UPH-3. Gamma ray values generally decrease with depth in the drill hole, corresponding to a decrease in the felsic mineral components of the granite. Correspondingly, an increase with depth in mafic minerals in the granite is indicated by the magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray measurements. These mineralogic changes indicated by the geophysical well logs support the hypothesis of fractionation during continuous crystalization of the intrusive penetrated by UPH-3. Two fracture zones and an altered zone within the granite penetrated by drill hole UPH-3 are defined by the physical property measurements. An abnormally low magnetic susceptibility response in the upper portion of the drill hole can be attributed to alteration of the rock adjacent to the sediments overlying the granite. Fracture zones can be identified from the sonic velocity, neutron, and resistivity measurements. A fracture zone, characterized by low resistivity values and low neutron values, is present in the depth interval from 1150 to 1320 m. Low magnetic susceptibility and high gamma ray values indicate the presence of felsic-micaceous pegmatites within this fracture zone. An unfractured region present from a depth of 1380 m to the bottom of the hole is characterized by an absence of physical property variations. The magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray measurements indicate a change in the amount of mafic minerals at the base of this otherwise homogenous region of the drilled interval. Abrupt changes and repeated patterns of physical properties within the drill hole may represent interruptions in the crystalization process of the melt or they may be indicative of critical temperatures for specific mineral assemblages within the intrusive.

  9. Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  10. Overview of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Hu, S.; Liu, T.; Fan, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling Project (WFSD) is one of the projects of the National Science and Technology Supporting Program. It aims to drill five boreholes along the May 12, 2008 Wenchuan earthquake zone in Sichuan province, China, more specifically along the Beichuan-Yingxiu fault belt and the Anxian-Guanxian fault belt, at the front of Longmenshan Range (with depths of 500 m, 1200 m, 2000 m and 3000 m). The sub-surface data will allow scientists to better understand the mechanism of the Wenchuan earthquake through scientific drilling. Long-term earthquake observation stations will be set up and the earthquake detection instruments will be installed in the boreholes to provide the critical and basic data for earthquake monitoring, forecasting and warning. At present, two boreholes have been completed, two more are being drilled, and the 3000 m-deep hole should be drilled in 2011. The drilling technical scheme has been conceived according to the Longmenshan fault zone's formation condition , which is highly fractured and the fault gouge very thick because of the repeated earthquakes. Based on the technical and economical evaluation on the existing coring methods, we have selected the top-drive and wireline coring method as the main drilling and coring method of the project. We have developed an hydraulic top-drive deep drill rig and a set of large diameter wireline coring tool. The drill rig has an electro-hydraulic proportional control, is easy to operate, and has a long feeding stroke. It can be used in coring, back and forth reaming. Its depth capacity is 3000 m for the 150 mm final diameter. We have used split barrel coring technology to solve the problem of coring in fractured formation. The core barrel is 4.5 m-long and the core diameter ranges from 85 to 100 mm. Over 92% core recovery is achieved with the cores being in good original state. Some extreme technical difficulties, such as hole gushing water, fractured formation, borehole

  11. Compositional variation within thick (>10 m) flow units of Mauna Kea Volcano cored by the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shichun; Vollinger, Michael J.; Frey, Frederick A.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Zhang, Qun

    2016-07-01

    Geochemical analyses of stratigraphic sequences of lava flows are necessary to understand how a volcano works. Typically one sample from each lava flow is collected and studied with the assumption that this sample is representative of the flow composition. This assumption may not be valid. The thickness of flows ranges from 100 m. Geochemical heterogeneity in thin flows may be created by interaction with the surficial environment whereas magmatic processes occurring during emplacement may create geochemical heterogeneities in thick flows. The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) cored ∼3.3 km of basalt erupted at Mauna Kea Volcano. In order to determine geochemical heterogeneities in a flow, multiple samples from four thick (9.3-98.4 m) HSDP flow units were analyzed for major and trace elements. We found that major element abundances in three submarine flow units are controlled by the varying proportion of olivine, the primary phenocryst phase in these samples. Post-magmatic alteration of a subaerial flow led to loss of SiO2, CaO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5, and as a consequence, contents of immobile elements, such as Fe2O3 and Al2O3, increase. The mobility of SiO2 is important because Mauma Kea shield lavas divide into two groups that differ in SiO2 content. Post-magmatic mobility of SiO2 adds complexity to determining if these groups reflect differences in source or process. The most mobile elements during post-magmatic subaerial and submarine alteration are K and Rb, and Ba, Sr and U were also mobile, but their abundances are not highly correlated with K and Rb. The Ba/Th ratio has been used to document an important role for a plagioclase-rich source component for basalt from the Galapagos, Iceland and Hawaii. Although Ba/Th is anomalously high in Hawaiian basalt, variation in Ba abundance within a single flow shows that it is not a reliable indicator of a deep source component. In contrast, ratios involving elements that are typically immobile, such as La/Nb, La

  12. Testing the ureilite projectile hypothesis for the El'gygytgyn impact: Determination of siderophile element abundances and Os isotope ratios in ICDP drill core samples and melt rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderis, S.; Wittmann, A.; Zaiss, J.; Elburg, M.; Ravizza, G.; Vanhaecke, F.; Deutsch, A.; Claeys, P.

    2013-07-01

    The geochemical nature of the impactites from International Continental Scientific Drilling Project—El'gygytgyn lake drill core 1C is compared with that of impact melt rock fragments collected near the western rim of the structure and literature data. Concentrations of major and trace elements, with special focus on siderophile metals Cr, Co, Ni, and the platinum group elements, and isotope ratios of osmium (Os), were determined to test the hypothesis of an ureilite impactor at El'gygytgyn. Least squares mixing calculations suggest that the upper volcanic succession of rhyolites, dacites, and andesites were the main contributors to the polymict impact breccias. Additions of 2-13.5 vol% of basaltic inclusions recovered from drill core intervals between 391.6 and 423.0 mblf can almost entirely account for the compositional differences observed for the bottom of a reworked fallout deposit at 318.9 mblf, a polymict impact breccia at 471.4 mblf, and three impact melt rock fragments. However, the measured Os isotope ratios and slightly elevated PGE content (up to 0.262 ng g-1 Ir) of certain impactite samples, for which the CI-normalized logarithmic PGE signature displays a relatively flat (i.e., chondritic) pattern, can only be explained by the incorporation of a small meteoritic contribution. This component is also required to explain the exceptionally high siderophile element contents and corresponding Ni/Cr, Ni/Co, and Cr/Co ratios of impact glass spherules and spherule fragments that were recovered from the reworked fallout deposits and from terrace outcrops of the Enmyvaam River approximately 10 km southeast of the crater center. Mixing calculations support the presence of approximately 0.05 wt% and 0.50-18 wt% of ordinary chondrite (possibly type-LL) in several impactites and in the glassy spherules, respectively. The heterogeneous distribution of the meteoritic component provides clues for emplacement mechanisms of the various impactite units.

  13. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  14. Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project. Chew Bahir, southern Ethiopia: How to get from three tonnes of sediment core to > 500 ka of continuous climate history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Verena; Asrat, Asfawossen; Cohen, Andrew S.; Gromig, Raphael; Günter, Christina; Junginger, Annett; Lamb, Henry F.; Schaebitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin H.

    2016-04-01

    In search of the environmental context of the evolution and dispersal of Homo sapiens and our close relatives within and beyond the African continent, the ICDP-funded Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) has recently cored five fluvio-lacustrine archives of climate change in East Africa. The sediment cores collected in Ethiopia and Kenya are expected to provide valuable insights into East African environmental variability during the last ~3.5 Ma. The tectonically-bound Chew Bahir basin in the southern Ethiopian rift is one of the five sites within HSPDP, located in close proximity to the Lower Omo River valley, the site of the oldest known fossils of anatomically modern humans. In late 2014, the two cores (279 and 266 m long respectively, HSPDP-CHB14-2A and 2B) were recovered, summing up to nearly three tonnes of mostly calcareous clays and silts. Deciphering an environmental record from multiple records, from the source region of modern humans could eventually allow us to reconstruct the pronounced variations of moisture availability during the transition into Middle Stone Age, and its implications for the origin and dispersal of Homo sapiens. Here we present the first results of our analysis of the Chew Bahir cores. Following the HSPDP protocols, the two parallel Chew Bahir sediment cores have been merged into one single, 280 m long and nearly continuous (>90%) composite core on the basis of a high resolution MSCL data set (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, gamma ray density, color intensity transects, core photographs). Based on the obvious cyclicities in the MSCL, correlated with orbital cycles, the time interval covered by our sediment archive of climate change is inferred to span the last 500-600 kyrs. Combining our first results from the long cores with the results from the accomplished pre-study of short cores taken in 2009/10 along a NW-SE transect across the basin (Foerster et al., 2012, Trauth et al., 2015), we have developed a hypothesis

  15. Oskarshamn site investigation. Hydrogeochemical monitoring programme for core and percussion drilled boreholes 2009. Summary of ground water chemistry results from spring and autumn sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regander, Claes; Bergman, Bo (Sweco Environment AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    This report summarises the results obtained in 2009 from the hydrogeochemical monitoring programme for core and percussion drilled boreholes. During 2009 groundwater sampling has been performed in monitored (permanently installed) boreholes in two sampling periods, spring (May-June), and autumn (October-November). Both in spring and autumn groundwater sampling was carried out in the following 12 sections; HLX28:2, HLX35:2, HLX37:1, HLX39:1, KLX08:4, KLX10:2, KLX10:5, KLX12A:2, KLX15A:3, KLX15A:6, KLX18A:3, KLX19A:3. The programme started in 2005 and since then water sampling has been performed twice every year. The objective of the hydrogeochemical monitoring programme is to determine the groundwater composition in selected sections chosen for this purpose. In 2009 the sampling of core drilled borehole sections has been conducted in time series, where each borehole section has been sampled at seven occasions. Percussion drilled borehole sections has been sampled at three occasions. The final sample in each section was taken when the electric conductivity had reached a stable level. Obtained results from the activities presented here include groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 5 including options and SKB chemistry reduced class 5. SKB chemistry reduced class 5 includes analysis of pH, electric conductivity, alkalinity, density, drill water (uranine), major cations (Chapter 5.4), F-, Br-, Cl-, SO{sub 4}2-, Fe(II)/Fe(tot), HS-, DOC, TOC and the isotopes delta2H, delta18O and 3H. Options for SKB chemistry class 5 include even lanthanoids and other trace elements, As, In, I, environmental metals, NH{sub 4}+, nutrient salts and the isotopes delta34S, delta37Cl, 87Sr/86Sr, 10B/11B, delta13C, 226Ra, 222Rn, 238U, 234U, 230Th and 232Th. All data from the activity are stored in the SICADA database

  16. Climatic Seesaws Across The North Pacific As Revealed By High-Mountain Ice Cores Drilled At Kamchatka And Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, T.; Goto-Azuma, K.; Kanamori, S.; Matoba, S.; Benson, C. S.; Muravyev, Y. D.; Salamatin, A. N.

    2004-12-01

    We drilled ca. 210-m deep ice cores at Mt. Ushkovsky (Kamchatka: 1998), King Col of Mt. Logan (2002) and Mt. Wrangell (2004). Thanks to the high accumulation rates up to 2 m per year in these mountains, the ice cores are expected to unveil the climate and atmospheric changes in the northern North Pacific during the last several centuries. The reconstructed annual accumulation rates time-series of Mt. Ushkovsky showed, for example, decadal to interdecadal oscillations which were closely correlated to the Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDO). Comparison between the reconstructed accumulation rates between the Ushkovsky and our two ice cores from Wrangell-St. Elias mountains suggests that the PDO played an important role in determining the precipitation at both side of the northern North Pacific: positive PDO supplied high precipitation in the Pacific North America and the negative PDO did high in Kamchatka during the last two centuries. Beside the significance of the climate proxy signals, the physical properties of the ice cores and the related glaciological features at the three mountains provided unique feature of glaciers developing on high mountains with complicated topographies and high accumulation rates. It was shown that careful treatment of dynamic behavior in these high mountain glaciers are indispensable for the precise reconstruction of past accumulation time-series.

  17. Contribution of Borehole Digital Imagery in Core-Log-Seismic Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Pezard

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP and the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP use many new technologies to increase the quality of core data. A problem with drilling deep oceanic or continental crust, as well as shallow fractured rock or karstic formations, is that core recovery can be low, and much of the recovered material often consists of small, disrupted core pieces that are frequently biased toward particular types of rocks (lithologies. Even when core recovery is high (in the case of sedimentary formation, recovered cores are not always oriented;as a result, detailed structural and paleomagnetic studies are impaired.

  18. 国外深海底岩芯取样钻机设计参数及其应用效果%The Design Parameters and Application of Foreign Deep-seabed Coring drills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭芸; 夏建新; 任华堂

    2015-01-01

    深海底蕴藏着大量的矿产资源,海底资源的开发有助于缓解全球性资源匮乏的局面。深海岩芯取样钻机是进行深海底矿产资源勘探、地质调查等不可缺少的重大技术装备。总结了国外已开发深海底岩芯取样钻机的主要设计参数及特点,分析了国外不同钻机的实际应用效果以及发展趋势。研究发现,国外已经先后开发了多台深海底岩芯取样钻机,部分已经应用于深海钻孔取芯,但均存在不同程度的技术问题;经过曲折的研发历程,钻机的钻具以及钻进方法均得到优化,但仍存在取芯率不稳定且普遍偏低等问题。探究国外钻机设计技术及开发经验,以期为我国深海钻机的研发和改进提供参考。%There are a large number of mineral resources hidden in the sea-floor, and the development of seabed re-sources is helpful for easing the situation of global resource scarcity. The deep-seabed coring drills are major technical equip-ment for resource exploration,geological survey in seafloor et al. The designed parameters and features of foreign deep-sea co-ring drills were summarized;The result of actual application and the development trend of foreign Coring drills were analyzed. From the study,many foreign countries have developed sets of deep-seabed Coring drills,and some of them have been used in sea-floor core drilling,but exist some kinds of technical issues. The drill tool and drilling method have been optimized undergo-ing a hard time,but there are still some problems that coring rate is not stable and generally low. In order to provide powerful reference for developing and improving the deep-sea coring drills of China,it is necessary to research design technology and de-velopment experience of foreign drills.

  19. Mineralogy and Origin of Sediments From Drill Holes on the Continental Margin Off Florida, 1965-1969 (NODC Accession 7100714)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drill cores obtained during the Joint Oceanographic Institutions' Deep Earth Sampling Program from the continental shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake...

  20. Drilling axial deviation mechanism and its control program for large-diameter blasthole rock-drilling%大直径深孔凿岩钻孔偏斜的机理及其控制方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴万荣; 魏建华; 张永顺; 杨襄璧

    2001-01-01

    According to the analysis of the affecting f actor and mechanics per formance for drilling axial deviation, the mechanical model was set up for the dr ill bit under offset load, thus the drilling axial deviation mechanism in the pr ocess of rock-drilling was revealed, the feeding force control program was proposed for controlling drilling axial deviation. The experiment results show that the control program can make the feeding force of the propulsion chang e automatically with the rods weight and rock properties. So the drilling axial deviation can be effectively controlled.%通过对钻孔偏斜的影响因素及力学特征的分析, 建立了钻头偏载的力学模型, 从而揭 示了凿岩过程钻孔偏斜的机理, 提出了控制钻孔偏斜的推进力控制方案。 试验结果表明, 该控 制方案能够随钻孔过程中孔内钻杆质量的变化及孔内因素的变化, 自动改变推进器的推进 力, 从而有效地控制钻孔偏斜。

  1. Paleomagnetic chronology and paleoenvironmental records from drill cores from the Hetao Basin and their implications for the formation of the Hobq Desert and the Yellow River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baofeng; Sun, Donghuai; Xu, Weihong; Wang, Fei; Liang, Baiqing; Ma, Zhiwei; Wang, Xin; Li, Zaijun; Chen, Fahu

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the Cenozoic environmental history of Hetao Basin, in the northern part of the Ordos Plateau in North China, is important not only for revealing the evolution of the Yellow River, but also for understanding the formation of the Hobq Desert. Here we present the stratigraphic framework of drill core DR01 with length of 2503.18 m, and the results of magnetostratigraphic and ESR dating and multi-proxy analyses of drill core WEDP05 with length of 274.60 m, from the Hetao Basin. The magnetostratigraphic and ESR results indicate that core WEDP05 spans the last ∼1.68 Ma. Stratigraphic sequence of core DR01 indicates that the Hetao area was uplifted and eroded during the early Cenozoic, before subsiding to form a sedimentary basin. Subsequently, the basin was a fluvio-lacustrine environment during the Pliocene and then experienced alternating desert and fluvio-lacustrine conditions during the Quaternary. Sedimentary facies and multi environmental-proxy analyses of core WEDP05 indicate that the basin was occupied by a fluvio-lacustrine system during the following intervals: ∼1.47 - ∼1.30 Ma, ∼1.17 - ∼1.07 Ma, ∼0.68 - ∼0.60 Ma and from ∼0.47 Ma to the last interglacial; and that a desert environment developed during the lake regression phases of ∼1.30 - ∼1.17 Ma, ∼1.07 - ∼0.68 Ma and ∼0.60 - ∼0.47 Ma. The presence of aeolian sand at the base of core WEDP05 suggests that the origin of the Hobq Desert can be traced back to the early Pleistocene, and resulted from the erosion and transportation of exposed fluvio-lacustrine sediments by near-surface winds associated with the Asian winter monsoon. A large river channel in the Hetao Basin may have existed as early as the Pliocene, which was occupied by the Yellow River when its upper reaches formed by at least ∼1.6 Ma. Subsequently, at least since ∼1.2 Ma, the Yellow River formed its drainage system around the Hetao Basin and controlled the paleoenvironment evolution of the basin.

  2. Outreach, Diversity, and Education Supported by NSF Facilities LacCore and the Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO), University of Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrbo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Climatic and environmental change are a powerful hook to engage students and the public with geoscience. Recent lake sediments often feature visual and compositional evidence of anthropogenic changes, which can pique curiosity and serve as a gateway for interest in more remote past changes. Cores provide an integrative, place-based geoscience education/outreach platform: lake dynamics incorporate principles of chemistry, physics, and biology; lake basin formation and sedimentary signals trace back to numerous geoscience subdisciplines. Lakes reflect local changes, and so are inherently place-based and relevant to both rural and urban populations. The esthetics of lakes in the landscape and sediments under the microscope spark the artistic sensibilities of those who do not consider themselves scientists: lakes are readymade for STEAM education. LacCore has exploited the magic of lake sediment cores in its 15 years as an NSF Facility, and now expands to additional environments as the NSF Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office. Part of scaling up is the formalization of major support for the Broader Impacts (BI) activities of Facility users. LacCore/CSDCO now musters its collaborative experiences in site REUs and other undergrad research projects, in-depth training of students, teachers, and faculty, a long list of informal education experiences, and common-good software development, to provide assistance to researchers seeking meaningful broader impacts and educators seeking extra- or co-curricular field and laboratory research experiences for their students. Outreach, diversity, and education support includes dissemination of best practices, as well as coordination, administration, and basic capacity for such activities in collaboration with project PIs and students, through no-cost support, or collaborative proposals or supplements from NSF where necessary for project scale. Community-driven research and broadening participation are central to the

  3. Site investigation SFR. Rock type coding, overview geological mapping and identification of rock units and possible deformation zones in drill cores from the construction of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersson, Jesper (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Curtis, Philip; Bockgaard, Niclas (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Mattsson, Haakan (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report presents the rock type coding, overview lithological mapping and identification of rock units and possible deformation zones in drill cores from 32 boreholes associated with the construction of SFR. This work can be seen as complementary to single-hole interpretations of other older SFR boreholes earlier reported in /Petersson and Andersson 2010/: KFR04, KFR08, KFR09, KFR13, KFR35, KFR36, KFR54, KFR55, KFR7A, KFR7B and KFR7C. Due to deficiencies in the available material, the necessary activities have deviated somewhat from the established methodologies used during the recent Forsmark site investigations for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of the current work has been, wherever possible, to allow the incorporation of all relevant material from older boreholes in the ongoing SFR geological modelling work in spite of the deficiencies. The activities include: - Rock type coding of the original geological mapping according to the nomenclature used during the preceding Forsmark site investigation. As part of the Forsmark site investigation such rock type coding has already been performed on most of the old SFR boreholes if the original geological mapping results were available. This earlier work has been complemented by rock type coding on two further boreholes: KFR01 and KFR02. - Lithological overview mapping, including documentation of (1) rock types, (2) ductile and brittle-ductile deformation and (3) alteration for drill cores from eleven of the boreholes for which no original geological borehole mapping was available (KFR31, KFR32, KFR34, KFR37,KFR38, KFR51, KFR69, KFR70, KFR71, KFR72 and KFR89). - Identification of possible deformation zones and merging of similar rock types into rock units. This follows SKB's established criteria and methodology of the geological Single-hole interpretation (SHI) process wherever possible. Deviations from the standard SHI process are associated with the lack of data, for example BIPS images

  4. Discussion on the Application of Oil Drilling Automation Core Technology%谈石油钻井自动化核心技术的运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘源

    2012-01-01

    石油开采是我国能源供应的主要行业之一,通过对自然资源的充分挖掘利用有助于缓解国内能源危机.钻井是地下石油资源开采利用的有效方式,能够以最简化的生产工艺提高油井产量,与早期传统的生产模式相比,我国石油钻井过程在技术运用上有了很大的改善,多项自动化技术为石油企业提供了可靠的技术保障.鉴于此,本文阐述了传统石油钻井的不足,并提出先进自动化核心技术的运用情况.%Oil production is one of the major industries of China's energy supply, taking full use of natural resources will help to easing the domestic energy crisis. Drilling is an effective way of exploitation and usage of underground petroleum resources, and it can improve oil well production rate with the most simplified production process. Compared to early traditional mode of production, it has been greatly improved for China's oil drilling in the use of technology, many automation technology provide a reliable technical support for the oil companies. In view of this, the article gives the shortage of traditional oil drilling, and provides the condition of application of advanced automated core technologies.

  5. Drilling successful from ROV Ventana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakes, Debra S.; McFarlane, James A. R.; Holloway, G. Leon; Greene, H. Gary

    Cores of granite and deformed sediment from the walls of Monterey Canyon were successfully recovered from December 30 to 31, 1992, by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Ventana using a small-diameter, double-barrel drill with a diamond bit. This HSTR (Holloway-Stakes-Tengdin-Rajcula) drill was developed to drill cores horizontally from sulfide/sulfate walls of active black smokers. The drill was first successfully used by the submersible Alvin in October 1991 to drill into massive sulfide chimneys, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Eos, June 30, 1992, p. 273), and it was subsequently used with equal success on the chalcopyrite-rich chimneys from 21°N and 9°N on the East Pacific Rise. The recent December dives, however, marked the first time that drilling has ever been attempted from the smaller ROV and the first time coring into the harder igneous rock substrate has been attempted.

  6. Facility for testing ice drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Delahunty, Chris; Goodge, John W.; Severinghaus, Jeffery P.

    2017-05-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) is designed for subsurface scientific investigations in Antarctica. Its objectives are to drill rapidly through ice, to core samples of the transition zone and bedrock, and to leave behind a borehole observatory. These objectives required the engineering and fabrication of an entirely new drilling system that included a modified mining-style coring rig, a unique fluid circulation system, a rod skid, a power unit, and a workshop with areas for the storage of supplies and consumables. An important milestone in fabrication of the RAID was the construction of a North American Test (NAT) facility where we were able to test drilling and fluid processing functions in an environment that is as close as possible to that expected in Antarctica. Our criteria for site selection was that the area should be cold during the winter months, be located in an area of low heat flow, and be at relatively high elevation. We selected a site for the facility near Bear Lake, Utah, USA. The general design of the NAT well (NAT-1) started with a 27.3 cm (10.75 in.) outer casing cemented in a 152 m deep hole. Within that casing, we hung a 14 cm (5.5 in.) casing string, and, within that casing, a column of ice was formed. The annulus between the 14 and 27.3 cm casings provided the path for circulation of a refrigerant. After in-depth study, we chose to use liquid CO2 to cool the hole. In order to minimize the likelihood of the casing splitting due to the volume increase associated with freezing water, the hole was first cooled and then ice was formed in increments from the bottom upward. First, ice cubes were placed in the inner liner and then water was added. Using this method, a column of ice was incrementally prepared for drilling tests. The drilling tests successfully demonstrated the functioning of the RAID system. Reproducing such a facility for testing of other ice drilling systems could be advantageous to other research programs in the future.

  7. Quantitative discrimination between oil and water in drilled bore cores via fast-neutron resonance transmission radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Vartsky, D; Dangendorf, V; Israelashvili, I; Mor, I; Bar, D; Tittelmeier, K; Weierganz, M; Breskin, A

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on Fast Neutron Resonance Transmission Radiography is proposed for non-destructive, quantitative determination of the weight percentages of oil and water in cores taken from subterranean or underwater geological formations. The ability of the method to distinguish water from oil stems from the unambiguously-specific energy dependence of the neutron cross-sections for the principal elemental constituents. Monte-Carlo simulations and initial results of experimental investigations indicate that the technique may provide a rapid, accurate and non-destructive method for quantitative evaluation of core fluids in thick intact cores, including those of tight shales for which the use of conventional core analytical approaches appears to be questionable.

  8. 10Be content in clasts from fallout suevitic breccia in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana: Clues to preimpact target distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Rocks from drill cores LB-07A (crater fill) and LB-08A (central uplift) into the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana, were analyzed for the presence of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which target rocks of various depths were mixed during the formation of the crater-filling breccia, and also to detect meteoric water infiltration within the impactite layer. 10Be abundances above background were found in two (out of 24) samples from the LB-07A core, and in none of five samples from the LB-08A core. After excluding other possible explanations for an elevated 10Be signal, we conclude that it is most probably due to a preimpact origin of those clasts from target rocks close to the surface. Our results suggest that in-crater breccias were well mixed during the impact cratering process. In addition, the lack of a 10Be signal within the rocks located very close to the lake sediment-impactite boundary suggests that infiltration of meteoric water below the postimpact crater floor was limited. This may suggest that the infiltration of the meteoric water within the crater takes place not through the aerial pore-space, but rather through a localized system of fractures.

  9. Paleo-environment of cold-water coral initiation in the NE Atlantic:Implications from a deep-water carbonate mound drilling core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, W.-Chr.,; Margreht, S.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding of the paleo-environment during initiation and early development of deep-water carbonate mounds in the NE Atlantic is still under debate. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307 sailed in 2005 to the Porcupine Seabight in order to investigate for the first time sediments from the base of a giant carbonate mound (Challenger Mound, 155 m). These results indicate that the initiation and start-up phase of this carbonate mound coincides with the beginning of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) at around 2.6 Ma (Kano et al. 2007). Further carbonate mound development seems to be strongly dependent on rapid changes in paleo-oceanographic and climatic conditions around the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary, especially characterized and caused by intermediate water masses. To characterise the paleo-environmental and paleo-ecological setting favourable for the initial coral colonization at 2.6 Ma, we use well-developed proxies such as δ18O and δ13C of planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) and of a collection of benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, Discanomalina coronata, Cibicides lobatulus, Lobatulua antarctica, Planulina ariminensis), benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as grain size analysis. These proxies indicate variability in seawater temperature, salinity and density of intermediate water masses from southern origin (Mediterranean, Bay of Biscay) supporting cold-water coral settlement and initial development in the Porcupine Seabight. References: Kano et al. (2007) Age constraints on the origin and growth history of a deep-water coral mound in the northeast Atlantic drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. Geology, 35(11):1051-1054.

  10. Production of sulfur gases and carbon dioxide by synthetic weathering of crushed drill cores from the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit near Casa Grande, Pinal County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, M.E.; Ryder, J.L.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of ground drill cores from the southern part of the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit, Casa Grande, Arizona, were oxidized in simulated weathering experiments. The samples were also separated into various mineral fractions and analyzed for contents of metals and sulfide minerals. The principal sulfide mineral present was pyrite. Gases produced in the weathering experiments were measured by gas chromatography. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and carbon disulfide were found in the gases; no hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides, or mercaptans were detected. Oxygen concentration was very important for production of the volatiles measured; in general, oxygen concentration was more important to gas production than were metallic element content, sulfide mineral content, or mineral fraction (oxide or sulfide) of the sample. The various volatile species also appeared to be interactive; some of the volatiles measured may have been formed through gas reactions. ?? 1990.

  11. Automated Classification and Correlation of Drill Cores using High-Resolution Hyperspectral Images and Supervised Pattern Classification Algorithms. Applications to Paleoseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, D. E.; Minster, B.; Rockwell, T.; Jasso, H.

    2006-12-01

    The standard methodology to describe, classify and correlate geologic materials in the field or lab rely on physical inspection of samples, sometimes with the assistance of conventional analytical techniques (e. g. XRD, microscopy, particle size analysis). This is commonly both time-consuming and inherently subjective. Many geological materials share identical visible properties (e.g. fine grained materials, alteration minerals) and therefore cannot be mapped using the human eye alone. Recent investigations have shown that ground- based hyperspectral imaging provides an effective method to study and digitally store stratigraphic and structural data from cores or field exposures. Neural networks and Naive Bayesian classifiers supply a variety of well-established techniques towards pattern recognition, especially for data examples with high- dimensionality input-outputs. In this poster, we present a new methodology for automatic mapping of sedimentary stratigraphy in the lab (drill cores, samples) or the field (outcrops, exposures) using short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral images and these two supervised classification algorithms. High-spatial/spectral resolution data from large sediment samples (drill cores) from a paleoseismic excavation site were collected using a portable hyperspectral scanner with 245 continuous channels measured across the 960 to 2404 nm spectral range. The data were corrected for geometric and radiometric distortions and pre-processed to obtain reflectance at each pixel of the images. We built an example set using hundreds of reflectance spectra collected from the sediment core images. The examples were grouped into eight classes corresponding to materials found in the samples. We constructed two additional example sets by computing the 2-norm normalization, the derivative of the smoothed original reflectance examples. Each example set was divided into four subsets: training, training test, verification and validation. A multi

  12. Contamination Control for Scientific Drilling Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmeyer, J

    2017-01-01

    Drilling is an integral part of subsurface exploration. Because almost all drilling operations require the use of a drill fluid, contamination by infiltration of drill fluid into the recovered core material cannot be avoided. Because it is impossible to maintain sterile conditions during drilling the drill fluid will contain surface microbes and other contaminants. As contamination cannot be avoided, it has to be tracked to identify those parts of the drill core that were not infiltrated by the drill fluid. This is done by the addition of tracer compounds. A great variety of tracers is available, and the choice depends on many factors. This review will first explain the basic principles of drilling before presenting the most common tracers and discussing their strengths and weaknesses. The final part of this review presents a number of key questions that have to be addressed in order to find the right tracer for a particular drilling operation.

  13. Program to develop improved downhole drilling motors. Semi-annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, W.C.

    1976-11-01

    Research progress is reported in two main sections: downhole drilling motor design and design of downhole motor seal, bearing, and test lubrication systems. Information on downhole drilling motor design is presented under the following subsection headings: Turbodrill development; positive displacement motor development; theory of Turbodrills; theory of positive displacement motors; basic motor components; forces on thrust bearings; thrust bearing design; radial bearing design; rotary seal design; sealed lubrication system; lubricants; and project status. The appendix contains information on high temperature lubricants. Information on the design of downhole motor seal, bearing, and test lubrication systems is presented under the following subsection headings: seal, bearing, and lubrication test design criteria; basic test conditions; independent and dependent variable parameters; alternative concepts for seal test apparatus; design of the seal test system; and bearing test system description. A schedule for remaining tasks is included. (JGB)

  14. An Eocene/Oligocene boundary geochemical proxy record from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1211 on the Shatsky Rise, Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, T.; Clarke, L. J.; Leng, M.

    2009-04-01

    Evidence for significant global oceanographic and climatic change at the Eocene/Oligocene Boundary (EOB) is well documented, but records from the Pacific Ocean are limited to a single location, Site 1218 (Lear et al., 2004; Coxall et al., 2005). Here we present new data from the Shatsky Rise for cores collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 198 that detail geochemical change across the boundary. During ODP Leg 198 an EOB section was recovered at Site 1211 (palaeodepth 2000-3000 m) on the southern high of the Shatsky Rise. This EOB section is a seemingly complete calcareous nannofossil ooze rich section, suggesting deposition above the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) throughout the EOB period. Deposition above the CCD should mean that changes in carbonate ion concentration, a potential control on foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios, will be reduced in comparison to existing records from ODP Site 1218 (palaeodepth ~3800 m; Lear et al., 2004). Based on data published in the ODP Leg 198 Initial and Scientific Reports, relevant Site 1211 cores were sampled across the EOB, as marked out by the last occurrence of Hantkenina spp. and a notable colour reflectance change. In the absence of a palaeomagnetic record, Sr-isotope chronostratigraphy has been used to supplement the existing biostratigraphy and facilitate the development of a more robust age model. Samples were picked for both benthonic and planktonic foraminifera, which subsequently were analysed for stable carbon- and oxygen-isotope and element/Ca (particularly Mg/Ca) ratios. These foraminiferal proxy data are supplemented by stable-isotope records from the <38 micron fine fraction, %CaCO3 and scanning X-ray florescence (Ca and Fe) data from across the EOB. The geochemical proxy data show the ubiquitous EOB positive shift in oxygen-isotope ratios synchronous with increases in %CaCO3, colour reflectance and % sand, suggesting enhanced carbonate preservation/sedimentation compared to the late Eocene. Benthonic

  15. 岩心钻机提下钻机械手的液压系统设计%Design of Hydraulics System for Hoisting and Lowering Manipulator of Core Drill Rig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊姗

    2014-01-01

    分析岩心钻机提下钻工艺,确定了机械手在提下钻工作中的任务和具体的动作顺序,设计了提下钻机械手的液压系统,对自动化、智能化岩心钻机的发展与应用具有一定的意义。%The process of core drill rig hoist and lower drill pipe was analyzed. The task and specific actions in order of manipula-tor in the hoisting and lowering process were determined. Then the hydraulics system for hoisting and lowering manipulator was de-signed. The research has certain value for development and application of automatic and intelligent core drill rig.

  16. IODP New Ventures in Exploring Scientific Targets (INVEST: Defining the New Goals of an International Drilling Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Inagaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The INVEST conference, an international meeting to define the scientific goals and required technology for a new ocean drilling program, was held at the University of Bremen on 22–25 September 2009. Based on the large attendance and vigorous engagement of scientists in the discussion of new science/technology ideas, INVEST was extremely successful. Initially 400 participants were expected, but the INVEST steering and organization committees were thrilled to see a much larger number of scientists flock to Bremen to demonstrate their support and enthusiasm for the continuation of an international scientific ocean drilling program. In all, 584 participants, including sixty-four students, from twenty-one nations and >200 institutions and agencies attended the INVEST conference. Contributions to INVEST included 103 submitted white papers that were posted on the INVEST webpage (http://www.marum.de/iodp-invest. html, and breakout discussions in fifty working groups that focused on a range of topics during the course of the conference. In addition, students and early career scientists, as well as national funding agency managers and platform providers, presented a total of eighty-six posters. Interspersed with the working group and plenary sessions were twelve keynote lectures, chosen to highlight overarching themes and new directions in research and technology.

  17. 500.000 years of environmental history in Eastern Anatolia: The PALEOVAN drilling project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litt, Thomas; Anselmetti, Flavio; Baumgarten, Henrike

    2012-01-01

    International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) drilled a complete succession of the lacustrine sediment sequence deposited during the last ~500,000 years in Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia (Turkey). Based on a detailed seismic site survey, two sites at a water depth of up to 360 m were...... drilled in summer 2010, and cores were retrieved from sub-lake-floor depths of 140 m (Northern Basin) and 220 m (Ahlat Ridge). To obtain a complete sedimentary section, the two sites were multiple-cored in order to investigate the paleoclimate history of a sensitive semi-arid region between the Black...

  18. Paleomagnetic and Magnetostratigraphic Studies in Drilling Projects of Impact Craters - Recent Studies, Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Velasco-Villarreal, M.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.

    2013-05-01

    Paleomagnetic studies have long been successfully carried out in drilling projects, to characterize the borehole columns and to investigate the subsurface structure and stratigraphy. Magnetic susceptibility logging and magnetostratigraphic studies provide data for lateral correlation, formation evaluation, azimuthal core orientation, physical properties, etc., and are part of the tools available in the ocean and continental drilling programs. The inclusion of continuous core recovery in scientific drilling projects have greatly expanded the range of potential applications of paleomagnetic and rock magnetic studies, by allowing laboratory measurements on core samples. For this presentation, we concentrate on drilling studies of impact structures and their usefulness for documenting the structure, stratigraphy and physical properties at depth. There are about 170-180 impact craters documented in the terrestrial record, which is a small number compared to what is observed in the Moon, Mars, Venus and other bodies of the solar system. Of the terrestrial impact craters, only a few have been studied by drilling. Some craters have been drilled as part of industry exploration surveys and/or academic projects, including notably the Sudbury, Ries, Vredefort, Manson and many other craters. As part of the Continental ICDP program, drilling projects have been conducted on the Chicxulub, Bosumtwi, Chesapeake and El gygytgyn craters. Drilling of terrestrial craters has proved important in documenting the shallow stratigraphy and structure, providing insight on the cratering and impact dynamics. Questions include several that can only be addressed by retrieving core samples and laboratory analyses. Paleomagnetic, rock magnetic and fabric studies have been conducted in the various craters, which are here summarized with emphasis on the Chicxulub crater and Yucatan carbonate platform. Chicxulub is buried under a kilometer of younger sediments, making drilling an essential tool. Oil

  19. Pre-breakup magmatism on the Vøring Margin: Insight from new sub-basalt imaging and results from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 642E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, M. M.; Meyer, R.; Planke, S.; Faleide, J. I.; Gernigon, L.; Frieling, J.; Sluijs, A.; Reichart, G.-J.; Zastrozhnov, D.; Theissen-Krah, S.; Said, A.; Myklebust, R.

    2016-04-01

    Improvements in sub-basalt imaging combined with petrological and geochemical observations from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 642E core provide new constraints on the initial breakup processes at the Vøring Margin. New and reprocessed high-quality seismic data allow us to identify a new seismic facies unit which we define as the Lower Series Flows. This facies unit is seismically characterized by wavy to continuous subparallel reflections with an internal disrupted and hummocky shape. Drilled lithologies, which we correlate to this facies unit, have been interpreted as subaqueous flows extruding and intruding into wet sediments. Locally, the top boundary of this facies unit is defined as a negative in polarity reflection and referred as the K-Reflection. This reflection can be correlated with the spatial extent of pyroclastic deposits, emplaced during transitional shallow marine to subaerial volcanic activities during the rift to drift transition. The drilled Lower Series Flows consist of peraluminous, cordierite bearing peperitic basaltic andesitic to dacitic flows interbedded with thick volcano-sedimentary deposits and intruded sills. The peraluminous geochemistry combined with available C (from calcite which fills vesicles and fractures), Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes data points toward upper crustal rock-mantle magma interactions with a significant contribution of organic carbon rich pelagic sedimentary material during crustal anatexis. From biostratigraphic analyses, Apectodinium augustum was found in the Lower Series Flows. This dinoflagellate cyst species is a marker for the Paleocene - Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). However, based on very high stable carbon isotope ratios of bulk organic matter we exclude that these strata represent the PETM. This implies that A. augustum was reworked into the early Eocene sediments of this facies unit. Crucially, this unit predates the breakup time of the Vøring Margin. Finally, a conceptual emplacement model for the

  20. ‘Building Core Knowledge - Reconstructing Earth History’: Transforming Undergraduate Instruction by Bringing Ocean Drilling Science on Earth History and Global Climate Change into the Classroom (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, K.; Leckie, R. M.; Jones, M. H.; Pound, K. S.; Pyle, E.; Krissek, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    This NSF-funded, Phase 1 CCLI project effectively integrates scientific ocean drilling data and research (DSDP-ODP-IODP-ANDRILL) with education. We have developed, and are currently testing, a suite of data-rich inquiry-based classroom learning materials based on sediment core archives. These materials are suitable for use in introductory geoscience courses that serve general education students, early geoscience majors, and pre-service teachers. 'Science made accessible' is the essence of this goal. Our team consists of research and education specialists from institutions ranging from R1 research to public liberal arts to community college. We address relevant and timely ‘Big Ideas’ with foundational geoscience concepts and climate change case studies, as well transferable skills valued in professional settings. The exercises are divided into separate but inter-related modules including: introduction to cores, seafloor sediments, microfossils and biostratigraphy, paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy, climate rhythms, oxygen-isotope changes in the Cenozoic, past Arctic and Antarctic climates, drill site selection, interpreting Arctic and Antarctic sediment cores, onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, onset of Antarctic glaciation, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Each module has several parts, and each is designed to be used in the classroom, laboratory, or assigned as homework. All exercises utilize authentic data. Students work with scientific uncertainty, practice quantitative and problem-solving skills, and expand their basic geologic and geographic knowledge. Students have the opportunity to work individually and in groups, evaluate real-world problems, and formulate hypotheses. Initial exercises in each module are useful to introduce a topic, gauge prior knowledge, and flag possible areas of student misconception. Comprehensive instructor guides provide essential background information, detailed answer keys, and alternative implementation

  1. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides.

  2. MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AT THE BOREHOLE OBSERVATORY ON THE COSTA RICA RIFT FLANK (OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM HOLE 896A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eNigro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbiology of subsurface, hydrothermally-influenced basaltic crust flanking mid-ocean ridges has remained understudied, due to the difficulty in accessing the subsurface environment. The instrumented boreholes resulting from scientific ocean drilling offer access to samples of the formation fluids circulating through oceanic crust. We analyzed the phylogenetic diversity of bacterial communities of fluid and microbial mat samples collected in situ from the observatory at Ocean Drilling Program Hole 896A, drilled into ~6.5-million-year-old basaltic crust on the flank of the Costa Rica Rift in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from borehole fluid and from a microbial mat coating the outer surface of the fluid port revealed both unique and shared phylotypes. The dominant bacterial clones from both samples were related to the autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing genus Thiomicrospira. Both samples yielded diverse gamma- and alphaproteobacterial phylotypes, as well as members of the Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Analysis of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO genes (cbbL and cbbM from the sampling port mat and from the borehole fluid demonstrated autotrophic carbon assimilation potential for in-situ microbial communities; most cbbL genes were related to those of the sulfur-oxidizing genera Thioalkalivibrio and Thiomicrospira, and cbbM genes were affiliated with uncultured phyloytypes from hydrothermal vent plumes and marine sediments. Several 16S rRNA gene phylotypes from the 896A observatory grouped with phylotypes recovered from seawater-exposed basalts and sulfide deposits at inactive hydrothermal vents, but there is little overlap with hydrothermally-influenced basaltic boreholes 1026B and U1301A on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, suggesting that site-specific characteristics of Hole 896A (i.e. seawater mixing into borehole fluids affect the microbial community

  3. Hyperspectral Alteration Information from Drill Cores and Deep Uranium Exploration in the Baiyanghe Uranium Deposit in the Xuemisitan Area, Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Jun Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Baiyanghe uranium deposit is a currently important medium-sized deposit in the Xuemisitan area, Xinjiang. The hydrothermal alteration in this deposit is closely related to the uranium mineralization of the deposit. In this study, hyperspectral data are collected from drill cores in the Baiyanghe uranium deposit using a FieldSpec4 visible-shortwave infrared spectrometer to study the hydrothermal alteration. The results reveal that the altered mineral assemblages have obvious zonation characteristics: (1 the upper section comprises long-wavelength illite and minor hematite and montmorillonite; (2 the middle section contains three types of illite (long-, medium- and short-wavelength illite and hematite; and (3 the lower section includes short-wavelength illite, chlorite and carbonate. Additionally, the variety in the characteristic absorption-peak wavelength of illite at 2200 nm gradually shifts to shorter wavelength and ranges between 2195 nm and 2220 nm with increasing depth, while the SWIR-IC (short-wavelength infrared illite crystallinity, a dimensionless quantity of the drill holes gradually increases from 0.2 to 2.1. These patterns reflect the hydrothermal fluid activity in the deposit, which features relatively high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal fluid in the deeper section and low-temperature, low-pressure hydrothermal fluid in the shallower section. Additionally, the uranium mineralization is located near the fracture zone, which represents the center of hydrothermal fluid activity or mineralization. This area has abundant alteration minerals, and the minerals illite (short- and medium-wavelength, hematite and fluorite can be used as uranium-prospecting indicators for uranium exploration in the deeper sections of the Baiyanghe uranium deposit.

  4. 滨海新区钻探取芯技术的改良及应用%Improvement and application of core-drilling technique in Binhai new area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐波; 牛文明; 张一飞

    2011-01-01

    阐述了滨海新区的地层结构特征,分析了该区域常规地质钻探取芯工艺的现状,指出目前普遍采用的单管干钻投球取芯法存在的问题是岩芯采取率低、原状土样扰动严重。以滨海新区某1200m超深地质钻孔施工为例,研究总结了该钻孔为提高钻探质量所进行的系列技术改良,详细分析了为提高岩芯采取率、减少土样扰动而进行的钻具异径接头、钻头及岩芯保护罩的改进,并就应用效果与常规的钻探取芯方法进行比较,分析认为这种改进使钻探取芯质量得到了有效提高,改进效果良好。%The stratigraphic characteristics and the conventional geological coring drilling technique in Binhai new area are elaborated.It is pointed out that the problem existed in the single-pipe dry drilling pitch which is commonly used is the low percentage of core recovery,which seriously disturbs the undisturbed soil samples.Taking the super deep geological drilling which is 1200m depth in Binhai new area as an example,a series of technical improvement for improving the quality of the drilling are studied and summarized.The improvement for the different diameter connector of drilling tool,the bit and the core shield is analyzed in detail,which improves the percentage of core recovery and decreases the disturbance to soil samples.The application effect of the improved technique is compared with that of the conventional core-drilling technique.It is believed that the quality of the core drilling has been effectively improved,and the technical improvement has gotten good application results.

  5. 77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear...-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling- Water Reactors.'' This... testing features of emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs). DATES...

  6. Horizontal drilling in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidey, P.; Precul, L. [Sproule Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    A review of oil and gas production in Ontario was presented with particular reference to drilling activity between 1987 to mid 2002 when 1450 vertical wells were drilled, of which 1100 were for petroleum production and the remainder were for gas storage, observation wells, private gas wells and stratigraphic tests. Of the 1100 vertical wells drilled for petroleum production, 40 per cent became gas wells, 16 per cent became oil wells, 4 per cent became oil and gas wells, and 40 per cent were dry. During the same time period, 133 horizontal wells were also drilled, mostly for petroleum. The most active operator was Talisman Energy, which drilled 101 of the 133 horizontal wells. The remainder were drilled by 12 other companies. Of the horizontal wells, 64 per cent became oil wells, 19 per cent became gas wells, and 17 per cent were dry. This presentation included graphs depicting which oil and gas pools saw vertical or horizontal drilling during the designated time period, and explained how the wells were classified. Both horizontal and vertical well targets were illustrated. Particular reference was made to Talisman Energy's Lake Erie Drilling program which revealed that horizontal wells have an initial production rate that is 5 times that expected from vertical wells. The Hillman Pool case study revealed that the initial rate of the average horizontal well is less than half that of the average vertical well. Horizontal drilling in the Lake Erie Morpeth Gas pool has also been a commercial success. This paper demonstrates that operators have maintained Ontario's oil and gas production at high levels. In 1997 widespread horizontal drilling began taking place in Ontario, and since then, approximately 30 per cent of the wells drilled in the province have been horizontal. 16 figs.

  7. Ries Bunte Breccia revisited: Indications for the presence of water in Itzing and Otting drill cores and implications for the emplacement process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrek, Alexa; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We reassessed two drill cores of the Bunte Breccia deposits of the Ries crater, Germany. The objectives of our study were the documentation of evidence for water in the Bunte Breccia, the evaluation of how that water influenced the emplacement processes, and from which preimpact water reservoir it was derived. The Bunte Breccia in both cores can be structured into a basal layer composed mainly of local substrate material, overlain by texturally and compositionally diverse, crater-derived breccia units. The basal layer is composed of the youngest sediments (Tertiary clays and Upper Jurassic limestone) and has a razor-sharp boundary to the upper breccia units, which are composed of older rocks of Upper Jurassic to Upper Triassic age. Sparse material exchange occurred between the basal layer and the rest of the Bunte Breccia. Fluids predominantly came from the Tertiary and the Upper Triassic sandstone formation. In the basal layer, Tertiary clays were subjected to intense, ductile deformation, indicating saturation with water. This suggests that water was mixed into the matrix, creating a fluidized basal layer with a strong shear localization. In the upper units, Upper Triassic sandstones are intensely deformed by granular flow. The texture requires that the rocks were disaggregated into granular sand. Vaporization of pore water probably aided fragmentation of these rocks. In the Otting core, hot suevite (T > 600 °C) covered the Bunte Breccia shortly after its emplacement. Vertically oriented gas escape pipes in suevite partly emanate directly at the contact to the Bunte Breccia. They indicate that the Bunte Breccia contained a substantial amount of water in the upper part that was vaporized and escaped through these vents.

  8. Why Drill More than One Ice Core? Paleoclimate Reconstruction along a Vertical Transect in the Saint Elias Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, C. P.; Yalcin, K.; Kreutz, K. J.; Mayewski, P. A.; Fisher, D.; Holdsworth, G.

    2004-05-01

    The Arctic represents one of the key regions on Earth in our efforts to document and understand global change. The St. Elias mountain range in the southwestern Yukon Territory has recently been the focus of an international ice core research.. The broad elevational extent of snow accumulation zones in this region (ranging from 2500 to 5300 m asl) allows for the detailed investigation of environmental change extending from the planetary boundary layer through to the free troposphere via the collection and analysis of ice cores from different elevations. Multi-parameter, high resolution glaciochemical records are currently available from the Northwest Col on Mt. Logan (5340 m asl, 103 m deep; 270 year record;) and from three cores recovered from the Eclipse Icefield (3107 m asl) in 1996 (160 m deep; 100 year record) and in 2002 (345 m and 140 m deep). Snow accumulation rates at Eclipse are about 5 times larger than the summit average of 0.30 m water equivalent. Despite their close proximity, the climate signals recorded on the summit of Mt. Logan also differ from those at Eclipse. For example, while the Mt. Logan record shows no increase in sulfate or nitrate deposition over the past 100 years, all three Eclipse cores shows a clear increase in nitrate and sulfate deposition beginning in the late 1940s due to an increase in anthropogenic emissions in Eurasia during this time period. Over the last century, the sulfate time-series from Eclipse records from 32 discrete volcanic events, primarily from Alaskan, Aleutian, or Kamchatkan eruptions, while the summit site only records 8 volcanic events. The Eclipse summer d18O record displays a significant positive relationship with summer temperatures at both coastal and interior Alaskan sites, while the Mt. Logan d18O time-series does not correlate well with instrumental temperature records or most circum-Arctic paleoclimate records. Conversely, the summit ice core accumulation time-series strongly correlates with

  9. The Towuti Drilling Project: paleoenvironments, biological evolution, and geomicrobiology of a tropical Pacific lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James M.; Bijaksana, Satria; Vogel, Hendrik; Melles, Martin; Kallmeyer, Jens; Ariztegui, Daniel; Crowe, Sean; Fajar, Silvia; Hafidz, Abdul; Haffner, Doug; Hasberg, Ascelina; Ivory, Sarah; Kelly, Christopher; King, John; Kirana, Kartika; Morlock, Marina; Noren, Anders; O'Grady, Ryan; Ordonez, Luis; Stevenson, Janelle; von Rintelen, Thomas; Vuillemin, Aurele; Watkinson, Ian; Wattrus, Nigel; Wicaksono, Satrio; Wonik, Thomas; Bauer, Kohen; Deino, Alan; Friese, André; Henny, Cynthia; Imran; Marwoto, Ristiyanti; Ode Ngkoimani, La; Nomosatryo, Sulung; Ode Safiuddin, La; Simister, Rachel; Tamuntuan, Gerald

    2016-07-01

    The Towuti Drilling Project (TDP) is an international research program, whose goal is to understand long-term environmental and climatic change in the tropical western Pacific, the impacts of geological and environmental changes on the biological evolution of aquatic taxa, and the geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry of metal-rich, ultramafic-hosted lake sediments through the scientific drilling of Lake Towuti, southern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Lake Towuti is a large tectonic lake at the downstream end of the Malili lake system, a chain of five highly biodiverse lakes that are among the oldest lakes in Southeast Asia. In 2015 we carried out a scientific drilling program on Lake Towuti using the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) Deep Lakes Drilling System (DLDS). We recovered a total of ˜ 1018 m of core from 11 drilling sites with water depths ranging from 156 to 200 m. Recovery averaged 91.7 %, and the maximum drilling depth was 175 m below the lake floor, penetrating the entire sedimentary infill of the basin. Initial data from core and borehole logging indicate that these cores record the evolution of a highly dynamic tectonic and limnological system, with clear indications of orbital-scale climate variability during the mid- to late Pleistocene.

  10. The Research and Application of Deep Hole Core Drilling Equipment for Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling Project%汶川地震断裂带科学钻探项目深孔取心钻探设备的研制与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱江龙; 胡时友; 黄洪波; 刘跃进; 张伟

    2012-01-01

      深孔取心钻探设备是为满足汶川地震断裂带科学钻探项目(WFSD)3000 m深部取心钻探需要而自主研制的我国首套科学钻探专用设备,包括KZ3000型全液压钻机以及深部钻探配套用高压泥浆泵和钻杆钻具等。该套设备集全液压、高速顶驱、大口径、深部取心于一身,具有综合能力强、工艺适应性广、操控智能程度高等特点,在WFSD-2孔深部取心钻探中,各项功能满足设计要求,应用情况良好。该套设备作为我国深部钻探装备的阶段性创新成果,在科学钻探、深部找矿和浅层油气钻采中,具有一定的推广价值。%  Deep hole core drilling equipment, including KZ3000 drill rig, high-pressure mud pump and wire-line coring rods and tools, is the first scientific drilling system in China, which was independently designed and manufactured to meet the needs of Wenchuan earthquake fault scientific drilling project (WFSD).The equipment is set fully hydraulic, high-speed top drive, large diameter and deep coring in one, featuring good comprehensive capability, wide process adaptability and high in-telligence of manipulation.During the WFSD-2 deep hole core drilling, it worked well by meeting the design requirements in all functions.As stage innovations for deep drilling equipment, it has a potential market value in scientific drilling, deep prospecting and shallow oil and gas drilling.

  11. Preliminary Results from the AIDP-2 and AIDP-3 Drill Cores Hint at Systematic Mo Enrichments in the ~2.65 Ga Roy Hill Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M.; Ostrander, C. M.; Lyons, T. W.; Olson, S. L.; Buick, R.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    In order to better understand the timing of the earliest oxygenation of Earth's surface environment, we are pursuing a multi-proxy investigation of paleoredox conditions in diamond drill cores through sedimentary rocks of the Archean Fortescue & Hamersley Groups. These cores were recovered in 2012 by the Agouron Institute from the Pilbara Craton of Western Australia. The AIDP-2 core samples a stratigraphic succession of carbonate and sulfidic, organic-rich shale in the Carawine Dolomite and Jeerinah Formation representing a shallow near-shore depositional setting. Core AIDP-3 samples a transition from BIF in the Marra Mamba Formation to organic-rich shales in the underlying Jeerinah Formation representing a deeper offshore depositional setting. We have analyzed 322 black shale samples from the Roy Hill Member of the Jeerinah Formation deposited just before the transition from the Fortescue to Hamersley Group. Roy Hill black shale units are mostly pyritic in AIDP-3, but are less so in AIDP-2. The Roy Hill Member of AIDP-3 extends from 2.629 Ga to2.676 Ga and contains the 2.632Ga Jeerinah impact layer, whereas the Roy Hill member of AIDP-2 is slightly older, lying beneath the Jeerinah impact layer, and has been dated to 2.636 Ga to >2.643 Ga [1]. Our initial findings reveal that Mo concentrations range between 0.7 and 7 ppm in the Roy Hill black shale member of AIDP-2 and AIDP-3. Corresponding Mo/Al ratios range between 1-9×10-5 ppm/ppm, indicating slight Mo enrichment relative to average continental crust. These results are consistent with a previous study by Scott et al. [2], which suggested little or no Mo enrichment. However, the higher resolution sampling in this study allows us to clearly resolve the Mo/Al depth profiles in these late Archean cores. These data suggest that the variations we see are not due to analytical scatter or sample variability, but instead represent real variations in Mo scavenged into these sediments. Ongoing work is focused on

  12. Influence of Preferred Orientation on the Performance of Brazing Diamond Core Drill Bit%择优取向对钎焊金刚石薄壁钻性能影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨合丹; 刘一波; 陈哲; 刘胜

    2015-01-01

    Brazing diamond core drill bit is a type of high-performance superhard material drilling tool which adopts the vacuum brazing technology.In view of the inherent feature of drilling tools,preferred orientation has been adopted for abrasive on the top and com-bined crystal edges of (1 1 1)and (1 10)face has been taken as blade edge of the diamond. This type of drill has a sharp Cutting-edge,smooth chip evacuation and less friction heat and presents high drilling efficiency and long service life.The actual drilling test shows that service life of preferred orientationФ6 and Ф32mm drill bits is almost doubled com-pared to conventional drill bit and the average drilling rate has been improved by over 50% with a very smooth drilling performance;service life of preferred orientationФ32mm has been increased by over 30% compared to uniform bit and the drilling stability of them is similar.%钎焊金刚石薄壁钻是一种采用真空钎焊技术进行的高性能超硬材料钻削工具。根据钻削工具的固有特征,将顶部磨料择优取向,取金刚石岀刃点为(111)面与(110)面结合晶棱,在钻削过程中刃口锋利,排屑顺畅,摩擦生热少,显示出极高的钻进效率和使用寿命。通过实际钻进验证可知:择优取向Φ6小钻头寿命比普通钻头提高接近1倍,平均钻速提高50%以上,并且钻进非常平稳;择优取向Φ32mm 常规钻头寿命比普通钻头提高1倍以上,平均钻速提高50%以上,并且钻进非常平稳;择优取向Φ32mm 常规钻头寿命比均布钻头提高30%以上,钻进平稳性相当。

  13. Internal deformation in layered Zechstein-III K-Mg salts. Structures formed by complex deformation and high contrasts in viscosity observed in drill cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    During the evaporation of a massive salt body, alternations of interrupted and full evaporation sequences can form a complex layering of different lithologies. Viscosity contrasts of up to five orders of magnitude between these different lithologies are possible in this environment. During the late stage of an evaporation cycle potassium and magnesium (K-Mg) salts are precipitated. These K-Mg salts are of economic interest but also a known drilling hazard due to their very low viscosity. How up to 200m thick layers of these evaporites affect salt deformation at different scales is not well known. A better understanding of salt tectonics with extreme mechanical stratification is needed for better exploration and production of potassium-magnesium salts and to predict the internal structure of potential nuclear waste repositories in salt. To gain a better understanding of the internal deformation of these layers we analyzed K-Mg salt rich drill cores out of the Zechstein III-1b subunit from the Veendam Pillow 10 km southeast of Groningen, near the city Veendam in the NE Netherlands. The study area has a complex geological history with multiple tectonic phases of extension and compression forming internal deformation in the pillow but also conserving most of the original layering. Beside halite the most common minerals in the ZIII-1b are carnallite, kieserite, anhydrite and bischofite alternating in thin layers of simple composition. Seismic interpretation revealed that the internal structure of the Veendam Pillow shows areas, in which the K-Mg salt rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, as a result of salt deformation. The internal structure of the ZIII-1b on the other hand, remains unknown. The core analysis shows a strong strain concentration in the weaker Bischofite (MgCl2*6H20) and Carnallite (KMgCl3*6H20) rich layers producing tectonic breccias and highly strained layers completely overprinting the original layering. Layers formed by alternating beds

  14. The record of Miocene climatic events in AND-2A drill core (Antarctica): Insights from provenance analyses of basement clasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroni, Sonia; Talarico, Franco M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper includes the results of a detailed quantitative provenance investigation on gravel-size clasts occurring within the late Early to Late Miocene sedimentary glacimarine section recovered for the first time by the AND-2A core in the SW sector of the Ross Sea (southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica). This period of time is of crucial interest, as it includes two of the major Cenozoic events in the global climatic evolution: the mid-Miocene climatic optimum and the middle Miocene climate transition. Petrographical and mineral chemistry data on basement clasts allow to individuate two different diagnostic clast assemblages, which clearly suggest two specific sectors of southern Victoria Land as the most likely sources: the Mulock-Skelton glacier and the Koettlitz-Blue glacier regions. Distribution patterns reveal high fluctuations of the detritus source areas throughout the investigated core interval, variations which can be interpreted as the direct result of an evolving McMurdo Sound paleogeography during the late Early to Late Miocene. Consistently with sedimentological studies, gravel-fraction clast distribution patterns clearly testify that the Antarctic ice sheet experienced a dramatic contraction at ca. 17.35 ± 0.14 Ma (likely correlated to the onset of the climatic optimum), and in a gravel-fraction clasts show that the variations of paleoenvironmental drivers characterising this period were able to exert deep transformation of the Antarctic ice sheet and reveal the methodology to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of paleo-glacial-flow direction and paleogeographic scenarios.

  15. Application of Wire-line Core Directional Drilling in Steep-dipping Strata Area%绳索取心定向钻井工艺在陡倾角岩层中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗炜

    2013-01-01

    贵州威宁阳关寨勘查区位于格目底向斜南西翼的西段,主要含煤地层为宣威组。勘查区西南部岩层较陡,倾角60°以上,特别是ZK102、ZK202、ZK302钻孔岩层倾角超过80°。如按常规垂直井设计,钻孔深度超过1400m,施工难度大。在分析勘查区绳索取心直井钻进困难和定向钻进优点基础上,对小口径绳索取心定向钻进技术可行性进行分析后认为:如把钻孔轨迹的曲率控制在10°/100m以内、增大曲率半径减小最大井斜、配备适合的定向仪器、增购高强度钻具,将定向钻井技术与绳索取心工艺相结合的方案是可行的。并以ZK202为例,介绍了定向孔井身轨迹的设计、钻进技术参数的选择、冲洗液的要求、造斜段措施等。钻探实践表明,采用绳索取心定向钻进技术在该区共施工3个钻孔,与原直井设计比较,减少钻探工程量2000余米,节约勘探成本约150万元,同时缩短工期约3个月,且控制目标煤层精确,完全达到地质设计目的。通过本次施工,为类似地层钻进积累了丰富的实践经验。%The Yangguanzhai exploration area, Weining, Guizhou is situated in western sector of the Gemudi syncline west limb; its main coal-bearing strata belong to the Xuanwei Formation. The southwestern part of the exploration area has steep-dipping strata with dip angle over 60o, especially over 80o in boreholes ZK102, ZK202 and ZK302. If using conventional vertical drilling when depth>1400m is hard to drill. In consideration of the hard vertical drilling situation and strongpoint of directional drilling, studied small diame-ter wire-line core directional drilling feasibility, considered that if controlled the borehole curvature within 10o/100m, to increase radi-us of curvature reduce maximum borehole deviation, equipped with adaptive direction finder and high strength drilling tools, combined directional drilling technology and wire

  16. Core Competencies in Geriatric Dentistry Fellowship Programs: a Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Christie M; Andrade, Allen D; Ruiz, Jorge G; Gibson, Gretchen

    2016-07-01

    The healthcare workforce is challenged with preparing for the increasing number of older persons and complexities of their healthcare needs. Fellowship trained geriatric dentists are charged with the task of addressing the dental needs of this vastly growing cohort.The purpose of this study is to formulate a set of competencies for Geriatric Dental Fellowship Training Programs. The Delphi technique-a series of three rounds of anonymous questionnaires to obtain the opinions of experts without bringing them together. In Round 1, we proposed 45 competencies based on findings in previous literature. In Round 2, there were 19 respondents whose edits narrowed our list to 39 competencies proposed by the participants. In Round 3, based on group consensus we formulated a final list of 42 competencies. Utilizing the Delphi process, a panel of geriatric dental experts identified a set of core competencies for curriculums in dental fellowship programs. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Site investigation SFR. Overview Boremap mapping of drill cores from KFR04, KFR08, KFR09, KFR13, KFR35, KFR36, KFR54, KFR55, KFR7A, KFR7B and KFR7C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersson, Jesper; Andersson, Ulf B. (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report presents the results from a renewed geological overview mapping of 11 drill cores obtained during the construction of the final repository for low and middle level radioactive operational waste (SFR) during the 80's. Drill cores from KFR04, KFR08, KFR09, KFR13, KFR35, KFR36, KFR54, KFR55, KFR7A, KFR7B and KFR7C, with a total length of 837 m, was selected primarily because of their distinctly crosscutting relationship with inferred deformation zones in the area. The main purpose for this geological mapping is calibration with the original mappings, which in turn aims to facilitate geological single-hole interpretation. The mapping was generally focused on the location and infilling mineralogy of broken and unbroken fractures, as well as crush zones, breccias and sealed networks. Also the overview lithology, alterations and ductile shear zones were documented. All boreholes selected for renewed mapping are located in a ductile, high-strain belt, which defines the northeastern margin of a structurally more homogeneous tectonic lens. The main component of the high-strain belt is felsic to intermediate rocks of inferred volcanic origin. The predominant rock in the selected drill cores is, however, a fine- to finely medium-grained metagranite, which clearly appears to be a high-strain variety of the typically medium-grained metagranite-granodiorite that prevails the tectonic lens. It is obvious that varieties of this high-strain rock previously was inferred to be meta volcanic rocks. Other volumetrically important rock types in the drill cores are pegmatitic granite, finely medium-grained granite and metagranodiorite-tonalite, aplitic metagranite, amphibolites and slightly coarser metagabbros. Virtually all rocks in the borehole have experienced Svecofennian metamorphism under amphibolite facies conditions. Excluding fractures within crush zones and sealed networks, there is a predominance of broken fractures in most of the drill cores. The total

  18. Integrated provenance-detrital thermochronology studies in ANDRILL AND-2A drill core: first evidence of an Oligocene exhumation episode (McMurdo Sound, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattin, M.; Talarico, F. M.; Sandroni, S.

    2009-12-01

    An integrated investigation including provenance analysis of the gravel-fraction and detrital apatite fission-track (AFT) thermochronology on the AND-2A core provides new results to constrain the exhumation history of source regions and the reconstruction of sediment provenance models in the Ross Embayment in Late Cenozoic time. All the AFT ages, from 20 samples, evenly distributed in the uppermost 1000 m of the core, indicate that the entire succession originated from a source that exhumed in the Oligocene/Late Eocene time. In fact, most of the grains in nearly all the samples can be grouped into a youngest grain-age component (P1) in the range between 21.7 Ma and 43.4 Ma. However, most of the samples show more than one population, documenting the presence of multiple source areas in some periods of the basin history. On the other hand, the presence in some of the samples of a unique peak suggests a limited drainage system, as indicated by the petrographic data. The AFT data indicate the presence of active tectonics at the end of the Oligocene, therefore suggesting a source of sediments located along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) south of the Dry Valleys Block, where bedrock AFT ages indicate an older (Eocene) exhumation phase. Hence, the idea of a structural segmentation of the TAM during the Cenozoic (Wilson, Glob. Plan. Change, 1999) is well supported by these data. Provenance analysis of the gravel fraction highlights significant down-core modal and compositional variations and the occurrence of two main basement clast assemblages, diagnostic of specific source regions and occurring in distinct core sections: a) including marbles, garnet micaschists and diopside schists, suggesting oscillation of "local" glaciers in the on-shore area close to the AND-2A drill site, and b) low-grade metasediments and alkaline granites, indicating oscillations of a most extensive ice sheet/shelf with a clear provenance from the Skelton-Mulock glacier area. These data agree

  19. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  20. Core Handling and Real-Time Non-Destructive Characterization at the Kochi Core Center: An Example of Core Analysis from the Chelungpu Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As an example of core analysis carried out inactive fault drilling programs, we report the procedures of core handling on the drilling site and non-destructive characterization in the laboratory. This analysis was employed onthe core samples taken from HoleBof the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP, which penetrated through the active fault that slipped during the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake. We show results of the non-destructive physical property measurements carried out at the Kochi Core Center (KCC, Japan. Distinct anomalies of lower bulk density and higher magnetic susceptibilitywere recognized in all three fault zones encountered in HoleB. To keep the core samples in good condition before they are used for variousanalyses is crucial. In addition, careful planning for core handlingand core analyses is necessary for successfulinvestigations. doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.s01.35.2007

  1. Postdepositional losses of methane sulfonate, nitrate, and chloride at the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica deep-drilling site in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, R.; Traufetter, F.; Fischer, H.; Oerter, H.; Piel, C.; Miller, H.

    2004-04-01

    We quantified postdepositional losses of methane sulfonate (MSA-), nitrate, and chloride at the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) drilling site in Dronning Maud Land (DML) (75°S, 0°E). Analyses of four intermediate deep firn cores and 13 snow pits were considered. We found that about 26 ± 13% of the once deposited nitrate and typically 51 ± 20% of MSA- were lost, while for chloride, no significant depletion could be observed in firn older than one year. Assuming a first order exponential decay rate, the characteristic e-folding time for MSA- is 6.4 ± 3 years and 19 ± 6 years for nitrate. It turns out that for nitrate and MSA- the typical mean concentrations representative for the last 100 years were reached after 5.4 and 6.5 years, respectively, indicating that beneath a depth of around 1.2-1.4 m postdepositional losses can be neglected. In the area of investigation, only MSA- concentrations and postdepositional losses showed a distinct dependence on snow accumulation rate. Consequently, MSA- concentrations archived at this site should be significantly dependent on the variability of annual snow accumulation, and we recommend a corresponding correction. With a simple approach, we estimated the partial pressure of the free acids MSA, HNO3, and HCl on the basis of Henry's law assuming that ionic impurities of the bulk ice matrix are localized in a quasi-brine layer (QBL). In contrast to measurements, this approach predicts a nearly complete loss of MSA-, NO3-, and Cl-.

  2. Deep-Time drilling in the Australian Archean: the Agouron Institute geobiological drilling project. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Agouron Institute has sponsored deep-time drilling across the South African Archean-Proterozoic boundary, investigating the rise of oxygen over an onshore-offshore environmental transect. It is now supporting a drilling program in the Australian Archean of the Pilbara Craton, addressing a similar theme but with the added goal of resolving controversy over the age and origin of hydrocarbon biomarker molecules in ancient kerogenous shales. As these have been claimed to provide evidence for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis long before the rise of atmospheric oxygen to persistently high levels during the ~2.3 Ga “Great Oxidation Event”, their syngenesis with their host shales is thus of critical importance for the interpretation of Earth’s early oxygenation history. During the first drilling season, 3 holes were drilled using techniques and equipment to minimize organic geochemical contamination (new drill-string components cleaned before drilling potentially biomarker-bearing rocks, pre-contamination of drilling fluid with a synthetic organic compound of similar geochemical characteristics to biomarkers, sterile cutting and storage of samples immediately upon retrieval from the core-barrel). The initial hole was a blank control for organic geochemistry, drilled into rocks too metamorphosed to retain biomarker molecules. These rocks, cherts, carbonates and pelites of the 3.52 Ga Coucal Formation, Coonterunah Group, have been metamorphosed to upper greenschist facies at temperatures near 500°C and so should have had any ancient soluble hydrocarbons destroyed. However, because they contain both carbonate and organic carbon, these rocks can instead provide isotopic information about the earliest evolution of biological metabolism as they possess residues of both the reactant and product sides of the carbon-fixation reaction. The second hole sampled an on-shore section of carbonates and kerogenous shales in the ~2.65 Ga Carawine Dolomite and Lewin Shale

  3. Nucleation process of magnitude 2 repeating earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault predicted by rate-and-state fault models with SAFOD drill core data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiro; Carpenter, Brett M.; Nielsen, Stefan B.

    2017-01-01

    Recent laboratory shear-slip experiments conducted on a nominally flat frictional interface reported the intriguing details of a two-phase nucleation of stick-slip motion that precedes the dynamic rupture propagation. This behavior was subsequently reproduced by a physics-based model incorporating laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction laws. However, applying the laboratory and theoretical results to the nucleation of crustal earthquakes remains challenging due to poorly constrained physical and friction properties of fault zone rocks at seismogenic depths. Here we apply the same physics-based model to simulate the nucleation process of crustal earthquakes using unique data acquired during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) experiment and new and existing measurements of friction properties of SAFOD drill core samples. Using this well-constrained model, we predict what the nucleation phase will look like for magnitude ˜2 repeating earthquakes on segments of the San Andreas Fault at a 2.8 km depth. We find that despite up to 3 orders of magnitude difference in the physical and friction parameters and stress conditions, the behavior of the modeled nucleation is qualitatively similar to that of laboratory earthquakes, with the nucleation consisting of two distinct phases. Our results further suggest that precursory slow slip associated with the earthquake nucleation phase may be observable in the hours before the occurrence of the magnitude ˜2 earthquakes by strain measurements close (a few hundred meters) to the hypocenter, in a position reached by the existing borehole.

  4. Search for a meteoritic component in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Platinum group element contents and osmium isotopic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Iain; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Coney, Louise; Ferrière, Ludovic; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Koeberl, Christian

    An attempt was made to detect a meteoritic component in both crater-fill (fallback) impact breccias and fallout suevites (outside the crater rim) at the Bosumtwi impact structure in Ghana. Thus far, the only clear indication for an extraterrestrial component related to this structure has been the discovery of a meteoritic signature in Ivory Coast tektites, which formed during the Bosumtwi impact event. Earlier work at Bosumtwi indicated unusually high levels of elements that are commonly used for the identification of meteoritic contamination (i.e., siderophile elements, including the platinum group elements [PGE]) in both target rocks and impact breccias from surface exposures around the crater structure, which does not allow unambiguous verification of an extraterrestrial signature. The present work, involving PGE abundance determinations and Os isotope measurements on drill core samples from inside and outside the crater rim, arrives at the same conclusion. Despite the potential of the Os isotope system to detect even small amounts of extraterrestrial contribution, the wide range in PGE concentrations and Os isotope composition observed in the target rocks makes the interpretation of unradiogenic, high-concentration samples as an impact signature ambiguous.

  5. Drilling Systems for Extraterrestrial Subsurface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Brennan, M.; Briggs, G.; Cooper, G.; Davis, K.; Dolgin, B.; Glaser, D.; Glass, B.; Gorevan, S.; Guerrero, J.; McKay, C.; Paulsen, G.; Stanley, S.; Stoker, C.

    2008-06-01

    Drilling consists of 2 processes: breaking the formation with a bit and removing the drilled cuttings. In rotary drilling, rotational speed and weight on bit are used to control drilling, and the optimization of these parameters can markedly improve drilling performance. Although fluids are used for cuttings removal in terrestrial drilling, most planetary drilling systems conduct dry drilling with an auger. Chip removal via water-ice sublimation (when excavating water-ice bound formations at pressure below the triple point of water) and pneumatic systems are also possible. Pneumatic systems use the gas or vaporization products of a high-density liquid brought from Earth, gas provided by an in situ compressor, or combustion products of a monopropellant. Drill bits can be divided into coring bits, which excavate an annular shaped hole, and full-faced bits. While cylindrical cores are generally superior as scientific samples, and coring drills have better performance characteristics, full-faced bits are simpler systems because the handling of a core requires a very complex robotic mechanism. The greatest constraints to extraterrestrial drilling are (1) the extreme environmental conditions, such as temperature, dust, and pressure; (2) the light-time communications delay, which necessitates highly autonomous systems; and (3) the mission and science constraints, such as mass and power budgets and the types of drilled samples needed for scientific analysis. A classification scheme based on drilling depth is proposed. Each of the 4 depth categories (surface drills, 1-meter class drills, 10-meter class drills, and deep drills) has distinct technological profiles and scientific ramifications.

  6. Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

  7. A computer program to determine the specific power of prismatic-core reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-05-01

    A computer program has been developed to determine the maximum specific power for prismatic-core reactors as a function of maximum allowable fuel temperature, core pressure drop, and coolant velocity. The prismatic-core reactors consist of hexagonally shaped fuel elements grouped together to form a cylindrically shaped core. A gas coolant flows axially through circular channels within the elements, and the fuel is dispersed within the solid element material either as a composite or in the form of coated pellets. Different coolant, fuel, coating, and element materials can be selected to represent different prismatic-core concepts. The computer program allows the user to divide the core into any arbitrary number of axial levels to account for different axial power shapes. An option in the program allows the automatic determination of the core height that results in the maximum specific power. The results of parametric specific power calculations using this program are presented for various reactor concepts.

  8. The Lake El’gygytgyn Scientific Drilling Project – Conquering Arctic Challenges through Continental Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Schwamborn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Between October 2008 and May 2009, the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDPco-sponsored a campaign at Lake El´gygytgyn, located in a 3.6-Ma-old meteorite impact crater in northeastern Siberia. Drilling targets included three holes in the center of the 170-m-deep lake, utilizing the lake ice cover as a drilling platform, plus one hole close to the shore in the western lake catchment. At the lake’s center. the entire 315-m-thick lakesediment succession was penetrated. The sediments lack any hiatuses (i.e., no evidence of basin glaciation or desiccation, and their composition reflects the regional climatic and environmental history with great sensitivity. Hence, the record provides the first comprehensive and widely timecontinuous insights into the evolution of the terrestrial Arctic since mid-Pliocene times. This is particularly true for the lowermost 40 meters and uppermost 150 meters of the sequence, which were drilled with almost 100% recovery and likely reflect the initial lake stage during the Pliocene and the last ~2.9 Ma, respectively. Nearly 200 meters of underlying rock were also recovered; these cores consist of an almost complete section of the various types of impact breccias including broken and fractured volcanic basement rocks and associated melt clasts. The investigation of this core sequence promises new information concerning the El´gygytgyn impact event, including the composition and nature of the meteorite, the energy released, and the shock behavior of the volcanic basement rocks. Complementary information on the regional environmental history, including the permafrost history and lake-level fluctuations, is being developed from a 142-m-long drill core recovered from the permafrost deposits in the lake catchment. This core consists of gravelly and sandy alluvial fan deposits in ice-rich permafrost, presumably comprising a discontinuous recordof both Quaternary and Pliocene deposits.

  9. Riserless drilling (managed pressure drilling)

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Ahsan

    2012-01-01

    There are several problems which an oil and gas industry is facing. These problems can be solved by riserless drilling method which comes under managed pressure drilling umbrella. The most important problem is increasing number of casing strings to complete a well and to control a well in limited pressure profile. A well model was developed and both conventional and riserless drilling approaches were applied to see how many casings will be needed to complete a same well with these approach...

  10. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4

  11. Archive of Core and Site/Hole Data and Photographs from the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Texas A&M University operates the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution for the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). The International Ocean Discovery...

  12. Palynological evidence for vegetational and climatic changes from the HQ deep drilling core in Yunnan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO XiaYun; SHEN Ji; WANG SuMin; XIAO HaiFeng; TONG GuoBang

    2007-01-01

    The high-resolution pollen study of a 737.72-m-long lake sediment core in the Heqing Basin of Yunnan Province shows that the vegetation and climate of mountains around the Heqing Basin went through six obvious changes since 2.780 Ma B.P. Namely, Pinus forest occupied most mountains around the studied area and the structure of vertical vegetational belt was simple between 2.780 and 2.729 Ma B.P.,reflecting a relatively warm and dry climate. During 2.729-2.608 Ma B.P., the areas of cold-temperate conifer forest (CTCF) and Tsuga forest increased and the structure of vertical vegetational belt became clear. According to percentages of tropical and subtropical elements growing in low-altitude regions rifely increased, we speculate that the increase of CTCF and Tsuga forest areas mainly resulted from strong uplift of mountains which provided upward expanding space and growing condition for these plants. Thus, the climate of the low-altitude regions around the basin was relatively warm and humid.Between 2.608 and 1.553 Ma B.P., Pinus forest occupied most mountains around the studied area and forest line of CTCF rose, which reflects a moderately warm-dry climate on the whole. During 1.553-0.876 Ma B.P., the structure of vertical vegetational belt in mountains around the studied area became complicated and the amplitude of vegetational belts shifting up and down enlarged, which implies that the amplitude of climatic change increased, the climatic associational feature was more complex and the climate was moderately cold at a majority of the stage. During 0.876-0.252 Ma B.P., there were all vertical vegetational belts existing at present in mountains around the studied area. The elements of each belt were more abundant and complex than earlier. At different periods in the stage vertical vegetational belts occurred as expanding or shrinking, and alternated each other. The amplitude of vegetational belts shifting up and down was the maximum in the whole section. This change

  13. Palynological evidence for vegetational and climatic changes from the HQ deep drilling core in Yunnan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The high-resolution pollen study of a 737.72-m-long lake sediment core in the Heqing Basin of Yunnan Province shows that the vegetation and climate of mountains around the Heqing Basin went through six obvious changes since 2.780 Ma B.P. Namely, Pinus forest occupied most mountains around the studied area and the structure of vertical vegetational belt was simple between 2.780 and 2.729 Ma B.P., reflecting a relatively warm and dry climate. During 2.729―2.608 Ma B.P., the areas of cold-temperate conifer forest (CTCF) and Tsuga forest increased and the structure of vertical vegetational belt became clear. According to percentages of tropical and subtropical elements growing in low-altitude regions rifely increased, we speculate that the increase of CTCF and Tsuga forest areas mainly resulted from strong uplift of mountains which provided upward expanding space and growing condition for these plants. Thus, the climate of the low-altitude regions around the basin was relatively warm and humid. Between 2.608 and 1.553 Ma B.P., Pinus forest occupied most mountains around the studied area and forest line of CTCF rose, which reflects a moderately warm-dry climate on the whole. During 1.553―0.876 Ma B.P., the structure of vertical vegetational belt in mountains around the studied area became complicated and the amplitude of vegetational belts shifting up and down enlarged, which implies that the amplitude of climatic change increased, the climatic associational feature was more complex and the climate was moderately cold at a majority of the stage. During 0.876―0.252 Ma B.P., there were all vertical vegetational belts existing at present in mountains around the studied area. The elements of each belt were more abundant and complex than earlier. At different periods in the stage vertical vegetational belts occurred as expanding or shrinking, and alternated each other. The amplitude of vegetational belts shifting up and down was the maximum in the whole section. This

  14. Core drilling of boreholes ONK-KR1, ONK-KR2, ONK-KR3, ONK-KR4 and ONK-PVA1 in ONKALO at Olkiluoto 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    Posiva Oy submitted am application for the Decision in Principle (the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki) to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. The investigation programme on the influence of grouting in ground-water chemistry will be started by Posiva. The programme consists of long-term and short-term effects of grouting and the influence of grouting at different distances from the tunnel on groundwater conditions. As a part of this Suomen Malmi oy (Smoy) core drilled four boreholes in ONKALO. The identification numbers of thee boreholes are ONK-KR1, ONK-KR2, ONK-KR3 and ONK-KR4. An additional borehole ONK-PVA1 was core drilled for long-term monitoring purposes in a place where no grouting is planned to be done.The diameter of the borehole sis 75.7 mm A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. The volume of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded as well as the pressure of the drilling water. The objective of these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 16 m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 11 dm{sup 3} in boreholes. The deviation of the boreholes was measured with the deviation measuring instrument EMS. The main rock types are migmatitic mica gneiss and granite. Filled fractures are most common type of fractures. The average fracture frequency of the boreholes varies from 0.6 to 3.1 pcs/m. The average RQD

  15. 钻芯法检测结构混凝土强度合格性评定分析%Analysis on conformity assessment of concrete strength with core drilling method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕列民; 崔德密; 王宁; 高修

    2011-01-01

    The main impact factors on the concrete compressive strength detected by the core drilling method are analyzed herein from the processes of the drilling, processing and testing of structural concrete core samples, and then a method of the assessment made on the uncertainty of the concrete strength detected with the core drilling method is put forward. Moreover, the introduction of the uncertainty into the conformity assessment of the structural concrete strength is also discussed in accordance with the actual engineering application concerned.%本文从结构混凝土芯样钻取、加工和试验过程,分析了钻芯法检测混凝土抗压强度的主要影响因素,提出了钻芯法检测混凝土强度不确定度的评定方法,并结合工程应用,引入不确定度对结构混凝土强度合格性评定进行了探讨.

  16. 钻芯检测结构混凝土强度技术的改善与提高%Improvement and Increase of Core-drilling Structural Concrete Strength Detection Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸小坛; 徐骋; 陶里; 周燕

    2001-01-01

    介绍结构混凝土强度的检测方法——钻芯法修正法及修正原理。在该方法中,利用误差理论中的置信度和估计精度理论,合理确定钻芯修正所需要的芯样数量。钻芯法修正法的实质是对混凝土强度检验结果的平均值的可信程度和检测精度提出具体的要求。%In this article, authors introduce a structural concrete strength detection method, core-drilling amendment method and amendment principles. This method properly determined the sample quantity to make core-drilling amendment with the confidence degree and precision estimate theory of error theory. The essential content of the core-drilling amendment method is to determine the requirement of confidence degree and detection precision degree of the average detection results of concrete strength.

  17. Scientific Drilling of the Terrestrial Cretaceous Songliao Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrestrial Scientific Drilling of the Cretaceous Songliao Basin Science Team

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of critical climate changes during the Cretaceous have the potential to enhance our understanding of modern global warming because the extreme variances are the best-known and most recent example of a greenhouse Earth (Bice et al., 2006. Marine Cretaceous climate archives are relatively well explored by scientific ocean drilling programs such as the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP and its predecessors. However, Cretaceous terrestrial climate records are at best fragmentary (Heimhofer et al., 2005. The long-lived Cretaceous Songliao Basin of NE China is an excellent candidate to fill this gap and provide important ocean-continent linkages in relation to environmental change (Fig. 1. This basin, located within one of the largest Cretaceous landmasses (Scotese, 1988, acted for about 100 million years as an intra-continental sediment trap; the present-day area of the basin is about 260,000 km2. It provides an almost complete terrestrial sedimentary recordfrom the Upper Jurassic to the Paleocene (Chen and Chang, 1994. Large-scale geological and geophysical investigations of lacustrine sediments and basin structures demonstrate that a rich archive of Cretaceous paleoclimate proxies exists. For example, the basin includes the Jehol Biota, a terrestrial response to the Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events (OAEs, and a potential K/T boundary (Qiang et al., 1998. An ongoing drilling program is supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China and by the Daqing Oilfield. It allowed for recovering of nearly complete cores from Upper Albian to the Uppermost Cretaceous in two boreholes (SK-I, SK II; commenced in 2006, Fig. 1. However, the older Cretaceous sedimentary record of Songliao Basin has not yet been cored. For that reason, a scientific drilling program has been proposed to the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP to sample the deeper sedimentaryrecord of the Songliao Basin through a new drill hole

  18. Drilling through the largest magma chamber on Earth: Bushveld Igneous Complex Drilling Project (BICDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, R. B.; Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Veksler, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    A scientific drilling project in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in South Africa has been proposed to contribute to the following scientific topics of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP): large igneous provinces and mantle plumes, natural resources, volcanic systems and thermal regimes, and deep life. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from eight countries met in Johannesburg to exchange ideas about the scientific objectives and a drilling strategy to achieve them. The workshop identified drilling targets in each of the three main lobes of the Bushveld Complex, which will integrate existing drill cores with new boreholes to establish permanently curated and accessible reference profiles of the Bushveld Complex. Coordinated studies of this material will address fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of parental Bushveld magma(s), the magma chamber processes that caused layering and ore formation, and the role of crust vs. mantle in the genesis of Bushveld granites and felsic volcanic units. Other objectives are to study geophysical and geodynamic aspects of the Bushveld intrusion, including crustal stresses and thermal gradient, and to determine the nature of deep groundwater systems and the biology of subsurface microbial communities.

  19. Has First-Grade Core Reading Program Text Complexity Changed across Six Decades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Elmore, Jeff; Relyea, Jackie Eunjung; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address possible text complexity shifts across the past six decades for a continually best-selling first-grade core reading program. The anthologies of one publisher's seven first-grade core reading programs were examined using computer-based analytics, dating from 1962 to 2013. Variables were Overall Text…

  20. Investigation of sulphide in core drilled boreholes KLX06, KAS03 and KAS09 at Laxemar and Aespoe Chemical-, microbiological- and dissolved gas data from groundwater in four borehole sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosdahl, Anette (Geosigma AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten; Hallbeck, Lotta (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Wallin, Bill (Geokema AB (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report describes a study performed during 2009 which focused on the production of sulphide (microbial sulphate reduction) in deep groundwater that was implemented in the core drilled boreholes KLX06, -475 to 482 meter above sea level, m a s l, KAS03,-97 to 241 and -613 to 984 m a s l, and KAS09, -96 to -125 m a s l, at Laxemar and Aspo. The study aimed to increase knowledge of background groundwater levels of sulphide and its variations in time and space through the analysis of sulphide and parameters related to sulphide production. Sampling of groundwater was conducted in three core drilled boreholes of varying age as time series with continuous pumping and as single samples. The analysis program covered chemical parameters (pH, chloride, sulphate, iron, and organic carbon), dissolved gas composition, stable isotopes in groundwater (delta2H, delta18O, delta34S, delta13C), stable isotopes of gaseous compounds (delta2H, delta13C, delta18O), microbiological parameters (sulphate- and iron reducing bacteria, SRB and IRB), phthalates and low molecular mass organic acids (LMMOA). The sampling in KLX06 was carried out as time series with a 9 week pause in pumping. When the water volume discharged was about 150 times that of the packer-isolated borehole section, sulphides decreased from 7 mg L-1 to 0.05 mg L-1 and the salinity increased from 740 to 1,480 mg L-1. After a 9 weeks pause in pumping, the sulphide concentration and salinity again approached the original values, i.e. 7 mg L-1 of sulphide and 450 mg L-1 of chloride. The SRB and IRB showed high concentrations that were reduced during pumping in the borehole. The water in the standpipe which has a different water composition than the groundwater, also showed similar high concentrations of sulphide and SRB. The standpipe is a plastic pipe in the wider upper part of the borehole; connected with the tube from the packer of the borehole section and used to accommodate a filter and a groundwater pump when collecting

  1. Investigation of sulphide in core drilled boreholes KLX06, KAS03 and KAS09 at Laxemar and Aespoe Chemical-, microbiological- and dissolved gas data from groundwater in four borehole sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosdahl, Anette (Geosigma AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten; Hallbeck, Lotta (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Wallin, Bill (Geokema AB (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report describes a study performed during 2009 which focused on the production of sulphide (microbial sulphate reduction) in deep groundwater that was implemented in the core drilled boreholes KLX06, -475 to 482 meter above sea level, m a s l, KAS03,-97 to 241 and -613 to 984 m a s l, and KAS09, -96 to -125 m a s l, at Laxemar and Aspo. The study aimed to increase knowledge of background groundwater levels of sulphide and its variations in time and space through the analysis of sulphide and parameters related to sulphide production. Sampling of groundwater was conducted in three core drilled boreholes of varying age as time series with continuous pumping and as single samples. The analysis program covered chemical parameters (pH, chloride, sulphate, iron, and organic carbon), dissolved gas composition, stable isotopes in groundwater (delta2H, delta18O, delta34S, delta13C), stable isotopes of gaseous compounds (delta2H, delta13C, delta18O), microbiological parameters (sulphate- and iron reducing bacteria, SRB and IRB), phthalates and low molecular mass organic acids (LMMOA). The sampling in KLX06 was carried out as time series with a 9 week pause in pumping. When the water volume discharged was about 150 times that of the packer-isolated borehole section, sulphides decreased from 7 mg L-1 to 0.05 mg L-1 and the salinity increased from 740 to 1,480 mg L-1. After a 9 weeks pause in pumping, the sulphide concentration and salinity again approached the original values, i.e. 7 mg L-1 of sulphide and 450 mg L-1 of chloride. The SRB and IRB showed high concentrations that were reduced during pumping in the borehole. The water in the standpipe which has a different water composition than the groundwater, also showed similar high concentrations of sulphide and SRB. The standpipe is a plastic pipe in the wider upper part of the borehole; connected with the tube from the packer of the borehole section and used to accommodate a filter and a groundwater pump when collecting

  2. Description of Tessaracoccus profundi sp.nov., a deep-subsurface actinobacterium isolated from a Chesapeake impact crater drill core (940 m depth).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, K W; Cockell, C S; Voytek, M A; Gronstal, A L; Kjeldsen, K U

    2009-11-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated CB31(T), was isolated from a 940 m depth sample of a drilling core obtained from the Chesapeake meteor impact crater. The strain was isolated aerobically on R2A medium agar plates supplemented with NaCl (20 g l(-1)) and MgCl2 x 6 H2O (3 g l(-1)). The colonies were circular, convex, smooth and orange. Cells were slightly curved, rod-shaped in young cultures and often appeared in pairs. In older cultures cells were coccoid. Cells stained Gram-positive, were non-motile and did not form endospores. The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan was LL: -diaminopimelic acid. The polar lipids included phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidglycerol, four different glycolipids, two further phospholipids and one unidentified lipid. The dominant menaquinone was MK-9(H(4)) (70%). The major cellular fatty acid was anteiso C15:0 (83%). The DNA G + C content was 68 mol%. The strain grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate to nitrite or by fermenting glucose. It was catalase positive and oxidase negative. It grew between 10 and 45 degrees C, with an optimum between 35 and 40 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5.7-9.3, with an optimum at pH 7.5. The closest phylogenetic neighbors based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity were members of the genus Tessaracoccus (95-96% identity). On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain CB31(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Tessaracoccus, for which we propose the name Tessaracoccus profundi sp. nov.. It is the first member of this genus that has been isolated from a deep subsurface environment. The type strain is CB31(T) (=NCIMB 14440(T) = DSM 21240(T)).

  3. Description of Tessaracoccus profundi sp.nov., a deep-subsurface actinobacterium isolated from a Chesapeake impact crater drill core (940 m depth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, K.W.; Cockell, C.S.; Voytek, M.A.; Gronstal, A.L.; Kjeldsen, K.U.

    2009-01-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated CB31T, was isolated from a 940 m depth sample of a drilling core obtained from the Chesapeake meteor impact crater. The strain was isolated aerobically on R2A medium agar plates supplemented with NaCl (20 g l-1) and MgCl2???6H 2O (3 g l-1). The colonies were circular, convex, smooth and orange. Cells were slightly curved, rod-shaped in young cultures and often appeared in pairs. In older cultures cells were coccoid. Cells stained Gram-positive, were non-motile and did not form endospores. The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan was ll-diaminopimelic acid. The polar lipids included phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidglycerol, four different glycolipids, two further phospholipids and one unidentified lipid. The dominant menaquinone was MK-9(H4) (70%). The major cellular fatty acid was anteiso C15:0 (83%). The DNA G + C content was 68 mol%. The strain grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate to nitrite or by fermenting glucose. It was catalase positive and oxidase negative. It grew between 10 and 45??C, with an optimum between 35 and 40??C. The pH range for growth was 5.7-9.3, with an optimum at pH 7.5. The closest phylogenetic neighbors based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity were members of the genus Tessaracoccus (95-96% identity). On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain CB31T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Tessaracoccus, for which we propose the name Tessaracoccus profundi sp. nov.. It is the first member of this genus that has been isolated from a deep subsurface environment. The type strain is CB31T (=NCIMB 14440T = DSM 21240T). ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Drilling reorganizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    As the first in a proposed series of steps that would move scientific ocean drilling from its own niche within the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) into the agency's Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant Gross, division director, has been appointed acting director of the Office of Scientific Ocean Drilling (OSOD). Gross will retain the directorship of the division, which also is part of AAEO. Allen M. Shinn, Jr., OSOD director for nearly 2 years, has been reassigned effective July 10 to a position in NSF's Office of Planning and Resource Management.The move aims to tie drilling operations more closely to the science with which it is associated, Gross said. This first step is an organizational response to the current leaning toward using a commercial drilling vessel as the drilling platform, he said. Before the market for such commercial drill ships opened (Eos, February 22, 1983, p . 73), other ship options for scientific ocean drilling included refurbishing the aging Glomar Challenger or renovating, at great expense, the Glomar Explorer. A possible next step in the reorganization is to make OSOD the third section within the Ocean Sciences Division. Currently, the division is divided into the Oceanographic Facilities and Support Section and the Ocean Sciences Research Section.

  5. FY13 Annual Progress Report for SECA Core Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2014-01-31

    components • Thermo-mechanical modeling and validation experiments were performed to understand/mitigate degradation of interconnects and seals during long-term stack operation. Electrochemical modeling 4 • Modeling tools were developed to improve understanding of electrochemical performance degradation of SOFCs related to changes in electrode microstructure and chemical interactions with contaminants. During FY13, PNNL continued to work with NETL to increase the extent of interaction between the SECA Core Technology Program and the SECA Industry Teams. In addition to using established mechanisms of communication, such as the annual SECA Workshop, representatives from PNNL and NETL participated in telecons and/or face-to-face meetings with all three industry teams during FY13. During these meetings, PNNL’s Core Technology Program work was presented in detail, after which feedback was solicited regarding current and future research topics. Results of PNNL’s SECA CTP work were also distributed via topical reports for the industry teams, DOE reports, technical society presentations, and papers in peer-reviewed technical journals. 5

  6. Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole: Window to the Precambrian bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Suvi; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo

    2017-04-01

    Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole is located in eastern Finland, at latitude 62°43'4'' N and longitude 29°3'43'' E. This 2516 m long and fully cored deep hole has been utilized as a geolaboratory open for researchers worldwide since it was drilled in 2004-2005. The 220 mm diameter drill hole is open without a casing (excluding the uppermost 40 m) and thus provides a direct access to in situ conditions to 2.5 km depth. There is a wide range of wire-line logs carried out by the drilling contractor and later by ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) in several logging sessions for geothermal, hydrogeological and deep biosphere studies. Lithology, metamorphism, fluid inclusions, density, magnetic properties, seismic velocities and thermal properties of the drill core have been studied by several international groups. The hole has kept open since the end of drilling enabling future studies to be conducted in it. The drill hole is situated in the southwestern part of the Outokumpu historical mining district famous for its Cu-Co-Zn sulfide deposits. These sulfide deposits are hosted by 1.96 Ga old ophiolitic rock types, known as the Outokumpu assemblage, also penetrated by the deep drill hole at 1314-1515 m depth. Laboratory and in situ petrophysical measurements have provided valuable information about physical properties of the typical rocks of the area that can be utilized in the mineral exploration efforts. The drill site of Outokumpu was chosen based on strong reflectivity observed in the high resolution seismic profiles acquired earlier in the area. Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole revealed that these reflections originate from the acoustic impedance variations caused by the ore hosting Outokumpu assemblage. In 2006, surface seismic reflection and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data were measured in the drill site, and these data show that not only is Outokumpu assemblage rocks reflective but also water bearing fracture at 965 m depth is observed as a

  7. Alteration of hyaloclastites in the HSDP 2 Phase 1 Drill Core: 2. Mass balance of the conversion of sideromelane to palagonite and chabazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Anthony W.; Schiffman, Peter; MacPherson, G. L.

    2005-09-01

    The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project 2 Phase 1 core permits study of each stage of alteration of basalt glass during burial because stages of the process are separated vertically. Previous work has shown that alteration of hyaloclastite occurs progressively. The latest stage observed in the Phase 1 core involves marginal replacement of sideromelane in shards with palagonite while simultaneously forming chabazite in pores. The basic reaction at this stage is sideromelane + components from pore waters = palagonite + chabazite + components to pore waters. Mass balance calculations show that Fe was virtually immobile in this process, being retained in palagonite. Na, Ca, Ba, P, Al, and Si were lost during palagonitization and not fully consumed in making chabazite. Mg was lost during palagonitization but retained elsewhere in smectite. K, Rb, and Sr were extracted from pore waters and enriched in the sum of the alteration products. The amount of enrichment depended upon the amount of chabazite present, which depended upon the porosity when chabazite formed. Ti, Y, U, Zr, Nb, REE, and Th were enriched in palagonite, compared to sideromelane, but were absent in chabazite. Mass balance of all phases for the entire alteration process (including earlier stages) was not possible because poorly consolidated samples do not yield accurate modal values of phases, trace element analysis of smectite was not possible, and exchange with lavas and intrusions in the succession cannot be evaluated. Calculations indicate that too little of major oxides, except Na2O, was released during palagonitization to account for the amount of smectite observed in hyaloclastites. The results of this study, and several others published in the literature, indicate that under various circumstances palagonitization will consume particular elements from pore fluid or release them to it. Such mobility implies that the hydrology of the particular system and the composition of the dissolved solids in the

  8. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology

  9. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology

  10. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  11. Velocity-porosity relationships for slope apron and accreted sediments in the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 315 Site C0001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Tobin, H. J.; Knuth, M.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we focused on the porosity and compressional wave velocity of marine sediments to examine the physical properties of the slope apron and the accreted sediments. This approach allows us to identify characteristic variations between sediments being deposited onto the active prism and those deposited on the oceanic plate and then carried into the prism during subduction. For this purpose we conducted ultrasonic compressional wave velocity measurements on the obtained core samples with pore pressure control. Site C0001 in the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment transect of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program is located in the hanging wall of the midslope megasplay thrust fault in the Nankai subduction zone offshore of the Kii peninsula (SW Japan), penetrating an unconformity at ˜200 m depth between slope apron sediments and the underlying accreted sediments. We used samples from Site C0001. Compressional wave velocity from laboratory measurements ranges from ˜1.6 to ˜2.0 km/s at hydrostatic pore pressure conditions estimated from sample depth. The compressional wave velocity-porosity relationship for the slope apron sediments shows a slope almost parallel to the slope for global empirical relationships. In contrast, the velocity-porosity relationship for the accreted sediments shows a slightly steeper slope than that of the slope apron sediments at 0.55 of porosity. This higher slope in the velocity-porosity relationship is found to be characteristic of the accreted sediments. Textural analysis was also conducted to examine the relationship between microstructural texture and acoustic properties. Images from micro-X-ray CT indicated a homogeneous and well-sorted distribution of small pores both in shallow and in deeper sections. Other mechanisms such as lithology, clay fraction, and abnormal fluid pressure were found to be insufficient to explain the higher velocity for accreted sediments. The higher slope in velocity-porosity relationship for

  12. Study and Application on GK -15 Mud Solid-phase Control Device for Geological Core Drilling%GK-15 型地质岩心钻探泥浆固控装置研究应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张飞; 熊虎林; 吕方; 米合江; 王智慧; 孙鑫

    2015-01-01

    Solid-control device is widely applied in petroleum drilling and has been implemented in series, standardization and specialization.Geological core drilling is different from oil drilling in depth, diameter and process.The GK-15 mud solid-control device for geological core drilling is developed on the basis of the comprehensive characteristics of solid-control device for petroleum drilling and combined with the requirements of geological core drilling technology, the vibration sieve, cleaner and centrifuge are connected through a pipeline to form a closed mud solid control device to achieve of slurry prepa-ration, circulation, solid control and reserve.The paper introduces the structure and parameters of GK-15 mud solid-con-trol device for and sums up the application conclusion.%固相控制装置在石油钻井中应用比较广泛,已实现系列化、标准化和专用化. 地质岩心钻探在深度、口径和工艺等方面不同于石油钻井. 因此,石油钻井固相控制装置不适合在地质岩心钻探施工中使用. GK-15型地质岩心钻探泥浆固相控制装置是在综合石油钻井固相控制装置特点的基础上,结合地质岩心钻探工艺的需求,把振动筛、清洁器和离心机通过管路联接,构成封闭的泥浆固相控制装置,实现泥浆的制备、循环、固相控制和储备. 介绍了GK-15型泥浆固相控制装置结构、性能参数以及取得的使用效果.

  13. Esmeralda Energy Company, Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008. Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, DOE GRED III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deymonaz, John [Fish Lake Green Power Co. (United States); Hulen, Jeffrey B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geosciences Inst.; Nash, Gregory D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geosciences Inst.; Schriener, Alex [Earth Systems Southwest (United States)

    2008-01-22

    The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (ESDP) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327⁰ F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

  14. Thirty thousand years of vegetation development and climate change in Angola (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1078

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Dupont

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ODP Site 1078 situated under the coast of Angola provides the first record of the vegetation history for Angola. The upper 11 m of the core covers the past 30 thousand years, which has been analysed palynologically in decadal to centennial resolution. Alkenone sea surface temperature estimates were analysed in centennial resolution. We studied sea surface temperatures and vegetation development during full glacial, deglacial, and interglacial conditions. During the glacial the vegetation in Angola was very open consisting of grass and heath lands, deserts and semi-deserts, which suggests a cool and dry climate. A change to warmer and more humid conditions is indicated by forest expansion starting in step with the earliest temperature rise in Antarctica, 22 thousand years ago. We infer that around the period of Heinrich Event 1, a northward excursion of the Angola Benguela Front and the Congo Air Boundary resulted in cool sea surface temperatures but rain forest remained present in the northern lowlands of Angola. Rain forest and dry forest area increase 15 thousand years ago. During the Holocene, dry forests and Miombo woodlands expanded. Also in Angola globally recognised climate changes at 8 thousand and 4 thousand years ago had an impact on the vegetation. During the past 2 thousand years, savannah vegetation became dominant.

  15. Mid-Pliocene Planktic Foraminifer Census Data and Alkenone Unsaturation Indices from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 677A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci; Caballero, Rocio; Pohlman, Emily; Herbert, Timothy; Peck, Victoria; Dowsett, Harry

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a long-term study of mid-Pliocene climatic and oceanographic conditions. One of the key elements of the study involves the use of quantitative composition of planktic foraminifer assemblages in conjunction with other proxies to constrain estimates of sea-surface temperature (SST) and to identify major oceanographic boundaries and water masses. Raw census data are made available as soon as possible after analysis through a series of reports that provide the basic data for future work. In this report we present raw census data (table 1) for planktic foraminifer assemblages in 14 samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 677A. We also present alkenone unsaturation index (UK'37) analyses for 89 samples from ODP Hole 677A (table 2). ODP Hole 677A is located in the Panama basin, due west of Ecuador at 1?12.138'N., 83?44.220'W., in 3461.2 meters of water (fig. 1). A variety of statistical methods have been developed to transform foraminiferal census data in Pliocene sequences into quantitative estimates of Pliocene SST. Details of statistical techniques, taxonomic groupings, and oceanographic interpretations are presented in more formal publications (Dowsett and Poore, 1990, 1991; Dowsett, 1991, 2007a,b; Dowsett and Robinson, 1998, 2007; Dowsett and others, 1996, 1999).

  16. Age constraints on the origin and growth history of a deep-water coral mound in the northeast Atlantic drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Akihiro; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Williams, Trevor; Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Kawagoe, Noriko; Takashima, Chiduru; Kakizaki, Yoshihiro; Abe, Kohei; Sakai, Saburo; Browning, Emily L.; Li, Xianghui; Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307 Scientists

    2007-11-01

    Sr isotope stratigraphy provides a new age model for the first complete section drilled through a deep-water coral mound. The 155-m-long section from Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Sea-bight, southwest of Ireland, is on Miocene siliciclastics and consists entirely of sediments bearing well-preserved cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa. The 87Sr/86Sr values of 28 coral specimens from the mound show an upward-increasing trend, correspond to ages from 2.6 to 0.5 Ma, and identify a significant hiatus from ca. 1.7 to 1.0 Ma at 23.6 m below seafloor. The age of the basal mound sediments coincides with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciations that set up the modern stratification of the northeast Atlantic and enabled coral growth. Mound growth persisted throughout glacial-interglacial fluctuations, reached a maximum rate (24 cm/k.y.) ca. 2.0 Ma, and ceased at 1.7 Ma. Unlike other buried mounds in Porcupine Seabight, Challenger Mound was only partly covered during its growth interruption, and growth restarted ca. 1.0 Ma.

  17. Corganiser: a web-based software tool for planning time-sensitive sampling of whole rounds during scientific drilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Corganiser is a software tool developed to simplify the process of preparing whole-round sampling plans for time-sensitive microbiology and geochemistry sampling during scientific drilling. It was developed during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 347, but is designed to work...... with a wide range of core and section configurations and can thus be used in future drilling projects. Corganiser is written in the Python programming language and is implemented both as a graphical web interface and command-line interface. It can be accessed online at http://130.226.247.137/....

  18. CIRIR Programs: Drilling and Research Opportunities at the Rochechouart Impact Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, P.; Alwmark, C.; Baratoux, D.; Brack, A.; Bruneton, P.; Buchner, E.; Claeys, P.; Dence, M.; French, B.; Hoerz, F

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its size, accessibility and erosional level, the Rochechouart impact structure, dated at 203 +/- 2 Ma (recalc.), is a unique reser-voir of knowledge within the population of the rare terrestrial analogous to large impacts craters observed on planetary surfaces. The site gives direct access to fundamental mechanisms both in impact-related geology (origin and evolution of planets) and biology (habitability of planets, emergence and evolution of life). For the last decade P. Lambert has been installing Rochechouart as International Natural Laboratory for studying impact processes and collateral effects on planetary surfaces. For this purpose the Center for International Research on Impacts and on Rochechouart (CIRIR) was installed on site in 2016 with twofold objectives and activities. First ones are scientific and dedicated to the scientific community. The second are cultural and educational and are dedi-cated to the public sensu lato. We present here the CIRIR, its scientific programs and the related reseach opportunities.

  19. [Effects of core competency support program on depression and suicidal ideation for adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a core competency support program on depression and suicidal ideation in adolescents. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. Participants for the study were high school students, 27 in the experimental group and 29 in the control group. Data were analyzed using the SPSS/WIN. 14.0 program with X(2) test, t-test, and ANCOVA. Participants in the core competency support program reported decreased depression scores significantly different from those in the control group. Participants in the core competency support program reported decreased suicidal ideation scores, also significantly different from those in the control group. The core competency support program was effective in decreasing depression and suicidal ideation for adolescents. Therefore, this approach is recommended as a suicide prevention strategy for adolescents.

  20. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (pcore competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [JSPS-NRCT Core university program on natural medicine in pharmaceutical sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ikuo; Yamazaki, Mikako; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2009-04-01

    The Core University Program provides a framework for international cooperative research in specifically designated fields and topics, centering around a core university in Japan and its counterpart university in other countries. In this program, individual scientists in the affiliated countries carry out cooperative research projects with sharply focused topics and explicitly delineated goals under leadership of the core universities. The Core University Program which we introduce here has been renewed since 2001 under the support of both the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT). Our program aims to conduct cooperative researches particularly focusing on Natural Medicine in the field of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Institute of Natural Medicine at University of Toyama (Japan), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chulalongkorn University (Thailand), and Chulabhorn Research Institute (Thailand) have been taking part in this JSPS-NRCT Core University Program as core universities. The Program is also supported by the 20 institution members in both countries. This program is running the five research subject under a key word of natural medicine which are related to i) age-related diseases, ii) allergy and cancer, iii) hepatitis and infectious diseases, iv) structure, synthesis, and bioactivity of natural medicines, and v) molecular biology of Thai medicinal plant components and database assembling of Thai medicinal plants. The program also encourages university members to strengthen related research activities, to share advanced academic and scientific knowledge on natural medicines.

  2. Support for Programming Models in Network-on-Chip-based Many-core Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Sleth

    and scalability in an image processing application with the aim of providing insight into parallel programming issues. The second part proposes and presents the tile-based Clupea many-core architecture, which has the objective of providing configurable support for programming models to allow different programming......This thesis addresses aspects of support for programming models in Network-on- Chip-based many-core architectures. The main focus is to consider architectural support for a plethora of programming models in a single system. The thesis has three main parts. The first part considers parallelization...

  3. Study on the Rotary Ultrasonic Elliptical Vibration Machining of CFRP Using Diam ond Core Drill%碳纤维复合材料旋转超声椭圆振动套磨制孔技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; 张德远; 何凤涛; 姜兴刚

    2016-01-01

    Taking into consideration these problem s including delam ination,fuzzing and rapid tool w ear et al. in conventional drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP),this paper put forw ard a new processing technology,i.e.,the rotary ultrasonic elliptical vibration m achining (RUEM ) of CFRP using diam ond core drill. The drilling m echanism in RUEM of CFRP is analyzed and the sm all sized RUEM system is developed for the first tim e. M eanw hile,the drilling experim ent about the RUEM of CFRP is carried out. The results show ed that com pared w ith the com m on drilling of core drill,the RUEM greatly im proved the rem oval effects of chip and rod,prolonged the tool life,reduced the thrust force and torque is 25% and 30% ,respectively,effectively reduced the defects of CFRP hole delam ination and fuzzing as w ell as im proved the surface integrity of m achined hole.%针对航空航天领域中碳纤维复合材料在制孔过程中易出现分层、毛刺和刀具磨损快等问题,提出了一种新型旋转超声椭圆振动套磨制孔技术。分析了旋转超声椭圆振动套磨制孔机理,研制出了小型化旋转超声椭圆振动套磨制孔系统,并进行了碳纤维复合材料(CFR P)套磨制孔实验。结果表明:相比于普通套磨,超声椭圆振动套磨极大改善了切屑粉尘和料芯的排出,延长了刀具使用寿命;明显降低了钻削力和扭矩分别约25%和30%;有效降低了复材孔分层和毛刺的制孔缺陷,改善了孔表面粗糙度和平整性,提高了加工质量。

  4. Core IV Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Paul; And Others

    This core curriculum guide consists of materials for use in presenting a 13-unit vocational agriculture course geared toward high school students living in metropolitan areas. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: employment in agricultural occupations, supervised occupational experience, leadership in…

  5. Using DSDP/ODP/IODP core photographs and digital images in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hélder; Berenguer, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-01

    Since the late 1960's, several scientific ocean drilling programmes have been uncovering the history of the Earth hidden beneath the seafloor. The adventure began in 1968 with the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and its special drill ship, the Glomar Challenger. The next stage was the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) launched in 1985 with a new drill ship, the JOIDES Resolution. The exploration of the ocean seafloor continued, between 2003 and 2013, through the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). During that time, in addition to the JOIDES Resolution, operated by the US, the scientists had at their service the Chikyu, operated by Japan, and Mission-Specific-Platforms, funded and implemented by the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling. Currently, scientific ocean drilling continues through the collaboration of scientists from 25 nations within the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). Over the last 50 years, the scientific ocean drilling expeditions conducted by these programmes have drilled and cored more than 3500 holes. The numerous sediment and rock samples recovered from the ocean floor have provided important insight on the active biological, chemical, and geological processes that have shaped the Earth over millions of years. During an expedition, once the 9.5-meter long cores arrive from the seafloor, the technicians label and cut them into 1.5-meter sections. Next, the shipboard scientists perform several analysis using non-destructive methods. Afterward, the technicians split the cores into two halves, the "working half", which scientists sample and use aboard the drilling platform, and the "archive half", which is kept in untouched condition after being visually described and photographed with a digital imaging system. The shipboard photographer also takes several close-up pictures of the archive-half core sections. This work presents some examples of how teachers can use DSDP/ODP/IODP core photographs and digital images, available

  6. Effect of Core Training Program on Physical Functional Performance in Female Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of core training program on speed, acceleration, vertical jump, and standing long jump in female soccer players. A total of 40 female soccer players volunteered to participate in this study. They were divided randomly into 1 of 2 groups: core training group (CTG; n = 20) and control group (CG;…

  7. Financial Sector Assessment Program : Malaysia - Core Principles for Effective Deposit Insurance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund; World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This assessment of compliance with the Core Principles for Effective Deposit Insurance Systems (Core Principles) was conducted as a part of the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) performed by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank at the request of the Malaysian government. This assessment was conducted by Claire McGuire, Senior Financial Sector Specialist with the Worl...

  8. 78 FR 31563 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Core Medical Services Waiver; Application Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Core Medical Services Waiver; Application Requirements AGENCY: Health... XXVI of the Public Health Service Act, as amended by the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Extension Act of... on core medical services, including antiretroviral drugs, for individuals with HIV/AIDS identified...

  9. Geothermal well drilling manual at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez P., A.; Flores S., M.

    1982-08-10

    The objective of the drilling manual is to solve all problems directly related to drilling during the construction of a well. In this case, the topics dealt which are drilling fluids and hydraulics to be applied in the field to improve drilling progress, eliminate risks and achieve good well-completion. There are other topics that are applicable such as drill bits and the drilling string, which are closely linked to drilling progress. On this occasion drilling fluid and hydraulics programs are presented, in addition to a computing program for a Casio FX-502P calculator to be applied in the field to optimize hydraulics and in the analysis of hydraulics for development and exploration wells at their different intervals.

  10. BWR refill-reflood program: core spray distribution experimental task plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, T.

    1981-02-01

    An experimental task plan for the BWR/4 core spray task of the Refill-Reflood Test Program is presented. The test program will provide core spray distribution data for a 30 degree sector of the BWR/4 and 5-218 design. This design uses different nozzle types and different sparger elevations than the BWR/6-218 design which was tested previously. Test parameter ranges are specified; individual tests are defined; and measurement and data utilization plans are defined.

  11. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  12. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  13. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  14. Direct Observation of Rhyolite Magma by Drilling: The Proposed Krafla Magma Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Sigmundsson, F.; Papale, P.; Markusson, S.; Loughlin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Remarkably, drilling in Landsvirkjun Co.'s geothermal field in Krafla Caldera, Iceland has encountered rhyolite magma or hypersolidus rhyolite at 2.1-2.5 km depth in 3 wells distributed over 3.5 km2, including Iceland Deep Drilling Program's IDDP-1 (Mortensen, 2012). Krafla's most recent rifting and eruption (basalt) episode was 1975-1984; deformation since that time has been simple decay. Apparently rhyolite magma was either emplaced during that episode without itself erupting or quietly evolved in situ within 2-3 decades. Analysis of drill cuttings containing quenched melt from IDDP-1 yielded unprecedented petrologic data (Zierenberg et al, 2012). But interpreting active processes of heat and mass transfer requires knowing spatial variations in physical and chemical characteristics at the margin of the magma body, and that requires retrieving core - a not-inconceivable task. Core quenched in situ in melt up to 1150oC was recovered from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii by the Magma Energy Project >30 years ago. The site from which IDDP-1 was drilled, and perhaps IDDP-1 itself, may be available to attempt the first-ever coring of rhyolite magma, now proposed as the Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP). KMDP would also include geophysical and geochemical experiments to measure the response of the magma/hydrothermal system to fluid injection and flow tests. Fundamental results will reveal the behavior of magma in the upper crust and coupling between magma and the hydrothermal system. Extreme, sustained thermal power output during flow tests of IDDP-1 suggests operation of a Kilauea-Iki-like freeze-fracture-flow boundary propagating into the magma and mining its latent heat of crystallization (Carrigan et al, EGU, 2014). Such an ultra-hot Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) might be developable beneath this and other magma-heated conventional hydrothermal systems. Additionally, intra-caldera intrusions like Krafla's are believed to produce the unrest that is so troubling in

  15. Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

  16. A Formative Program Evaluation of Electronic Clinical Tracking System Documentation to Meet National Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynette S; Branstetter, M Laurie

    2016-09-01

    Electronic clinical tracking systems are used in many educational institutions of higher learning to document advanced practice registered nursing students' clinical experiences. Students' clinical experiences are constructed according to the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties core competencies. These competencies form a basis for evaluation of advanced practice registered nursing programs. However, no previous studies have evaluated the use of electronic clinical tracking systems to validate students' clinical experiences in meeting national core competencies. Medatrax, an electronic clinical tracking system, is evaluated using a formative program evaluation approach to determine if students' clinical documentations meet Family/Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner Competencies in a midsouthern family nurse practitioner program. This formative program evaluation supports the use of an electronic clinical tracking system in facilitating accreditation and program outcome goals. The significance of this study is that it provides novel evidence to support the use of an electronic clinical tracking system to assist a midsouthern school of nursing in meeting national core competencies.

  17. In-situ Trace Element and REE Analysis of Garnet Porphyroblast from the Murphy Belt Drill Core by 213 nm Laser Ablation High Resolution ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaTour, T. E.; Ghazi, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Laser ablation coupled with high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-HR-ICPMS) is a powerful tool for in-situ trace element analysis of solid samples on the micron scale. Recent development of the 213 nm (quintupled) Nd-YAG laser has significantly improved upon the more widely used 266 nm laser. In this study we focus on analysis of zoned garnets from the Murphy Marble Belt with a Universal Platform (UP) Merchantek/New Wave 213 nm laser ablation system, coupled with a Finnigan MAT Element2 high resolution ICPMS which is equipped with the fast scanning power supply magnet. Laser ablation parameters included 60 um spots size, 100% energy level, repetition rate of 20Hz and scanning speed of 16-20 um/seconds. Garnets were analyzed for Mg, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Hf and REE and the data used here were obtained by using a line scan across the diameter of the garnet porphyroblasts. Aluminous schist from drill core from the Murphy Marble Belt of the Western Blue Ridge of Georgia contains two generations of garnet, gt I and gt II. Gt II occurs as stand-alone grains and as overgrowths on gt I. Gt I grew in conjunction with development of biotite (bi) schistosity. Gt-bi geothermometry yields 512-531oC for gt I, consistent upper greenschist metamorphism. Growth of gt I was followed by growth of gt II, kyanite (ky), and staurolite (st), in turn followed by growth of sillimanite (si), large muscovite (ms) porphyroclasts, (and gt II?), associated with a high-T mylonitic event in which plagioclase and aggregates of ky+st+bi were converted to porphyroclasts, lying in a medium grained si-ms-bi schistosity. This was followed by a retrograde mylonitic event which partially converted si, ky, st, and large ms to fine grained ms schistosity which is the dominant schistosity in the rocks. Gt II is distinctly higher in CaO and lower in MnO than gt I, suggesting that it grew under high pressure, perhaps resulting from overthrusting which formed the high-T mylonitic

  18. Laser Drilling Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser drilling processes including modelling, quality assessment of drilled holes, and laser drilling applications. It provides insights into the laser drilling process and the relation among the drilling parameters pertinent to improved end product quality. This book is written for engineers and scientists working on laser machining, particularly laser drilling.

  19. General Considerations for Drill System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    meltwater can bu absorbed and refrozen in the adjacent snow. A similar principle has been suggested for disposal of melted rock produced by thermal...This last item can become very serious if the drill is immersed in meltwater . Ileat losses at the drill head are not easy to estimate in simple...Phlslberth, K. (in pr is) The thermal probe deep drilling method by E016 in 1968 at Station jul-Joaet. Central Greenland , Proceedings of icr Core

  20. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  1. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  2. 76 FR 34287 - ITS Joint Program Office; Core System Requirements Walkthrough and Architecture Proposal Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Core System Requirements Walkthrough and Architecture Proposal Review..., U.S. Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) ITS Joint Program Office (ITS JPO) will host two free public meetings with accompanying webinars to...

  3. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  4. Elemental changes and alteration recorded by basaltic drill core samples recovered from in situ temperatures up to 345°C in the active, seawater-recharged Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2016-11-01

    Hydrothermal activity results in element exchanges between seawater and oceanic crust that contribute to many aspects of ocean chemistry; therefore, improving knowledge of the associated chemical processes is of global significance. Hydrothermally altered basaltic drill core samples from the seawater-recharged Reykjanes geothermal system in Iceland record elemental gains and losses similar to those observed in samples of hydrothermally altered oceanic crust. At Reykjanes, rocks originally emplaced on the seafloor were buried by continued volcanism and subsided to the current depths (>2250 m below surface). These rocks integrate temperature-dependent elemental gains and losses from multiple stages of hydrothermal alteration that correspond to chemical exchanges observed in rocks from different crustal levels of submarine hydrothermal systems. Specifically, these lithologies have gained U, Mg, Zn, and Pb and have lost K, Rb, Ba, Cu, and light rare earth elements (La through Eu). Alteration and elemental gains and losses in lithologies emplaced on the seafloor can only be explained by a complex multistage hydrothermal alteration history. Reykjanes dolerite intrusions record alteration similar to that reported for the sheeted dike section of several examples of oceanic crust. Specifically, Reykjanes dolerites have lost K, Rb, Ba, and Pb, and gained Cu. The Reykjanes drill core samples provide a unique analog for seawater-oceanic crust reactions actively occurring at high temperatures (275-345°C) beneath a seafloor hydrothermal system.

  5. Equilibration: Developing the Hard Core of the Piagetian Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that the status of the concept of equilibration is classified by considering Piagetian theory as a research program in the sense elaborated in 1974 by Lakatos. A pilot study was made to examine the precision and testability of equilibration in Piaget's 1977 model.(Author/RH)

  6. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  7. Bucket drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezverkhiy, V.M.; Nabokov, I.M.; Podoksik, D.Z.; Sadovskiy, S.S.; Shanyukevich, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The bucket drill including a cylindrical housing with bottom, ground intake windows and cutting knives is hinged to the housing, the mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives including rods connected by the cutter knives, and drive shaft is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the effectiveness of drilling by automatic change in the angle of cutting depending on the strength of the drillable rock, the drill is equipped with elastic elements and cap with annular slits in which there are elastic elements. The mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives is equipped with levers hinged to the housing, pins with shaft and rocker arm. The rods are made with a slit and from one end are rigidly connected to the cutting knives, and from the other end to the levers by means of pins which are arranged in slits of the rod with the possibility of movement. The upper ends of the levers are installed with the possibility of movement in the pins whose shafts are arranged with the possibility of rotation in the rocker arm rigidly connected to the drive shaft. The drive shaft is equipped with cantilevers installed in the cap with the possibility of rotation and interaction with the elastic elements.

  8. Number & operations drill sheets : grades PK-2

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2010-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the number & operations concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. Each drill sheet contains warm-up and timed drill activities for the student to practice number & operations concepts.

  9. Precision Positioning for Shallow Water Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayes, D. N.; Schmidt, V. E.

    2002-12-01

    The science-driven requirement for sediment cores on continental shelves has led to the Active Heave Compensation (AHC) upgrade Global LAke Drilling (GLAD)-800 drilling system. The AHC-GLAD800 drill rig was developed for installation on the largest vessels in the UNOLS fleet and was tested in the November 2001 on the R/V Knorr. Evaluation of the results of that test cruise pointed out the need for a significant increase in the accuracy and repeatability of the real-time navigation input to the vessel?s dynamic positioning (DP) system. An shore-based evaluation of different Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers including P-Code, US Coast Guard broadcast differential GPS (DGPS) and commercial satellite distributed DGPS was used to develop an approach for real-time system that flags and excludes outliers in order to maintain the tight input requirements for the DP system. Analysis of the data collected from the shore-based experiments and the at-sea field program will be presented.

  10. FY 1983 Funding for ocean drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Proposed funding for scientific ocean drilling within the National Science Foundation (NSF) in fiscal 1983 totals $14 million, $6 million less than the current fiscal 1982 plan and about half of the original FY 1982 budget request of $26 million. However, there is more to these numbers than simple subtraction: Additional funding for scientific ocean drilling programs is on hold while decisions are being made about a future drilling program called Advanced Ocean Drilling (AOD).With the demise of the Ocean Margin Drilling Program (OMDP) when industry withdrew its support (Eos, October 20, 1981, p. 705) and with the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) long ago scheduled to end in fiscal 1983, the future for scientific ocean drilling within NSF was uncertain. To steer ocean drilling toward scientific objectives for the decade, the Conference on Scientific Ocean Drilling (COSOD) (Eos, December 22, 1981, p. 1197) examined four ocean drilling options and decided that the Glomar Explorer, converted to the current capabilities of the DSDP mainstay Glomar Challenger (i.e., without riser and well-control technologies), would meet scientific objectives through the decade. In December, the National Research Council's Committee on Ocean Margin Drilling came to the identical conclusion in its interim report. Both of these decisions were based solely on scientific merit and did not consider costs.

  11. 冰层取心回转钻进模拟实验台的设计与测试%Design and Test on Experimental Table of Stimulated Rotary Drilling for Ice Coring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云望; 曹品鲁; 龙翔; 陈宝义; 杨成

    2016-01-01

    Polar drilling practice reveals the complicated geological conditions near the bottom of ice sheet and the ice-rock interface;warm ice, basal melt water and even the debris-rich ice with unequal thickness may exist, these conditions make coring drilling extremely difficult.The optimization of bit types and the determination of reasonable drilling parameters be-come important factors to ensure safe and rapid drilling.In this paper, an experimental table is introduced, which can stim-ulate rotary drilling in ice with adjustable bit pressure and rotation speed of 0~10kN and 0~300r/min respectively and the maximum torque about 100N· m.By this experimental table, the temperature of bit, borehole depth, drilling speed and some other parameters can be measured to provide means for further research on the influence of bit type and structure pa-rameters on torque and cutting temperature.Ice drilling experiment was carried out with PDC bit;the results show that the experimental requirements can be met by this table with accurately adjusted drilling pressure and speed.%极地钻探实践表明,冰盖底部冰岩交界附近地质情况异常复杂,不但可能存在暖冰、基底融水,甚至还存在厚度不等的冰岩夹层,取心钻探异常困难,而优选钻头类型、确定合理的钻进参数是保证其安全、快速钻进的重要因素。本文设计了一套能够模拟冰层回转钻进的实验台,其技术参数为:钻压、转速分别可在0~10 kN、0~300 r/min范围内调节,最大扭矩约100 N· m。该实验台能够测量钻头切削具温度、钻孔深度及钻进速度等参数,为深入研究钻头类型及结构参数、钻进参数对扭矩、钻速和切削温度的影响规律提供了手段。采用PDC复合片钻头进行了冰钻实验,结果表明,实验台能够准确调节钻压和转速,可满足实验要求。

  12. BNL program in support of LWR degraded-core accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two major sources of loading on dry watr reactor containments are steam generatin from core debris water thermal interactions and molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON (Muir, 1981) and MARCH (Wooton, 1980) computer codes. Progress in the two programs is described in this paper. 8 figures.

  13. Preliminary Results of Stress Measurement Using Drill Cores of TCDP Hole-A: an Application of Anelastic Strain Recovery Method to Three-Dimensional In-Situ Stress Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiren Lin En-Chao Yeh1

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the feature of rock stress change at different depths above, within, and beneath the Chelungpu fault after the Chi-Chi earthquake, we employed a core-based stress measurement method, anelastic strain recovery (ASR technique to determine both the orientations and magnitudes of present three-dimensional principal rock stresses using drill core samples retrieved from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP main Hole-A. The core samples used were taken from three depths; and their lithology were sandstone at depths of 592 and 1755 m and siltstone at 1112 m. The anelastic strains of the specimens in nine directions, including six independent directions, were measured after its in-situ stress was released. Acquired anelastic strains were of high quality and reached several hundred microstrains, which is sufficiently high for the accuracy of the measurement system used. Thus, the strain data could be used for three dimensional analysis resulting in the determination of orientations and the estimation of magnitudes of the principal in-situ stresses. Preliminary stress measurement results showed that the orientations of principal stresses changed between the shallower depth above the fault and the deeper depth beneath it, that is, the present stress distribution in the TCDP hole might be influenced by the Chelungpu fault rupture. At the same time, anelastic strain recovery measurement is well suited for the task of directly determining the orientations of principal in-situ stresses and to estimate the magnitude of stresses at large/great depth.

  14. 76 FR 21789 - ITS Joint Program Office; Vehicle to Infrastructure Core System Concept of Operations; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Vehicle to Infrastructure Core System Concept of Operations; Notice of... Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The U.S. Department of Transportation ITS Joint Program Office (ITS JPO) will... about the ITS JPO, visit the program's Web site at http://www.its.dot.gov . The V2I Core System...

  15. The Need for Scientific Ocean Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Susan E.; deMenocal, Peter B.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Saffer, Demian

    2011-03-01

    Mark Twain once said, “I was seldom able to see an opportunity until it had ceased to be one.” The scientific community could soon miss an opportunity in ocean drilling. A recent article in Eos by D. K. Smith et al. (Ocean drilling: Forty years of international collaboration, Eos, 91(43), 393-394, 2010) summarized the history of scientific ocean drilling and presented an overview of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) as it currently operates. IODP will end in 2013, and an ambitious science plan is being developed to launch a new drilling program. Some people have asked, Given the program's past successes, why do we need more scientific ocean drilling?

  16. Phase 1 drilling operations at the Magma Energy Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the Phase 1 drilling operations for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. An important part of the Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program, this well is designed to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degree}C, whichever comes first. There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart, with scientific investigations in the borehole between the drilling intervals. Phase 1 of this project resulted in a 20 inch cased hole to 2558 feet, with 185 feet of coring beyond that. This document comprises a narrative of the daily activities, copies of the daily mud and lithologic reports, time breakdowns of rig activities, inventories of lost circulation materials, temperature logs of the cored hole, and a strip chart mud log. 2 figs.

  17. Drilling equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, Yu.M.; Kholosha, Ye.G.; Leshchenko, A.G.; Timchenko, A.I.

    1979-01-10

    The invention refers to units designed for extracting minerals by mechanical action on the face by a cutting tool. There is a known drills which includes a pulse device which contains a combustion chamber, cylinder, piston-percussion tool and cutting tool. The combustion chamber and the sub-piston cavity of the cylinder are connected by a channel in which there is a distributor. Its shortcoming is the fact that the pulse device does not guarantee the necessary motion of the actuating mechanism for its velocity and frequency of the shocks on the cutting tool. This reduces the efficiency of the operation and limits the area of application. The purpose of the proposed invention is to improve productivity of the device. This is achieved because the head of the drill is equipped with a 2-piston pulse device which contains 2-combustion chambers, 2 working cylinders, 2 piston percussion instruments, a rod with gas-conducting and connecting channels for interconnection of the sub-piston cavities and combustion chambers of both cylinders. The spent gases of one cylinder are used for closing the combustion chamber of the second cylinder.

  18. An Exploratory Study of Purposeful and Strategic Communicative Techniques to Teach Vocabulary From Core Reading Programs to English Learners

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effect of implementing purposeful and strategic communicative techniques situated in aspects of the communicative approach to language learning when teaching vocabulary from a core reading program to English learners. Given the importance of vocabulary instruction and the widespread use of core reading programs, it is imperative such studies are conducted to determine effective instructional practices of vocabulary with core reading programs for English learners. Parti...

  19. 绳索取心钻进工艺在佳县上高寨普查勘探区深孔中的应用%Application of Wire-line Core Drilling Technology in Shanggaozhai Prospecting Area Deep Boreholes, Jiaxian County

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王眼会; 程湖渊

    2015-01-01

    Upper part strata in the Shanggaozhai prospecting area have Quaternary accumulated loess, bedrock mainly yellowish brown Luohe sandstone and grayish white argillaceous sandstone, grayish brown mudstone. Rock hardness is relatively small, fractures and fragmentation status rather serious, thus caused drilling operation difficult. Based on summarization of problems appeared in common core drilling, introduced wire-line core drilling technological peculiarity and application details. The result has shown that the wire-line core drilling technology can increase penetrating time, lower down labor intensity, improve drilling quality, rock and coal core re⁃covery, and reduce the cost. Finally, after estimation, the common drilling technology unit cost is 520.23 RMB Yuan/m, while wire-line core drilling is 310.16 RMB Yuan/m, have reduced 40%. Thus the technology has guiding significance in popularization of wire-line core drilling in coalfield deep borehole drilling.%佳县上高寨普查勘探区上部为第四系黄土堆积而成,基岩主要是由黄褐色洛河砂岩以及灰白色泥质砂岩、灰褐色泥岩等构成,岩石硬度比较小,裂隙、破碎情况比较突出,导致钻探施工难度较大。在总结用普通取心钻进时出现的问题基础上,介绍了绳索取心钻进的钻进工艺技术的特点和应用细节。结果表明,采用绳索取心钻进工艺技术,增大了纯钻进时间,降低劳动强度,提高钻进质量和岩、煤心采取率,降低了钻探成本。最后经过测算普通钻进工艺的单位成本为520.53元/m,绳索取心钻进工艺的单位成本为310.16元/m,单位成本降低了40%。对普及绳索取心钻探工艺在煤田中深孔钻进勘探具有重要的指导意义。

  20. Heliportable drilling in the 21. century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argue, F. [Academy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada); Korach, D. [Nabors Alaska, Anchorage, AK (United States); Read, M. [Nabors Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The access season for conventional ice roads has been reduced. Therefore, efficient drilling programs are required for a short winter drilling, and long wells are not able to compete in one season. Heliportable drilling provides non-ice access. This presentation outlined the merits of heliportable drilling in the twenty-first century. Conventional heliportable drilling was discussed and several images of current and past heliportable drilling rigs were presented. New technologies were also illustrated and discussed, with particular reference to the Mi26T enabler, a Russian super heavy lift helicopter, leased to Airborne Energy Solutions. Operating data for the Mi26T was also presented and the heli-drill system was explained. Several twenty-first century heli-rigs were also illustrated and described, including rig 119H, rig 103AC, rig 106E, rig 99AC, and rig 105E. Last, the presentation identified the next steps for heli-rigs. tabs., figs.

  1. Friis Hills Drilling Project - Coring an Early to mid-Miocene terrestrial sequence in the Transantarctic Mountains to examine climate gradients and ice sheet variability along an inland-to-offshore transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A. R.; Levy, R. H.; Naish, T.; Gorman, A. R.; Golledge, N.; Dickinson, W. W.; Kraus, C.; Florindo, F.; Ashworth, A. C.; Pyne, A.; Kingan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Early to mid-Miocene is a compelling interval to study Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) sensitivity. Circulation patterns in the southern hemisphere were broadly similar to present and reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentrations were analogous to those projected for the next several decades. Geologic records from locations proximal to the AIS are required to examine ice sheet response to climate variability during this time. Coastal and offshore drill core records recovered by ANDRILL and IODP provide information regarding ice sheet variability along and beyond the coastal margin but they cannot constrain the extent of inland retreat. Additional environmental data from the continental interior is required to constrain the magnitude of ice sheet variability and inform numerical ice sheet models. The only well-dated terrestrial deposits that register early to mid-Miocene interior ice extent and climate are in the Friis Hills, 80 km inland. The deposits record multiple glacial-interglacial cycles and fossiliferous non-glacial beds show that interglacial climate was warm enough for a diverse biota. Drifts are preserved in a shallow valley with the oldest beds exposed along the edges where they terminate at sharp erosional margins. These margins reveal drifts in short stratigraphic sections but none is more than 13 m thick. A 34 m-thick composite stratigraphic sequence has been produced from exposed drift sequences but correlating beds in scattered exposures is problematic. Moreover, much of the sequence is buried and inaccessible in the basin center. New seismic data collected during 2014 reveal a sequence of sediments at least 50 m thick. This stratigraphic package likely preserves a detailed and more complete sedimentary sequence for the Friis Hills that can be used to refine and augment the outcrop-based composite stratigraphy. We aim to drill through this sequence using a helicopter-transportable diamond coring system. These new cores will allow us to obtain

  2. Deep drilling in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohn, G.S.; Koeberl, C.; Miller, K.G.; Reimold, W.U.

    2009-01-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure lies buried at moderate depths below Chesapeake Bay and surrounding landmasses in southeastern Virginia, USA. Numerous characteristics made this impact structure an inviting target for scientific drilling, including the location of the impact on the Eocene continental shelf, its threelayer target structure, its large size (??85 km diameter), its status as the source of the North American tektite strewn field, its temporal association with other late Eocene terrestrial impacts, its documented effects on the regional groundwater system, and its previously unstudied effects on the deep microbial biosphere. The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project was designed to drill a deep, continuously cored test hole into the central part of the structure. A project workshop, funding proposals, and the acceptance of those proposals occurred during 2003-2005. Initial drilling funds were provided by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Supplementary funds were provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate, ICDP, and USGS. Field operations were conducted at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, by Drilling, Observation, and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC) and the project staff during September-December 2005, resulting in two continuously cored, deep holes. The USGS and Rutgers University cored a shallow hole to 140 m in April-May 2006 to complete the recovered section from land surface to 1766 m depth. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of crater materials and 444 m of overlying postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. The crater section consists of, from base to top: basement-derived blocks of crystalline rocks (215 m); a section of suevite, impact melt rock, lithic impact breccia, and cataclasites (154 m); a thin interval of quartz sand and lithic blocks (26 m); a

  3. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  4. Manual development: A strategy for identifying core components of integrated health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooss, Angela; Hartman, Megan; Ibañez, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    Integrated care models are gaining popularity as a clinical strategy to reduce costs and improve client outcomes; however, implementation of such complex models requires an understanding of programmatic core components essential to producing positive outcomes. To promote this understanding, evaluators can work collaboratively with organization staff and leaderships to gather information on program implementation, adaptations, organizational buy-in, and project outcomes. In 2011, SAMHSA funded two Miami health clinics to implement integrated care models in co-located settings. Changes in the federal healthcare landscape, non-Medicaid expansion for Florida, and the complexity of projects goals led evaluators to facilitate a core component review as part of evaluation. A manual was developed throughout the project and captured a description, adaptations, inputs needed, lessons learned, and sustainability for each integrated care component. To increase chances for program success, evaluators should institute a method to better define core components of new programs and implementation adaptations, while keeping program replication in mind. Breaking down the program structurally gave the evaluation utility for stakeholders, and ultimately served as a resource for organizations to better understand their program model. The manual also continues to serve as a dissemination and replication source for other providers looking to implement integrated care.

  5. Histograms showing variations in oil yield, water yield, and specific gravity of oil from Fischer assay analyses of oil-shale drill cores and cuttings from the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, John D.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado contains over 1.5 trillion barrels of oil in place, making the basin the largest known oil-shale deposit in the world. Previously published histograms display oil-yield variations with depth and widely correlate rich and lean oil-shale beds and zones throughout the basin. Histograms in this report display oil-yield data plotted alongside either water-yield or oil specific-gravity data. Fischer assay analyses of core and cutting samples collected from exploration drill holes penetrating the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin can aid in determining the origins of those deposits, as well as estimating the amount of organic matter, halite, nahcolite, and water-bearing minerals. This report focuses only on the oil yield plotted against water yield and oil specific gravity.

  6. New optimized drill pipe size for deep-water, extended reach and ultra-deep drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellison, Michael J.; Delgado, Ivanni [Grant Prideco, Inc., Hoston, TX (United States); Falcao, Jose Luiz; Sato, Ademar Takashi [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moura, Carlos Amsler [Comercial Perfuradora Delba Baiana Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    A new drill pipe size, 5-7/8 in. OD, represents enabling technology for Extended Reach Drilling (ERD), deep water and other deep well applications. Most world-class ERD and deep water wells have traditionally been drilled with 5-1/2 in. drill pipe or a combination of 6-5/8 in. and 5-1/2 in. drill pipe. The hydraulic performance of 5-1/2 in. drill pipe can be a major limitation in substantial ERD and deep water wells resulting in poor cuttings removal, slower penetration rates, diminished control over well trajectory and more tendency for drill pipe sticking. The 5-7/8 in. drill pipe provides a significant improvement in hydraulic efficiency compared to 5-1/2 in. drill pipe and does not suffer from the disadvantages associated with use of 6-5/8 in. drill pipe. It represents a drill pipe assembly that is optimized dimensionally and on a performance basis for casing and bit programs that are commonly used for ERD, deep water and ultra-deep wells. The paper discusses the engineering philosophy behind 5-7/8 in. drill pipe, the design challenges associated with development of the product and reviews the features and capabilities of the second-generation double-shoulder connection. The paper provides drilling case history information on significant projects where the pipe has been used and details results achieved with the pipe. (author)

  7. Searching for the Core of Journalism Education: Program Directors Disagree on Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out their mission of preparing students to be successful journalism professionals, educators make important decisions on the core curriculum: the common courses that all journalism students must take to graduate, no matter their area of emphasis or academic constraints. This national study of U.S. journalism program directors shows they…

  8. The Team-Taught Cross-Functional Core: Insights from a Long-Term Undergraduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttermore, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A small number of undergraduate business schools have made significant changes to their curriculum to deliver a team-taught, cross-functional undergraduate core. The author examines an exemplary early-adopting program to better understand the long-term impact such a change has had on the overall organization, and to seek insights on implementation…

  9. A National Survey of Core Course Requirements, Department Names, and Undergraduate Program Titles in Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Corwin P.

    1998-01-01

    Assesses the typical number of core courses departments have, the most commonly used ones, and, in a general way, their contents. Provides data on department names and undergraduate program areas for a picture of the communication disciplines in the 1990s. (RS)

  10. COCO: a computer program for seismic analysis of a single column of the HTGR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickard, N.D.

    1978-02-01

    The document serves as a user's manual and theoretical manual for the COCO code. COCO is a nonlinear numerical integration program designed to analyze a single column of the HTGR core for seismic excitation. Output of the code includes dowel forces, collision forces, and a time history of the motion of the blocks.

  11. Literacy at the Core of the Delaware World Language Immersion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton-Archer, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Certain aspects of the implementation of language immersion programs in Delaware are unique given the state's size, demographics, and role in national education initiatives including Race to the Top, Common Core, and Smarter Balance. The Delaware experience typifies what every state, district, or even school goes through as they try to provide…

  12. Geology of the USW SD-12 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engstrom, D.A. [Spectra Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the {open_quotes}Systematic Drilling Program,{close_quotes} as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. A virtually complete section of the Calico Hills Formation was also recovered, as was core from the entire Prow Pass Tuff formation of the Crater Flat Group.

  13. New constraints on the Paleoarchean meteorite bombardment of the Earth - Geochemistry and Re-Os isotope signatures of spherule layers in the BARB5 ICDP drill core from the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Toni; Koeberl, Christian; Luguet, Ambre; van Acken, David; Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Ozdemir, Seda; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2017-08-01

    Archean spherule layers, resulting from impacts by large extraterrestrial objects, to date represent the only remnants of the early meteorite, asteroid, and comet bombardment of the Earth. Only few Archean impact debris layers have been documented, all of them embedded in the 3.23-3.47 billion year old successions of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB) in South Africa and the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. Some of them might be correlated with each other. Given the scarcity of Archean spherule deposits, four spherule layer intersections from the recently recovered BARB5 drill core from the central Barberton Greenstone Belt, analyzed in this study, provide an opportunity to gain new insight into the early terrestrial impact bombardment. Despite being hydrothermally overprinted, siderophile element abundance signatures of spherule-rich samples from the BARB5 drill core, at least in part, retained a meteoritic fingerprint. The impact hypothesis for the generation of the BARB5 spherule layers is supported by correlations between the abundances of moderately (Cr, Co, Ni) and highly siderophile (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Ru and Pd) elements, whose peak concentrations and interelement ratios are within the range of those for chondrites. Rhenium-Osmium isotope evidence further support the impact hypothesis. Collectively, this study provides evidence for extraterrestrial admixtures ranging between ∼40 and up to 100% to three of the four analyzed BARB5 spherule layers, and a scenario for their genesis involving (i) impact of a chondritic bolide into a sedimentary target, (ii) varying admixtures of meteoritic components to target materials, (iii) spherule formation via condensation in an impact vapor plume, (iv) transportation of the spherules and sedimentation under submarine conditions, followed by (v) moderate post-impact remobilization of transition metals and highly siderophile elements.

  14. [The new eubacterium Roseomonas baikalica sp. nov. isolated from core samples collected by deep-hole drilling of the bottom of Lake Baĭkal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, I S; Pechurkina, N I; Morozova, O V; Riabchikova, E I; Belikov, S I; Puchkova, L I; Emel'ianova, E K; Torok, T; Repin, V E

    2007-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of samples of sedimentary rocks from various eras of the geological history of the Baikal rift has enabled us to isolate a large number of microorganisms that can be classified into new, previously undescribed species. The present work deals with the identification and study of the morphological, biochemical, and physiological properties of one such strain, Che 82, isolated from sample C-29 of 3.4-3.5 Ma-old sedimentary rocks taken at a drilling depth of 146.74 m. As a result of our investigations, strain Che 82 is described as a new bacterial species, Roseomonas baikalica sp. nov., belonging to the genus Roseomonas within the family Methylobacteriaceae, class Alphaproteobacteria.

  15. Mini core germplasm collections for infusing genetic diversity in plant breeding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari D Upadhyaya*, Devvart Yadav, Naresh Dronavalli, CLL Gowda, and Sube Singh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic resources are essential components to meet future food security needs of world. Crop germplasm diversitycontributes to developing improved crop cultivars aimed at increasing crop productivity. The large size of germplasmcollections, coupled with unavailability of detailed data and information, has resulted in low use (<1% of germplasmleading to a narrow genetic base in many crops. The miniaturization of crop collections with almost full representation ofgenetic diversity in the form of mini core (~1% of the entire collection approach is an effective methodology to enrichand enhance crop improvement programs. The concept and process of developing mini core at The International CropsResearch Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT has been recognized worldwide as an “International PublicGood” (IPG. The mini core provides a means for accessing the larger collections for further exploration and also helps inproper assessment of genetic diversity and population structure and for association mapping and targeted gene mining.Use of mini core approach will lead to greater utilization of diverse germplasm for developing broad-based cultivars,especially in the context of climate change. Many national programs have shown immense interest in evaluating minicore as reflected by the supply of 114 sets of mini core of chickpea, groundnut, pigeonpea, sorghum, pearl millet, foxtailmillet and finger millet to researchers in 14 countries. Scientists have been able to identify new and diverse sources ofvariation for morpho-agronomic, quality, biotic, and abiotic stress resistance traits in various crops. The molecularcharacterization of the mini core will further enhance its use in plant breeding programs.

  16. Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judzis, Arnis [Salt Lake City, UT; Black, Alan D [Coral Springs, FL; Green, Sidney J [Salt Lake City, UT; Robertson, Homer A [West Jordan, UT; Bland, Ronald G [Houston, TX; Curry, David Alexander [The Woodlands, TX; Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W.

    2011-04-19

    To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

  17. Developing core competencies for monitoring and evaluation tracks in South Asian MPH programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negandhi, Himanshu; Negandhi, Preeti; Tiwari, Ritika; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay; Kulatilaka, Hemali; Tikyani, Sangeeta

    2015-08-05

    Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) provides vital information for decision-making and its structures, systems and processes are expected to be integrated throughout the life-cycle of public health programs. The acquisition of these skills should be developed in a structured manner and needs educational systems to identify core competencies in M&E teaching. This article presents our work on harmonizing M&E competencies for Masters level programs in the South Asian context and undertaking the global review of M&E track/ concentration offered in various Masters of Public Health (MPH) programs. Through an online search and snow-balling, we mapped institutions offering M&E tracks/ concentrations in Masters of Public Health (MPH) programs globally. We obtained detailed information about their M&E curriculum from university websites and brochures. The data on curricular contents was extracted and compiled. We analyzed the curricular contents using the framework for core competencies developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH); and the Miller's triangle. This data was then used to inform a consultative exercise aimed at identifying core competencies for an M&E track/ concentration in MPH programs in the South Asian context. Our curricular review of M&E content within MPH programs globally showed that different domains or broad topic areas relating to M&E are covered differently across the programs. The quantitative sciences (Biostatistics and Epidemiology) and Health Policy and Management are covered in much greater depth than the other two domains (Social & Behavioral Sciences and Environmental Health Sciences). The identification of core competencies for an M&E track/ concentration in the South Asian context was undertaken through a consultative group exercise involving representation from 11 institutions across Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka. During the consultation, the group engaged in a focused discussion to reach consensus on a set of 15

  18. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training.

  19. Follow the drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch-Roy, O. [Dando Drilling International (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The paper discusses modern drilling techniques with which Dando Drilling has been involved. It describes equipment supplied to opencast coal operations in Kalimantan, Borneo. These include polycrystalline diamond drill bits, flushing media, rig drilling controls and other specialised equipment. 3 photos.

  20. Petrology, phase equilibria and monazite geochronology of granulite-facies metapelites from deep drill cores in the Ordos Block of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Fang; Santosh, M.; Bockmann, Kiara; Kelsey, David E.; Hand, Martin; Hu, Jianmin; Wan, Yusheng

    2016-10-01

    Among the various Precambrian crustal blocks in the North China Craton (NCC), the geology and evolution of the Ordos Block remain largely enigmatic due to paucity of outcrop. Here we investigate granulite-facies metapelites obtained from deep-penetrating drill holes in the Ordos Block and report petrology, calculated phase equilibria and in-situ monazite LA-ICP-MS geochronology. The rocks we studied are two samples of cordierite-bearing garnet-sillimanite-biotite metapelitic gneisses and one graphite-bearing, two-mica granitic gneiss. The peak metamorphic age from LA-ICP-MS dating of monazite in all three samples is in the range of 1930-1940 Ma. The (U + Pb)-Th chemical ages through EPMA dating reveals that monazite occurring as inclusions in garnet are older than those in the matrix. Calculated metamorphic phase diagrams for the cordierite-bearing metapelite suggest peak P-T conditions ca. 7-9 kbar and 775-825 °C, followed by decompression and evolution along a clockwise P-T path. Our petrologic and age data are consistent with those reported from the Khondalite Belt in the Inner Mongolia Suture Zone in the northern part of the Ordos Block, suggesting that these granulite-facies metasediments represent the largest Paleoproterozoic accretionary belt in the NCC.

  1. Nature and Significance of Igneous Rocks Cored in the State 2-14 Research Borehole: Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Charles T.; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1988-11-01

    The State 2-14 research borehole of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project penetrated 3.22 km of Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary rocks in the Salton Sea geothermal system, located in the Salton Trough of southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico. In addition, three intervals of igneous rocks were recovered; a silicic tuff and two sills of altered diabase. The chemical composition of the silicic tuff at 1704 m depth suggests that it is correlative with the Durmid Hill tuff, cropping out 25 km NW of the geothermal system. In turn, both of these tuffs may be deposits of the Bishop Tuff, erupted from the Long Valley caldera of central California at 0.7 Ma. The diabases are similar to basaltic xenoliths found in the nearby Salton Buttes rhyolite domes. These diabase are interpreted as hypabyssal intrusions resulting from magmatism due to rifting of the Salton Trough as part of the East Pacific Rise/Gulf of California transtensional system. The sills apparently intruded an already developed geo-thermal system and were in turn altered by it.

  2. Contamination assessment in microbiological sampling of the Eyreville core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronstal, A.L.; Voytek, M.A.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Von der, Heyde; Lowit, M.D.; Cockell, C.S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the deep subsurface biosphere is limited due to difficulties in recovering materials. Deep drilling projects provide access to the subsurface; however, contamination introduced during drilling poses a major obstacle in obtaining clean samples. To monitor contamination during the 2005 International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deep drilling of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, four methods were utilized. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mimic the ability of contaminant cells to enter samples through fractures in the core material during retrieval. Drilling mud was infused with a chemical tracer (Halon 1211) in order to monitor penetration of mud into cores. Pore water from samples was examined using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fl uorescence spectroscopy to characterize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) present at various depths. DOC signatures at depth were compared to signatures from drilling mud in order to identify potential contamination. Finally, microbial contaminants present in drilling mud were identified through 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) clone libraries and compared to species cultured from core samples. Together, these methods allowed us to categorize the recovered core samples according to the likelihood of contamination. Twenty-two of the 47 subcores that were retrieved were free of contamination by all the methods used and were subsequently used for microbiological culture and culture-independent analysis. Our approach provides a comprehensive assessment of both particulate and dissolved contaminants that could be applied to any environment with low biomass. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Method of magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. Experimental measurements for geologic structures determination; Methode de cartographie de susceptibilite magnetique sur carottes de forage. Mesures experimentales pour la determination de structures geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delrive, C.

    1993-11-08

    The evaluation of the safety of a deep geologic repository for dangerous materials requires the knowledge of the interstitial system of the surrounding host rock. A method is proposed for the determination of geologic structures (in particular fractures) from the magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated using a SQUID magneto-gradient meter. A measurement tool using a new magnetic susceptibility captor and a testing bench have been developed. This tool allows the measurement of rocks with a magnetic susceptibility greater than 10{sup -5} SI units and can generate magnetic susceptibility maps with 4 x 4 mm{sup 2} pixels. A magnetic visibility criterion has been defined which allows to foresee if a structure is visible or not. According to the measurements done, it is shown that any centimeter-scale structure with a sufficient magnetic contrast (20%) with respect to the matrix is visible. Therefore, the dip and the orientation of such structure can be determined with a 3 degree and a 5 degree precision, respectively. The position of the structure along the core axis is known with a 4 mm precision. On the other hand, about half of the magnetic contrasts observed do not correspond to the visual analyses and can be explained by very small variations of the mineralogic composition. This last point offers some interesting ways for future research using magnetic susceptibility mapping. (J.S.). 31 refs., 90 figs., 18 tabs., 2 photos., 6 appends.

  4. Evaluation of commercial drilling and geological software for deep drilling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdominici, Simona; Prevedel, Bernhard; Conze, Ronald; Tridec Team

    2013-04-01

    The avoidance of operational delays, financial losses and drilling hazards are key indicators for successful deep drilling operations. Real-time monitoring of drilling operation data as well as geological and petrophysical information obtained during drilling provide valuable knowledge that can be integrated into existing geological and mechanical models in order to improve the drilling performance. We have evaluated ten different geological and drilling software packages capable to integrate real-time drilling and planning data (e.g. torque, drag, well path, cementing, hydraulic data, casing design, well control, geo-steering, cost and time) as well as other scientific and technical data (i.e. from drilling core, geophysical downhole logging, production test) to build geological and geophysical models for planning of further deep drillings in a given geological environment. To reach this goal, the software has to be versatile to handle different data formats from disciplines such as geology, geophysics, petrophysics, seismology and drilling engineering as well as data from different drilling targets, such as geothermal fluids, oil/gas, water reservoirs, mining purpose, CO2 sequestration, or scientific goals. The software must be capable to analyze, evaluate and plan in real-time the next drilling steps in the best possible way and under safe conditions. A preliminary geological and geophysical model with the available data from site surveys and literature is built to address a first drilling plan, in which technical and scientific aspects are taken into consideration to perform the first drilling (wildcat well). During the drilling, the acquired scientific and technical data will be used to refine the previous geological-drilling model. The geological model hence becomes an interactive object strongly linked to the drilling procedure, and the software should allow to make rapid and informed decisions while drilling, to maximize productivity and minimize drilling

  5. Martian dreaming: The red-hot search for evidence of life on other planets could spur revolutionary new drilling techniques for Planet Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2004-02-01

    The challenge of proving the existence of water, hence the possibility of life, on Mars, the development of lightweight, compact technology to do the necessary drilling and the potential impact that development of that technology may have on drilling technology on Earth, is discussed. One of the most advanced of the projects designed to look deeper into the Martian surface is a joint NASA-Baker Hughes development of a fully automated bottomhole assembly attached by cable that drills fluidless and at low power levels. The device is designed to operate without a drillstring; it acquires a core, hauls it up the cable and goes down again. At least in theory, the cable could be extended more or less indefinitely. The drill is planned to be field-tested in the Canadian High Arctic. Automation of the equipment that will be able to deal with the wide variety of situations that challenge even the best human operators, will be the most likely legacy of the program that could have the potential to make useful contributions to the exploration industry. Various other projects, such as laser drilling, and drilling with Kevlar coiled tubing containing geophysical sensors embedded in the drill collars, are underway at the Colorado School of Mines. Honeybee Robotics has developed a prototype one-metre drill, that is capable of taking core samples and transfer them to a spectrometer. They are also developing the unique Inchworm deep drilling system that will be capable to burrow several kilometres below the surface. Among these experimental projects the Inchworm system in particular is seen as having the greatest potential for application in the oil and gas industry. An all-Canadian mission to Mars scheduled for 2011 that could leverage Canadian mining industry drilling technology to drill for rock samples is also reported.

  6. CASING DRILLING TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2005-01-01

    Casing drilling is an alternative option to conventional drilling and uses standard oilfield casing instead of drillstring. This technology is one of the greatest developments in drilling operations. Casing drilling involves drilling and casing a well simultaneously. In casing driling process, downhole tools can be retrieved, through the casing on wire-line, meaning tool recovery or replacement of tools can take minutes versus hours under conventional methods. This process employs wireline-re...

  7. Effects of Functional Training Program in Core Muscles in Women with Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Darío Pinzón-Ríos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the effects of a program of functional muscles core training targeting women with fibromyalgia. Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental type trial was conducted, before and after an intervention, for 20 days, often three days/week, 60 minutes each session. In a single-group of eight women, changes in muscle strength, pain, quality of life related to health and physical activity were evaluated. Results: An increase in repetitions of the test trunk flexion, time on the left and right bridge testing lateral and prone bridge the test were found. All features of pain decreased, and, according to the S-FIQ, a decrease in morning fatigue, stiffness and anxiety was reported. Also Met’s/minute-weeks increased after intervention. Conclusion: These data suggest that functional program core muscle training is effective in increasing muscle strength, pain modulation, functional performance optimization, and increased levels of physical activity in women with fibromyalgia.

  8. Core stability for dancers - testing the effect of an exercise program

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to create a targeted tool, a three-month exercise program, for an advanced group of dancers to improve their core stability. The second purpose was to increase awareness of the importance of deep abdominal activation among dancers. The thesis was implemented in cooperation with a local dance school in Pori, Tanssikoulu Tiina ja heimo, which provided the target group of research: an advanced group of dancers, called LeikistiVakavasti. The research methods of this...

  9. Effects of Functional Training Program in Core Muscles in Women with Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the effects of a program of functional muscles core training targeting women with fibromyalgia. Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental type trial was conducted, before and after an intervention, for 20 days, often three days/week, 60 minutes each session. In a single-group of eight women, changes in muscle strength, pain, quality of life related to health and physical activity were evaluated. Results: An increase in repetitions of the test trunk flexio...

  10. Improvement in dynamic balance and core endurance after a 6-week core-stability-training program in high school track and field athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A; Mitzel, Jonathan G

    2013-11-01

    Core training specifically for track and field athletes is vague, and it is not clear how it affects dynamic balance and core-endurance measures. To determine the effects of a 6-week core-stabilization-training program for high school track and field athletes on dynamic balance and core endurance. Test-retest. High school in north central West Virginia. Thirteen healthy high school student athletes from 1 track and field team volunteered for the study. Subjects completed pretesting 1 wk before data collection. They completed a 6-wk core-stabilization program designed specifically for track and field athletes. The program consisted of 3 levels with 6 exercises per level and lasted for 30 min each session 3 times per week. Subjects progressed to the next level at 2-wk intervals. After 6 wk, posttesting was conducted The subjects were evaluated using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) for posteromedial (PM), medial (M), and anteromedial (AM) directions; abdominal-fatigue test (AFT); back-extensor test (BET); and side-bridge test (SBT) for the right and left sides. Posttest results significantly improved for all 3 directions of the SEBT (PM, M, and AM), AFT, BET, right SBT, and left SBT. Effect size was large for all variables except for PM and AM, where a moderate effect was noted. Minimal-detectable-change scores exceeded the error of the measurements for all dependent variables. After the 6-wk core-stabilization-training program, measures of the SEBT, AFT, BET, and SBT improved, thus advocating the use of this core-stabilization-training program for track and field athletes.

  11. International solar-terrestrial physics program: A plan for the core spaceflight missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    This brochure has been prepared by NASA on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA), the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan) (ISAS), and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to describe the scope of the science problems to be investigated and the mission plan for the core International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. This information is intended to stimulate discussions and plans for the comprehensive worldwide ISTP Program. The plan for the study of the solar - terrestrial system is included. The Sun, geospace, and Sun-Earth interaction is discussed as is solar dynamics and the origins of solar winds.

  12. Permeability and seismic velocity and their anisotropy across the Alpine Fault, New Zealand: An insight from laboratory measurements on core from the Deep Fault Drilling Project phase 1 (DFDP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. J.; Tatham, D.; Faulkner, D. R.; Mariani, E.; Boulton, C.

    2017-08-01

    The Alpine Fault, a transpressional plate boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, is known to rupture quasiperiodically with large magnitude earthquakes (Mw 8). The hydraulic and elastic properties of fault zones are thought to vary over the seismic cycle, influencing the nature and style of earthquake rupture and associated processes. We present a suite of laboratory permeability and P (Vp) and S (Vs) wave velocity measurements performed on fault lithologies recovered during the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1), which sampled principal slip zone (PSZ) gouges, cataclasites, and fractured ultramylonites, with all recovered lithologies overprinted by abundant secondary mineralization, recording enhanced fluid-rock interaction. Core material was tested in three orthogonal directions, orientated relative to the down-core axis and, when present, foliation. Measurements were conducted with pore pressure (H2O) held at 5 MPa over an effective pressure (Peff) range of 5-105 MPa. Permeabilities and seismic velocities decrease with proximity to the PSZ with permeabilities ranging from 10-17 to 10-21 m2 and Vp and Vs ranging from 4400 to 5900 m/s in the ultramylonites/cataclasites and 3900 to 4200 m/s at the PSZ. In comparison with intact country rock protoliths, the highly variable cataclastic structures and secondary phyllosilicates and carbonates have resulted in an overall reduction in permeability and seismic wave velocity, as well as a reduction in anisotropy within the fault core. These results concur with other similar studies on other mature, tectonic faults in their interseismic period.

  13. DANCE, BALANCE AND CORE MUSCLE PERFORMANCE MEASURES ARE IMPROVED FOLLOWING A 9-WEEK CORE STABILIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM AMONG COMPETITIVE COLLEGIATE Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graning, Jessica; McPherson, Sue; Carter, Elizabeth; Edwards, Joshuah; Melcher, Isaac; Burgess, Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Background Dance performance requires not only lower extremity muscle strength and endurance, but also sufficient core stabilization during dynamic dance movements. While previous studies have identified a link between core muscle performance and lower extremity injury risk, what has not been determined is if an extended core stabilization training program will improve specific measures of dance performance. Hypothesis/Purpose This study examined the impact of a nine-week core stabilization program on indices of dance performance, balance measures, and core muscle performance in competitive collegiate dancers. Study Design Within-subject repeated measures design. Methods A convenience sample of 24 female collegiate dance team members (age = 19.7 ± 1.1 years, height = 164.3 ± 5.3 cm, weight 60.3 ± 6.2 kg, BMI = 22.5 ± 3.0) participated. The intervention consisted of a supervised and non-supervised core (trunk musculature) exercise training program designed specifically for dance team participants performed three days/week for nine weeks in addition to routine dance practice. Prior to the program implementation and following initial testing, transversus abdominis (TrA) activation training was completed using the abdominal draw-in maneuver (ADIM) including ultrasound imaging (USI) verification and instructor feedback. Paired t tests were conducted regarding the nine-week core stabilization program on dance performance and balance measures (pirouettes, single leg balance in passe’ releve position, and star excursion balance test [SEBT]) and on tests of muscle performance. A repeated measures (RM) ANOVA examined four TrA instruction conditions of activation: resting baseline, self-selected activation, immediately following ADIM training and four days after completion of the core stabilization training program. Alpha was set at 0.05 for all analysis. Results Statistically significant improvements were seen on single leg balance in passe

  14. DANCE, BALANCE AND CORE MUSCLE PERFORMANCE MEASURES ARE IMPROVED FOLLOWING A 9-WEEK CORE STABILIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM AMONG COMPETITIVE COLLEGIATE Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Todd; Graning, Jessica; McPherson, Sue; Carter, Elizabeth; Edwards, Joshuah; Melcher, Isaac; Burgess, Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Dance performance requires not only lower extremity muscle strength and endurance, but also sufficient core stabilization during dynamic dance movements. While previous studies have identified a link between core muscle performance and lower extremity injury risk, what has not been determined is if an extended core stabilization training program will improve specific measures of dance performance. This study examined the impact of a nine-week core stabilization program on indices of dance performance, balance measures, and core muscle performance in competitive collegiate dancers. Within-subject repeated measures design. A convenience sample of 24 female collegiate dance team members (age = 19.7 ± 1.1 years, height = 164.3 ± 5.3 cm, weight 60.3 ± 6.2 kg, BMI = 22.5 ± 3.0) participated. The intervention consisted of a supervised and non-supervised core (trunk musculature) exercise training program designed specifically for dance team participants performed three days/week for nine weeks in addition to routine dance practice. Prior to the program implementation and following initial testing, transversus abdominis (TrA) activation training was completed using the abdominal draw-in maneuver (ADIM) including ultrasound imaging (USI) verification and instructor feedback. Paired t tests were conducted regarding the nine-week core stabilization program on dance performance and balance measures (pirouettes, single leg balance in passe' releve position, and star excursion balance test [SEBT]) and on tests of muscle performance. A repeated measures (RM) ANOVA examined four TrA instruction conditions of activation: resting baseline, self-selected activation, immediately following ADIM training and four days after completion of the core stabilization training program. Alpha was set at 0.05 for all analysis. Statistically significant improvements were seen on single leg balance in passe' releve and bilateral anterior reach for the SEBT (both p ≤ 0

  15. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP): (I) Drilling for Supercritical Hydrothermal Fluids is Underway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.; Bird, D. K.; Reed, M. H.; Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.

    2008-12-01

    production should follow in 2010. During 2009-19 two new wells, ~4 km deep, will be drilled at the Hengill and the Reykjanes geothermal fields in southern Iceland, and subsequently deepened into the supercritical zone. In contrast to the fresh water systems at Krafla and Hengill, the Reykjanes geothermal system produces hydrothermally modified seawater on the Reykjanes peninsula, where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge comes on land. Processes at depth at Reykjanes should be more similar to those responsible for black smokers on oceanic rift systems. Because of the considerable international scientific opportunities afforded by the IDDP, the US National Science Foundation and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program will jointly fund the coring and sampling for scientific studies. Research is underway on samples from existing wells in the targeted geothermal fields, and on active mid-ocean ridge systems that have conditions believed to be similar to those that will be encountered in deep drilling by the IDDP. Some of these initial scientific studies by US investigators are reported in the accompanying papers.

  16. Historical record of European emissions of heavy metals to the atmosphere since the 1650s from alpine snow/ice cores drilled near Monte Rosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbante, Carlo; Schwikowski, Margit; Döring, Thomas; Gäggeler, Heinz W; Schotterer, Ulrich; Tobler, Leo; van de Velde, Katja; Ferrari, Christophe; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Andrea; Rosman, Kevin; Bolshov, Michael; Capodaglio, Gabriele; Cescon, Paolo; Boutron, Claude

    2004-08-01

    Cr, Cu, Zn, Co, Ni, Mo, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sb, Pt, Au, and U have been determined in clean room conditions by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques, in various sections of two dated snow/ice cores from the high-altitude (4450 m asl) glacier saddle Colle Gnifetti, Monte Rosa massif, located in the Swiss-Italian Alps. These cores cover a 350-year time period, from 1650 to 1994. The results show highly enhanced concentrations for most metals in snow/ice dated from the second half of the 20th century, compared with concentrations in ancient ice dated from the 17th and 18th centuries. The highest increase factors from the pre-1700 period to the post-1970 period are observed for Cd (36), Zn (19), Bi (15), Cu (11), and Ni (9), confirming the importance of atmospheric pollution by heavy metals in Europe. Metal concentrations observed in Colle Gnifetti snow around 1980 appear to be quantitatively related to metal emissions from Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Belgium, and Austria at that time, making it possible to reconstruct past changes in metal emission in these countries during the last centuries.

  17. Depth profile of 41Ca in an Apollo 15 drill core and the low-energy neutron flux in the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Fink, D.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Masarik, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1997-05-01

    Systematic measurements of the concentrations of cosmogenic 41Ca (half-life = 1.04 × 10 5 yr) in the Apollo 15 long core 15001-15006 were performed by accelerator mass spectroscopy. Earlier measurements of cosmogenic 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 53Mn in the same core have provided confirmation and improvement of theoretical models for predicting production profiles of nuclides by cosmic ray induced spallation in the Moon and large meteorites. Unlike these nuclides, 41Ca in the lunar surface is produced mainly by thermal neutron capture reactions on 40Ca. The maximum productions of 41Ca, about 1 dpm/g Ca, was observed at a depth in the Moon of about 150 g/cm 2. For depths below about 300 g/cm 2, 41Ca production falls off exponentially with an e-folding length of 175 g/cm 2. Neutron production in the Moon was modeled with the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code System, and yields of nuclei produced by low-energy thermal and epithermal neutrons were calculated with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code. The new theoretical calculations using these codes are in good agreement with our measured 41Ca concentrations as well as with 60Co and direct neutron fluence measurements in the Moon.

  18. Coccolithophore and benthic foraminifera distribution patterns in the Gulf of Cadiz and Western Iberian Margin during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 339

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B.; Grunert, P.; Ausin, B.; Hodell, D.; Flores, J.-A.; Alvarez-Zarikian, C. A.; Hernandez-Molina, F. J.; Stow, D.; Piller, W. E.; Paytan, A.

    2017-06-01

    For the first time during an Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition (Exp. 339, Mediterranean Outflow) water samples for living coccolithophore distributions and mudline samples for coccoliths, benthic foraminifera, and geochemical analyses in the underlying surface sediments were collected. In total, 14 water samples (from 5 to 20 m water depth) and 7 mudline samples were gathered at the drill sites. Coccolithophore distributions show spatial variations in species diversity. In particular, assemblages that characterize the Western Iberian Margin differ from those in the Gulf of Cadiz, indicative of oceanographic and environmental controls on the community in the upper ocean (0-20 m depth). Comparison of the living assemblages to those in surface sediments shows differences in the presence of some species, suggesting the influence of post deposition sedimentary processes. Other factors such as the season of sampling and the limited sampling depth may also have a role in the differences recorded. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages seem to be primarily determined by source, quantity and quality of available food. Sites in the Gulf of Cadiz are bathed by Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) and characterized by a considerable amount of advected food particles. Elevated epibenthic foraminifera exploit this niche, while arborescent epifaunal and infaunal taxa thrive on food particles falling out of MOW. The combined data suggest different flow speeds and settling of MOW suspension load in the Gulf of Cadiz. In contrast, assemblages from the Western Iberian Margin located farthest from or outside of MOW are determined by local export productivity and mirror trophic conditions in the surface waters. Both assemblages reveal variation in the composition at intermediate and deep water depths along the southern and western Iberian Margins with distance from the Strait of Gibraltar.

  19. Development and application of the capacity to make tests of dynamic displacement in samples of oil well drilling cores; Desarrollo y aplicacion de la capacidad para realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras L, Enrique; Garcia M, Pablo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In the Laboratory of Deposits of the Gerencia de Geotermia of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) the capacity has been developed to make tests of dynamic oil displacement by means of gas or brine injection in samples of oil well drilling cores. Also the methodologies to interpret the results of these tests in terms of dynamics and the efficiency of the oil recovery in terms of the relative permeability have been developed. These capacities represent a very important contribution towards the improvement of the insufficiency that exists in the country to make the large amount of tests of dynamic displacement that demand the different Actives of PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP), since they satisfy their necessities of data on which the activities of design and implementation of the most suitable techniques for the hydrocarbon recovery of the oil deposits lean. In the present work these capacities are described and some examples are presented of the results that have been obtained from their application in special studies of drilling cores, which have been recently made in the Laboratory of Deposits of the IIE for diverse Actives of PEP exploitation. [Spanish] En el laboratorio de yacimientos de la Gerencia de Geotermia del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) se ha desarrollado la capacidad de realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico de aceite mediante inyeccion de salmuera o de gases en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros. Tambien se han desarrollado las metodologias para interpretar los resultados de estas pruebas en terminos de la dinamica y la eficiencia de la recuperacion de aceite y en terminos de la permeabilidades relativas. Estas capacidades representan una contribucion muy importante hacia el mejoramiento de la insuficiencia que existe en el pais para realizar la gran cantidad de pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico que demandan los diferentes activos de explotacion de PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion (PEP), ya

  20. Geology of the USW SD-7 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engstrom, D.A. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The USW SD-7 drill hole is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the Systematic Drilling Program, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Yucca Mountain site has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-7 drill hole is located near the southern end of the potential repository area and immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility. The hole is not far from the junction of the Main Test Level drift and the proposed South Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-7 is 2675.1 ft (815.3 m) deep, and the core recovered nearly complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. Core was recovered from much of the underlying Calico Hills Formation, and core was virtually continuous in the Prow Pass Tuff and the Bullfrog Tuff. The SD-7 drill hole penetrated the top several tens of feet into the Tram Tuff, which underlies the Prow Pass and Bullfrog Tuffs. These latter three units are all formations of the Crater Flat Group, The drill hole was collared in welded materials assigned to the crystal-poor middle nonlithophysal zone of the Tiva Canyon Tuff; approximately 280 ft (85 m) of this ash-flow sheet was penetrated by the hole. The Yucca Mountain Tuff appears to be missing from the section at the USW SD-7 location, and the Pah Canyon Tuff is only 14.5 ft thick. The Pah Canyon Tuff was not recovered in core because of drilling difficulties, suggesting that the unit is entirely nonwelded. The presence of this unit is inferred through interpretation of down-hole geophysical logs.

  1. Geology of the USW SD-7 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engstrom, D.A. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The USW SD-7 drill hole is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the Systematic Drilling Program, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Yucca Mountain site has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-7 drill hole is located near the southern end of the potential repository area and immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility. The hole is not far from the junction of the Main Test Level drift and the proposed South Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-7 is 2675.1 ft (815.3 m) deep, and the core recovered nearly complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. Core was recovered from much of the underlying Calico Hills Formation, and core was virtually continuous in the Prow Pass Tuff and the Bullfrog Tuff. The SD-7 drill hole penetrated the top several tens of feet into the Tram Tuff, which underlies the Prow Pass and Bullfrog Tuffs. These latter three units are all formations of the Crater Flat Group, The drill hole was collared in welded materials assigned to the crystal-poor middle nonlithophysal zone of the Tiva Canyon Tuff; approximately 280 ft (85 m) of this ash-flow sheet was penetrated by the hole. The Yucca Mountain Tuff appears to be missing from the section at the USW SD-7 location, and the Pah Canyon Tuff is only 14.5 ft thick. The Pah Canyon Tuff was not recovered in core because of drilling difficulties, suggesting that the unit is entirely nonwelded. The presence of this unit is inferred through interpretation of down-hole geophysical logs.

  2. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  3. Introduction to drilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Malcom

    1989-12-01

    Terrestrial drilling technology is reviewed. The general requirements for a drilling system are given and conventional drilling techniques (rotary drag-bit, rotary roller-bit, percussive, rotary percussive) are described. Unconventional techniques for penetrating solids are outlined, including thermal drilling (spalling or melting), projectile penetration, high pressure liquid jets, explosive jets, erosion by projectile streams, and chemical penetration. Special attention is given to drilling in ice and frozen soils, performance data are given, including values for penetration rate and specific energy consumption. The principles, theory and equipment relating to each drilling technique are indicated by means of diagrams.

  4. The Core Curricula of Information Systems Undergraduate Programs: A Survey of AACSB-Accredited Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    The author examines the present state of information systems undergraduate programs in the United States. He reviewed 516 institutions and collected data on 234 institutions offering information systems (IS) undergraduate programs. Of seven core courses required by the IS 2010 curriculum model, four are required by more than 50% of the programs,…

  5. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  6. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  7. Ship Heave Effects on ODP Drilling Dynamics: analysis of MWD data in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, G.; Gaillot, P.; Goldberg, D.

    2001-12-01

    Characterization of the dynamics of ship heave and its effect on downhole drilling and coring has been long sought after in the Ocean Drilling Program. Operating in the Nankai trough region, the JOIDES Resolution acquired new data of downhole parameters using commercially-available Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) tools at two drilling sites. Our objective during ODP Leg 196 was to record weight-on-bit, rate of penetration, torque, and pump pressure near the bit as drilling proceeded. Digital instruments installed on the rig floor simultaneously acquired vital surface information of the drilling parameters. Although the sampling rate afforded by the downhole tools is insufficient to resolve wave periods of 8-10 seconds, longer wavelength changes are clearly observed. Wavelet transform analysis was used to eliminate window length restrictions with conventional Fourier analysis and to retain the time-specific information recorded in the raw signal. The integration of the uphole and downhole data sets and subsequent wavelet analysis show less variation with heave than in previous experiments near Antarctica where sea states reached 4 meters. The ratio of surface to downhole weight-on-bit for the two data sets in the >30 second spectral window varies systematically with changes in sea state, water depth, pipe depth and driller input. We are thus able to study the effects and drilling dynamics in changing sea states and in water depths up to 4800 meters and to evaluate the operation of the shipboard heave compensation systems. As a result of these analyses, ODP is deriving an empirical approach for operational use to describe downhole and uphole drilling parameters under a variety of conditions and in different geological environments.

  8. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  9. Institute of Medicine core competencies as a foundation for nursing program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tama L; Hancock, Dawson R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore one institution's experience integrating the Institute of Medicine (IOM) competencies into a pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing curriculum. In response to a growing number of errors in the health care system and efforts to increase patient safety and quality of care, the IOM proposed that students in health care professions learn to implement five core competencies. The program evaluation encompassed a mixed-method, stakeholder-focused methodology using a curriculum matrix triangulated with Student and Faculty Core Competency surveys. Results of the study indicate that all competencies were evident in the curriculum. Students often cited barriers to implementation of the competencies while faculty cited opportunities. Findings suggest that faculty need to raise student awareness of performing the competencies and be deliberate in the design of experiences to facilitate competency implementation.

  10. Tools used in mineral exploration for measuring the conductivity and the resistivity in drillholes and on drill core: observations on their range of sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Devon; Smith, Richard S.; Mahmoodi, Omid

    2016-07-01

    A study has been undertaken to acquire conductivity data using the EM39 low-induction-number conductivity tool. Measurements were taken in three holes in the Sudbury, Ontario, area: at Victoria in the south-west part of the Sudbury structure; at Levack, in the north range; and at the Lady Violet deposit near Copper Cliff. These data were compared with pre-existing data acquired using four other tools and measurements taken on core extracted from the holes. The four tools are the DGI galvanic downhole resistivity tool, the IFG downhole conductivity tool, and the handheld KT-10 and GDD meters. The comparison shows that each tool has a finite range of sensitivity. The resistivity tool used by DGI Geoscience is sensitive to conductivities primarily in the range 0.01 to 100 mS/m; the EM39 tool is sensitive to conductivities in the range of ~30 mS/m to 3000 mS/m and the IFG tool to conductivities greater than 30 mS/m. In the sub-ranges where the ranges of two instruments overlap, one might expect a good correlation between the measurements derived from the two tools. However, this is not always the case, as the instruments can have a different volume of sensitivity: the EM39 has a coil separation of 50 cm and will see material greater than 20 cm away from the hole; whereas the IFG conductivity tool seems to have a smaller spatial scale of sensitivity due to its 10 cm coil size. The handheld instruments used to log the conductivity of the core are sensitive to more conductive material (greater than ~1 S/m). The scale of the sensors of these handheld instruments is a few cm, so they are focussing on a very local estimate. The spatial characteristics of the handheld instruments are similar to the IFG tool, so there is a reasonable linear correlation between the conductivities derived from these three different instruments. However, the slopes are not unity; for example, the GDD instrument gives values three times greater than the KT-10. When selecting tools for measuring

  11. 78 FR 63516 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY... Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors.'' This RG describes testing methods the NRC staff considers acceptable for demonstrating the operability of emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling...

  12. [JSPS Asian core program on cutting-edge organic chemistry in Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Minoru; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    The vision to establish this program was to establish and extend cooperative research efforts beyond the intraregional boundaries. The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) has taken an initiative to support an Asian Core Program, which aims to create world-class research hubs within the Asian region and foster the development of the next generation of leading researchers by establishing sustainable collaborative relations among research and educational institutions in Asian countries. Nagoya University strongly supports and is the Core University of this program with Minoru Isobe and Toshio Nishikawa serving as the coordinator. Representing their respective countries/regions, Guo-Qiang Lin and Zhu-Jun Yao (China, Shanghai), Sunggak Kim and Kwan-Soo Kim (Korea), Somsak Ruchirawat (Thailand), and Chun-Chen Liao and Biing-Jiun Uang (China, Taipei) share in the vision to enhance collaborative efforts. As coordinators they have invited many cooperative universities/institutes in their home countries/regions to start the network since 2005. Singapore (Tech-Peng Loh) has joined lately, and Hong Kong is represented by Henry Wong. All cooperating regions also agreed to support this program by acquiring matching funds for the duration of the program, that is, until March 2010. This program is jointly supported by the JSPS (Japan), the NNSFC (China, Beijing), the NSCT (China, Taipei), the KOSEF/CMDS (Korea), the NRCT/CRI (Thailand), and the IUPAC for an East Asian Network Task group project. Pauline Chiu takes the general secretary work. The initiation of the Asian Core Program and the Inauguration Conference (The 0th International Conference on Cutting-Edge Organic Chemistry in Asia; ICCEOCA-0) was held in Nagoya (2006. 3), which was followed by ICCEOCA-1 in Okinawa, Japan (2006. 10), ICCEOCA-2 in Busan, Korea (2007. 9), ICCEOCA-3 in Hangzhou, China (2008. 10). A post symposium of ICCEOCA-1 was held in Hsinchu, Taiwan (2006. 10), and a satellite symposium of

  13. Geochemical and stable isotopic data on barren and mineralized drill core in the Devonian Popovich Formation, Screamer sector of the Betze-Post gold deposit, northern Carlin trend, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, William D.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Zohar, Pamela B.; Tousignant, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The Devonian Popovich Formation is the major host for Carlin-type gold deposits in the northern Carlin trend of Nevada. The Popovich is composed of gray to black, thin-bedded, calcareous to dolomitic mudstone and limestone deposited near the carbonate platform margin. Carlin-type gold deposits are Eocene, disseminated, auriferous pyrite deposits characterized by acid leaching, sulfidation, and silicification that are typically hosted in Paleozoic calcareous sedimentary rocks exposed in windows through siliceous sedimentary rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. The Carlin trend currently is the largest gold producer in the United States. The Screamer ore zone is a tabular body on the periphery of the huge Betze-Post gold deposit. Screamer is a good place to study both the original lithogeochemistry of the Popovich Formation and the effects of subsequent alteration and mineralization because it is below the level of supergene oxidation, mostly outside the contact metamorphic aureole of the Jurassic Goldstrike stock, has small, high-grade ore zones along fractures and Jurassic dikes, and has intervening areas with lower grade mineralization and barren rock. In 1997, prior to mining at Screamer, drill core intervals from barren and mineralized Popovich Formation were selected for geochemical and stable isotope analysis. The 332, five-foot core samples analyzed are from five holes separated by as much as 2000 feet (600 meters). The samples extend from the base of the Wispy unit up through the Planar and Soft sediment deformation units into the lower part of the upper Mud unit of the Popovich Formation.

  14. Pore-water mobility: Distribution of {delta}{sup 37}Cl, {sup 36}Cl/Cl, {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I and dissolved {sup 4}He concentration in the core drilled in the Mobara gas field, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahara, Yasunori, E-mail: mahara@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University, 2-chome, Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Ohta, Tomoko [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University, 2-chome, Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Tokunaga, Tomochika [Dept. Environmental Systems, School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [Dept. Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Yayoi 2-11-16, Bunkyou, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Nagao, Keisuke [Laboratory for Earthquake Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Honngo, Bunkyou, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakata, Eiji; Miyamoto, Yuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko 1646, Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Kubota, Takumi [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University, 2-chome, Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    We measured {sup 36}Cl/Cl and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I isotope ratios, dissolved {sup 4}He concentrations, and {delta}{sup 37}Cl to estimate the residence time and flow characteristics of pore water in rocks of the Kazusa Group in the Mobara gas field, Japan. We deduced a residence time of 0.28-0.85 Ma for the pore water, based on a secular equilibrium value of 7.05 {+-} 1.58 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} for the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio in Pleistocene strata of the gas field. Furthermore, the concentration of {sup 4}He corrected by the solubility equilibrium model in the pore water indicated that residence times varied from 0.09 to 0.62 Ma from the depth of 642 to the depth of 1742 m in the core drilled in the gas field. The pore-water dating results have insignificant differences between the ages of the Kazusa Group formations, compared with the iodine ages from {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio. Variations of {delta}{sup 37}Cl in the pore water suggested that mass transport in rocks of the Kazusa Group was dominantly controlled by diffusion.

  15. Overview of the extensive logging use in the scientific ocean drilling's most challenging project, Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw Thu, Moe; Sanada, Yoshinori; Kido, Yukari; Kawamura, Yoshihisa; Kuramoto, Shin'ichi; Matsuda, Shigemi

    2010-05-01

    First of its kind in scientific drilling history, NanTroSEIZE is complex drilling project with multiyear and multistage effort, aimed at drilling, coring, logging, and instrumenting the seismogenic zone of an active subduction margin, in a region thought to generate megathrust earthquakes of magnitude >8.0 on the moment-magnitude scale. Four stages are divided to realize ambitious scientific objectives using CHIKYU, most advanced floating laboratory in scientific drilling. Unlike the industry use of logging technology, expeditions in the scientific ocean drilling used logging data in much wider applications by working various software onboard Chikyu and laboratory measurements of core-cuttings throughout single or multiple expeditions, ranging from 40 to 56 days. Instead of traditional full coring, logging-while-drilling was made across the transect at the beginning to quickly access the geological and structural information from the formation. In line with changing tactic of heavy use on logging, four working groups were organized and worked on the logging data; lithologic characterization/lithostratigraphy, physical properties and hydrogeology, structural geology and geomechanics and cuttings/core-log-seismic integration (CLSI). During the Stage 1 with three expeditions, a transect of eight sites were drilled frontal thrust region, the midslope megasplay fault region, and the Kumano forearc basin region using full suite of MWD-LWD and made coring and downhole measurements. Stage 2 composed of two expeditions with the aims of building on the results of Stage 1 and preparing for later observatory installations for long-term monitoring of deformation at the updip limit of the seismogenic zone. Extensive logging program at riser site, first ever in scientific ocean drilling history, includes conventional wireline logging with long-awaited formation stress measurements and wide-angle walk-away VSP with longest-ever offset to have better velocity information of the

  16. Lack of training threatening drilling talent supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Flatern, R.

    1996-07-01

    When oil prices crashed in the mid-1980s, the industry tightened budgets. Among the austerity measures taken to survive the consequences of low product prices was an end to expensive, long-term investment training of drilling engineers. In the absence of traditional sources of trained drilling talent, forward-looking contractors are creating their own training programs. The paper describes the activities of some companies who are setting up their own training programs, and an alliance being set up by Chevron and Amoco for training. The paper also discusses training drilling managers, third-party trainers, and the consequences for the industry that does not renew its inventory of people.

  17. Joint Rescue Drill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Ships gather for a joint rescue drill at the Waigaoqiao Dock in Shanghai on August 24.A large-scale rescue drill, combining maritime and air forces,was held as part of the ongoing World Maritime Rescue Conference 2011 in the city.During the drill,

  18. Paleoclimatic implications of magnetic susceptibility in Late Pliocene-Quaternary sediments from deep drilling core SG-1 in the western Qaidam Basin (NE Tibetan Plateau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilin; Appel, Erwin; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Song, Chunhui; Cao, Liwan

    2012-06-01

    Lake sediments are important archives of paleoclimate change and erosion history. A 938.5 m long core (SG-1) of lacustrine sediments, dated at 2.77 Ma to 0.1 Ma, was obtained from the western Qaidam Basin in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, consisting of dark grayish mudstone and grayish siltstone, intercalated with salts and fine sandstones in the upper part. Magnetic susceptibility data, combined with detailed rock magnetic properties, were analyzed for revealing the significance of ferro(i)magnetic concentration for past changes of climate and erosion. Mass-specific susceptibility (χ) shows a striking cyclic and long-term variation. Samples with high χ values are dominated by magnetite and maghemite with pseudo-single-domain properties. In contrast, samples with low χ values contain maghemite from single-domain to multidomain and, additionally, a significant fraction of hematite. The driving mechanism of χ variation can be explained by three alternative models: (1) different source regions with alternations of wind and cryoclastic erosion in a wider hinterland (dry-cold climate) and surface runoff erosion from a narrower area (more humid climate) and (2 and 3) low-temperature oxidation, occurring either in the lake sediments (dry climate) or in the catchment area during weathering (more humid climate). Trends of χ match with changes in sedimention rates and are roughly synchronous with the deep-sea δ18O record on a glacial-interglacial timescale. Therefore, the concentration of magnetic minerals in the western Qaidam Basin sediments is likely controlled by both tectonic influence and paleoenvironmental changes but can be best interpreted by alternations and trends of dry-cold and more humid periods due to Asian drying and global cooling.

  19. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Kamalesh [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Aaron, Dick [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Macpherson, John [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Many countries around the world, including the USA, have untapped geothermal energy potential. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology is needed to economically utilize this resource. Temperatures in some EGS reservoirs can exceed 300°C. To effectively utilize EGS resources, an array of injector and production wells must be accurately placed in the formation fracture network. This requires a high temperature directional drilling system. Most commercial services for directional drilling systems are rated for 175°C while geothermal wells require operation at much higher temperatures. Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) projects have been initiated to develop a 300°C capable directional drilling system, the first developing a drill bit, directional motor, and drilling fluid, and the second adding navigation and telemetry systems. This report is for the first project, “High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System, including drill bit, directional motor and drilling fluid, for enhanced geothermal systems,” award number DE-EE0002782. The drilling system consists of a drill bit, a directional motor, and drilling fluid. The DOE deliverables are three prototype drilling systems. We have developed three drilling motors; we have developed four roller-cone and five Kymera® bits; and finally, we have developed a 300°C stable drilling fluid, along with a lubricant additive for the metal-to-metal motor. Metal-to-metal directional motors require coatings to the rotor and stator for wear and corrosion resistance, and this coating research has been a significant part of the project. The drill bits performed well in the drill bit simulator test, and the complete drilling system has been tested drilling granite at Baker Hughes’ Experimental Test Facility in Oklahoma. The metal-to-metal motor was additionally subjected to a flow loop test in Baker Hughes’ Celle Technology Center in Germany, where it ran for more than 100

  20. Initial report on drilling into seismogenic zones of M2.0 - M5.5 earthquakes from deep South African gold mines (DSeis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Durrheim, Raymond; Yabe, Yasuo; Ito, Takatoshi; van Aswegen, Gerrie; Grobbelaar, Michelle; Funato, Akio; Ishida, Akimasa; Ogasawara, Hiroyuki; Mngadi, Siyanda; Manzi, Musa; Ziegler, Martin; Ward, Tony; Moyer, Pamela; Boettcher, Margaret; Ellsworth, Bill; Liebenberg, Bennie; Wechsler, Neta; Onstott, Tullis; Berset, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) approved our proposal (Ogasawara et al., EGU 2016) to drill into and around seismogenic zones where critically stressed faults initiated ruptures at depth. The drilling targets include four ruptures equivalent to M2.0, 2.8, 3.5, and 5.5 that dynamically and quasi-statically evolved in 2.9 Ga hard rock in the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa. Major advantages of our drilling locations are the large quantity and high-quality of existing data from dense seismic arrays both on surface and near-field underground in three deep South African gold mines. Additionally, the great depths (1.0 to 3.3 km from surface) to collar holes reduce drilling costs significantly and enable a larger number of holes to be drilled. Flexibility in drilling direction will also allow us to minimize damage in borehole or drilled cores. With the ICDP funds, we will conduct full-core drilling of 16 holes with drilling ranges from 50 to 750 m to recover both materials and fractures in and around the seismogenic zones, followed by core and borehole logging. Additional in-hole monitoring at close proximity will be supported by co-mingled funds and will follow the ICDP drilling. Expected magnitudes of maximum shear stress are several tens of MPa. We have established an overcoring procedure to measure 3D-stress state for adverse underground working conditions so as not to interfere with mining operations. This procedure was optimized based on the Compact Conic-ended Borehole Overcoring (CCBO) technique (ISRM suggested; Sugawara and Obara, 1999). Funato and Ito (2016 IJRMMS) developed a diametrical core deformation analysis (DCDA) method to measure differential stress using only drilled core by assuming diametrical change with roll angles caused by elastic in-axisymmetrical expansion during drilling. A gold mine has already drilled a hole to intersect the hypocenter of a 2016 M3.5 earthquake and carried out the CCBO stress measurement in

  1. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population.

  2. LEADAT: a MATLAB-based program for lead-210 data analysis of sediment cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xueqiang; MATSUMOTO Eiji

    2006-01-01

    The program described herein (LEADAT) serves to calculate sediment date and sedimentation rate using the 210Pb method for the studies of environmental processes and pollution history on a time scale of 100~150 a. The program written in MATLAB (Version7.0) permits the user to select the principal models of 210Pb method, I.e., the constant fluxes of sediment and lead-210 (CFSL) model, the constant flux of lead-210 (CFL) model, the constant initial concentration of lead-210 (CICL) model and the two-layer mixing (TLM) model. Although appropriate model selection is essentially based on understanding of the sedimentary processes, the pattern of the excess 210Pb profile is also helpful for model selection. The excess 210Pb profiles for two sediment cores collected from a brackish lake and an embayment respectively are used to demonstrate the application of the program. With a graphical user interface, the program can be easily executed. Not only ASCII but also graphical output can be generated by means of the program. Meanwhile, the code can be modified easily for extension.

  3. Final Technical Report for “A Heliportable Sonic Drilling Platform for Microhole Drilling and Exploration”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, Peter

    2008-05-05

    The Phase I objectives were fully achieved the execution of a program that included the: • Development of a comprehensive model of the sonic drill technology and interaction of the dynamic drilling parameters with the impedance of the earth. • Operation and measurement of the sonic drilling process in the field at full scale. • Comparison of the analytical and experimental results to form an objective and quantified approach to describe the fundamental phenomena and to develop a methodology for automated control of the sonic drilling process. • Conceptual design of a modular sonic drilling system that can be transported to remote sites by helicopter. As a result, the feasibility of a commercially viable sonic drilling technology that can produce microholes up to 1,500 feet in depth, and that is field deployable to remote, environmentally sensitive sites via a helicopter, has been demonstrated.

  4. New types of drilling tools fit with PCD elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koníèek Jiøí

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant developments in drilling technology over the last years has been the introduction of polycrystalline diamond (PCD as macro-cutting elements in the rotary drill application. This paper gives a summary of core bits and cutter bits, produced by Pramet Šumperk Co., which are fit with these PCD elements. Some results, obtained with these types of cutter bits by drilling in mines of Ostrava-Karviná Basin, are also presented.

  5. Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Psychology Doctoral Programs: Core Competencies and a Framework for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Johnson, Shara M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Rausch, Emilie M; Conroy, Mary Alice

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and counseling psychology programs currently lack adequate evidence-based competency goals and training in suicide risk assessment. To begin to address this problem, this article proposes core competencies and an integrated training framework that can form the basis for training and research in this area. First, we evaluate the extent to which current training is effective in preparing trainees for suicide risk assessment. Within this discussion, sample and methodological issues are reviewed. Second, as an extension of these methodological training issues, we integrate empirically- and expert-derived suicide risk assessment competencies from several sources with the goal of streamlining core competencies for training purposes. Finally, a framework for suicide risk assessment training is outlined. The approach employs Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) methodology, an approach commonly utilized in medical competency training. The training modality also proposes the Suicide Competency Assessment Form (SCAF), a training tool evaluating self- and observer-ratings of trainee core competencies. The training framework and SCAF are ripe for empirical evaluation and potential training implementation.

  6. Effects of the CORE Exercise Program on Pain and Active Range of Motion in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Junesun

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the effects of the CORE exercise program on pain and active range of motion (AROM) in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups: the CORE group (n = 15) and the control group (n = 15). The CORE group performed the CORE exercise program for 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week, for 4 weeks, while the control group did not perform any exercise. The visual analog scale (VAS) and an algometer were used to measure pain, and pain-free AROM in the trunk was measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The CORE group showed significantly decreased VAS scores at rest and during movement and had a significantly increased pressure pain threshold in the quadratus lumborum and AROM in the trunk compared with those in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the CORE exercise program is effective in decreasing pain and increasing AROM in patients with chronic low back pain. Thus, the CORE exercise program can be used to manage pain and AROM in patients with chronic low back pain.

  7. The Chew Bahir Drilling Project (HSPDP). Deciphering climate information from the Chew Bahir sediment cores: Towards a continuous half-million year climate record near the Omo - Turkana key palaeonanthropological Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Verena E.; Asrat, Asfawossen; Chapot, Melissa S.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Dean, Jonathan R.; Deino, Alan; Günter, Christina; Junginger, Annett; Lamb, Henry F.; Leng, Melanie J.; Roberts, Helen M.; Schaebitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin H.

    2017-04-01

    As a contribution towards an enhanced understanding of human-climate interactions, the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) has successfully completed coring five dominantly lacustrine archives of climate change during the last 3.5 Ma in East Africa. All five sites in Ethiopia and Kenya are adjacent to key paleoanthropological research areas encompassing diverse milestones in human evolution, dispersal episodes, and technological innovation. The 280 m-long Chew Bahir sediment records, recovered from a tectonically-bound basin in the southern Ethiopian rift in late 2014, cover the past 550 ka of environmental history, a time period that includes the transition to the Middle Stone Age, and the origin and dispersal of modern Homo sapiens. Deciphering climate information from lake sediments is challenging, due to the complex relationship between climate parameters and sediment composition. We will present the first results in our efforts to develop a reliable climate-proxy tool box for Chew Bahir by deconvolving the relationship between sedimentological and geochemical sediment composition and strongly climate-controlled processes in the basin, such as incongruent weathering, transportation and authigenic mineral alteration. Combining our first results from the long cores with those from a pilot study of short cores taken in 2009/10 along a NW-SE transect of the basin, we have developed a hypothesis linking climate forcing and paleoenvironmental signal-formation processes in the basin. X-ray diffraction analysis of the first sample sets from the long Chew Bahir record reveals similar processes that have been recognized for the uppermost 20 m during the pilot-study of the project: the diagenetic illitization of smectites during episodes of higher alkalinity and salinity in the closed-basin lake induced by a drier climate. The precise time resolution, largely continuous record and (eventually) a detailed understanding of site specific proxy formation

  8. Hydrothermal brecciation in the Jemez Fault zone, Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) corehole VC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks intersected deep in Continental Scientific Drilling Program corehole VC-1, adjacent to the late Cenozoic Valles caldera complex, have been disrupted to form a spectacular breccia sequence. The breccias are of both tectonic and hydrothermal origin, and probably formed in the Jemez fault zone, a major regional structure with only normal displacement since mid-Miocene. Tectonic breccias are contorted, crushed, sheared, and granulated; slickensides are commmon. Hydrothermal breccias, by contrast, lack these frictional textures, but arej commonly characterized by fluidized matrix foliation and prominent clast rounding. Fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal breccias are dominantly two-phase, liquid-rich at room temperature, principally secondary, and form two distinctly different compositional groups. Older inclusions, unrelated to brecciation, are highly saline and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range 189 to 246/sup 0/C. Younger inclusions, in part of interbreccia origin, are low-salinity and homogenize (also to liquid) in the range 230 to 283/sup 0/C. Vapor-rich inclusions locally trapped along with these dilute liquid-rich inclusions document periodic boiling. These fluid-inclusion data, together with alteration assemblages and textures as well as the local geologic history, have been combined to model hydrothermal brecciation at the VC-1 site.

  9. New Era of Scientific Ocean Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, N.; Toczko, S.; Sanada, Y.; Igarashi, C.; Kubo, Y.; Maeda, L.; Sawada, I.; Takase, K.; Kyo, N.

    2014-12-01

    The D/V Chikyu, committed to scientific ocean drilling since 2007, has completed thirteen IODP expeditions, and Chikyu's enhanced drilling technology gives us the means to reach deep targets, enhanced well logging, deep water riserless drilling, and state of the art laboratory. Chikyu recovered core samples from 2466 meters below sea floor (mbsf) in IODP Exp. 337, and drilled to 3058.5 mbsf in IODP Exp. 348, but these are still not the limit of Chikyu's capability. As deep as these depths are, they are just halfway to the 5200 mbsf plate boundary target for the NanTroSEIZE deep riser borehole. There are several active IODP proposals in the pipeline. Each has scientific targets requiring several thousand meters of penetration below the sea floor. Riser technology is the only way to collect samples and data from that depth. Well logging has been enhanced with the adoption of riser drilling, especially for logging-while-drilling (LWD). LWD has several advantages over wireline logging, and provides more opportunities for continuous measurements even in unstable boreholes. Because of the larger diameter of riser pipes and enhanced borehole stability, Chikyu can use several state-of-the-art downhole tools, e.g. fracture tester, fluid sampling tool, wider borehole imaging, and the latest sonic tools. These new technologies and tools can potentially expand the envelope of scientific ocean drilling. Chikyu gives us access to ultra-deep water riserless drilling. IODP Exp. 343/343T investigating the March 2011 Tohoku Oki Earthquake, explored the toe of the landward slope of the Japan Trench. This expedition reached the plate boundary fault target at more than 800 mbsf in water depths over 6900 m for logging-while-drilling, coring, and observatory installation. This deep-water drilling capability also expands the scientific ocean drilling envelope and provides access to previously unreachable targets. On top of these operational capabilities, Chikyu's onboard laboratory is

  10. Geologic field notes and geochemical analyses of outcrop and drill core from Mesoproterozoic rocks and iron-oxide deposits and prospects of southeast Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Warren C.; Granitto, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources/Missouri Geological Survey, undertook a study from 1988 to 1994 on the iron-oxide deposits and their host Mesoproterozoic igneous rocks in southeastern Missouri. The project resulted in an improvement of our understanding of the geologic setting, mode of formation, and the composition of many of the known deposits and prospects and the associated rocks of the St. Francois terrane in Missouri. The goal for this earlier work was to allow the comparison of Missouri iron-oxide deposits in context with other iron oxide-copper ± uranium (IOCG) types of mineral deposits observed globally. The raw geochemical analyses were released originally through the USGS National Geochemical Database (NGDB, http://mrdata.usgs.gov). The data presented herein offers all of the field notes, locations, rock descriptions, and geochemical analyses in a coherent package to facilitate new research efforts in IOCG deposit types. The data are provided in both Microsoft Excel (Version Office 2010) spreadsheet format (*.xlsx) and MS-DOS text formats (*.txt) for ease of use by numerous computer programs.

  11. Rescuing Paleomagnetic Data from Deep-Sea Cores Through the IEDA-CCNY Data Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A.; Randel, C.; Palumbo, R. V.; Carter, M.; Cai, Y.; Kent, D. V.; Lehnert, K.; Block, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data provides essential information for evaluating the chronostratigraphy of sedimentary cores. Lamont research vessels Vema and Robert Conrad collected over 10,000 deep-sea sediment cores around the world from 1953 to 1989. 10% of these cores have been sampled for paleomagnetic analyses at Lamont. Over the years, only 10% of these paleomagnetic records have been published. Moreover, data listings were only rarely made available in older publications because electronic appendices were not available and cyberinfrastructure was not in place for publishing and preserving these data. As a result, the majority of these datasets exist only as fading computer printouts in binders on the investigator's bookshelf. This summer, undergraduate students from the NSF-funded IEDA-CCNY Data Internship Program started digitizing this enormous dataset under the supervision of Dennis Kent, the current custodian of the data and one of the investigators who oversaw some of the data collection process, and an active leader in the field. Undergraduate students worked on digitizing paper records, proof-reading and organizing the data sheets for future integration into an appropriate repository. Through observing and plotting the data, the students learned about how sediment cores and paleomagnetic data are collected and used in research, and the best practices in data publishing and preservation from IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance) team members. The students also compared different optical character recognition (OCR) softwares and established an efficient workflow to digitize these datasets. These datasets will eventually be incorporated in the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), so that they can be easily compared with similar datasets and have the potential to generate new findings. Through this data rescue project, the students had the opportunity to learn about an important field of scientific research and interact with world-class scientists.

  12. Fifty Years of Soviet and Russian Drilling Activity in Polar and Non-Polar Ice: A Chronological History

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    86 Dzhantuganskoye Firn Plateau (Central Caucasus, drilling site #C5).....................................86 1984: Vavilov...32 Figure 13. Core auger used at Druznaya Station for drilling in firn . ..............................................34 Figure 14. Drilling...in October of 1956 just outside Mirny (Kapitsa 1958; Model 1959). Two holes to depths of 23.5 and 86.5 m were drilled using a conventional GP-1

  13. Data analysis & probability drill sheets : grades 6-8

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the data analysis & probability concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages your students to review the concepts in unique ways. Each drill sheet contains warm-up and timed drill activities for the student to practice data analysis & probability concepts.

  14. Scientific drilling projects in ancient lakes: Integrating geological and biological histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Thomas; Wagner, Bernd; Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Albrecht, Christian; Ariztegui, Daniel; Delicado, Diana; Francke, Alexander; Harzhauser, Mathias; Hauffe, Torsten; Holtvoeth, Jens; Just, Janna; Leng, Melanie J.; Levkov, Zlatko; Penkman, Kirsty; Sadori, Laura; Skinner, Alister; Stelbrink, Björn; Vogel, Hendrik; Wesselingh, Frank; Wonik, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Sedimentary sequences in ancient or long-lived lakes can reach several thousands of meters in thickness and often provide an unrivalled perspective of the lake's regional climatic, environmental, and biological history. Over the last few years, deep-drilling projects in ancient lakes became increasingly multi- and interdisciplinary, as, among others, seismological, sedimentological, biogeochemical, climatic, environmental, paleontological, and evolutionary information can be obtained from sediment cores. However, these multi- and interdisciplinary projects pose several challenges. The scientists involved typically approach problems from different scientific perspectives and backgrounds, and setting up the program requires clear communication and the alignment of interests. One of the most challenging tasks, besides the actual drilling operation, is to link diverse datasets with varying resolution, data quality, and age uncertainties to answer interdisciplinary questions synthetically and coherently. These problems are especially relevant when secondary data, i.e., datasets obtained independently of the drilling operation, are incorporated in analyses. Nonetheless, the inclusion of secondary information, such as isotopic data from fossils found in outcrops or genetic data from extant species, may help to achieve synthetic answers. Recent technological and methodological advances in paleolimnology are likely to increase the possibilities of integrating secondary information. Some of the new approaches have started to revolutionize scientific drilling in ancient lakes, but at the same time, they also add a new layer of complexity to the generation and analysis of sediment-core data. The enhanced opportunities presented by new scientific approaches to study the paleolimnological history of these lakes, therefore, come at the expense of higher logistic, communication, and analytical efforts. Here we review types of data that can be obtained in ancient lake drilling

  15. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate‐Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report: Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report; Methane Hydrate Workshop Report; Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan; and Final Scientific/Technical Report

  16. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report: Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report; Methane Hydrate Workshop Report; Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan; and Final Scientific/Technical Report.

  17. Advances in developing the air-lift drilling technology. Concept of a portal drilling rig - trial of a steerable shaft drilling bit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.

    1988-12-01

    The Federal Minister of Research and Technology is supporting a project of Wirth GmbH to develop a new drilling rig suitable for drilling deep shafts from the surface through ground of almost any condition, from unstable formations to solid rock. The development of such drilling rig is based on the blind drilling method with air-assisted reverse circulation. - Various concepts of drilling rigs have been developed in accordance with different planning stages of a combined RD-project. Based on the experience of an extensive R and D program a steerable vertical drilling bit has been developed by which deviations from the vertical can be positively corrected. The prototype of this steerable bit with a diameter of 2.1 m has been tested successfully while drilling a well with a depth of more than 200 m in an open pit coal mine.

  18. Fatigue analysis of aluminum drill pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ribeiro Plácido

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed to investigate the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of aluminum drill pipes. Initially, the fatigue properties were determined through small-scale tests performed in an optic-mechanical fatigue apparatus. Additionally, full-scale fatigue tests were carried out with three aluminum drill pipe specimens under combined loading of cyclic bending and constant axial tension. Finally, a finite element model was developed to simulate the stress field along the aluminum drill pipe during the fatigue tests and to estimate the stress concentration factors inside the tool joints. By this way, it was possible to estimate the stress values in regions not monitored during the fatigue tests.

  19. Physical property data from the ICDP-USGS Eyreville cores A and B, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA, acquired using a multisensor core logger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, H.A.; Murray, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilled three core holes to a composite depth of 1766 m within the moat of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. Core recovery rates from the drilling were high (??90%), but problems with core hole collapse limited the geophysical downhole logging to natural-gamma and temperature logs. To supplement the downhole logs, ??5% of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure cores was processed through the USGS GeoTek multisensor core logger (MSCL) located in Menlo Park, California. The measured physical properties included core thickness (cm), density (g cm-3), P-wave velocity (m s-1), P-wave amplitude (%), magnetic susceptibility (cgs), and resistivity (ohm-m). Fractional porosity was a secondary calculated property. The MSCL data-sampling interval for all core sections was 1 cm longitudinally. Photos of each MSCL sampled core section were imbedded with the physical property data for direct comparison. These data have been used in seismic, geologic, thermal history, magnetic, and gravity models of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. Each physical property curve has a unique signature when viewed over the full depth of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure core holes. Variations in the measured properties reflect differences in pre-impact target-rock lithologies and spatial variations in impact-related deformation during late-stage crater collapse and ocean resurge. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  20. Resident clinical duties while preparing for the ABR core examination: position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStigter, Kristen K; Mainiero, Martha B; Janower, Murray L; Resnik, Charles S

    2012-11-01

    Historically, diagnostic radiology residents have been allowed time off from clinical duties to study for the ABR oral board examination. This practice has resulted in a disruptive "board frenzy" at many programs. The new ABR examination structure gives programs an opportunity to evaluate this practice. This position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology describes the rationale behind a recommendation of no time off from clinical service before the ABR core examination.

  1. Quality in drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, E.; Gervais, I. [Sedco Forex Jacintoport Facility, Channelview, TX (United States); Le Moign, Y.; Pangarkar, S.; Stibbs, B. [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); McMorran, P. [Sedco Forex, Pau (France); Nordquist, E. [Dubai Petroleum Company, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Pittman, T. [Sedco Forex, Perth (Australia); Schindler, H. [Sedco Forex, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Scott, P. [Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Driven by cost and profitability pressures, quality has taken on new meaning and importance in the oil field during the past decade. In drilling operations, new initiatives have led to cooperative team efforts between operators and drilling contractors to enhance quality. In this article examples are given of how one drilling contractor, by adopting a quality culture, is reaping major benefits for its clients as well as its employees. 22 figs., 19 refs.

  2. Experimental Study of Formation Damage during Underbalanced-Drilling in Naturally Fractured Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Salimi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental investigation of formation damage in a fractured carbonate core sample under underbalanced drilling (UBD conditions. A major portion of this study has concentrated on problems which are often associated with UBD and the development of a detailed protocol for proper design and execution of an UBD program. Formation damage effects, which may occur even if the underbalanced pressure condition is maintained 100% of the time during drilling operation, have been studied. One major concern for formation damage during UBD operations is the loss of the under-balanced pressure condition. Hence, it becomes vital to evaluate the sensitivity of the formation to the effect of an overbalanced pulse situation. The paper investigates the effect of short pulse overbalance pressure during underbalanced conditions in a fractured chalk core sample. Special core tests using a specially designed core holder are conducted on the subject reservoir core. Both overbalance and underbalanced tests were conducted with four UBD drilling fluids. Core testing includes measurements of the initial permeability and return permeability under two different pressure conditions (underbalanced and overbalanced. Then the procedure is followed by applying a differential pressure on the core samples to mimic the drawdown effect to determine the return permeability capacity. In both UBD and short pulse OBP four mud formulations are used which are: lab oil, brine (3% KCL, water-based mud (bentonite with XC polymer and fresh water. The return permeability measurements show that a lab oil system performed fairly well during UBD and short OB conditions. The results indicate that a short overbalance pressure provides a significant reduction in permeability of the fractured formations. In most tests, even application of a high drawdown pressure during production cannot restore the initial permeability by more than 40%.

  3. Marinobacter alkaliphilus sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from subseafloor alkaline serpentine mud from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1200 at South Chamorro Seamount, Mariana Forearc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Ken; Moyer, Craig L; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Nogi, Yuichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2005-02-01

    Novel alkaliphilic, mesophilic bacteria were isolated from subseafloor alkaline serpentine mud from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1200D at a serpentine mud volcano, South Chamorro Seamount in the Mariana Forearc. The cells of type strain ODP1200D-1.5T were motile rods with a single polar flagellum. Growth was observed between 10 and 45-50 degrees C (optimum temperature: 30-35 degrees C, 45-min doubling time), between pH 6.5 and 10.8-11.4 (optimum: pH 8.5-9.0), and between NaCl concentrations of 0 and 21% (w/v) (optimum NaCl concentration: 2.5-3.5%). The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic heterotroph utilizing various complex substrates, hydrocarbons, carbohydrates, organic acids, and amino acids. Nitrate or fumarate could serve as an electron acceptor to support growth under anaerobic conditions. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 57.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolate belonged to the genus Marinobacter and was the most closely related to M. aquaeolei strain VT8T and M. hydrocarbonoclasticus strain SP.17T, while DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that the new isolate could be genetically differentiated from the previously described species of Marinobacter. Based on the physiological and molecular properties of the new isolate, we propose the name Marinobacter alkaliphilus sp. nov., type strain: ODP1200D-1.5T (JCM12291T and ATCC BAA-889T).

  4. Drilling cost-cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capuano, L.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Louis E. Capuano, Jr., President, ThermaSource, Inc., discusses cost-cutting in the drilling phase of geothermal energy exploration and production. All aspects of a geothermal project including the drilling must be streamlined to make it viable and commercial. If production could be maximized from each well, there would be a reduction in drilling costs. This could be achieved in several ways, including big hole and multi-hole completion, directional drilling, better knowledge of the resource and where to penetrate, etc.

  5. Using core competencies to build an evaluative framework: outcome assessment of the University of Guelph Master of Public Health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Nicole; Wallar, Lauren E; McEwen, Scott A; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2014-07-31

    Master of Public Health programs have been developed across Canada in response to the need for graduate-level trained professionals to work in the public health sector. The University of Guelph recently conducted a five-year outcome assessment using the Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada as an evaluative framework to determine whether graduates are receiving adequate training, and identify areas for improvement. A curriculum map of core courses and an online survey of University of Guelph Master of Public Health graduates comprised the outcome assessment. The curriculum map was constructed by evaluating course outlines, assignments, and content to determine the extent to which the Core Competencies were covered in each course. Quantitative survey results were characterized using descriptive statistics. Qualitative survey results were analyzed to identify common themes and patterns in open-ended responses. The University of Guelph Master of Public Health program provided a positive learning environment in which graduates gained proficiency across the Core Competencies through core and elective courses, meaningful practicums, and competent faculty. Practice-based learning environments, particularly in collaboration with public health organizations, were deemed to be beneficial to students' learning experiences. The Core Competencies and graduate surveys can be used to conduct a meaningful and informative outcome assessment. We encourage other Master of Public Health programs to conduct their own outcome assessments using a similar framework, and disseminate these results in order to identify best practices and strengthen the Canadian graduate public health education system.

  6. Exploration and Application of Wire-line Core Drilling in Longdong Coalfield%陇东煤田绳索取心钻探的探索和应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘小志

    2013-01-01

    The formation characteristics of Longdong coalfield region are described, and based on the analysis on the main factors influencing the drilling construction, the drill bit diameter increasing, the borehole structure optimizing, the suitable drill bit for rock optimally selecting, mud system improving and other supporting technologies were adopted.The paper fo-cuses on the prevention and treatment of the adhesive sticking drill accident.%简述了陇东煤田地区地层特点,分析影响钻探施工的主要因素,采取增大钻头外径、优化钻孔结构、优选适岩钻头、完善泥浆体系等配套技术措施,重点阐述了粘附卡钻事故的预防和处理技术。

  7. Drill cuttings mount formation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye

    2014-07-01

    Oil, Gas and Energy sector has been identified as an essential driving force in the Malaysian Economic Transformation Programs (ETP). Recently confirmed discovery of many offshore oil and gas deposits in Malaysian waters has ignited new confidence in this sector. However, this has also spurred intense interest on safeguarding the health and environment of coastal waters in Malaysia from adverse impact resulting from offshore oil and gas production operation. Offshore discharge of spent drilling mud and rock cuttings is the least expensive and simplest option to dispose of large volumes of drilling wastes. But this onsite offshore disposal may have adverse environmental impacts on the water column and the seabed. It may also pose occupational health hazards to the workers living in the offshore platforms. It is therefore important to model the transport and deposition of drilling mud and rock cuttings in the sea to enable proper assessment of their adverse impacts on the environment and the workers. Further, accumulation of drill particles on the seabed may impede proper operation of pipelines on the seabed. In this paper, we present an in-house application model TUNA-PT developed to cater to local oil and gas industry needs to simulate the dispersion and mount formation of drill cuttings by offshore oil and gas exploration and production platforms. Using available data on Malaysian coastal waters, simulation analyses project a pile formation on the seabed with a maximum height of about 1 m and pile radius of around 30 to 50 m. Simulated pile heights are not sensitive to the heights of release of the cuttings as the sensitivity has been mitigated by the depth of water.

  8. THE IRON OXIDE CHANGES IN DRILLING CORES FROM THE TWO WALLS OF XIADIAN ACTIVE FAULT%夏垫活动断裂两盘岩心氧化铁变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓平; 曹景虎; 陈献程

    2012-01-01

    采用全取岩心的钻探方法,在1679年三河-平谷8级地震的地震断层两侧各完成了一个深约50m的钻孔.在2个钻孔中分别采集了14C、OSL和TL测年样品,且测定了样品的沉积年代.结合钻孔中揭露出地层的沉积特征,可以把XD1孔中晚更新世地层划分为4段,相应地也可把XD6孔揭露的晚更新世地层划分为4段.2个孔中的地层段可以相互对应,它们的地层沉积时代大致相同.在断层上升盘的XD1孔岩心中,大致按照0.5m的间隔采集样品,在断层下降盘的XD6钻孔岩心中,大致按照1m的间隔采集样品,实验室用高锰酸钾滴定法、邻菲啰啉分光光度法分别测定了每件样品的FeO和Fe2O3含量.分析2个钻孔中同沉积时段地层中FeO、Fe2O3含量,以及Fe2+/Fe3+比值,发现灰黑色沉积物中Fe2+/Fe3+比值大于灰黄色沉积物中Fe2+/Fe3+比值,灰黑色沉积物处于较强的还原环境中.断层上升盘、下降盘同沉积时段地层均为灰黑色时,断层下降盘地层中Fe2+/Fe3+比值大于断层上升盘相应的地层,其沉积的还原环境强于断层上升盘.%Using the complete core drilling method, we completed two boreholes on both sides of Xiadian active fault on which an MB. 0 earthquake occurred in 1679. From rock cores of the two boreholes, we collected 14C, OSL and TL samples and determined their depositional ages. According to the geochron-ological data, and in combination with the sedimentary features of the formation in borehole cores, the late Pleistocene strata in XD1 hole can be divided into four stratigraphic sections. And the late Pleistocene revealed by borehole XD6 can also be divided into four stratigraphic sections. Late Pleistocene can be juxtaposed in the two boreholes; the deposition times of corresponding stratigraphic sections are also consistent. We collected some samples from XD1 (on the upthrown plate ) at a 0. 5 meters interval roughly, and from XD6 (downthrown plate) at a 1. 0 meters

  9. Sea Bed Drilling Technology MARUM-MeBo: Overview on recent scientific drilling campaigns and technical developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Tim; Bergenthal, Markus; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Pape, Thomas; Kopf, Achim; Huhn-Frehers, Katrin; Gohl, Karsten; Wefer, Gerold

    2017-04-01

    The MARUM-MeBo (abbreviation for Meeresboden-Bohrgerät, the German expression for seafloor drill rig) is a robotic drilling system that is developed since 2004 at the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen in close cooperation with Bauer Maschinen GmbH and other industry partners. The MARUM-MeBo drill rigs can be deployed from multipurpose research vessel like, RV MARIA S. MERIAN, RV METEOR, RV SONNE and RV POLARSTERN and are used for getting long cores both in soft sediments as well as hard rocks in the deep sea. The first generation drill rig, the MARUM-MeBo70 is dedicated for a drilling depth of more than 70 m (Freudenthal and Wefer, 2013). Between 2005 and 2016 it was deployed on 17 research expeditions and drilled about 3 km into different types of geology including carbonate and crystalline rocks, gas hydrates, glacial tills, sands and gravel, glacial till and hemipelagic mud with an average recovery rate of about 70 %. We used the development and operational experiences of MARUM-MeBo70 for the development of a second generation drill rig MARUM-MeBo200. This drill rig is dedicated for conducting core drilling down to 200 m below sea floor. After successful sea trials in the North Sea in October 2014 the MeBo200 was used on a scientific expedition on the research vessel RV SONNE (SO247) in March/April 2016. During 12 deployments we drilled altogether 514 m in hemipelagic sediments with volcanic ashes as well as in muddy and sandy slide deposits off New Zealand. The average core recovery was about 54%. The maximum drilling depth was 105 m below sea floor. Developments for the MeBo drilling technology include the development of a pressure core barrel that was successfully deployed on two research expeditions so far. Bore hole logging adds to the coring capacity. Several autonomous logging probes have been developed in the last years for a deployment with MeBo in the logging while tripping mode - a sonic probe measuring in

  10. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  11. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  12. GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF AMERICULTURE STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witcher, James

    2006-08-01

    This report summarizes the GRED drilling operations in the AmeriCulture State 2 well with an overview of the preliminary geologic and geothermal findings, from drill cuttings, core, geophysical logs and water geochemical sampling.

  13. A Model for the Formation of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater as Revealed by Drilling and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, G. S.; Kenkmann, T.; Wünnemann, K.; Wittmann, A.; Reimold, W. U.; Melosh, H. J.

    The combination of numerical simulation results and petrographic analysis of drill core from the recent ICDP-USGS drilling project provides new insight into the formation of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater.

  14. Ellog Auger Drilling -"3-in-one" method for hydrogeological data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kurt; Larsen, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    continuously while drilling. Data processing is carried out in the field, and recorded log features are displayed as drilling advances. A slotted section in the stem, above the cutting head, allows anaerobic water and soil-gas samples to be taken at depth intervals of approximately 0.2 m. The logging, water......The Ellog auger drilling method is an integrated approach for hydrogeological data collection during auger drilling in unconsolidated sediments. The drill stem is a continuous flight, hollow-stem auger with integrated electrical and gamma logging tools. The geophysical logging is performed......, and gas sampling instrumentation in the drill stem is removable; therefore, when the drill stem is pulled back, piezometers can be installed through the hollow stem. Cores of sediments can subsequently be taken continuously using a technique in which the drill bit can be reinserted after each coring...

  15. International Collaboration in Data Management for Scientific Ocean Drilling: Preserving Legacy Data While Implementing New Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, F. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP: 2003-2013 initial phase) is the successor to the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP: 1968-1983) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP: 1985-2003). These earlier scientific drilling programs amassed collections of sediment and rock cores (over 300 kilometers stored in four repositories) and data organized in distributed databases and in print or electronic publications. International members of the IODP have established, through memoranda, the right to have access to: (1) all data, samples, scientific and technical results, all engineering plans, data or other information produced under contract to the program; and, (2) all data from geophysical and other site surveys performed in support of the program which are used for drilling planning. The challenge that faces the individual platform operators and management of IODP is to find the right balance and appropriate synergies among the needs, expectations and requirements of stakeholders. The evolving model for IODP database services consists of the management and integration of data collected onboard the various IODP platforms (including downhole logging and syn-cruise site survey information), legacy data from DSDP and ODP, data derived from post-cruise research and publications, and other IODP-relevant information types, to form a common, program-wide IODP information system (e.g., IODP Portal) which will be accessible to both researchers and the public. The JANUS relational database of ODP was introduced in 1997 and the bulk of ODP shipboard data has been migrated into this system, which is comprised of a relational data model consisting of over 450 tables. The JANUS database includes paleontological, lithostratigraphic, chemical, physical, sedimentological, and geophysical data from a global distribution o