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Sample records for douglas point site

  1. Site management plan: Douglas Point Ecological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.L.; Miles, K.J.; Strass, P.K.; McDonald, B.

    1979-01-01

    A portion of the Douglas Point Site has been set aside for use as an ecological monitoring facility (DPEL). Plans call for it to provide for long-term scientific study and analysis of specific terrestrial and aquatic ecological systems representative of the coastal plain region of the mid-Atlantic United States. Discussion of the program is presented under the following section headings: goals and objectives; management and organization of DPEL; laboratory director; site manager; monitoring manager; research manager; and, organizational chart. The seven appendixes are entitled: detailed site description; supplemental land use plan; contract between Potomac Electric Power Company and Charles County Community Collge (CCCC); research and monitoring projects initiated at the Douglas Point Power Plant site; advisory committees; facilities and equipment; and CCCC personnel resumes

  2. Power plant site evaluation - Douglas Point site. Volume 1, part 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This is part of a series of reports containing an evaluation of the proposed Douglas Point nuclear generating station site located on the Potomac River in Maryland 30 miles south of Washington, DC. This report contains sections on cooling tower air emissions, noise impacts, transmission line effects, radiation from normal releases, site features affecting radiological accidents, and meteorology

  3. Power plant site evaluation, electric energy demand forecasts - Douglas Point Site. Volume 3. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.W.

    1975-07-01

    This is part of a series of reports containing an evaluation of the proposed Douglas Point nuclear generating station site located on the Potomac River in Maryland 30 miles south of Washington, D.C. This report contains chapters on the Potomac Electric Power Company's market, forecasting future demand, modelling, a residential demand model, a nonresidential demand model, the Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative Model, short term predictive accuracy, and total system requirements

  4. Remotely controlled repairs at Douglas Point NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broad, Les

    In September, 1977, leakage of heavy water at a rate of 125 kg/hr was detected in an area of the Douglas Point NGS reactor vault below the calandria known as the lower labyrinth. Radiation in the area ranges up to 5000 R/hr and the only ready access was through four 75 mm inspection ports that open into the moderator room. Remote-controlled equipment was designed and built to diagnose the problems and carry out repairs. All damaged piping was fixed, supports were replaced as needed, and system vibration was reduced. The work was done with no injuries and little radiation dose

  5. Remotely controlled repair at Douglas Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The Douglas Point nuclear generating station, completed in 1966, was Canada's first venture in commercial nuclear power. The discovery, 11 years later, of two perforations in auxiliary piping in a high radiation area led Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd and Ontario Hydro to develop new approaches to remotely controlled repair that will have much wider applications. Eddy current and ultrasonic testing were used to determine the pattern and extent of wear in a pipe encircled by a U-bolt, without first removing the U-bolt. Progress was monitored using remote TV cameras. Welding tools were designed and fabricated for the repairs, and a manipulator was also designed to transport the tool into its place of work. (author)

  6. Decontamination of the Douglas Point reactor, May 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesurf, J.E.; Stepaniak, R.; Broad, L.G.; Barber, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    The Douglas Point reactor primary heat transport system including the fuel, was successfully decontaminated by the CAN-DECON process in 1975. A second decontamination, also using the CAN-DECON process, was successfully performed in May 1983. This paper outlines the need for the decontamination, the process used, the results obtained, and the benefits to the station maintenance and operation

  7. FIND: Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.M.

    1975-12-01

    This index is presented as a guide to microfiche items 1 through 136 in Docket 50448, which was assigned to Potomac Electric Power Company's Application for Licenses to construct and operate Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2. Information received from August, 1973 through July, 1975 is included

  8. Remotely controlled repair of piping at Douglas Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrath, J.J.

    1983-06-01

    The 200 MWe Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station which started operation in 1966 was Canada's first commercial nuclear power plant. In 1977, after 11 years of operation, leakage of heavy water was detected and traced to the Moderator Piping System (pipe sizes 19 mm to 76 mm) located in a vault below the reactor where the radiation fields during shutdown ranged up to 5000 R/Hr. Inspection using remotely operated TV cameras showed that a 'U' bolt clamp support had worn through the wall of one pipe and resulted in the leakage and also that wear was occurring on other pipes. An extensive repair plan was subsequently undertaken in the form of a joint venture of the designer-owner Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and the builder-operator, Ontario Hydro. This paper describes the equipment and procedures used in remotely controlled repairs at Douglas Point

  9. Properties of Douglas Point Generating Station heat transport corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.; Rummery, T.E.

    1975-09-01

    Chemical, radiochemical and structural properties of circulating and fixed corrosion products from the Douglas Point Generating Station are documented. Interaction of Monel-400 and carbon steel corrosion products is described, and the mechanisms of Monel-400 surface deposit release, and activity buildup in the coolant system, are briefly discussed. Efficiencies of filters and ion-exchangers for the removal of released radionuclides are given. (author)

  10. Remediation System Evaluation, Douglas Road Landfill Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Douglas Road Landfill Superfund Site is located in St. Joseph County just north of Mishawaka,Indiana. The site consists of a 16-acre capped landfill located on an approximately 32-acre lot (includingthe land purchased in 1999 for a wetlands...

  11. Use of dominant tree heights in determining site index for Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R. Staebler

    1948-01-01

    Measuring heights of Douglas-fir trees for the determination of site index is a time-consuming job, especially in dense stands. Both dominant and codominant trees must be measured since site index curves represent the average height of dominants and codominants. It has been suggested that considerable time might be saved if only dominant trees were measured, since...

  12. Condensates near the Argyres-Douglas point in SU (2) gauge theory with broken Ν = 2 supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorsky, A.

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of the chiral condensates in the SU(2) gauge theory with broken N = 2 supersymmetry is reviewed. The calculation of monopole, dyon, and charge condensates is described. It is shown that the monopole and charge condensates vanish at the Argyres-Douglas point where the monopole and charge vacua collide. This phenomenon is interpreted as a deconfinement of electric and magnetic charges at the Argyres-Douglas point. (authors)

  13. Spatial distribution of nearshore fish in the vicinity of two thermal generating stations, Nanticoke and Douglas Point, on the Great Lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minns, C.K.; Kelso, J.R.M.; Hyatt, W.

    1978-01-01

    At Nanticoke, Lake Erie, 1974, mean fish density varied considerably, range 162-14 204/10 000 m 3 , as estimated by digital acoustic fish enumeration. At Douglas Point, Lake Huron, 1975, mean density varied less, range 108-671/10 000 m 3 . At both sites fish densities were generally greatest in the shallowest, 3-5 m, depths. At Nanticoke, where the nearshore has low relief, there were no distinguishable communities. At Douglas Point, where depth increases rapidly offshore, there was evidence of benthic and pelagic communities. There was no evidence of altered fish distribution in relation to temperature. At Nanticoke there was no vertical variation in temperature and no vertical response was to be expected. At Douglas Point there was thermal stratification present in the summer and there was no apparent response. The influence of incident radiation was uncertain because of the effects of diurnal migrations. At both locations fish were clustered horizontally to varying degrees in the spring and fall, while in the summer fish were distributed more evenly. Densest clusters were usually in the vicinity of the turbulent discharge at both locations. The lack of temperature response and the similarity of Nanticoke with situations at nearby streams on Lake Erie suggest that the fish are responding to currents and perhaps topography. (author)

  14. Measurement and analysis of pressure tube elongation in the Douglas Point reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, A.R.; MacEwan, S.R.; Jamieson, H.C.; Mitchell, A.B.

    1980-02-01

    Elongations of zirconium alloy pressure tubes in CANDU reactors, which occur as a result of neutron-irradiation-induced creep and growth, have been measured over the past 6 years, and the consequences of thses elongations have recently been analysed. Elongation rates, previously deduced from extensive measurements of elongations of cold-worked Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes in the Pickering reactors, have been modified to apply to the pressure tubes in the Douglas Point (DP) reactor by taking into account measured diffences in texture and dislocation density. Using these elongation rates, and structural data unique to the DP reactor, the analysis predicts elongation behaviour which is in good agreement with pressure tube elongations measured during the ten years of reactor operation. (Auth)

  15. Final environmental statement related to the proposed construction of Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2: (Docket Nos. 50-448 and 50-449)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Potomac Electric Power Company for the construction of the Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2, located in Charles County, Maryland. The exhaust steam will be cooled via a closed-cycle mode incorporating natural-draft wet cooling towers. The water used in the cooling system will be obtained from the Potomac River. Construction-related activities on the site will convert about 290 acres of the 1390 acres of forested land at the Douglas Point site to industrial use. In addition to acreage at the site, approximately 4.5 miles of transmission corridor will require about 211 acres of land for rights-of-way. This corridor will connect with 27 miles of existing rights-of-way over which a line connecting Possum Point to Burches Hill has already been approved. The installation of new transmission line, uniquely identified with Douglas Point, along the existing right-of-way will involve approximately 464 additional acres. As described in the application, the maximum river water intake will be about 97,200 gpm. Of this, a maximum of about 28,000 gpm will be lost in drift or evaporation from the cooling towers. About 700 gpm maximum of fresh well water will be consumed. It is conservatively assumed that all aquatic organisms entrained in the service water system will be killed due to thermal and mechanical shock. It is further estimated that at 97,200 gpm maximum total river water intake, the maximum impact on the striped bass fishery will be a reduction of <5%. The risk associated with accidental radiation exposure is very low. 32 figs., 59 tabs

  16. Monitoring plan for long-term environmental measurements at the proposed Douglas Point Ecological Laboratory, Nanjemoy, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.L.; Miles, K.J.; Strass, P.K.; McDonald, B.S.; Nugent, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Douglas Point Ecological Laboratory has been set up at the site of a proposed power plant, which is to be powered by either nuclear, coal, or an alternate form of fuel. A plan for long-range monitoring of terrestrial ecosystems and atmospheric chemistry is presented. A site characterization study will be made initially. Chemical and physical soil profiles will be established with continuous measurement of soil moisture and nutrient content, as well as other parameters. Data sets will be established, reflecting changes in rainfall pH and rate of deposition through precipitation and dryfall sedimentation of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , K + , Na + , SO 4 3- , Cl - , NH 4 + , and NO 3 - . Among other objectives are the development of new monitoring techniques that can be used to trace energy flow, nutrient transport, and radionuclide transport through all trophic levels to selected carnivores. The atmospheric monitoring plan is outlined as to system design and specifications; system installation, operation, and maintenance, data processing and reports; quality assurance program; and project organization. A discussion of administrative and operational monitoring costs is included

  17. The extension of the SWS period or CANDU reactors with particular reference to Douglas Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The foregoing approach to the determination of the fate of a concrete containment building is worth much consideration. The expenditure of $10 8 or its escalated equivalent is too much to pay for the probable saving of fraction of a statistical life. The unquestioning adoption of the dogma of reactor dismantlement displays a complete misunderstanding of the numerics of ''risk'', even the place of reactor dismantling in the spectrum of nuclear risk. The position of the risk of reactor dismantling is more than an order of magnitude lower than the former of these. The most altruistic criterion for any engineering activity is the achievement of the greatest expected net benefit (or the least expected net detriment) when all the consequences of the activity are taken into account. As has been shown this criterion leads to the conclusion that, at least in CANDU reactors and particularly Douglas Point, there is apparently no reason why the S.W.S. period should not be extended indefinitely

  18. Deconfinement at the Argyres-Douglas point in SU(2) gauge theory with broken N=2 supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorsky, A.; Vainshtein, A.; Yung, A.

    2000-01-01

    We consider chiral condensates in SU(2) gauge theory with broken N=2 supersymmetry. The matter sector contains an adjoint multiplet and one fundamental flavor. Matter and gaugino condensates are determined by integrating out the adjoint field. The only nonperturbative input is the Affleck-Dine-Seiberg (ADS) superpotential generated by one instanton plus the Konishi anomaly. These results are consistent with those obtained by the 'integrating in' procedure, including a reproduction of the Seiberg-Witten curve from the ADS superpotential. We then calculate monopole, dyon, and charge condensates using the Seiberg-Witten approach. We show that the monopole and charge condensates vanish at the Argyres-Douglas point where the monopole and charge vacua collide. We interpret this phenomenon as a deconfinement of electric and magnetic charges at the Argyres-Douglas point

  19. Confinement near Argyres-Douglas point in N=2 QCD and low energy version of AdS/CFT correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, Alexei

    2002-01-01

    We study Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) flux tubes on the Higgs branch of N=2 QCD with SU(2) gauge group and N f =2 flavors of fundamental matter. In particular, we consider this theory near Argyres-Douglas (AD) point where the mass of monopoles connected by these ANO strings become small. In this regime the effective QED which describes the theory on the Higgs branch becomes strongly coupled. We argue that the appropriate description of the theory is in terms of long and thin flux tubes (strings) with small tension. We interpret this as another example of duality between field theory in strong coupling and string theory in weak coupling. Then we consider the non-critical string theory for these flux tubes which includes fifth (Liouville) dimension. We identify CFT at the AD point as UV fix point corresponding to AdS metric on the 5d 'gravity' side. The perturbation associated with the monopole mass term creates a kink separating UV and IR behavior. We estimate the renormalized string tension and show that it is determined by the small monopole mass. In particular, it goes to zero at the AD point

  20. Estimating tree biomass, carbon, and nitrogen in two vegetation control treatments in an 11-year-old Douglas-fir plantation on a highly productive site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren D. Devine; Paul W. Footen; Robert B. Harrison; Thomas A. Terry; Constance A. Harrington; Scott M. Holub; Peter J. Gould

    2013-01-01

    We sampled trees grown with and without competing vegetation control in an 11-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation on a highly productive site in southwestern Washington to create diameter based allometric equations for estimating individual-tree bole, branch, foliar, and total...

  1. Influences of climate, fire, and topography on contemporary age structure patterns of Douglas-fir at 205 old forest sites in western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan J. Poage; Peter J. Weisberg; Peter C. Impara; John C. Tappeiner; Thomas S. Sensenig

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of forest development is basic to understanding the ecology, dynamics, and management of forest ecosystems. We hypothesized that the age structure patterns of Douglas-fir at 205 old forest sites in western Oregon are extremely variable with long and (or) multiple establishment periods common, and that these patterns reflect variation in regional-scale climate...

  2. DOUGLAS MORRISON

    CERN Multimedia

    Irma, Fiona & Wendy

    2001-01-01

    The Morrison family would like to convey to all Douglas's friends their warmest thanks for the very many moving letters, cards and telegrams. These have been so appreciated. Please accept our heartfelt thanks.

  3. Site-to-site genetic correlations and their implications on breeding zone size and optimum number of progeny test sites for Coastal Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.R. Johnson

    1997-01-01

    Type B genetic correlations were used to examine the relation among geographic differences between sites and their site-to-site genetic (Type B) correlations. Examination of six local breeding zones in Oregon indicated that breeding zones were, for the most part, not too large because few environmental variables were correlated with Type B genetic correlations. The...

  4. Relating Magnetic Parameters to Heavy Metal Concentrations and Environmental Factors at Formosa Mine Superfund Site, Douglas County, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, T. L.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in the field of environmental magnetism have led to exciting new applications for this field. Magnetic minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and tend to have an affinity for heavy metals. Hence, it has been demonstrated that magnetic properties are often significantly related to concentrations of heavy metals and other pollutants. As a result, magnetic techniques have been used as proxy for determining hot spots of several types of pollution produced from a diversity of anthropogenic sources. Magnetic measurements are non-destructive and relatively inexpensive compared to geochemical analyses. The utility of environmental magnetic methods varies widely depending on biological, chemical and physical processes that create and transform soils and sediments. Applications in the direction of mapping heavy metals have been studied and shown to be quite useful in countries such as China and India but to date, little research has been done in the US. As such, there is need to expand the scope of research to a wider range of soil types and land uses, especially within the US. This study investigates the application of environmental magnetic techniques to mapping of heavy metal concentrations at the Formosa Mine Superfund Site, an abandoned mine about 25 miles southwest of Roseburg, OR. The soils and sediment at this site are derived from pyrite-rich bedrock which is weak in terms of magnetic susceptibility. Using hotspot analysis, correlation and cluster analyses, interactions between metals and magnetic parameters are investigated in relation to environmental factors such as proximity to seeps and adits. Preliminary results suggest significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with certain heavy metals, signifying that magnetic methods may be useful in mapping heavy metal hotspots at this site. Further analysis examines the relation of various land use differences in magnetic signatures obtained throughout the Cow Creek watershed.

  5. Development over 25 years of Douglas-fir, western hemlock, and western redcedar planted at various spacings on a very good site in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald L. Reukema; J. Harry G. Smith

    1987-01-01

    Results of five spacing trials on the University of British Columbia Research Forest, covering a range of plantation spacings from 1 to 5 meters, showed that choice of initial spacing is among the most important factors influencing bole and crown development and stand growth and yield. The trials include Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesi), western...

  6. Early survival and height growth of Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedlings and variations in site factors following treatment of logging residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Lopushlnsky; D. Zabowskl; T.D. Anderson

    1992-01-01

    Logging residues were broadcast burned, piled and burned, removed, or left in place after clearcutting in a high-elevation subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) forest in north-central Washington. Survival, height growth and foliar nutrient content of planted Douglas-fir...

  7. Geographic Response Plan (GRP) Sensitive Site Points (Editable), Guam, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is an editable point feature data set with points over Apra Harbor in Guam. These points represent sensitive sites such as access points for public use and...

  8. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Points, Region 9, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA, Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  9. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Points, Region 9, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA, Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  10. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  11. The predetermined sites of examination for tender points in fibromyalgia syndrome are frequently associated with myofascial trigger points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Hongyou; Wang, Ying; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2010-01-01

    . PERSPECTIVE: This article underlies the importance of active MTrPs in FMS patients. Most of the TP sites in FMS are MTrPs. Active MTrPs may serve as a peripheral generator of fibromyalgia pain and inactivation of active MTrPs may thus be an alternative for the treatment of FMS.......The aim of this present study is to test the hypotheses that the 18 predetermined sites of examination for tender points (TP sites) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), and that the induced pain from active MTrPs at TP sites may mimic fibromyalgia pain. Each TP site......), but not latent MTrPs (r = -.001, P = .99), was positively correlated with spontaneous pain intensity in FMS. The current study provides first evidence that pain from active MTrPs at TP sites mimics fibromyalgia pain. MTrPs may relate to generalized increased sensitivity in FMS due to central sensitization...

  12. Social Network Sites: A Starting Point for Career Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlke, Christina

    2010-01-01

    This action research study explores the career influence of social network sites (SNSs) by examining 14 web-based articles that consider the risks and opportunities of SNSs from a job search perspective. Three themes are discussed: user visibility, self-presentation, and network connections. Practical strategies are identified to help career…

  13. Superfund Removal Site Points, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of CERCLA (Superfund) Removal sites. CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)...

  14. Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd E. Wickman; Richard R. Mason; Galen C. Trostle

    1981-01-01

    The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough) is an important defoliator of true firs and Douglas-fir in Western North America. Severe tussock moth outbreaks have occurred in British Columbia, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Arizona, and New Mexico, but the area subject to attack is more extensive

  15. Douglas R.O. Morrison

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Douglas R.O. Morrison 1929 - 2001 Douglas' friends and colleagues are warmly invited to join in a memorial gathering on Friday, 23 March 2001 at 16.00 hours in the CERN Main Auditorium Some colleagues will pay tribute to Douglas' scientific achievements and to his role in leading the collaborations:   Welcome, short CV The 'hadron times' The 'neutrino times' Recent activities Collaborations The 'social environment' A book of condolence will be available. The gathering will conclude with refreshments in the Salle des Pas Perdus.

  16. Carbon Transfers and Emissions Following Harvest and Pile Burning in Coastal Douglas-fir Forests Determined from Analysis of High-Resolution UAV Imagery and Point Clouds and from Field Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Gougeon, F.; Kelley, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Forest carbon (C) models require knowledge on C transfers due to intense disturbances such as fire, harvest, and slash burning. In such events, live trees die and C transferred to detritus or exported as round wood. With burning, live and detrital C is lost as emissions. Burning can be incomplete, leaving wood, charred and scattered or in unburnt rings and piles. For harvests, all round wood volume is routinely measured, while dispersed and piled residue volumes are typically assessed in field surveys, scaled to a block. Recently, geospatial methods have been used to determine, for an entire block, piled residues using LiDAR or image point clouds (PC) and dispersed residues by analysis of high-resolution imagery. Second-growth Douglas-fir forests on eastern Vancouver Island were examined, 4 blocks at Oyster River (OR) and 2 at Northwest Bay (NB). OR blocks were cut winter 2011, piled spring 2011, field survey, aerial RGB imagery and LiDAR PC acquired fall 2011, piles burned, burn residues surveyed, and post-burn aerial RGB imagery acquired 2012. NB blocks were cut fall 2014, piled spring 2015, field survey, UAV RGB imagery and image PC acquired summer 2015, piles burned and burn residues surveyed spring 2016, and post-burn UAV RGB imagery and PC acquired fall 2016. Volume to biomass conversion used survey species proportions and wood density. At OR, round wood was 261.7 SE 13.1, firewood 1.7 SE 0.3, and dispersed residue by survey, 13.8 SE 3.6 tonnes dry mass (t dm) ha-1. Piled residues were 8.2 SE 0.9 from pile surveys vs. 25.0 SE 5.9 t dm ha-1 from LiDAR PC bulk pile volumes and packing ratios. Post-burn, piles lost 5.8 SE 0.5 from survey of burn residues vs. 18.2 SE 4.7 t dm ha-1 from pile volume changes using 2011 LiDAR PC and 2012 imagery. The percentage of initial merchantable biomass exported as round & fire wood, remaining as dispersed & piled residue, and lost to burning was, respectively, 92.5%, 5.5% and 2% using only field methods vs. 87%, 7% and 6% from

  17. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Ray Point Site, Ray Point, Texas. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Results are reported from an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ray Point, Texas. The Phase II--Title I services generally include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of soil sampling and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. About 490,000 tons of ore were processed at this mill with all of the uranium sold on the commercial market. None was sold to the AEC; therefore, this report focuses on a physical description of the site and the identification of radiation pathways. No remedial action options were formulated for the site, inasmuch as none of the uranium was sold to the AEC and Exxon Corporation has agreed to perform all actions required by the State of Texas. Radon gas release from the tailings at the Ray Point site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. Exxon is also studying the feasibility of reprocessing the tailings

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: STAGING (Staging Site Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for staging sites along the Hudson River. Vector points in this data set represent locations of possible staging areas...

  19. Douglas MacArthur- An Administrative Biography

    OpenAIRE

    Tehan III, William J.

    2002-01-01

    For more than a half century Douglas MacArthur was a servant of the United States. He is best remembered as a general and a soldier, especially for his leadership during World War II and the Korean War. MacArthur was also the Superintendent of West Point, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army, Generalissimo ( Commander) of the Armed Forces and Military Advisor (Minister of Defense) to the President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, and the Supreme Commander Allied Powers and the Military Gove...

  20. European network on the determination of site end points for radiologically contaminated land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Peter; Lennon, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Nexia Solutions are currently running a small European network entitled 'European Network on the Determination of Site End Points for Radiologically Contaminated Land (ENDSEP)'. Other network members include NRG (Netherlands), UKAEA (UK), CEA (France), SOGIN (Italy), Wismut (Germany), Saxon State Agency of Environment and Geology (Germany). The network is focused on the technical and socio-economical issues associated with the determination of end points for sites potentially, or actually, impacted by radiological contamination. Such issues will cover: - Those associated with the run up to establishing a site end point; - Those associated with verifying that the end points have been met; and Those associated with post closure. The network's current high level objectives can be summarized as follows: Share experience and best practice in the key issues running up to determining site end points; Gain a better understanding of the potential effects of recent and forthcoming EU legislation; Assess consistency between approaches; Highlight potential gaps within the remit of site end point determination and management; and - Consider the formulation of research projects with a view to sharing time and expense. The programme of work revolves around the following key tasks: - Share information, experience and existing good practice. - Look to determine sustainable approaches to contaminated land site end point management. - Through site visits, gain first hand experience of determining an appropriate end point strategy, and identifying and resolving end point issues. Highlight the key data gaps and consider the development of programmes to either close out these gaps or to build confidence in the approaches taken. Production of position papers on each technical are a highlighting how different countries approach/resolve a specific problem. (authors)

  1. Matrix models, Argyres-Douglas singularities and double scaling limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldi, Gaetano

    2003-01-01

    We construct an N = 1 theory with gauge group U(nN) and degree n+1 tree level superpotential whose matrix model spectral curve develops an Argyres-Douglas singularity. The calculation of the tension of domain walls in the U(nN) theory shows that the standard large-N expansion breaks down at the Argyres-Douglas points, with tension that scales as a fractional power of N. Nevertheless, it is possible to define appropriate double scaling limits which are conjectured to yield the tension of 2-branes in the resulting N = 1 four dimensional non-critical string theories as proposed by Ferrari. (author)

  2. Factors affecting diurnal stem contraction in young Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren D. Devine; Constance Harrington

    2011-01-01

    Diurnal fluctuation in a tree's stem diameter is a function of daily growth and of the tree's water balance, as water is temporarily stored in the relatively elastic outer cambial and phloem tissues. On a very productive site in southwestern Washington, U.S.A we used recording dendrometers to monitor stem diameter fluctuations of Douglas-fir at plantation...

  3. Response of individual Douglas-fir trees to release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald L. Reukema

    1961-01-01

    To evaluate effects of different degrees of release on individual Douglas-fir trees, a study was started in 1952 in a 41-year-old, site IV stand at the Wind River Experimental Forest. A remeasurement at the end of four growing seasons showed that dominants respond more quickly and positively to the removal of competing trees than codominants or intermediates. A second...

  4. The Director-General visits the ATLAS construction site at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1998-01-01

    Photo 05 : Claude Guitton (left), Project Manager for the EDF/Knight Piesold joint venture responsible for design and site supervision for LHC civil engineering at Point 1 takes the Director-General Chris Llewellyn Smith and LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans on a tour of the site.

  5. Douglas County Historical Rectified Aerial Photos 1937

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This raster dataset consists of approximately 200 aerial photographs taken in 1937 in Douglas county, Kansas, United States. The Douglas County Public Works...

  6. Douglas County Historical Rectified Aerial Photos 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This raster dataset consists of approximately 200 aerial photographs taken in 1954 in Douglas county, Kansas, United States. The Douglas County Public Works...

  7. Comparative effects of urea fertilizer and red alder in a site III, coast Douglas-fir plantation in the Washington Cascade Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Harry W. Anderson; Marshall Murray; Rick. Leon

    2005-01-01

    Five randomly assigned treatments were used to quantify effects of adding varying numbers of red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) or nitrogen (N) fertilization on growth of a 10-year-old conifer plantation at a medium quality site in the western Washington Cascade Range. Zero, 20, 40, and 80 alder trees per acre were retained along with about 300 conifers...

  8. Eco-physiological characteristics and variation in water source use between montane Douglas-Fir and lodgepole pine trees in southwestern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2009-12-01

    Winter weather on the Canadian prairies is now warmer and drier than 50 years ago and this has implications for soil water re-charge in montane ecosystems with consequences for tree and ecosystem function. We used measurements of the hydrogen isotope ratio of tree stem water to analyze the use of different water sources (winter snow melt, ground water, summer precipitation) in two montane forest sites, one dominated by Douglas-Fir and the other dominated by lodgepole pine trees. On average during the growing season (May-October) stem water in both Douglas-Fir and lodgepole pine trees was composed of 60% summer precipitation. However, during late summer Douglas-Fir trees showed an increased use of ground water as summer precipitation was minimal and ground water was accessible at the bottom of a relatively large soil reservoir. The low summer precipitation and reduced soil water availability in the shallow soils at the lodgepole pine site resulted in severely reduced photosynthetic capacity in late summer. Increased precipitation during the autumn resulted in recovery of photosynthetic gas exchange in lodgepole pine before winter dormancy was induced by low temperatures. Stomatal limitation of photosynthesis, as estimated from measurements of the carbon isotope composition of leaf tissue, was higher in Douglas-Fir than lodgepole pine. This was also associated with lower midday water potential values in Douglas-Fir and sapwood cross-sectional area that was only 70% of that measured in lodgepole pine. The vulnerability of xylem to loss of conductivity with declines in water potential was very similar between the two species. However, midday water potential in Douglas-Fir approached values where cavitation and loss of conductivity were apparent, while in lodgepole pine midday water potential was always much higher than the point at which loss of hydraulic conductivity occurred. These data suggest that, despite the presence of Douglas-Fir on deeper and higher quality

  9. Geometric Arveson–Douglas conjecture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Engliš, Miroslav; Eschmeier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 274, April (2015), s. 606-630 ISSN 0001-8708 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Arveson- Douglas conjecture * generalized Toeplitz operator Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001870815000328

  10. Douglas Morrison 1930-2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It is with great sadness that we have learnt of the death of our colleague and friend Douglas Morrison on Sunday 25 February 2001. In accordance with the wishes of the family, the funeral will be strictly private. A memorial gathering is planned to be held at CERN at a later date. A full tribute will appear in the next issue.

  11. Fertilizing Douglas-fir forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Roger D. Right

    1979-01-01

    This report supplements a slide-tape presentation of the same title. Part I of the report describes the current practice of nitrogen fertilization of Douglas-fir forests in western Washington and Oregon and the effects of this fertilization on tree growth and water quality. Part II discusses factors that affect costs and revenues from investments in forest...

  12. Douglas-fir displays a range of growth responses to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) growth in the Pacific Northwest is affected by climatic, edaphic factors and Swiss needle cast (SNC) disease. We examine Douglas-fir growth responses to temperature, dewpoint deficit (DPD), soil moisture, and SNC using time series intervention analysis of intra-annual tree-ring width data collected at nine forest stands in western Oregon, USA. The effects of temperature and SNC were similar in importance on tree growth at all sites. Previous-year DPD during the annual drought period was a key factor limiting growth regionally. Winter temperature was more important at high elevation cool sites, whereas summer temperature was more important at warm and dry sites. Growth rate increased with summer temperature to an optimum (Topt) then decreased at higher temperatures. At drier sites, temperature and water affected growth interactively such that Topt decreased with decreasing summer soil moisture. With climate change, growth rates increased at high elevation sites and declined at mid-elevation inland sites since ~1990. Growth response to climate is masked by SNC regionally. We conclude that as temperature rises and precipitation patterns shift towards wetter winters and drier summers, Douglas-fir will experience greater temperature and water stress and an increase in severity of SNC. By the end of the 21st century, climate models predict hotter, drier summers and warmer, wetter winters in the Pac

  13. Early survival and growth of planted Douglas-fir with red alder in four mixed regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall D. Murray; Richard E. Miller

    1986-01-01

    To quantify between-species interactions, we measured and compared survival and growth of planted Douglas-fir and associated planted and volunteer red alder at a location on the west side of the Cascade Range in Washington. The planted alder were wildlings dug either from a nearby area or from a distant, coastal site and interplanted into a 3-year-old Douglas-fir...

  14. 75 FR 51257 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County (Douglas PUD); Notice of Application Ready for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... District No. 1 of Douglas County (Douglas PUD); Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis and...: May 27, 2010. d. Applicant: Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County (Douglas PUD). e. Name of... in Douglas, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties, Washington. The project currently occupies 15.15 acres of...

  15. Reconnaissance radiological characterization for the White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Smith, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the result of field work performed at the former White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California. The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program tasked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group in Grand Junction, Colo., with this project. The objective was to determine whether or not radioisotopes possibly associated with past Department of Defense (DOD) operations were present and within accepted background levels. The radiation survey was accomplished by performing three independent radiation surveys, both outdoors and indoors, and random soil sampling. Initially, the site was land surveyed to develop a grid block system. A background radiation investigation was performed out in the San Pedro area

  16. Ultrasound-guided thoracenthesis: the V-point as a site for optimal drainage positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanforlin, A; Gavelli, G; Oboldi, D; Galletti, S

    2013-01-01

    In the latest years the use of lung ultrasound is increasing in the evaluation of pleural effusions, because it makes follow-up easier and drainage more efficient by providing guidance on the most appropriate sampling site. However, no standardized approach for ultrasound-guided thoracenthesis is actually available. To evaluate our usual ultrasonographic landmark as a possible standard site to perform thoracenthesis by assessing its value in terms of safety and efficiency (success at first attempt, drainage as complete as possible). Hospitalized patients with non organized pleural effusion underwent thoracenthesis after ultrasound evaluation. The point showing on ultrasound the maximum thickness of the effusion ("V-point") was chosen for drainage. 45 ultrasound guided thoracenthesis were performed in 12 months. In 22 cases there were no complications; 16 cases of cough, 2 cases of mild dyspnea without desaturation, 4 cases of mild pain; 2 cases of complications requiring medical intervention occurred. No case of pneumothorax related to the procedure was detected. In all cases drainage was successful on the first attempt. The collected values of maximum thickness at V-point (min 3.4 cm - max 15.3 cm) and drained fluid volume (min 70 ml - max 2000 ml) showed a significative correlation (p measure of the maximum thickness at V-point provides high efficiency to ultrasound guided thoracentesis and allows to estimate the amount of fluid in the pleural cavity. It is also an easy parameter that makes the proposed method quick to learn and apply.  

  17. GPU-Based Point Cloud Superpositioning for Structural Comparisons of Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Matthias; Fober, Thomas; Freisleben, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to solve the labeled point cloud superpositioning problem for performing structural comparisons of protein binding sites. The solution is based on a parallel evolution strategy that operates on large populations and runs on GPU hardware. The proposed evolution strategy reduces the likelihood of getting stuck in a local optimum of the multimodal real-valued optimization problem represented by labeled point cloud superpositioning. The performance of the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy is compared to a previously proposed CPU-based sequential approach for labeled point cloud superpositioning, indicating that the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy leads to qualitatively better results and significantly shorter runtimes, with speed improvements of up to a factor of 1,500 for large populations. Binary classification tests based on the ATP, NADH, and FAD protein subsets of CavBase, a database containing putative binding sites, show average classification rate improvements from about 92 percent (CPU) to 96 percent (GPU). Further experiments indicate that the proposed GPU-based labeled point cloud superpositioning approach can be superior to traditional protein comparison approaches based on sequence alignments.

  18. Douglas Davis / Douglas Davis ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davis, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika kunstnikust Douglas Davisest (sünd. 1933) ja tema loonmingust, intervjuu kunstnikuga 8. 05. 1999 Osnabrückis. D. Davis oma interaktiivsetest performance'itest "Austrian Tapes" ja "Florence Tapes" (1970-ndad), Interneti-projektist "Terrible Beauty", sateliidiperformance'ist "Seven Thoughts" (1976), teleperformance'ist "The Last Nine Minutes" (1977), Vitali Komari ja Aleksander Melamidiga koos tehtud projektist "Questions Moscow New York" (1975-1976), võrguprojektidest "The World's Longest Sentence" (1994, asub New Yorgi Whitney Muuseumis), "MetaBody" jm.

  19. Graft union formation in Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Copes

    1969-01-01

    Greenhouse-grown Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) graft unions were examined between 2 and 84 days after grafting. Room temperature was maintained at 60-70 F throughout the growing season. In most respects grafts of Douglas-fir followed development patterns previously reported for spruce and pine grafts, but specific differences...

  20. Development of uniform hazard response spectra for rock sites considering line and point sources of earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2001-12-01

    Traditionally, the seismic design basis ground motion has been specified by normalised response spectral shapes and peak ground acceleration (PGA). The mean recurrence interval (MRI) used to computed for PGA only. It is shown that the MRI associated with such response spectra are not the same at all frequencies. The present work develops uniform hazard response spectra i.e. spectra having the same MRI at all frequencies for line and point sources of earthquakes by using a large number of strong motion accelerograms recorded on rock sites. Sensitivity of the number of the results to the changes in various parameters has also been presented. This work is an extension of an earlier work for aerial sources of earthquakes. These results will help to determine the seismic hazard at a given site and the associated uncertainities. (author)

  1. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on local site related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammon, K.M.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom, adjacent to an existing nuclear power station. The CEGB evidence to the Inquiry on local site related issues begins by setting the proposed development within the context of local authority planning policies for the area. The implications of the development in terms of overall land needs, construction, access, buildings and works both temporary and permanent, are described. Environmental impacts, aesthetic and socio-economic factors are considered including possible effects on agriculture, nature conservation, water supply, transport and employment. (UK)

  2. 77 FR 10649 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Douglas, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ...-1313; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-17] Modification of Class E Airspace; Douglas, AZ AGENCY: Federal... Bisbee Douglas International Airport, Douglas, AZ. Decommissioning of the Cochise VHF Omni-Directional... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend controlled airspace at Douglas, AZ (76 FR 78180...

  3. Geophysical Survey of Poverty Point UNESCO World Heritage Site Mound A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, W.; Bourke, J. R.; De Smet, T.; Nikulin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Poverty Point is an UNESCO World Heritage Site located in northern Louisiana, known for its six earthwork ridges and mounds of archeological significance. The largest of these earthworks and most significant feature on the site, Mound A is over 70 feet (21 m) high and 640 feet (200 m) long. To construct this mound, it would have taken about 16 million basket loads of dirt which weight approximately 50 lbs. each (23 kg). The current archeological theory describing the construction of Mound A states it was built in three months at most, with some suggesting construction times as short as a month, but beyond this not much else is known about Mound A or Poverty Point. The pace of Mound A's construction has been used as evidence to support the idea that there was a central leader directing its construction and that the population inhabiting the site was more socio-politically complex than previous hunter-gatherer populations in North America. Evidence of heterogeneity and stratigraphic layering, however, is an indication of a slow mound construction over centuries by a relatively egalitarian hunter-gather society. A greater understanding of the construction style and timeline for the construction of Mound A will lead to a greater understanding to the site, its people their lifestyles. Mound Builders have been known to cap mounds they have built if they were to be built in stages so if Mound A was built in stages it is likely capped with some more dense material than the dirt surrounding it. To better understand the construction history of Mound A we collected photogrammetry, seismic reflection, ground-penetrating radar, frequency-domain electromagnetic-induction, resistivity, and magnetometry data over the mound. The seismic data had a normal moveout correction, it was stacked and migrated. Additionally, with the application of quadcopter-based photogrammetry a three-dimensional digital model of Mound A was developed to display and assist in further understanding and

  4. Pest management in Douglas-fir seed orchards: a microcomputer decision method

    Science.gov (United States)

    James B. Hoy; Michael I. Haverty

    1988-01-01

    The computer program described provides a Douglas-fir seed orchard manager (user) with a quantitative method for making insect pest management decisions on a desk-top computer. The decision system uses site-specific information such as estimates of seed crop size, insect attack rates, insecticide efficacy and application costs, weather, and crop value. At sites where...

  5. Ground-based forest harvesting effects on soil physical properties and Douglas-fir growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian Ares; Thomas A. Terry; Richard E. Miller; Harry W. Anderson; Barry L. Flaming

    2005-01-01

    Soil properties and forest productivity can be affected by heavy equipment used for harvest and site preparation but these impacts vary greatly with site conditions and operational practices. We assessed the effects of ground-based logging on soil physical properties and subsequent Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb) Franco] growth on a highly...

  6. The EuroSITES network: Integrating and enhancing fixed-point open ocean observatories around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampitt, Richard S.; Larkin, Kate E.; EuroSITES Consortium

    2010-05-01

    EuroSITES is a 3 year (2008-2011) EU collaborative project (3.5MEuro) with the objective to integrate and enhance the nine existing open ocean fixed point observatories around Europe (www.eurosites.info). These observatories are primarily composed of full depth moorings and make multidisciplinary in situ observations within the water column as the European contribution to the global array OceanSITES (www.oceansites.org). In the first 18 months, all 9 observatories have been active and integration has been significant through the maintenance and enhancement of observatory hardware. Highlights include the enhancement of observatories with sensors to measure O2, pCO2, chlorophyll, and nitrate in near real-time from the upper 1000 m. In addition, some seafloor missions are also actively supported. These include seafloor platforms currently deployed in the Mediterranean, one for tsunami detection and one to monitor fluid flow related to seismic activity and slope stability. Upcoming seafloor science missions in 2010 include monitoring benthic biological communities and associated biogeochemistry as indicators of climate change in both the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean. EuroSITES also promotes the development of innovative sensors and samplers in order to progress capability to measure climate-relevant properties of the ocean. These include further developing current technologies for autonomous long-term monitoring of oxygen consumption in the mesopelagic, pH and mesozooplankton abundance. Many of these science missions are directly related to complementary activities in other European projects such as EPOCA, HYPOX and ESONET. In 2010 a direct collaboration including in situ field work will take place between ESONET and EuroSITES. The demonstration mission MODOO (funded by ESONET) will be implemented in 2010 at the EuroSITES PAP observatory. Field work will include deployment of a seafloor lander system with various sensors which will send data to shore in real

  7. The most remote point method for the site selection of the future GGOS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Hayo; Pedreros, Felipe

    2014-10-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) proposes 30-40 geodetic observatories as global infrastructure for the most accurate reference frame to monitor the global change. To reach this goal, several geodetic observatories have upgrade plans to become GGOS stations. Most initiatives are driven by national institutions following national interests. From a global perspective, the site distribution remains incomplete and the initiatives to improve this are up until now insufficient. This article is a contribution to answer the question on where to install new GGOS observatories and where to add observation techniques to existing observatories. It introduces the iterative most remote point (MRP) method for filling in the largest gaps in existing technique-specific networks. A spherical version of the Voronoi-diagram is used to pick the optimal location of the new observatory, but practical concerns determine its realistic location. Once chosen, the process is iterated. A quality and a homogeneity parameter of global networks measure the progress of improving the homogeneity of the global site distribution. This method is applied to the global networks of VGOS, and VGOS co-located with SLR to derive some clues about where additional observatory sites or additional observation techniques at existing observatories will improve the GGOS network configuration. With only six additional VGOS-stations, the homogeneity of the global VGOS-network could be significantly improved by more than . From the presented analysis, 25 known or new co-located VGOS and SLR sites are proposed as the future GGOS backbone: Colombo, Easter Island, Fairbanks, Fortaleza, Galapagos, GGAO, Hartebeesthoek, Honiara, Ibadan, Kokee Park, La Plata, Mauritius, McMurdo, Metsahövi, Ny Alesund, Riyadh, San Diego, Santa Maria, Shanghai, Syowa, Tahiti, Tristan de Cunha, Warkworth, Wettzell, and Yarragadee.

  8. Point and Fixed Plot Sampling Inventory Estimates at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2004-02-01

    This report provides calculation of systematic point sampling volume estimates for trees greater than or equal to 5 inches diameter breast height (dbh) and fixed radius plot volume estimates for trees < 5 inches dbh at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken County, South Carolina. The inventory of 622 plots was started in March 1999 and completed in January 2002 (Figure 1). Estimates are given in cubic foot volume. The analyses are presented in a series of Tables and Figures. In addition, a preliminary analysis of fuel levels on the SRS is given, based on depth measurements of the duff and litter layers on the 622 inventory plots plus line transect samples of down coarse woody material. Potential standing live fuels are also included. The fuels analyses are presented in a series of tables.

  9. Cross-site comparisons of concentration-discharge relationships reveal climate-driven chemostatic set points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsey, S.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Streamflow solute concentrations often vary predictably with flows, providing insight into processes controlling solute generation and export. Previous work by the authors showed that log-transformed concentration-discharge relationships of weathering-derived solutes in 59 headwater catchments had relatively low slopes, implying that these watersheds behaved almost like chemostats. That is, their rates of solute production and/or mobilization were nearly proportional to water fluxes, on both event and inter-annual time scales. Here we re-examine these findings using data from roughly 1000 catchments, ranging from ˜10 to >1,000,000 sq. km in drainage area, and spanning a wide range of lithologic and climatic settings.Concentration-discharge relationships among this much larger set of much larger catchments are broadly consistent with the chemostatic behavior described above. However, site-to-site variations in mean concentrations among these catchments are negatively correlated with long-term average precipitation and discharge, suggesting dilution of stream concentrations under long-term leaching of the critical zone. Thus, on event and inter-annual time scales, stream solute concentrations are chemostatically buffered by groundwater storage and fast chemical reactions (such as ion exchange), but on much longer time scales, the catchment's chemostatic "set point" is determined by climatically driven critical zone evolution. We present examples illustrating short-term and long-term controls on water quality consistent with variations in weather and climate, and discuss their implications.

  10. All-sky-imaging capabilities for ionospheric space weather research using geomagnetic conjugate point observing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, C.; Baumgardner, J.; Wroten, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2018-04-01

    Optical signatures of ionospheric disturbances exist at all latitudes on Earth-the most well known case being visible aurora at high latitudes. Sub-visual emissions occur equatorward of the auroral zones that also indicate periods and locations of severe Space Weather effects. These fall into three magnetic latitude domains in each hemisphere: (1) sub-auroral latitudes ∼40-60°, (2) mid-latitudes (20-40°) and (3) equatorial-to-low latitudes (0-20°). Boston University has established a network of all-sky-imagers (ASIs) with sites at opposite ends of the same geomagnetic field lines in each hemisphere-called geomagnetic conjugate points. Our ASIs are autonomous instruments that operate in mini-observatories situated at four conjugate pairs in North and South America, plus one pair linking Europe and South Africa. In this paper, we describe instrument design, data-taking protocols, data transfer and archiving issues, image processing, science objectives and early results for each latitude domain. This unique capability addresses how a single source of disturbance is transformed into similar or different effects based on the unique "receptor" conditions (seasonal effects) found in each hemisphere. Applying optical conjugate point observations to Space Weather problems offers a new diagnostic approach for understanding the global system response functions operating in the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516 is located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 516 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Septic Systems and Discharge Points, and is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (sm b ullet) CAS 03-59-01, Bldg 3C-36 Septic System (sm b ullet) CAS 03-59-02, Bldg 3C-45 Septic System (sm b ullet) CAS 06-51-01, Sump and Piping (sm b ullet) CAS 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris (sm b ullet) CAS 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping (sm b ullet) CAS 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 06-51-02 and 22-19-04 is no further action. The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 03-59-01, 03-59-02, 06-51-01, and 06-51-03 is clean closure. Closure activities included removing and disposing of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)-impacted septic tank contents, septic tanks, distribution/clean out boxes, and piping. CAU 516 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 516 Corrective Action Plan (CAP). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 516 Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2004). This Closure Report documents CAU 516 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 186 tons of hydrocarbon waste in the form of TPH-impacted soil and debris, as well as 89 tons of construction debris, were generated and managed and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as field screening of soil samples and the utilization of laboratory analysis to characterize and classify waste streams, were employed during the performance of closure work

  12. AMCO On-Site Trichloroethene (TCE) Air Monitoring Points, Oakland CA, Live 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains points depicting locations and air monitor sensor readings for Trichloroethene (TCE) and supports the AMCO Chemical Superfund Site air...

  13. Kirk Douglas: "My Stroke of Luck"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age of 90, Kirk Douglas is an American institution and one of the world's most revered actors, ... with me. You have spoken openly about the depression you suffered following your stroke. How did you ...

  14. Douglas-fir tussock moth- and Douglas-fir beetle-caused mortality in a ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forest in the Colorado Front Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Ann M. Lynch; Willis C. Schaupp; Vladimir Bocharnikov

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough, occurred in the South Platte River drainage on the Pike-San Isabel National Forest in the Colorado Front Range attacking Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. Stocking levels, species composition, and tree size in heavily and lightly defoliated stands were similar. Douglas-fir...

  15. ARM Tethered Balloon System & AALCO Activities at AMF3 Site at Oliktok Point, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, J.; Dexheimer, D.; Mei, F.; Roesler, E. L.; Longbottom, C.; Hillman, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's (ARM) third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) and the restricted airspace associated with it at Oliktok Point, Alaska, since October 2013. The site hosts ground-based instrumentation which collects a variety of continuous atmospheric measurements as well as user-conducted unmanned aircraft and tethered balloon campaigns. SNL has operated ARM's tethered balloon system (TBS) as part of the Inaugural Campaigns for ARM Research using Unmanned Systems (ICARUS) since 2016. AALCO (Aerial Assessment of Liquid in Clouds at Oliktok), is an ARM Intensive Operations Period conducted by SNL at the AMF3 since 2016. The operation of the TBS during ICARUS and AALCO to altitudes above 4,000' AGL in a variety of seasons and conditions is addressed. A Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and supercooled liquid water content (SLWC) sensors have been deployed under both campaigns. The performance of these sensors is discussed and results are presented. DTS measurements and their relationship to concurrent temperature measurements from unmanned aircraft and radiosondes are shown. SLWC sensor in situ measurements are compared with microwave radiometer and radiosonde-derived measurements. Preliminary analysis of using Large Eddy Simulations to compare with the SLWC measurements reveals three-dimensional properties of the observed clouds.

  16. Robust Segmentation of Planar and Linear Features of Terrestrial Laser Scanner Point Clouds Acquired from Construction Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalek, Reza; Lichti, Derek D; Ruwanpura, Janaka Y

    2018-01-01

    Automated segmentation of planar and linear features of point clouds acquired from construction sites is essential for the automatic extraction of building construction elements such as columns, beams and slabs. However, many planar and linear segmentation methods use scene-dependent similarity thresholds that may not provide generalizable solutions for all environments. In addition, outliers exist in construction site point clouds due to data artefacts caused by moving objects, occlusions and dust. To address these concerns, a novel method for robust classification and segmentation of planar and linear features is proposed. First, coplanar and collinear points are classified through a robust principal components analysis procedure. The classified points are then grouped using a new robust clustering method, the robust complete linkage method. A robust method is also proposed to extract the points of flat-slab floors and/or ceilings independent of the aforementioned stages to improve computational efficiency. The applicability of the proposed method is evaluated in eight datasets acquired from a complex laboratory environment and two construction sites at the University of Calgary. The precision, recall, and accuracy of the segmentation at both construction sites were 96.8%, 97.7% and 95%, respectively. These results demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method for robust segmentation of planar and linear features of contaminated datasets, such as those collected from construction sites. PMID:29518062

  17. Soil spore bank communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi in endangered Chinese Douglas-fir forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhugui; Shi, Liang; Tang, Yangze; Hong, Lizhou; Xue, Jiawang; Xing, Jincheng; Chen, Yahua; Nara, Kazuhide

    2018-01-01

    Chinese Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga sinensis) is an endangered Pinaceae species found in several isolated regions of China. Although soil spore banks of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi can play an important role in seedling establishment after disturbance, such as in the well-known North American relative (Pseudotsuga menziesii), we have no information about soil spore bank communities in relict forests of Chinese Douglas-fir. We conducted bioassays of 73 soil samples collected from three Chinese Douglas-fir forests, using North American Douglas-fir as bait seedlings, and identified 19 species of ECM fungi. The observed spore bank communities were significantly different from those found in ECM fungi on the roots of resident trees at the same sites (p = 0.02). The levels of potassium (K), nitrogen (N), organic matter, and the pH of soil were the dominant factors shaping spore bank community structure. A new Rhizopogon species was the most dominant species in the spore banks. Specifically, at a site on Sanqing Mountain, 22 of the 57 surviving bioassay seedlings (representing 21 of the 23 soil samples) were colonized by this species. ECM fungal richness significantly affected the growth of bioassay seedlings (R 2  = 0.20, p = 0.007). Growth was significantly improved in seedlings colonized by Rhizopogon or Meliniomyces species compared with uncolonized seedlings. Considering its specificity to Chinese Douglas-fir, predominance in the soil spore banks, and positive effect on host growth, this new Rhizopogon species could play critical roles in seedling establishment and forest regeneration of endangered Chinese Douglas-fir.

  18. Instream Biological Assessment of NPDES Point Source Discharges at the Savannah River Site, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, W.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) currently has 31 NPDES outfalls that have been permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to discharge to SRS streams and the Savannah River. In order to determine the cumulative impacts of these discharges to the receiving streams, a study plan was developed to perform in-stream assessments of the fish assemblages, macroinvertebrate assemblages, and habitats of the receiving streams. These studies were designed to detect biological impacts due to point source discharges. Sampling was initially conducted between November 1997 and July 1998 and was repeated in the summer and fall of 2000. A total of 18 locations were sampled (Table 1, Figure 1). Sampling locations for fish and macroinvertebrates were generally the same. However, different locations were sampled for fish (Road A-2) and macroinvertebrates (Road C) in the lower portion of Upper Three Runs, to avoid interference with ongoing fisheries studies at Road C. Also, fish were sampled in Fourmile Branch at Road 4 rather than at Road F because the stream at Road F was too narrow and shallow to support many fish. Sampling locations and parameters are detailed in Sections 2 and 3 of this report. In general, sampling locations were selected that would permit comparisons upstream and downstream of NPDES outfalls. In instances where this approach was not feasible because effluents discharge into the headwaters of a stream, appropriate unimpacted reference were used for comparison purposes. This report summarizes the results of the sampling that was conducted in 2000 and also compares these data to the data that were collected in 1997 and 1998

  19. A branch point consensus from Arabidopsis found by non-circular analysis allows for better prediction of acceptor sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Niels; Rouzé, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Little knowledge exists about branch points in plants; it has even been claimed that plant introns lack conserved branch point sequences similar to those found in vertebrate introns. A putative branch point consensus sequence for Arabidopsis thaliana resembling the well known metazoan consensus s...... in the recognition of true acceptor sites; the false positive rate being reduced by a factor of 2. We take this as an indication that the consensus found here is the genuine one and that the branch point does play a role in the proper recognition of the acceptor site in plants.......Little knowledge exists about branch points in plants; it has even been claimed that plant introns lack conserved branch point sequences similar to those found in vertebrate introns. A putative branch point consensus sequence for Arabidopsis thaliana resembling the well known metazoan consensus...... sequence has been proposed, but this is based on search of sequences similar to those in yeast and metazoa. Here we present a novel consensus sequence found by a non-circular approach. A hidden Markov model with a fixed A nucleotide was trained on sequences upstream of the acceptor site. The consensus...

  20. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on potential off-site effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom. This evidence to the Inquiry is concerned with the potential of the proposed Hinkely Point ''C'' PWR to increase the exposure of members of the public offsite to radiation. The policy is to replicate the design of the Sizewell ''B'' reactor. The evidence examined in great detail at the Sizewell ''B'' Public Inquiry where the Inspector concluded that the risk would be very small. The purpose of this evidence is to provide an explicit account of the potential off-site effects of radiation at the Hinkley Point site, so that it can be seen that there is nothing specific to this location that could lead to a different conclusion. (author)

  1. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red Hill...

  2. Douglas-fir growth and yield: research 1909-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.O. Curtis; D.D. Marshall

    2004-01-01

    Systematic research on growth and yield of Douglas-fir began in 1909. This line of early research evolved over time and culminated in publication of USDA Bulletin 201, The Yield of Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest. B201 had an enormous influence on development of Douglas-fir forestry and was arguably the most influential single research publication ever produced in...

  3. Lagrangians for generalized Argyres-Douglas theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Sergio; Giacomelli, Simone

    2017-10-01

    We continue the study of Lagrangian descriptions of N=2 Argyres-Douglas theories. We use our recent interpretation in terms of sequential confinement to guess the Lagrangians of all the Argyres-Douglas models with Abelian three dimensional mirror. We find classes of four dimensional N=1 quivers that flow in the infrared to generalized Argyres-Douglas theories, such as the ( A k , A kN + N -1) models. We study in detail how the N=1 chiral rings map to the Coulomb and Higgs Branches of the N=2 CFT's. The three dimensional mirror RG flows are shown to land on the N=4 complete graph quivers. We also compactify to three dimensions the gauge theory dual to ( A 1, D 4), and find the expected Abelianization duality with N=4 SQED with 3 flavors.

  4. Bootstrapping the (A1, A2) Argyres-Douglas theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornagliotto, Martina; Lemos, Madalena; Liendo, Pedro

    2018-03-01

    We apply bootstrap techniques in order to constrain the CFT data of the ( A 1 , A 2) Argyres-Douglas theory, which is arguably the simplest of the Argyres-Douglas models. We study the four-point function of its single Coulomb branch chiral ring generator and put numerical bounds on the low-lying spectrum of the theory. Of particular interest is an infinite family of semi-short multiplets labeled by the spin ℓ. Although the conformal dimensions of these multiplets are protected, their three-point functions are not. Using the numerical bootstrap we impose rigorous upper and lower bounds on their values for spins up to ℓ = 20. Through a recently obtained inversion formula, we also estimate them for sufficiently large ℓ, and the comparison of both approaches shows consistent results. We also give a rigorous numerical range for the OPE coefficient of the next operator in the chiral ring, and estimates for the dimension of the first R-symmetry neutral non-protected multiplet for small spin.

  5. AMCO On-Site Air Monitoring Points, Oakland CA, Live 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains points depicting locations and air monitor sensor readings for Vinyl Chloride, Trichloroethene (TCE), and Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and...

  6. Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth- and Douglas-Fir Beetle-Caused Mortality in a Ponderosa Pine/Douglas-Fir Forest in the Colorado Front Range, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Negrón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough, occurred in the South Platte River drainage on the Pike-San Isabel National Forest in the Colorado Front Range attacking Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco. Stocking levels, species composition, and tree size in heavily and lightly defoliated stands were similar. Douglas-fir tussock moth defoliation resulted in significant Douglas-fir mortality in the heavily defoliated stands, leading to a change in dominance to ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Lawson. Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsuqae Hopkins, populations increased following the defoliation event but caused less mortality, and did not differ between heavily and lightly defoliated stands. Douglas-fir tussock moth-related mortality was greatest in trees less than 15 cm dbh (diameter at 1.4 m above the ground that grew in suppressed and intermediate canopy positions. Douglas-fir beetle-related mortality was greatest in trees larger than 15 cm dbh that grew in the dominant and co-dominant crown positions. Although both insects utilize Douglas-fir as its primary host, stand response to infestation is different. The extensive outbreak of the Douglas-fir tussock moth followed by Douglas-fir beetle activity may be associated with a legacy of increased host type growing in overstocked conditions as a result of fire exclusion.

  7. Effect of stand edge on the natural regeneration of spruce, beech and Douglas-fir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumír Dobrovolný

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work aimed at studying the strategy of woody plants regeneration during the regeneration of a spruce stand with the admixture of beech and Douglas-fir by border cutting (NW-SE aspect on acidic sites of higher elevations in the Bohemian-Moravian Upland. Spruce is better adapted to bear shade than Douglas-fir. Nevertheless, in optimal light conditions up to a distance of ca. 35 m (about 16% DIFFSF from the stand edge, the Douglas-fir can put the spruce into danger as to height growth. By contrast to beech, the density of spruce is significantly higher within the distance of 45 m (about 15% DIFFSF from the stand edge but further on the situation would change to the benefit of beech. The density of Douglas-fir significantly dominates over beech within a distance of 35 m from the stand edge; from 55 m (less than 15% DIFFSF, the situation changes in favour of beech. Beech can survive in full shade deep in the stand core waiting for its opportunity to come. As compared to spruce and Douglas-fir, the height growth of beech was at all times significantly greater at a distance of 25 m from the stand edge. Converted to practical conditions, spruce and Douglas-fir with individually admixed beech seedlings showed good prosperity approximately up to a distance of one stand height from the edge. A mixture of spruce and beech did well at a greater distance but good prosperity at a distance of 2–3 stand heights was shown only by beech. Thus, border regeneration eliminates disadvantages of the climatic extremes of clear-cutting and specifics of shelterwood felling during which one – usually shade-tolerant tree species dominates in the natural regeneration (e.g. beech.

  8. Management, morphological, and environmental factors influencing Douglas-fir bark furrows in the Oregon Coast Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Christopher D.; Puettmann, Klaus J.; Huso, Manuela M.P.; Hagar, Joan C.; Falk, Kristen R.

    2013-01-01

    Many land managers in the Pacific Northwest have the goal of increasing late-successional forest structures. Despite the documented importance of Douglas-fir tree bark structure in forested ecosystems, little is known about factors influencing bark development and how foresters can manage development. This study investigated the relative importance of tree size, growth, environmental factors, and thinning on Douglas-fir bark furrow characteristics in the Oregon Coast Range. Bark furrow depth, area, and bark roughness were measured for Douglas-fir trees in young heavily thinned and unthinned sites and compared to older reference sites. We tested models for relationships between bark furrow response and thinning, tree diameter, diameter growth, and environmental factors. Separately, we compared bark responses measured on trees used by bark-foraging birds with trees with no observed usage. Tree diameter and diameter growth were the most important variables in predicting bark characteristics in young trees. Measured environmental variables were not strongly related to bark characteristics. Bark furrow characteristics in old trees were influenced by tree diameter and surrounding tree densities. Young trees used by bark foragers did not have different bark characteristics than unused trees. Efforts to enhance Douglas-fir bark characteristics should emphasize retention of larger diameter trees' growth enhancement.

  9. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on on-site radioactive waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passant, F.H.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom. The CEGB evidence to the Inquiry presented here provides information on the on-site management of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes both during station operation and during decommissioning. Estimates are given of current and projected future discharges of liquid and gaseous wastes from the site and packaging and transport arrangements for solid radioactive wastes are described. The framework of waste management policy, disposal strategy and legislation in the United Kingdom which will determine procedure at Hinkley Point ''C'' is given. (UK)

  10. Distribution of flux vacua around singular points in Calabi-Yau moduli space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Tohru; Tachikawa, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    We study the distribution of type-IIB flux vacua in the moduli space near various singular loci, e.g. conifolds, ADE singularities on P 1 , Argyres-Douglas point etc, using the Ashok-Douglas density det (R+ω). We find that the vacuum density is integrable around each of them, irrespective of the type of the singularities. We study in detail an explicit example of an Argyres-Douglas point embedded in a compact Calabi-Yau manifold

  11. Inheritance of graft compatibility in Douglas fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Copes

    1973-01-01

    Graft compatibility of genetically related and unrelated rootstock-scion combinations was compared. Scion clones were 75% compatible when grafted on half-related rootstocks but only 56% compatible when grafted on unrelated rootstocks. Most variance associated with graft incompatibility in Douglas-fir appears to be caused by multiple genes.

  12. Architectural analysis of Douglas-fir forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of natural and semi-natural Douglas-fir forest ecosystems in western Washington and western Oregon was analyzed by various case-studies, to yield vital information needed for the design of new silvicultural systems with a high level of biodiversity, intended for low-input

  13. 2014-2016 Avian Point Count and Migration Surveys at Site 300 for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratanduono, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-14

    The primary goals of the surveys were to: 1) collect minutes of bird activity within Site 300, 2) consider relative abundance of the different bird species occurring within the Site, 3) collect behavioral information, and 4) provide compelling evidence to determine the status of the Site as a migration corridor or migration stopover site. To this end, two survey types were conducted: avian point counts were conducted on a monthly basis from February 2014 through January 2016 and migration surveys were conducted over two three-month periods from September 2014 through November 2014, and September 2015 through November 2015. These two surveys types provided the opportunity to observe avian species in a variety of conditions across a two year period. Whenever possible or relevant, the observations of either survey were used to inform and complement the observations of the other survey in pursuit of the above goals. Both survey types are described below.

  14. Minimal Liouville gravity correlation numbers from Douglas string equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belavin, Alexander; Dubrovin, Boris; Mukhametzhanov, Baur

    2014-01-01

    We continue the study of (q,p) Minimal Liouville Gravity with the help of Douglas string equation. We generalize the results of http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0550-3213(91)90548-Chttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/42/30/304004, where Lee-Yang series (2,2s+1) was studied, to (3,3s+p 0 ) Minimal Liouville Gravity, where p 0 =1,2. We demonstrate that there exist such coordinates τ m,n on the space of the perturbed Minimal Liouville Gravity theories, in which the partition function of the theory is determined by the Douglas string equation. The coordinates τ m,n are related in a non-linear fashion to the natural coupling constants λ m,n of the perturbations of Minimal Lioville Gravity by the physical operators O m,n . We find this relation from the requirement that the correlation numbers in Minimal Liouville Gravity must satisfy the conformal and fusion selection rules. After fixing this relation we compute three- and four-point correlation numbers when they are not zero. The results are in agreement with the direct calculations in Minimal Liouville Gravity available in the literature http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.66.2051http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11232-005-0003-3http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11232-006-0075-8

  15. Comparison of Uas-Based Photogrammetry Software for 3d Point Cloud Generation: a Survey Over a Historical Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoost, F.; Arefi, H.

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)-based photogrammetry offers an affordable, fast and effective approach to real-time acquisition of high resolution geospatial information and automatic 3D modelling of objects for numerous applications such as topography mapping, 3D city modelling, orthophoto generation, and cultural heritages preservation. In this paper, the capability of four different state-of-the-art software packages as 3DSurvey, Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4Dmapper Pro and SURE is examined to generate high density point cloud as well as a Digital Surface Model (DSM) over a historical site. The main steps of this study are including: image acquisition, point cloud generation, and accuracy assessment. The overlapping images are first captured using a quadcopter and next are processed by different software to generate point clouds and DSMs. In order to evaluate the accuracy and quality of point clouds and DSMs, both visual and geometric assessments are carry out and the comparison results are reported.

  16. COMPARISON OF UAS-BASED PHOTOGRAMMETRY SOFTWARE FOR 3D POINT CLOUD GENERATION: A SURVEY OVER A HISTORICAL SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alidoost

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial System (UAS-based photogrammetry offers an affordable, fast and effective approach to real-time acquisition of high resolution geospatial information and automatic 3D modelling of objects for numerous applications such as topography mapping, 3D city modelling, orthophoto generation, and cultural heritages preservation. In this paper, the capability of four different state-of-the-art software packages as 3DSurvey, Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4Dmapper Pro and SURE is examined to generate high density point cloud as well as a Digital Surface Model (DSM over a historical site. The main steps of this study are including: image acquisition, point cloud generation, and accuracy assessment. The overlapping images are first captured using a quadcopter and next are processed by different software to generate point clouds and DSMs. In order to evaluate the accuracy and quality of point clouds and DSMs, both visual and geometric assessments are carry out and the comparison results are reported.

  17. Reconstruction of measurable three-dimensional point cloud model based on large-scene archaeological excavation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Sen; Zhang, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Wei-Xing

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines a low-cost, user-friendly photogrammetric technique with nonmetric cameras to obtain excavation site digital sequence images, based on photogrammetry and computer vision. Digital camera calibration, automatic aerial triangulation, image feature extraction, image sequence matching, and dense digital differential rectification are used, combined with a certain number of global control points of the excavation site, to reconstruct the high precision of measured three-dimensional (3-D) models. Using the acrobatic figurines in the Qin Shi Huang mausoleum excavation as an example, our method solves the problems of little base-to-height ratio, high inclination, unstable altitudes, and significant ground elevation changes affecting image matching. Compared to 3-D laser scanning, the 3-D color point cloud obtained by this method can maintain the same visual result and has advantages of low project cost, simple data processing, and high accuracy. Structure-from-motion (SfM) is often used to reconstruct 3-D models of large scenes and has lower accuracy if it is a reconstructed 3-D model of a small scene at close range. Results indicate that this method quickly achieves 3-D reconstruction of large archaeological sites and produces heritage site distribution of orthophotos providing a scientific basis for accurate location of cultural relics, archaeological excavations, investigation, and site protection planning. This proposed method has a comprehensive application value.

  18. Habitat characteristics at den sites of the Point Arena mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa nigra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Zielinski; John E. Hunter; Robin Hamlin; Keith M. Slauson; M. J. Mazurek

    2010-01-01

    The Point Arena mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa nigra) is a federally listed endangered species, but has been the subject of few studies. Mountain beavers use burrows that include a single subterranean den. Foremost among the information needs for this subspecies is a description of the above-ground habitat features associated with dens. Using...

  19. Tree-ring stable isotopes record the impact of a foliar fungal pathogen on CO(2) assimilation and growth in Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffell, Brandy J; Meinzer, Frederick C; Voelker, Steven L; Shaw, David C; Brooks, J Renée; Lachenbruch, Barbara; McKay, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    Swiss needle cast (SNC) is a fungal disease of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) that has recently become prevalent in coastal areas of the Pacific Northwest. We used growth measurements and stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in tree-rings of Douglas-fir and a non-susceptible reference species (western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla) to evaluate their use as proxies for variation in past SNC infection, particularly in relation to potential explanatory climate factors. We sampled trees from an Oregon site where a fungicide trial took place from 1996 to 2000, which enabled the comparison of stable isotope values between trees with and without disease. Carbon stable isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) of treated Douglas-fir tree-rings was greater than that of untreated Douglas-fir tree-rings during the fungicide treatment period. Both annual growth and tree-ring Δ(13)C increased with treatment such that treated Douglas-fir had values similar to co-occurring western hemlock during the treatment period. There was no difference in the tree-ring oxygen stable isotope ratio between treated and untreated Douglas-fir. Tree-ring Δ(13)C of diseased Douglas-fir was negatively correlated with relative humidity during the two previous summers, consistent with increased leaf colonization by SNC under high humidity conditions that leads to greater disease severity in following years. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Instream biological assessment of NPDES point source discharges at the Savannah River Site, 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Savannah River Site currently has 33 permitted NPDES outfalls that have been permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health an Environmental Control to discharge to SRS streams and the Savannah River. In order to determine the cumulative impacts of these discharges to the receiving streams, a study plan was developed to perform in-stream assessments of the fish assemblages, macroinvertebrate assemblages, and habitats of the receiving streams

  1. Instream biological assessment of NPDES point source discharges at the Savannah River Site, 1997-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-28

    The Savannah River Site currently has 33 permitted NPDES outfalls that have been permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health an Environmental Control to discharge to SRS streams and the Savannah River. In order to determine the cumulative impacts of these discharges to the receiving streams, a study plan was developed to perform in-stream assessments of the fish assemblages, macroinvertebrate assemblages, and habitats of the receiving streams.

  2. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public enquiry: proof of evidence on coal fired power station sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fothergill, S.; Witt, S.

    1988-11-01

    The Coalfield Communities Campaign (CCC) has argued that if a new base-load power station is required it should be coal-fired rather than nuclear, and that it should use UK coal. Proposals for new power stations at both Hinkley Point and at Fawley have encountered very considerable local and regional opposition, and this is increasingly likely to be the case at many other sites especially in Southern England. In contrast the CCC has sought to demonstrate that its member authorities would generally welcome the development of new coal-fired capacity on appropriate sites within their areas. In particular, this proof establishes that there is a prima facie case for considering three sites - Thorpe Marsh, Hams Hall and Uskmouth - as potential locations for a new large coal-fired power station as an alternative to Hinkley Point C. The relevant local authorities have expressed their willingness to co-operate in more detailed planning or technical investigations to secure a coal-fired power station on these sites. The CCC considers this to be a major and unprecedented offer to the CEGB and its successor bodies, which could greatly speed the development of new power staion capacity and be of considerable economic and social benefit to coalfield communities.

  3. POINT CLOUD MAPPING METHODS FOR DOCUMENTING CULTURAL LANDSCAPE FEATURES AT THE WORMSLOE STATE HISTORIC SITE, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Jordana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Documentation of the three-dimensional (3D cultural landscape has traditionally been conducted during site visits using conventional photographs, standard ground surveys and manual measurements. In recent years, there have been rapid developments in technologies that produce highly accurate 3D point clouds, including aerial LiDAR, terrestrial laser scanning, and photogrammetric data reduction from unmanned aerial systems (UAS images and hand held photographs using Structure from Motion (SfM methods. These 3D point clouds can be precisely scaled and used to conduct measurements of features even after the site visit has ended. As a consequence, it is becoming increasingly possible to collect non-destructive data for a wide variety of cultural site features, including landscapes, buildings, vegetation, artefacts and gardens. As part of a project for the U.S. National Park Service, a variety of data sets have been collected for the Wormsloe State Historic Site, near Savannah, Georgia, USA. In an effort to demonstrate the utility and versatility of these methods at a range of scales, comparisons of the features mapped with different techniques will be discussed with regards to accuracy, data set completeness, cost and ease-of-use.

  4. What's the point? The contribution of a sustainability view in contaminated site remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert; Norrman, Jenny; Back, Pär-Erik; Söderqvist, Tore; Rosén, Lars

    2018-07-15

    Decision support tools (DST) are often used in remediation projects to aid in the complex decision on how best to remediate a contaminated site. In recent years, the sustainable remediation concept has brought increased attention to the often-overlooked contradictory effects of site remediation, with a number of sustainability assessment tools now available. The aim of the present study is twofold: (1) to demonstrate how and when different assessment views affect the decision support outcome on remediation alternatives in a DST, and (2) to demonstrate the contribution of a full sustainability assessment. The SCORE tool was used in the analysis; it is based on a holistic multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach, assessing sustainability in three dimensions: environmental, social, and economic. Four assessment scenarios, compared to a full sustainability assessment, were considered to reflect different possible assessment views; considering public and private problem owner perspectives, as well as green and traditional assessment scopes. Four real case study sites in Sweden were analyzed. The results show that the decision support outcome from a full sustainability assessment most often differs to that of other assessment views, and results in remediation alternatives which balance trade-offs in most of the scenarios. In relation to the public perspective and traditional scope, which is seen to lead to the most extensive and expensive remediation alternatives, the trade-off is related to less contaminant removal in favour of reduced negative secondary effects such as emissions and waste disposal. Compared to the private perspective, associated with the lowest cost alternatives, the trade-off is higher costs, but more positive environmental and social effects. Generally, both the green and traditional assessment scopes miss out on relevant social and local environmental secondary effects which may ultimately be very important for the actual decision in a

  5. 75 FR 77691 - Douglas and Nolichucky Tributary Reservoirs Land Management Plan, in Cocke, Greene, Hamblen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Douglas and Nolichucky Tributary Reservoirs Land Management Plan, in... the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). TVA has prepared the Douglas and Nolichucky Tributary... Douglas and Nolichucky tributary reservoirs has been allocated into broad use categories or ``zones...

  6. A Canadian paradox: Tommy Douglas and eugenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Tommy Douglas is an icon of Canadian 20th Century political history and is considered by many as the "Father" of Medicare, a key component of our national identity. Throughout his career, he was associated at both the provincial and federal levels with progressive causes concerning disadvantaged populations. In his sociology Master's thesis written in the early 1930's, Douglas endorsed eugenic oriented solutions such as segregation and sterilization to address what was perceived to be an endemic and biologically determined problem. At first glance, this endorsement of eugenics appears to be paradoxical, but careful analysis revealed that this paradox has multiple roots in religion, political belief, historical exposure and our own desire to view our collective history in a favourable light.

  7. Argyres-Douglas theories, chiral algebras and wild Hitchin characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Laura; Pei, Du; Yan, Wenbin; Ye, Ke

    2018-01-01

    We use Coulomb branch indices of Argyres-Douglas theories on S 1 × L( k, 1) to quantize moduli spaces M_H of wild/irregular Hitchin systems. In particular, we obtain formulae for the "wild Hitchin characters" — the graded dimensions of the Hilbert spaces from quantization — for four infinite families of M_H , giving access to many interesting geometric and topological data of these moduli spaces. We observe that the wild Hitchin characters can always be written as a sum over fixed points in M_H under the U(1) Hitchin action, and a limit of them can be identified with matrix elements of the modular transform ST k S in certain two-dimensional chiral algebras. Although naturally fitting into the geometric Langlands program, the appearance of chiral algebras, which was known previously to be associated with Schur operators but not Coulomb branch operators, is somewhat surprising.

  8. On Berenstein-Douglas-Seiberg duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Volker

    2003-01-01

    I review the proposal of Berenstein-Douglas for a completely general definition of Seiberg duality. To give evidence for their conjecture I present the first example of a physical dual pair and explicitly check that it satisfies the requirements. Then I explicitly show that a pair of toric dual quivers is also dual according to their proposal. All these computations go beyond tilting modules, and really work in the derived category. I introduce all necessary mathematics where needed. (author)

  9. Lesions of the Pouch of Douglas: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debra S

    2016-01-01

    The pouch of Douglas may become occupied by a variety of mass-like lesions, which may be challenging to providers who treat women. These lesions may initially be thought to arise from the uterus or adnexa. We conducted a literature review using a Medline search of the terms "Douglas' pouch," "pouch of Douglas," "cul-de-sac," and "rectouterine pouch." A review of the scope of pouch of Douglas lesions is presented to assist in developing a differential diagnosis if a patient with such a lesion is encountered. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth after precommercial thinning in two stands of Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Steele

    1955-01-01

    Twenty years ago, portions of two young Douglas-fir stands on the Wind River Experimental Forest in Skamania County, Washington, were thinned by removing some of the trees in the suppressed and intermediate crown classes. At time of thinning, one stand, (A), was 23 years old and the second, (B), was 30 years old. In both cases site quality is IV. The trees taken out...

  11. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant’s critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events. PMID:26805832

  12. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Manes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant’s critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events.

  13. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-20

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant's critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events.

  14. Minimal Liouville gravity on the torus via the Douglas string equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spodyneiko, Lev

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we assume that the partition function in minimal Liouville gravity (MLG) obeys the Douglas string equation. This conjecture makes it possible to compute the torus correlation numbers in (3,p) MLG. We perform this calculation using also the resonance relations between the coupling constants in the KdV frame and in the Liouville frame. We obtain explicit expressions for the torus partition function and for the one- and two-point correlation numbers. (paper)

  15. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in Douglas-fir: report no. 18--Rocky Brook, 1963-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis; David D. Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the history and results of the Rocky Brook installation of the cooperative levels-of-growing-stock (LOGS) study in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), over the 41-year period 1965 to 2006. This 1938 plantation is one of the two site-IV installations among the nine installations in the study. Much public...

  16. Simulating historical disturbance regimes and stand structures in old-forest ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike Hillis; Vick Applegate; Steve Slaughter; Michael G. Harrington; Helen Smith

    2001-01-01

    Forest Service land managers, with the collaborative assistance from research, applied a disturbance based restoration strategy to rehabilitate a greatly-altered, high risk Northern Rocky Mountain old-forest ponderosa pine-Douglas-fir stand. Age-class structure and fire history for the site have been documented in two research papers (Arno and others 1995, 1997)....

  17. Tethered Balloon Operations at ARM AMF3 Site at Oliktok Point, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, D.; Lucero, D. A.; Helsel, F.; Hardesty, J.; Ivey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Oliktok Point has been the home of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) third ARM Mobile Facility, or AMF3, since October 2013. The AMF3 is operated through Sandia National Laboratories and hosts instrumentation collecting continuous measurements of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, energy, and other meteorological variables. The Arctic region is warming more quickly than any other region due to climate change and Arctic sea ice is declining to record lows. Sparsity of atmospheric data from the Arctic leads to uncertainty in process comprehension, and atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM) are understood to underestimate low cloud presence in the Arctic. Increased vertical resolution of meteorological properties and cloud measurements will improve process understanding and help AGCMs better characterize Arctic clouds. SNL is developing a tethered balloon system capable of regular operation at AMF3 in order to provide increased vertical resolution atmospheric data. The tethered balloon can be operated within clouds at altitudes up to 7,000' AGL within DOE's R-2204 restricted area. Pressure, relative humidity, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction are recorded at multiple altitudes along the tether. These data were validated against stationary met tower data in Albuquerque, NM. The altitudes of the sensors were determined by GPS and calculated using a line counter and clinometer and compared. Wireless wetness sensors and supercooled liquid water content sensors have also been deployed and their data has been compared with other sensors. This presentation will provide an overview of the balloons, sensors, and test flights flown, and will provide a preliminary look at data from sensor validation campaigns and test flights.

  18. On-site meteorological instrumentation requirements to characterize diffusion from point sources: workshop report. Final report Sep 79-Sep 80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strimaitis, D.; Hoffnagle, G.; Bass, A.

    1981-04-01

    Results of a workshop entitled 'On-Site Meteorological Instrumentation Requirements to Characterize Diffusion from Point Sources' are summarized and reported. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Raleigh, North Carolina, on January 15-17, 1980. Its purpose was to provide EPA with a thorough examination of the meteorological instrumentation and data collection requirements needed to characterize airborne dispersion of air contaminants from point sources and to recommend, based on an expert consensus, specific measurement technique and accuracies. Secondary purposes of the workshop were to (1) make recommendations to the National Weather Service (NWS) about collecting and archiving meteorological data that would best support air quality dispersion modeling objectives and (2) make recommendations on standardization of meteorological data reporting and quality assurance programs

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. B. Campbell email = campbek@nv.doe.gov

    2002-01-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are

  20. Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve: Protecting the World's Oldest Complex Macrofossils at a Newly Inscribed UNESCO World Heritage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jack

    2017-04-01

    The late Ediacaran rocks of the Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland, record the oldest known assemblage of large, complex fossils anywhere. These fossils represent the transition in the history of life on earth to large, architecturally complex organisms, following nearly three billion years of a microbially-dominated world. In July 2016, the Reserve was inscribed on World Heritage List. Inscription has led to increased geotourism demands on the locality, a consequence welcomed by the local community who wish to develop the economy. This is potentially at odds with the interests of Government and Researchers whose inclination is often to prohibit all activity that may adversely impact a site. This presentation will outline several approaches being used to quantitatively measure potential historic and current damage to the Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve from geotourism activity, as well as natural events. Technologies such as LiDAR scanning, photogrammetry, and time lapse cameras are compared and contrasted for their suitability to monitor the integrity of fossil sites. Footwear erosion of fossil surfaces remains a concern of policy makers at the Reserve; experimental work to test the benefits of various footwear erosion reduction protocols is discussed. The legislative and management framework for the Reserve is reviewed, and the importance of building academic-community-government relationships examined. The benefits of geoconservation are shared by all in society - as such the importance of presenting geoconservation research outcomes in ways specifically tailored to local communities and policy makes is highlighted.

  1. Recording Approach of Heritage Sites Based on Merging Point Clouds from High Resolution Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussenmeyer, P.; Alby, E.; Landes, T.; Koehl, M.; Guillemin, S.; Hullo, J. F.; Assali, P.; Smigiel, E.

    2012-07-01

    Different approaches and tools are required in Cultural Heritage Documentation to deal with the complexity of monuments and sites. The documentation process has strongly changed in the last few years, always driven by technology. Accurate documentation is closely relied to advances of technology (imaging sensors, high speed scanning, automation in recording and processing data) for the purposes of conservation works, management, appraisal, assessment of the structural condition, archiving, publication and research (Patias et al., 2008). We want to focus in this paper on the recording aspects of cultural heritage documentation, especially the generation of geometric and photorealistic 3D models for accurate reconstruction and visualization purposes. The selected approaches are based on the combination of photogrammetric dense matching and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) techniques. Both techniques have pros and cons and recent advances have changed the way of the recording approach. The choice of the best workflow relies on the site configuration, the performances of the sensors, and criteria as geometry, accuracy, resolution, georeferencing, texture, and of course processing time. TLS techniques (time of flight or phase shift systems) are widely used for recording large and complex objects and sites. Point cloud generation from images by dense stereo or multi-view matching can be used as an alternative or as a complementary method to TLS. Compared to TLS, the photogrammetric solution is a low cost one, as the acquisition system is limited to a high-performance digital camera and a few accessories only. Indeed, the stereo or multi-view matching process offers a cheap, flexible and accurate solution to get 3D point clouds. Moreover, the captured images might also be used for models texturing. Several software packages are available, whether web-based, open source or commercial. The main advantage of this photogrammetric or computer vision based technology is to get

  2. Douglas-fir tussock moth: an annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Campbell; Lorna C. Youngs

    1978-01-01

    This annotated bibliography includes references to 338 papers. Each deals in some way with either the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), or a related species. Specifically, 210 publications and 82 unpublished documents make some reference, at least, to the Douglas-fir tussock moth; 55 are concerned with other species in...

  3. Plant guide: Douglas' dusty-maiden (Chaenactic douglasii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek Tilley; Dan Ogle; Loren St. John

    2010-01-01

    Douglas' dustymaiden can be used as part of a native forb component in wildland seedings to increase biodiversity, improve wildlife habitat, and provide food for numerous birds and mammals. Douglas' dustymaiden is readily visited by pollinators and other insect species. It is considered an important species for sage grouse during brood rearing because of its...

  4. Cliff stability assessment using electrical resistivity tomography at the historic WWII D-Day invasion site, Pointe du Hoc, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Udphuay, S.; Warden, R.

    2007-05-01

    The 1944 D-Day invasion site at Pointe du Hoc, Normandy, France is an important WWII battlefield and cultural resource but is at risk from chalk cliff collapse. The American Battle Monuments Commission tasked us to evaluate the geohazard to the observation post and other cliff-side buildings of historical significance. Geophysical multi-electrode resistivity profiling is used to study cliff stability and the condition of the observation- post foundations. Preliminary 2-D geological interpretations are provided of individual profiles. The copious steel, concrete and void spaces at the site renders hydrogeological interpretation challenging but tractable. The cliff face appears to be relatively intact and well-drained. Several routes taken by groundwater into fractures within the chalk were identified mainly on the western side of the site. The eastern side is drier and somewhat sheltered from the Atlantic storms but may contain large void spaces that could efficiently transmit groundwater flow during heavy precipitation events, thereby imperiling the major antiaircraft gun emplacement occupied by Col. Rudder in the early days of the Allied invasion. The forward German observation post perched close to the sea stack, which now hosts the U.S. Ranger memorial, may be moving with the soil and not securely anchored to bedrock. A complex failure mechanism is identified as a combination of groundwater dissolution of the fractured chalk and sea wave attack at the cliff base.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Site closure was performed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 262 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV, 2002a]). CAU 262 is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 262 consists of the following nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the NTS: CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage tank CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B CAS 25-04-07, Septic System CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-28

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 on the NTS, CAU 516 includes six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) consisting of two septic systems, a sump and piping, a clean-out box and piping, dry wells, and a vehicle decontamination area. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from July 22 through August 14, 2003, with supplemental sampling conducted in late 2003 and early 2004. The potential exposure pathways for any contaminants of concern (COCs) identified during the development of the DQOs at CAU 516 gave rise to the following objectives: (1) prevent or mitigate exposure to media containing COCs at concentrations exceeding PALs as defined in the corrective action investigation plan; and (2) prevent the spread of COCs beyond each CAS. The following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 516: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Alternative 1, No Further Action, is the preferred corrective action for two CASs (06-51-02 and 22-19-04). Alternative 2, Clean Closure, is the preferred corrective action for four CASs (03-59-01, 03-59-02, 06-51-01, and 06-51-03). The selected alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, as well as meeting all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will further eliminate the contaminated media at CAU 516.

  7. Size of Douglas-fir trees in relation to distance from a mixed red alder - Douglas-fir stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Miller; D.L. Reukema; T.A. Max

    1993-01-01

    Variation in diameter, height, and stem volume of 57-year-old Douglas-fir(Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) was related to distance of these trees from a 27 m wide strip in the same Douglas-fir plantation that had been interplanted with red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.). Within the...

  8. 76 FR 78180 - Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Douglas, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ...-1313; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-17] Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Douglas, AZ AGENCY... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Bisbee Douglas International Airport, Douglas, AZ... feet above the surface at Douglas, AZ. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate...

  9. Douglas-fir plantations in Europe: a retrospective test of assisted migration to address climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac-Renton, Miriam G; Roberts, David R; Hamann, Andreas; Spiecker, Heinrich

    2014-08-01

    We evaluate genetic test plantations of North American Douglas-fir provenances in Europe to quantify how tree populations respond when subjected to climate regime shifts, and we examined whether bioclimate envelope models developed for North America to guide assisted migration under climate change can retrospectively predict the success of these provenance transfers to Europe. The meta-analysis is based on long-term growth data of 2800 provenances transferred to 120 European test sites. The model was generally well suited to predict the best performing provenances along north-south gradients in Western Europe, but failed to predict superior performance of coastal North American populations under continental climate conditions in Eastern Europe. However, model projections appear appropriate when considering additional information regarding adaptation of Douglas-fir provenances to withstand frost and drought, even though the model partially fails in a validation against growth traits alone. We conclude by applying the partially validated model to climate change scenarios for Europe, demonstrating that climate trends observed over the last three decades warrant changes to current use of Douglas-fir provenances in plantation forestry throughout Western and Central Europe. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Competitive relations between Douglas-fir and Pacific madrone on shallow soils in a Mediterranean climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng Q.; Newton, M.; Tappeiner, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    A large area of Pacific Coast forests is characterized by shallow soil, with negligible rainfall in the growing season. This study explores water-seeking strategy on such a site. We studied availability of bedrock water and its effects on growth and ecophysiology of 11-yr-old planted Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) and sprouting Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii Pursh). The study was carried out at three regulated densities of madrone sprouts on shallow ( 0.05) among three densities of madrone. However, cover in plots with the highest density of madrone (1322 sprout clumps/ha) depleted 50 mm of water from the 1.5 m layer by June, whereas vegetation on lower density treatments withdrew 15-28 mm by June, with later withdrawal distributed more uniformly through the growing season. Madrone density significantly affected basal diameter (P a?? 0.0001) and height growth (P a?? 0.002) of Douglas-fir. Madrone was consistently taller than Douglas-fir in all plots. The height of 11-yr-old madrone sprout clumps (424-465 cm) did not differ significantly among densities. Madrone leaf area index and biomass were higher at the high density of madrone than at medium density (P a?? 0.045, LAI; P a?? 0.001, biomass). Physiological advantages and rooting habits of madrone give it a competitive advantage over Douglas-fir in this area that it might not have if bedrock did not provide the principal water reservoir for summer growth.

  11. Lithic technological responses to Late Pleistocene glacial cycling at Pinnacle Point Site 5-6, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyle S.; Oestmo, Simen; Pereira, Telmo; Ranhorn, Kathryn L.; Schoville, Benjamin J.; Marean, Curtis W.

    2017-01-01

    There are multiple hypotheses for human responses to glacial cycling in the Late Pleistocene, including changes in population size, interconnectedness, and mobility. Lithic technological analysis informs us of human responses to environmental change because lithic assemblage characteristics are a reflection of raw material transport, reduction, and discard behaviors that depend on hunter-gatherer social and economic decisions. Pinnacle Point Site 5–6 (PP5-6), Western Cape, South Africa is an ideal locality for examining the influence of glacial cycling on early modern human behaviors because it preserves a long sequence spanning marine isotope stages (MIS) 5, 4, and 3 and is associated with robust records of paleoenvironmental change. The analysis presented here addresses the question, what, if any, lithic assemblage traits at PP5-6 represent changing behavioral responses to the MIS 5-4-3 interglacial-glacial cycle? It statistically evaluates changes in 93 traits with no a priori assumptions about which traits may significantly associate with MIS. In contrast to other studies that claim that there is little relationship between broad-scale patterns of climate change and lithic technology, we identified the following characteristics that are associated with MIS 4: increased use of quartz, increased evidence for outcrop sources of quartzite and silcrete, increased evidence for earlier stages of reduction in silcrete, evidence for increased flaking efficiency in all raw material types, and changes in tool types and function for silcrete. Based on these results, we suggest that foragers responded to MIS 4 glacial environmental conditions at PP5-6 with increased population or group sizes, ‘place provisioning’, longer and/or more intense site occupations, and decreased residential mobility. Several other traits, including silcrete frequency, do not exhibit an association with MIS. Backed pieces, once they appear in the PP5-6 record during MIS 4, persist through MIS

  12. Jon Douglas Carlson (1945-2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar-Carlson, Matt; Kottler, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Jon Douglas Carlson, who passed away on February 1, 2017, in Madison, Wisconsin, due to complications from a bone marrow transplant. Jon was a leading figure within counseling, psychology, and education, with a specific focus on Adlerian theory and practice. His professional work was informed by over 40 years of clinical practice. During his distinguished career, he published 64 books, 185 articles, and more than 300 training videos adopted by universities around the world. Carlson's professional legacy lives on through the many books and countless hours of professional video sessions, as well as through the healthy, engaged lives of the clients, students, and colleagues that he encouraged, mentored, and supported. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. NEEDLE ANATOMY CHANGES WITH INCREASING TREE AGE IN DOUGLAS FIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological differences between old growth and sapling (Pseudotsuga menziesii, (Mirb.) Franco) Douglas fir trees may extend to differences in needle anatomy. We used microscopy with image analysis to compare and quantify anatomical parameters in cross-sections of previous year...

  14. Geophysical investigation of the June 6, 1944 D-Day invasion site at Pointe du Hoc, Normandy, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Pierce, C. J.; Warden, R. R.; Burt, R. A.

    2005-05-01

    A near-surface geophysical survey at the D-Day invasion site atop the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc, Normandy, France was carried out using ground-penetrating radar, electromagnetic induction, and magnetic gradiometry equipment. The subsurface targets of investigation are predominantly buried concrete and steel structures and earthworks associated with the German coastal fortifications at this stronpoint of Hitler's Atlantic Wall. The targets are readily detectable embedded within the vadose zone of a weakly magnetic, electrically resistive loess soil cover. The radar and electromagnetic induction responses lend themselves to plan-view imaging of the subsurface, while the magnetics data reveal the presence of buried magnetic bodies in a more subtle fashion. Several intriguing geophysical signatures were discovered, including what may be the buried remains of a railway turntable, ordnance fragments in the bomb craters, a buried steel-reinforced concrete trench, and a linear chain of machine gun firing positins. Geophysical prospecting is shown to be a very powerful tool for historical battlefield characterization.

  15. Site-Selective Ribosylation of Fluorescent Nucleobase Analogs Using Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase as a Catalyst: Effects of Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Stachelska-Wierzchowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic ribosylation of fluorescent 8-azapurine derivatives, like 8-azaguanine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, with purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP as a catalyst, leads to N9, N8, and N7-ribosides. The final proportion of the products may be modulated by point mutations in the enzyme active site. As an example, ribosylation of the latter substrate by wild-type calf PNP gives N7- and N8-ribosides, while the N243D mutant directs the ribosyl substitution at N9- and N7-positions. The same mutant allows synthesis of the fluorescent N7-β-d-ribosyl-8-azaguanine. The mutated form of the E. coli PNP, D204N, can be utilized to obtain non-typical ribosides of 8-azaadenine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine as well. The N7- and N8-ribosides of the 8-azapurines can be analytically useful, as illustrated by N7-β-d-ribosyl-2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, which is a good fluorogenic substrate for mammalian forms of PNP, including human blood PNP, while the N8-riboside is selective to the E. coli enzyme.

  16. Assessing urban forest effects and values: Douglas County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Allison R. Bodine; Robert E. Hoehn; Alexis Ellis; Kim Bomberger; Daniel E. Crane; Theodore A. Endreny; Thomas Taggert; Emily. Stephan

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of trees in Douglas County, Kansas, reveals that this area has about 14,164,000 trees with tree and shrub canopy that covers 25.2 percent of the county. The most common tree species are American elm, northern hackberry, eastern redcedar, Osage-orange, and honeylocust. Trees in Douglas County currently store about 1.7 million tons of carbon (6.4 million tons...

  17. Microbial Activity in Forest Soil Under Beech, Spruce, Douglas Fir and Fir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal-Jafari Timea

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the microbial activity in forest soil from different sites under deciduous and coniferous trees in Serbia. One site on Stara planina was under beech trees (Fagus sp. while another under mixture of spruce (Picea sp. and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga sp.. The site on Kopaonik was under mixture of beech (Fagus sp. and spruce (Picea sp. trees. The site on Tara was dominantly under fir (Abies sp., beech (Fagus sp. and spruce (Picea sp.. The total number of bacteria, the number of actinobacteria, fungi and microorganisms involved in N and C cycles were determined using standard method of agar plates. The activities of dehydrogenase and ß-glucosidase enzymes were measured by spectrophotometric methods. The microbial activity was affected by tree species and sampling time. The highest dehydrogenase activity, total number of bacteria, number of actinobacteria, aminoheterotrophs, amylolytic and cellulolytic microorganisms were determined in soil under beech trees. The highest total number of fungi and number of pectinolytic microorganisms were determined in soil under spruce and Douglas fir trees. The correlation analyses proved the existence of statistically significant interdependency among investigated parameters.

  18. Galactosemia caused by a point mutation that activates cryptic donor splice site in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadelius, C.; Lagerkvist, A. (Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden) Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Molin, A.K.; Larsson, A. (Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Von Doebeln, U. (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1993-08-01

    Galactosemia affects 1/84,000 in Sweden and is manifested in infancy when the child is exposed to galactose in the diet. If untreated there is a risk of severe early symptoms and, even with a lactose-free diet, late symptoms such as mental retardation and ovarial dysfunction may develop. In classical galactosemia, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) (EC 2.7.7.12) is defective and the normal cDNA sequence of this enzyme has been characterized. Recently eight mutations leading to galactosemia were published. Heparinized venous blood was drawn from a patient with classical galactosemia. In the cDNA from the patient examined, an insertion of 54 bp was found at position 1087. Amplification of the relevant genomic region of the patient's DNA was performed. Exon-intron boundaries and intronic sequences thus determined revealed that the 54-bp insertion was located immediately downstream of exon 10. It was further found that the patient was heterozygous for a point mutation, changing a C to a T (in 5 of 9 clones) at the second base in the intron downstream of the insertion. This alteration creates a sequence which, as well as the ordinary splice site, differs in only two positions from the consensus sequence. It was found that the mutation occurred in only one of the 20 alleles from galactosemic patients and in none of the 200 alleles from normal controls. The mutation is inherited from the mother, who also was found to express the 54-bp-long insertion at the mRNA level. Sequences from the 5[prime] end of the coding region were determined after genomic amplification, revealing a sequence identical to that reported. The mutation on the paternal allele has not been identified. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Thinning shock and response to fertilizer less than expected in young Douglas-fir stand at Wind River Experimental Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean S. DeBell; Constance A. Harrington; John. Shumway

    2002-01-01

    Three thinning treatments (thinned to 3.7 by 3.7 m, thinned to 4.3 by 4.3 m, and an unthinned control treatment with nominal spacing averaging 2.6 by 2.6 m) were installed in a 10-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation growing on a low-quality site at the Wind River Experimental Forest in southwest Washington. Two...

  20. Tõlkimise kõrge kunsti kirjelduskeele otsingud jätkuvad: Tallinnas käis Douglas Robinson / Anne Lange

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lange, Anne, 1962-

    2013-01-01

    Tõlketeadusest ja tõlketeadlasest Douglas Robinsonist. Sisaldab intervjuud Douglas Robinsoniga, kes pidas Tallinna Ülikooli kultuuriteaduste ja kunstide doktorikooli seminari raames avaliku loengu tõlkimisest

  1. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in Douglas-fir: report no. 19—The Iron Creek study, 1966–2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis; David D. Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the history and results of the Iron Creek installation of the cooperative Levels-of-Growing-Stock (LOGS) study in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), over the period 1966–2006 (ages 19 to 59). This is a 1949 plantation on an excellent site, and is one of nine installations in the study. Results are generally...

  2. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in Douglas-fir: report no. 08—The LOGS Study, 20-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis; David D. Marshall

    1986-01-01

    This progress report reviews the history and status of the cooperative levels-of-growing-stock study in coast Douglas-fir, begun in 1961, in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. It presents new analyses, including comparisons among some installations. Data now available are primarily from the site II installations, which are approaching completion of the study....

  3. Stand-level gas-exchange responses to seasonal drought in very young versus old Douglas-fir forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia Wharton; Matt Schroeder; Ken Bible; Matthias Falk; Kyaw Tha Paw U

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral (ES) stands (0 to 15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) (~450 to 500 years old) forest in the Wind River Experimental Forest,...

  4. Report of a Case and Review of Literature of Internal Hernia through Peritoneal Defect in Pouch of Douglas: A Rare Occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, Vamseedharan; Venugopal, Sarveswaran; Subramaniam, Surees Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction attributable to internal hernia as a cause is a rare phenomenon with a reported incidence of 0.6%-5.8%. Internal hernias ensuing as a result of defect in the pouch of Douglas is extremely rare with only six such cases reported so far in the literature. We present a case of 74-year-old posthysterectomy status female who presented with features of intestinal obstruction. Intraoperatively, the site of obstruction was found to be a rent in the peritoneum of the pouch of Douglas through which a loop of ileum was found herniating. The viability of the bowel was confirmed, and the defect was closed. The postoperative course was uneventful. This report presents an extremely rare type of internal hernia caused by defect in the pouch of Douglas and review of the literature so far available.

  5. Assessment of Heavy Metals Concentration in Soils at Selected Points on Roads and Sites Around Nairobi Using EDXRF Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanjala, O. F.; Rathore, I.V.S.; Murungi, J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased exhaust emissions (gaseous and particulate), fuel leakage, damping and wear and tear of vehicle parts have resulted in environmental pollution by heavy metals especially along major roads with high traffic. This calls for constant monitoring to make sure that the levels of heavy metals do not go above the threshold limits recommended due to their adverse health effects on human beings, plants and animals. This research project focused on determining the present concentrations of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, and Ni) in soils at selected points on roads around Nairobi and some selected sites with respect to distance off-road and depth. The soil samples collected were ground into fine particles of size less than 100m and prepared into pellet form for analysis using Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. This analytic technique is fast, non-destructive and enables simultaneous determination of the concentrations of many elements in a sample with high sensitivity. It consists of a Si(Li) detector with energy resolution between 170eV to 190eV at 5.9KeV, MnKα-lines and a radioisotope source 109Cd (T1/2 =461.4 days) for sample excitation leading to emission of characteristic X-rays. Quantitative analysis was done using a software program called Quantitative X-ray Analysis System with a sub-routine program called Quantitative Analysis of Environmental Samples to finally obtain the concentrations of the different elements in the samples. The levels of the heavy metals obtained from the selected sampling sites C.Gar, K. Gar, K.R, G.B.P and Nai were 82.2±7.6, g/g to 236.1±9.2, g/g Pb, 273±9.2, g/g to 794±26, g/gZn, 32.4±4.8, g/g to 221.8±6.8, g/g Cu, and 10.72.7, g/g to 33±4.8, g/g Ni. From the results, it was found that the concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Ni were very high at the garages followed by parking places for buses and heavy commercial vehicles and lastly at roundabouts. The concentrations of heavy metals on the selected roads at Roy, Cab

  6. 77 FR 52264 - Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate... Airworthiness Directive (AD): Hughes Helicopters Inc., and McDonnel Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate...

  7. 78 FR 18226 - Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate... directive (AD): 2013-05-16 Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type...

  8. The Role of Social Networking Sites in Creating Moral Crisis and the Role of the University in Confronting It from the View Point of Qassim University Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Smadi, Hend Sam'an Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed at recognizing the effect of the social networking sites (henceforth snss) in creating moral crisis and the role of the university in its confrontation from the view point of faculty members at Qassim University. Two tests were constructed; the first included (29 items) developed to identify the role of snss in creating moral…

  9. The structural evolution of the coastal area between Danger Point and Struisbaai in the southern Cape Fold Belt, with implications for the siting of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.J.B.; Andreoli, M.A.G.

    1990-01-01

    A structural analysis of the coastal area between Danger Point and Struisbaai in the Southern Cape has been undertaken, using the technique of structural domain analysis coupled with geophysical interpretation and geological mapping. This study forms part of the country-wide geological investigations that are being carried out for the purpose of siting South Africa's future nuclear power stations. 30 refs., 18 figs

  10. 78 FR 59914 - Foreign-Trade Zone 160-Anchorage, Alaska; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ...: Site 1 (56.89 acres)--the Port of Anchorage and Port of Anchorage Industrial Park, 1075 Dock Rd., 1076... acres)--619 East Ship Creek Ave., Anchorage; Site 6 (12.2 acres)-- Douglas Management Company, 660...

  11. 75 FR 38798 - Douglas County, OR; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 13722-000] Douglas County... Intervene, and Competing Applications June 24, 2010. On May 5, 2010, Douglas County, Oregon, filed an... the feasibility of the Douglas County Wave and Tidal Energy Power Project, in the Pacific Ocean, off...

  12. 75 FR 50878 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD- 90-30 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39-16388. Docket No. FAA-2010-0433; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM..., 2010. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model...

  13. 75 FR 47631 - Douglas Battery Manufacturing Co., Currently Known as Lexington Road Properties, Inc., Including...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,430] Douglas Battery... to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance on January 6, 2010, applicable to workers of Douglas... and industrial batteries. New information shows that in January 2010, Douglas Battery Manufacturing...

  14. 33 CFR 147.817 - Sir Douglas Morpeth Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sir Douglas Morpeth Tension Leg... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.817 Sir Douglas Morpeth Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Sir Douglas Morpeth Tension Leg Platform (Morpeth...

  15. 75 FR 68245 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ...-1043; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-200-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... McDonnell Douglas Model MD-90-30 airplanes. This proposed AD would require installing new fire handle... airworthiness directive (AD): McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-1043; Directorate Identifier...

  16. 75 FR 38056 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-0645; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-200-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas..., September 9, 2008), for certain McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 airplanes. That AD requires a... fasteners in the aft mount support fitting of the left and right engines on 29 McDonnell Douglas Corporation...

  17. 75 FR 21528 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ...-0433; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-117-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... main landing gear (MLG) during gear extension, damaging the hydraulic system on McDonnell Douglas.... The retract cylinder support fittings for the MLG on McDonnell Douglas Model MD-80 series airplanes...

  18. 75 FR 36577 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD- 90-30 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-0554; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-082-AD. Comments Due Date (a... supersedes AD 2009-07-04, Amendment 39-15863. Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas...

  19. 75 FR 80742 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...-1202; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-167-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): McDonnell Douglas Corporation... Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 airplanes, certificated in any category. Subject (d) Joint Aircraft...

  20. 75 FR 66653 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD- 90-30 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...-15667 (73 FR 52203, September 9, 2008), and adding the following new AD: 2010-22-04 McDonnell Douglas... supersedes AD 2008-18-10, Amendment 39-15667. Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas...

  1. Absolutism and Natural Law Argument: William O. Douglas on Freedom of Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    Noting that United States Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas has often been characterized as an "absolutist" in terms of First Amendment policy, this paper argues that, in fact, Douglas's policy positions provided for less than absolute freedom to communicate. The paper then reveals, through an anlaysis of 18 of Douglas's opinions,…

  2. Tree water storage and its diurnal dynamics related to sap flow and changes in stem volume in old-growth Douglas-fir trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermák, Jan; Kucera, Jiri; Bauerle, William L; Phillips, Nathan; Hinckley, Thomas M

    2007-02-01

    Diurnal and seasonal tree water storage was studied in three large Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) trees at the Wind River Canopy Crane Research site. Changes in water storage were based on measurements of sap flow and changes in stem volume and tissue water content at different heights in the stem and branches. We measured sap flow by two variants of the heat balance method (with internal heating in stems and external heating in branches), stem volume with electronic dendrometers, and tissue water content gravimetrically. Water storage was calculated from the differences in diurnal courses of sap flow at different heights and their integration. Old-growth Douglas-fir trees contained large amounts of free water: stem sapwood was the most important storage site, followed by stem phloem, branch sapwood, branch phloem and needles. There were significant time shifts (minutes to hours) between sap flow measured at different positions within the transport system (i.e., stem base to shoot tip), suggesting a highly elastic transport system. On selected fine days between late July and early October, when daily transpiration ranged from 150 to 300 liters, the quantity of stored water used daily ranged from 25 to 55 liters, i.e., about 20% of daily total sap flow. The greatest amount of this stored water came from the lower stem; however, proportionally more water was removed from the upper parts of the tree relative to their water storage capacity. In addition to lags in sap flow from one point in the hydrolic pathway to another, the withdrawal and replacement of stored water was reflected in changes in stem volume. When point-to-point lags in sap flow (minutes to hours near the top and stem base, respectively) were considered, there was a strong linear relationship between stem volume changes and transpiration. Volume changes of the whole tree were small (equivalent to 14% of the total daily use of stored water) indicating that most stored water came from

  3. Exploring functionally related enzymes using radially distributed properties of active sites around the reacting points of bound ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueno Keisuke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics approaches, particularly those solving the 3D structures of many proteins with unknown functions, have increased the desire for structure-based function predictions. However, prediction of enzyme function is difficult because one member of a superfamily may catalyze a different reaction than other members, whereas members of different superfamilies can catalyze the same reaction. In addition, conformational changes, mutations or the absence of a particular catalytic residue can prevent inference of the mechanism by which catalytic residues stabilize and promote the elementary reaction. A major hurdle for alignment-based methods for prediction of function is the absence (despite its importance of a measure of similarity of the physicochemical properties of catalytic sites. To solve this problem, the physicochemical features radially distributed around catalytic sites should be considered in addition to structural and sequence similarities. Results We showed that radial distribution functions (RDFs, which are associated with the local structural and physicochemical properties of catalytic active sites, are capable of clustering oxidoreductases and transferases by function. The catalytic sites of these enzymes were also characterized using the RDFs. The RDFs provided a measure of the similarity among the catalytic sites, detecting conformational changes caused by mutation of catalytic residues. Furthermore, the RDFs reinforced the classification of enzyme functions based on conventional sequence and structural alignments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the application of RDFs provides advantages in the functional classification of enzymes by providing information about catalytic sites.

  4. N =1 Lagrangians for generalized Argyres-Douglas theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Prarit; Sciarappa, Antonio; Song, Jaewon

    2017-10-01

    We find N = 1 Lagrangian gauge theories that flow to generalized ArgyresDouglas theories with N = 2 supersymmetry. We find that certain SU quiver gauge theories flow to generalized Argyres-Douglas theories of type ( A k-1 , A mk-1) and ( I m,km , S). We also find quiver gauge theories of SO/Sp gauge groups flowing to the ( A 2 m-1 , D 2 mk+1), ( A 2 m , D 2 m( k-1)+ k ) and D m(2 k + 2) m(2 k + 2) [ m] theories.

  5. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  6. PTM Modeling of Dredged Suspended Sediment at Proposed Polaris Point and Ship Repair Facility CVN Berthing Sites - Apra Harbor, Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    sedimentation outside of the channel footprint. For example, dredging near the edge of the footprint can be confined to time periods when tidal currents...Cases 1 or 2 due to the lower loss rate. Sedimentation rates outside the channel prism are further reduced because all sediment is introduced in the...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 16 PTM Modeling of Dredged Suspended Sediment at Proposed Polaris Point and Ship Repair Facility CVN Berthing

  7. Up through the Ranks at McDonnell Douglas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Mary

    1989-01-01

    Raher than bemoan the lack of leadership potential among younger employees, McDonnell Douglas Corporation has embarked on a comprehensive strategy of on-the-job development for staff members at all levels of the organization. Three types of rotational training are being used to address corporate, functional, and intracompany needs. (Author)

  8. Predicting Douglas-fir's response to a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Watts; Sheel Bansal; Connie Harrington; Brad. St. Clair

    2015-01-01

    Douglas-fir is an iconic tree in the Pacific Northwest. Although individual trees may appear to be identical, genetic differences within each tree have resulted from adaptation to the local environment. These genetic differences over time have resulted in differences among populations that are important to the species' survival and growth in changing climates....

  9. Some economic considerations in thinning Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman P. Worthington

    1957-01-01

    Many thousands of acres of young Douglas-fir stands in western Washington are ready for commercial thinning. This is true even after liberal allowance is made for premerchantable and under stocked stands, unfavorable topography, and lack of markets. However, with but few exceptions, regular systematic thinning is not being practiced even in favorably located, operable...

  10. Developmental decline in height growth in Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Bond; Nicole M. Czarnomski; Clifton Cooper; Michael E. Day; Michael S. Greenwood

    2007-01-01

    The characteristic decline in height growth that occurs over a tree's lifespan is often called "age-related decline." But is the reduction in height growth in aging trees a function of age or of size? We grafted shoot tips across different ages and sizes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) trees to determine whether...

  11. On Humans as Animals: Sparring with the beast in Douglas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper draws on Charles Darwin's argument in The Descent of Man that humans are animals, and then offers a close reading of Douglas Livingstone's poem “Traffic interlude: Descent from the Tower”. It argues that the poem uses the genre of fable to tell the story of man's internal tussle between intellect and instinct, ...

  12. The Flood of History: Connection Interviews Historian Douglas Brinkley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connection: The Journal of the New England Board of Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Douglas Brinkley, an award-winning author and historian and director of Tulane University's Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization. His wide-ranging portfolio includes books on John Kerry and the Vietnam War, Ronald Reagan and D-Day, Rosa Parks, Henry Ford, Dean Acheson and Jimmy Carter. He is…

  13. Effects of bear damage on Douglas-fir lumber recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini C. Lowell; Dennis Dykstra; George McFadden

    2009-01-01

    Bear activily resulting in injury to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) trees has been documented as early as the mid-1850s in the Pacific Northwest. The study reported in this article was designed to help managers decide whether the common practice of removing the damaged but potentially valuable butt section of the bottom log and...

  14. A Second Look at Douglas Barnes's "From Communication to Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This article revisits Douglas Barnes's book-length exploration of the implications for teachers of a constructivist epistemology, notably in relation to the importance of small-group talk in classrooms. Empirically based consideration of small-group exploratory pupil-pupil talk enabled Barnes to reveal the learning strategies such a context…

  15. Two commercial thinnings in century-old Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Steele

    1954-01-01

    As young-growth forests replace old-growth forests as the primary source of Douglas-fir raw material, the technique of managing young stands becomes increasingly important. Managers of young-growth timber need to know whether it is economical and silviculturally feasible to make thinnings in stands that are close to rotation age. Final harvest of some stands of this...

  16. Light thinning in century-old Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Steele

    1948-01-01

    A stand-improvement study in century-old Douglas-fir at the Wind River Experimental Forest provides an example of a commercial thinning that gave a substantial intermediate harvest, salvaged considerable material that would have been lost through mortality, greatly increased the net growth rate, and improved the general vigor of the stand, leaving the forest in a more...

  17. A Cellular Universe: Douglas Livingstone's Collected Poems, A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The publication of Douglas Livingstone's collected poems enables readers to see that his skill and control of his craft grew in strength and scope over the nearly forty years of his publishing career. Enriched by the inclusion of many hitherto unpublished poems, A Ruthless Fidelity reveals equally that certain features of ...

  18. Reproduction following small group cuttings in virgin Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman P. Worthington

    1953-01-01

    Quick and adequate regeneration of Douglas-fir forests as they are harvested is a major forest management problem in the Puget Sound region. Clear-cutting by staggered settings has not always resulted in adequate regeneration even where no part of the area is more than one-fourth mile from a seed source. Single tree selection, experimented with extensively, has many...

  19. Non-Douglas-Kazakov phase transition of two-dimensional generalized Yang-Mills theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorrami, M.; Alimohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    In two-dimensional Yang-Mills and generalized Yang-Mills theories for large gauge groups, there is a dominant representation determining the thermodynamic limit of the system. This representation is characterized by a density, the value of which should everywhere be between zero and one. This density itself is determined by means of a saddle-point analysis. For some values of the parameter space, this density exceeds one in some places. So one should modify it to obtain an acceptable density. This leads to the well-known Douglas-Kazakov phase transition. In generalized Yang-Mills theories, there are also regions in the parameter space where somewhere this density becomes negative. Here too, one should modify the density so that it remains nonnegative. This leads to another phase transition, different from the Douglas-Kazakov one. Here the general structure of this phase transition is studied, and it is shown that the order of this transition is typically three. Using carefully-chosen parameters, however, it is possible to construct models with the order of the phase transition not equal to three. A class of these non-typical models is also studied. (orig.)

  20. Foliar nitrogen metabolism of adult Douglas-fir trees is affected by soil water availability and varies little among provenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Baoguo; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Dannenmann, Michael; Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Hess, Moritz; Jansen, Kirstin; Eiblmeier, Monika; Gessler, Arthur; Kohnle, Ulrich; Ensminger, Ingo; Rennenberg, Heinz; Wildhagen, Henning

    2018-01-01

    The coniferous forest tree Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is native to the pacific North America, and is increasingly planted in temperate regions worldwide. Nitrogen (N) metabolism is of great importance for growth, resistance and resilience of trees. In the present study, foliar N metabolism of adult trees of three coastal and one interior provenance of Douglas-fir grown at two common gardens in southwestern Germany (Wiesloch, W; Schluchsee, S) were characterized in two subsequent years. Both the native North American habitats of the seed sources and the common garden sites in Germany differ in climate conditions. Total and mineral soil N as well as soil water content were higher in S compared to W. We hypothesized that i) provenances differ constitutively in N pool sizes and composition, ii) N pools are affected by environmental conditions, and iii) that effects of environmental factors on N pools differ among interior and coastal provenances. Soil water content strongly affected the concentrations of total N, soluble protein, total amino acids (TAA), arginine and glutamate. Foliar concentrations of total N, soluble protein, structural N and TAA of trees grown at W were much higher than in trees at S. Provenance effects were small but significant for total N and soluble protein content (interior provenance showed lowest concentrations), as well as arginine, asparagine and glutamate. Our data suggest that needle N status of adult Douglas-fir is independent from soil N availability and that low soil water availability induces a re-allocation of N from structural N to metabolic N pools. Small provenance effects on N pools suggest that local adaptation of Douglas-fir is not dominated by N conditions at the native habitats.

  1. The Importance of Surface-Binding Site towards Starch-Adsorptivity Level in α-Amylase: A Review on Structural Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umi Baroroh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate composed of glucose. As a source of energy, starch can be degraded by various amylolytic enzymes, including α-amylase. In a large-scale industry, starch processing cost is still expensive due to the requirement of high temperature during the gelatinization step. Therefore, α-amylase with raw starch digesting ability could decrease the energy cost by avoiding the high gelatinization temperature. It is known that the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM and the surface-binding site (SBS of α-amylase could facilitate the substrate binding to the enzyme’s active site to enhance the starch digestion. These sites are a noncatalytic module, which could interact with a lengthy substrate such as insoluble starch. The major interaction between these sites and the substrate is the CH/pi-stacking interaction with the glucose ring. Several mutation studies on the Halothermothrix orenii, SusG Bacteroides thetaiotamicron, Barley, Aspergillus niger, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera α-amylases have revealed that the stacking interaction through the aromatic residues at the SBS is essential to the starch adsorption. In this review, the SBS in various α-amylases is also presented. Therefore, based on the structural point of view, SBS is suggested as an essential site in α-amylase to increase its catalytic activity, especially towards the insoluble starch.

  2. DIGITAL INVASIONS: FROM POINT CLOUDS TO HISTORICAL BUILDING OBJECT MODELING (H-BOM OF A UNESCO WHL SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chiabrando

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper here presented shows the outcomes of a research/didactic activity carried out within a workshop titled "Digital Invasions. From point cloud to Heritage Building Information Modeling" held at Politecnico di Torino (29th September–5th October 2016. The term digital invasions refers to an Italian bottom up project born in the 2013 with the aim of promoting innovative digital ways for the enhancement of Cultural Heritage by the co-creation of cultural contents and its sharing through social media platforms. At this regard, we have worked with students of Architectural Master of Science degree, training them with a multidisciplinary teaching team (Architectural Representation, History of Architecture, Restoration, Digital Communication and Geomatics. The aim was also to test if our students could be involved in a sort of niche crowdsourcing for the creation of a library of H-BOMS (Historical-Building Object Modeling of architectural elements.

  3. Digital Invasions: from Point Clouds to Historical Building Object Modeling H-Bom of a Unesco Whl Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiabrando, F.; Lo Turco, M.; Santagati, C.

    2017-02-01

    The paper here presented shows the outcomes of a research/didactic activity carried out within a workshop titled "Digital Invasions. From point cloud to Heritage Building Information Modeling" held at Politecnico di Torino (29th September-5th October 2016). The term digital invasions refers to an Italian bottom up project born in the 2013 with the aim of promoting innovative digital ways for the enhancement of Cultural Heritage by the co-creation of cultural contents and its sharing through social media platforms. At this regard, we have worked with students of Architectural Master of Science degree, training them with a multidisciplinary teaching team (Architectural Representation, History of Architecture, Restoration, Digital Communication and Geomatics). The aim was also to test if our students could be involved in a sort of niche crowdsourcing for the creation of a library of H-BOMS (Historical-Building Object Modeling) of architectural elements.

  4. Growth responses of young Douglas-fir and tanoak 11 years after various levels of hardwood removal and understory suppression in southwestern Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, T.B.; Tappeiner, John C.

    1997-01-01

    At two sites in southwestern Oregon, height, diameter, and crown width of young Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and sprout-origin tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) were measured 1–11 years after reducing the density of a 2-year-old tanoak stand to 0%, 25%, 50%, and 100% of its initial cover. Some plots also included suppression of understory vegetation. Tanoak cover developed linearly with time, with steepness of the growth trajectory increasing at a diminishing rate with increasing percentage of initial tanoak cover. Fifth-year cover of understory vegetation declined linearly with increasing percentage of initial tanoak cover (R2 = 0.29). Survival of Douglas-fir (96–100%) differed little among initial abundances of tanoak, while growth trajectories for its size became increasingly exponential with decreasing percentage of initial tanoak cover. Eleventh-year heights of Douglas-fir were similar for 0%, 25%, and 50% of initial tanoak cover; however, diameter increased linearly with decreasing percentage of initial tanoak cover (R2 = 0.73), and the slope of the relationship steepened with understory suppression. Our results indicate that young stands exhibiting a wide range of stand compositions and productivities can be established by early manipulations of tanoak and understory abundance. Complete removal of tanoak plus understory suppression are necessary to maximize Douglas-fir growth, while productive, mixed stands can be achieved by removing 50% or more of tanoak cover.

  5. Trapping Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) with pheromone baited multiple-funnel traps does not reduce Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Progar; N. Sturdevant; M.J. Rinella

    2010-01-01

    Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins) (DFB) causes considerable mortality to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in western North American forests. We evaluated the use of semiochemical-baited multiple-funnel traps for the protection of small, high-value stands of trees, such as those occurring...

  6. Point Source contamination approach for hydrological risk assessment of a major hypothetical accident from second research reactor at Inshas site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, M.A.; Tawfik, F.S.

    2002-01-01

    The point source contamination mechanism and the deterministic conservative approach have been implemented to demonstrate the hazards of hydrological pollution due to a major hypothetical accident in the second research reactor at Inshas. The radioactive inventory is assumed to be dissolved in 75% of the cooling water (25% are lost) and comes directly into contact with ground water and moved down gradient. Five radioisotopes(I-129, Sr-90, Ru-106, Cs-134 and Cs-137) of the entire inventory are found to be highly durable and represent vulnerability in the environment. Their downstream spread indices; C max : maximum concentration at the focus of the moving ellipse, delta: pollution duration at different distances, A:polluted area at different distances and X min : safety distance from the reactor, were calculated based on analytical solutions of the convection-dispersion partial differential equation for absorbable and decaying species. The largest downstream contamination range was found for Sr-90 and Ru-106 but still no potential. The geochemical and hydrological parameters of the water bearing formations play a great role in buffering and limiting the radiation effects. These reduce the retention time of the radioisotopes several order of magnitudes in the polluted distances. Sensitivity analysis of the computed pollution ranges shows low sensitivity to possible potential for variations activity of nuclide inventory, dispersivity and saturated thickness and high sensitivity for possible variations in groundwater velocity and retention factors

  7. Mixed-Species Effects on Soil C and N Stocks, C/N Ratio and pH Using a Transboundary Approach in Adjacent Common Garden Douglas-Fir and Beech Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seid Muhie Dawud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mixed forest of Douglas-fir and beech has been suggested as one of the possible future forest types in Northwest Europe but the effects of this mixed forest on soil properties relative to monoculture stands are unknown. In a transboundary investigation of adjacent common garden Douglas-fir and beech stands, we determined the effects on topsoil properties. However, responses of C and N stocks, the C/N ratio and pH were site- and soil layer-specific and were mainly single-sided and without synergistic effects. Beech reduced the soil C and N stocks in Douglas-fir at the nutrient-poor site, caused an increase in the C/N ratio in the forest floor and mineral soil at both nutrient-poor and -rich sites, and reduced the acidifying effect of Douglas-fir at the nutrient-poor site. These results do not support the hypothesis that mixture effects would be consistent across sites and soil layers. The lack of synergistic effects may be attributed to the relatively similar litter quality or rooting depth that prevented any larger niche differentiation and complementarity. The results indicate that the transboundary approach within a mature common garden proved useful as a platform to test tree species interactions, and this approach could be explored in soil studies until dedicated mixed-species common gardens reach maturity.

  8. 3-D Resistivity Tomography for Cliff Stability Study at the D-Day Pointe du Hoc Historic Site in Normandy, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udphuay, S.; Everett, M. E.; Guenther, T.; Warden, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The D-Day invasion site at Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, France is one of the most important World War II battlefields. The site remains today a valuable historic cultural resource. However the site is vulnerable to cliff collapses that could endanger the observation post building and U.S. Ranger memorial located just landward of the sea stack, and an anti-aircraft gun emplacement, Col. Rudder's command post, located on the cliff edge about 200 m east of the observation post. A 3-D resistivity tomography incorporating extreme topography is used in this study to provide a detailed site stability assessment with special attention to these two buildings. Multi-electrode resistivity measurements were made across the cliff face and along the top of the cliff around the two at-risk buildings to map major subsurface fracture zones and void spaces that could indicate possible accumulations and pathways of groundwater. The ingress of acidic groundwater through the underlying carbonate formations enlarges pre-existing tectonic fractures via limestone dissolution and weakens the overall structural integrity of the cliff. The achieved 3-D resistivity tomograms provide diagnostic subsurface resistivity distributions. Resistive zones associated with subsurface void spaces have been located. These void spaces constitute a stability geohazard as they become significant drainage routes during and after periods of heavy rainfalls.

  9. Identification of novel antitubulin agents by using a virtual screening approach based on a 7-point pharmacophore model of the tubulin colchi-site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarotti, Alberto; Theeramunkong, Sewan; Mesenzani, Ornella; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Tron, Gian Cesare

    2011-12-01

    Tubulin inhibition represents an established target in the field of anticancer research, and over the last 20 years, an intensive search for new antimicrotubule agents has occurred. Indeed, in silico models have been presented that might aid the discovery of novel agents. Among these, a 7-point pharmacophore model has been recently proposed. As a formal proof of this model, we carried out a ligand-based virtual screening on the colchicine-binding site. In vitro testing demonstrated that two compounds displayed a cytotoxic profile on neuroblastoma cancer cells (SH-SY5H) and one had an antitubulinic profile. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Schur indices, BPS particles, and Argyres-Douglas theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Córdova, Clay; Shao, Shu-Heng

    2016-01-01

    We conjecture a precise relationship between the Schur limit of the superconformal index of four-dimensional N=2 field theories, which counts local operators, and the spectrum of BPS particles on the Coulomb branch. We verify this conjecture for the special case of free field theories, N=2 QED, and SU(2) gauge theory coupled to fundamental matter. Assuming the validity of our proposal, we compute the Schur index of all Argyres-Douglas theories. Our answers match expectations from the connection of Schur operators with two-dimensional chiral algebras. Based on our results we propose that the chiral algebra of the generalized Argyres-Douglas theory (A_k_−_1,A_N_−_1) with k and N coprime, is the vacuum sector of the (k,k+N)W_k minimal model, and that the Schur index is the associated vacuum character.

  11. Fourier phase retrieval with a single mask by Douglas-Rachford algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengwen; Fannjiang, Albert

    2018-05-01

    The Fourier-domain Douglas-Rachford (FDR) algorithm is analyzed for phase retrieval with a single random mask. Since the uniqueness of phase retrieval solution requires more than a single oversampled coded diffraction pattern, the extra information is imposed in either of the following forms: 1) the sector condition on the object; 2) another oversampled diffraction pattern, coded or uncoded. For both settings, the uniqueness of projected fixed point is proved and for setting 2) the local, geometric convergence is derived with a rate given by a spectral gap condition. Numerical experiments demonstrate global, power-law convergence of FDR from arbitrary initialization for both settings as well as for 3 or more coded diffraction patterns without oversampling. In practice, the geometric convergence can be recovered from the power-law regime by a simple projection trick, resulting in highly accurate reconstruction from generic initialization.

  12. Variation in water potential, hydraulic characteristics and water source use in montane Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine trees in southwestern Alberta and consequences for seasonal changes in photosynthetic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Shilo F; Flanagan, Lawrence B; Sharp, Eric J; Cai, Tiebo

    2012-02-01

    Tree species response to climate change-induced shifts in the hydrological cycle depends on many physiological traits, particularly variation in water relations characteristics. We evaluated differences in shoot water potential, vulnerability of branches to reductions in hydraulic conductivity, and water source use between Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm. (lodgepole pine) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (interior Douglas-fir), and determined the consequences for seasonal changes in photosynthetic capacity. The Douglas-fir site had soil with greater depth, finer texture and higher organic matter content than soil at the lodgepole pine site, all factors that increased the storage of soil moisture. While the measured xylem vulnerability curves were quite similar for the two species, Douglas-fir had lower average midday shoot water potentials than did lodgepole pine. This implied that lodgepole pine exhibited stronger stomatal control of transpiration than Douglas-fir, which helped to reduce the magnitude of the water potential gradient required to access water from drying soil. Stable hydrogen isotope measurements indicated that Douglas-fir increased the use of groundwater during mid-summer when precipitation inputs were low, while lodgepole pine did not. There was a greater reduction of photosynthetic carbon gain in lodgepole pine compared with Douglas-fir when the two tree species were exposed to seasonal declines in soil water content. The contrasting patterns of seasonal variation in photosynthetic capacity observed for the two species were a combined result of differences in soil characteristics at the separate sites and the inherent physiological differences between the species.

  13. Barium enema and CT findings of Douglas pouch metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Kunihisa; Uchiyama, Nachiko; Iinuma, Hajime; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed barium enema and CT findings of Douglas pouch metastasis in 170 patients. The findings were divided into three types: Anterior compression type, anterior fixed folds type, and stenosis type. Patients with gastric cancer usually showed a stenosis type, especially in those with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Patients with colon and ovary cancer usually showed an anterior compression type. In patients with gastric cancer, those who showed a stenosis type had the most favorable prognosis among these three types. (author)

  14. Review Team Focused Modeling Analysis of Radial Collector Well Operation on the Hypersaline Groundwater Plume beneath the Turkey Point Site near Homestead, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Vail, Lance W.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory served as members of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission review team for the Florida Power & Light Company's application for two combined construction permits and operating licenses (combined licenses or COLs) for two proposed new reactor units-Turkey Point Units 6 and 7. The review team evaluated the environmental impacts of the proposed action based on the October 29, 2014 revision of the COL application, including the Environmental Report, responses to requests for additional information, and supplemental information. As part of this effort, team members tasked with assessing the environmental effects of proposed construction and operation of Units 6 and 7 at the Turkey Point site reviewed two separate modeling studies that analyzed the interaction between surface water and groundwater that would be altered by the operation of radial collector wells (RCWs) at the site. To further confirm their understanding of the groundwater hydrodynamics and to consider whether certain actions, proposed after the two earlier modeling studies were completed, would alter the earlier conclusions documented by the review team in their draft environmental impact statement (EIS; NRC 2015), a third modeling analysis was performed. The third modeling analysis is discussed in this report.

  15. Review Team Focused Modeling Analysis of Radial Collector Well Operation on the Hypersaline Groundwater Plume beneath the Turkey Point Site near Homestead, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vail, Lance W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory served as members of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission review team for the Florida Power & Light Company’s application for two combined construction permits and operating licenses (combined licenses or COLs) for two proposed new reactor units—Turkey Point Units 6 and 7. The review team evaluated the environmental impacts of the proposed action based on the October 29, 2014 revision of the COL application, including the Environmental Report, responses to requests for additional information, and supplemental information. As part of this effort, team members tasked with assessing the environmental effects of proposed construction and operation of Units 6 and 7 at the Turkey Point site reviewed two separate modeling studies that analyzed the interaction between surface water and groundwater that would be altered by the operation of radial collector wells (RCWs) at the site. To further confirm their understanding of the groundwater hydrodynamics and to consider whether certain actions, proposed after the two earlier modeling studies were completed, would alter the earlier conclusions documented by the review team in their draft environmental impact statement (EIS; NRC 2015), a third modeling analysis was performed. The third modeling analysis is discussed in this report.

  16. [Effect of ear point embedding on plasma and effect site concentrations of propofol-remifentanil in elderly patients after target-controlled induction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Wan, Liling; Gao, Fei; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2017-08-12

    To observe the clinical effect of ear point embedding on plasma and effect site concentrations of propofol-remifentanil in elderly patients who underwent abdominal external hernia surgery at the time of consciousness and pain disappearing by target-controlled infusion (TCI) and bispectral index (BIS). Fifty patients who underwent elective abdominal hernia surgery were randomly assigned into an observation group and a control group, 25 cases in each one. In the observation group, 30 minutes before anesthesia induction, Fugugou (Extra), Gan (CO 12 ), Pizhixia (AT 4 ), and Shenmen (TF 4 ) were embedded by auricular needles until the end of surgery, 10 times of counter press each point. In the control group, the same amount of auricular tape was applied until the end of surgery at the same points without stimulation 30 minutes before anesthesia induction. Patients in the two groups were given total intravenous anesthesia, and BIS was monitored by BIS anesthesia depth monitor. Propofol was infused by TCI at a beginning concentration of 1.5μg/L and increased by 0.3μg/L every 30s until the patients lost their consciousness. After that, remifentanil was infused by TCI at a beginning concentration of 2.0μg/L and increased by 0.3μg/L every 30s until the patients had no body reaction to pain stimulation (orbital reflex). Indices were recorded, including mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and the BIS values, at the time of T 0 (entering into the operation room), T 1 (losing consciousness) and T 2 (pain relief), the plasma and effect site concentrations of propofol at T 1 , the plasma and effect site concentrations of remifentanil at T 2 . After surgery we recorded the total amounts of propofol and remifentanil, surgery time and anesthesia time. At T 1 and T 2 , MAP and HR of the observation group were higher than those of the control group ( P effect site concentrations of propofol in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group

  17. Less than 50% nitrogen retention 1-year after high N additions to Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen-Correa, S.; Harrison, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    In Pacific Northwest forests, N is known to be a limiting nutrient particularly in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) ecosystems. Fertilizers are commonly applied to increase productivity in commercially managed forests. Despite known N limitations, Douglas-fir uptake of applied fertilizers is typically low and highly variable depending on environmental site conditions of a particular forest. We measured N recovery within a 1-year time frame at five sites using a fertilizer enriched in 15N as a tracer. Comparisons were also made between Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizers (EEFs) and an unformulated urea fertilizer to determine if N recovery is improved with fertilizers designed to limit volatile losses of ammonia. Retention was low across all sites and fertilizer types with a mean of 39.0% recovered after 1-year. The largest fertilizer pool was the top 20cm of mineral soil. The use of EFFs as a management tool to improve N use efficiency at the five sites in our study is not supported by our results as no significant differences in total 1-year N recovery or tree uptake of N were observed between treatments. The low N recovery after 1-year but simultaneous increases in above ground biomass support a model of N loss where the ecosystem can continue to accumulate biomass with simultaneous leaching and gaseous losses of N. This conclusion contrasts with the commonly held assumption that fertilization of N limited Douglas-fir forests, should yield negligible losses of N and high recovery of the applied fertilizer. Additionally, we conclude that management decisions regarding fertilizer use efficiency and the benefits of fertilization need to be site specific due to the variable N recovery rates based on site factors as opposed to fertilizer treatment type. Finally, despite differences in the size of available soil N pools the amount of N recovered in the above group pools (i.e. bole wood and foliage) were not significantly different between sites. N uptake by the plants

  18. Obituary: Douglas H. Sampson, 1925-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Peter; Clark, Robert E. H.; Zhang, Honglin; Fontes, Christopher J.

    2003-12-01

    Douglas H. Sampson, a renowned theoretical atomic physicist and a professor emeritus of astronomy and astrophysics at The Pennsylvania State University, passed away on 8 December 2002, in State College, Pennsylvania, of a hemorrhagic stroke. He had retired in 1997 after 32 years of service to the University and had maintained an active research program up to the day of his death. Doug, as he was universally known to his friends and colleagues, was born in Devils Lake, North Dakota on 19 May 1925. His parents, Abner and Mabel Sampson, were farmers. He was raised without running water or electricity on a farm, homesteaded by his ancestors in Edmore, North Dakota. He was one of two children in his class at a two-room rural elementary school and graduated as valedictorian from Edmore High School in 1944. No physics classes or advanced mathematics classes were offered in his small high school. In 1956, he was married to Carlyn Grutzner. During Doug Sampson's military service in the United States Army from February 1945 until December 1946, he was selected as a MP (Military Policeman) in the Philippines. His military experience provided him with the opportunity to attend college under the GI Bill. Because he had to work on the family farm, he started college a month later every fall and took exams a month earlier each spring. Nevertheless, Sampson graduated as co-salutatorian from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota in 1951 with a BA degree with majors in physics and mathematics. Afterwards he received his MS and PhD degrees in theoretical physics from Yale University in 1953 and 1956 under the guidance of Henry Margenau. Sampson then became a staff member of the Theoretical Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory until 1961. While there he performed calculations of fundamental atomic cross sections used in the determination of opacities for radiation transport simulations. The calculation of high quality atomic data would end up being a life long pursuit

  19. Biomass conversion and expansion factors in Douglas-fir stands of different planting density: variation according to individual growth and prediction equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marziliano, P.A.; Menguzzato, G.; Scuderi, A.; Scalise, C.; Coletta, V.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study: We built biomass expansion factors (BCEFs) from Douglas-fir felled trees planted with different planting densities to evaluate the differences according tree size and planting density. Area of study: The Douglas-fir plantation under study is located on the northern coastal chain of Calabria (Tyrrhenian side) south Italy. Materials and methods: We derived tree level BCEFs, relative to crown (BCEFc), to stem (BCEFst = basic density, BD) and total above-ground (BCEFt) from destructive measurements carried out in a Douglas-fir plantation where four study plots were selected according to different planting densities (from 833 to 2500 trees per hectare). The measured BCEFs were regressed against diameter at breast height and total height, planting density, site productivity (SP) and their interactions to test the variation of BCEFs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey comparison test were used to test differences in BCEFt, BCEFc and in BD between plots with different planting density. Main results: BCEFs decreased with increasing total height and DBH, but large dispersion measures were obtained for any of the compartments in the analysis. An increasing trend with planting density was found for all the analyzed BCEFs, but together with planting density, BCEFs also resulted dependent upon site productivity. BCEFt average values ranged between 1.40 Mg m-3 in planting density with 833 trees/ha (PD833) to 2.09 Mg m-3 in planting density with 2500 trees/ha (PD2500), which are in the range of IPCC prescribed values for Douglas-fir trees. Research highlights: Our results showed that the application of BCEF to estimate forest biomass in stands with different planting densities should explicitly account for the effect of planting density and site productivity.

  20. Biomass conversion and expansion factors in Douglas-fir stands of different planting density: variation according to individual growth and prediction equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marziliano, P.A.; Menguzzato, G.; Scuderi, A.; Scalise, C.; Coletta, V.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of study: We built biomass expansion factors (BCEFs) from Douglas-fir felled trees planted with different planting densities to evaluate the differences according tree size and planting density. Area of study: The Douglas-fir plantation under study is located on the northern coastal chain of Calabria (Tyrrhenian side) south Italy. Materials and methods: We derived tree level BCEFs, relative to crown (BCEFc), to stem (BCEFst = basic density, BD) and total above-ground (BCEFt) from destructive measurements carried out in a Douglas-fir plantation where four study plots were selected according to different planting densities (from 833 to 2500 trees per hectare). The measured BCEFs were regressed against diameter at breast height and total height, planting density, site productivity (SP) and their interactions to test the variation of BCEFs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey comparison test were used to test differences in BCEFt, BCEFc and in BD between plots with different planting density. Main results: BCEFs decreased with increasing total height and DBH, but large dispersion measures were obtained for any of the compartments in the analysis. An increasing trend with planting density was found for all the analyzed BCEFs, but together with planting density, BCEFs also resulted dependent upon site productivity. BCEFt average values ranged between 1.40 Mg m-3 in planting density with 833 trees/ha (PD833) to 2.09 Mg m-3 in planting density with 2500 trees/ha (PD2500), which are in the range of IPCC prescribed values for Douglas-fir trees. Research highlights: Our results showed that the application of BCEF to estimate forest biomass in stands with different planting densities should explicitly account for the effect of planting density and site productivity.

  1. Carbon dioxide flux measurements from a coastal Douglas-fir forest floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewitt, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis examined the process that affects the exchange of carbon between the soil and the atmosphere with particular attention to the large amounts of carbon stored in soils in the form of decaying organic matter. This forest floor measuring study was conducted in 2000 at a micro-meteorological tower flux site in a coastal temperature Douglas-fir forest. The measuring study involved half hourly measurements of both carbon dioxide and below-ground carbon dioxide storage. Measurements were taken at 6 locations between April and December to include a large portion of the growing season. Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of carbon dioxide flux above the forest floor over a two month period in the summer and the autumn were compared with forest floor measurements. Below-ground carbon dioxide mixing ratios of soil air were measured at 6 depths between 0.02 to 1 m using gas diffusion probes and a syringe sampling method. Maximum carbon dioxide fluxes measured by the soil chambers varied by a factor of 3 and a high spatial variability in soil carbon dioxide flux was noted. Forest floor carbon dioxide fluxes measured by each of the chambers indicated different sensitivities to soil temperature. Hysteresis in the flux temperature relationship over the year was evident. Reliable below-canopy EC measurements of the forest floor carbon dioxide flux were difficult to obtain because of the every low wind speeds below the forest canopy. The amount of carbon dioxde present in the soil increased rapidly with depth near the surface but less rapidly deeper in the soil. It was suggested that approximately half of the carbon dioxide produced below-ground comes from between the soil surface and the first 0.15 m of depth. Carbon dioxide fluxes from the floor of a Douglas-fir forest were found to be large compared to other, less productive ecosystems

  2. Transport of the first half of the CMS hadronic forward calorimeter (HF) from building 186 (CERN Meyrin site) to the CMS construction hall at point 5, Cessy, France.

    CERN Multimedia

    Florelle Antoine

    2006-01-01

    The two halves of the Forward Hadronic Calorimeter (HF) were transported from the CERN Meyrin site to the surface assembly hall at LHC Point 5 in Cessy, France, during the first part of July. Transporting these 300 tonne objects involved the construction around them of a 65-metre long trailer, simultaneously pushed and pulled by two trucks at either end. The main road between St. Genis and Cessy was closed during these operations and a police escort was provided for the ~5 hour journeys. The two HF halves will be the first major elements to be lowered by the gantry crane into the underground experimental cavern around the end of July or beginning of August.

  3. Transport of the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter from building 186 (CERN Meyrin site) to the CMS construction hall at point 5, Cessy, France.

    CERN Multimedia

    Florelle Antoine

    2006-01-01

    The two halves of the Forward Hadronic Calorimeter (HF) were transported from the CERN Meyrin site to the surface assembly hall at LHC Point 5 in Cessy, France, during the first part of July. Transporting these 300 tonne objects involved the construction around them of a 65-metre long trailer, simultaneously pushed and pulled by two trucks at either end. The main road between St. Genis and Cessy was closed during these operations and a police escort was provided for the ~5 hour journeys. The two HF halves will be the first major elements to be lowered by the gantry crane into the underground experimental cavern around the end of July or beginning of August.

  4. Projected future suitable habitat and productivity of Douglas-fir in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron R. Weiskittel; Nicholas L. Crookston; Gerald E. Rehfeldt

    2012-01-01

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) is one of the most common and commercially important species in western North America. The species can occupy a range of habitats, is long-lived (up to 500 years), and highly productive. However, the future of Douglas-fir in western North America is highly uncertain due to the expected changes in climate conditions....

  5. Multi-decadal establishment for single-cohort Douglas-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James A. Freund; Jerry F. Franklin; Andrew J. Larson; James A. Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The rate at which trees regenerate following stand-replacing wildfire is an important but poorly understood process in the multi-century development of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) forests. Temporal patterns of Douglas-fir establishment reconstructed from old-growth forests (>450 year) have...

  6. "Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District": Implications for Teams Serving Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Elizabeth L. W.

    2017-01-01

    On March 22, 2017, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that schools are obligated to provide more than de mimimus services for students with disabilities. The core issue in "Endrew F. v. Douglas County Schools" is how schools are to define the "A" in FAPE: What is an appropriate public education? Douglas County schools held…

  7. Conversion of SPORL pretreated Douglas fir forest residues into microbial lipids with oleaginous yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce S. Dien; Junyong Zhu; Patricia J. Slininger; Cletus P. Kurtzman; Bryan R. Moser; Patricia J. O' Bryan; Roland Gleisner; Michael A. Cotta

    2016-01-01

    Douglas fir is the dominant commercial tree grown in the United States. In this study Douglas fir residue was converted to single cell oils (SCO) using oleaginous yeasts. Monosaccharides were extracted from the woody biomass by pretreating with sulfite and dilute sulfuric acid (SPORL process) and hydrolyzing using commercial cellulases. A new SPORL process that uses pH...

  8. Belowground competition from overstory trees influences Douglas-fir sapling morphology in thinned stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren D. Devine; Timothy B. Harrington

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated effects of belowground competition on morphology of naturally established coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) saplings in 60- to 80-year-old thinned Douglas-fir stands in southwestern Washington. We separately quantified belowground competition from overstory and understory sources...

  9. 77 FR 45965 - Determination of Attainment for the Paul Spur/Douglas PM10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... Paul Spur/Douglas NA covers approximately 220 square miles along the border with Mexico within Cochise... Pirtleville, 2010 population 1,744, (U.S. Census). The 2010 population of Agua Prieta, Mexico, just across the border from Douglas, is 78,138 (Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia). To summarize our proposed...

  10. 75 FR 47203 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-11 and MD-11F Airplanes Equipped...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD- 11 and MD-11F Airplanes Equipped With General... Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: 2010-16-03 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39... applies to McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-11 and MD-11F airplanes, certified in any category...

  11. 77 FR 34033 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project Operation On May 27, 2010, the Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County, licensee for the Wells Hydroelectric Project... regulations thereunder. The Wells Hydroelectric Project is located on the Columbia River in Douglas, Okanogan...

  12. 77 FR 67862 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport (OCQ) Oconto, WI AGENCY: Federal Aviation... No. 18) at the J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport, Oconto, WI. Parcel No. 18 is located outside of the... property to be released at the J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport in Oconto, Wisconsin: Part of Government...

  13. 75 FR 40821 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Settlement Agreement and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Settlement Agreement and Soliciting Comments July 7, 2010. Take...: Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County, Washington. e. Location: The existing project is located at river mile 515.6 on the Columbia River in Chelan, Douglas, and Okanogan Counties in central...

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred N. Wickline

    2004-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 516 is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) 03-59-01 - Bldg 3C-36 Septic System; (2) 03-59-02 - Bldg 3C-45 Septic System; (3) 06-51-01 - Sump and Piping; (4) 06-51-02 - Clay Pipe and Debris; (5) 06-51-03 - Clean Out Box and Piping; and (7) 22-19-04 - Vehicle Decontamination Area. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of an acceptable corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 516. Corrective action investigation activities were performed between July 22 and August 14, 2003, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Supplemental sampling was conducted in late 2003 and early 2004.

  15. Historic Sites and National Register of Historic Places - BRIDGES_HISTORIC_IDNR_IN: Historic Bridge Locations in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, 1:5,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — IDNR documentation states - “This dataset contains point locations of historic bridges in Indiana. It includes buildings, districts, sites, structures and objects...

  16. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spera, D.A. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (USA)); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. (Gougeon Bros., Bay City, MI (USA))

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well • 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole • 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping • 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 556 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities began on February 7 and were completed on June 19, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 556 data were evaluated based on the data quality assessment process, which demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 556 that required the completion of a corrective action. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 556 revealed the following: • Corrective Action Sites 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01 do not contain contamination at

  18. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo B. Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a number of organizational memberships, (b number of social networking sites (SNS, and (c grade-point average (GPA on global social responsibility (GSR; and in the indirect effects of (a and of (b through (c on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students.

  19. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Romeo B.; Baring, Rito V.; Sta. Maria, Madelene A.

    2016-01-01

    The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a) number of organizational memberships, (b) number of social networking sites (SNS), and (c) grade-point average (GPA) on global social responsibility (GSR); and in the indirect effects of (a) and of (b) through (c) on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students. PMID:27247700

  20. Site formation processes at Pinnacle Point Cave 13B (Mossel Bay, Western Cape Province, South Africa): resolving stratigraphic and depositional complexities with micromorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkanas, Panagiotis; Goldberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Site PP13B is a cave located on the steep cliffs of Pinnacle Point near Mossel Bay in Western Cape Province, South Africa. The depositional sequence of the cave, predating Marine Isotopic Stage 11 (MIS 11) and continuing to present, is in the form of isolated sediment exposures with different depositional facies and vertical and lateral variations. Micromorphological analysis demonstrated that a suite of natural sedimentation processes operated during the development of the sequence ranging from water action to aeolian activity, and from speleothem formations to plant colonization and root encrustation. At the same time, anthropogenic sediments that are mainly in the form of burnt remains from combustion features (e.g., wood ash, charcoal, and burnt bone) were accumulating. Several erosional episodes have resulted in a complicated stratigraphy, as discerned from different depositional and post-depositional features. The cave is associated with a fluctuating coastal environment, frequent changes in sea level and climate controlled patterns of sedimentation, and the presence or absence of humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Romeo B; Baring, Rito V; Sta Maria, Madelene A

    2016-02-01

    The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a) number of organizational memberships, (b) number of social networking sites (SNS), and (c) grade-point average (GPA) on global social responsibility (GSR); and in the indirect effects of (a) and of (b) through (c) on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students.

  2. ODE/IM correspondence and the Argyres-Douglas theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Katsushi; Shu, Hongfei

    2017-08-01

    We study the quantum spectral curve of the Argyres-Douglas theories in the Nekrasov-Sahashvili limit of the Omega-background. Using the ODE/IM correspondence we investigate the quantum integrable model corresponding to the quantum spectral curve. We show that the models for the A 2 N -type theories are non-unitary coset models ( A 1)1 × ( A 1) L /( A 1) L+1 at the fractional level L=2/2N+1-2 , which appear in the study of the 4d/2d correspondence of N = 2 superconformal field theories. Based on the WKB analysis, we clarify the relation between the Y-functions and the quantum periods and study the exact Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition for the quantum periods. We also discuss the quantum spectral curves for the D and E type theories.

  3. The Utilization of the Cobb-Douglas Production Function for Analyzing Indonesia's and Malaysia's Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Ratna Wulan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the utilization Cobb-Douglas production function in its classical form for analyzing Indonesia's and Malaysia's economic growth in relation to the intensity of using capital and labour as determinants of the production.

  4. A preliminary study of the deterioration of alder and Douglas-fir chips in outdoor piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest. Wright

    1954-01-01

    In the fall of 1952, E. E. Matson of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station learned that the Fir-Tex Insulating Board Company bf St. Helens, Oregon was considering mixing alder with Douglas-fir chips for outside storage. Since alder heartwood i s more susceptible to decay than that of Douglas-fir, the question arose whether mixing the two might...

  5. Identification of varieties and gene flow in Douglas fir exemplified in artificially established stands in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Fussi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco] is an economically valuable non-native tree species in Germany and is considered very promising in view of global climate change. Therefore, the genetic characterization of Douglas-fir populations and seed stands in Germany is essential. We studied coastal and interior Douglas-fir varieties, both present in Germany, by using eleven isoenzyme and four microsatellite loci. By analyzing eight reference populations of known origin we were able to identify the two varieties on the population level using Bayesian and distance based methods. Seven populations present in Bavaria were then successfully assigned to one of the two varieties. Within varieties we found stronger grouping within the interior variety than within the coastal one. Despite lower differences within coastal Douglas-fir we have first indications for the origin of two populations. For two Bavarian populations, natural regeneration was included and genetic data revealed no significant genetic difference between adults and offspring. The parentage analysis for one of the studied stands revealed that a large proportion of adults took part in the reproduction, but some trees were more successful than others in transferring their genes to the next generation. Our study was able to improve variety identification of Douglas-fir using isoenzyme markers and nuclear microsatellites and study reproductive patterns, both are important issues for the management of Douglas-fir stands in Bavaria.

  6. Arthropod prey of Wilson's Warblers in the understory of Douglas-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, J.C.; Dugger, K.M.; Starkey, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Availability of food resources is an important factor in avian habitat selection. Food resources for terrestrial birds often are closely related to vegetation structure and composition. Identification of plant species important in supporting food resources may facilitate vegetation management to achieve objectives for providing bird habitat. We used fecal analysis to describe the diet of adult Wilson's Warblers (Wilsonia pusilla) that foraged in the understory of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in western Oregon during the breeding season. We sampled arthropods at the same sites where diet data were collected, and compared abundance and biomass of prey among seven common shrub species. Wilson's Warblers ate more caterpillars (Lepidoptera larvae), flies (Diptera), beetles (Coleoptera), and Homoptera than expected based on availability. Deciduous shrubs supported higher abundances of arthropod taxa and size classes used as prey by Wilson's Warblers than did evergreen shrubs. The development and maintenance of deciduous understory vegetation in conifer forests of the Pacific Northwest may be fundamental for conservation of food webs that support breeding Wilson's Warblers and other shrub-associated, insectivorous songbirds.

  7. Landscape planning as a contribution to the assessment and finding of sites for energy facilities from an ecological and creative point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchwald, K.

    1977-01-01

    The environmental agreeability examination through landscape planning in connection with the finding of sites for power stations and their integration into area planning is explained. The procedure of landscape planning for the assessment of power station sites is also presented. (RW) [de

  8. 2016 Results for Avian Monitoring at the TA-36 Minie Site, TA-39 Point 6, and TA-16 Burn Ground at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Brent E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berryhill, Jesse Tobias [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-01-23

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) biologists in the Environmental Compliance and Protection Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) initiated a multi-year program in 2013 to monitor avifauna at two open detonation sites and one open burn site on LANL property. Monitoring results from these efforts are compared among years and with avifauna monitoring conducted at other areas across LANL. The objectives of this study are to determine whether LANL firing site operations impact bird abundance or diversity. LANS biologists completed the fourth year of this effort in 2016. The overall results from 2016 continue to indicate that operations are not negatively affecting bird populations. Data suggest that community structure may be changing at some sites and this trend will continue to be monitored.

  9. Community Structure of Fish and Macrobenthos at Selected Shallow-water Sites in Relation to the Barber's Point Outfall, Oahu, Hawaii, 1991 - 1999 (NODC Accession 0000174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report provides the results of the eight years of an annual quantitative monitoring of shallow marine communities inshore of the Barbers Point Ocean Outfall...

  10. Fish Census Data from Annual Surveys at Selected Shallow-water Sites Near the Barber's Point Sewage Outfall, Ewa, Oahu, Hawaii, 1991 - 2010 (NODC Accession 0073346)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Honouliuli Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) located in Ewa, Oahu, Hawaii, near Barbers Point (Kalaeloa) has been in operation since 1982. It releases...

  11. A SNP resource for Douglas-fir: de novo transcriptome assembly and SNP detection and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Glenn T; Yu, Jianbin; Knaus, Brian; Cronn, Richard; Kolpak, Scott; Dolan, Peter; Lorenz, W Walter; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2013-02-28

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the world, also has one of the largest tree breeding programs. Although the coastal and interior varieties of Douglas-fir (vars. menziesii and glauca) are native to North America, the coastal variety is also widely planted for timber production in Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and Chile. Our main goal was to develop a SNP resource large enough to facilitate genomic selection in Douglas-fir breeding programs. To accomplish this, we developed a 454-based reference transcriptome for coastal Douglas-fir, annotated and evaluated the quality of the reference, identified putative SNPs, and then validated a sample of those SNPs using the Illumina Infinium genotyping platform. We assembled a reference transcriptome consisting of 25,002 isogroups (unique gene models) and 102,623 singletons from 2.76 million 454 and Sanger cDNA sequences from coastal Douglas-fir. We identified 278,979 unique SNPs by mapping the 454 and Sanger sequences to the reference, and by mapping four datasets of Illumina cDNA sequences from multiple seed sources, genotypes, and tissues. The Illumina datasets represented coastal Douglas-fir (64.00 and 13.41 million reads), interior Douglas-fir (80.45 million reads), and a Yakima population similar to interior Douglas-fir (8.99 million reads). We assayed 8067 SNPs on 260 trees using an Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array. Of these SNPs, 5847 (72.5%) were called successfully and were polymorphic. Based on our validation efficiency, our SNP database may contain as many as ~200,000 true SNPs, and as many as ~69,000 SNPs that could be genotyped at ~20,000 gene loci using an Infinium II array-more SNPs than are needed to use genomic selection in tree breeding programs. Ultimately, these genomic resources will enhance Douglas-fir breeding and allow us to better understand landscape-scale patterns of genetic variation and potential responses to

  12. An Allometric Algorithm for Fractal-Based Cobb-Douglas Function of Geographical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized Cobb-Douglas production function has been derived from a general input-output relation based on fractality assumptions. It was proved to be a useful self-affine model for geographical analysis. However, the ordinary least square calculation is always an ineffectual method for the Cobb-Douglas modeling because of the multicollinearity in the logarithmic linear regression. In this paper, a novel approach is proposed to build the geographical Cobb-Douglas models. Combining the concept of allometric scaling with the linear regression technique, we obtain a simple algorithm that can be employed to estimate the parameters of the Cobb-Douglas function. As a case, the algorithm and models are applied to the public transportation of China’s cities, and the results validate the allometric algorithm. A conclusion can be drawn that the allometric analysis is an effective way of modeling geographical systems with the general Cobb-Douglas function. This study is significant for integrating the notions of allometry, fractals, and scaling into a new framework to form a quantitative methodology of spatial analysis.

  13. Land Use and Land Cover - CEMETERY_SITES_IDNR_IN: Cemetery Site Locations in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, 1:5,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — IDNR documentation states - “This dataset contains locations of cemetery sites in Indiana, regardless of age, number of graves, or size of the cemetery. Is it not...

  14. Natural regeneration of Douglas-fir and associated species using modified clear-cutting systems in the Oregon Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry F. Franklin

    1963-01-01

    Clear cutting is the standard harvesting system in old-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Pacific Northwest. Usually these clear cuts are in "staggered settings" of 15 to 80 acres with the surrounding stand left uncut to provide seed and serve as a firebreak. However, satisfactory natural regeneration of Douglas-fir...

  15. 77 FR 43146 - Twin Cities & Western Railroad Company, the Estate of Douglas M. Head, and the DMH Trust fbo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35642] Twin Cities & Western Railroad Company, the Estate of Douglas M. Head, and the DMH Trust fbo Martha M. Head--Continuance... Class III rail carrier, and the Estate of Douglas M. Head (the Estate), a noncarrier, to continue in...

  16. 75 FR 81264 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2149-152] Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement December 16, 2010. On May 27, 2010, Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County filed an application for the...

  17. Flight periodicity of the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Colorado, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Willis C. Schaupp; Lee Pederson

    2011-01-01

    There are about 500 species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the United States (Wood 1982). A number of them are important disturbance agents in forested ecosystems, occasionally creating large tracts of dead trees. One eruptive species is the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins, which utilizes Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga...

  18. Douglas-fir displays a range of growth responses to temperature, water, and Swiss needle cast in western Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) growth in the Pacific Northwest is affected by climatic, edaphic factors and Swiss needle cast (SNC) disease. We examine Douglas-fir growth responses to temperature, dewpoint deficit (DPD), soil moisture, and SNC ...

  19. Growth of bear-damaged trees in a mixed plantation of Douglas-fir and red alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Harry W. Anderson; Donald L. Reukema; Timothy A. Max

    2007-01-01

    Incidence and effects of tree damage by black bear (Ursus americanus altifrontalis) in a 50-year-old, coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii) plantation are described. Bears girdled or partially girdled 35 dominant or codominant Douglas-fir trees per acre, but only in that...

  20. Changes in wood product proportions in the Douglas-fir region with respect to size, age, and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Monserud; X. Zhou

    2007-01-01

    We examine both the variation and the changing proportions of different wood products obtained from trees and logs in the Douglas-fir region of the Northwestern United States. Analyses are based on a large product recovery database covering over 40 years of recovery studies; 13 studies are available for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.)...

  1. An examination of the genetic control of Douglas-fir vascular tissue phytochemicals: implications for black bear foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce A. Kimball; G.R. Johnson; Dale L. Nolte; Doreen L. Griffin

    1999-01-01

    Silvicultural practices can influence black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging preferences for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) cambial-zone vascular tissues, but little is known about the role of genetics. To study the impact of genetic selection, vascular tissue samples were collected from Douglas-fir trees in six half-sib families from five...

  2. The influence of weather variation on regional growth of Douglas-fir stands in the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Peterson; Linda S. Heath

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we examine the influence of precipitation and temperature deviations on regional volume growth rates in even aged, onnen.,ed second growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) stands. Between 1969 and 1986, average volume growth rates in natural stands of coast Douglas fix in western Washington and Oregon were negatively...

  3. Deterioration of beetle-killed Douglas-fir in Oregon and Washington: a summary of findings to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest Wright; K.H. Wright

    1954-01-01

    In 1952 and 1953 cooperative research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Forest Experiment Station and the Research Department of Weyerhaeuser Timber Company to obtain information concerning the rate of deterioration of beetle-killed Douglas-fir. The study was prompted by an outbreak of the Douglas-fir beetle that developed in 1951 and has since killed an estimated...

  4. 75 FR 34661 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ...-0549; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-109-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... [Amended] 2. The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: McDonnell Douglas Corporation... comments by August 2, 2010. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas...

  5. 75 FR 47199 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-10 Series Airplanes, DC-9-30...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 9-10 Series Airplanes, DC-9-30 Series... existing airworthiness directive (AD), which applies to all McDonnell Douglas Model DC-9-10 series..., 2010). That AD applies to all McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-10 series airplanes, DC-9-30...

  6. 75 FR 61989 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-8-31, DC-8-32, DC-8-33, DC-8-41...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 8-31, DC-8-32, DC-8-33, DC-8-41, DC-8-42, and... to all of the McDonnell Douglas Corporation airplanes identified above. The existing AD currently... the following new airworthiness directive (AD): 2010-21-03 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39...

  7. 75 FR 38017 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-10 Series Airplanes, DC-9-30...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 9-10 Series Airplanes, DC-9-30 Series... previously to all known U.S. owners and operators of the McDonnell Douglas Corporation airplanes identified... INFORMATION: On July 15, 2009, we issued AD 2009-15-16, which applies to all McDonnell Douglas Model DC-9-10...

  8. 75 FR 2831 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, and MD-10-10F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ...-0043; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-128-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... directive (AD) for certain McDonnell Douglas Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, and MD-10-10F airplanes. This... adding the following new AD: McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-0043; Directorate...

  9. 75 FR 63040 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-30, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-30, DC-10-30F (KDC-10... following new airworthiness directive (AD): 2010-21-13 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39-16473... November 18, 2010. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas...

  10. 75 FR 20790 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ...-0384; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-003-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-0384; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-003-AD. Comments Due Date (a... the airplanes identified in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(2) of this AD. (1) McDonnell Douglas Corporation...

  11. 75 FR 68246 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ...-1044; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-033-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas..., 2007) and adding the following new AD: McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-1044.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to all McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC...

  12. 75 FR 6162 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ...-1213; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-097-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain McDonnell Douglas Corporation... [Amended] 2. The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: McDonnell Douglas Corporation...

  13. 75 FR 75872 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-30, DC-9-40, and DC-9-50...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 9-30, DC-9-40, and DC-9-50 Series Airplanes...: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the McDonnell Douglas Corporation airplanes... to include an airworthiness directive (AD) that would apply to certain McDonnell Douglas Model DC-9...

  14. Do site-specific radiocarbon measurements reflect localized distributions of 14C in biota inhabiting a wetland with point contamination sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, T; King-Sharp, K J; Benz, M L; Carr, J; Killey, R W D; Beresford, N A; Wood, M D

    2013-12-01

    Duke Swamp is a wetland ecosystem that receives (14)C via a groundwater pathway originating from a waste management area on Atomic Energy Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site. This groundwater reaches the surface of the swamp, resulting in relatively high (14)C levels over an area of 146 m(2). The objective of this study was to quantify (14)C concentrations in flora and fauna inhabiting areas of Duke Swamp over the gradient of (14)C activity concentrations in moss to determine whether (14)C specific activities in receptor biota reflect the localized nature of the groundwater source in the swamp. Representative receptor plants and animals, and corresponding air and soil samples were collected at six sites in Duke Swamp with (14)C specific activities in air that ranged from 1140 to 45,900 Bq/kg C. In general, it was found that specific activities of (14)C in biota tissues reflected those measured in environmental media collected from the same sampling site. The findings demonstrate that mosses could be used in monitoring programs to ensure protection of biota in areas with elevated (14)C, negating the need to capture and euthanize higher organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision No. 1 (9/2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This corrective action investigation plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 262 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): Underground Storage Tank (25-02-06), Septic Systems A and B (25-04-06), Septic System (25-04-07), Leachfield (25-05-03), Leachfield (25-05-05), Leachfield (25-05-06), Radioactive Leachfield (25-05-08), Leachfield (25-05-12), and Dry Well (25-51-01). Situated in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), sites addressed by CAU 262 are located at the Reactor-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Test Cell C; and Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facilities. The R-MAD, Test Cell C, and E-MAD facilities supported nuclear rocket reactor and engine testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The activities associated with the testing program were conducted between 1958 and 1973. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for the site include oil/diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and tritium. The scope of the corrective action field investigation at the CAU will include the inspection of portions of the collection systems, sampling the contents of collection system features in situ of leachfield logging materials, surface soil sampling, collection of samples of soil underlying the base of inlet and outfall ends of septic tanks and outfall ends of diversion structures and distribution boxes, collection of soil samples from biased or a combination of

  16. 74 Microeconomics The Complete Theory of Cobb-Douglas Production Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Angelo Ioan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper treats various aspects concerning the Cobb-Douglas production function. On the one hand were highlighted conditions for the existence of the Cobb-Douglas function. Also were calculated the main indicators of it and short and long-term costs. It has also been studied the dependence of long-term cost of the parameters of the production function. The determination of profit was made both for perfect competition market and maximizes its conditions. Also we have studied the effects of Hicks and Slutsky and the production efficiency problem

  17. Regeneration in mixed conifer and Douglas-fir shelterwood cuttings in the Cascade Range of Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.W. Seidel

    1983-01-01

    A survey of shelterwood cuttings in mixed conifer and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests in the Cascade Range in Washington showed that, on the average, shelterwood units were adequately-stocked with a mixture of advance, natural postharvest, and planted reproduction of a number of species. Shelterwood cuttings in the...

  18. Geographical Variation in the Terpene Composition of the Leaf Oil of Douglas Fir,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two forms of Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii and var. glauca, differ quite considerably with regard to the monoterpenes of...their leaf oils. Several chemical races, differing quantitatively in certain monoterpenes , appear to exist in each variety and the leaf oil composition seems to be particularly useful in classifying intermediate forms. (Author)

  19. BOLE WATER CONTENT SHOWS LITTLE SEASONAL VARIATION IN CENTURY-OLD DOUGLAS-FIR TREES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purportedly, large Douglas-fir trees in the American Pacific Northwest use water stored in bole tissues to ameliorate the effects of seasonal summer drought, the water content of bole tissues being drawn down over the summer months and replenished during the winter. Continuous mo...

  20. The economic significance of mortality in old-growth Douglas-fir management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.O. McMahon

    1961-01-01

    Current mortality in the Douglas-fir subregion, exclusive of catastrophic mortality, approximates a billion feet a year. The Forest Service report "Timber Resources for America's Future" recommended "...utilizing a substantial portion of the unsalvaged mortality loss..." as one means of permanently increasing the Nation's timber supply and...

  1. Stump-to-truck cable logging cost equations for young-growth douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux; Roger D. Fight; Tom L. Ortman

    1986-01-01

    Logging cost simulators and data from logging cost studies have been assembled and converted into a series of equations that can be used to estimate the cost of logging young-growth coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco var. menziesii) in mountainous terrain of the Pacific Northwest. These equations were...

  2. Corrigendum to “Geometric Arveson–Douglas conjecture” [Adv. Math. 274 (2015) 606–630

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Engliš, Miroslav; Eschmeier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 278, June (2015), s. 254 ISSN 0001-8708 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Arveson- Douglas conjecture * generalized Toeplitz operator Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000187081500119X

  3. Fusion energy development at McDonnell Douglas: why and how

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ard, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    The McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company started a development program in fusion energy in 1974. This paper discusses the rationale for an industrial program in fusion energy and gives a brief account of the major activities that the company has been involved in during the course of this effort

  4. Lack of caching of direct-seeded Douglas fir seeds by deer mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    Seed caching by deer mice was investigated by radiotagging seeds in forest and clear-cut areas in coastal British Columbia. Deer mice tend to cache very few Douglas fir seeds in the fall when the seed is uniformly distributed and is at densities comparable with those used in direct-seeding programs. (author)

  5. Aaron Douglas and Hale Woodruff: African American Art Education, Gallery Work, and Expanded Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Sharif

    2011-01-01

    This analysis of archival materials discovered at Fisk and Atlanta Universities examines the teaching careers of Aaron Douglas and Hale Woodruff, two African American artists who came to prominence during the New Negro Movement in the 1920s and taught at historically Black universities in the 1930s and 1940s. These artists had a profound influence…

  6. Regional patterns of increasing Swiss needle cast impacts on Douglas-fir growth with warming temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal pathogen, Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii, occurs wherever Douglas-fir is found but disease damage is believed to be limited in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) to the Oregon Coast Range and is of no concern outside the coastal fog zone [1]. However, knowledge remains limited on...

  7. A Case of Extragonadal Teratoma in the Pouch of Douglas and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Mamoru; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Morii, Eiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Mature cystic teratoma is a germ cell tumor of the ovaries and is often observed in clinical practice. However, extragonadal teratomas are rare tumors and have been reported outside the ovaries, (e.g., in the greater omentum). The mechanism underlying the development of extragonadal teratomas remains unknown. We encountered a case of extragonadal teratoma in the pouch of Douglas that appeared to be a parasitic dermoid cyst. From our experience and the literature review, we discuss the potential mechanism leading to the development of extragonadal teratomas. A 41-year-old nonpregnant woman was referred to our department due to myoma and anemia. A 4-cm asymptomatic mass in the pouch of Douglas was observed, and the patient was diagnosed with ovarian mature cystic teratoma. She underwent laparoscopic surgery, and intraoperative findings revealed that the fallopian tube was injured and torn, and a residual small ovary was observed in the left side of the ovary. A tumor measuring approximately 4 cm observed in the pouch of Douglas was extracted without rupturing. The tumor was diagnosed as a parasitic dermoid cyst by macroscopic and histopathological findings. Auto-amputation could be the underlying mechanism that leads to an isolated parasitic dermoid cyst in the pouch of Douglas. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimating biomass of shrubs and forbs in central Washington Douglas-fir stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Olson; Robert E. Martin

    1981-01-01

    Understory plants in closed 70-year-old even-aged Douglas-fir stands in north central Washington were destructively sampled to determine the relationship of ground cover and height to dry weight. Weight of plant material can be estimated from the product of plant height and percentage of ground cover on 50- x 100-centimeter (cm) quadrats. Correlation coefficients for...

  9. Nitrogen turnover in fresh Douglas fir litter directly after additions of moisture and inorganic nitrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, K.J.; Tietema, A.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of wetting and drying and inorganic nitrogen (N) addition on carbon (C) and N turnover in fresh Douglas fir litter (Speuld forest, the Netherlands) were investigated. Litter was incubated for 9 days in the laboratory, receiving different moisture and N addition treatments. Following the

  10. The Douglas-fir genome sequence reveals specialization of the photosynthetic apparatus in Pinaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. Neale; Patrick E. McGuire; Nicholas C. Wheeler; Kristian A. Stevens; Marc W. Crepeau; Charis Cardeno; Aleksey V. Zimin; Daniela Puiu; Geo M. Pertea; U. Uzay Sezen; Claudio Casola; Tomasz E. Koralewski; Robin Paul; Daniel Gonzalez-Ibeas; Sumaira Zaman; Richard Cronn; Mark Yandell; Carson Holt; Charles H. Langley; James A. Yorke; Steven L. Salzberg; Jill L. Wegrzyn

    2017-01-01

    A reference genome sequence for Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Coastal Douglas-fir) is reported, thus providing a reference sequence for a third genus of the family Pinaceae. The contiguity and quality of the genome assembly far exceeds that of other conifer reference genome sequences (contig N50 = 44,136 bp and scaffold N50...

  11. Prescribed fire opportunities in grasslands invaded by Douglas-fir: state-of-the-art guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    George E. Gruell; James K. Brown; Charles L. Bushey

    1986-01-01

    Provides information on use of prescribed fire to enhance productivity of bunchgrass ranges that have been invaded by Douglas-fir. Six vegetative "situations" representative of treatment opportunities most commonly encountered in Montana are discussed. Included are fire prescription considerations and identification of the resource objective, fire objective,...

  12. Dynamic phenotypic plasticity in photosynthesis and biomass patterns in Douglas-fir seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Koehn; G. I. McDonald; D. L. Turner; D. L. Adams

    2010-01-01

    As climate changes, understanding the mechanisms long-lived conifers use to adapt becomes more important. Light gradients within a forest stand vary constantly with the changes in climate, and the minimum light required for survival plays a major role in plant community dynamics. This study focuses on the dynamic plasticity of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var....

  13. Breeding biology and bee guild of Douglas' dustymaiden, Chaenactis douglasii (Asteraceae, Helenieae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Cane; Byron Love; Katharine Swoboda

    2012-01-01

    Douglas' dustymaiden, Chaenactis douglasii (Hook.) Hook. & Arn., is a widespread, inconspicuous, short-lived perennial wildflower that blooms in early summer and is found in basin sagesteppe to upper montane areas throughout the U.S. Intermountain West. The species is proving practical to grow for seed and is expected to be used for western rangeland...

  14. Simulation of carbon and water budgets of a Douglas-fir forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.T.; Dekker, S.C.; Bouten, W.; Kohsiek, W.; Mohren, G.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    The forest growth/hydrology model FORGRO–SWIF, consisting of a forest growth and a soil water model, was applied to quantify the inter-annual variability of the carbon and water budgets of a Douglas-fir forest (Pseudotsuga menziessii (Mirb.) Franco) in The Netherlands. With these budgets, the water

  15. Overstory response to alternative thinning treatments in young Douglas-fir forests of Western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liane R. Davis; Klaus J. Puettmann; Gabriel F. Tucker

    2007-01-01

    An increase in land dominated by young second-growth Douglas-fir forests in the Pacific Northwest has coincided with heightened concerns over loss of old-growth habitat. In search of options for managing young forests to provide late-successional forest structures, the Young Stand Thinning and Diversity Study was designed to test the effectiveness of modified thinning...

  16. On Measurement of Efficiency of Cobb-Douglas Production Function with Additive and Multiplicative Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Moyazzem Hossain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In developing counties, efficiency of economic development has determined by the analysis of industrial production. An examination of the characteristic of industrial sector is an essential aspect of growth studies. The most of the developed countries are highly industrialized as they brief “The more industrialization, the more development”. For proper industrialization and industrial development we have to study industrial input-output relationship that leads to production analysis. For a number of reasons econometrician’s belief that industrial production is the most important component of economic development because, if domestic industrial production increases, GDP will increase, if elasticity of labor is higher, implement rates will increase and investment will increase if elasticity of capital is higher. In this regard, this paper should be helpful in suggesting the most suitable Cobb-Douglas production function to forecast the production process for some selected manufacturing industries of developing countries like Bangladesh. This paper choose the appropriate Cobb-Douglas function which gives optimal combination of inputs, that is, the combination that enables it to produce the desired level of output with minimum cost and hence with maximum profitability for some selected manufacturing industries of Bangladesh over the period 1978-79 to 2011-2012. The estimated results shows that the estimates of both capital and labor elasticity of Cobb-Douglas production function with additive errors are more efficient than those estimates of Cobb-Douglas production function with multiplicative errors.

  17. Fungal endophytes in woody roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Hoff; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Geral I. McDonald; Jonalea R. Tonn; Mee-Sook Kim; Paul J. Zambino; Paul F. Hessburg; J. D. Rodgers; T. L. Peever; L. M. Carris

    2004-01-01

    The fungal community inhabiting large woody roots of healthy conifers has not been well documented. To provide more information about such communities, a survey was conducted using increment cores from the woody roots of symptomless Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) growing in dry forests...

  18. Effects of heat treatment on some physical properties of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianjun Li; Zhiyong Cai; Qunying Mou; Yiqiang Wu; Yuan Liu

    2011-01-01

    In this study the effect of heat treatment on some physical properties of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) was investigated. Wood specimens were subjected to heat treatment at 160, 180, 200 and 220°C for 1, 2, 3 and 4h. The results show that heat treatment resulted in a darkened color, decreased moisture performance and increased dimensional stability of...

  19. Volume growth trends in a Douglas-fir levels-of-growing-stock study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis

    2006-01-01

    Mean curves of increment and yield in gross total cubic volume and net merchantable cubic volume were derived from seven installations of the regional cooperative Levels-of-Growing-Stock Study (LOGS) in Douglas-fir. The technique used reduces the seven curves for each treatment for each variable of interest to a single set of readily interpretable mean curves. To a top...

  20. Nitrogen, corn, and forest genetics: the agricultural yield strategy-implications for Douglas-fir management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy R. Silen

    1982-01-01

    Agricultural yield strategy simply aims to increase number of grain bearing stalks per acre. Forestry strategies look to thinning, fertilizer, and genetics, each to provide gains. The agricultural strategies applied to Douglas-fir appear to be impractical for long rotations. Concern is expressed for commitments to perpetual inputs of materials and energy to keep a...

  1. Growth and morphogenesis of shoot initials of Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, P.W.

    1984-01-01

    An optimalized method of micropropagation of Douglas fir is described. Seasonal changes were found in optima for nitrate and sucrose in the medium and in the optimum for the light intensity during the culture of shoot initials. Differences in morphogenesis were obtained from shoot initials that had

  2. Foliar essential oils and deer browsing preference of Douglas-fir genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Radwan

    1978-01-01

    Yield and composition of essential oils were compared in foliage of Douglas-fir. Five clones with different susceptibilities to deer browsing were used; foliage was collected during the dormant season. There were no qualitative differences among the oils of the different clones, but the oils differed quantitatively in all variables measured. Eight variables appeared...

  3. Effectiveness of fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir shoots from infection by Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.A. Chastagner; E.M. Hansen; K.L. Riley; W. Sutton

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of 20 systemic and contact fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir seedlings from infection by Phytophthora ramorum was determined. Some systemic products were applied about a week prior to bud break, while most treatments were applied just after bud break. In addition to the fungicides, two surfactants were included in the post-bud...

  4. Growth phenology of coast Douglas-fir seed sources planted in diverse environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Gould; Constance A. Harrington; J. Bradley St. Clair

    2012-01-01

    The timing of periodic life cycle events in plants (phenology) is an important factor determining how species and populations will react to climate change. We evaluated annual patterns of basal-area and height growth of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotusuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings from four seed sources...

  5. DFSIM with economics: A financial analysis option for the DFSIM Douglas-fir simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger O. Fight; Judith M. Chittester; Gary W. Clendenen

    1984-01-01

    A modified version of the DFSIM Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii) growth and yield simulator, DFSIM WITH ECONOMICS, now has an economics option that allows the user to estimate present net worth at the same time a silvicultural regime is simulated. If desired, the economics option will apply a...

  6. Physiological responses of planting frozen and thawed Douglas-fir seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Anisul Islam; Kent G. Apostol; Douglass F. Jacobs; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2008-01-01

    We studied the short-term (7-day) physiological responses of planting thawed and frozen root plugs of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings in 2 separate experiments under cool-moist and warm-dry growing conditions, respectively. Our results showed that shoot water potential, root hydraulic conductance, net photosynthesis (A), and...

  7. Habitat management for red tree voles in Douglas-fir forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.H. Huff; R.S. Holthausen; K.B. Aubry

    1992-01-01

    The relations between arboreal rodents and trees causes the animals to be particularly sensitive to the effects of timber harvesting.Among arboreal rodents,we consider the redtree vole to be the most vulnerable to local extinctions resulting from the loss or fragmentation of old-growth Douglas-fir forests. Redtree voles are nocturnal,canopy dwelling, and difficult to...

  8. Hviler Dansk Økonomi på en Cobb-Douglas teknologi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harck, Søren H.

    Prisdannelsen og faktorefterspørgslen i Det økonomiske Råds sekretariats SMEC-model af dansk økonomi har siden 1998 været teoretisk begrundet i en underliggende Cobb-Douglas teknologi (i kombination med en antagelse om omkostningsminimering). I SMEC-forgængeren SMEC 94 var det derimod markup...

  9. Silvicultural research and the evolution of forest practices in the Douglas-fir region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis; Dean S. DeBell; Richard E. Miller; Michael Newton; J. Bradley St. Clair; William I. Stein

    2007-01-01

    Silvicultural practices in the Douglas-fir region evolved through a combination of formal research, observation, and practical experience of forest managers and silviculturists, and changing economic and social factors. This process began more than a century ago and still continues. It has had a great influence on the economic well-being of the region and on the...

  10. Structural lumber from dense stands of small-diameter Douglas-fir trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Eini C. Lowell; Roland Hernandez

    2005-01-01

    Small-diameter trees growing in overstocked dense stands are often targeted for thinning to reduce fire hazard and improve forest health and ecosystem diversity. In the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain regions, Douglas-fir can be a predominant species in such stands. In this study, mechanical properties and grade yield of structural products were estimated for 2 by...

  11. Realized gains from block-plot coastal Douglas-fir trials in the northern Oregon Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrence Z. Ye; Keith J.S. Jayawickrama; J. Bradley. St. Clair

    2010-01-01

    Realized gains for coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) were evaluated using data collected from 15-year-old trees from five field trials planted in large block plots in the northern Oregon Cascades. Three populations with different genetic levels (elite--high predicted gain; intermediate--moderate predicted gain; and an...

  12. Morphology and accumulation of epicuticular wax on needles of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance A. Harrington; William C. Carlson

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have documented differences in epicuticular wax among several tree species but little attention has been paid to changes in accumulation of foliar wax that can occur during the year. We sampled current-year needles from the terminal shoots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) in late June/early...

  13. Early genetic evaluation of open-pollinated Douglas-fir families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; David A. Perry

    1987-01-01

    In a test of early genetic evaluation of the growth potential of 14 families of open-pollinated Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) [Mirb.] Franco), measures of growth and phenology of seedligns grown in a coldframe were correlated with height of saplings in evaluation plantations at 9, 12, and 15 years. fifteen-year height was most strongly...

  14. David Douglas Duncan's Changing Views on War: An Audio-Visual Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politowski, Richard

    This paper is the script for a slide presentation about photographer David Douglas Duncan and his view of war. It is intended to be used with slides made from pictures Duncan took during World War II, the Korean War, and the war in Viet Nam and published in various books and periodicals. It discusses a shift in emphasis to be seen both in the…

  15. 77 FR 31268 - Determination of Attainment for the Paul Spur/Douglas PM10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... 220 square miles along the border with Mexico within Cochise County. Cities and towns within this area.... Census). The 2010 population of Agua Prieta, Mexico, just across the border from Douglas, is 78,138 (Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia). C. How does EPA make attainment determinations? Generally...

  16. The Douglas-Fir Genome Sequence Reveals Specialization of the Photosynthetic Apparatus in Pinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Neale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A reference genome sequence for Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb. Franco (Coastal Douglas-fir is reported, thus providing a reference sequence for a third genus of the family Pinaceae. The contiguity and quality of the genome assembly far exceeds that of other conifer reference genome sequences (contig N50 = 44,136 bp and scaffold N50 = 340,704 bp. Incremental improvements in sequencing and assembly technologies are in part responsible for the higher quality reference genome, but it may also be due to a slightly lower exact repeat content in Douglas-fir vs. pine and spruce. Comparative genome annotation with angiosperm species reveals gene-family expansion and contraction in Douglas-fir and other conifers which may account for some of the major morphological and physiological differences between the two major plant groups. Notable differences in the size of the NDH-complex gene family and genes underlying the functional basis of shade tolerance/intolerance were observed. This reference genome sequence not only provides an important resource for Douglas-fir breeders and geneticists but also sheds additional light on the evolutionary processes that have led to the divergence of modern angiosperms from the more ancient gymnosperms.

  17. Effects of water suspension and wet-dry cycling on fertility of Douglas-fir pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald L. Copes; Nan C. Vance

    2000-01-01

    Studies were made to determine how long Douglas-fir pollen remains viable after suspension in cool water form 0 to 34 days. Linear regression analysis of in vivo and in vitro tests indicated that filled seed efficiency and pollen viability, respectively, decreased about 3 percent per day. The relation may have been nonlinear the first 6 days, as little decrease...

  18. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  19. Columbia River wildlife mitigation habitat evaluation procedures report: Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County pygmy rabbit projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, P.R.; Ratassepp, J.; Berger, M.; Judd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites

  20. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  1. Effective Indices in Site Selection of Furniture Industry from Point of View of Suppliers in North Khorasan Province: Application of AHP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Darijani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate conducting studies on site selection will have economic impact on performance of industrial firm; besides the effects of social, environmental, cultural and economic in their area. Also, the regional characteristics as key factors in determining where to locate the problem is that it creates incentives for public, private and cooperative sectors for investing on that place. Determining the effective indices in furniture industry to set sellers' view is the aim of this study that conducted in North Khorasan province, Iran in 2010. After reviewing literatures and interviews, the effecting factors were identified and classified into five main groups; "materials and products", "infrastructure", "mortal", "economic" and "rules and regulations". Value of weighted indices determined by getting comments from experienced furniture sellers as well as using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP applied and flexible technique by Expert Choice software. The results showed that materials, distance to market, existing invertors indices with value-weighted 0.126, 0.114 and 0.099, respectively had highest priority.

  2. Chemical composition of douglas-fir foliage on mule deer winter range. Research report No. RR 91003-CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, M J; Armleder, H M; Dawson, R J

    1991-01-01

    In the interior of British Columbia, Douglas-fir litterfall is a major source of mule deer winter food. An earlier study found that preference for Douglas-fir foliage was correlated with tree diameter. This study identified the underlying factors of selection so that wildlife managers might have a wider range of forage enhancement options on mule deer winter range. Samples of Douglas-fir foliage were collected from trees at Knife Creek and Big Lake, and analyzed for minerals, tannins, and in vitro digestible dry matter.

  3. Rapid point-of-care CD4 testing at mobile HIV testing sites to increase linkage to care: an evaluation of a pilot program in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bruce A; Schnippel, Kathryn; Ndibongo, Buyiswa; Xulu, Thembisile; Brennan, Alana; Long, Lawrence; Fox, Matthew P; Rosen, Sydney

    2012-10-01

    A mobile HIV counseling and testing (HCT) program around Johannesburg piloted the integration of point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing, using the Pima analyzer, to improve linkages to HIV care. We report results from this pilot program for patients testing positive (n = 508) from May to October 2010. We analyzed 3 primary outcomes: assignment to testing group (offered POC CD4 or not), successful follow-up (by telephone), and completed the referral visit for HIV care within 8 weeks after HIV testing if successfully followed up. Proportions for each outcome were calculated, and relative risks were estimated using a modified Poisson approach. Three hundred eleven patients were offered the POC CD4 test, and 197 patients were not offered the test. No differences in patient characteristics were observed between the 2 groups. Approximately 62.7% of patients were successfully followed up 8 weeks after HIV testing, with no differences observed between testing groups. Among those followed up, 54.4% reported completing their referral visit. Patients offered the POC CD4 test were more likely to complete the referral visit for further HIV care (relative risk 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.00 to 1.57). In this mobile HCT setting, patients offered POC CD4 testing as part of the HCT services were more likely to visit a referral clinic after testing, suggesting that rapid CD4 testing technology may improve linkage to HIV care. Future research can evaluate options for adjusting HCT services if POC CD4 testing was included permanently and the cost-effectiveness of the POC CD4 testing compared with other approaches for improving linkage of care.

  4. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Marie Muzika; Judith Engle; Catherine Parks; Boyd. Wickman

    1993-01-01

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) trees characterized as either "resistant" or "susceptible" western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more...

  6. Fixed Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Fixed Points - From Russia with Love - A Primer of Fixed Point Theory. A K Vijaykumar. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 101-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  8. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  9. Effects of manganese and manganese-nitrogen applications on growth and nutrition of Douglas-fir seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Radwan; John S. Shumway; Dean S. DeBell

    1979-01-01

    Effects of manganese (Mn) on Douglas-fir grown in soil, with and without urea, and in nutrient solution were investigated. In addition, Mn sorption by forest soils was evaluated. Results show that Douglas-fir does not respond to added Mn and is quite tolerant to high Mn levels. Moreover, Mn sorption by soils is high. It is doubtful that Mn toxicity is of practical...

  10. Benefit Opportunities for Integrated Surface and Airspace Departure Scheduling: A Study of Operations at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppenbarger, Rich; Jung, Yoon; Kozon, Tom; Farrahi, Amir; Malik, Wakar; Lee, Hanbong; Chevalley, Eric; Kistler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    NASA is collaborating with the FAA and aviation industry to develop and demonstrate new capabilities that integrate arrival, departure, and surface air-traffic operations. The concept relies on trajectory-based departure scheduling and collaborative decision making to reduce delays and uncertainties in taxi and climb operations. The paper describes the concept and benefit mechanisms aimed at improving flight efficiency and predictability while maintaining or improving operational throughput. The potential impact of the technology is studied and discussed through a quantitative analysis of relevant shortfalls at the site identified for initial deployment and demonstration in 2017: Charlotte-Douglas International Airport. Results from trajectory analysis indicate substantial opportunity to reduce taxi delays for both departures and arrivals by metering departures at the gate in a manner that maximizes throughput while adhering to takeoff restrictions due mostly to airspace constraints. Substantial taxi-out delay reduction is shown for flights subject to departure restrictions stemming from traffic flow management initiatives. Opportunities to improve the predictability of taxi, takeoff, and climb operations are examined and their potential impact on airline scheduling decisions and air-traffic forecasting is discussed. In addition, the potential to improve throughput with departure scheduling that maximizes use of available runway and airspace capacity is analyzed.

  11. Diet of Wilson's warblers and distribution of arthropod prey in the understory of Douglas-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, Joan C.; Dugger, Kate; Starkey, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Availability of food resources is an important factor in avian habitat selection. Food resources for terrestrial birds often are closely related to vegetation structure and composition. Identification of plant species important in supporting food resources may facilitate vegetation management to achieve objectives for providing bird habitat. We used fecal analysis to describe the diet of adult Wilson's Warblers (Wilsonia pusilla) that foraged in the understory of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in western Oregon during the breeding season. We sampled arthropods at the same sites where diet data were collected, and compared abundance and biomass of prey among seven common shrub species. Wilson's Warblers ate more caterpillars (Lepidoptera larvae), flies (Diptera), beetles (Coleoptera), and Homoptera than expected based on availability. Deciduous shrubs supported higher abundances of arthropod taxa and size classes used as prey by Wilson's Warblers than did evergreen shrubs. The development and maintenance of deciduous understory vegetation in conifer forests of the Pacific Northwest may be fundamental for conservation of food webs that support breeding Wilson's Warblers and other shrub-associated, insectivorous songbirds.

  12. Dew Point

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, Shelly

    1999-01-01

    Dew Point was a solo exhibition originating at PriceWaterhouseCoopers Headquarters Gallery, London, UK and toured to the Centre de Documentacio i Museu Textil, Terrassa, Spain and Gallery Aoyama, Tokyo, Japan.

  13. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  14. Tipping Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  15. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  16. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture ... about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a ...

  18. Increased water deficit decreases Douglas fir growth throughout western US forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restaino, Christina M; Peterson, David L; Littell, Jeremy

    2016-08-23

    Changes in tree growth rates can affect tree mortality and forest feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. As air temperature increases, evaporative demand also increases, increasing effective drought in forest ecosystems. Using a spatially comprehensive network of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) chronologies from 122 locations that represent distinct climate environments in the western United States, we show that increased temperature decreases growth via vapor pressure deficit (VPD) across all latitudes. Using an ensemble of global circulation models, we project an increase in both the mean VPD associated with the lowest growth extremes and the probability of exceeding these VPD values. As temperature continues to increase in future decades, we can expect deficit-related stress to increase and consequently Douglas fir growth to decrease throughout its US range.

  19. Some Characterizations of the Cobb-Douglas and CES Production Functions in Microeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the study of the shape and the properties of the production possibility frontier is a subject of great interest in economic analysis. Vîlcu (Vîlcu, 2011 proved that the generalized Cobb-Douglas production function has constant return to scale if and only if the corresponding hypersurface is developable. Later on, the authors A. D. Vîlcu and G. E. Vîlcu, 2011 extended this result to the case of CES production function. Both results establish an interesting link between some fundamental notions in the theory of production functions and the differential geometry of hypersurfaces in Euclidean spaces. In this paper, we give some characterizations of minimal generalized Cobb-Douglas and CES production hypersurfaces in Euclidean spaces.

  20. Synthetic Biology and the Moral Significance of Artificial Life: A Reply to Douglas, Powell and Savulescu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    I discuss the moral significance of artificial life within synthetic biology via a discussion of Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's paper 'Is the creation of artificial life morally significant'. I argue that the definitions of 'artificial life' and of 'moral significance' are too narrow. Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's definition of artificial life does not capture all core projects of synthetic biology or the ethical concerns that have been voiced, and their definition of moral significance fails to take into account the possibility that creating artificial life is conditionally acceptable. Finally, I show how several important objections to synthetic biology are plausibly understood as arguing that creating artificial life in a wide sense is only conditionally acceptable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. 75 FR 60602 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC-10-30, DC-10... adding the following new AD: 2010-20-14 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39-16449. Docket No. FAA... the airplanes identified in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(2) of this AD. (1) McDonnell Douglas Corporation...

  2. 75 FR 23571 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC-10-30, DC-10... amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: 2010-09-12 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39... to McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC-10-30, DC-10-30F (KC-10A...

  3. 75 FR 6160 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ...-0032; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-213-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas...: McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-0032; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-213-AD. Comments Due... applies to McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-15, DC-10-30, DC-10-30F (KC-10A...

  4. 75 FR 80744 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...-1203; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-168-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): McDonnell Douglas Corporation... Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87) and MD-88...

  5. 75 FR 35611 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, and MD-10-10F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, and MD-10-10F Airplanes... certain McDonnell Douglas Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, and MD-10-10F airplanes. That NPRM was published in... amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: 2010-13-06 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39...

  6. 75 FR 38943 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-30, DC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ...-0672; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-047-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas...: McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-0672; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-047-AD. Comments Due... applies to McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-10, DC-10-10F, DC-10-30, DC-10-30F (KDC-10), DC-10...

  7. 75 FR 61352 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-30, DC-10-30F, DC-10-30F (KC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-30, DC-10-30F, DC-10-30F (KC-10A and KDC-10...-13 McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Amendment 39-16448; Docket No. FAA-2010-0553; Directorate.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC- 10-30, DC-10-30F, DC-10-30F (KC-10A...

  8. Fire, fuels, and restoration of ponderosa pine-Douglas-fir forests in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, W. L.; Veblen, T. T.; Sherriff, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Forest restoration in ponderosa pine and mixed ponderosa pine–Douglas fir forests in the US Rocky Mountains has been highly influenced by a historical model of frequent, low-severity surface fires developed for the ponderosa pine forests of the Southwestern USA. A restoration model, based on this low-severity fire model, focuses on thinning and prescribed burning to restore historical forest structure. However, in the US Rocky Mountains, research on fire history and forest structure, and earl...

  9. Manipulating stand structure of Douglas-fir plantations for wildlife habitat and wood production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy B. Harrington

    2010-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, a study was initiated by Oregon State University (OSU) in 1983 to determine effects of hardwood competition on Douglas-fir plantation development. The use of herbicides to uniformly suppress competing vegetation—especially fast-growing hardwoods—proved to be an effective approach to ensure dominance and a high level of productivity for planted...

  10. Internal hernia through the pouch of douglas after hysterectomy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Jin; Cho, Seung Hyun; Shin, Hyun Woong; Kim, Tae Eun; Kim, Byung Young; Kim, Hee Jin

    2012-01-01

    Internal hernia is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. Among the different types of internal hernias, the pelvic hernia is extremely rare. We report the radiographic findings of a patient with a Douglas pouch hernia presenting with closed loop obstruction at the anterior aspect of the distal rectum. The patient was a 60 year old female, who had undergone a hysterectomy 20 years prior, for treatment of a uterine myoma

  11. Cobb-Douglas production function: the case of a converging economy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Dana; Hurník, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 57, 9-10 (2007), s. 465-476 ISSN 0015-1920 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : Cobb- Douglas production function * Czech economy Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.382, year: 2007 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1088_fau_9_10_2007_00000053.pdf

  12. Inheritance of germinative energy and germinative capacity in Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Greathouse

    1966-01-01

    In the West foresters have had considerable difficulty in reforesting south-facing slopes. We considered this problem when we selected plus-trees for the first Douglas-fir seed orchard in Region 6. We were, however, faced with the need to answer such questions as these: (1) Should we try to produce seed inherently suited for south slopes? (2) If so, should we strive to...

  13. FIRE RESISTANCE OF DOUGLAS FIR [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco] WOOD TREATED WITH SOME CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kemal YALINKILIÇ

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Combustible properties of treated douglas wood specimens and fire-retardancy of some preservatives were tested in this study. Crib test of ASTM E 160-150 was followed. Results indicated that, aqueous solutions of boric acid (BA, borax (Bx (Na2BO7 10H2O or BA + Bx mixture (7: 3, w: w had fire retardant efficacy (FRE over untreated wood and reduced the combustibility of vinil monomers (Styrene and methylmetacrylate which were applied as secondary treatment.

  14. McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company independent research and development: Preparing for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Allen C.

    1988-01-01

    During the 1970's and 80's, research has produced the technology that is seen in aircraft such as the LHX and future models. The technology is discussed that is reaching maturity and moving into the application stage of future programs. Technology is discussed in six major areas: advanced concepts, analysis techniques, structures, systems, simulation, and research and development facilities. The partnership of McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Co. and the government in developing these technologies is illustrated in several programs.

  15. Meeting the challenges with the Douglas Aircraft Company Aeroelastic Design Optimization Program (ADOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Bruce A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Aeroelastic Design Optimization Program (ADOP) at the Douglas Aircraft Company is given. A pilot test program involving the animation of mode shapes with solid rendering as well as wire frame displays, a complete aircraft model of a high-altitude hypersonic aircraft to test ADOP procedures, a flap model, and an aero-mesh modeler for doublet lattice aerodynamics are discussed.

  16. Plastic cages to protect Douglas-fir seedlings from animal damage in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen C. Crouch

    1980-01-01

    Effects of plastic mesh cages designed to protect Douglas-fir seedlings from animals were evaluated in western Oregon. In two tests over 5-year periods, caging increased survival by 0 and 13 percent and increased height growth by 0.8 and 1.2 feet compared with uncaged trees. Benefits from caging might have been greater if damage had been more prevalent during the tests...

  17. Automated knot detection with visual post-processing of Douglas-fir veneer images

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.L. Todoroki; Eini C. Lowell; Dennis Dykstra

    2010-01-01

    Knots on digital images of 51 full veneer sheets, obtained from nine peeler blocks crosscut from two 35-foot (10.7 m) long logs and one 18-foot (5.5 m) log from a single Douglas-fir tree, were detected using a two-phase algorithm. The algorithm was developed using one image, the Development Sheet, refined on five other images, the Training Sheets, and then applied to...

  18. Fitting of full Cobb-Douglas and full VRTS cost frontiers by solving goal programming problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, B.; Mahaboob, B.; Subbarami Reddy, C.; Madhusudhana Rao, B.

    2017-11-01

    The present research article first defines two popular production functions viz, Cobb-Douglas and VRTS production frontiers and their dual cost functions and then derives their cost limited maximal outputs. This paper tells us that the cost limited maximal output is cost efficient. Here the one side goal programming problem is proposed by which the full Cobb-Douglas cost frontier, full VRTS frontier can be fitted. This paper includes the framing of goal programming by which stochastic cost frontier and stochastic VRTS frontiers are fitted. Hasan et al. [1] used a parameter approach Stochastic Frontier Approach (SFA) to examine the technical efficiency of the Malaysian domestic banks listed in the Kuala Lumpur stock Exchange (KLSE) market over the period 2005-2010. AshkanHassani [2] exposed Cobb-Douglas Production Functions application in construction schedule crashing and project risk analysis related to the duration of construction projects. Nan Jiang [3] applied Stochastic Frontier analysis to a panel of New Zealand dairy forms in 1998/99-2006/2007.

  19. Point Lepreau generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganong, G.H.D.; Strang, A.E.; Gunter, G.E.; Thompson, T.S.

    Point Lepreau-1 reactor is a 600 MWe generating station expected to be in service by October 1979. New Brunswick is suffering a 'catch up' phenomenon in load growth and needs to decrease dependence on foreign oil. The site is on salt water and extensive study has gone into corrosion control. Project management, financing and scheduling have unique aspects. (E.C.B.)

  20. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit other Web Sites Maintained by CPSC: cpsc.gov| poolsafely.gov| recalls.gov| saferproducts.gov Privacy, Security, and Legal Notice | Accessibility Policy | Open Government @ ...

  1. Outdoor Recreation Sites Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The RECSITES data layer contains a wide range of recreational sites in Vermont. This point data layer includes parks, ski areas, boat access points, and many other...

  2. 75 FR 82333 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-10-10, DC-10-10F, and MD-10-10F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ...-1206; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-216-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas... amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket No. FAA-2010-1206.... [[Page 82335

  3. Tree-ring stable isotopes record the impact of a foliar fungal pathogen on CO2 assimilation and growth in Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiss needle cast (SNC) is a fungal disease of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) that has recently become prevalent in coastal areas of the Pacific Northwest. We used growth measurements and stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in tree-rings of Douglas-fir and a non-susceptible...

  4. Virginia ESI: REPTPT (Reptile Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for sea turtles in Virginia. Vector points in this data set represent nesting sites. Species-specific...

  5. Maryland ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for raptors in Maryland. Vector points in this data set represent bird nesting sites. Species-specific...

  6. Nekrasov and Argyres-Douglas theories in spherical Hecke algebra representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2017-06-01

    AGT conjecture connects Nekrasov instanton partition function of 4D quiver gauge theory with 2D Liouville conformal blocks. We re-investigate this connection using the central extension of spherical Hecke algebra in q-coordinate representation, q being the instanton expansion parameter. Based on AFLT basis together with intertwiners we construct gauge conformal state and demonstrate its equivalence to the Liouville conformal state, with careful attention to the proper scaling behavior of the state. Using the colliding limit of regular states, we obtain the formal expression of irregular conformal states corresponding to Argyres-Douglas theory, which involves summation of functions over Young diagrams.

  7. Nekrasov and Argyres–Douglas theories in spherical Hecke algebra representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chaiho, E-mail: rimpine@sogang.ac.kr; Zhang, Hong, E-mail: kilar@itp.ac.cn

    2017-06-15

    AGT conjecture connects Nekrasov instanton partition function of 4D quiver gauge theory with 2D Liouville conformal blocks. We re-investigate this connection using the central extension of spherical Hecke algebra in q-coordinate representation, q being the instanton expansion parameter. Based on AFLT basis together with intertwiners we construct gauge conformal state and demonstrate its equivalence to the Liouville conformal state, with careful attention to the proper scaling behavior of the state. Using the colliding limit of regular states, we obtain the formal expression of irregular conformal states corresponding to Argyres–Douglas theory, which involves summation of functions over Young diagrams.

  8. An overview of the Douglas Aircraft Company Aeroelastic Design Optimization Program (ADOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Alan J.

    1989-01-01

    From a program manager's viewpoint, the history, scope and architecture of a major structural design program at Douglas Aircraft Company called Aeroelastic Design Optimization Program (ADOP) are described. ADOP was originally intended for the rapid, accurate, cost-effective evaluation of relatively small structural models at the advanced design level, resulting in improved proposal competitiveness and avoiding many costly changes later in the design cycle. Before release of the initial version in November 1987, however, the program was expanded to handle very large production-type analyses.

  9. Elevated Annual Runoff Ratios in Pacific Northwest Catchments Impacted by Epidemic Foliage Disease of Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, K. D.; Bywater-Reyes, S.; LeBoldus, J. M.; Segura, C.; Ritokova, G.; Shaw, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Catchments in the Western United States are undergoing unprecedented levels of tree die-off and/or reduced vigor due to increased severity of wildfire, drought, insect outbreaks, and disease. In the U.S. Pacific Northwest, Swiss needle cast (SNC) is the most damaging foliar disease of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), physically obstructing stomata and preventing CO2 uptake and transpiration. A recent analysis in coastal Oregon indicated a substantial increase in area affected by the disease, from 530.5 km2 in 1996 to 2,387.1 km2 in 2015. Deforestation or reduced tree vigor can have profound impacts on catchment hydrology, in theory, producing increased streamflow due to reduced interception and transpiration. However, these increases have not always been detectable as impacts also depend on factors such as climate and vegetation composition. Moreover, press disturbances, such as insect outbreaks or disease, often do not result in complete removal of understorey or canopy vegetation. We analyzed trends in annual runoff ratios (quotient of discharge divided by precipitation) from 1990-2015 in 12 catchments (183-1,744 km2) in western Oregon. In general, runoff ratios increased by 10-27% in catchments with a total area of SNC >10%, with the most substantial runoff increases in catchments with SNC impacting >25% of the area. Interestingly, the most severely impacted catchment ( 90.5% SNC) showed a decrease in runoff. This is consistent with a potential compensatory response from understory western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) trees, a phenomenon observed in the most severely impacted sites. Findings from this study are important for assessing the impacts of biotic forest disturbances on water supply and aquatic ecosystem health.

  10. Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites - MDC_ContaminatedSite

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A point feature class of open DERM Contaminated sites - see phase code for status of site. Contaminated sites identifies properties where environmental contamination...

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Nuclear Power Station Siting from the Point of View of Safety; Evaluacion Cuantitativa del Emplazamiento de Centrales Nucleoelectricas desde el Punto de Vista de la Seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serment Cabrero, V. [Comision Nacional de Energia Nuclear y Universidad Nacional Autonomia de Mexico (Mexico); Velez, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional y Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    1967-09-15

    Apart from the minimum operational and safety requirements for the siting of nuclear power stations, the paper proposes introducing the total mean dose to the general population as an additional criterion. Although the calculation of this dose presupposes a detailed knowledge of the main pathways by which the population may be irradiated in case of an accident, the present state of power reactor technology makes it possible to tackle the problem already. An estimate of the total mean dose per unit time involves the safety aspects of the reactor, the features of the site considered, and the way in which these features affect safety. The authors derive the general formula expressing the total mean dose as a function of all the parameters concerned. It is pointed out that in the case of accidents in which the release of fission products is independent of the mechanisms of irradiation, this formula is considerably simplified and makes it possible to establish a classification of the relative suitability, from the safety point of view, of the sites proposed, without touching upon the difficult problem of the definition of accidents and their probabilities of occurrence. A further simplification accrues when there exist predominant mechanisms governing the accidental irradiation of the population. The approach adopted is particularly well suited to calculations with digital computers, and helps to identify the areas in which information is lacking and to direct research intended to remove these deficiencies. (author) [Spanish] Ademas de los requisitos mfnimos opecacionales y de seguridad para el emplazamiento de centrales nucleoelectricas, se sugiere utilizar como criterio adicional la dosis total promedio a la poblacion. Aunque el calculo de esa dosis implica el conocimiento detallado de los caminos principales por los cuales la poblacion puede ser irradiada en el caso de un accidente, el estado actual de la tecnologia de los reactores nucleares de potencia permite ya

  12. Point defects in platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercy, G.R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made of the mobility and types of point defect introduced in platinum by deformation in liquid nitrogen, quenching into water from 1600 o C, or reactor irradiation at 50 o C. In all cases the activation energy for motion of the defect was determined from measurements of electrical resistivity. Measurements of density, hardness, and x-ray line broadening were also made there applicable. These experiments indicated that the principal defects remaining in platinum after irradiation were single vacant lattice sites and after quenching were pairs of vacant lattice sites. Those present after deformation In liquid nitrogen were single vacant lattice sites and another type of defect, perhaps interstitial atoms. (author)

  13. Aliens and existential elevators: absurdity and its shadows in Douglas Adams’s Hitch hiker series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. van der Colff

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available According to twentieth-century existentialist philosophy, the universe as we know it is steeped in senselessness, and the only possible means of survival is the construction of subjective meaning. Douglas Adams’s fictional universe portrayed in his “Hitch hiker” series reflects the arbitrary nature of existence, and the characters dwelling in this narrative space are faced with two existential choices: the one is defiance in the face of senselessness, the other is bleak despair. This article explores the existential choices made by prominent characters in the “Hitch hiker” series. The article distinguishes between and analyses the Sisyphus characters and their polar opposites (or nihilist shadows in Douglas Adams’s “Hitch hiker” series. Adams’s characters, be they human, alien or sentient machine, all face the same existential choice: actuate individual meaning, or resort to despondency. Characters who choose the first option are regarded as Sisyphus figures, whereas characters who choose the latter are referred to as shadows or nihilist nemeses.

  14. The Intensity of using production factors in Romania. Estimates from Cobb-Douglas and CES Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Zaman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The production function explains the mechanism through which inputs are changed into outputs and the partial efficiency of labour and capital. It also allows for understanding the elasticity of substitution, which measures the percentage change in factor proportions due to a percentage change in the marginal rate of technical substitution. In this research we have used aggregate production functions of Cobb-Douglas type in different time-series and cross-section analysis of Romania’s economic growth from the standpoint of the intensity of using capital and labour factors, as determinant elements for the level of production and GDP. We have also applied the two factor Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES production function, which is considered to be the generalised form of the Cobb-Douglas function. Using the available statistical data regarding Romania’s economy in the 1990-2005 period, we have performed time-series and cross-section analysis based on the aggregated production functions at the national level.

  15. Tolerance to multiple climate stressors: A case study of Douglas-fir drought and cold hardiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A; St. Clair, John Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Summary: 1. Drought and freeze events are two of the most common forms of climate extremes which result in tree damage or death, and the frequency and intensity of both stressors may increase with climate change. Few studies have examined natural covariation in stress tolerance traits to cope with multiple stressors among wild plant populations. 2. We assessed the capacity of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), an ecologically and economically important species in the northwestern USA, to tolerate both drought and cold stress on 35 populations grown in common gardens. We used principal components analysis to combine drought and cold hardiness trait data into generalized stress hardiness traits to model geographic variation in hardiness as a function of climate across the Douglas-fir range. 3. Drought and cold hardiness converged among populations along winter temperature gradients and diverged along summer precipitation gradients. Populations originating in regions with cold winters had relatively high tolerance to both drought and cold stress, which is likely due to overlapping adaptations for coping with winter desiccation. Populations from regions with dry summers had increased drought hardiness but reduced cold hardiness, suggesting a trade-off in tolerance mechanisms. 4. Our findings highlight the necessity to look beyond bivariate trait–climate relationships and instead consider multiple traits and climate variables to effectively model and manage for the impacts of climate change on widespread species.

  16. Pruning high-value Douglas-fir can reduce dwarf mistletoe severity and increase longevity in Central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helen M. Maffei; Gregory M. Filip; Nancy E. Grulke; Brent W. Oblinger; Ellis Q. Margolis; Kristen L. Chadwick

    2016-01-01

    Mid- to very large-sized Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menzieseii var. menziesii) that were lightly- to moderately-infected by dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium douglasii) were analyzed over a 14-year period to evaluate whether mechanical pruning could eradicate mistletoe (or at least delay the onset of severe infection) without...

  17. Canopy structure and tree condition of young, mature, and old-growth Douglas-fir/hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.B. Bingham; J.O. Sawyer

    1992-01-01

    Sixty-two Douglas-fir/hardwood stands ranging from 40 to 560 years old were used to characterize the density; diameter, and height class distributions of canopy hardwoods and conifers in young (40 -100 yr), mature (101 - 200 yr) and old-growth (>200 yr) forests. The crown, bole, disease, disturbance, and cavity conditions of canopy conifers and hardwoods were...

  18. Occurrence of shrubs and herbaceous vegetation after clear cutting old-growth Douglas-fir in the Oregon Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vern P. Yerkes

    1960-01-01

    Land managers often express a need for more complete information about the vegetative cover that develops on cutover areas between harvest of old-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and establishment of a young-growth forest. The composition and density of this cover frequently determines the management techniques that must be used to...

  19. Relationship between canopy structure, microclimate, and Swiss needle cast severity among different ages of Douglas-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiss needle cast (SNC) is an endemic disease of Douglas-fir caused by Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii. The fungus infects newly emerged needles between May and August. As the fungus develops, its fruiting bodies (pseudothecia) block the stomata and inhibit gas exchange, reducing the p...

  20. Exact decoupling of the Dirac Hamiltonian. II. The generalized Douglas-Kroll-Hess transformation up to arbitrary order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiher, Markus; Wolf, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In order to achieve exact decoupling of the Dirac Hamiltonian within a unitary transformation scheme, we have discussed in part I of this series that either a purely numerical iterative technique (the Barysz-Sadlej-Snijders method) or a stepwise analytic approach (the Douglas-Kroll-Hess method) are possible. For the evaluation of Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians up to a pre-defined order it was shown that a symbolic scheme has to be employed. In this work, an algorithm for this analytic derivation of Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians up to any arbitrary order in the external potential is presented. We discuss how an estimate for the necessary order for exact decoupling (within machine precision) for a given system can be determined from the convergence behavior of the Douglas-Kroll-Hess expansion prior to a quantum chemical calculation. Once this maximum order has been accomplished, the spectrum of the positive-energy part of the decoupled Hamiltonian, e.g., for electronic bound states, cannot be distinguished from the corresponding part of the spectrum of the Dirac operator. An efficient scalar-relativistic implementation of the symbolic operations for the evaluation of the positive-energy part of the block-diagonal Hamiltonian is presented, and its accuracy is tested for ground-state energies of one-electron ions over the whole periodic table. Furthermore, the first many-electron calculations employing sixth up to fourteenth order DKH Hamiltonians are presented

  1. The importance of seasonal temperature and moisture patterns on growth of Douglas-fir in western Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas-fir growth in the Pacific Northwest is thought to be water limited. However, discerning the relative influence of air temperature and plant available soil water (W) on growth is difficult because they interact with each other, with other climate factors and with the inher...

  2. Regional effects of Swiss needle cast disease and climate on growth of Douglas-fir in western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal pathogen, Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii, occurs wherever Douglas-fir is found but disease damage is believed to be limited to the Coast Range and is of no concern outside this region (Shaw et al., 2011). However, knowledge remains limited on the spatial distribution of Sw...

  3. Ecological adaptations in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca). IV. Montana and Idaho near the Continental Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald Rehfeldt

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-seven seedling populations of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) sampled from near the Continental Divide in Idaho and Montana exhibited pronounced genetic differences when compared in three common environments. Differentiation involved several traits that are components of an annual developmental cycle that must be completed within a growing...

  4. The analytic solution of the firm's cost-minimization problem with box constraints and the Cobb-Douglas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayón, L.; Grau, J. M.; Ruiz, M. M.; Suárez, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most well-known problems in the field of Microeconomics is the Firm's Cost-Minimization Problem. In this paper we establish the analytical expression for the cost function using the Cobb-Douglas model and considering maximum constraints for the inputs. Moreover we prove that it belongs to the class C1.

  5. Fire-mediated pathways of stand development in Douglas-fir/western hemlock forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.J. Tepley; F.J. Swanson; T.A. Spies

    2013-01-01

    Forests dominated by Douglas-fir and western hemlock in the Pacific Northwest of the United States have strongly influenced concepts and policy concerning old-growth forest conservation. Despite the attention to their old-growth characteristics, a tendency remains to view their disturbance ecology in relatively simple terms, emphasizing infrequent, stand-replacing (SR...

  6. Inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms, random amplified polymorphic DNAs and isozymes in coastal Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.D. Jermstad; A.M. Reem; J.R. Henifin; N.C. Wheeler; D.B Neale

    1994-01-01

    A total of 225 new genetic loci [151 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and 74 random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPD)] in coastal Douglas- fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii] have been identified using a three-generation outbred pedigree. The Mendelian inheritance of 16 RFLP loci and 29...

  7. Fingerprints of a forest fungus: Swiss needle cast, carbon isotopes, carbohydrates, and growth in Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Watts; Frederick Meinzer; Brandy J. Saffell

    2014-01-01

    Swiss needle cast is caused by a fungus native to the Pacific Northwest. Its host is Douglas-fir, an iconic evergreen tree in the region. The fungus does not kill its host, but it adversely affects the tree's growth. The fungal fruiting bodies block the stomata, small openings on the underside of the needle where carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other gases are...

  8. Exact decoupling of the Dirac Hamiltonian. II. The generalized Douglas-Kroll-Hess transformation up to arbitrary order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wolf, Alexander

    2004-12-08

    In order to achieve exact decoupling of the Dirac Hamiltonian within a unitary transformation scheme, we have discussed in part I of this series that either a purely numerical iterative technique (the Barysz-Sadlej-Snijders method) or a stepwise analytic approach (the Douglas-Kroll-Hess method) are possible. For the evaluation of Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians up to a pre-defined order it was shown that a symbolic scheme has to be employed. In this work, an algorithm for this analytic derivation of Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians up to any arbitrary order in the external potential is presented. We discuss how an estimate for the necessary order for exact decoupling (within machine precision) for a given system can be determined from the convergence behavior of the Douglas-Kroll-Hess expansion prior to a quantum chemical calculation. Once this maximum order has been accomplished, the spectrum of the positive-energy part of the decoupled Hamiltonian, e.g., for electronic bound states, cannot be distinguished from the corresponding part of the spectrum of the Dirac operator. An efficient scalar-relativistic implementation of the symbolic operations for the evaluation of the positive-energy part of the block-diagonal Hamiltonian is presented, and its accuracy is tested for ground-state energies of one-electron ions over the whole periodic table. Furthermore, the first many-electron calculations employing sixth up to fourteenth order DKH Hamiltonians are presented. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  9. A strategy for monitoring Swiss needle cast and assessing its growth impact in Douglas-fir plantations of Coastal Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug Maguire; Alan Kanaskie; Mike McWilliams

    2000-01-01

    Many Douglas-fir plantations along the north coast of Oregon are exhibiting severe symptoms of Swiss needle cast disease (SNC). These symptoms include premature loss of foliage, abundant fungal pseudothecia on needles, yellowing of foliage, and apparent reduction in diameter and height growth. The development of the disease and its impacts on growth are currently being...

  10. History of fire and Douglas-fir establishment in a savanna and sagebrush-grassland mosaic, southwestern Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily K. Heyerdahl; Richard F. Miller; Russell A. Parsons

    2006-01-01

    Over the past century, trees have encroached into grass- and shrublands across western North America. These include Douglas-fir trees (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) encroaching into mountain big sagebrush Nutt. ssp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle) from stable islands of savanna in...

  11. Growth response of Douglas-fir seedlings to nitrogen fertilization: importance of Rubisco activation state and respiration rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel K. Manter; Kathleen L. Kavanagh; Cathy L. Rose

    2005-01-01

    High foliar nitrogen concentration ([N]) is associated with high rates of photosynthesis and thus high tree productivity; however, at excessive [N], tree productivity is reduced. Reports of excessive [N] in the Douglas-fir forests of the Oregon Coast Range prompted this investigation of growth and needle physiological responses to increasing foliar N concentrations in...

  12. Timber supply in the Pacific Northwest: managing for economic and ecological values in Douglas-fir forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.O. Curtis; A.B. Carey

    1996-01-01

    The Douglas-fir region of western Washington and Oregon and coastal British Columbia contains the most productive forestlands in North America. Yet disagreement among user groups and conflicting goals, policies, and laws have nearly paralyzed timber management on federal lands and greatly increased costs and complexity of management on nonfederal lands. Constructive...

  13. Height-growth response to climatic changes differs among populations of Douglas-fir: A novel analysis of historic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura P. Leites; Andrew P. Robinson; Gerald E. Rehfeldt; John D. Marshall; Nicholas L. Crookston

    2012-01-01

    Projected climate change will affect existing forests, as substantial changes are predicted to occur during their life spans. Species that have ample intraspecific genetic differentiation, such as Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), are expected to display population-specific growth responses to climate change. Using a mixed-effects modeling approach,...

  14. Spatial and population characteristics of dwarf mistletoe infected trees in an old-growth Douglas-fir - western hemlock forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David C. Shaw; Jiquan Chen; Elizabeth A. Freeman; David M. Braun

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the distribution and severity of trees infected with western hemlock dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium tsugense (Rosendahl) G.N. Jones subsp. tsugense) in an old-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) - western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.)...

  15. Slow and fast pyrolysis of Douglas-fir lignin: Importance of liquid-intermediate formation on the distribution of products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Pecha, Brennan; van Kuppevelt, Michiel; McDonald, Armando G.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The formation of liquid intermediates and the distribution of products were studied under slow and fast pyrolysis conditions. Results indicate that monomers are formed from lignin oligomeric products during secondary reactions, rather than directly from the native lignin. Lignin from Douglas-fir

  16. Seasonal carbohydrate dynamics and growth in Douglas-fir trees experiencing chronic, fungal-mediated reduction in functional leaf area

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. J. Saffell; F. C. Meinzer; D. R. Woodruff; D. C. Shaw; S. L. Voelker; B. Lachenbruch; K. Falk

    2014-01-01

    Stored non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) could play an important role in tree survival in the face of a changing climate and associated stress-related mortality. We explored the effects of the stomata-blocking and defoliating fungal disease called Swiss needle cast on Douglas-fir carbohydrate reserves and growth to evaluate the extent to which NSCs can be mobilized...

  17. Symptoms associated with inoculation of stems on living Douglas-fir and Grand Fir Trees with Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Chastagner; Kathy Riley; Katie Coats; Marianne Elliott; Annie DeBauw; Norm Dart

    2010-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the potential risk of infection and colonization of living Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and grand fir (Abies grandis) stems, the stems on over 150 trees of each species were inoculated at a Christmas tree farm near Los Gatos, California. This study had the following objectives: 1)...

  18. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON SOIL CARBON DENSITY FRACTIONS IN A DOUGLAS FIR MESOCOSM STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a 4-year full-factorial study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on Douglas fir seedlings growing in reconstructed native forest soils in mesocosms. The elevated CO2 treatment was ambient CO2 plus 200 ppm CO2. The elevated temperature treatm...

  19. Genetic variation in tolerance of Douglas-fir to Swiss needle cast as assessed by symptom expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.R. Jonhson

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of Swiss needle cast on Douglas-fir has increased significantly in recent years on the Oregon coast. Genetic variation in symptoms of disease infection, as measured by foliage traits, was assessed in two series of progeny trials to determine whether these "crown health" indicators were under genetic control and correlated with tolerance;...

  20. Fine-scale variability in growth-climate relationships of Douglas-fir, North Cascade Range, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Case; David L. Peterson

    2005-01-01

    Information about the sensitivity to climate of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) is valuable because it will allow forest managers to maximize growth, better understand how carbon sequestration may change over time, and better model and predict future ecosystem responses to climatic change. We examined the effects of climatic...

  1. Measuring Absolutists: Justices Hugo L. Black and William O. Douglas and Their Differences of Opinion on Freedom of the Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Thomas A.

    The absolutist approach to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution--argued for many years by Supreme Court Justices Hugo L. Black and William O. Douglas--is regarded as the most libertarian interpretation by most mass communication law students. However, the two justices found agreement difficult in some First Amendment cases,…

  2. Estimation of population structure in coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii] using allozyme and microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantin V. Krutovsky; John Bradley St. Clair; Robert Saich; Valerie D. Hipkins; David B. Neale

    2009-01-01

    Characterizing population structure using neutral markers is an important first step in association genetic studies in order to avoid false associations between phenotypes and genotypes that may arise from nonselective demographic factors. Population structure was studied in a wide sample of approximately 1,300 coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii...

  3. Family differences in equations for predicting biomass and leaf area in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.B. St. Clair

    1993-01-01

    Logarithmic regression equations were developed to predict component biomass and leaf area for an 18-yr-old genetic test of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco var. menziesii) based on stem diameter or cross-sectional sapwood area. Equations did not differ among open-pollinated families in slope, but intercepts...

  4. Two-dimensional heat flow analysis applied to heat sterilization of ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir square timbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    William T. Simpson

    2004-01-01

    Equations for a two-dimensional finite difference heat flow analysis were developed and applied to ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir square timbers to calculate the time required to heat the center of the squares to target temperature. The squares were solid piled, which made their surfaces inaccessible to the heating air, and thus surface temperatures failed to attain...

  5. Relationships among chilling hours, photoperiod, calendar date, cold hardiness, seed source, and storage of Douglas-fir seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase; Nabil Khadduri; Euan Mason; Kas Dumroese

    2016-01-01

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) seedlings from three nurseries in the Pacific Northwest United States were lifted on five dates from mid-October through mid-December 2006. Each nursery provided seedlings from a low- and a high-elevation seed lot. Photoperiod and accumulated chilling hours (calculated using two methods) were evaluated...

  6. Growth of Douglas-fir near equipment trails used for commercial thinning in the Oregon Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Jim Smith; Paul W. Adams; Harry W. Anderson

    2007-01-01

    Soil disturbance is a visually apparent result of using heavy equipment to harvest trees. Subsequent consequences for growth of remaining trees, however, are variable and seldom quantified. We measured tree growth 7 and 11 years after thinning of trees in four stands of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii(...

  7. Tree growth and soil relations at the 1925 Wind River spacing test in coast Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Donald L. Reukema; Harry W. Anderson

    2004-01-01

    The 1925 Wind River spacing test is the earliest field trial seeking to determine the most appropriate spacing for planting Douglas-fir. Spacing treatments were not replicated, although individual spacings were subsampled by two to four tree-measurement plots. Previously, greater growth occurred at the wider spacings (10 and 12 ft) than at the closer spacings (4, 5, 6...

  8. Detecting response of Douglas-fir plantations to urea fertilizer at three locations in the Oregon Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Jim Smith; Harry. Anderson

    2001-01-01

    Fertilizer trials in coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Oregon Coast Range usually indicate small and statistically nonsignificant response to nitrogen (N) fertilizers. Inherently weak experimental designs of past trials could make them too insensitive to detect growth differences...

  9. Impact of Nitrogen Fertilization on Forest Carbon Sequestration and Water Loss in a Chronosequence of Three Douglas-Fir Stands in the Pacific Northwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Dou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To examine the effect of nitrogen (N fertilization on forest carbon (C sequestration and water loss, we used an artificial neural network model to estimate C fluxes and evapotranspiration (ET in response to N fertilization during four post-fertilization years in a Pacific Northwest chronosequence of three Douglas-fir stands aged 61, 22 and 10 years old in 2010 (DF49, HDF88 and HDF00, respectively. Results showed that N fertilization increased gross primary productivity (GPP for all three sites in all four years with the largest absolute increase at HDF00 followed by HDF88. Ecosystem respiration increased in all four years at HDF00, but decreased over the last three years at HDF88 and over all four years at DF49. As a result, fertilization increased the net ecosystem productivity of all three stands with the largest increase at HDF88, followed by DF49. Fertilization had no discernible effect on ET in any of the stands. Consequently, fertilization increased water use efficiency (WUE in all four post-fertilization years at all three sites and also increased light use efficiency (LUE of all the stands, especially HDF00. Our results suggest that the effects of fertilization on forest C sequestration and water loss may be associated with stand age and fertilization; the two younger stands appeared to be more efficient than the older stand with respect to GPP, WUE and LUE.

  10. Wood Anatomy and Insect Defoliator Systems: Is there an anatomical response to sustained feeding by the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on Douglas-fir (Pseudotusga menziesii)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Jodi; Gärtner, Holger; Alfaro, René; Smith, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) is the most widespread and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in western North America, and has a long-term coexistence with its primary host tree, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Franco). Western spruce budworm (WSB) outbreaks usually last for several years, and cause reductions in annual growth, stem defects, and regeneration delays. In British Columbia, the WSB is the second most damaging insect after the mountain pine beetle, and sustained and/or severe defoliation can result in the mortality of host trees. Numerous studies have used tree rings to reconstruct WSB outbreaks across long temporal scales, to evaluate losses in stand productivity, and examine isotope ratios. Although some studies have looked at the impacts of artificial defoliation on balsam fir in eastern North America, there has been no prior research on how WSB outbreaks affect the anatomical structure of the stem as described by intra-annual wood density and potential cell size variations. The objective of this study was to anatomically examine the response of Douglas-fir to sustained WSB outbreaks in two regions of southern British Columbia. We hypothesize that the anatomical intra-annual characteristics of the tree rings, such as cell wall thickness, latewood cell size, and/or lumen area changes during sustained WSB outbreaks. To test this hypothesis we sampled four permanent sample plots in coastal and dry interior sites, which had annually resolved defoliation data collected over a 7-12 year period. At each site diameter-at-breast height (cm), height (m), and crown position were recorded and three increment cores were extracted from 25 trees. Increment cores were prepared to permit anatomical and x-ray density analyses. For each tree, a 15µm thick micro section was cut from the radial plane. Digital images of the micro sections were captured and processed. In each annual ring, features such as cell lumen area (µm2

  11. Controle da cochonilha (Orthezia praelonga Douglas, 1891 em laranjeira, com inseticidas granulados Chemical control of coccid (Orthezia praelonga Douglas, 1891 for orange-trees, with insecticide granulated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.M. Mariconi

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de se avaliar a eficiência de inseticidas granulados no controle da Orthezia praelonga em laranjeiras, foram empregados o aldicarbe 15% e o imidaclopride 5%, aplicados ao solo. Os tratamentos foram seis, com quatro repetições: A testemunha; B aldicarbe, 100g/pl; C aldicarbe, 65g/pl; D imidaclopride, 100g/pl; E aldicarbe, 130g/pl; F imidaclopride, 75g/pl. Foram feitas seis avaliações: uma prévia e outras cinco após 07, 20, 34, 49 e 70 dias da aplicação. Os melhores tratamentos foram: aldicarbe 100g/pl e aldicarbe, 130g/pl, aos 49 e 70 dias, respectivamente.The experiment was carried out on adult orange-trees in the county of Limeira, SP, Brazil. The objective was to evaluate the efficiency of insecticide granules with 15% aldicarb and 5% imidadoprid, applied to the soil, to control the citrus coccid Orthezia praelonga Douglas, 1891. Treatments were six: A check; B aldicarb, 100g/pl; C aldicarb, 65g/pl; D imidacloprid 100g/pl; E aldicarb, 130g/pl; F imidacloprid, 75g/pl of commercial insecticide granules. Six evaluations were made, one previous and other five 07, 20, 34, 49 and 70 days after application. The most efficient treatments were E and B at 49 and 70 days, respectively.

  12. Regional patterns of increasing Swiss needle cast impacts on Douglas-fir growth with warming temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Henry; Beedlow, Peter A; Waschmann, Ronald S; Tingey, David T; Cline, Steven; Bollman, Michael; Wickham, Charlotte; Carlile, Cailie

    2017-12-01

    The fungal pathogen, Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii , causing Swiss needle cast (SNC) occurs wherever Douglas-fir is found but disease damage is believed to be limited in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) to the Coast Range of Oregon and Washington (Hansen et al., Plant Disease , 2000, 84 , 773; Rosso & Hansen, Phytopathology , 2003, 93 , 790; Shaw, et al., Journal of Forestry , 2011, 109 , 109). However, knowledge remains limited on the history and spatial distribution of SNC impacts in the PNW. We reconstructed the history of SNC impacts on mature Douglas-fir trees based on tree-ring width chronologies from western Oregon. Our findings show that SNC impacts on growth occur wherever Douglas-fir is found and is not limited to the coastal fog zone. The spatiotemporal patterns of growth impact from SNC disease were synchronous across the region, displayed periodicities of 12-40 years, and strongly correlated with winter and summer temperatures and summer precipitation. The primary climatic factor limiting pathogen dynamics varied spatially by location, topography, and elevation. SNC impacts were least severe in the first half of the 20th century when climatic conditions during the warm phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (1924-1945) were less conducive to pathogen development. At low- to mid-elevations, SNC impacts were most severe in 1984-1986 following several decades of warmer winters and cooler, wetter summers including a high summer precipitation anomaly in 1983. At high elevations on the west slope of the Cascade Range, SNC impacts peaked several years later and were the greatest in the 1990s, a period of warmer winter temperatures. Climate change is predicted to result in warmer winters and will likely continue to increase SNC severity at higher elevations, north along the coast from northern Oregon to British Columbia, and inland where low winter temperatures currently limit growth of the pathogen. Our findings indicate that SNC may become a significant

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Praesepe members rotational periods from K2 LCs (Douglas+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, S. T.; Agueros, M. A.; Covey, K. R.; Kraus, A.

    2018-01-01

    We continue to use the Praesepe membership catalog presented in PaperII (Douglas+, 2014, J/ApJ/795/161), which includes 1130 cluster members with membership probabilities Pmem>=50% as calculated by Kraus & Hillenbrand (2007, J/AJ/134/2340) and 39 previously identified members too bright to be included by those authors in their catalog for the cluster. We assign these bright stars Pmem=100%. We also continue to use the photometry and stellar masses presented in Table 5 of Paper II. For most of our analysis, as in that work, we include only the 1099 stars with Pmem>=70%. K2 targeted Praesepe in its Campaign 5. We analyze the resulting long-cadence data for 794 Praesepe members. We present Prot for 677 K2 targets. Of these, 471 are new measurements. (3 data files).

  14. Impact of energy efficiency gains on output and energy use with Cobb-Douglas production function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Taoyuan

    2007-01-01

    A special issue of Energy Policy-28 (2000)-was devoted to a collection of papers, edited by Dr. Lee Schipper. The collection included a paper entitled 'A view from the macro side: rebound, backfire, and Khazzoom-Brookes' in which it was argued that the impact of fuel efficiency gains on output (roughly, GDP) is likely to be relatively small by Cobb-Douglas production function. However, an error in the analysis leads to under-estimation of the long-term impact. This paper first provides a partial equilibrium analysis by an alternative method for the same case and then proceeds to an analysis on the issue in a two-sector general equilibrium system. In the latter analysis, energy price is internalized. Both energy use efficiency and energy production efficiency are involved

  15. Irregular singularities in Liouville theory and Argyres-Douglas type gauge theories, I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotto, D. [Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), Princeton, NJ (United States); Teschner, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Motivated by problems arising in the study of N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories we introduce and study irregular singularities in two-dimensional conformal field theory, here Liouville theory. Irregular singularities are associated to representations of the Virasoro algebra in which a subset of the annihilation part of the algebra act diagonally. In this paper we define natural bases for the space of conformal blocks in the presence of irregular singularities, describe how to calculate their series expansions, and how such conformal blocks can be constructed by some delicate limiting procedure from ordinary conformal blocks. This leads us to a proposal for the structure functions appearing in the decomposition of physical correlation functions with irregular singularities into conformal blocks. Taken together, we get a precise prediction for the partition functions of some Argyres-Douglas type theories on S{sup 4}. (orig.)

  16. Age-related variation in genetic control of height growth in Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, G; Usanis, R A; Silen, R R

    1972-01-01

    The development of genetic variances in height growth of Douglas-fir over a 53-year period is analyzed and found to fall into three periods. In the juvenile period, variances in environmental error increase logarithmically, genetic variance within populations exists at moderate levels, and variance among populations is low but increasing. In the early reproductive period, the response to environmental sources of error variance is restricted, genetic variance within populations disappears, and populational differences strongly emerge but do not increase as expected. In the later period, environmental error again increases rapidly, but genetic variance within populations does not reappear and population differences are maintained at about the same level as established in the early reproductive period. The change between the juvenile and early reproductive periods is perhaps associated with the onset of ecological dominance and significant allocations of energy to reproduction.

  17. Irregular singularities in Liouville theory and Argyres-Douglas type gauge theories, I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiotto, D.; Teschner, J.

    2012-03-01

    Motivated by problems arising in the study of N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories we introduce and study irregular singularities in two-dimensional conformal field theory, here Liouville theory. Irregular singularities are associated to representations of the Virasoro algebra in which a subset of the annihilation part of the algebra act diagonally. In this paper we define natural bases for the space of conformal blocks in the presence of irregular singularities, describe how to calculate their series expansions, and how such conformal blocks can be constructed by some delicate limiting procedure from ordinary conformal blocks. This leads us to a proposal for the structure functions appearing in the decomposition of physical correlation functions with irregular singularities into conformal blocks. Taken together, we get a precise prediction for the partition functions of some Argyres-Douglas type theories on S 4 . (orig.)

  18. SharePoint 2010 For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Vanessa L

    2012-01-01

    Here's the bestselling guide on SharePoint 2010, updated to cover Office 365 SharePoint Portal Server is an essential part of the enterprise infrastructure for many businesses. The Office 365 version includes significantly enhanced cloud capabilities. This second edition of the bestselling guide to SharePoint covers getting a SharePoint site up and running, branded, populated with content, and more. It explains ongoing site management and offers plenty of advice for administrators who want to leverage SharePoint and Office 365 in various ways.Many businesses today rely on SharePoint Portal Ser

  19. Aircraft Accident Report. Runway Overrun During Landing American Airlines Flight 1420 McDonnell Douglas MD-82, N215AA Little Rock, Arkansas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    This report explains the accident involving American Airlines flight 1420, a McDonnell Douglas MD-82, which crashed after it overran the end of runway 4R during landing at Little Rock National Airport...

  20. Basal area growth, carbon isotope discrimination, and intrinsic water use efficiency after fertilization of Douglas-fir in the Oregon Coast Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many hectares of intensively managed Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. Franco) stands in western North America are fertilized with nitrogen to increase growth rates. Understanding the mechanisms of response facilitates prioritization of stands for treatment. The objective ...

  1. Sixth-order Douglas-Kroll: two-component reference data for one-electron ions from 1s12 through 4f72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuellen, Christoph van

    2005-01-01

    Quasirelativistic Douglas-Kroll calculations including spin-orbit interaction have been performed for hydrogen-like (one-electron) ions. The Douglas-Kroll operators have been implemented up to the sixth order, and a huge even-tempered basis set has been applied that gives results to microhartree accuracy for the energy levels 1s 12 through 4f 72 for all ions with nuclear charge from Z=1 up to Z=100. Besides providing reference data for other implementations, these results can be used to analyse the performance of the Douglas-Kroll method. Such an analysis is presented for the 1s energy levels and the spin-orbit splitting of the 2p shell. The leading order of the error of the Douglas-Kroll result is different for 2s and 2p 12 although these levels are degenerate both at nonrelativistic and Dirac level

  2. SharePoint User's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Corporation, Infusion Development

    2009-01-01

    This straightforward guide shows SharePoint users how to create and use web sites for sharing and collaboration. Learn to use the document and picture libraries for adding and editing content, add discussion boards and surveys, receive alerts when documents and information have been added or changed, and enhance security. Designed to help you find answers quickly, the book shows how to make the most of SharePoint for productivity and collaboration.

  3. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program: Rapid Ecological Assessments of Fish Large-Area Stationary Point Count Surveys (SPC) at Coral Reef Sites across the Pacific Ocean from 2000 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The large-area stationary point count (SPC) method is used to conduct reef fish surveys in the Hawaiian and Mariana Archipelagos, American Samoa, and the Pacific...

  4. Temporal change in soil carbon stability at a paired old-growth douglas-fir forest/clear-cut site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest ecosystems are estimated to contain one-half of the total terrestrial carbon (C) pool (1146 Pg), with two-thirds of this C (787 Pg) residing in forest soils. Given the magnitude of this C pool, it is critical to understand the effects of forest management practices on soil...

  5. Fourth order Douglas implicit scheme for solving three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Hasnain

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research paper represents a numerical approximation to non-linear three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term from population genetics. Since various initial and boundary value problems exist in three dimension reaction diffusion phenomena, which are studied numerically by different numerical methods, here we use finite difference schemes (Alternating Direction Implicit and Fourth Order Douglas Implicit to approximate the solution. Accuracy is studied in term of L2, L∞ and relative error norms by random selected grids along time levels for comparison with analytical results. The test example demonstrates the accuracy, efficiency and versatility of the proposed schemes. Numerical results showed that Fourth Order Douglas Implicit scheme is very efficient and reliable for solving 3-D non-linear reaction diffusion equation.

  6. Fourth order Douglas implicit scheme for solving three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Shahid; Saqib, Muhammad; Mashat, Daoud Suleiman

    2017-07-01

    This research paper represents a numerical approximation to non-linear three dimension reaction diffusion equation with non-linear source term from population genetics. Since various initial and boundary value problems exist in three dimension reaction diffusion phenomena, which are studied numerically by different numerical methods, here we use finite difference schemes (Alternating Direction Implicit and Fourth Order Douglas Implicit) to approximate the solution. Accuracy is studied in term of L2, L∞ and relative error norms by random selected grids along time levels for comparison with analytical results. The test example demonstrates the accuracy, efficiency and versatility of the proposed schemes. Numerical results showed that Fourth Order Douglas Implicit scheme is very efficient and reliable for solving 3-D non-linear reaction diffusion equation.

  7. Effects of long-term pruning, meristem origin, and branch order on the rooting of Douglas-fir stem cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Copes

    1992-01-01

    The rooting percentages of 14 Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) clones were examined annually from 1974 to 1988. The trees were 10 and 13 years old in 1974 and were pruned to 2.0 m in 1978 and 1979 and then recut annually to 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 m, starting in 1983. The pruned trees showed no evidence of decreased rooting percentage...

  8. Transcription through the eye of a needle: daily and annual cyclic gene expression variation in Douglas-fir needles

    OpenAIRE

    Cronn, Richard; Dolan, Peter C.; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Wegrzyn, Jill L.; Neale, David B.; St. Clair, J. Bradley; Denver, Dee R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Perennial growth in plants is the product of interdependent cycles of daily and annual stimuli that induce cycles of growth and dormancy. In conifers, needles are the key perennial organ that integrates daily and seasonal signals from light, temperature, and water availability. To understand the relationship between seasonal cycles and seasonal gene expression responses in conifers, we examined diurnal and circannual needle mRNA accumulation in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) n...

  9. Transcription Through The Eye Of A Needle: Daily And Annual Cycles Of Gene Expression Variation In Douglas-Fir Needles

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Peter; Cronn, Richard; Denver, Dee; Clair, J.; Neale, David; Wegrzyn, Jill; Jogdeo, Sanjuro

    2017-01-01

    Background: Perennial growth in plants is the product of interdependent cycles of daily and annual stimuli that induce cycles of growth and dormancy. In conifers, needles are the key perennial organ that integrates daily and seasonal signals from light, temperature, and water availability. To understand the relationship between seasonal rhythms and seasonal gene expression responses in conifers, we examined diurnal and circannual needle mRNA accumulation in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)...

  10. Five-Year Impacts of Swiss Needle Cast on Douglas-fir in Interior Forests of Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FILIP, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2001 and 2006, we examined 590 Douglas-firs in 59 stands age 10-23 years in the northern Cascade Mountain foothills in Oregon, USA. Mean 5-year-dbh growth was 6.1 cm and total-height growth was 3.6 m. Mean needle-retention index increased by 3.4 over 5 years, and mid-crown retention increased by 1.2 years. Mean percentages of stomata occluded by pseudothecia of Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii were 13.6% for 2000-(2-year-old needles and 1.7% for 2001-(1-year-old needles sampled in 2002, and 13.3% for 2004 (2-year-old needles sampled in 2006. Mean crown-length to sapwood-area ratio was 5.2 cm/cm2 in 2006. There were poor correlations (R2 <0.3 among all variables except for a moderate correlation between stand elevation and either 2000-stomata occluded (R2 = 0.43 or 2004-stomata occluded (R2 = 0.50, where there were fewer pseudothecia at the higher elevations. Either 5 years is not enough time to evaluate the affects of Swiss needle cast on Douglas-fir growth in the Oregon Cascades or there was no significant effect of Swiss needle cast during the latest outbreak on Douglas-fir growth. Based on our results and their interpretation, forest managers may need not alter their current practices in the northern Oregon Cascades, and managing a mix of Douglas-fir and western hemlock at lower elevations and noble fir at higher elevations will help offset any future stand-growth declines due to Swiss needle cast.

  11. Volume and weight characteristics of a typical Douglas-fir/ western larch stand, Coram Experimental Forest, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Benson; Joyce A. Schlieter

    1980-01-01

    An over-mature Douglas-fir/western larch stand on the Coram Experimental Forest in Montana averaged about 7,300 ft3/acre (511 rn3/ha) of wood over 3 inches (7.62 cm) in diameter, and an additional 57 tons/acre (128/ha) of fine material, before harvest. After logging, using three different cutting methods and four different levels of utilization, wood residues ranged...

  12. Seasonal carbohydrate dynamics and growth in Douglas-fir trees experiencing chronic, fungal-mediated reduction in functional leaf area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffell, Brandy J; Meinzer, Frederick C; Woodruff, David R; Shaw, David C; Voelker, Steven L; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Falk, Kristen

    2014-03-01

    Stored non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) could play an important role in tree survival in the face of a changing climate and associated stress-related mortality. We explored the effects of the stomata-blocking and defoliating fungal disease called Swiss needle cast on Douglas-fir carbohydrate reserves and growth to evaluate the extent to which NSCs can be mobilized under natural conditions of low water stress and restricted carbon supply in relation to potential demands for growth. We analyzed the concentrations of starch, sucrose, glucose and fructose in foliage, twig wood and trunk sapwood of 15 co-occurring Douglas-fir trees expressing a gradient of Swiss needle cast symptom severity quantified as previous-year functional foliage mass. Growth (mean basal area increment, BAI) decreased by ∼80% and trunk NSC concentration decreased by 60% with decreasing functional foliage mass. The ratio of relative changes in NSC concentration and BAI, an index of the relative priority of storage versus growth, more than doubled with increasing disease severity. In contrast, twig and foliage NSC concentrations remained nearly constant with decreasing functional foliage mass. These results suggest that under disease-induced reductions in carbon supply, Douglas-fir trees retain NSCs (either actively or due to sequestration) at the expense of trunk radial growth. The crown retains the highest concentrations of NSC, presumably to maintain foliage growth and shoot extension in the spring, partially compensating for rapid foliage loss in the summer and fall.

  13. Professional SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Tom; Fried, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Learn to leverage the features of the newest version of SharePoint, in this update to the bestseller. More than simply a portal, SharePoint is Microsoft's popular content management solution for building intranets and Web sites or hosting wikis and blogs. Offering broad coverage on all aspects of development for the SharePoint platform, this comprehensive book shows you exactly what SharePoint does, how to build solutions, and what features are accessible within SharePoint. Written by one of the most recognized names in SharePoint development, Professional SharePoint 2010 Development offers an

  14. Cellular Phone Towers, FCC registered communications towers. Points were generated from FCC data latlong. Originally created as a basis of comparison for Appraiser's cell tower points, bu comparison was inconclusive. Represented all registered FCC sites as of 6/26/2003. No, Published in 2003, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cellular Phone Towers dataset current as of 2003. FCC registered communications towers. Points were generated from FCC data latlong. Originally created as a basis of...

  15. Enhancement of Carbon Sequestration in west coast Douglas-fir Forests with Nitrogen Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Jassal, R.; Black, A.; Brummer, C.; Spittlehouse, D.; Nesic, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Fertilization is one of the eligible management practices for C sequestering and hence reducing CO2 emissions under Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol. In the coastal regions of British Columbia, which have very little nitrogen (N) deposition from pollution sources owing to their remote location, and soils deficient in N (Hanley et al., 1996), Douglas-fir stands respond to N fertilization (Brix, 1981; Fisher and Binkley, 2000; Chapin et al., 2002). However, a major concern with N fertilization is the potential loss from the soil surface of the highly potent greenhouse gas N2O, and little is known about such losses in N-fertilized forest soils. While it is necessary to determine and quantify the effects of N fertilization on stand C sequestration, it is also important to address environmental concerns by measuring N2O emissions to determine the net greenhouse gas (GHG) global warming potential (GWP). The GWP of N2O is 296 times (100-year time horizon) greater than that of CO2 (Ehhalt and Prather, 2001), yet there is little information on its net radiative forcing as a result of forest fertilization. We report two years of results on the effects of N fertilization in a chronosequence of three Douglas-fir stands (7, 19 and 58 years old, hereafter referred to as HDF00, HDF88 and DF49, respectively) on net C sequestration or net primary productivity measured using the eddy-covariance technique. DF49 (110 ha) and HDF88 (20 ha) were aerially fertilized with urea at 200 kg N ha-1 on Jan 13 and Feb 17, 2007, respectively, while due to its young age and competing understory, fertilizer to HDF00 (5 ha) was manually applied at 80 g urea/tree (60 kg N ha-1) along the tree drip line on Feb 13-14, 2007. Additionally, we calculate the net change in GHG GWP resulting from fertilization of DF49 by accounting for N2O emissions and energy costs of fertilizer production, transport, and application. We also compare polymer-coated slow-release urea (Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (ESN

  16. Site environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the site environmental programs. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs monitor for impacts from operations in several areas. The first area consists of the point of possible release into the environment. The second area consists of possible contamination adjacent to DOE facilities, and the third area is the general environment both on and off the site.

  17. Site environmental programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the site environmental programs. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs monitor for impacts from operations in several areas. The first area consists of the point of possible release into the environment. The second area consists of possible contamination adjacent to DOE facilities, and the third area is the general environment both on and off the site

  18. Testing a hydraulic trait based model of stomatal control: results from a controlled drought experiment on aspen (Populus tremuloides, Michx.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, Douglas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D. M.; Venturas, M.; Sperry, J.; Wang, Y.; Anderegg, W.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling approaches for tree stomatal control often rely on empirical fitting to provide accurate estimates of whole tree transpiration (E) and assimilation (A), which are limited in their predictive power by the data envelope used to calibrate model parameters. Optimization based models hold promise as a means to predict stomatal behavior under novel climate conditions. We designed an experiment to test a hydraulic trait based optimization model, which predicts stomatal conductance from a gain/risk approach. Optimal stomatal conductance is expected to maximize the potential carbon gain by photosynthesis, and minimize the risk to hydraulic transport imposed by cavitation. The modeled risk to the hydraulic network is assessed from cavitation vulnerability curves, a commonly measured physiological trait in woody plant species. Over a growing season garden grown plots of aspen (Populus tremuloides, Michx.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, Douglas) were subjected to three distinct drought treatments (moderate, severe, severe with rehydration) relative to a control plot to test model predictions. Model outputs of predicted E, A, and xylem pressure can be directly compared to both continuous data (whole tree sapflux, soil moisture) and point measurements (leaf level E, A, xylem pressure). The model also predicts levels of whole tree hydraulic impairment expected to increase mortality risk. This threshold is used to estimate survivorship in the drought treatment plots. The model can be run at two scales, either entirely from climate (meteorological inputs, irrigation) or using the physiological measurements as a starting point. These data will be used to study model performance and utility, and aid in developing the model for larger scale applications.

  19. The legacy of Douglas Guthrie (1885-1975), surgeon and medical historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Iain

    2018-01-01

    After graduating in medicine Douglas Guthrie embarked on a career as an ENT surgeon. When his Edinburgh hospital appointment ended in 1936 he began to write History of Medicine, which, thanks to a favourable review by George Bernard Shaw, became a worldwide best seller when first published in 1945. This marked the start of Guthrie's second career as a lecturer in history of medicine at the University of Edinburgh where his prime responsibility was delivering systematic lectures on medical history to medical undergraduates. At a time when history of medicine was virtually the exclusive preserve of medical doctors, Guthrie promoted to them the historiography techniques of the academic historian. His vision that social historians should become involved in the field and that history of medicine should be taught in arts and humanities faculties began to be adopted in British universities a decade or so after Guthrie made the recommendation. His legacy includes the Scottish Society of the History of Medicine and the British Society for the History of Medicine, both of which he helped to found. His name is commemorated in various charitable trusts which he established to promote the study of history of medicine.

  20. Argyres-Douglas theories, the Macdonald index, and an RG inequality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buican, Matthew [NHETC and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University,Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago,Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Nishinaka, Takahiro [NHETC and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University,Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-24

    We conjecture closed-form expressions for the Macdonald limits of the superconformal indices of the (A{sub 1},A{sub 2n−3}) and (A{sub 1},D{sub 2n}) Argyres-Douglas (AD) theories in terms of certain simple deformations of Macdonald polynomials. As checks of our conjectures, we demonstrate compatibility with two S-dualities, we show symmetry enhancement for special values of n, and we argue that our expressions encode a non-trivial set of renormalization group flows. Moreover, we demonstrate that, for certain values of n, our conjectures imply simple operator relations involving composites built out of the SU(2){sub R} currents and flavor symmetry moment maps, and we find a consistent picture in which these relations give rise to certain null states in the corresponding chiral algebras. In addition, we show that the Hall-Littlewood limits of our indices are equivalent to the corresponding Higgs branch Hilbert series. We explain this fact by considering the S{sup 1} reductions of our theories and showing that the equivalence follows from an inequality on monopole quantum numbers whose coefficients are fixed by data of the four-dimensional parent theories. Finally, we comment on the implications of our work for more general N=2 superconformal field theories.

  1. Evaluation of Pushback Decision-Support Tool Concept for Charlotte Douglas International Airport Ramp Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Hoang, Ty; Jung, Yoon C.; Malik, Waqar; Lee, Hanbong; Dulchinos, Victoria L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new departure pushback decision-support tool (DST) for airport ramp-tower controllers. It is based on NASA's Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) collaborative decision-making concept, except with the modification that the gate releases now are controlled by tactical pushback (or gate-hold) advisories instead of strategic pre-assignments of target pushback times to individual departure flights. The proposed ramp DST relies on data exchange with the airport traffic control tower (ATCT) to coordinate pushbacks with the ATCT's flow-management intentions under current operational constraints, such as Traffic Management Initiative constraints. Airlines would benefit in reduced taxi delay and fuel burn. The concept was evaluated in a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment with current ramp-tower controllers at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport as participants. The results showed that the tool helped reduce taxi time by one minute per flight and overall departure flight fuel consumption by 10-12% without reducing runway throughput. Expect Departure Clearance Time (EDCT) conformance also was improved when advisories were provided. These benefits were attained without increasing the ramp-tower controllers' workload. Additionally, the advisories reduced the ATCT controllers' workload.

  2. Analysis of solar thermophotovoltaic test data from experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, K.W.; Kusek, S.M.; Drubka, R.E. [McDonnell Douglas, 5301 Bolsa Avenue, Huntington Beach, California 92647 (United States); Fay, T.D. [21911 Bacalar, Mission Viejo, California 92692 (United States)

    1995-01-05

    Solar thermophotovoltaic power systems offer potentially high system efficiency for solar energy to electrical energy conversion and attractive system advantages. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has been investigating this technology for both space and terrestrial applications for several years. A testbed prototype was designed, built, and tested on a 90 kW{sub t} dish concentrator at the MDA solar test facility. Twelve experiments were conducted with absorber temperatures in excess of 1300 {degree}C being achieved using only a fraction of the reflected power from the 90 kW{sub t} dish concentrator. This paper discusses the solar thermophotovoltaic testbed prototype unit, test data, and presents an analysis of the unit`s performance. A combination of analytical analysis and test data is used to obtain an understanding of the system and subsystem performance. The preliminary results of these tests and analysis indicate a solar thermophotovoltaic power system can achieve high system performance. Furthermore, system demonstrations are possible utilizing a combination of current off-the-shelf hardware components and components currently being tested in laboratories. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Vertex operator algebras of Argyres-Douglas theories from M5-branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaewon; Xie, Dan; Yan, Wenbin

    2017-12-01

    We study aspects of the vertex operator algebra (VOA) corresponding to Argyres-Douglas (AD) theories engineered using the 6d N=(2, 0) theory of type J on a punctured sphere. We denote the AD theories as ( J b [ k], Y), where J b [ k] and Y represent an irregular and a regular singularity respectively. We restrict to the `minimal' case where J b [ k] has no associated mass parameters, and the theory does not admit any exactly marginal deformations. The VOA corresponding to the AD theory is conjectured to be the W-algebra W^{k_{2d}}(J, Y ) , where {k}_{2d}=-h+b/b+k with h being the dual Coxeter number of J. We verify this conjecture by showing that the Schur index of the AD theory is identical to the vacuum character of the corresponding VOA, and the Hall-Littlewood index computes the Hilbert series of the Higgs branch. We also find that the Schur and Hall-Littlewood index for the AD theory can be written in a simple closed form for b = h. We also test the conjecture that the associated variety of such VOA is identical to the Higgs branch. The M5-brane construction of these theories and the corresponding TQFT structure of the index play a crucial role in our computations.

  4. Monitoring soil chemical and physical parameters under Douglas fir in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konsten, C.J.M.; Tiktak, A.; Bouten, W.

    1987-01-01

    In march 1987 a monitoring program started in two Douglas fir stands of different vitality in the Netherlands. Aim of the study is to provide insight in the chemical and physical rooting conditions of the vegetation and to quantify the contributions of atmospheric deposition to soil acidification. The hydrological part of the monitoring progam consists of automated measurements of precipitation, throughfall, soil water pressure head and soil water content; in addition soil water content is determined by neutron sonde measurements and gravimetry. These data are used as input data for simulation models which calculate water fluxes through the vegetation and soil. For the soil chemical part of the program precipitation (bulk and wet-only), throughfall and litter fall are sampled. The soil solution is sampled by suction from porous cups and from porous plates by a new, continous technique. Combination of soil chemical and soil physical data will result in chemical fluxes through the vegetation and through various soil compartments. Element budgets for the ecosystem will also be calculated. The program forms part of an interdisciplinary monitoring project within the Dutch Priority Programme on Acidification. 2 figs., 1 tab., 19 refs.

  5. Argyres-Douglas theories, the Macdonald index, and an RG inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buican, Matthew; Nishinaka, Takahiro

    2016-02-01

    We conjecture closed-form expressions for the Macdonald limits of the super-conformal indices of the ( A 1 , A 2 n - 3) and ( A 1 , D 2 n ) Argyres-Douglas (AD) theories in terms of certain simple deformations of Macdonald polynomials. As checks of our conjectures, we demonstrate compatibility with two S-dualities, we show symmetry enhancement for special values of n, and we argue that our expressions encode a non-trivial set of renormalization group flows. Moreover, we demonstrate that, for certain values of n, our conjectures imply simple operator relations involving composites built out of the SU(2) R currents and flavor symmetry moment maps, and we find a consistent picture in which these relations give rise to certain null states in the corresponding chiral algebras. In addition, we show that the Hall-Littlewood limits of our indices are equivalent to the corresponding Higgs branch Hilbert series. We explain this fact by considering the S 1 reductions of our theories and showing that the equivalence follows from an inequality on monopole quantum numbers whose coefficients are fixed by data of the four-dimensional parent theories. Finally, we comment on the implications of our work for more general {N}=2 superconformal field theories.

  6. Argyres-Douglas theories, the Macdonald index, and an RG inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buican, Matthew; Nishinaka, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    We conjecture closed-form expressions for the Macdonald limits of the superconformal indices of the (A 1 ,A 2n−3 ) and (A 1 ,D 2n ) Argyres-Douglas (AD) theories in terms of certain simple deformations of Macdonald polynomials. As checks of our conjectures, we demonstrate compatibility with two S-dualities, we show symmetry enhancement for special values of n, and we argue that our expressions encode a non-trivial set of renormalization group flows. Moreover, we demonstrate that, for certain values of n, our conjectures imply simple operator relations involving composites built out of the SU(2) R currents and flavor symmetry moment maps, and we find a consistent picture in which these relations give rise to certain null states in the corresponding chiral algebras. In addition, we show that the Hall-Littlewood limits of our indices are equivalent to the corresponding Higgs branch Hilbert series. We explain this fact by considering the S 1 reductions of our theories and showing that the equivalence follows from an inequality on monopole quantum numbers whose coefficients are fixed by data of the four-dimensional parent theories. Finally, we comment on the implications of our work for more general N=2 superconformal field theories.

  7. Research on energy-saving effect of technological progress based on Cobb-Douglas production function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chaoqing; Liu Sifeng; Wu Junlong

    2009-01-01

    Energy issues receive more and more attention these days. And it is considered that technological progress is an essential approach to save energy. This essay is to analyze the relation between energy intensity and technological progress by Cobb-Douglas production function in which energy, labor, capital and technological progress are taken as independent variables. It proves that the growth of output per capital and output per labor will increase energy intensity while technological progress will decrease energy intensity. Empirical research on Chinese industry is used here to indicate technological progress greatly decreases energy intensity. Because of the interferences of Asian financial crisis, there is something abnormal in the data. So in the empirical research, average weaken buffer operator (ABWO) is applied to weaken the interference of Asian financial crisis to the fixed assets, energy and value added. The results of the empirical research show that technological progress decreases energy intensity of Chinese industry an average of 6.3% every year in China.

  8. A tradução desobediente do poeta Douglas Diegues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Ferreira Pompêo de Camargo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo buscar ampliar o conceito de tradução embasado nas teorias de Walter Benjamin, Haroldo de Campos, Néstor García Canclini e John Milton, aproximando-o da crítica cultural. Busca também, a partir do conceito aumentado de tradução, analisar a obra de Douglas Diegues, cuja poética é cuidadosamente construída e enraizada sobre bases ligadas ao conceito de tradução criativa. O poeta brasileiro escreve em portunhol selvagem (mistura entre o português, espanhol e guarani, língua literária desobediente que funciona como ponte, aproximando diversas culturas que coabitam a América Latina. Uma narrativa poética que culmina na tradução de obras canônicas para o portunhol selvagem, prática batizada por ele de transdeliração. Dessa forma, o poeta, astutamente, cria diálogo e arcabouço retóricos e subjetivos codificados na língua fronteiriça.

  9. Region 9 NPL Sites (Superfund Sites 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPL site POINT locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup under the Superfund program. Eligibility is determined by a scoring method called Hazard Ranking System. Sites with high scores are listed on the NPL. The majority of the locations are derived from polygon centroids of digitized site boundaries. The remaining locations were generated from address geocoding and digitizing. Area covered by this data set include Arizona, California, Nevada, Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, Northern Marianas and Trust Territories. Attributes include NPL status codes, NPL industry type codes and environmental indicators. Related table, NPL_Contaminants contains information about contaminated media types and chemicals. This is a one-to-many relate and can be related to the feature class using the relationship classes under the Feature Data Set ENVIRO_CONTAMINANT.

  10. Digital microwave communication engineering point-to-point microwave systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kizer, George

    2013-01-01

    The first book to cover all engineering aspects of microwave communication path design for the digital age Fixed point-to-point microwave systems provide moderate-capacity digital transmission between well-defined locations. Most popular in situations where fiber optics or satellite communication is impractical, it is commonly used for cellular or PCS site interconnectivity where digital connectivity is needed but not economically available from other sources, and in private networks where reliability is most important. Until now, no book has adequately treated all en

  11. Columbia River ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for bird nesting sites in the Columbia River area. Vector points in this data set represent locations of...

  12. In-situ arsenic remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Angela P.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Welch, Alan H.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional arsenic remediation strategies primarily involve above-ground treatment that include costs involved in the disposal of sludge material. The primary advantages of in-situ remediation are that building and maintaining a large treatment facility are not necessary and that costs associated with the disposal of sludge are eliminated. A two-phase study was implemented to address the feasibility of in-situ arsenic remediation in Douglas County, Nevada. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater within Douglas County range from 1 to 85 micrograms per liter. The primary arsenic species in groundwater at greater than 250 ft from land surface is arsenite; however, in the upper 150 ft of the aquifer arsenate predominates. Where arsenite is the primary form of arsenic, the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate is necessary. The results of the first phase of this investigation indicated that arsenic concentrations can be remediated to below the drinking-water standard using aeration, chlorination, iron, and pH adjustment. Arsenic concentrations were remediated to less than 10 micrograms per liter in groundwater from the shallow and deep aquifer when iron concentrations of 3-6 milligrams per liter and pH adjustments to less than 6 were used. Because of the rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen, the secondary drinking-water standards for iron (300 micrograms per liter) and manganese (100 micrograms per liter) were exceeded during treatment. Treatment was more effective in the shallow well as indicated by a greater recovery of water meeting the arsenic standard. Laboratory and field tests were included in the second phase of this study. Laboratory column experiments using aquifer material indicated the treatment process followed during the first phase of this study will continue to work, without exceeding secondary drinking-water standards, provided that groundwater was pre-aerated and an adequate number of pore volumes treated. During the 147-day laboratory experiment, no

  13. Drought effects on root and needle terpenoid content of a coastal and an interior Douglas fir provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, Anita; Duan, Qiuxiao; Jansen, Kirstin; Verena Junker, Laura; Kammerer, Bernd; Rennenberg, Heinz; Ensminger, Ingo; Gessler, Arthur; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is a conifer species that stores large amounts of terpenoids, mainly monoterpenoids in resin ducts of various tissues. The effects of drought on stored leaf terpenoid concentrations in trees are scarcely studied and published data are partially controversial, since reduced, unaffected or elevated terpenoid contents due to drought have been reported. Even less is known on the effect of drought on root terpenoids. In the present work, we investigated the effect of reduced water availability on the terpenoid content in roots and needles of Douglas fir seedlings. Two contrasting Douglas fir provenances were studied: an interior provenance (var. glauca) with assumed higher drought resistance, and a coastal provenance (var. menziesii) with assumed lower drought resistance. We tested the hypothesis that both provenances show specific patterns of stored terpenoids and that the patterns will change in response to drought in both, needles and roots. We further expected stronger changes in the less drought tolerant coastal provenance. For this purpose, we performed an experiment under controlled conditions, in which the trees were exposed to moderate and severe drought stress. According to our expectations, the study revealed clear provenance-specific terpenoid patterns in needles. However, such patterns were not detected in the roots. Drought slightly increased the needle terpenoid contents of the coastal but not of the interior provenance. We also observed increased terpenoid abundance mainly in roots of the moderately stressed coastal provenance. Overall, from the observed provenance-specific reactions with increased terpenoid levels in trees of the coastal origin in response to drought, we conclude on functions of terpenoids for abiotic stress tolerance that might be fulfilled by other, constitutively expressed mechanisms in drought-adapted interior provenances. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  14. Species distribution models may misdirect assisted migration: insights from the introduction of Douglas-fir to Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiffin, Juliette; Badeau, Vincent; Bréda, Nathalie

    2017-03-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs), which statistically relate species occurrence to climatic variables, are widely used to identify areas suitable for species growth under future climates and to plan for assisted migration. When SDMs are projected across times or spaces, it is assumed that species climatic requirements remain constant. However, empirical evidence supporting this assumption is rare, and SDM predictions could be biased. Historical human-aided movements of tree species can shed light on the reliability of SDM predictions in planning for assisted migration. We used Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), a North American conifer introduced into Europe during the mid-19th century, as a case-study to test niche conservatism. We combined transcontinental data sets of Douglas-fir occurrence and climatic predictors to compare the realized niches between native and introduced ranges. We calibrated a SDM in the native range and compared areas predicted to be climatically suitable with observed presences. The realized niches in the native and introduced ranges showed very limited overlap. The SDM calibrated in North America had very high predictive power in the native range, but failed to predict climatic suitability in Europe where Douglas-fir grows in climates that have no analogue in the native range. We review the ecological mechanisms and silvicultural practices that can trigger such shifts in realized niches. Retrospective analysis of tree species introduction revealed that the assumption of niche conservatism is erroneous. As a result, distributions predicted by SDM are importantly biased. There is a high risk that assisted migration programs may be misdirected and target inadequate species or introduction zones. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Deriving Fuel Mass by Size Class in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Queen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Requirements for describing coniferous forests are changing in response to wildfire concerns, bio-energy needs, and climate change interests. At the same time, technology advancements are transforming how forest properties can be measured. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is yielding promising results for measuring tree biomass parameters that, historically, have required costly destructive sampling and resulted in small sample sizes. Here we investigate whether TLS intensity data can be used to distinguish foliage and small branches (≤0.635 cm diameter; coincident with the one-hour timelag fuel size class from larger branchwood (>0.635 cm in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii branch specimens. We also consider the use of laser density for predicting biomass by size class. Measurements are addressed across multiple ranges and scan angles. Results show TLS capable of distinguishing fine fuels from branches at a threshold of one standard deviation above mean intensity. Additionally, the relationship between return density and biomass is linear by fuel type for fine fuels (r2 = 0.898; SE 22.7% and branchwood (r2 = 0.937; SE 28.9%, as well as for total mass (r2 = 0.940; SE 25.5%. Intensity decays predictably as scan distances increase; however, the range-intensity relationship is best described by an exponential model rather than 1/d2. Scan angle appears to have no systematic effect on fine fuel discrimination, while some differences are observed in density-mass relationships with changing angles due to shadowing.

  16. First report of Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Lecanodiaspididae) and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsaro Júnior, A L; Peronti, A L B G; Costa, V A; Morais, E G F; Pereira, P R V S

    2016-02-01

    Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Lecanodiaspididae) and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) are reported for the first time in Brazil. Specimens of this scale insect were collected on branches and stems of Acacia mangium Willd., Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit (Fabaceae), Morus nigra L. (Moraceae), Citrus reticulata Blanco (Rutaceae), Tectona grandis L. f. (Verbenaceae), Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae), Annona squamosa L. and Xylopia aromatica (Lam.) Mart. (Annonaceae), in three municipalities of the Roraima state. All plants here mentioned are recorded for the first time as a host for L. dendrobii. Morphological characters of L. dendrobii and symptoms presented by the host plants infested by this pest are included in this work.

  17. Selecting Populations for Non-Analogous Climate Conditions Using Universal Response Functions: The Case of Douglas-Fir in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Wang, Tongli; Andre, Konrad; Konnert, Monika; Lexer, Manfred J; Matulla, Christoph; Schueler, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Identifying populations within tree species potentially adapted to future climatic conditions is an important requirement for reforestation and assisted migration programmes. Such populations can be identified either by empirical response functions based on correlations of quantitative traits with climate variables or by climate envelope models that compare the climate of seed sources and potential growing areas. In the present study, we analyzed the intraspecific variation in climate growth response of Douglas-fir planted within the non-analogous climate conditions of Central and continental Europe. With data from 50 common garden trials, we developed Universal Response Functions (URF) for tree height and mean basal area and compared the growth performance of the selected best performing populations with that of populations identified through a climate envelope approach. Climate variables of the trial location were found to be stronger predictors of growth performance than climate variables of the population origin. Although the precipitation regime of the population sources varied strongly none of the precipitation related climate variables of population origin was found to be significant within the models. Overall, the URFs explained more than 88% of variation in growth performance. Populations identified by the URF models originate from western Cascades and coastal areas of Washington and Oregon and show significantly higher growth performance than populations identified by the climate envelope approach under both current and climate change scenarios. The URFs predict decreasing growth performance at low and middle elevations of the case study area, but increasing growth performance on high elevation sites. Our analysis suggests that population recommendations based on empirical approaches should be preferred and population selections by climate envelope models without considering climatic constrains of growth performance should be carefully appraised before

  18. Selecting Populations for Non-Analogous Climate Conditions Using Universal Response Functions: The Case of Douglas-Fir in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Wang, Tongli; Andre, Konrad; Konnert, Monika; Lexer, Manfred J.; Matulla, Christoph; Schueler, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Identifying populations within tree species potentially adapted to future climatic conditions is an important requirement for reforestation and assisted migration programmes. Such populations can be identified either by empirical response functions based on correlations of quantitative traits with climate variables or by climate envelope models that compare the climate of seed sources and potential growing areas. In the present study, we analyzed the intraspecific variation in climate growth response of Douglas-fir planted within the non-analogous climate conditions of Central and continental Europe. With data from 50 common garden trials, we developed Universal Response Functions (URF) for tree height and mean basal area and compared the growth performance of the selected best performing populations with that of populations identified through a climate envelope approach. Climate variables of the trial location were found to be stronger predictors of growth performance than climate variables of the population origin. Although the precipitation regime of the population sources varied strongly none of the precipitation related climate variables of population origin was found to be significant within the models. Overall, the URFs explained more than 88% of variation in growth performance. Populations identified by the URF models originate from western Cascades and coastal areas of Washington and Oregon and show significantly higher growth performance than populations identified by the climate envelope approach under both current and climate change scenarios. The URFs predict decreasing growth performance at low and middle elevations of the case study area, but increasing growth performance on high elevation sites. Our analysis suggests that population recommendations based on empirical approaches should be preferred and population selections by climate envelope models without considering climatic constrains of growth performance should be carefully appraised before

  19. Point 1 Updates

    CERN Multimedia

    Inigo-Golfin, J.

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Not only has Civil Engineering finished the construction of the USA15 technical cavern, but the excavation of the main UX15 cavern has resumed below the machine tunnel, after a brief halt to allow the construction of the UJ-caverns for the power converters of the LHC machine. The excavation work should end in August 2002. The UX15 hand-over to ATLAS is expected in April 2003. On the surface civil engineering is starting to complete the last two surface buildings (SDX1 and SH1), once the services (cooling pipes, ventilation ducts and the largest item, the lift modules and its lift of course) in the shaft PX15 have been completed. But the civil engineering is not all. A lot more is under way. The site installation of the steel structures in the caverns is to begin in Autumn, along with all the cooling pipes, airconditi...

  20. SharePoint 2013 for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Withee, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The bestselling guide on running SharePoint, now updated to cover all the new features of SharePoint 2013 SharePoint Portal Server is an essential part of the enterprise infrastructure for many businesses. Building on the success of previous versions of SharePoint For Dummies, this new edition covers all the latest features of SharePoint 2013 and provides you with an easy-to-understand resource for making the most of all that this version has to offer. You'll learn how to get a site up and running, branded, and populated with content, workflow, and management. In addition, t

  1. Radium issues at Hunters Point Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radium was a common source of illumination used in numerous instruments and gauges for military equipment prior to 1970. As a result of its many military applications radium 226 is now a principle radionuclide of concern at military base closures sites throughout the United States. This is an overview of the site characterization strategy employed and a potential site remediation technology being considered at a radium contaminated landfill at Hunters Point Annex, a former U.S. Navy shipyard in San Francisco, California

  2. Effects of mountain beaver management and thinning on 15-year-old Douglas fir growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dan L; Engeman, Richard M; Farley, James P

    2015-07-01

    We examined 4-year growth of 15-year-old damaged and undamaged Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menzesii) after integrating temporary population reductions of mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa) with thinning in a pre-commercial hand-planted plantation in western Washington. Five treatment combinations were considered: (1) trapping mountain beavers in an unthinned area, (2) trapping before thinning to 65 trees/ha (160 trees/ac), (3) no trapping and thinning to 65 trees/ha, (4) no trapping and thinning to 146 trees/ha (360 trees/ac), and (5) no trapping and no thinning. Removal of ≥ 90 % of mountain beavers temporarily reduced mountain beaver activity whether the stand was unthinned or thinned. Diameter growth at breast height (dbh) was greater for undamaged trees than for damaged trees in thinned areas. Tree height growth was greatest in trapped areas whether thinned or not. No differences were detected in 4-year survival between trees damaged aboveground and those without aboveground damage, which may be related to undetected root damage to trees without aboveground damage. Basal diameter growth and dbh growth were greatest for areas thinned to 65 trees/ha. Seventy-eight percent of stomachs from mountain beaver trapped in winter contained Douglas fir root or stem materials. Overall, short-term removal of mountain beavers integrated with pre-commercial thinning promoted growth of crop trees.

  3. Local adaptation in migrated interior Douglas-fir seedlings is mediated by ectomycorrhizas and other soil factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Brian J; Twieg, Brendan D; O'Neill, Gregory A; Mohn, William W; Simard, Suzanne W

    2015-08-01

    Separating edaphic impacts on tree distributions from those of climate and geography is notoriously difficult. Aboveground and belowground factors play important roles, and determining their relative contribution to tree success will greatly assist in refining predictive models and forestry strategies in a changing climate. In a common glasshouse, seedlings of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) from multiple populations were grown in multiple forest soils. Fungicide was applied to half of the seedlings to separate soil fungal and nonfungal impacts on seedling performance. Soils of varying geographic and climatic distance from seed origin were compared, using a transfer function approach. Seedling height and biomass were optimized following seed transfer into drier soils, whereas survival was optimized when elevation transfer was minimised. Fungicide application reduced ectomycorrhizal root colonization by c. 50%, with treated seedlings exhibiting greater survival but reduced biomass. Local adaptation of Douglas-fir populations to soils was mediated by soil fungi to some extent in 56% of soil origin by response variable combinations. Mediation by edaphic factors in general occurred in 81% of combinations. Soil biota, hitherto unaccounted for in climate models, interacts with biogeography to influence plant ranges in a changing climate. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Age trends in Douglas-fir genetic parameters and implications for optimum selection age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.R. Johnson; R.A. Sniezko; N.L. Mandel

    1997-01-01

    rends in genetic variation were examined over 51 progeny test sites throughout western Oregon. Narrow sense heritabilities for height and diameter showed an increasing trend to age 25, the oldest age examined. Before age 10, height heritabilities were relatively unstable. Type B site-site genetic correlations increased slowly with age for height and remained relatively...

  5. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  6. Beginning SharePoint 2010 Building Business Solutions with SharePoint

    CERN Document Server

    Perran, Amanda; Mason, Jennifer; Rogers, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Two SharePoint MVPs provide the ultimate introduction to SharePoint 2010Beginning SharePoint 2010: Building Team Solutions with SharePoint provides information workers and site managers with extensive knowledge and expert advice, empowering them to become SharePoint champions within their organizations.Provides expansive coverage of SharePoint topics, as well as specialty areas such as forms, excel services, records management, and web content managementDetails realistic usage scenarios, and includes practice examples that highlight best practices for configuration and customizationIncludes de

  7. THE USE OF INTER SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEATS (ISSR) IN DISTINGUISHING NEIGHBORING DOUGLAS-FIR TREES AS A MEANS TO IDENTIFYING TREE ROOTS WITH ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are attempting to identify specific root fragments from soil cores with individual trees. We successfully used Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) to distinguish neighboring old-growth Douglas-fir trees from one another, while maintaining identity among each tree's parts. W...

  8. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study on Douglas-fir: report no. 02—The Hoskins Study, 1963-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Bell; Alan B. Berg

    1972-01-01

    Public and private agencies are cooperating in a study of eight thinning regimes in young Douglas-fir stands. Regimes differ in the amount of basal area allowed to accrue in growing stock at each successive thinning. All regimes start with a common level-of-growing-stock which is established by a conditioning thinning. Thinning interval is...

  9. SEASONAL PATTERNS AND VERTICAL PROFILE OF SOIL WATER UPTAKE AND UTILIZATION BY YOUNG AND OLD DOUGLAS-FIR AND PONDEROSA PINE FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water availability has a strong influence on the distribution of forest tree species across the landscape. However, we do not understand how seasonal patterns of water utilization by tree species are related to their drought tolerance. In the Pacific Northwest, Douglas-fir occu...

  10. Patterns of Increasing Swiss Needle Cast Impacts on Growth of 20- and 40-year-old Douglas-fir from Tillamook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, Swiss Needle Cast (SNC) is causing an epidemic west of the Oregon Coast Range from Coos Bay to Astoria. The most severely infected Douglas-fir trees are located on BLM land and Stimson Lumber plantations in Tillamook where environmental conditions are highly favorable ...

  11. Douglas Lowy and Nirali Shah discuss advancements in cancer treatment at the second annual Chasing Cancer Summit | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Monday, September 18, 2017, the second annual Chasing Cancer Summit was held at the Washington Post headquarters in downtown Washington, D.C. The live event brought together a group of experts, including CCR’s Douglas Lowy, M.D., and Nirali Shah, M.D., for discussions on the latest developments in cancer detection and treatment.  Read more...

  12. Tree-ring history of Swiss needle cast impact on Douglas-fir growth in western Oregon: Correlations with climate variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal pathogen, Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii, occurs wherever Douglas-fir is found but disease damage is believed to be limited to the Coast Range and is of no concern outside the coastal fog zone (Shaw et al., 2011). However, knowledge remains limited on the history and spati...

  13. Residual densities affect growth of overstory trees and planted Douglas-fir, western hemlock, and western redcedar: results from the first decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie Chandler Brodie; Dean S. DeBell

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, interest has increased in silvicultural systems and harvest cuts that retain partial overstories, but there are few data available on the growth of the understory trees in such stands. We studied the response of overstory trees and underplanted seedlings, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western hemlock (Tsuga...

  14. CCR’s Douglas Lowy and John Schiller receive the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas Lowy, M.D., and John Schiller, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Cellular Oncology have received the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their groundbreaking research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. The Lasker Awards are widely regarded as the country’s most prestigious biomedical research prizes.

  15. Effects of silviculture and genetics on branch/knot attributes of coastal Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir and implications for wood quality--a synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini C. Lowell; Douglas A. Maguire; David G. Briggs; Eric C. Turnblom; Keith J.S. Jayawickrama; Jed. Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Douglas-fir is the most commercially important timber species in the US Pacific Northwest due to its ecological prevalence and its superior wood attributes, especially strength and stiffness properties that make it highly prized for structural applications. Its economic significance has led to extensive establishment and management of plantations over the last few...

  16. Relativistic effects on linear and nonlinear polarizabilities studied by effective-core potential, Douglas-Kroll, and Dirac-Hartree-Fock response theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Patrick; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Ruud, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    A systematic investigation of a hierarchy of methods for including relativistic effects in the calculation of linear and nonlinear optical properties was carried out. The simple ECP method and the more involved spin-averaged Douglas-Kroll approximation were compared to benchmark results obtained...

  17. SEASONAL PATTERNS OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN DOUGLAS FIR SEEDLINGS DURING THE THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR OF EXPOSURE TO ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the interactive effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on seasonal patterns of photosynthesis in Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings. Seedlings were grown in sunlit chambers controlled to track either ambient (~400 ppm) CO2 or am...

  18. Tree microhabitat structures as indicators of biodiversity in Douglas-fir forests of different stand ages and management histories in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa K. Michel; Susanne. Winter

    2009-01-01

    In this study, microhabitat structures in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests were defined and their frequency and abundance in natural stands and stands of varying active management histories and stand ages was compared. Indicator microhabitat structures for natural forests were determined and the relationship of the abundance of...

  19. Growth and yield of all-aged Douglas-fir -- western hemlock forest stands: a matrix model with stand diversity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingjing Liang; Joseph Buonglorno; Robert A. Monserud

    2005-01-01

    A density-dependent matrix model was developed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) -- western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) forest stands in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The model predicted the number and volume of trees for 4 species groups and 19 diameter classes. The parameters...

  20. The relation between fine root density and proximity of stems in closed Douglas-fir plantations on homogen[e]ous sandy soils: implications for sampling design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsthoorn, A.F.M.; Klap, J.M.; Oude Voshaar, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Studies have been carried out in two fully stocked, fast growing Douglas-fir plantations of the Dutch ACIFORN project in three consecutive years, to obtain information on fine root densities (Olsthoorn 1991). For the present paper, data collected in early summer 1987 were used to study the relation

  1. The importance of amino sugar turnover to C and N cycling in organic horizons of old-growth Douglas-fir forest soils colonized by ectomycorrhizal mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Zeglin; L.A. Kluber; D.D. Myrold

    2012-01-01

    Amino sugar dynamics represent an important but under-investigated component of the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles in old-growth Douglas-fir forest soils. Because fungal biomass is high in these soils, particularly in areas colonized by rhizomorphic ectomycorrhizal fungal mats, organic matter derived from chitinous cell wall material (or the monomeric building...

  2. THE KINETICS OF NH(4)+ AND NO3(-) UPTAKE BY DOUGLAS-FIR FROM SINGLE N-SOLUTIONS AND FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING BOTH NH(4)+ AND NO3(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMMINGAVANWIJK, C; PRINS, HBA

    The kinetics of NH4+ and NO3- uptake in young Douglas fir trees (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) were studied in solutions, containing either one or both N species. Using solutions containing a single N species, the V(max) of NH4+ uptake was higher than that of NO3- uptake. The K(m) of NH4+

  3. Exploring climate niches of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) haplotypes in the western United States: implications for evolutionary history and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas J. Shinneman; Robert E. Means; Kevin M. Potter; Valerie D. Hipkins; Tzen-Yuh Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) occupies montane environments throughout western North America, where it is both an ecologically and economically important tree species. A recent study using mitochondrial DNA analysis demonstrated substantial genetic variation among ponderosa pine populations in the western U.S., identifying 10 haplotypes with unique...

  4. ELEVATED CO2 AND ELEVATED TEMPERATURE HAVE NO EFFECT ON DOUGLAS-FIR FINE-ROOT DYNAMICS IN NITROGEN-POOR SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here, we investigate fine-root production, mortality and standing crop of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 and elevated air temperature. We hypothesized that these treatments would increase fine-root production, but that mortality ...

  5. Monitoring larval populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth and the western spruce budworm on permanent plots: sampling methods and statistical properties of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.R. Mason; H.G. Paul

    1994-01-01

    Procedures for monitoring larval populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth and the western spruce budworm are recommended based on many years experience in sampling these species in eastern Oregon and Washington. It is shown that statistically reliable estimates of larval density can be made for a population by sampling host trees in a series of permanent plots in a...

  6. Soil disturbance and 10-year growth response of coast Douglas-fir on nontilled and tilled skid trails in the Oregon Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald Heninger; William Scott; Alex Dobkowski; Richard Miller; Harry Anderson; Steve Duke

    2002-01-01

    We (i) quantified effects of skidder yarding on soil properties and seedling growth in a portion of western Oregon, (ii) determined if tilling skid trails improved tree growth, and (iii) compared results with those from an earlier investigation in coastal Washington. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings were hand planted at...

  7. The relationship between Swiss needle cast symptom severity and level of Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii colonization in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Temel; G.R. Johnson; J.K. Stone

    2004-01-01

    This study examined 108 15-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii trees to investigate whether trees exhibiting less severe Swiss needle cast (SNC) symptoms were more resistant (had less fungal colonization) or more tolerant (maintained healthy foliage under similar infection levels). Trees were sampled from...

  8. Using sulfite chemistry for robust bioconversion of Douglas-fir forest residue to bioethanol at high titer and lignosulfonate: A pilot-scale evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; M. Subhosh Chandra; Feng Gu; Roland Gleisner; J.Y. Zhu; John Sessions; Gevan Marrs; Johnway Gao; Dwight Anderson

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrated at the pilot-scale (50 kg) use of Douglas-fir forest harvest residue, an underutilized forest biomass, for the production of high titer and high yield bioethanol using sulfite chemistry without solid–liquor separation and detoxification. Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL) was directly applied to the...

  9. The End of Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Jo

    2018-01-01

    Have teachers become too dependent on points? This article explores educators' dependency on their points systems, and the ways that points can distract teachers from really analyzing students' capabilities and achievements. Feldman argues that using a more subjective grading system can help illuminate crucial information about students and what…

  10. Demerit points systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    In 2012, 21 of the 27 EU Member States had some form of demerit points system. In theory, demerit points systems contribute to road safety through three mechanisms: 1) prevention of unsafe behaviour through the risk of receiving penalty points, 2) selection and suspension of the most frequent

  11. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  12. Columbia River ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector points and lines representing human-use resource data for Columbia River. In the data set, vector points represent aquaculture sites,...

  13. AECL's participation in the commissioning of Point Lepreau generating station unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, S.; Singh, K.; Yerramilli, S.

    1983-05-01

    Support from Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) to Point Lepreau during the commissioning program has been in the form of: seconded staff for commissioning program management, preparation of commissioning procedures, and hands-on commissioning of several systems; analysis of test results; engineering service for problem solving and modifications; design engineering for changes and additions; procurement of urgently-needed parts and materials; technological advice; review of operational limits; interpretation of design manuals and assistance with and preparation of submissions to regulatory authorities; and development of equipment and procedures for inspection and repairs. This, together with AECL's experience in the commissioning of other 600 MWe stations, Douglas Point and Ontario Hydro stations, provides AECL with a wide range of expertise for providing operating station support services for CANDU stations

  14. Site organization and site arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissonnet, B.; Macqueron, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The present paper deals with criteria for the choice of a production unit or power plant site, the organization and development of a site in terms of its particular characteristics and takes into account personnel considerations in site organizations as well as the problem of integrating the architecture into the environment. (RW) [de

  15. Point specificity in acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Emma M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The existence of point specificity in acupuncture is controversial, because many acupuncture studies using this principle to select control points have found that sham acupoints have similar effects to those of verum acupoints. Furthermore, the results of pain-related studies based on visual analogue scales have not supported the concept of point specificity. In contrast, hemodynamic, functional magnetic resonance imaging and neurophysiological studies evaluating the responses to stimulation of multiple points on the body surface have shown that point-specific actions are present. This review article focuses on clinical and laboratory studies supporting the existence of point specificity in acupuncture and also addresses studies that do not support this concept. Further research is needed to elucidate the point-specific actions of acupuncture.

  16. Transcription through the eye of a needle: daily and annual cyclic gene expression variation in Douglas-fir needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronn, Richard; Dolan, Peter C; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Neale, David B; St Clair, J Bradley; Denver, Dee R

    2017-07-24

    Perennial growth in plants is the product of interdependent cycles of daily and annual stimuli that induce cycles of growth and dormancy. In conifers, needles are the key perennial organ that integrates daily and seasonal signals from light, temperature, and water availability. To understand the relationship between seasonal cycles and seasonal gene expression responses in conifers, we examined diurnal and circannual needle mRNA accumulation in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) needles at diurnal and circannual scales. Using mRNA sequencing, we sampled 6.1 × 10 9 reads from 19 trees and constructed a de novo pan-transcriptome reference that includes 173,882 tree-derived transcripts. Using this reference, we mapped RNA-Seq reads from 179 samples that capture daily and annual variation. We identified 12,042 diurnally-cyclic transcripts, 9299 of which showed homology to annotated genes from other plant genomes, including angiosperm core clock genes. Annual analysis revealed 21,225 circannual transcripts, 17,335 of which showed homology to annotated genes from other plant genomes. The timing of maximum gene expression is associated with light intensity at diurnal scales and photoperiod at annual scales, with approximately half of transcripts reaching maximum expression +/- 2 h from sunrise and sunset, and +/- 20 days from winter and summer solstices. Comparisons with published studies from other conifers shows congruent behavior in clock genes with Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria), and a significant preservation of gene expression patterns for 2278 putative orthologs from Douglas-fir during the summer growing season, and 760 putative orthologs from spruce (Picea) during the transition from fall to winter. Our study highlight the extensive diurnal and circannual transcriptome variability demonstrated in conifer needles. At these temporal scales, 29% of expressed transcripts show a significant diurnal cycle, and 58.7% show a significant circannual cycle. Remarkably

  17. Preferred design of transfer points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firstbrook, J

    1983-06-01

    The paper reports the results of a study carried out at MRDE on the performance of transfer points. These sites still require a considerable deployment of manpower. The investigations were divided into 3 main sections: mineral handling; chute design; belt cleaning and spillage conveying. In order to achieve a sufficient level of reliability of a transfer system, it is considered that the coal size should not be greater than 250 mm. Different designs of gravity transfer chute were studied and 3 basic designs emerged as being effective : dump chute, curved site entry, and asymmetric side entry. Selection is dependent on conveyor sizes, speeds, and mineral throughput. Individual belt cleaners are not sufficient to clean belts carrying typical run-of-mine material: two cleaners followed by a set of squeeze rollers are recommended. Several designs of spillage conveyor were investigated; at the present time the electro/hydraulic type appears to be the most satisfactory.

  18. Site operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, W.B.; Ebenhack, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter is a discussion of the management and operations practices used at the Barnwell Waste Management Facility in Barnwell, SC. The following topics are discussed: (1) Waste receiving and inspection, including manifest and certificates of compliance, radiological surveys, disposition of nonconforming items, and decontamination and disposition of secondary waste streams; (2) Waste disposal, including Title 10 CFR 61 requirements, disposal area evaluations, shipment offloading, container emplacement, and radiation protection; (3) Trench closure, including trench backfilling, trench capping, and permanent markers; (4) Site maintenance and stabilization, including trench maintenance, surface water management, and site closure activities; (5) Site monitoring programs, including operational monitoring, and environmental monitoring program; (6) Personnel training and qualifications, including basic training program, safety training program, special skills training, and physical qualifications; (7) Records management, including waste records, personnel training records, personnel dosimetry records, site monitoring records, trench qualification and construction records, and site drawings and stabilization records; (8) Site security; (9) Emergency response plans; and (10) Quality assurance

  19. Interesting Interest Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2012-01-01

    on spatial invariance of interest points under changing acquisition parameters by measuring the spatial recall rate. The scope of this paper is to investigate the performance of a number of existing well-established interest point detection methods. Automatic performance evaluation of interest points is hard......Not all interest points are equally interesting. The most valuable interest points lead to optimal performance of the computer vision method in which they are employed. But a measure of this kind will be dependent on the chosen vision application. We propose a more general performance measure based...... position. The LED illumination provides the option for artificially relighting the scene from a range of light directions. This data set has given us the ability to systematically evaluate the performance of a number of interest point detectors. The highlights of the conclusions are that the fixed scale...

  20. 'Life?': modernism and liminality in Douglas Livingstone’s A littoral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terblanche

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to find his place within nature in South Africa and in a global modern context, Douglas Livingstone returns strongly to modernist poetry in his 1991 volume A littoral zone. In contrast to his predecessors like Wallace Stevens in “The glass of water” and T.S. Eliot in The waste land, this volume at critical moments gets stuck in a liminal stage. Images and poems, and eventually the volume as a whole, despite the highlights they present, say that it no longer seems so possible to end up also within the postliminal stage, so as to complete a rite of passage. Yet modernist poems such as Stevens’s “The glass of water” have the ability to end up in postliminal affirmation through and beyond the liminal stage of the overall process. Here light becomes a thirsty lion that comes down to drink from the glass, with a resultant transcendence of the dualistic between-ness that characterises the liminal stage in the modernist poetic mode, while this further results in the incorporation of a deeper and refreshing, dynamic unity. Even more remarkable is that this poetic rite is not of a closing nature, but open, especially in the sense that it affirms all that is possible and greater than the individual ego or subject, this, while getting stuck within a liminal stage just short of the postliminal stage can be in the nature of closure, as Livingstone shows, for example, when he says in “Low tide at Station 20” that humanity is trapped in its inability to see the original power of unity with and within nature in order to live within it; and while humanity remains an ugly outgrowth on the gigantic spine of evolution. In provisional conclusion this article finds that it will be better to view Victor Turner’s 1979 celebration of what he terms the “liminoid” in the place of a “true liminality” critically. Although it is impossible to return to a collective catharsis in watching a play, one cannot feel too comfortable about

  1. Gene activity test determines cold tolerance in Douglas-fir seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter A. Balk; Diane L. Haase; Monique F. van Wordragen

    2008-01-01

    Forest tree nurseries rely on a tight scheduling of operations to be able to deliver vigorous seedlings to the planting site. Cooler or freezer storage is often used to maintain planting stock in an inactive condition and to ensure a plant supply for geographically diverse planting sites, which is a requirement for large-scale or internationally operating nurseries....

  2. First report of Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Lecanodiaspididae and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Marsaro Júnior

    Full Text Available Abstract Lecanodiaspis dendrobii Douglas, 1892 (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Lecanodiaspididae and the associated parasitoid Cephaleta sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae are reported for the first time in Brazil. Specimens of this scale insect were collected on branches and stems of Acacia mangium Willd., Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit (Fabaceae, Morus nigra L. (Moraceae, Citrus reticulata Blanco (Rutaceae, Tectona grandis L. f. (Verbenaceae, Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae, Annona squamosa L. and Xylopia aromatica (Lam. Mart. (Annonaceae, in three municipalities of the Roraima state. All plants here mentioned are recorded for the first time as a host for L. dendrobii. Morphological characters of L. dendrobii and symptoms presented by the host plants infested by this pest are included in this work.

  3. Douglas Hanahan: The daunting complexity of cancer: understanding the battlefield is a step towards winning the war

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The Inaugural Grace-CERN Lecture The daunting complexity of cancer: understanding the battlefield is a step towards winning the war  Douglas Hanahan, Ph.D. Director, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC)  Professor of Molecular Oncology, School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) Vice Director, Swiss Cancer Center Lausanne Synopsis (version francaise ci-dessous) Cancer is a disease with hundreds of variations, both in affected organs and in responses to different therapies.  Modern human cancer research is producing an avalanche of data about the distinctive genetic aberrations of its specific types, further accentuating the diversity and vast complexity of the disease. There is hope that elucidating its mechanisms will lead to more informed and more effective therapeutic strategies.  Understanding the enemy is paramount, and yet tumors arising in different organs can be so different as to de...

  4. Economic impact due to Cimanuk river flood disaster in Garut district using Cobb-Douglas analysis with least square method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestari, T. A. S.; Supian, S.; Purwani, S.

    2018-03-01

    Cimanuk River, Garut District, West Java which have upper course in Papandayan Mountain have an important purpose in dialy living of Garut people as a water source. But in 2016 flash flood in this river was hitted and there was 26 peple dead and 23 peole gone. Flash flood which hitted last year make the settlement almost align with the ground, soaking school and hospital. BPLHD Jawa Barat saw this condition as a disaster which coused by distroyed upper course of Cimanuk River. Flash Flood which happened on the 2016 had ever made economic sector paralized. Least square method selected to analyze economic condition in residents affected post disaster, after the mathematical equations was determined by Cobb Douglas Method. By searching proportion value of the damage, and the result expected became a view to the stakeholder to know which sector that become a worse and be able to make a priority in development

  5. Heroic Measures for an American Hero: Attempting to Save the Life of General Douglas MacArthur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Theodore N

    2017-12-01

    General Douglas MacArthur was a towering public figure on an international stage for the first half of the 20th century. He was healthy throughout his life but developed a series of medical problems when he entered his 80s. This article reviews the General's medical care during two separate life-threatening medical crises that required surgical intervention. The first episode occurred in 1960 when MacArthur presented with renal failure due to an obstructed prostate. Four years later after his 84th birthday, MacArthur developed bile duct obstruction from common duct stones. He underwent an uncomplicated cholecystectomy and common duct exploration but developed variceal bleeding requiring an emergent splenorenal shunt. His terminal event was precipitated by strangulated bowel in long-ignored very large inguinal hernias. MacArthur died, despite state-of-the-art surgical intervention, due to renal failure and hepatic coma.

  6. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program: McDonnell-Douglas Helicopter Company achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mostafa; Weisenburger, Richard; Hashemi-Kia, Mostafa

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of some of the work performed by McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company under NASA Langley-sponsored rotorcraft structural dynamics program known as DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS). A set of guidelines which is applicable to dynamic modeling, analysis, testing, and correlation of both helicopter airframes and a large variety of structural finite element models is presented. Utilization of these guidelines and the key features of their applications to vibration modeling of helicopter airframes are discussed. Correlation studies with the test data, together with the development and applications of a set of efficient finite element model checkout procedures, are demonstrated on a large helicopter airframe finite element model. Finally, the lessons learned and the benefits resulting from this program are summarized.

  7. Ethanol synthesis and aerobic respiration in the laboratory by leader segments of Douglas-fir seedlings from winter and spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Gladwin; Kelsey, Rick G

    2004-05-01

    Stem segments from terminal leaders of Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, seedlings were sampled in mid-December when cambial cells were dormant. The residual, debudded leaders were resampled again in early May when the cambium was metabolically active. May stems had higher constitutive ethanol concentrations than December stems. This was not the result of cambial hypoxia generated by rapid spring respiration rates, because when aerobic respiration was stimulated by incubating the stems in air at 30 degrees C ethanol production was induced in December, but not in May. Rapid respiration rates at 30 degrees C may have depleted O(2) supplies and induced ethanol production in December stems because dormant, thick-walled cambial cells may be less permeable to CO(2) and O(2), compared with metabolically active, thin-walled cambial cells in May. December stem segments incubated in a N(2) atmosphere at 30 degrees C synthesized 1.8 times more ethanol than segments from May, most likely because spring growth had reduced the soluble sugars available for fermentation. CO(2) efflux from May stems (after 5.5 h of incubation at 30 degrees C) was equal to December stems per unit volume, but greater than December stems per unit surface area. N(2)-induced ethanol concentrations were positively related with CO(2) efflux per unit volume, indicating that rapidly respiring leaders can maintain rapid fermentation rates, provided soluble sugars are readily available. N(2)-induced ethanol and CO(2) efflux per unit volume declined with increasing leader diameter in both seasons, whereas there were no relationships between CO(2) efflux per unit surface area and diameter. Cambium physiology and phenology influence the induction of fermentation and concentrations of ethanol produced in terminal leaders of Douglas-fir, and probably other conifers as well. This needs to be considered when comparing fermentation among species, or comparing individuals from different seasons, or

  8. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  9. Indexing Moving Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan; Erickson, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    We propose three indexing schemes for storing a set S of N points in the plane, each moving along a linear trajectory, so that any query of the following form can be answered quickly: Given a rectangle R and a real value t, report all K points of S that lie inside R at time t. We first present an...

  10. Generalized zero point anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Jose Alexandre; Maia Junior, Adolfo

    1994-01-01

    It is defined Zero point Anomaly (ZPA) as the difference between the Effective Potential (EP) and the Zero point Energy (ZPE). It is shown, for a massive and interacting scalar field that, in very general conditions, the renormalized ZPA vanishes and then the renormalized EP and ZPE coincide. (author). 3 refs

  11. Poisson branching point processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, K.; Teich, M.C.; Saleh, B.E.A.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of a special branching point process. The initial process is assumed to be a homogeneous Poisson point process (HPP). The initiating events at each branching stage are carried forward to the following stage. In addition, each initiating event independently contributes a nonstationary Poisson point process (whose rate is a specified function) located at that point. The additional contributions from all points of a given stage constitute a doubly stochastic Poisson point process (DSPP) whose rate is a filtered version of the initiating point process at that stage. The process studied is a generalization of a Poisson branching process in which random time delays are permitted in the generation of events. Particular attention is given to the limit in which the number of branching stages is infinite while the average number of added events per event of the previous stage is infinitesimal. In the special case when the branching is instantaneous this limit of continuous branching corresponds to the well-known Yule--Furry process with an initial Poisson population. The Poisson branching point process provides a useful description for many problems in various scientific disciplines, such as the behavior of electron multipliers, neutron chain reactions, and cosmic ray showers

  12. The Lagrangian Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, J. Oliver

    2017-01-01

    There are five unique points in a star/planet system where a satellite can be placed whose orbital period is equal to that of the planet. Simple methods for calculating the positions of these points, or at least justifying their existence, are developed.

  13. Publication point indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Anita; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    ; the Cumulated Publication Point Indicator (CPPI), which graphically illustrates the cumulated gain of obtained vs. ideal points, both seen as vectors; and the normalized Cumulated Publication Point Index (nCPPI) that represents the cumulated gain of publication success as index values, either graphically......The paper presents comparative analyses of two publication point systems, The Norwegian and the in-house system from the interdisciplinary Danish Institute of International Studies (DIIS), used as case in the study for publications published 2006, and compares central citation-based indicators...... with novel publication point indicators (PPIs) that are formalized and exemplified. Two diachronic citation windows are applied: 2006-07 and 2006-08. Web of Science (WoS) as well as Google Scholar (GS) are applied to observe the cite delay and citedness for the different document types published by DIIS...

  14. Multispectral Image Feature Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhian Aguilera

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel feature point descriptor for the multispectral image case: Far-Infrared and Visible Spectrum images. It allows matching interest points on images of the same scene but acquired in different spectral bands. Initially, points of interest are detected on both images through a SIFT-like based scale space representation. Then, these points are characterized using an Edge Oriented Histogram (EOH descriptor. Finally, points of interest from multispectral images are matched by finding nearest couples using the information from the descriptor. The provided experimental results and comparisons with similar methods show both the validity of the proposed approach as well as the improvements it offers with respect to the current state-of-the-art.

  15. Economically Significant Sites - OSPR [ds356

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This point data set shows locations of Economically Significant Sites along the California coast from Del Norte to San Diego counties. Data for locating these points...

  16. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  17. Do acupuncture points exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xiaohui; Zhang Xinyi; Liu Chenglin; Dang, Ruishan; Huang Yuying; He Wei; Ding Guanghong

    2009-01-01

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian. (note)

  18. Do acupuncture points exist?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Xiaohui; Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (State Key Laboratory), and Synchrotron Radiation Research Center of Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liu Chenglin [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Dang, Ruishan [Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huang Yuying; He Wei [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ding Guanghong [Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, Pudong, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2009-05-07

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian. (note)

  19. Superfund Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This layer represents active Superfund Sites published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These data were extracted from the Superfund Enterprise...

  20. Site development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, J.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a general view over all necessary considerations to develop the site after it has been chosen and before starting with the construction of a nuclear power plant. (orig./RW) [de