WorldWideScience

Sample records for double-stranded rna-binding protein

  1. Conserved asymmetry underpins homodimerization of Dicer-associated double-stranded RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyam, Alex; Coupland, Claire E; Dégut, Clément; Haley, Ruth A; Baxter, Nicola J; Jakob, Leonhard; Aguiar, Pedro M; Meister, Gunter; Williamson, Michael P; Lagos, Dimitris; Plevin, Michael J

    2017-12-01

    Double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) are commonly found in modular proteins that interact with RNA. Two varieties of dsRBD exist: canonical Type A dsRBDs interact with dsRNA, while non-canonical Type B dsRBDs lack RNA-binding residues and instead interact with other proteins. In higher eukaryotes, the microRNA biogenesis enzyme Dicer forms a 1:1 association with a dsRNA-binding protein (dsRBP). Human Dicer associates with HIV TAR RNA-binding protein (TRBP) or protein activator of PKR (PACT), while Drosophila Dicer-1 associates with Loquacious (Loqs). In each case, the interaction involves a region of the protein that contains a Type B dsRBD. All three dsRBPs are reported to homodimerize, with the Dicer-binding region implicated in self-association. We report that these dsRBD homodimers display structural asymmetry and that this unusual self-association mechanism is conserved from flies to humans. We show that the core dsRBD is sufficient for homodimerization and that mutation of a conserved leucine residue abolishes self-association. We attribute differences in the self-association properties of Loqs, TRBP and PACT to divergence of the composition of the homodimerization interface. Modifications that make TRBP more like PACT enhance self-association. These data are examined in the context of miRNA biogenesis and the protein/protein interaction properties of Type B dsRBDs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L. [Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fox, Gavin C. [Spanish CRG Beamline BM16, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Raaij, Mark J. van, E-mail: vanraaij@usc.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Unidad de Difracción de Rayos X, Laboratorio Integral de Dinámica y Estructura de Biomoléculas José R. Carracido, Edificio CACTUS, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  3. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-01-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals

  4. Viral double-strand RNA-binding proteins can enhance innate immune signaling by toll-like Receptor 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lai

    Full Text Available Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3 detects double-stranded (ds RNAs to activate innate immune responses. While poly(I:C is an excellent agonist for TLR3 in several cell lines and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, viral dsRNAs tend to be poor agonists, leading to the hypothesis that additional factor(s are likely required to allow TLR3 to respond to viral dsRNAs. TLR3 signaling was examined in a lung epithelial cell line by quantifying cytokine production and in human embryonic kidney cells by quantifying luciferase reporter levels. Recombinant 1b hepatitis C virus polymerase was found to enhance TLR3 signaling in the lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells when added to the media along with either poly(I:C or viral dsRNAs. The polymerase from the genotype 2a JFH-1 HCV was a poor enhancer of TLR3 signaling until it was mutated to favor a conformation that could bind better to a partially duplexed RNA. The 1b polymerase also co-localizes with TLR3 in endosomes. RNA-binding capsid proteins (CPs from two positive-strand RNA viruses and the hepadenavirus hepatitis B virus (HBV were also potent enhancers of TLR3 signaling by poly(I:C or viral dsRNAs. A truncated version of the HBV CP that lacked an arginine-rich RNA-binding domain was unable to enhance TLR3 signaling. These results demonstrate that several viral RNA-binding proteins can enhance the dsRNA-dependent innate immune response initiated by TLR3.

  5. Antiviral activity of double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT against influenza A virus mediated via suppression of viral RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ping; Yuen, Chun-Kit; Cheung, Pak-Hin Hinson; Fung, Sin-Yee; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2018-03-07

    PACT is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein that has been implicated in host-influenza A virus (IAV) interaction. PACT facilitates the action of RIG-I in the activation of the type I IFN response, which is suppressed by the viral nonstructural protein NS1. PACT is also known to interact with the IAV RNA polymerase subunit PA. Exactly how PACT exerts its antiviral activity during IAV infection remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrated the interplay between PACT and IAV polymerase. Induction of IFN-β by the IAV RNP complex was most robust when both RIG-I and PACT were expressed. PACT-dependent activation of IFN-β production was suppressed by the IAV polymerase subunits, polymerase acidic protein, polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), and PB2. PACT associated with PA, PB1, and PB2. Compromising PACT in IAV-infected A549 cells resulted in the augmentation of viral RNA (vRNA) transcription and replication and IFN-β production. Furthermore, vRNA replication was boosted by knockdown of PACT in both A549 cells and IFN-deficient Vero cells. Thus, the antiviral activity of PACT is mediated primarily via its interaction with and inhibition of IAV polymerase. Taken together, our findings reveal a new facet of the host-IAV interaction in which the interplay between PACT and IAV polymerase affects the outcome of viral infection and antiviral response.-Chan, C.-P., Yuen, C.-K., Cheung, P.-H. H., Fung, S.-Y., Lui, P.-Y., Chen, H., Kok, K.-H., Jin, D.-Y. Antiviral activity of double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT against influenza A virus mediated via suppression of viral RNA polymerase.

  6. Inhibition of antiviral innate immunity by birnavirus VP3 protein via blockage of viral double-stranded RNA binding to the host cytoplasmic RNA detector MDA5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chengjin; Jia, Lu; Sun, Yanting; Hu, Boli; Wang, Lun; Lu, Xingmeng; Zhou, Jiyong

    2014-10-01

    Chicken MDA5 (chMDA5), the sole known pattern recognition receptor for cytoplasmic viral RNA in chickens, initiates type I interferon (IFN) production. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) evades host innate immunity, but the mechanism is unclear. We report here that IBDV inhibited antiviral innate immunity via the chMDA5-dependent signaling pathway. IBDV infection did not induce efficient type I interferon (IFN) production but antagonized the antiviral activity of beta interferon (IFN-β) in DF-1 cells pretreated with IFN-α/β. Dual-luciferase assays and inducible expression systems demonstrated that IBDV protein VP3 significantly inhibited IFN-β expression stimulated by naked IBDV genomic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The VP3 protein competed strongly with chMDA5 to bind IBDV genomic dsRNA in vitro and in vivo, and VP3 from other birnaviruses also bound dsRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that deletion of the VP3 dsRNA binding domain restored IFN-β expression. Our data demonstrate that VP3 inhibits antiviral innate immunity by blocking binding of viral genomic dsRNA to MDA5. MDA5, a known pattern recognition receptor and cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor, plays a critical role in host antiviral innate immunity. Many pathogens escape or inhibit the host antiviral immune response, but the mechanisms involved are unclear for most pathogens. We report here that birnaviruses inhibit host antiviral innate immunity via the MDA5-dependent signaling pathway. The antiviral innate immune system involving IFN-β did not function effectively during birnavirus infection, and the viral protein VP3 significantly inhibited IFN-β expression stimulated by naked viral genomic dsRNA. We also show that VP3 blocks MDA5 binding to viral genomic dsRNA in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that birnavirus-encoded viral protein VP3 is an inhibitor of the antiviral innate immune response and inhibits the antiviral innate immune response via the MDA5-dependent signaling pathway

  7. Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus 4a protein is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein that suppresses PACT-induced activation of RIG-I and MDA5 in the innate antiviral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Kam-Leung; Yeung, Man Lung; Kok, Kin-Hang; Yuen, Kit-San; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Tse, Herman; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging pathogen that causes severe disease in human. MERS-CoV is closely related to bat coronaviruses HKU4 and HKU5. Evasion of the innate antiviral response might contribute significantly to MERS-CoV pathogenesis, but the mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized MERS-CoV 4a protein as a novel immunosuppressive factor that antagonizes type I interferon production. MERS-CoV 4a protein contains a double-stranded RNA-binding domain capable of interacting with poly(I · C). Expression of MERS-CoV 4a protein suppressed the interferon production induced by poly(I · C) or Sendai virus. RNA binding of MERS-CoV 4a protein was required for IFN antagonism, a property shared by 4a protein of bat coronavirus HKU5 but not by the counterpart in bat coronavirus HKU4. MERS-CoV 4a protein interacted with PACT in an RNA-dependent manner but not with RIG-I or MDA5. It inhibited PACT-induced activation of RIG-I and MDA5 but did not affect the activity of downstream effectors such as RIG-I, MDA5, MAVS, TBK1, and IRF3. Taken together, our findings suggest a new mechanism through which MERS-CoV employs a viral double-stranded RNA-binding protein to circumvent the innate antiviral response by perturbing the function of cellular double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT. PACT targeting might be a common strategy used by different viruses, including Ebola virus and herpes simplex virus 1, to counteract innate immunity. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging and highly lethal human pathogen. Why MERS-CoV causes severe disease in human is unclear, and one possibility is that MERS-CoV is particularly efficient in counteracting host immunity, including the sensing of virus invasion. It will therefore be critical to clarify how MERS-CoV cripples the host proteins that sense viruses and to compare MERS-CoV with its ancestral viruses in bats in the counteraction of virus sensing

  8. Non-structural protein 1 of influenza viruses inhibits rapid mRNA degradation mediated by double-stranded RNA-binding protein, staufen1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hana; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2013-07-11

    Although non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza viruses is not essential for virulence, this protein is involved in host-virus interactions, viral replication, and translation. In particular, NS1 is known to interact with the host protein, staufen1 (Stau1). This interaction is important for efficient viral replication. However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which NS1 influences the viral life cycle remains obscure. Here, we show using immunoprecipitation and artificial tethering that the N-terminus of NS1, NS1(1-73), interacts with Stau1, blocks the Stau1-Upf1 interaction, and consequently inhibits the efficiency of Stau1-mediated mRNA decay (SMD), but not nonsense-mediatedmRNA decay (NMD). The regulation of SMD efficiency by NS1 may contribute to building a more favorable cellular environment for viral replication. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  10. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  11. Viral Proteins That Bind Double-Stranded RNA: Countermeasures Against Host Antiviral Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Several animal viruses encode proteins that bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to counteract host dsRNA-dependent antiviral responses. This article discusses the structure and function of the dsRNA-binding proteins of influenza A virus and Ebola viruses (EBOVs).

  12. Human Ku70 protein binds hairpin RNA and double stranded DNA through two different sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisenko, Andrey N; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina S; Zatsepin, Timofey S; Gottikh, Marina B

    2017-01-01

    Human protein Ku usually functions in the cell as a complex of two subunits, Ku70 and Ku80. The Ku heterodimer plays a key role in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway by specifically recognizing the DNA ends at the site of the lesion. The binding of the Ku heterodimer to DNA has been well-studied, and its interactions with RNA have been also described. However, Ku70 subunit is known to have independent DNA binding capability, which is less characterized. RNA binding properties of Ku70 have not been yet specially studied. We have prepared recombinant full-length Ku70 and a set of its truncated mutants in E. coli, and studied their interactions with nucleic acids of various structures: linear single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA, as well as closed circular DNA and hairpin RNA. Ku70 has demonstrated a high affinity binding to double stranded DNA and hairpin RNA with a certain structure only. Interestingly, in contrast to the Ku heterodimer, Ku70 is found to interact with closed circular DNA. We also show for the first time that Ku70 employs two different sites for DNA and RNA binding. The double-stranded DNA is recognized by the C-terminal part of Ku70 including SAP domain as it has been earlier demonstrated, whereas hairpin RNA binding is provided by amino acids 251-438. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Mutational analysis of vaccinia virus E3 protein: the biological functions do not correlate with its biochemical capacity to bind double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueck, Kevin J; Hu, YuanShen Sandy; Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie; Cao, Jingxin

    2015-05-01

    Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they suppress the related

  14. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs-consisting of 2-3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)-arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1-β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Activation of repair and checkpoints by double-strand breaks of DNA. Activational cascade of protein phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltovaya, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of double-strand breaks repair and checkpoints include phosphorylations of repair and checkpoint-proteins by protein kinases. Chemical modification of proteins has different consequences including activation, changing of affinity to proteins and localization

  16. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihoko Kai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR, and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, “sensor” proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM’s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs, and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in a poly(ADP-ribose (PAR-dependent manner (unpublished data. DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP ribose polymerase 1 makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as

  17. Translocation of double-stranded DNA through membrane-adapted phi29 motor protein nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, David; Jing, Peng; Geng, Jia; Subramaniam, Varuni; Lee, Tae Jin; Montemagno, Carlo; Guo, Peixuan

    2009-11-01

    Biological pores have been used to study the transport of DNA and other molecules, but most pores have channels that allow only the movement of small molecules and single-stranded DNA and RNA. The bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging motor, which allows double-stranded DNA to enter the virus during maturation and exit during an infection, contains a connector protein with a channel that is between 3.6 and 6 nm wide. Here we show that a modified version of this connector protein, when reconstituted into liposomes and inserted into planar lipid bilayers, allows the translocation of double-stranded DNA. The measured conductance of a single connector channel was 4.8 nS in 1 M KCl. This engineered and membrane-adapted phage connector is expected to have applications in microelectromechanical sensing, microreactors, gene delivery, drug loading and DNA sequencing.

  18. A brave new world of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo; Schwarzl, Thomas; Preiss, Thomas

    2018-01-17

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are typically thought of as proteins that bind RNA through one or multiple globular RNA-binding domains (RBDs) and change the fate or function of the bound RNAs. Several hundred such RBPs have been discovered and investigated over the years. Recent proteome-wide studies have more than doubled the number of proteins implicated in RNA binding and uncovered hundreds of additional RBPs lacking conventional RBDs. In this Review, we discuss these new RBPs and the emerging understanding of their unexpected modes of RNA binding, which can be mediated by intrinsically disordered regions, protein-protein interaction interfaces and enzymatic cores, among others. We also discuss the RNA targets and molecular and cellular functions of the new RBPs, as well as the possibility that some RBPs may be regulated by RNA rather than regulate RNA.

  19. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Anji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  20. Double-stranded RNA-induced activation of activating protein-1 promoter is differentially regulated by the non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Muhammad; Zohari, Siamak; Belák, Sándor; Berg, Mikael

    2012-02-01

    Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses is a multifunctional protein that antagonizes the host immune response by interfering with several host signaling pathways. Based on putative amino acid sequences, NS1 proteins are categorized into two gene pools, allele A and allele B. Here we identified that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are able to inhibit double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced activating protein-1 (AP-1) promoter in cultured cell lines (human A549 and mink lung cells). Allele B NS1 proteins from corresponding subtypes of influenza A viruses are weak in this inhibition, despite significant levels of expression of each NS1 protein in human A549 cells. Furthermore, the capability to inhibit AP-1 promoter was mapped in the effector domain, since RNA binding domain alone lost its ability to inhibit this promoter activation. Chimeric forms of NS1 protein, composed of either RNA binding domain of allele A or B and effector domain of allele A or B, showed comparable inhibition to that of their wild-type NS1 proteins, or to the effector domain of corresponding NS1 proteins. Both alleles A and B NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 were expressed to significant levels, and were localized predominantly in the nucleus of human A549 cells. These results underscore the importance of the effector domain in inhibiting AP-1 promoter activation, and the biological function of the effector domain in stabilizing the RNA binding domain. Further, we revealed the versatile nature of NS1 in inhibiting the AP-1 transcription factor, in a manner dependent on allele type. Comprehensive studies, focusing on the molecular mechanisms behind this differential inhibition, may facilitate exploration of the zoonotic and pathogenic potential of influenza A viruses.

  1. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  3. RNA-binding domain in the nucleocapsid protein of gill-associated nidovirus of penaeid shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumporn Soowannayan

    Full Text Available Gill-associated virus (GAV infects Penaeus monodon shrimp and is the type species okavirus in the Roniviridae, the only invertebrate nidoviruses known currently. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs using His(6-tagged full-length and truncated proteins were employed to examine the nucleic acid binding properties of the GAV nucleocapsid (N protein in vitro. The EMSAs showed full-length N protein to bind to all synthetic single-stranded (ssRNAs tested independent of their sequence. The ssRNAs included (+ and (- sense regions of the GAV genome as well as a (+ sense region of the M RNA segment of Mourilyan virus, a crustacean bunya-like virus. GAV N protein also bound to double-stranded (dsRNAs prepared to GAV ORF1b gene regions and to bacteriophage M13 genomic ssDNA. EMSAs using the five N protein constructs with variable-length N-terminal and/or C-terminal truncations localized the RNA binding domain to a 50 amino acid (aa N-terminal sequence spanning Met(11 to Arg(60. Similarly to other RNA binding proteins, the first 16 aa portion of this sequence was proline/arginine rich. To examine this domain in more detail, the 18 aa peptide (M(11PVRRPLPPQPPRNARLI(29 encompassing this sequence was synthesized and found to bind nucleic acids similarly to the full-length N protein in EMSAs. The data indicate a fundamental role for the GAV N protein proline/arginine-rich domain in nucleating genomic ssRNA to form nucleocapsids. Moreover, as the synthetic peptide formed higher-order complexes in the presence of RNA, the domain might also play some role in protein/protein interactions stabilizing the helical structure of GAV nucleocapsids.

  4. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  5. RNA Binding Proteins Posttranscriptionally Regulate Genes Involved In Oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    lysed in triple- detergent RIPA buffer with protease inhibitor cocktail (Roche, Pleasanton, CA). For nuclear and cytoplasmic fractionation, the NE-PER kit...Posttranscriptional regulation of IL-13 in T cells: role of the RNA-binding protein HuR. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 2008, 121(4):853-859...and western blot analysis. Western analysis was performed as described previously.12 For detection of VEGFα and TSP1 from tumors, triple- detergent

  6. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  7. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, B.A.; Eberwine, J.; Spencer, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington`s disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to >37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and LJV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase regulates the motility of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Xu

    Full Text Available Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR is an interferon-induced protein kinase that plays a central role in the anti-viral process. Due to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative action, there is an increased interest in PKR modulation as an anti-tumor strategy. PKR is overexpressed in breast cancer cells; however, the role of PKR in breast cancer cells is unclear. The expression/activity of PKR appears inversely related to the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells. The current study investigated the role of PKR in the motility/migration of breast cancer cells. The activation of PKR by a synthesized dsRNA (PIC significantly decreased the motility of several breast cancer cell lines (BT474, MDA-MB231 and SKBR3. PIC inhibited cell migration and blocked cell membrane ruffling without affecting cell viability. PIC also induced the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and impaired the formation of lamellipodia. These effects of PIC were reversed by the pretreatment of a selective PKR inhibitor. PIC also activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and its downstream MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2. PIC-induced activation of p38 MAPK and MK2 was attenuated by the PKR inhibitor and the PKR siRNA, but a selective p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580 or other MAPK inhibitors did not affect PKR activity, indicating that PKR is upstream of p38 MAPK/MK2. Cofilin is an actin severing protein and regulates membrane ruffling, lamellipodia formation and cell migration. PIC inhibited cofilin activity by enhancing its phosphorylation at Ser3. PIC activated LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1, an upstream kinase of cofilin in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. We concluded that the activation of PKR suppressed cell motility by regulating the p38 MAPK/MK2/LIMK/cofilin pathway.

  9. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemi...

  10. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase mediates viral-induced encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuner, Donalyn; Gromeier, Matthias; Davies, Monique V.; Dorner, Andrew J.; Song Benbo; Patel, Rupali V.; Wimmer, Eckard J.; McLendon, Roger E.; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2003-01-01

    The double-stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) plays an important role in control of viral infections and cell growth. We have studied the role of PKR in viral infection in mice that are defective in the PKR signaling pathway. Transgenic mice were derived that constitutively express a trans-dominant-negative kinase-defective mutant PKR under control of the β-actin promoter. The trans-dominant-negative PKR mutant expressing transgenic mice do not have a detectable phenotype, similar to observations with PKR knock-out mice. The requirement for PKR in viral pathogenesis was studied by intracerebral infection of mice with a mouse-adapted poliovirus. Histopathological analysis revealed diffuse encephalomyelitis with severe inflammatory lesions throughout the central nervous system (CNS) in infected wild-type mice. In contrast, histopathological evaluation of virus-injected trans-dominant-negative PKR transgenic mice as well as PKR knock-out mice yielded no signs of tissue damage associated with inflammatory host responses. However, the virus did replicate in both models of PKR-deficient mice at a level equal to that observed in wild-type infected mice. Although the results indicate a clear difference in susceptibility to poliovirus-induced encephalitis, this difference manifests clinically as a slight delay in fatal neuropathy in trans-dominant-negative PKR transgenic and PKR knock-out animals. Our observations support the finding that viral-induced PKR activation may play a significant role in pathogenesis by mediating the host response to viral CNS infection. They support PKR to be an effective target to control tissue damage due to deleterious host responses to viral infection

  12. Rbfox2 controls autoregulation in RNA-binding protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangi, Mohini; Boutz, Paul L; Paul, Prakriti; Sharp, Phillip A

    2014-03-15

    The tight regulation of splicing networks is critical for organismal development. To maintain robust splicing patterns, many splicing factors autoregulate their expression through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD). However, as negative autoregulation results in a self-limiting window of splicing factor expression, it is unknown how variations in steady-state protein levels can arise in different physiological contexts. Here, we demonstrate that Rbfox2 cross-regulates AS-NMD events within RNA-binding proteins to alter their expression. Using individual nucleotide-resolution cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (iCLIP) and mRNA sequencing, we identified >200 AS-NMD splicing events that are bound by Rbfox2 in mouse embryonic stem cells. These "silent" events are characterized by minimal apparent splicing changes but appreciable changes in gene expression upon Rbfox2 knockdown due to degradation of the NMD-inducing isoform. Nearly 70 of these AS-NMD events fall within genes encoding RNA-binding proteins, many of which are autoregulated. As with the coding splicing events that we found to be regulated by Rbfox2, silent splicing events are evolutionarily conserved and frequently contain the Rbfox2 consensus UGCAUG. Our findings uncover an unexpectedly broad and multilayer regulatory network controlled by Rbfox2 and offer an explanation for how autoregulatory splicing networks are tuned.

  13. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clustering of double strand break-containing chromosome domains is not inhibited by inactivation of major repair proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Stap, C.; Van Oven, C.; Hoebe, R.; Aten, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    For efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cells rely on a process that involves the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, which may help to protect non-repaired DNA ends from separating until they can be rejoined by DNA repair proteins. It has been observed that as a secondary effect, this process can lead to unintended clustering of multiple, initially separate, DSB-containing chromosome domains. This work demonstrates that neither inactivation of the major repair proteins XRCC3 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) nor inhibition of DNA-PK by vanillin influences the aggregation of DSB-containing chromosome domains. (authors)

  15. RNA-Binding Domain Proteins in Kinetoplastids: a Comparative Analysis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaudenzi, Javier; Frasch, Alberto C.; Clayton, Christine

    2005-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are important in many aspects of RNA processing, function, and destruction. One class of such proteins contains the RNA recognition motif (RRM), which consists of about 90 amino acid residues, including the canonical RNP1 octapeptide: (K/R)G(F/Y)(G/A)FVX(F/Y). We used a variety of homology searches to classify all of the RRM proteins of the three kinetoplastids Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania major. All three organisms have similar sets of RRM-containing protein orthologues, suggesting common posttranscriptional processing and regulatory pathways. Of the 75 RRM proteins identified in T. brucei, only 13 had clear homologues in other eukaryotes, although 8 more could be given putative functional assignments. A comparison with the 18 RRM proteins of the obligate intracellular parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi revealed just 3 RRM proteins which appear to be conserved at the primary sequence level throughout eukaryotic evolution: poly(A) binding protein, the rRNA-processing protein MRD1, and the nuclear cap binding protein. PMID:16339728

  16. RNA- binding protein Stau2 is important for spindle integrity and meiosis progression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Du, Juan; Chen, Dandan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Weng, Jing; Liang, Yuanjing; Ma, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Staufen2 (Stau2) is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein involved in cell fate decision by regulating mRNA transport, mRNA stability, translation, and ribonucleoprotein assembly. Little is known about Stau2 expression and function in mammalian oocytes during meiosis. Herein we report the sub-cellular distribution and function of Stau2 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Western blot analysis revealed high and stable expression of Stau2 in oocytes from germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII). Immunofluorescence showed that Stau2 was evenly distributed in oocytes at GV stage, and assembled as filaments after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), particularly, colocalized with spindle at MI and MII. Stau2 was disassembled when microtubules were disrupted with nocodazole, on the other hand, when MTs were stabilized with taxol, Stau2 was not colocalized with the stabilized microtubules, but aggregated around the chromosomes array, indicating Stau2 assembly and colocalization with microtubules require both microtubule integrity and its normal dynamics. During interphase and mitosis of BHK and MEF cells, Stau2 was not distributed on microtubules, but colocalized with cis-Golgi marker GM130, implying its association with Golgi complex but not the spindle in fully differentiated somatic cells. Specific morpholino oligo-mediated Stau2 knockdown disrupted spindle formation, chromosome alignment and microtubule-kinetochore attachment in oocytes. The majority oocytes were arrested at MI stage, with bright MAD1 at kinetochores, indicating activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Some oocytes were stranded at telophase I (TI), implying suppressed first polar body extrution. Together these data demonstrate that Stau2 is required for spindle formation and timely meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

  17. Modeling of the catalytic core of Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like 4 protein and its complex with double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Sarzyńska, Joanna; Miłostan, Maciej; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Łukasiak, Piotr; Kuliński, Tadeusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Błażewicz, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Plant Dicer-like proteins (DCLs) belong to the Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzyme family. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression and antiviral defense through RNA interference pathways. A model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana encodes four DCL proteins (AtDCL1-4) that produce different classes of small regulatory RNAs. Our studies focus on AtDCL4 that processes double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) into 21 nucleotide trans-acting small interfering RNAs. So far, little is known about the structures of plant DCLs and the complexes they form with dsRNA. In this work, we present models of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 and AtDCL4-dsRNA complex constructed by computational methods. We built a homology model of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 comprising Platform, PAZ, Connector helix and two RNase III domains. To assemble the AtDCL4-dsRNA complex two modeling approaches were used. In the first method, to establish conformations that allow building a consistent model of the complex, we used Normal Mode Analysis for both dsRNA and AtDCL4. The second strategy involved template-based approach for positioning of the PAZ domain and manual arrangement of the Connector helix. Our results suggest that the spatial orientation of the Connector helix, Platform and PAZ relative to the RNase III domains is crucial for measuring dsRNA of defined length. The modeled complexes provide information about interactions that may contribute to the relative orientations of these domains and to dsRNA binding. All these information can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of AtDCL4-mediated dsRNA recognition and binding, to produce small RNA of specific size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Live cell visualization of the interactions between HIV-1 Gag and the cellular RNA-binding protein Staufen1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouland Andrew J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 uses cellular proteins and machinery to ensure transmission to uninfected cells. Although the host proteins involved in the transport of viral components toward the plasma membrane have been investigated, the dynamics of this process remain incompletely described. Previously we showed that the double-stranded (dsRNA-binding protein, Staufen1 is found in the HIV-1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP that contains the HIV-1 genomic RNA (vRNA, Gag and other host RNA-binding proteins in HIV-1-producing cells. Staufen1 interacts with the nucleocapsid domain (NC domain of Gag and regulates Gag multimerization on membranes thereby modulating HIV-1 assembly. The formation of the HIV-1 RNP is dynamic and likely central to the fate of the vRNA during the late phase of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Results Detailed molecular imaging of both the intracellular trafficking of virus components and of virus-host protein complexes is critical to enhance our understanding of factors that contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis. In this work, we visualized the interactions between Gag and host proteins using bimolecular and trimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC and TriFC analyses. These methods allow for the direct visualization of the localization of protein-protein and protein-protein-RNA interactions in live cells. We identified where the virus-host interactions between Gag and Staufen1 and Gag and IMP1 (also known as VICKZ1, IGF2BP1 and ZBP1 occur in cells. These virus-host interactions were not only detected in the cytoplasm, but were also found at cholesterol-enriched GM1-containing lipid raft plasma membrane domains. Importantly, Gag specifically recruited Staufen1 to the detergent insoluble membranes supporting a key function for this host factor during virus assembly. Notably, the TriFC experiments showed that Gag and Staufen1 actively recruited protein partners when tethered to mRNA. Conclusions The

  19. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measles virus C protein impairs production of defective copyback double-stranded viral RNA and activation of protein kinase R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Christian K; Radeke, Monte J; Cattaneo, Roberto; Samuel, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) lacking expression of C protein (C(KO)) is a potent activator of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR), whereas the isogenic parental virus expressing C protein is not. Here, we demonstrate that significant amounts of dsRNA accumulate during C(KO) mutant infection but not following parental virus infection. dsRNA accumulated during late stages of infection and localized with virus replication sites containing N and P proteins. PKR autophosphorylation and stress granule formation correlated with the timing of dsRNA appearance. Phospho-PKR localized to dsRNA-containing structures as revealed by immunofluorescence. Production of dsRNA was sensitive to cycloheximide but resistant to actinomycin D, suggesting that dsRNA is a viral product. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses revealed reduced viral RNA synthesis and a steepened transcription gradient in C(KO) virus-infected cells compared to those in parental virus-infected cells. The observed alterations were further reflected in lower viral protein expression levels and reduced C(KO) virus infectious yield. RNA deep sequencing confirmed the viral RNA expression profile differences seen by qPCR between C(KO) mutant and parental viruses. After one subsequent passage of the C(KO) virus, defective interfering RNA (DI-RNA) with a duplex structure was obtained that was not seen with the parental virus. We conclude that in the absence of C protein, the amount of PKR activator RNA, including DI-RNA, is increased, thereby triggering innate immune responses leading to impaired MV growth.

  1. Predictions of RNA-binding ability and aggregation propensity of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, Federico, 1985-

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control the fate of a multitude of coding and non-coding transcripts. Formation of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes fine-tunes regulation of post-transcriptional events and influences gene expression. Recently, it has been observed that non-canonical proteins with RNA-binding ability are enriched in structurally disordered and low-complexity regions that are generally involved in functional and dysfunctional associations. Therefore, it is possible that interaction...

  2. Sendai Virus C Protein Plays a Role in Restricting PKR Activation by Limiting the Generation of Intracellular Double-Stranded RNA▿

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Kenji; Komatsu, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Sada, Kiyonao; Gotoh, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Sendai virus (SeV) C protein is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in regulating viral genome replication and transcription, antagonizing the host interferon system, suppressing virus-induced apoptosis, and facilitating virus assembly and budding. We here report a novel role of SeV C protein, the limitation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) generation for maintaining the rate of protein synthesis in infected cells. It was found that the intracellular protein synthesis rate was ...

  3. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  4. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  5. A dsRNA-binding protein MdDRB1 associated with miRNA biogenesis modifies adventitious rooting and tree architecture in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chun-Xiang; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xie, Xing-Bin; Feng, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Shu, Huai-Rui; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2014-02-01

    Although numerous miRNAs have been already isolated from fruit trees, knowledge about miRNA biogenesis is largely unknown in fruit trees. Double-strand RNA-binding (DRB) protein plays an important role in miRNA processing and maturation; however, its role in the regulation of economically important traits is not clear yet in fruit trees. EST blast and RACE amplification were performed to isolate apple MdDRB1 gene. Following expression analysis, RNA binding and protein interaction assays, MdDRB1 was transformed into apple callus and in vitro tissue cultures to characterize the functions of MdDRB1 in miRNA biogenesis, adventitious rooting, leaf development and tree growth habit. MdDRB1 contained two highly conserved DRB domains. Its transcripts existed in all tissues tested and are induced by hormones. It bound to double-strand RNAs and interacted with AtDCL1 (Dicer-Like 1) and MdDCL1. Chip assay indicated its role in miRNA biogenesis. Transgenic analysis showed that MdDRB1 controls adventitious rooting, leaf curvature and tree architecture by modulating the accumulation of miRNAs and the transcript levels of miRNA target genes. Our results demonstrated that MdDRB1 functions in the miRNA biogenesis in a conserved way and that it is a master regulator in the formation of economically important traits in fruit trees. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. APC/C-mediated degradation of dsRNA-binding protein 4 (DRB4 involved in RNA silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Marrocco

    Full Text Available Selective protein degradation via the ubiquitin-26S proteasome is a major mechanism underlying DNA replication and cell division in all Eukaryotes. In particular, the APC/C (Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome is a master ubiquitin protein ligase (E3 that targets regulatory proteins for degradation allowing sister chromatid separation and exit from mitosis. Interestingly, recent work also indicates that the APC/C remains active in differentiated animal and plant cells. However, its role in post-mitotic cells remains elusive and only a few substrates have been characterized.In order to identify novel APC/C substrates, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as the bait Arabidopsis APC10/DOC1, one core subunit of the APC/C, which is required for substrate recruitment. This screen identified DRB4, a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in the biogenesis of different classes of small RNA (sRNA. This protein interaction was further confirmed in vitro and in plant cells. Moreover, APC10 interacts with DRB4 through the second dsRNA binding motif (dsRBD2 of DRB4, which is also required for its homodimerization and binding to its Dicer partner DCL4. We further showed that DRB4 protein accumulates when the proteasome is inactivated and, most importantly, we found that DRB4 stability depends on APC/C activity. Hence, depletion of Arabidopsis APC/C activity by RNAi leads to a strong accumulation of endogenous DRB4, far beyond its normal level of accumulation. However, we could not detect any defects in sRNA production in lines where DRB4 was overexpressed.Our work identified a first plant substrate of the APC/C, which is not a regulator of the cell cycle. Though we cannot exclude that APC/C-dependent degradation of DRB4 has some regulatory roles under specific growth conditions, our work rather points to a housekeeping function of APC/C in maintaining precise cellular-protein concentrations and homeostasis of DRB4.

  8. Conserved RNA-Binding Proteins Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Simona; Forand, Daniel; Wolf, Margaret; Tyus, Courtney; Barney, Julia; Kellogg, Leah; Simon, Margo A.; Kerr, Genevieve; Wells, Kristen L.; Younes, Serena; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Olesnicky, Eugenia C.; Killian, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of dendritic branching is critical for sensory reception, cell−cell communication within the nervous system, learning, memory, and behavior. Defects in dendrite morphology are associated with several neurologic disorders; thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern dendrite morphogenesis is important. Recent investigations of dendrite morphogenesis have highlighted the importance of gene regulation at the posttranscriptional level. Because RNA-binding proteins mediate many posttranscriptional mechanisms, we decided to investigate the extent to which conserved RNA-binding proteins contribute to dendrite morphogenesis across phyla. Here we identify a core set of RNA-binding proteins that are important for dendrite morphogenesis in the PVD multidendritic sensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homologs of each of these genes were previously identified as important in the Drosophila melanogaster dendritic arborization sensory neurons. Our results suggest that RNA processing, mRNA localization, mRNA stability, and translational control are all important mechanisms that contribute to dendrite morphogenesis, and we present a conserved set of RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes in diverse animal species. Furthermore, homologs of these genes are expressed in the human brain, suggesting that these RNA-binding proteins are candidate regulators of dendrite development in humans. PMID:25673135

  9. Non-homologous end-joining protein expression screen from radiosensitive cancer patients yields a novel DNA double strand break repair phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Michael J; Goh, Su Kak; McKay, Jeremy N; Chao, Michael; McKay, Timothy M

    2017-03-01

    Clinical radiosensitivity is a significant impediment to tumour control and cure, in that it restricts the total doses which can safely be delivered to the whole radiotherapy population, within the tissue tolerance of potentially radiosensitive (RS) individuals. Understanding its causes could lead to personalization of radiotherapy. We screened tissues from a unique bank of RS cancer patients for expression defects in major DNA double-strand break repair proteins, using Western blot analysis and subsequently reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We hypothesized that abnormalities in expression of these proteins may explain the radiosensitivity of some of our cancer patients. The cells from one patient showed a reproducibly consistent expression reduction in two complex-forming DNA double-strand break repair protein components (DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4). We also showed a corresponding reduction in both gene products at the mRNA level. Additionally, the mRNA inducibility by ionizing radiation was increased for one of the proteins in the patient's cells. We confirmed the likely functional significance of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) expression abnormalities with a DNA double strand break (DNA DSB) repair assay. We have identified a novel biological phenotype linked to clinical radiosensitivity. This is important in that very few molecular defects are known in human radiotherapy subjects. Such knowledge may contribute to the understanding of radiation response mechanisms in cancer patients and to personalization of radiotherapy.

  10. A versatile assay for RNA-binding proteins in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strein, Claudia; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control RNA fate from synthesis to decay. Since their cellular expression levels frequently do not reflect their in vivo activity, methods are needed to assess the steady state RNA-binding activity of RBPs as well as their responses to stimuli. While electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) have been used for such determinations, their results serve at best as proxies for the RBP activities in living cells. Here, we describe a quantitative dual fluorescence method to analyze protein-mRNA interactions in vivo. Known or candidate RBPs are fused to fluorescent proteins (eGFP, YFP), expressed in cells, cross-linked in vivo to RNA by ultraviolet light irradiation, and immunoprecipitated, after lysis, with a single chain antibody fragment directed against eGFP (GFP-binding protein, GBP). Polyadenylated RNA-binding activity of fusion proteins is assessed by hybridization with an oligo(DT) probe coupled with a red fluorophore. Since UV light is directly applied to living cells, the assay can be used to monitor dynamic changes in RNA-binding activities in response to biological or pharmacological stimuli. Notably, immunoprecipitation and hybridization can also be performed with commercially available GBP-coupled 96-well plates (GFP-multiTrap), allowing highly parallel RNA-binding measurements in a single experiment. Therefore, this method creates the possibility to conduct in vivo high-throughput RNA-binding assays. We believe that this fast and simple radioactivity-free method will find many useful applications in RNA biology.

  11. The DNA double-stranded break repair protein endo-exonuclease as a therapeutic target for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Terry Y-K; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Yeh, Chiaoli; Yuen, Leonard; Griller, David

    2004-08-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability and are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for cancer. In this study, we report that the endo-exonuclease, a protein involved in the recombination repair process of the DNA double-stranded break pathway, is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cells and could represent an effective target for developing anticancer drugs. We identify a dicationic diarylfuran, pentamidine, which has been used clinically to treat opportunistic infections and is an inhibitor of the endo-exonuclease as determined by enzyme kinetic assay. In clonogenic and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays as well as in the in vivo Lewis lung carcinoma mouse tumor model, pentamidine is shown to possess the ability to selectively kill cancer cells. The LD50 of pentamidine on cancer cells maintained in vitro is correlated with the endo-exonuclease enzyme activity. Tumor cell that has been treated with pentamidine is reduced in the endo-exonuclease as compared with the untreated control. Furthermore, pentamidine synergistically potentiates the cytotoxic effect of DNA strand break and cross-link-inducing agents such as mitomycin C, etoposide, and cisplatin. In addition, we used the small interfering RNA for the mouse homologue of the endo-exonuclease to down-regulate the level of endo-exonuclease in the mouse myeloma cell line B16F10. Down-regulation of the endo-exonuclease sensitizes the cell to 5-fluorouracil. These studies suggested the endo-exonuclease enzyme as a novel potential therapeutic target for cancer.

  12. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shan-Shan [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Jiang, Teng [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Hui-Wen [Laboratory Center for Basic Medical Sciences, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tan, Lan [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Guo, Jun, E-mail: Guoj@njmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  13. Induction of DNA damage in γ-irradiated nuclei stripped of nuclear protein classes: differential modulation of double-strand break and DNA-protein crosslink formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, L.-Y.; Friedman, L.R.; Oleinick, N.L.; Chiu, S.-M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of chromatin proteins on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and DNA-protein crosslinks (dpc) by γ-radiation was investigated. Low molecular weight non-histone proteins and classes of histones were extracted with increasing concentrations of NaC1, whereas nuclear matrix proteins were not extractable even by 2.0 M NACl. The yield of dsb increased with progressive removal of proteins from chromatin. The data support our previous conclusion that nuclear matrix protein rather than the majority of the histones are the predominant substrates for dpc production, although the involvement of a subset of tightly bound histones (H3 and H4) has not been excluded. This finding demonstrates that chromatin proteins can differentially modify the yield of two types of radiation-induced DNA lesions. (author)

  14. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramachi, Junpei [Department of Histology and Oral Histology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Hirashima, Kanji [Department of Histology and Oral Histology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Haneji, Tatsuji, E-mail: tat-hane@dent.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Oral Histology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  15. The CRM domain: An RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1–YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved “GxxG” loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes. PMID:17105995

  16. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  17. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  18. FASTKD2 is an RNA-binding protein required for mitochondrial RNA processing and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popow, Johannes; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Curk, Tomaz; Schwarzl, Thomas; Sauer, Sven; Hentze, Matthias W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial RNA processing is an essential step for the synthesis of the components of the electron transport chain in all eukaryotic organisms, yet several aspects of mitochondrial RNA biogenesis and regulation are not sufficiently understood. RNA interactome capture identified several disease-relevant RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with noncanonical RNA-binding architectures, including all six members of the FASTK (FAS-activated serine/threonine kinase) family of proteins. A mutation within one of these newly assigned FASTK RBPs, FASTKD2, causes a rare form of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. To investigate whether RNA binding of FASTKD2 contributes to the disease phenotype, we identified the RNA targets of FASTKD2 by iCLIP. FASTKD2 interacts with a defined set of mitochondrial transcripts including 16S ribosomal RNA (RNR2) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) messenger RNA. CRISPR-mediated deletion of FASTKD2 leads to aberrant processing and expression of RNR2 and ND6 mRNA that encodes a subunit of the respiratory complex I. Metabolic phenotyping of FASTKD2-deficient cells reveals impaired cellular respiration with reduced activities of all respiratory complexes. This work identifies key aspects of the molecular network of a previously uncharacterized, disease-relevant RNA-binding protein, FASTKD2, by a combination of genomic, molecular, and metabolic analyses. © 2015 Popow et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Klein

    Full Text Available We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  20. Fragile X mental retardation protein: A paradigm for translational control by RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eileen; Joseph, Simpson

    2015-07-01

    Translational control is a common mechanism used to regulate gene expression and occur in bacteria to mammals. Typically in translational control, an RNA-binding protein binds to a unique sequence in the mRNA to regulate protein synthesis by the ribosomes. Alternatively, a protein may bind to or modify a translation factor to globally regulate protein synthesis by the cell. Here, we review translational control by the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the absence of which causes the neurological disease, fragile X syndrome (FXS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  1. Cryphonectria nitschkei virus 1 structure shows that the capsid protein of chrysoviruses is a duplicated helix-rich fold conserved in fungal double-stranded RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Carrascosa, José L; Alfonso, Carlos; Trus, Benes; Havens, Wendy M; Ghabrial, Said A; Castón, José R

    2012-08-01

    Cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of Cryphonectria nitschkei virus 1, a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, shows that the capsid protein (60 copies/particle) is formed by a repeated helical core, indicative of gene duplication. This unusual organization is common to chrysoviruses. The arrangement of many of these putative α-helices is conserved in the totivirus L-A capsid protein, suggesting a shared motif. Our results indicate that a 120-subunit T=1 capsid is a conserved architecture that optimizes dsRNA replication and organization.

  2. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  3. Phloem RNA-binding proteins as potential components of the long-distance RNA transport system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICENTE ePALLAS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs govern a myriad of different essential processes in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence reveals that apart from playing critical roles in RNA metabolism and RNA transport, RBPs perform a key function in plant adaption to various environmental conditions. Long distance RNA transport occurs in land plants through the phloem, a conducting tissue that integrates the wide range of signalling pathways required to regulate plant development and response to stress processes. The macromolecules in the phloem pathway vary greatly and include defence proteins, transcription factors, chaperones acting in long distance trafficking, and RNAs (mRNAs, siRNAs and miRNAs. How these RNA molecules translocate through the phloem is not well understood, but recent evidence indicates the presence of translocatable RNA-binding proteins in the phloem, which act as potential components of long distance RNA transport system. This review updates our knowledge on the characteristics and functions of RBPs present in the phloem.

  4. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M. (UW)

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  5. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  6. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA-binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  7. Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV is induced by gamma-irradiation and interacts with an Arabidopsis homologue of the double strand break repair protein XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C E; Waterworth, W M; Jiang, Q; Bray, C M

    2000-10-01

    Rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced in DNA during replication, recombination, and DNA damage is catalysed by DNA ligase enzymes. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Double-strand breaks in DNA, which can occur spontaneously in the cell or be induced experimentally by gamma-irradiation, represent one of the most serious threats to genomic integrity. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) rather than homologous recombination is the major pathway for repair of DSBs in organisms with complex genomes, including humans and plants. DNA ligase IV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans catalyses the final step in the NHEJ pathway of DSB repair. In this study we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue (AtLIG4) of human and S. cerevisiae DNA ligase IV which is shown to encode an ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a theoretical molecular mass of 138 kDa and 48% similarity in amino-acid sequence to the human DNA ligase IV. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated a strong interaction between A. thaliana DNA ligase IV and the A. thaliana homologue of the human DNA ligase IV-binding protein XRCC4. This interaction is shown to be mediated via the tandem BRCA C-terminal domains of A. thaliana DNA ligase IV protein. Expression of AtLIG4 is induced by gamma-irradiation but not by UVB irradiation, consistent with an in vivo role for the A. thaliana DNA ligase IV in DSB repair.

  8. DNA-Damage Response RNA-Binding Proteins (DDRBPs): Perspectives from a New Class of Proteins and Their RNA Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Martin; Vagner, Stéphan

    2017-10-27

    Upon DNA damage, cells trigger an early DNA-damage response (DDR) involving DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, and late responses involving gene expression regulation that determine cell fate. Screens for genes involved in the DDR have found many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), while screens for novel RBPs have identified DDR proteins. An increasing number of RBPs are involved in early and/or late DDR. We propose to call this new class of actors of the DDR, which contain an RNA-binding activity, DNA-damage response RNA-binding proteins (DDRBPs). We then discuss how DDRBPs contribute not only to gene expression regulation in the late DDR but also to early DDR signaling, DNA repair, and chromatin modifications at DNA-damage sites through interactions with both long and short noncoding RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Piñeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis.

  10. DEAF1 is a Pellino1-interacting protein required for interferon production by Sendai virus and double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordureau, Alban; Enesa, Karine; Nanda, Sambit; Le Francois, Brice; Peggie, Mark; Prescott, Alan; Albert, Paul R; Cohen, Philip

    2013-08-23

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA of viral origin, a ligand for Melanoma Differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3), induces the TANK-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation and activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 (IRF3) and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Pellino1, which are required for interferon β (IFNβ) gene transcription. Here, we report that Pellino1 interacts with the transcription factor Deformed Epidermal Autoregulatory Factor 1 (DEAF1). The interaction is independent of the E3 ligase activity of Pellino1, but weakened by the phosphorylation of Pellino1. We show that DEAF1 binds to the IFNβ promoter and to IRF3 and IRF7, that it is required for the transcription of the IFNβ gene and IFNβ secretion in MEFs infected with Sendai virus or transfected with poly(I:C). DEAF1 is also needed for TLR3-dependent IFNβ production. Taken together, our results identify DEAF1 as a novel component of the signal transduction network by which dsRNA of viral origin stimulates IFNβ production.

  11. Efficient Detection of Long dsRNA in Vitro and in Vivo Using the dsRNA Binding Domain from FHV B2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Monsion

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA plays essential functions in many biological processes, including the activation of innate immune responses and RNA interference. dsRNA also represents the genetic entity of some viruses and is a hallmark of infections by positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Methods for detecting dsRNA rely essentially on immunological approaches and their use is often limited to in vitro applications, although recent developments have allowed the visualization of dsRNA in vivo. Here, we report the sensitive and rapid detection of long dsRNA both in vitro and in vivo using the dsRNA binding domain of the B2 protein from Flock house virus. In vitro, we adapted the system for the detection of dsRNA either enzymatically by northwestern blotting or by direct fluorescence labeling on fixed samples. In vivo, we produced stable transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana lines allowing the visualization of dsRNA by fluorescence microscopy. Using these techniques, we were able to discriminate healthy and positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus-infected material in plants and insect cells. In N. benthamiana, our system proved to be very potent for the spatio-temporal visualization of replicative RNA intermediates of a broad range of positive-sense RNA viruses, including high- vs. low-copy number viruses.

  12. Emerging roles for RNA-binding proteins as effectors and regulators of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Ruben G; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van der Veer, Eric P

    2017-05-07

    The cardiovascular system comprises multiple cell types that possess the capacity to modulate their phenotype in response to acute or chronic injury. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms play a key role in the regulation of remodelling and regenerative responses to damaged cardiovascular tissues. Simultaneously, insufficient regulation of cellular phenotype is tightly coupled with the persistence and exacerbation of cardiovascular disease. Recently, RNA-binding proteins such as Quaking, HuR, Muscleblind, and SRSF1 have emerged as pivotal regulators of these functional adaptations in the cardiovascular system by guiding a wide-ranging number of post-transcriptional events that dramatically impact RNA fate, including alternative splicing, stability, localization and translation. Moreover, homozygous disruption of RNA-binding protein genes is commonly associated with cardiac- and/or vascular complications. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the versatile role of RNA-binding proteins in regulating the transcriptome during phenotype switching in cardiovascular health and disease. We also detail existing and potential DNA- and RNA-based therapeutic approaches that could impact the treatment of cardiovascular disease in the future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. RNA-Binding Proteins Revisited – The Emerging Arabidopsis mRNA Interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Köster, Tino

    2017-04-13

    RNA–protein interaction is an important checkpoint to tune gene expression at the RNA level. Global identification of proteins binding in vivo to mRNA has been possible through interactome capture – where proteins are fixed to target RNAs by UV crosslinking and purified through affinity capture of polyadenylated RNA. In Arabidopsis over 500 RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in UV-crosslinked samples have been identified. As in mammals and yeast, the mRNA interactomes came with a few surprises. For example, a plethora of the proteins caught on RNA had not previously been linked to RNA-mediated processes, for example proteins of intermediary metabolism. Thus, the studies provide unprecedented insights into the composition of the mRNA interactome, highlighting the complexity of RNA-mediated processes.

  14. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  15. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS(SV40)) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS(SV40) in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS(SV40) formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS(SV40) likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS(SV40) can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PiRaNhA: A server for the computational prediction of RNA-binding residues in protein sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yoichi; Spriggs, Ruth V; Nakamura, Haruki; Jones, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The PiRaNhA web server is a publicly available online resource that automatically predicts the location of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) in protein sequences. The goal of functional annotation of sequences in the field of RNA binding is to provide predictions of high accuracy that require only small numbers of targeted mutations for verification. The PiRaNhA server uses a support vector machine (SVM), with position-specific scoring matrices, residue interface propensity, predicted residue acces...

  17. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interactio...

  18. Control of Gene Expression by RNA Binding Protein Action on Alternative Translation Initiation Sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Re

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcript levels do not faithfully predict protein levels, due to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs and non-coding RNAs. We developed a multivariate linear regression model integrating RBP levels and predicted RBP-mRNA regulatory interactions from matched transcript and protein datasets. RBPs significantly improved the accuracy in predicting protein abundance of a portion of the total modeled mRNAs in three panels of tissues and cells and for different methods employed in the detection of mRNA and protein. The presence of upstream translation initiation sites (uTISs at the mRNA 5' untranslated regions was strongly associated with improvement in predictive accuracy. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the recently discovered widespread uTISs in the human genome can be a previously unappreciated substrate of translational control mediated by RBPs.

  19. Cooperativity in RNA-Protein Interactions: Global Analysis of RNA Binding Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary T. Campbell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The control and function of RNA are governed by the specificity of RNA binding proteins. Here, we describe a method for global unbiased analysis of RNA-protein interactions that uses in vitro selection, high-throughput sequencing, and sequence-specificity landscapes. The method yields affinities for a vast array of RNAs in a single experiment, including both low- and high-affinity sites. It is reproducible and accurate. Using this approach, we analyzed members of the PUF (Pumilio and FBF family of eukaryotic mRNA regulators. Our data identify effects of a specific protein partner on PUF-RNA interactions, reveal subsets of target sites not previously detected, and demonstrate that designer PUF proteins can precisely alter specificity. The approach described here is, in principle, broadly applicable for analysis of any molecule that binds RNA, including proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules.

  20. Structure of theEscherichia coliProQ RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Grecia M; Hardwick, Steven W; Maslen, Sarah L; Skehel, J Mark; Holmqvist, Erik; Vogel, Jörg; Bateman, Alex; Luisi, Ben F; Broadhurst, R William

    2017-05-01

    The protein ProQ has recently been identified as a global small noncoding RNA-binding protein in Salmonella , and a similar role is anticipated for its numerous homologs in divergent bacterial species. We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli ProQ, revealing an N-terminal FinO-like domain, a C-terminal domain that unexpectedly has a Tudor domain fold commonly found in eukaryotes, and an elongated bridging intradomain linker that is flexible but nonetheless incompressible. Structure-based sequence analysis suggests that the Tudor domain was acquired through horizontal gene transfer and gene fusion to the ancestral FinO-like domain. Through a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have mapped putative RNA-binding surfaces on all three domains of ProQ and modeled the protein's conformation in the apo and RNA-bound forms. Taken together, these data suggest how the FinO, Tudor, and linker domains of ProQ cooperate to recognize complex RNA structures and serve to promote RNA-mediated regulation. © 2017 Gonzalez et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Transcriptome-wide analysis of regulatory interactions of the RNA-binding protein HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Svetlana; Jens, Marvin; Theil, Kathrin; Schwanhäusser, Björn; Selbach, Matthias; Landthaler, Markus; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2011-08-05

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation relies on hundreds of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the function of most RBPs is unknown. The human RBP HuR/ELAVL1 is a conserved mRNA stability regulator. We used PAR-CLIP, a recently developed method based on RNA-protein crosslinking, to identify transcriptome-wide ∼26,000 HuR binding sites. These sites were on average highly conserved, enriched for HuR binding motifs and mainly located in 3' untranslated regions. Surprisingly, many sites were intronic, implicating HuR in mRNA processing. Upon HuR knockdown, mRNA levels and protein synthesis of thousands of target genes were downregulated, validating functionality. HuR and miRNA binding sites tended to reside nearby but generally did not overlap. Additionally, HuR knockdown triggered strong and specific upregulation of miR-7. In summary, we identified thousands of direct and functional HuR targets, found a human miRNA controlled by HuR, and propose a role for HuR in splicing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transformation frequency of γ irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y.

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of γ-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D O value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author)

  3. Transformation frequency of [gamma] irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Strahlenchemie, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of [gamma]-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D[sub O] value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author).

  4. KREPA4, an RNA binding protein essential for editosome integrity and survival of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Reza; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; O'Rear, Jeff; Gilliam, Troy; Tarun, Salvador; Stuart, Kenneth

    2006-05-01

    The 20S editosome, a multiprotein complex, catalyzes the editing of most mitochondrial mRNAs in trypanosomatids by uridylate insertion and deletion. RNAi mediated inactivation of expression of KREPA4 (previously TbMP24), a component of the 20S editosome, in procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei resulted in inhibition of cell growth, loss of RNA editing, and disappearance of 20S editosomes. Levels of MRP1 and REAP-1 proteins, which may have roles in editing but are not editosome components, were unaffected. Tagged KREPA4 protein is incorporated into 20S editosomes in vivo with no preference for either insertion or deletion subcomplexes. Consistent with its S1-like motif, recombinant KREPA4 protein binds synthetic gRNA with a preference for the 3' oligo (U) tail. These data suggest that KREPA4 is an RNA binding protein that may be specific for the gRNA Utail and also is important for 20S editosome stability.

  5. RNA-binding protein conserved in both microtubule- and microfilament-based RNA localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havin, Leora; Git, Anna; Elisha, Zichrini; Oberman, Froma; Yaniv, Karina; Schwartz, Sigal Pressman; Standart, Nancy; Yisraeli, Joel K.

    1998-01-01

    Vg1 mRNA translocation to the vegetal cortex of Xenopus oocytes requires intact microtubules, and a 3′ UTR cis-acting element (termed VLE), which also mediates sequence-specific binding of several proteins. One protein, the 69-kD Vg1 RBP, associates Vg1 RNA to microtubules in vitro. Here we show that Vg1 RBP-binding sites correlate with vegetal localization. Purification and cloning of Vg1 RBP revealed five RNA-binding motifs: four KH and one RRM domains. Surprisingly, Vg1 RBP is highly homologous to the zipcode binding protein implicated in the microfilament-mediated localization of β actin mRNA in fibroblasts. These data support Vg1 RBP’s direct role in vegetal localization and suggest the existence of a general, evolutionarily conserved mechanism for mRNA targeting. PMID:9620847

  6. RNA-binding protein conserved in both microtubule- and microfilament-based RNA localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havin, L; Git, A; Elisha, Z; Oberman, F; Yaniv, K; Schwartz, S P; Standart, N; Yisraeli, J K

    1998-06-01

    Vg1 mRNA translocation to the vegetal cortex of Xenopus oocytes requires intact microtubules, and a 3' UTR cis-acting element (termed VLE), which also mediates sequence-specific binding of several proteins. One protein, the 69-kD Vg1 RBP, associates Vg1 RNA to microtubules in vitro. Here we show that Vg1 RBP-binding sites correlate with vegetal localization. Purification and cloning of Vg1 RBP revealed five RNA-binding motifs: four KH and one RRM domains. Surprisingly, Vg1 RBP is highly homologous to the zipcode binding protein implicated in the microfilament-mediated localization of beta actin mRNA in fibroblasts. These data support Vg1 RBP's direct role in vegetal localization and suggest the existence of a general, evolutionarily conserved mechanism for mRNA targeting.

  7. RBPmap: a web server for mapping binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Inbal; Kosti, Idit; Ares, Manuel; Cline, Melissa; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2014-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression is executed in many cases by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that bind to mRNAs as well as to non-coding RNAs. RBPs recognize their RNA target via specific binding sites on the RNA. Predicting the binding sites of RBPs is known to be a major challenge. We present a new webserver, RBPmap, freely accessible through the website http://rbpmap.technion.ac.il/ for accurate prediction and mapping of RBP binding sites. RBPmap has been developed specifically for mapping RBPs in human, mouse and Drosophila melanogaster genomes, though it supports other organisms too. RBPmap enables the users to select motifs from a large database of experimentally defined motifs. In addition, users can provide any motif of interest, given as either a consensus or a PSSM. The algorithm for mapping the motifs is based on a Weighted-Rank approach, which considers the clustering propensity of the binding sites and the overall tendency of regulatory regions to be conserved. In addition, RBPmap incorporates a position-specific background model, designed uniquely for different genomic regions, such as splice sites, 5' and 3' UTRs, non-coding RNA and intergenic regions. RBPmap was tested on high-throughput RNA-binding experiments and was proved to be highly accurate. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Impaired embryonic development in mice overexpressing the RNA-binding protein TIAR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Kharraz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TIA-1-related (TIAR protein is a shuttling RNA-binding protein involved in several steps of RNA metabolism. While in the nucleus TIAR participates to alternative splicing events, in the cytoplasm TIAR acts as a translational repressor on specific transcripts such as those containing AU-Rich Elements (AREs. Due to its ability to assemble abortive pre-initiation complexes coalescing into cytoplasmic granules called stress granules, TIAR is also involved in the general translational arrest observed in cells exposed to environmental stress. However, the in vivo role of this protein has not been studied so far mainly due to severe embryonic lethality upon tiar invalidation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine potential TIAR tissue-specificity in various cellular contexts, either embryonic or adult, we constructed a TIAR transgenic allele (loxPGFPloxPTIAR allowing the conditional expression of TIAR protein upon Cre recombinase activity. Here, we report the role of TIAR during mouse embryogenesis. We observed that early TIAR overexpression led to low transgene transmission associated with embryonic lethality starting at early post-implantation stages. Interestingly, while pre-implantation steps evolved correctly in utero, in vitro cultured embryos were very sensitive to culture medium. Control and transgenic embryos developed equally well in the G2 medium, whereas culture in M16 medium led to the phosphorylation of eIF2alpha that accumulated in cytoplasmic granules precluding transgenic blastocyst hatching. Our results thus reveal a differential TIAR-mediated embryonic response following artificial or natural growth environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reports the importance of the tightly balanced expression of the RNA-binding protein TIAR for normal embryonic development, thereby emphasizing the role of post-transcriptional regulations in early embryonic programming.

  9. Differential Analysis of Protein Expression in RNA-Binding-Protein Transgenic and Parental Rice Seeds Cultivated under Salt Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Rika; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Adachi, Reiko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Yamada, Akiyo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic plants tolerant to various environmental stresses are being developed to ensure a consistent food supply. We used a transgenic rice cultivar with high saline tolerance by introducing an RNA-binding protein (RBP) from the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum); differences in salt-soluble protein expression between nontransgenic (NT) and RBP rice seeds were analyzed by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), a gel-based proteomic method. To identify RBP-related changes in pr...

  10. The C proteins of human parainfluenza virus type 1 limit double-stranded RNA accumulation that would otherwise trigger activation of MDA5 and protein kinase R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Bartlett, Emmalene; Schomacker, Henrick; Surman, Sonja; Akira, Shizuo; Bae, Yong-Soo; Collins, Peter; Murphy, Brian; Schmidt, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) is an important respiratory pathogen in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. We found that infection with wild-type (WT) HPIV1 suppressed the innate immune response in human airway epithelial cells by preventing not only phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) but also degradation of IκBβ, thereby inhibiting IRF3 and NF-κB activation, respectively. Both of these effects were ablated by a F170S substitution in the HPIV1 C proteins (F170S) or by silencing the C open reading frame [P(C-)], resulting in a potent beta interferon (IFN-β) response. Using murine knockout cells, we found that IFN-β induction following infection with either mutant relied mainly on melanoma-associated differentiation gene 5 (MDA5) rather than retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). Infection with either mutant, but not WT HPIV1, induced a significant accumulation of intracellular double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). These mutant viruses directed a marked increase in the accumulation of viral genome, antigenome, and mRNA that was coincident with the accumulation of dsRNA. In addition, the amount of viral proteins was reduced compared to that of WT HPIV1. Thus, the accumulation of dsRNA might be a result of an imbalance in the N protein/genomic RNA ratio leading to incomplete encapsidation. Protein kinase R (PKR) activation and IFN-β induction followed the kinetics of dsRNA accumulation. Interestingly, the C proteins did not appear to directly inhibit intracellular signaling involved in IFN-β induction; instead, their role in preventing IFN-β induction appeared to be in suppressing the formation of dsRNA. PKR activation contributed to IFN-β induction and also was associated with the reduction in the amount of viral proteins. Thus, the HPIV1 C proteins normally limit the accumulation of dsRNA and thereby limit activation of IRF3, NF-κB, and PKR. If C protein function is compromised, as in the case of F170S HPIV1, the

  11. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DAN-PK), a key enzyme in the re-ligation of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    Repair pathways of DNA are now defined and some important findings have been discovered in the last few years. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NEH) is a crucial process in the repair of radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEj implies at least three steps: the DNA free-ends must get closer, preparation of the free-ends by exonucleases and then a transient hybridization in a region of DNA with weak homology. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is the key enzyme in this process. DNA-PK is a nuclear serine/threonine kinase that comprises three components: a catalytic subunit (DNA-PK cs ) and two regulatory subunits, DNA-binding proteins, Ku80 and Ku70. The severe combined immuno-deficient (scid) mice are deficient in DNA-PK cs : this protein is involved both in DNA repair and in the V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes. It is a protein-kinase of the P13-kinase family and which can phosphorylate Ku proteins, p53 and probably some other proteins still unknown. DNA-PK is an important actor of DSBs repair (induced by ionising radiations or by drugs like etoposide), but obviously it is not the only mechanism existing in the cell for this function. Some others, like homologous recombination, seem also to have a great importance for cell survival. (authors)

  12. Multifunctional RNA Binding Protein OsTudor-SN in Storage Protein mRNA Transport and Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hong-Li; Tian, Li; Kumamaru, Toshihiro; Hamada, Shigeki; Okita, Thomas W

    2017-12-01

    The multifunctional RNA-binding protein Tudor-SN plays multiple roles in transcriptional and posttranscriptional processes due to its modular domain structure, consisting of four tandem Staphylococcus nuclease (SN)-like domains (4SN), followed by a carboxyl-terminal Tudor domain, followed by a fifth partial SN sequence (Tsn). In plants, it confers stress tolerance, is a component of stress granules and P-bodies, and may participate in stabilizing and localizing RNAs to specific subdomains of the cortical-endoplasmic reticulum in developing rice ( Oryza sativa ) endosperm. Here, we show that, in addition to the intact rice OsTudor-SN protein, the 4SN and Tsn modules exist as independent polypeptides, which collectively may coassemble to form a complex population of homodimer and heteroduplex species. The 4SN and Tsn modules exhibit different roles in RNA binding and as a protein scaffold for stress-associated proteins and RNA-binding proteins. Despite their distinct individual properties, mutations in both the 4SN and Tsn modules mislocalize storage protein mRNAs to the cortical endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that the two modular peptide regions of OsTudor-SN confer different cellular properties but cooperate in mRNA localization, a process linking its multiple functions in the nucleus and cytoplasm. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. A C-terminal Myb extension domain defines a novel family of double-strand telomeric DNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Surovtseva, Yulia V; Vespa, Laurent; Shakirov, Eugene V; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2004-11-12

    Little is known about the protein composition of plant telomeres. We queried the Arabidopsis thaliana genome data base in search of genes with similarity to the human telomere proteins hTRF1 and hTRF2. hTRF1/hTRF2 are distinguished by the presence of a single Myb-like domain in their C terminus that is required for telomeric DNA binding in vitro. Twelve Arabidopsis genes fitting this criterion, dubbed TRF-like (TRFL), fell into two distinct gene families. Notably, TRFL family 1 possessed a highly conserved region C-terminal to the Myb domain called Myb-extension (Myb-ext) that is absent in TRFL family 2 and hTRF1/hTRF2. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that recombinant proteins from TRFL family 1, but not those from family 2, formed homodimers and heterodimers in vitro. DNA binding studies with isolated C-terminal fragments from TRFL family 1 proteins, but not family 2, showed specific binding to double-stranded plant telomeric DNA in vitro. Removal of the Myb-ext domain from TRFL1, a family 1 member, abolished DNA binding. However, when the Myb-ext domain was introduced into the corresponding region in TRFL3, a family 2 member, telomeric DNA binding was observed. Thus, Myb-ext is required for binding plant telomeric DNA and defines a novel class of proteins in Arabidopsis.

  14. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  15. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  16. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara generating excess early double-stranded RNA transiently activates protein kinase R and triggers enhanced innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolferstätter, Michael; Schweneker, Marc; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Klingenberg, Marieken; Brinkmann, Kay; Wielert, Ursula; Lauterbach, Henning; Hochrein, Hubertus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important molecular pattern associated with viral infection and is detected by various extra- and intracellular recognition molecules. Poxviruses have evolved to avoid producing dsRNA early in infection but generate significant amounts of dsRNA late in infection due to convergent transcription of late genes. Protein kinase R (PKR) is activated by dsRNA and triggers major cellular defenses against viral infection, including protein synthesis shutdown, apoptosis, and type I interferon (IFN-I) production. The poxviral E3 protein binds and sequesters viral dsRNA and is a major antagonist of the PKR pathway. We found that the highly replication-restricted modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) engineered to produce excess amounts of dsRNA early in infection showed enhanced induction of IFN-β in murine and human cells in the presence of an intact E3L gene. IFN-β induction required a minimum overlap length of 300 bp between early complementary transcripts and was strongly PKR dependent. Excess early dsRNA produced by MVA activated PKR early but transiently in murine cells and induced enhanced systemic levels of IFN-α, IFN-γ, and other cytokines and chemokines in mice in a largely PKR-dependent manner. Replication-competent chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) generating excess early dsRNA also enhanced IFN-I production and was apathogenic in mice even at very high doses but showed no in vitro host range defect. Thus, genetically adjuvanting MVA and CVA to generate excess early dsRNA is an effective method to enhance innate immune stimulation by orthopoxvirus vectors and to attenuate replicating vaccinia virus in vivo. Efficient cellular sensing of pathogen-specific components, including double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), is an important prerequisite of an effective antiviral immune response. The prototype poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) and its derivative modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) produce dsRNA as a by-product of viral

  17. The Arabidopsis RNA-binding protein AtRGGA regulates tolerance to salt and drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosone, Alfredo; Batelli, Giorgia; Nurcato, Roberta; Aurilia, Vincenzo; Punzo, Paola; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth Kumar; Ruberti, Ida; Sassi, Massimiliano; Leone, Antonietta; Costa, Antonello; Grillo, Stefania

    2015-05-01

    Salt and drought stress severely reduce plant growth and crop productivity worldwide. The identification of genes underlying stress response and tolerance is the subject of intense research in plant biology. Through microarray analyses, we previously identified in potato (Solanum tuberosum) StRGGA, coding for an Arginine Glycine Glycine (RGG) box-containing RNA-binding protein, whose expression was specifically induced in potato cell cultures gradually exposed to osmotic stress. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog, AtRGGA, is a functional RNA-binding protein required for a proper response to osmotic stress. AtRGGA gene expression was up-regulated in seedlings after long-term exposure to abscisic acid (ABA) and polyethylene glycol, while treatments with NaCl resulted in AtRGGA down-regulation. AtRGGA promoter analysis showed activity in several tissues, including stomata, the organs controlling transpiration. Fusion of AtRGGA with yellow fluorescent protein indicated that AtRGGA is localized in the cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic perinuclear region. In addition, the rgga knockout mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in root growth and survival tests and to salt stress during germination and at the vegetative stage. AtRGGA-overexpressing plants showed higher tolerance to ABA and salt stress on plates and in soil, accumulating lower levels of proline when exposed to drought stress. Finally, a global analysis of gene expression revealed extensive alterations in the transcriptome under salt stress, including several genes such as ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2, GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE TAU9, and several SMALL AUXIN UPREGULATED RNA-like genes showing opposite expression behavior in transgenic and knockout plants. Taken together, our results reveal an important role of AtRGGA in the mechanisms of plant response and adaptation to stress. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. The Arabidopsis RNA-Binding Protein AtRGGA Regulates Tolerance to Salt and Drought Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Ambrosone, Alfredo

    2015-03-17

    Salt and drought stress severely reduce plant growth and crop productivity worldwide. The identification of genes underlying stress response and tolerance is the subject of intense research in plant biology. Through microarray analyses, we previously identified in potato (Solanum tuberosum) StRGGA, coding for an Arginine Glycine Glycine (RGG) box-containing RNA-binding protein, whose expression was specifically induced in potato cell cultures gradually exposed to osmotic stress. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog, AtRGGA, is a functional RNA-binding protein required for a proper response to osmotic stress. AtRGGA gene expression was up-regulated in seedlings after long-term exposure to abscisic acid (ABA) and polyethylene glycol, while treatments with NaCl resulted in AtRGGA down-regulation. AtRGGA promoter analysis showed activity in several tissues, including stomata, the organs controlling transpiration. Fusion of AtRGGA with yellow fluorescent protein indicated that AtRGGA is localized in the cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic perinuclear region. In addition, the rgga knockout mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in root growth and survival tests and to salt stress during germination and at the vegetative stage. AtRGGA-overexpressing plants showed higher tolerance to ABA and salt stress on plates and in soil, accumulating lower levels of proline when exposed to drought stress. Finally, a global analysis of gene expression revealed extensive alterations in the transcriptome under salt stress, including several genes such as ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2, GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE TAU9, and several SMALL AUXIN UPREGULATED RNA-like genes showing opposite expression behavior in transgenic and knockout plants. Taken together, our results reveal an important role of AtRGGA in the mechanisms of plant response and adaptation to stress.

  19. Sendai virus C protein plays a role in restricting PKR activation by limiting the generation of intracellular double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kenji; Komatsu, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Sada, Kiyonao; Gotoh, Bin

    2008-10-01

    Sendai virus (SeV) C protein is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in regulating viral genome replication and transcription, antagonizing the host interferon system, suppressing virus-induced apoptosis, and facilitating virus assembly and budding. We here report a novel role of SeV C protein, the limitation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) generation for maintaining the rate of protein synthesis in infected cells. It was found that the intracellular protein synthesis rate was maintained even after wild-type (wt) SeV infection, but markedly suppressed following C-knockout SeV infection. This indicates the requirement of C protein for maintaining protein synthesis after infection. In contrast to wt SeV infection, C-knockout SeV infection caused phosphorylation of both the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha and dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). Phosphorylation of eIF2alpha occurred mainly due to the action of PKR, since knockdown of PKR by small interfering RNA limited eIF2alpha phosphorylation. C protein, however, could inhibit neither poly(I):poly(C)-activated nor Newcastle disease virus-induced phosphorylation of PKR and eIF2alpha, suggesting that C protein does not target common pathways leading to PKR activation. Immunofluorescent staining experiments with a monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing dsRNA revealed generation of a large amount of dsRNA in cells infected with C-knockout SeV but not wt SeV. The dsRNA generation as well as phosphorylation of PKR and eIF2alpha induced by C-knockout SeV was markedly suppressed in cells constitutively expressing C protein. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the SeV C protein limits generation of dsRNA, thereby keeping PKR inactive to maintain intracellular protein synthesis.

  20. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A.; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-09-08

    Abstract

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutationsin vivo.

  1. Expression of the double-stranded RNA of the soybean pod borer Leguminivora glycinivorella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) ribosomal protein P0 gene enhances the resistance of transgenic soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanli; Li, Yang; Zang, Zhenyuan; Li, Na; Ran, Ruixue; Cao, Yingxue; Li, Tianyu; Zhou, Quan; Li, Wenbin

    2017-12-01

    The soybean pod borer [SPB; Leguminivora glycinivorella (Matsumura) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)] is the most important soybean pest in northeastern Asia. Silencing genes using plant-mediated RNA-interference is a promising strategy for controlling SPB infestations. The ribosomal protein P0 is important for protein translation and DNA repair in the SPB. Thus, transferring P0 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into plants may help prevent SPB-induced damage. We investigated the effects of SpbP0 dsRNA injections and SpbP0 dsRNA-expressing transgenic soybean plants on the SPB. Larval mortality rates were greater for SpbP0 dsRNA-injected larvae (96%) than for the control larvae (31%) at 14 days after injections. Transgenic T 2 soybean plants expressing SpbP0 dsRNA sustained less damage from SPB larvae than control plants. In addition, the expression level of the SpbP0 gene decreased and the mortality rate increased when SPB larvae were fed on T 3 transgenic soybean pods. Moreover, the surviving larvae were deformed and exhibited inhibited growth. Silencing SpbP0 expression is lethal to the SPB. Transgenic soybean plants expressing SpbP0 dsRNA are more resistant to the SPB than wild-type plants. Thus, SpbP0 dsRNA-expressing transgenic plants may be useful for controlling insect pests. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. A KH-Domain RNA-Binding Protein Interacts with FIERY2/CTD Phosphatase-Like 1 and Splicing Factors and Is Important for Pre-mRNA Splicing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2013-10-17

    Eukaryotic genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins, yet the functions of most of these proteins are unknown. In a genetic study of stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis, we identified a K homology (KH)-domain RNA-binding protein, HOS5 (High Osmotic Stress Gene Expression 5), as required for stress gene regulation and stress tolerance. HOS5 was found to interact with FIERY2/RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 1 (FRY2/CPL1) both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction is mediated by the first double-stranded RNA-binding domain of FRY2/CPL1 and the KH domains of HOS5. Interestingly, both HOS5 and FRY2/CPL1 also interact with two novel serine-arginine (SR)-rich splicing factors, RS40 and RS41, in nuclear speckles. Importantly, FRY2/CPL1 is required for the recruitment of HOS5. In fry2 mutants, HOS5 failed to be localized in nuclear speckles but was found mainly in the nucleoplasm. hos5 mutants were impaired in mRNA export and accumulated a significant amount of mRNA in the nuclei, particularly under salt stress conditions. Arabidopsis mutants of all these genes exhibit similar stress-sensitive phenotypes. RNA-seq analyses of these mutants detected significant intron retention in many stress-related genes under salt stress but not under normal conditions. Our study not only identified several novel regulators of pre-mRNA processing as important for plant stress response but also suggested that, in addition to RNAP II CTD that is a well-recognized platform for the recruitment of mRNA processing factors, FRY2/CPL1 may also recruit specific factors to regulate the co-transcriptional processing of certain transcripts to deal with environmental challenges. © 2013 Chen et al.

  3. A KH-domain RNA-binding protein interacts with FIERY2/CTD phosphatase-like 1 and splicing factors and is important for pre-mRNA splicing in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins, yet the functions of most of these proteins are unknown. In a genetic study of stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis, we identified a K homology (KH-domain RNA-binding protein, HOS5 (High Osmotic Stress Gene Expression 5, as required for stress gene regulation and stress tolerance. HOS5 was found to interact with FIERY2/RNA polymerase II (RNAP II carboxyl terminal domain (CTD phosphatase-like 1 (FRY2/CPL1 both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction is mediated by the first double-stranded RNA-binding domain of FRY2/CPL1 and the KH domains of HOS5. Interestingly, both HOS5 and FRY2/CPL1 also interact with two novel serine-arginine (SR-rich splicing factors, RS40 and RS41, in nuclear speckles. Importantly, FRY2/CPL1 is required for the recruitment of HOS5. In fry2 mutants, HOS5 failed to be localized in nuclear speckles but was found mainly in the nucleoplasm. hos5 mutants were impaired in mRNA export and accumulated a significant amount of mRNA in the nuclei, particularly under salt stress conditions. Arabidopsis mutants of all these genes exhibit similar stress-sensitive phenotypes. RNA-seq analyses of these mutants detected significant intron retention in many stress-related genes under salt stress but not under normal conditions. Our study not only identified several novel regulators of pre-mRNA processing as important for plant stress response but also suggested that, in addition to RNAP II CTD that is a well-recognized platform for the recruitment of mRNA processing factors, FRY2/CPL1 may also recruit specific factors to regulate the co-transcriptional processing of certain transcripts to deal with environmental challenges.

  4. Mapping a nucleolar targeting sequence of an RNA binding nucleolar protein, Nop25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Suzuki, Shunji; Kanno, Motoko; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Tanaka, Junya

    2006-01-01

    Nop25 is a putative RNA binding nucleolar protein associated with rRNA transcription. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism of Nop25 localization in the nucleolus. Deletion experiments of Nop25 amino acid sequence showed Nop25 to contain a nuclear targeting sequence in the N-terminal and a nucleolar targeting sequence in the C-terminal. By expressing derivative peptides from the C-terminal as GFP-fusion proteins in the cells, a lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide (KRKHPRRAQDSTKKPPSATRTSKTQRRRR) allowed a GFP-fusion protein to be transported and fully retained in the nucleolus. When the peptide was fused with cMyc epitope and expressed in the cells, a cMyc epitope was then detected in the nucleolus. Nop25 did not localize in the nucleolus by deletion of the peptide from Nop25. Furthermore, deletion of a subdomain (KRKHPRRAQ) in the peptide or amino acid substitution of lysine and arginine residues in the subdomain resulted in the loss of Nop25 nucleolar localization. These results suggest that the lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide is the most prominent nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25 and that the long stretch of basic residues might play an important role in the nucleolar localization of Nop25. Although Nop25 contained putative SUMOylation, phosphorylation and glycosylation sites, the amino acid substitution in these sites had no effect on the nucleolar localization, thus suggesting that these post-translational modifications did not contribute to the localization of Nop25 in the nucleolus. The treatment of the cells, which expressed a GFP-fusion protein with a nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25, with RNase A resulted in a complete dislocation of the protein from the nucleolus. These data suggested that the nucleolar targeting sequence might therefore play an important role in the binding of Nop25 to RNA molecules and that the RNA binding of Nop25 might be essential for the nucleolar localization of Nop25

  5. The nucleolar RNA-binding protein B-36 is highly conserved among plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiltinan, M J; Schelling, M E; Ehtesham, N Z; Thomas, J C; Christensen, M E

    1988-08-01

    The nucleolar protein B-36 is an RNA-associated protein which has a number of properties in common with pre-mRNA-binding proteins (hnRNP proteins). Like the hnRNP proteins, B-36 appears to be evolutionarily conserved among various eukaryotes (protists and several animal species). The conservation of B-36 throughout the plant kingdom has been investigated using a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies previously shown to recognize a minimum of four different epitopes in Physarum B-36, the protein used to generate the monoclonal antibodies. Two of the epitopes (I and III) are widely conserved in 34 kDa proteins (presumably B-36 homologues) from the various species tested (Chlamydomonas, moss, fern, oat, onion, carrot, and bean). Using immunofluorescence localization in moss and carrot protoplasts, the cross-reacting proteins were shown to be restricted to the nucleolus, further confirming their probable homology to B-36. Epitopes I and III are also unique to the B-36 homologues as demonstrated by the failure of any other bands to cross-react. Another epitope (IV) was specifically recognized in the plant B-36 homologues but exhibited greatly reduced affinity for the monoclonal antibody relative to Physarum B-36. The remaining epitope (II), unlike the others, exhibited variable conservation in the plant B-36 homologues and, in addition, was present in several other seemingly unrelated proteins. Finally, several of the plant species exhibited two cross-reacting variants at roughly the 34 kDa position and in at least one of these cases a single monoclonal antibody was able to distinguish between the two variants, a result indicating that the variants do have bona fide structural differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. DNA and protein binding, double-strand DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of the antibacterial drug nalidixic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Muruganantham, Amsaveni; Ghosh, Swapan K; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2017-09-01

    The water soluble mixed ligand complexes [Cu(nal)(diimine)(H 2 O)](ClO 4 ) 1-4, where H(nal) is nalidixic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (2), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3), and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4), have been isolated. The coordination geometry around Cu(II) in 1 and that in the Density Functional Theory optimized structures of 1-4 has been assessed as square pyramidal. The trend in DNA binding constants (K b ) determined using absorption spectral titration (K b : 1, 0.79±0.1base pair. In contrast, 3 and 4 are involved in intimate hydrophobic interaction with DNA through the methyl substituents on phen ring, which is supported by viscosity and protein binding studies. DNA docking studies imply that 4 is involved preferentially in DNA major groove binding while 1-3 in minor groove binding and that all the complexes, upon removing the axially coordinated water molecule, bind in the major groove. Interestingly, 3 and 4 display prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while 1 and 2 effect only single-strand DNA cleavage in the absence of an activator. The complexes 3 and 4 show cytotoxicity higher than 1 and 2 against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7). The complex 4 induces apoptotic mode of cell death in cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plant-feeding insects harbor double-stranded RNA viruses encoding a novel proline-alanine rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to that of fungal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Allyn; Sisterson, Mark S; Yokomi, Raymond; Stenger, Drake C

    2010-09-01

    Novel double-stranded RNAs (approximately 8 kbp) were isolated from threecornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. The two new viruses, designated Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and Circulifer tenellus virus 1 (CiTV1), do not appear to be encapsidated in conventional virions and shared a genome organization similar to that of several unclassified fungal viruses. SpFV1 and CiTVl encode a proline-alanine rich protein (PArp) and an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRp). Expression of the 3'-proximal RdRp ORF appears to result from -1 translational frameshifting of the PArp ORF. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp indicated that SpFV1 and CiTV1 were most closely related to each other and the unclassified plant virus Cucurbit yellows associated virus, and more distantly related to the unclassified fungal dsRNA viruses Phlebiopsis gigantea virus 2 and Fusarium graminearum virus 3. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins...

  9. De novo design of RNA-binding proteins with a prion-like domain related to ALS/FTD proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Kana; Ito, Daisuke; Mashima, Kyoko; Oyama, Munenori; Takahashi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2017-12-04

    Aberrant RNA-binding proteins form the core of the neurodegeneration cascade in spectrums of disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Six ALS-related molecules, TDP-43, FUS, TAF15, EWSR1, heterogeneous nuclear (hn)RNPA1 and hnRNPA2 are RNA-binding proteins containing candidate mutations identified in ALS patients and those share several common features, including harboring an aggregation-prone prion-like domain (PrLD) containing a glycine/serine-tyrosine-glycine/serine (G/S-Y-G/S)-motif-enriched low-complexity sequence and rich in glutamine and/or asparagine. Additinally, these six molecules are components of RNA granules involved in RNA quality control and become mislocated from the nucleus to form cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs) in the ALS/FTD-affected brain. To reveal the essential mechanisms involved in ALS/FTD-related cytotoxicity associated with RNA-binding proteins containing PrLDs, we designed artificial RNA-binding proteins harboring G/S-Y-G/S-motif repeats with and without enriched glutamine residues and nuclear-import/export-signal sequences and examined their cytotoxicity in vitro. These proteins recapitulated features of ALS-linked molecules, including insoluble aggregation, formation of cytoplasmic IBs and components of RNA granules, and cytotoxicity instigation. These findings indicated that these artificial RNA-binding proteins mimicked features of ALS-linked molecules and allowed the study of mechanisms associated with gain of toxic functions related to ALS/FTD pathogenesis.

  10. Expression of Quaking RNA-Binding Protein in the Adult and Developing Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiko, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Aono, Kentaro; Kawashima, Togo; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Ku, Li; Feng, Yue; Koike, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI), which belongs to the STAR family of KH domain-containing RNA-binding proteins, functions in pre-mRNA splicing, microRNA regulation, and formation of circular RNA. QKI plays critical roles in myelinogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous systems and has been implicated neuron-glia fate decision in the brain; however, neither the expression nor function of QKI in the neural retina is known. Here we report the expression of QKI RNA-binding protein in the developing and mature mouse retina. QKI was strongly expressed by Müller glial cells in both the developing and adult retina. Intriguingly, during development, QKI was expressed in early differentiating neurons, such as the horizontal and amacrine cells, and subsequently in later differentiating bipolar cells, but not in photoreceptors. Neuronal expression was uniformly weak in the adult. Among QKI isoforms (5, 6, and 7), QKI-5 was the predominantly expressed isoform in the adult retina. To study the function of QKI in the mouse retina, we examined quakingviable(qkv) mice, which have a dysmyelination phenotype that results from deficiency of QKI expression and reduced numbers of mature oligodendrocytes. In homozygous qkv mutant mice (qkv/qkv), the optic nerve expression levels of QKI-6 and 7, but not QKI-5 were reduced. In the retina of the mutant homozygote, QKI-5 levels were unchanged, and QKI-6 and 7 levels, already low, were also unaffected. We conclude that QKI is expressed in developing and adult Müller glia. QKI is additionally expressed in progenitors and in differentiating neurons during retinal development, but expression weakened or diminished during maturation. Among QKI isoforms, we found that QKI-5 predominated in the adult mouse retina. Since Müller glial cells are thought to share properties with retinal progenitor cells, our data suggest that QKI may contribute to maintaining retinal progenitors prior to differentiation into neurons. On the other hand, the expression of QKI in

  11. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA metabolism, including replication, recombination and repair, substantiated by its interactions with PCNA, DNA helicases BLM and WRN, and several DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. We investigated the sub-nuclear localization of hEXO1 during S-phas...

  12. Use of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference to determine the substrates of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Marco; Worby, Carolyn A; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Clemens, James C; Dixon, Jack E

    2002-08-15

    Despite the wealth of information generated by genome-sequencing projects, the identification of in vivo substrates of specific protein kinases and phosphatases is hampered by the large number of candidate enzymes, overlapping enzyme specificity and sequence similarity. In the present study, we demonstrate the power of RNA interference (RNAi) to dissect signal transduction cascades involving specific kinases and phosphatases. RNAi is used to identify the cellular tyrosine kinases upstream of the phosphorylation of Down-Syndrome cell-adhesion molecule (Dscam), a novel cell-surface molecule of the immunoglobulin-fibronectin super family, which has been shown to be important for axonal path-finding in Drosophila. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Dscam recruits the Src homology 2 domain of the adaptor protein Dock to the receptor. Dock, the ortho- logue of mammalian Nck, is also essential for correct axonal path-finding in Drosophila. We further determined that Dock is tyrosine-phosphorylated in vivo and identified DPTP61F as the protein tyrosine phosphatase responsible for maintaining Dock in its non-phosphorylated state. The present study illustrates the versatility of RNAi in the identification of the physiological substrates for protein kinases and phosphatases.

  13. The RNA-binding protein ATX-2 regulates cytokinesis through PAR-5 and ZEN-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnazzo, Megan M; Uhlemann, Eva-Maria E; Villarreal, Alex R; Shirayama, Masaki; Dominguez, Eddie G; Skop, Ahna R

    2016-10-15

    The spindle midzone harbors both microtubules and proteins necessary for furrow formation and the completion of cytokinesis. However, the mechanisms that mediate the temporal and spatial recruitment of cell division factors to the spindle midzone and midbody remain unclear. Here we describe a mechanism governed by the conserved RNA-binding protein ATX-2/Ataxin-2, which targets and maintains ZEN-4 at the spindle midzone. ATX-2 does this by regulating the amount of PAR-5 at mitotic structures, particularly the spindle, centrosomes, and midbody. Preventing ATX-2 function leads to elevated levels of PAR-5, enhanced chromatin and centrosome localization of PAR-5-GFP, and ultimately a reduction of ZEN-4-GFP at the spindle midzone. Codepletion of ATX-2 and PAR-5 rescued the localization of ZEN-4 at the spindle midzone, indicating that ATX-2 mediates the localization of ZEN-4 upstream of PAR-5. We provide the first direct evidence that ATX-2 is necessary for cytokinesis and suggest a model in which ATX-2 facilitates the targeting of ZEN-4 to the spindle midzone by mediating the posttranscriptional regulation of PAR-5. © 2016 Gnazzo et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Handshakes and Fights: The Regulatory Interplay of RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Dassi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available What drives the flow of signals controlling the outcome of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression? This regulatory layer, presiding to processes ranging from splicing to mRNA stability and localization, is a key determinant of protein levels and thus cell phenotypes. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs form a remarkable army of post-transcriptional regulators, strong of more than 1,500 genes implementing this expression fine-tuning plan and implicated in both cell physiology and pathology. RBPs can bind and control a wide array of RNA targets. This sheer amount of interactions form complex regulatory networks (PTRNs where the action of individual RBPs cannot be easily untangled from each other. While past studies have mostly focused on the action of individual RBPs on their targets, we are now observing an increasing amount of evidence describing the occurrence of interactions between RBPs, defining how common target RNAs are regulated. This suggests that the flow of signals in PTRNs is driven by the intertwined contribution of multiple RBPs, concurrently acting on each of their targets. Understanding how RBPs cooperate and compete is thus of paramount importance to chart the wiring of PTRNs and their impact on cell phenotypes. Here we review the current knowledge about patterns of RBP interaction and attempt at describing their general principles. We also discuss future directions which should be taken to reach a comprehensive understanding of this fundamental aspect of gene expression regulation.

  15. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruikang; Moss, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzymes and cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 catalyze successive steps in mRNA degradation and prevent double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) accumulation, whereas the viral E3 protein can bind dsRNA. We showed that dsRNA and E3 colocalized within cytoplasmic viral factories in cells infected with a decapping enzyme mutant as well as with wild-type VACV and that they coprecipitated with antibody. An E3 deletion mutant induced protein kinase R (PKR) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation earlier and more strongly than a decapping enzyme mutant even though less dsRNA was made, leading to more profound effects on viral gene expression. Human HAP1 and A549 cells were genetically modified by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) to determine whether the same pathways restrict E3 and decapping mutants. The E3 mutant replicated in PKR knockout (KO) HAP1 cells in which RNase L is intrinsically inactive but only with a double knockout (DKO) of PKR and RNase L in A549 cells, indicating that both pathways decreased replication equivalently and that no additional dsRNA pathway was crucial. In contrast, replication of the decapping enzyme mutant increased significantly (though less than that of wild-type virus) in DKO A549 cells but not in DKO HAP1 cells where a smaller increase in viral protein synthesis occurred. Xrn1 KO A549 cells were viable but nonpermissive for VACV; however, wild-type and mutant viruses replicated in triple-KO cells in which RNase L and PKR were also inactivated. Since KO of PKR and RNase L was sufficient to enable VACV replication in the absence of E3 or Xrn1, the poor replication of the decapping mutant, particularly in HAP1 DKO, cells indicated additional translational defects. Viruses have evolved ways of preventing or counteracting the cascade of antiviral responses that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers in host cells. We showed that the dsRNA produced in

  16. CRA-1 uncovers a double-strand break-dependent pathway promoting the assembly of central region proteins on chromosome axes during C. elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Smolikov

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The synaptonemal complex (SC, a tripartite proteinaceous structure that forms between homologous chromosomes during meiosis, is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation. Here we identify CRA-1, a novel and conserved protein that is required for the assembly of the central region of the SC during C. elegans meiosis. In the absence of CRA-1, central region components fail to extensively localize onto chromosomes at early prophase and instead mostly surround the chromatin at this stage. Later in prophase, central region proteins polymerize along chromosome axes, but for the most part fail to connect the axes of paired homologous chromosomes. This defect results in an inability to stabilize homologous pairing interactions, altered double-strand break (DSB repair progression, and a lack of chiasmata. Surprisingly, DSB formation and repair are required to promote the polymerization of the central region components along meiotic chromosome axes in cra-1 mutants. In the absence of both CRA-1 and any one of the C. elegans homologs of SPO11, MRE11, RAD51, or MSH5, the polymerization observed along chromosome axes is perturbed, resulting in the formation of aggregates of the SC central region proteins. While radiation-induced DSBs rescue this polymerization in cra-1; spo-11 mutants, they fail to do so in cra-1; mre-11, cra-1; rad-51, and cra-1; msh-5 mutants. Taken together, our studies place CRA-1 as a key component in promoting the assembly of a tripartite SC structure. Moreover, they reveal a scenario in which DSB formation and repair can drive the polymerization of SC components along chromosome axes in C. elegans.

  17. Mutations Abrogating VP35 Interaction with Double-Stranded RNA Render Ebola Virus Avirulent in Guinea Pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prins, Kathleen C.; Delpeut, Sebastien; Leung, Daisy W.; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Reid, St. Patrick; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Cárdenas, Washington B.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F. (CNRS-INSERM); (Mount Sinai Hospital); (LB-Ecuador); (Iowa State)

    2010-10-11

    Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding inhibitor of host interferon (IFN)-{alpha}/{beta} responses that also functions as a viral polymerase cofactor. Recent structural studies identified key features, including a central basic patch, required for VP35 dsRNA binding activity. To address the functional significance of these VP35 structural features for EBOV replication and pathogenesis, two point mutations, K319A/R322A, that abrogate VP35 dsRNA binding activity and severely impair its suppression of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} production were identified. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography reveal minimal structural perturbations in the K319A/R322A VP35 double mutant and suggest that loss of basic charge leads to altered function. Recombinant EBOVs encoding the mutant VP35 exhibit, relative to wild-type VP35 viruses, minimal growth attenuation in IFN-defective Vero cells but severe impairment in IFN-competent cells. In guinea pigs, the VP35 mutant virus revealed a complete loss of virulence. Strikingly, the VP35 mutant virus effectively immunized animals against subsequent wild-type EBOV challenge. These in vivo studies, using recombinant EBOV viruses, combined with the accompanying biochemical and structural analyses directly correlate VP35 dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition functions with viral pathogenesis. Moreover, these studies provide a framework for the development of antivirals targeting this critical EBOV virulence factor.

  18. Inducible Major Vault Protein Plays a Pivotal Role in Double-Stranded RNA- or Virus-Induced Proinflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nanfang; Liu, Shi; Xia, Zhangchuan; Ren, Sheng; Feng, Jian; Jing, Mingzhen; Gao, Xin; Wiemer, Erik A C; Zhu, Ying

    2016-03-15

    Pathogen invasion triggers robust antiviral cytokine production via different transcription factor signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated that major vault protein (MVP) induces type I IFN production during viral infection; however, little is known about the role of MVP in proinflammatory responses. In this study, we found in vitro that expression of MVP, IL-6, and IL-8 was inducible upon dsRNA stimulation or viral infection. Moreover, MVP was essential for the induction of IL-6 and IL-8, as impaired expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in MVP-deficient human PBMCs, human lung epithelial cells (A549), and THP-1 monocytes, as well as in murine splenocytes, peritoneal macrophages, and PBMCs from MVP-knockout (MVP(-/-)) mice, was observed. Upon investigation of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that MVP acted in synergy with AP-1 (c-Fos) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)β-liver-enriched transcriptional activating protein to activate the IL6 and IL8 promoters. Introduction of mutations into the AP-1 and C/EBPβ binding sites on the IL6 and IL8 promoters resulted in the loss of synergistic activation with MVP. Furthermore, we found that MVP interacted with both c-Fos and C/EBPβ. The interactions promoted nuclear translocation and recruitment of these transcription factors to IL6 and IL8 promoter regions. In the MVP(-/-) mouse model, significantly decreased expression of early antiviral cytokines resulted in higher viral titer in the lung, higher mortality, and heavier lung damage after infection with lethal influenza A virus. Taken together, our findings help to delineate a novel role of MVP in host proinflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Yellow fever virus capsid protein is a potent suppressor of RNA silencing that binds double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Wiley, Michael R; Badawi, Atif; Adelman, Zach N; Myles, Kevin M

    2016-11-29

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus (YFV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and West Nile virus (WNV), profoundly affect human health. The successful transmission of these viruses to a human host depends on the pathogen's ability to overcome a potentially sterilizing immune response in the vector mosquito. Similar to other invertebrate animals and plants, the mosquito's RNA silencing pathway comprises its primary antiviral defense. Although a diverse range of plant and insect viruses has been found to encode suppressors of RNA silencing, the mechanisms by which flaviviruses antagonize antiviral small RNA pathways in disease vectors are unknown. Here we describe a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) encoded by the prototype flavivirus, YFV. We show that the YFV capsid (YFC) protein inhibits RNA silencing in the mosquito Aedes aegypti by interfering with Dicer. This VSR activity appears to be broadly conserved in the C proteins of other medically important flaviviruses, including that of ZIKV. These results suggest that a molecular "arms race" between vector and pathogen underlies the continued existence of flaviviruses in nature.

  20. Microarray Meta-Analysis of RNA-Binding Protein Functions in Alternative Polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Yuting; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate diverse mRNA transcripts with different 3′UTRs from the same gene. In this study, we systematically searched for the APA events with differential expression in public mouse microarray data. Hundreds of genes with over-represented differential APA events and the corresponding experiments were identified. We further revealed that global APA differential expression occurred prevalently in tissues such as brain comparing to peripheral tissues, and biological processes such as development, differentiation and immune responses. Interestingly, we also observed widespread differential APA events in RNA-binding protein (RBP) genes such as Rbm3, Eif4e2 and Elavl1. Given the fact that RBPs are considered as the main regulators of differential APA expression, we constructed a co-expression network between APAs and RBPs using the microarray data. Further incorporation of CLIP-seq data of selected RBPs showed that Nova2 represses and Mbnl1 promotes the polyadenylation of closest poly(A) sites respectively. Altogether, our study is the first microarray meta-analysis in a mammal on the regulation of APA by RBPs that integrated massive mRNA expression data under a wide-range of biological conditions. Finally, we present our results as a comprehensive resource in an online website for the research community. PMID:24622240

  1. Reducing the RNA binding protein TIA1 protects against tau-mediated neurodegeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicco, Daniel J; Ash, Peter E A; Maziuk, Brandon; LeBlang, Chelsey; Medalla, Maria; Al Abdullatif, Ali; Ferragud, Antonio; Botelho, Emily; Ballance, Heather I; Dhawan, Uma; Boudeau, Samantha; Cruz, Anna Lourdes; Kashy, Daniel; Wong, Aria; Goldberg, Lisa R; Yazdani, Neema; Zhang, Cheng; Ung, Choong Y; Tripodis, Yorghos; Kanaan, Nicholas M; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Cottone, Pietro; Leszyk, John; Li, Hu; Luebke, Jennifer; Bryant, Camron D; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Emerging studies suggest a role for tau in regulating the biology of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We now show that reducing the RBP T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) in vivo protects against neurodegeneration and prolongs survival in transgenic P301S Tau mice. Biochemical fractionation shows co-enrichment and co-localization of tau oligomers and RBPs in transgenic P301S Tau mice. Reducing TIA1 decreased the number and size of granules co-localizing with stress granule markers. Decreasing TIA1 also inhibited the accumulation of tau oligomers at the expense of increasing neurofibrillary tangles. Despite the increase in neurofibrillary tangles, TIA1 reduction increased neuronal survival and rescued behavioral deficits and lifespan. These data provide in vivo evidence that TIA1 plays a key role in mediating toxicity and further suggest that RBPs direct the pathway of tau aggregation and the resulting neurodegeneration. We propose a model in which dysfunction of the translational stress response leads to tau-mediated pathology.

  2. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RNA BINDING DOMAIN OF HUMAN STEM LOOP BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthi Kashyap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A gene encoding the RNA binding domain (RBD of human stem loop binding protein (SLBP was cloned in pET 28a vector and over-expressed in E. coli codon plus cells. The over-expressed SLBP-RBD carried no tag and aggregated as inclusion bodies in the cell lysate. Inclusion bodies were semi-purified to >85% purity by establishing a method involving detergent washing and subsequently denatured in 8 M urea. Refolding of the denatured RBD was carried out by step dialysis in decreasing concentrations of urea and L-arginine. Refolded SLBP-RBD was analyzed using size exclusion chromatography that revealed its monomeric nature and folded state. Uniformly 15N and 15N,13C labeled SLBP-RBD was prepared at concentrations for solution NMR studies. Approximately, 60% of the sequence specific backbone resonance assignments have been achieved through standard triple resonance NMR experiments. Analyses of secondary chemical shifts reveal presence of a small helical secondary structural elements and large intrinsically disordered regions.

  3. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J R; Cook, Stuart A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3' and 5' splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure.

  4. TERRA transcripts are bound by a complex array of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Stagno d'Alcontres, Martina; Blasco, Maria A

    2010-06-29

    Telomeres are transcribed from the telomeric C-rich strand, giving rise to UUAGGG repeat-containing telomeric transcripts or TERRA, which are novel structural components of telomeres. TERRA abundance is highly dependent on developmental status (including nuclear reprogramming), telomere length, cellular stresses, tumour stage and chromatin structure. However, the molecular mechanisms and factors controlling TERRA levels are still largely unknown. In this study, we identify a set of RNA-binding proteins, which endogenously bind and regulate TERRA in the context of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The identification was carried out by biotin pull-down assays followed by LC-MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Different members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family are among the ribonucleoprotein family that bind more abundantly to TERRA. Downregulation of TERRA-bound RBPs by small interfering RNA further shows that they can impact on TERRA abundance, their location and telomere lengthening. These findings anticipate an impact of TERRA-associated RBPs on telomere biology and telomeres diseases, such as cancer and aging.

  5. In silico characterization and Molecular modeling of double-strand break repair protein MRE11 from Phoenix dactylifera v deglet nour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekik, Imen; Chaabene, Zayneb; Grubb, C Douglas; Drira, Noureddine; Cheour, Foued; Elleuch, Amine

    2015-11-05

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic and mutagenic. MRE11 plays an essential role in repairing DNA by cleaving broken ends through its 3' to 5' exonuclease and single-stranded DNA endonuclease activities. The present study aimed to in silico characterization and molecular modeling of MRE11 from Phoenix dactylifera L cv deglet nour (DnMRE11) by various bioinformatic approaches. To identify DnMRE11 cDNA, assembled contigs from our cDNA libraries were analysed using the Blast2GO2.8 program. The DnMRE11 protein length was 726 amino acids. The results of HUMMER show that DnMRE11 is formed by three domains: the N-terminal core domain containing the nuclease and capping domains, the C-terminal half containing the DNA binding and coiled coil region. The structure of DnMRE11 is predicted using the Swiss-Model server, which contains the nuclease and capping domains. The obtained model was verified with the structure validation programs such as ProSA and QMEAN servers for reliability. Ligand binding studies using COACH indicated the interaction of DnMRE11 protein with two Mn(2+) ions and dAMP. The ConSurf server predicted that residues of the active site and Nbs binding site have high conservation scores between plant species. A model structure of DnMRE11 was constructed and validated with various bioinformatics programs which suggested the predicted model to be satisfactory. Further validation studies were conducted by COACH analysis for active site ligand prediction, and revealed the presence of six ligands binding sites and two ligands (2 Mn(2+) and dAMP).

  6. Plant-feeding insects harbor double-stranded RNA viruses encoding a novel proline-alanine rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to that of fungal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel double-stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genomes of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and Circulifer tenell...

  7. Novel double-stranded RNA viruses of plant-feeding insects encode a serine-alanine-proline rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to fungal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel double stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from the three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genome organization of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and ...

  8. Infectious bursal disease virus capsid protein VP3 interacts both with VP1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and with viral double-stranded RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.G.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Thomas, A.A.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Boot, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of the Birnaviridae family. Its two genome segments are encapsidated together with multiple copies of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, VP1, in a single-shell capsid that is composed of VP2 and VP3. In this study we

  9. Intracellular localization and interaction of mRNA binding proteins as detected by FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Gerecht, Pamela S; Taylor, Molly A; Port, J David

    2010-09-15

    A number of RNA binding proteins (BPs) bind to A+U rich elements (AREs), commonly present within 3'UTRs of highly regulated RNAs. Individual RNA-BPs proteins can modulate RNA stability, RNA localization, and/or translational efficiency. Although biochemical studies have demonstrated selectivity of ARE-BPs for individual RNAs, less certain is the in vivo composition of RNA-BP multiprotein complexes and how their composition is affected by signaling events and intracellular localization. Using FRET, we previously demonstrated that two ARE-BPs, HuR and AUF1, form stable homomeric and heteromeric associations in the nucleus and cytoplasm. In the current study, we use immuno-FRET of endogenous proteins to examine the intracellular localization and interactions of HuR and AUF1 as well as KSRP, TIA-1, and Hedls. These results were compared to those obtained with their exogenously expressed, fluorescently labeled counterparts. All ARE-BPs examined were found to colocalize and to form stable associations with selected other RNA-BPs in one or more cellular locations variably including the nucleus, cytoplasm (in general), or in stress granules or P bodies. Interestingly, FRET based interaction of the translational suppressor, TIA-1, and the decapping protein, Hedls, was found to occur at the interface of stress granules and P bodies, dynamic sites of intracellular RNA storage and/or turnover. To explore the physical interactions of RNA-BPs with ARE containing RNAs, in vitro transcribed Cy3-labeled RNA was transfected into cells. Interestingly, Cy3-RNA was found to coalesce in P body like punctate structures and, by FRET, was found to interact with the RNA decapping proteins, Hedls and Dcp1. Biochemical methodologies, such as co-immunoprecipitation, and cell biological approaches such as standard confocal microscopy are useful in demonstrating the possibility of proteins and/or proteins and RNAs interacting. However, as demonstrated herein, colocalization of proteins and

  10. Both Maintenance and Avoidance of RNA-Binding Protein Interactions Constrain Coding Sequence Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2017-05-01

    While the principal force directing coding sequence (CDS) evolution is selection on protein function, to ensure correct gene expression CDSs must also maintain interactions with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Understanding how our genes are shaped by these RNA-level pressures is necessary for diagnostics and for improving transgenes. However, the evolutionary impact of the need to maintain RBP interactions remains unresolved. Are coding sequences constrained by the need to specify RBP binding motifs? If so, what proportion of mutations are affected? Might sequence evolution also be constrained by the need not to specify motifs that might attract unwanted binding, for instance because it would interfere with exon definition? Here, we have scanned human CDSs for motifs that have been experimentally determined to be recognized by RBPs. We observe two sets of motifs-those that are enriched over nucleotide-controlled null and those that are depleted. Importantly, the depleted set is enriched for motifs recognized by non-CDS binding RBPs. Supporting the functional relevance of our observations, we find that motifs that are more enriched are also slower-evolving. The net effect of this selection to preserve is a reduction in the over-all rate of synonymous evolution of 2-3% in both primates and rodents. Stronger motif depletion, on the other hand, is associated with stronger selection against motif gain in evolution. The challenge faced by our CDSs is therefore not only one of attracting the right RBPs but also of avoiding the wrong ones, all while also evolving under selection pressures related to protein structure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Functional characterization of two paralogs that are novel RNA binding proteins influencing mitochondrial transcripts of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kafková, Lucie; Ammerman, M. L.; Faktorová, D.; Fisk, J. C.; Zimmer, S.L.; Sobotka, Roman; Read, L. K.; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 10 (2012), s. 1846-1861 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : RNA editing * RNA binding protein * ribonuclear protein (RNP) * mitochondria * trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.088, year: 2012 http://rnajournal.cshlp.org/content/18/10/1846

  12. Non-Target Effects of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-Derived Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP) Used in Honey Bee RNA Interference (RNAi) Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Francis M F; Aleixo, Aline C; Barchuk, Angel R; Bomtorin, Ana D; Grozinger, Christina M; Simões, Zilá L P

    2013-01-04

    RNA interference has been frequently applied to modulate gene function in organisms where the production and maintenance of mutants is challenging, as in our model of study, the honey bee, Apis mellifera. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP) is currently commonly used as control in honey bee RNAi experiments, since its gene does not exist in the A. mellifera genome. Although dsRNA-GFP is not expected to trigger RNAi responses in treated bees, undesirable effects on gene expression, pigmentation or developmental timing are often observed. Here, we performed three independent experiments using microarrays to examine the effect of dsRNA-GFP treatment (introduced by feeding) on global gene expression patterns in developing worker bees. Our data revealed that the expression of nearly 1,400 genes was altered in response to dsRNA-GFP, representing around 10% of known honey bee genes. Expression changes appear to be the result of both direct off-target effects and indirect downstream secondary effects; indeed, there were several instances of sequence similarity between putative siRNAs generated from the dsRNA-GFP construct and genes whose expression levels were altered. In general, the affected genes are involved in important developmental and metabolic processes associated with RNA processing and transport, hormone metabolism, immunity, response to external stimulus and to stress. These results suggest that multiple dsRNA controls should be employed in RNAi studies in honey bees. Furthermore, any RNAi studies involving these genes affected by dsRNA-GFP in our studies should use a different dsRNA control.

  13. Analysis of sequencing data for probing RNA secondary structures and protein-RNA binding in studying posttranscriptional regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xihao; Wu, Yang; Lu, Zhi John; Yip, Kevin Y

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been used to study posttranscriptional regulations, where the identification of protein-RNA binding is a major and fast-developing sub-area, which is in turn benefited by the sequencing methods for whole-transcriptome probing of RNA secondary structures. In the study of RNA secondary structures using high-throughput sequencing, bases are modified or cleaved according to their structural features, which alter the resulting composition of sequencing reads. In the study of protein-RNA binding, methods have been proposed to immuno-precipitate (IP) protein-bound RNA transcripts in vitro or in vivo By sequencing these transcripts, the protein-RNA interactions and the binding locations can be identified. For both types of data, read counts are affected by a combination of confounding factors, including expression levels of transcripts, sequence biases, mapping errors and the probing or IP efficiency of the experimental protocols. Careful processing of the sequencing data and proper extraction of important features are fundamentally important to a successful analysis. Here we review and compare different experimental methods for probing RNA secondary structures and binding sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the computational methods proposed for analyzing the corresponding sequencing data. We suggest how these two types of data should be integrated to study the structural properties of RBP binding sites as a systematic way to better understand posttranscriptional regulations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. RNA Binding Proteins in Eye Development and Disease: Implication of Conserved RNA Granule Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Soma; Siddam, Archana D.; Barnum, Carrie E.; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The molecular biology of metazoan eye development is an area of intense investigation. These efforts have led to the surprising recognition that although insect and vertebrate eyes have dramatically different structures, the orthologs or family members of several conserved transcription and signaling regulators such as Pax6, Six3, Prox1 and Bmp4 are commonly required for their development. In contrast, our understanding of post-transcriptional regulation in eye development and disease, particularly regarding the function of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), is limited. We examine the present knowledge of RBPs in eye development in the insect model Drosophila, as well as several vertebrate models such as fish, frog, chicken and mouse. Interestingly, of the 42 RBPs that have been investigated with for their expression or function in vertebrate eye development, 24 (~60%) are recognized in eukaryotic cells as components of RNA granules such as Processing bodies (P-bodies), Stress granules, or other specialized ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. We discuss the distinct developmental and cellular events that may necessitate potential RBP/RNA granule-associated RNA regulon models to facilitate post-transcriptional control of gene expression in eye morphogenesis. In support of these hypotheses, three RBPs and RNP/RNA granule components Tdrd7, Caprin2 and Stau2 are linked to ocular developmental defects such as congenital cataract, Peters anomaly and microphthalmia in human patients or animal models. We conclude by discussing the utility of interdisciplinary approaches such as the bioinformatics tool iSyTE (integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery) to prioritize RBPs for deriving post-transcriptional regulatory networks in eye development and disease. PMID:27133484

  15. The RNA binding protein RBPMS is a selective marker of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Allen R.; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    There are few neurochemical markers that reliably identify retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are a heterogeneous population of cells that integrate and transmit the visual signal from the retina to the central visual nuclei. We have developed and characterized a new set of affinity purified guinea pig and rabbit antibodies against RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS). On Western blots these antibodies recognize a single band at ~24 kDa, corresponding to RBPMS, and they strongly label RGC and displaced RGC (dRGC) somata in mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit and monkey retina. RBPMS immunoreactive cells and RGCs identified by other techniques have a similar range of somal diameters and areas. The density of RBPMS cells in mouse and rat retina is comparable to earlier semi-quantitative estimates of RGCs. RBPMS is mainly expressed in medium and large DAPI-, DRAQ5-, NeuroTrace- and NeuN-stained cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and RBPMS is not expressed in syntaxin (HPC-1) immunoreactive cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and GCL, consistent with their identity as RGCs, and not displaced amacrine cells. In mouse and rat retina, most RBPMS cells are lost following optic nerve crush or transection at three weeks, and all Brn3a, SMI-32 and melanopsin immunoreactive RGCs also express RBPMS immunoreactivity. RBPMS immunoreactivity is localized to CFP-fluorescent RGCs in the B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J mouse line. These findings show that antibodies against RBPMS are robust reagents that exclusively identify RGCs and dRGCs in multiple mammalian species, and they will be especially useful for quantification of RGCs. PMID:24318667

  16. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.......5). To characterize the physiological role of IMP1, we generated IMP1-deficient mice carrying a gene trap insertion in the Imp1 gene. Imp1(-/-) mice were on average 40% smaller than wild-type and heterozygous sex-matched littermates. Growth retardation was apparent from E17.5 and remained permanent into adult life...

  17. Identification of Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein-RNA binding inhibitors using a high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J Stephen

    2012-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection, and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interaction, we developed a fluorescence polarization-based high-throughput drug-screening assay and tested 26 424 chemical compounds for their ability to disrupt an N-RNA complex. From libraries of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, druglike molecules, and natural product extracts, we identified several lead compounds that are promising candidates for medicinal chemistry.

  18. Differential Analysis of Protein Expression in RNA-Binding-Protein Transgenic and Parental Rice Seeds Cultivated under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic plants tolerant to various environmental stresses are being developed to ensure a consistent food supply. We used a transgenic rice cultivar with high saline tolerance by introducing an RNA-binding protein (RBP) from the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum); differences in salt-soluble protein expression between nontransgenic (NT) and RBP rice seeds were analyzed by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), a gel-based proteomic method. To identify RBP-related changes in protein expression under salt stress, NT and RBP rice were cultured with or without 200 mM sodium chloride. Only two protein spots differed between NT and RBP rice seeds cultured under normal conditions, one of which was identified as a putative abscisic acid-induced protein. In NT rice seeds, 91 spots significantly differed between normal and salt-stress conditions. Two allergenic proteins of NT rice seeds, RAG1 and RAG2, were induced by high salt. In contrast, RBP rice seeds yielded seven spots and no allergen spots with significant differences in protein expression between normal and salt-stress conditions. Therefore, expression of fewer proteins was altered in RBP rice seeds by high salt than those in NT rice seeds. PMID:24410502

  19. Differential analysis of protein expression in RNA-binding-protein transgenic and parental rice seeds cultivated under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rika; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Adachi, Reiko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Yamada, Akiyo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2014-02-07

    Transgenic plants tolerant to various environmental stresses are being developed to ensure a consistent food supply. We used a transgenic rice cultivar with high saline tolerance by introducing an RNA-binding protein (RBP) from the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum); differences in salt-soluble protein expression between nontransgenic (NT) and RBP rice seeds were analyzed by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), a gel-based proteomic method. To identify RBP-related changes in protein expression under salt stress, NT and RBP rice were cultured with or without 200 mM sodium chloride. Only two protein spots differed between NT and RBP rice seeds cultured under normal conditions, one of which was identified as a putative abscisic acid-induced protein. In NT rice seeds, 91 spots significantly differed between normal and salt-stress conditions. Two allergenic proteins of NT rice seeds, RAG1 and RAG2, were induced by high salt. In contrast, RBP rice seeds yielded seven spots and no allergen spots with significant differences in protein expression between normal and salt-stress conditions. Therefore, expression of fewer proteins was altered in RBP rice seeds by high salt than those in NT rice seeds.

  20. Combinatorial Control of mRNA Fates by RNA-Binding Proteins and Non-Coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Iadevaia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is mediated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and small non-coding RNAs (e.g., microRNAs that bind to distinct elements in their mRNA targets. Here, we review recent examples describing the synergistic and/or antagonistic effects mediated by RBPs and miRNAs to determine the localisation, stability and translation of mRNAs in mammalian cells. From these studies, it is becoming increasingly apparent that dynamic rearrangements of RNA-protein complexes could have profound implications in human cancer, in synaptic plasticity, and in cellular differentiation.

  1. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range....... Competition experiments indicate that the binding site for the small RNAs on the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase molecule at least partially overlaps that for the synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(I).poly(C). Several of the RNAs function as potent activators of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in vitro......-stranded RNA, can also be activated by RNA ligands with little secondary structure. Since 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase possesses no homology to other known RNA-binding proteins, the development of small specific ligands by SELEX should facilitate studies of RNA-protein interactions and may reveal novel...

  2. Bioinformatics comparisons of RNA-binding proteins of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strains reveal novel virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pritha; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2017-08-24

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved various strategies to counteract host defences. They are also exposed to environments that are undergoing constant changes. Hence, in order to survive, bacteria must adapt themselves to the changing environmental conditions by performing regulations at the transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional levels. Roles of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as virulence factors have been very well studied. Here, we have used a sequence search-based method to compare and contrast the proteomes of 16 pathogenic and three non-pathogenic E. coli strains as well as to obtain a global picture of the RBP landscape (RBPome) in E. coli. Our results show that there are no significant differences in the percentage of RBPs encoded by the pathogenic and the non-pathogenic E. coli strains. The differences in the types of Pfam domains as well as Pfam RNA-binding domains, encoded by these two classes of E. coli strains, are also insignificant. The complete and distinct RBPome of E. coli has been established by studying all known E. coli strains till date. We have also identified RBPs that are exclusive to pathogenic strains, and most of them can be exploited as drug targets since they appear to be non-homologous to their human host proteins. Many of these pathogen-specific proteins were uncharacterised and their identities could be resolved on the basis of sequence homology searches with known proteins. Detailed structural modelling, molecular dynamics simulations and sequence comparisons have been pursued for selected examples to understand differences in stability and RNA-binding. The approach used in this paper to cross-compare proteomes of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains may also be extended to other bacterial or even eukaryotic proteomes to understand interesting differences in their RBPomes. The pathogen-specific RBPs reported in this study, may also be taken up further for clinical trials and/or experimental validations.

  3. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  4. DNA double strand break repair in mammalian cells: role of MRE11 and BLM proteins at the initiation of Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabarz, Anastazja

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions, which can lead to genetic rearrangements. Two pathways are responsible for repairing these lesions: homologous recombination (HR) and non homologous end joining (NHEJ). In our laboratory, an intrachromosomal substrate has been established in order to measure the efficiency and the fidelity of NHEJ in living cells (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004). This approach led us to identify a KU-independent alternative pathway, which uses micro homologies in the proximity of the junction to accomplish repair - the alternative NHEJ (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004, Guirouilh-Barbat et Rass 2007). The goal of my thesis consisted in identifying and characterising major actors of this pathway. In the absence of KU, alternative NHEJ would be initiated by ssDNA resection of damaged ends. We showed that the nuclease activity of MRE11 is necessary for this mechanism. MRE11 overexpression leads to a two fold stimulation of NHEJ efficiency, while the extinction of MRE11 by siRNA results in a two fold decrease. Our results demonstrate that the proteins RAD50 and CtIP act in the same pathway as MRE11. Moreover, in cells deficient for XRCC4, MIRIN - an inhibitor of the MRN complex - leads to a decrease in repair efficiency, implicating MRE11 in alternative NHEJ. We also showed that MRE11 can act in an ATM-dependent and independent manner (Rass et Grabarz Nat Struct Mol Biol 2009). The initiation of break resection needs to be pursued by a more extensive degradation of DNA, which is accomplished in yeast by the proteins Exo1 and Sgs1/Dna2. In human cells, in vitro studies have recently proposed a similar model of a two-step break resection. We chose to elucidate the role of one of the human homologs of Sgs1 - the RecQ helicase BLM - in the resection process. Our experiments show, that he absence of BLM decreases the efficiency of end joining by NHEJ, accompanied by an increase in error-prone events, especially long-range deletions (≥200 nt). This

  5. The Human dsRNA binding protein PACT is unable to functionally substitute for the Drosophila dsRNA binding protein R2D2 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K Dickerman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary function of the dsRNA binding protein (dsRBP PACT/RAX is to activate the dsRNA dependent protein kinase PKR in response to stress signals.  Additionally, it has been identified as a component of the small RNA processing pathway.  A role for PACT/RAX in this pathway represents an important interplay between two modes of post-transcriptional gene regulation.  The function of PACT/RAX in this context is poorly understood.  Thus, additional models are required to clarify the mechanism by which PACT/RAX functions.  In this study, Drosophila melanogaster was employed to identify functionally orthologous dsRNA-binding proteins.  Transgenic Drosophila expressing human PACT were generated to determine whether PACT is capable of functionally substituting for the Drosophila dsRBP R2D2, which has a well-defined role in small RNA biogenesis.  Results presented here indicate that PACT is unable to substitute for R2D2 at the whole organism level.

  6. Coordinateendonucleolytic 5' and 3' trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povirk, Lawrence; Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; F., Lawrence

    2008-02-18

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis slowly trims 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5' {yields} 3' exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5'-phosphate but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3' overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent, and did not require a 5'-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3'-phosphoglycolate or 3'-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2-4 nucleotides from the 3'-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nucleotides from the 5'-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5'-terminal strand, resulting in short 3' overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites.

  7. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance.

  8. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Viktorovskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses replication.Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated.The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with DENV and reveals how DENV modulates and usurps

  9. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  10. The Puf-family RNA-binding protein Puf2 controls sporozoite conversion to liver stages in the malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Müller

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by unicellular, obligate intracellular parasites of the genus Plasmodium. During host switch the malaria parasite employs specialized latent stages that colonize the new host environment. Previous work has established that gametocytes, sexually differentiated stages that are taken up by the mosquito vector, control expression of genes required for mosquito colonization by translational repression. Sexual parasite development is controlled by a DEAD-box RNA helicase of the DDX6 family, termed DOZI. Latency of sporozoites, the transmission stage injected during an infectious blood meal, is controlled by the eIF2alpha kinase IK2, a general inhibitor of protein synthesis. Whether RNA-binding proteins participate in translational regulation in sporozoites remains to be studied. Here, we investigated the roles of two RNA-binding proteins of the Puf-family, Plasmodium Puf1 and Puf2, during sporozoite stage conversion. Our data reveal that, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei, Puf2 participates in the regulation of IK2 and inhibits premature sporozoite transformation. Inside mosquito salivary glands puf2⁻ sporozoites transform over time to round forms resembling early intra-hepatic stages. As a result, mutant parasites display strong defects in initiating a malaria infection. In contrast, Puf1 is dispensable in vivo throughout the entire Plasmodium life cycle. Our findings support the notion of a central role for Puf2 in parasite latency during switch between the insect and mammalian hosts.

  11. Hexanucleotide Repeats in ALS/FTD Form Length-Dependent RNA Foci, Sequester RNA Binding Proteins, and Are Neurotoxic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Bok Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The GGGGCC (G4C2 intronic repeat expansion within C9ORF72 is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Intranuclear neuronal RNA foci have been observed in ALS and FTD tissues, suggesting that G4C2 RNA may be toxic. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of 38× and 72× G4C2 repeats form intranuclear RNA foci that initiate apoptotic cell death in neuronal cell lines and zebrafish embryos. The foci colocalize with a subset of RNA binding proteins, including SF2, SC35, and hnRNP-H in transfected cells. Only hnRNP-H binds directly to G4C2 repeats following RNA immunoprecipitation, and only hnRNP-H colocalizes with 70% of G4C2 RNA foci detected in C9ORF72 mutant ALS and FTD brain tissues. We show that expanded G4C2 repeats are potently neurotoxic and bind hnRNP-H and other RNA binding proteins. We propose that RNA toxicity and protein sequestration may disrupt RNA processing and contribute to neurodegeneration.

  12. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  13. Transition of Plasmodium sporozoites into liver stage-like forms is regulated by the RNA binding protein Pumilio

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S. S.

    2011-05-19

    Many eukaryotic developmental and cell fate decisions that are effected post-transcriptionally involve RNA binding proteins as regulators of translation of key mRNAs. In malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), the development of round, non-motile and replicating exo-erythrocytic liver stage forms from slender, motile and cell-cycle arrested sporozoites is believed to depend on environmental changes experienced during the transmission of the parasite from the mosquito vector to the vertebrate host. Here we identify a Plasmodium member of the RNA binding protein family PUF as a key regulator of this transformation. In the absence of Pumilio-2 (Puf2) sporozoites initiate EEF development inside mosquito salivary glands independently of the normal transmission-associated environmental cues. Puf2- sporozoites exhibit genome-wide transcriptional changes that result in loss of gliding motility, cell traversal ability and reduction in infectivity, and, moreover, trigger metamorphosis typical of early Plasmodium intra-hepatic development. These data demonstrate that Puf2 is a key player in regulating sporozoite developmental control, and imply that transformation of salivary gland-resident sporozoites into liver stage-like parasites is regulated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. 2011 Gomes-Santos et al.

  14. The nuclear RNA binding protein RBP33 influences mRNA and spliced leader RNA abundance in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirovic, Olivera; Trikin, Roman; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Doiron, Nicholas; Jakob, Martin; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) containing proteins are important regulators of gene expression in trypanosomes. Here we expand our current knowledge on the exclusively nuclear localized RRM domain containing protein RBP33 of Trypanosoma brucei. Overexpression of RBP33 leads to a quick growth arrest in G2/M in bloodstream form cells likely due to an overall mRNA- and spliced leader abundance decrease while the ribosomal RNAs remain unaffected. The recombinant RBP33 binds to poly(A) and random sequence RNA in vitro confirming its role as a RNA binding protein. Finally super-resolution microscopy detects RBP33 in small punctae throughout the nucleus and surrounding the nucleolus, however the signal is depleted inside the nucleolus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiphasic and Dynamic Changes in Alternative Splicing during Induction of Pluripotency Are Coordinated by Numerous RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cieply

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS plays a critical role in cell fate transitions, development, and disease. Recent studies have shown that AS also influences pluripotency and somatic cell reprogramming. We profiled transcriptome-wide AS changes that occur during reprogramming of fibroblasts to pluripotency. This analysis revealed distinct phases of AS, including a splicing program that is unique to transgene-independent induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Changes in the expression of AS factors Zcchc24, Esrp1, Mbnl1/2, and Rbm47 were demonstrated to contribute to phase-specific AS. RNA-binding motif enrichment analysis near alternatively spliced exons provided further insight into the combinatorial regulation of AS during reprogramming by different RNA-binding proteins. Ectopic expression of Esrp1 enhanced reprogramming, in part by modulating the AS of the epithelial specific transcription factor Grhl1. These data represent a comprehensive temporal analysis of the dynamic regulation of AS during the acquisition of pluripotency.

  16. RCK: accurate and efficient inference of sequence- and structure-based protein-RNA binding models from RNAcompete data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Yaron; Wang, Yuhao; Berger, Bonnie

    2016-06-15

    Protein-RNA interactions, which play vital roles in many processes, are mediated through both RNA sequence and structure. CLIP-based methods, which measure protein-RNA binding in vivo, suffer from experimental noise and systematic biases, whereas in vitro experiments capture a clearer signal of protein RNA-binding. Among them, RNAcompete provides binding affinities of a specific protein to more than 240 000 unstructured RNA probes in one experiment. The computational challenge is to infer RNA structure- and sequence-based binding models from these data. The state-of-the-art in sequence models, Deepbind, does not model structural preferences. RNAcontext models both sequence and structure preferences, but is outperformed by GraphProt. Unfortunately, GraphProt cannot detect structural preferences from RNAcompete data due to the unstructured nature of the data, as noted by its developers, nor can it be tractably run on the full RNACompete dataset. We develop RCK, an efficient, scalable algorithm that infers both sequence and structure preferences based on a new k-mer based model. Remarkably, even though RNAcompete data is designed to be unstructured, RCK can still learn structural preferences from it. RCK significantly outperforms both RNAcontext and Deepbind in in vitro binding prediction for 244 RNAcompete experiments. Moreover, RCK is also faster and uses less memory, which enables scalability. While currently on par with existing methods in in vivo binding prediction on a small scale test, we demonstrate that RCK will increasingly benefit from experimentally measured RNA structure profiles as compared to computationally predicted ones. By running RCK on the entire RNAcompete dataset, we generate and provide as a resource a set of protein-RNA structure-based models on an unprecedented scale. Software and models are freely available at http://rck.csail.mit.edu/ bab@mit.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by

  17. SpoVG Is a Conserved RNA-Binding Protein That Regulates Listeria monocytogenes Lysozyme Resistance, Virulence, and Swarming Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas P; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2016-04-05

    In this study, we sought to characterize the targets of the abundant Listeria monocytogenes noncoding RNA Rli31, which is required for L. monocytogenes lysozyme resistance and pathogenesis. Whole-genome sequencing of lysozyme-resistant suppressor strains identified loss-of-expression mutations in the promoter of spoVG , and deletion of spoVG rescued lysozyme sensitivity and attenuation in vivo of the rli31 mutant. SpoVG was demonstrated to be an RNA-binding protein that interacted with Rli31 in vitro . The relationship between Rli31 and SpoVG is multifaceted, as both the spoVG -encoded protein and the spoVG 5′-untranslated region interacted with Rli31. In addition, we observed that spoVG -deficient bacteria were nonmotile in soft agar and suppressor mutations that restored swarming motility were identified in the gene encoding a major RNase in Gram-positive bacteria, RNase J1. Collectively, these findings suggest that SpoVG is similar to global posttranscriptional regulators, a class of RNA-binding proteins that interact with noncoding RNA, regulate genes in concert with RNases, and control pleiotropic aspects of bacterial physiology. spoVG is widely conserved among bacteria; however, the function of this gene has remained unclear since its initial characterization in 1977. Mutation of spoVG impacts various phenotypes in Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin resistance, capsule formation, and enzyme secretion in Staphylococcus aureus and also asymmetric cell division, hemolysin production, and sporulation in Bacillus subtilis . Here, we demonstrate that spoVG mutant strains of Listeria monocytogenes are hyper-lysozyme resistant, hypervirulent, nonmotile, and misregulate genes controlling carbon metabolism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SpoVG is an RNA-binding protein. These findings suggest that SpoVG has a role in L. monocytogenes , and perhaps in other bacteria, as a global gene regulator. Posttranscriptional gene regulators help bacteria adapt to

  18. Recombinant expression and purification of the RNA-binding LARP6 proteins from fish genetic model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José M; Horn, Daniel A; Pu, Xinzhu; Lewis, Karen A

    2017-06-01

    The RNA-binding proteins that comprise the La-related protein (LARP) superfamily have been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions, from tRNA maturation to regulation of protein synthesis. To more expansively characterize the biological function of the LARP6 subfamily, we have recombinantly expressed the full-length LARP6 proteins from two teleost fish, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). The yields of the recombinant proteins were enhanced to >2 mg/L using a tandem approach of an N-terminal His 6 -SUMO tag and an iterative solubility screening assay to identify structurally stabilizing buffer components. The domain topologies of the purified fish proteins were probed with limited proteolysis. The fish proteins contain an internal, protease-resistant 40 kDa domain, which is considerably more stable than the comparable domain from the human LARP6 protein. The fish proteins are therefore a lucrative model system in which to study both the evolutionary divergence of this family of La-related proteins and the structure and conformational dynamics of the domains that comprise the LARP6 protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Different forms of soluble cytoplasmic mRNA binding proteins and particles in Xenopus laevis oocytes and embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, M.T.; Krohne, G.; Franke, W.W. (Institute of Cell and Tumor Biology, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the formation of maternally stored mRNPs during Xenopus laevis development, we searched for soluble cytoplasmic proteins of the oocyte that are able to selectively bind mRNAs, using as substrate radiolabeled mRNA. In vitro mRNP assembly in solution was followed by UV-cross-linking and RNase digestion, resulting in covalent tagging of polypeptides by nucleotide transfer. Five polypeptides of approximately 54, 56 60, 70, and 100 kD (p54, p56, p60, p70, and p100) have been found to selectively bind mRNA and assemble into mRNPs. These polypeptides, which correspond to previously described native mRNP components, occur in three different particle classes of approximately 4.5S, approximately 6S, and approximately 15S, as also determined by their reactions with antibodies against p54 and p56. Whereas the approximately 4.5S class contains p42, p60, and p70, probably each in the form of individual molecules or small complexes, the approximately 6S particles appears to consist only of p54 and p56, which occur in a near-stoichiometric ratio suggestive of a heterodimer complex. The approximately 15S particles contain, in addition to p54 and p56, p60 and p100 and this is the single occurring form of RNA-binding p100. We have also observed changes in the in vitro mRNA binding properties of these polypeptides during oogenesis and early embryonic development, in relation to their phosphorylation state and to the activity of an approximately 15S particle-associated protein kinase, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the developmental translational regulation of maternal mRNAs.

  20. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  1. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile, E-mail: cecile.keryer-bibens@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Cosson, Bertrand [UPMC Universite de Paris 06, UMR 7150, Equipe Traduction Cycle Cellulaire et Developpement, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29682 Roscoff (France); CNRS, UMR 7150, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29682 Roscoff (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Paillard, Luc [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Poncet, Didier [Virologie Moleculaire et Structurale, UMR CNRS, 2472, INRA, 1157, 91198 Gif sur Yvette (France); Osborne, H. Beverley, E-mail: beverley.osborne@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France)

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  2. KREPA6 is an RNA-binding protein essential for editosome integrity and survival of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Salvador Zipagan; Schnaufer, Achim; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; Proff, Rosemary; Deng, Junpeng; Hol, Wim; Stuart, Kenneth

    2008-02-01

    Most mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastid protozoa require post-transcriptional RNA editing that inserts and deletes uridylates, a process that is catalyzed by multiprotein editosomes. KREPA6 is the smallest of six editosome proteins that have predicted oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds. Inactivation of KREPA6 expression results in disruption and ultimate loss of approximately 20S editosomes and inhibition of procyclic form cell growth. Gel shift studies show that recombinant KREPA6 binds RNA, but not DNA, with a preference for oligo-(U) whether on the 3' end of gRNA or as a (UU)(12) homopolymer. Thus, KREPA6 is essential for the structural integrity and presence of approximately 20S editosomes and for cell viability. It functions in RNA binding perhaps primarily through the gRNA 3' oligo(U) tail. The significance of these findings to key steps in editing is discussed.

  3. The RNA-binding proteins FMR1, rasputin and caprin act together with the UBA protein lingerer to restrict tissue growth in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Baumgartner

    Full Text Available Appropriate expression of growth-regulatory genes is essential to ensure normal animal development and to prevent diseases like cancer. Gene regulation at the levels of transcription and translational initiation mediated by the Hippo and Insulin signaling pathways and by the TORC1 complex, respectively, has been well documented. Whether translational control mediated by RNA-binding proteins contributes to the regulation of cellular growth is less clear. Here, we identify Lingerer (Lig, an UBA domain-containing protein, as growth suppressor that associates with the RNA-binding proteins Fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMR1 and Caprin (Capr and directly interacts with and regulates the RNA-binding protein Rasputin (Rin in Drosophila melanogaster. lig mutant organs overgrow due to increased proliferation, and a reporter for the JAK/STAT signaling pathway is upregulated in a lig mutant situation. rin, Capr or FMR1 in combination as double mutants, but not the respective single mutants, display lig like phenotypes, implicating a redundant function of Rin, Capr and FMR1 in growth control in epithelial tissues. Thus, Lig regulates cell proliferation during development in concert with Rin, Capr and FMR1.

  4. The RNA-binding proteins FMR1, rasputin and caprin act together with the UBA protein lingerer to restrict tissue growth in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Roland; Stocker, Hugo; Hafen, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate expression of growth-regulatory genes is essential to ensure normal animal development and to prevent diseases like cancer. Gene regulation at the levels of transcription and translational initiation mediated by the Hippo and Insulin signaling pathways and by the TORC1 complex, respectively, has been well documented. Whether translational control mediated by RNA-binding proteins contributes to the regulation of cellular growth is less clear. Here, we identify Lingerer (Lig), an UBA domain-containing protein, as growth suppressor that associates with the RNA-binding proteins Fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMR1) and Caprin (Capr) and directly interacts with and regulates the RNA-binding protein Rasputin (Rin) in Drosophila melanogaster. lig mutant organs overgrow due to increased proliferation, and a reporter for the JAK/STAT signaling pathway is upregulated in a lig mutant situation. rin, Capr or FMR1 in combination as double mutants, but not the respective single mutants, display lig like phenotypes, implicating a redundant function of Rin, Capr and FMR1 in growth control in epithelial tissues. Thus, Lig regulates cell proliferation during development in concert with Rin, Capr and FMR1.

  5. RStrucFam: a web server to associate structure and cognate RNA for RNA-binding proteins from sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pritha; Mathew, Oommen K; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-10-07

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with their cognate RNA(s) to form large biomolecular assemblies. They are versatile in their functionality and are involved in a myriad of processes inside the cell. RBPs with similar structural features and common biological functions are grouped together into families and superfamilies. It will be useful to obtain an early understanding and association of RNA-binding property of sequences of gene products. Here, we report a web server, RStrucFam, to predict the structure, type of cognate RNA(s) and function(s) of proteins, where possible, from mere sequence information. The web server employs Hidden Markov Model scan (hmmscan) to enable association to a back-end database of structural and sequence families. The database (HMMRBP) comprises of 437 HMMs of RBP families of known structure that have been generated using structure-based sequence alignments and 746 sequence-centric RBP family HMMs. The input protein sequence is associated with structural or sequence domain families, if structure or sequence signatures exist. In case of association of the protein with a family of known structures, output features like, multiple structure-based sequence alignment (MSSA) of the query with all others members of that family is provided. Further, cognate RNA partner(s) for that protein, Gene Ontology (GO) annotations, if any and a homology model of the protein can be obtained. The users can also browse through the database for details pertaining to each family, protein or RNA and their related information based on keyword search or RNA motif search. RStrucFam is a web server that exploits structurally conserved features of RBPs, derived from known family members and imprinted in mathematical profiles, to predict putative RBPs from sequence information. Proteins that fail to associate with such structure-centric families are further queried against the sequence-centric RBP family HMMs in the HMMRBP database. Further, all other essential

  6. Modeling the combined effect of RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs in post-transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HafezQorani, Saber; Lafzi, Atefeh; de Bruin, Ruben G; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van der Veer, Eric P; Son, Yeşim Aydın; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-05-19

    Recent studies show that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) function in coordination with each other to control post-transcriptional regulation (PTR). Despite this, the majority of research to date has focused on the regulatory effect of individual RBPs or miRNAs. Here, we mapped both RBP and miRNA binding sites on human 3'UTRs and utilized this collection to better understand PTR. We show that the transcripts that lack competition for HuR binding are destabilized more after HuR depletion. We also confirm this finding for PUM1(2) by measuring genome-wide expression changes following the knockdown of PUM1(2) in HEK293 cells. Next, to find potential cooperative interactions, we identified the pairs of factors whose sites co-localize more often than expected by random chance. Upon examining these results for PUM1(2), we found that transcripts where the sites of PUM1(2) and its interacting miRNA form a stem-loop are more stabilized upon PUM1(2) depletion. Finally, using dinucleotide frequency and counts of regulatory sites as features in a regression model, we achieved an AU-ROC of 0.86 in predicting mRNA half-life in BEAS-2B cells. Altogether, our results suggest that future studies of PTR must consider the combined effects of RBPs and miRNAs, as well as their interactions. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. RNABindRPlus: a predictor that combines machine learning and sequence homology-based methods to improve the reliability of predicted RNA-binding residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Rasna R; Xue, Li C; Wilkins, Katherine; El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions are central to essential cellular processes such as protein synthesis and regulation of gene expression and play roles in human infectious and genetic diseases. Reliable identification of protein-RNA interfaces is critical for understanding the structural bases and functional implications of such interactions and for developing effective approaches to rational drug design. Sequence-based computational methods offer a viable, cost-effective way to identify putative RNA-binding residues in RNA-binding proteins. Here we report two novel approaches: (i) HomPRIP, a sequence homology-based method for predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins; (ii) RNABindRPlus, a new method that combines predictions from HomPRIP with those from an optimized Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on a benchmark dataset of 198 RNA-binding proteins. Although highly reliable, HomPRIP cannot make predictions for the unaligned parts of query proteins and its coverage is limited by the availability of close sequence homologs of the query protein with experimentally determined RNA-binding sites. RNABindRPlus overcomes these limitations. We compared the performance of HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus with that of several state-of-the-art predictors on two test sets, RB44 and RB111. On a subset of proteins for which homologs with experimentally determined interfaces could be reliably identified, HomPRIP outperformed all other methods achieving an MCC of 0.63 on RB44 and 0.83 on RB111. RNABindRPlus was able to predict RNA-binding residues of all proteins in both test sets, achieving an MCC of 0.55 and 0.37, respectively, and outperforming all other methods, including those that make use of structure-derived features of proteins. More importantly, RNABindRPlus outperforms all other methods for any choice of tradeoff between precision and recall. An important advantage of both HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus is that they rely on readily available sequence and sequence

  8. RNABindRPlus: A Predictor that Combines Machine Learning and Sequence Homology-Based Methods to Improve the Reliability of Predicted RNA-Binding Residues in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Rasna R.; Xue, Li C.; Wilkins, Katherine; El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions are central to essential cellular processes such as protein synthesis and regulation of gene expression and play roles in human infectious and genetic diseases. Reliable identification of protein-RNA interfaces is critical for understanding the structural bases and functional implications of such interactions and for developing effective approaches to rational drug design. Sequence-based computational methods offer a viable, cost-effective way to identify putative RNA-binding residues in RNA-binding proteins. Here we report two novel approaches: (i) HomPRIP, a sequence homology-based method for predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins; (ii) RNABindRPlus, a new method that combines predictions from HomPRIP with those from an optimized Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on a benchmark dataset of 198 RNA-binding proteins. Although highly reliable, HomPRIP cannot make predictions for the unaligned parts of query proteins and its coverage is limited by the availability of close sequence homologs of the query protein with experimentally determined RNA-binding sites. RNABindRPlus overcomes these limitations. We compared the performance of HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus with that of several state-of-the-art predictors on two test sets, RB44 and RB111. On a subset of proteins for which homologs with experimentally determined interfaces could be reliably identified, HomPRIP outperformed all other methods achieving an MCC of 0.63 on RB44 and 0.83 on RB111. RNABindRPlus was able to predict RNA-binding residues of all proteins in both test sets, achieving an MCC of 0.55 and 0.37, respectively, and outperforming all other methods, including those that make use of structure-derived features of proteins. More importantly, RNABindRPlus outperforms all other methods for any choice of tradeoff between precision and recall. An important advantage of both HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus is that they rely on readily available sequence and sequence

  9. Classification and purification of proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by RNA-binding specificities.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, M S; Dreyfuss, G

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles display very high binding affinities for different ribonucleotide homopolymers. The specificity of some of these proteins at high salt concentrations and in the presence of heparin allows for their rapid one-step purification from HeLa nucleoplasm. We show that the hnRNP C proteins are poly(U)-binding proteins and compare their specificity to that of the previously described cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein. Thes...

  10. Identification of the RNA recognition element of the RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins and their transcriptome-wide mRNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazi, Thalia A; Leonhardt, Carl S; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Li, Song; Max, Klaas E A; Meyer, Cindy; Yamaji, Masashi; Cekan, Pavol; Jacobs, Nicholas C; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Bognanni, Claudia; Larsson, Erik; Ohler, Uwe; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies implicated the RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) family of proteins in oocyte, retinal ganglion cell, heart, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle development. These RNA-binding proteins contain a single RNA recognition motif (RRM), and their targets and molecular function have not yet been identified. We defined transcriptome-wide RNA targets using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) in HEK293 cells, revealing exonic mature and intronic pre-mRNA binding sites, in agreement with the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of the proteins. Computational and biochemical approaches defined the RNA recognition element (RRE) as a tandem CAC trinucleotide motif separated by a variable spacer region. Similar to other mRNA-binding proteins, RBPMS family of proteins relocalized to cytoplasmic stress granules under oxidative stress conditions suggestive of a support function for mRNA localization in large and/or multinucleated cells where it is preferentially expressed. © 2014 Farazi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures, and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance.

  12. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. The RNA binding site of S8 ribosomal protein of Escherichia coli: Selex and hydroxyl radical probing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, H; Cachia, C; Westhof, E; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C

    1997-03-01

    The RNA binding site of ribosomal protein S8 of Escherichia coli is confined to a small region within the stem of a hairpin in 16S rRNA (nt 588-605/633-651), and thus represents a model system for understanding RNA/protein interaction rules. The S8 binding site on 16S rRNA was suspected to contain noncanonical features difficult to prove with classical genetical or biochemical means. We performed in vitro iterative selection of RNA aptamers that bind S8. For the different aptamers, the interactions with the protein were probed with hydroxyl radicals. Aptamers that were recognized according to the same structural rules as wild-type RNA, but with variations not found in nature, were identified. These aptamers revealed features in the S8 binding site that had been concealed during previous characterizations by the high base conservation throughout evolution. Our data demonstrate that the core structure of the S8 binding site is composed of three interdependent bases (nt 597/641/643), with an essential intervening adenine nucleotide (position 642). The other elements important for the binding site are a base pair (598/640) above the three interdependent bases and a bulged base at position 595, the identity of which is not important. Possible implications on the geometry of the S8 binding site are discussed with the help of a three-dimensional model.

  14. ssHMM: extracting intuitive sequence-structure motifs from high-throughput RNA-binding protein data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David; Krestel, Ralf; Ohler, Uwe; Vingron, Martin; Marsico, Annalisa

    2017-11-02

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in RNA post-transcriptional regulation and recognize target RNAs via sequence-structure motifs. The extent to which RNA structure influences protein binding in the presence or absence of a sequence motif is still poorly understood. Existing RNA motif finders either take the structure of the RNA only partially into account, or employ models which are not directly interpretable as sequence-structure motifs. We developed ssHMM, an RNA motif finder based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) and Gibbs sampling which fully captures the relationship between RNA sequence and secondary structure preference of a given RBP. Compared to previous methods which output separate logos for sequence and structure, it directly produces a combined sequence-structure motif when trained on a large set of sequences. ssHMM's model is visualized intuitively as a graph and facilitates biological interpretation. ssHMM can be used to find novel bona fide sequence-structure motifs of uncharacterized RBPs, such as the one presented here for the YY1 protein. ssHMM reaches a high motif recovery rate on synthetic data, it recovers known RBP motifs from CLIP-Seq data, and scales linearly on the input size, being considerably faster than MEMERIS and RNAcontext on large datasets while being on par with GraphProt. It is freely available on Github and as a Docker image. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Hepatitis delta antigen requires a flexible quasi-double-stranded RNA structure to bind and condense hepatitis delta virus RNA in a ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brittany L; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Casey, John L

    2014-07-01

    The circular genome and antigenome RNAs of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) form characteristic unbranched, quasi-double-stranded RNA secondary structures in which short double-stranded helical segments are interspersed with internal loops and bulges. The ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) formed by these RNAs with the virus-encoded protein hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) perform essential roles in the viral life cycle, including viral replication and virion formation. Little is understood about the formation and structure of these complexes and how they function in these key processes. Here, the specific RNA features required for HDAg binding and the topology of the complexes formed were investigated. Selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) applied to free and HDAg-bound HDV RNAs indicated that the characteristic secondary structure of the RNA is preserved when bound to HDAg. Notably, the analysis indicated that predicted unpaired positions in the RNA remained dynamic in the RNP. Analysis of the in vitro binding activity of RNAs in which internal loops and bulges were mutated and of synthetically designed RNAs demonstrated that the distinctive secondary structure, not the primary RNA sequence, is the major determinant of HDAg RNA binding specificity. Atomic force microscopy analysis of RNPs formed in vitro revealed complexes in which the HDV RNA is substantially condensed by bending or wrapping. Our results support a model in which the internal loops and bulges in HDV RNA contribute flexibility to the quasi-double-stranded structure that allows RNA bending and condensing by HDAg. RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) formed by the hepatitis delta virus RNAs and protein, HDAg, perform critical roles in virus replication. Neither the structures of these RNPs nor the RNA features required to form them have been characterized. HDV RNA is unusual in that it forms an unbranched quasi-double-stranded structure in which short base-paired segments are interspersed

  16. MTE1 Functions with MPH1 in Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimit, Askar; Kim, TaeHyung; Anand, Ranjith P; Meister, Sarah; Ou, Jiongwen; Haber, James E; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2016-05-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks occur upon exposure of cells to ionizing radiation and certain chemical agents or indirectly through replication fork collapse at DNA damage sites. If left unrepaired, double-strand breaks can cause genome instability and cell death, and their repair can result in loss of heterozygosity. In response to DNA damage, proteins involved in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination relocalize into discrete nuclear foci. We identified 29 proteins that colocalize with recombination repair protein Rad52 in response to DNA damage. Of particular interest, Ygr042w/Mte1, a protein of unknown function, showed robust colocalization with Rad52. Mte1 foci fail to form when the DNA helicase gene MPH1 is absent. Mte1 and Mph1 form a complex and are recruited to double-strand breaks in vivo in a mutually dependent manner. MTE1 is important for resolution of Rad52 foci during double-strand break repair and for suppressing break-induced replication. Together our data indicate that Mte1 functions with Mph1 in double-strand break repair. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. RNA-binding protein VICKZ is expressed in a germinal center associated pattern among lymphoma subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natkunam, Y.; Vainer, G.; Zhao, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    and tumorigenesis/metastasis. We generated an antibody that recognizes all three isoforms of VICKZ protein and characterized its expression in normal lymphoid tissue and in lymphoma subtypes. In normal tonsils, VICKZ protein showed a germinal center-specific pattern of expression with staining localized...... to the cytoplasm. Among 868 non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphomas tested by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, staining for VICKZ protein was present in 76% (126/165) of follicular lymphoma, 78% (155/200) of DLBCL, 90% (9/10) of mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma, and 100% (2/2) of Burkitt lymphoma. A subset...... protein in lymphoma subtypes suggests a potential utility for VICKZ in the identification of subgroups of DLBCL associated with different prognoses....

  18. Translation repression by maternal RNA binding protein Zar1 is essential for early oogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Liyun; Yuan, Yue; Cheng, Feng; Fang, Junshun; Zhou, Fang; Ma, Weirui; Jiang, Yan; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Shan, Lingjuan; Chen, Dahua; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of maternal RNA is deposited in oocytes and is reserved for later development. Control of maternal RNA translation during oocyte maturation has been extensively investigated and its regulatory mechanisms are well documented. However, translational regulation of maternal RNA in early oogenesis is largely unexplored. In this study, we generated zebrafish zar1 mutants that result in early oocyte apoptosis and fully penetrant male development. Loss of p53 suppresses the apoptosis in zar1 mutants and restores oocyte development. zar1 immature ovaries show upregulation of proteins implicated in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). More importantly, loss of Zar1 causes marked upregulation of zona pellucida (ZP) family proteins, while overexpression of ZP proteins in oocytes causes upregulation of stress-related activating transcription factor 3 (atf3), arguing that tightly controlled translation of ZP proteins is essential for ER homeostasis during early oogenesis. Furthermore, Zar1 binds to ZP gene mRNAs and represses their translation. Together, our results indicate that regulation of translational repression and de-repression are essential for precisely controlling protein expression during early oogenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Oncoprotein AEG-1 is an Endoplasmic Reticulum RNA Binding Protein Whose Interactome is Enriched In Organelle Resident Protein-Encoding mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Hoffman, Alyson M; Sarkar, Devanand; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2018-02-07

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), an oncogene whose overexpression promotes tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and enhanced chemoresistance, is thought to function primarily as a scaffolding protein, regulating PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Here we report that AEG-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident integral membrane RNA-binding protein (RBP). Examination of the AEG-1 RNA interactome by HITS-CLIP and PAR-CLIP methodologies revealed a high enrichment for endomembrane organelle-encoding transcripts, most prominently those encoding ER resident proteins, and within this cohort, for integral membrane protein-encoding RNAs. Cluster mapping of the AEG-1/RNA interaction sites demonstrated a normalized rank order interaction of coding sequence > 5' untranslated region, with 3' untranslated region interactions only weakly represented. Intriguingly, AEG-1/membrane protein mRNA interaction sites clustered downstream of encoded transmembrane domains, suggestive of a role in membrane protein biogenesis. Secretory and cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs were also represented in the AEG-1 RNA interactome, with the latter category notably enriched in genes functioning in mRNA localization, translational regulation, and RNA quality control. Bioinformatic analyses of RNA binding motifs and predicted secondary structure characteristics indicate that AEG-1 lacks established RNA binding sites though shares the property of high intrinsic disorder commonly seen in RBPs. These data implicate AEG-1 in the localization and regulation of secretory and membrane protein-encoding mRNAs and provide a framework for understanding AEG-1 function in health and disease. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Effects of the RNA-binding protein, KSRP, on innate immune response against Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhe; Cao, Mei; Yi, Sijun; Cheng, Juan; Wang, Lei; Tao, Yuwei; Wu, Daoyan; Peng, Jingshan; Zhang, Mao; Qi, Panpan; Zhao, Jian

    2018-01-08

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) contributes to various gastric diseases such as chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Host innate immune response against the pathogen plays a significant role in elimination of pathogen infection. Importantly, pathogen elimination is closely related to numerous inflammatory-related genes that participate in complex biological response of cells to harmful stimuli. Here we studied effects of the KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), a RNA-binding protein, on innate immune response against H. pylori infection. We found that H. pylori infection downregulated KSRP expression directly, and that KSRP overexpression repressed upregulation of CXCL-2 expression induced by H. pylori and facilitated H. pylori proliferation in vitro. Similarly, KSRP overexpression in H. pylori mice also facilitated H. pylori proliferation and colonization, and induced more severe gastric mucosal damage. Intriguingly, CXCL-2 and HMOX-1 were upregulated in H. pylori infected mice after KSRP overexpression. This difference in expression of these genes implicated that KSRP was closely associated with and directly participated in the innate immune response against H. pylori. These results were beneficial for understanding the in vivo function of KSRP on innate immune response against pathogen infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Allosteric inhibition of a stem cell RNA-binding protein by an intermediary metabolite

    OpenAIRE

    Clingman, Carina C; Deveau, Laura M; Hay, Samantha A; Genga, Ryan M; Shandilya, Shivender MD; Massi, Francesca; Ryder, Sean P

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest When an embryo is developing, stem cells must divide and develop into many specialized types of cells. However, if cell division doesn't stop, or if it restarts later in life, it can cause tumors to form. Musashi-1 is a protein that binds to molecules of RNA and helps to promote cell growth during development: mice that lack this protein have serious brain defects and die shortly after birth. Musashi-1 is usually turned off in adult cells that are not dividing. Sometimes, however...

  2. In vitro binding kinetics of DNA double strand break repair proteins Ku70/80 and DNA-PKcs quantified by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2012-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal types of DNA damage that occurs in eukaryotic cells. There are two distinct pathways of repairing DSBs, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In the NHEJ repairing pathway, DSB recognition and repair initiation is directed by the interaction of DNAbinding subunit Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-PK protein catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Mutations in these proteins result in repair stalling and eventual DNA misrepair that may lead to genomic instability. Studying the binding kinetics of these repair proteins is therefore important for understanding the conditions under which DSB repair stalls. Currently open questions are, what is the minimum DNA length that this complex needs to get a foothold onto a DSB and how tightly does DNA-PKcs bind onto the DNA-Ku70/80 complex. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS) techniques have the potential to give information about the binding kinetics of DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions at the single-molecule level. In this work, FCS/FCCS measurements were performed to explore the minimum DNA base-pair (bp) length that Ku70/80 needed as a foothold to bind effectively onto the tips of different lengths of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments that mimic DSBs. 25 bp, 33 bp and 50 bp of dsDNA were used for these experiments and binding was studied as a function of salt concentration in solution. It was found that the 25 bp binding was weak even at physiological salt concentrations while the dissociation constant (Kd) remained constant for 33 and 50 bp dsDNA strand lengths. These studies indicated that the minimum binding length for the Ku70/8 is in the vicinity of 25 bp. The specificity of binding of Ku70/80 was proven by competitive binding FCCS experiments between Cy5-labeled DNA, GFP-Ku70/80 and titrations of unlabeled Ku70/80. Finally, using FCCS it was possible to estimate

  3. Post-translational modification directs nuclear and hyphal tip localization of Candida albicans mRNA-binding protein Slr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyachet, Chaiyaboot; Beißel, Christian; Li, Xiang; Lorrey, Selena; Mackenzie, Olivia; Martin, Patrick M; O'Brien, Katharine; Pholcharee, Tossapol; Sim, Sue; Krebber, Heike; McBride, Anne E

    2017-05-01

    The morphological transition of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans from budding to hyphal growth has been implicated in its ability to cause disease in animal models. Absence of SR-like RNA-binding protein Slr1 slows hyphal formation and decreases virulence in a systemic candidiasis model, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation in these processes. SR (serine-arginine)-rich proteins influence multiple steps in mRNA metabolism and their localization and function are frequently controlled by modification. We now demonstrate that Slr1 binds to polyadenylated RNA and that its intracellular localization is modulated by phosphorylation and methylation. Wildtype Slr1-GFP is predominantly nuclear, but also co-fractionates with translating ribosomes. The non-phosphorylatable slr1-6SA-GFP protein, in which six serines in SR/RS clusters are substituted with alanines, primarily localizes to the cytoplasm in budding cells. Intriguingly, hyphal cells display a slr1-6SA-GFP focus at the tip near the Spitzenkörper, a vesicular structure involved in molecular trafficking to the tip. The presence of slr1-6SA-GFP hyphal tip foci is reduced in the absence of the mRNA-transport protein She3, suggesting that unphosphorylated Slr1 associates with mRNA-protein complexes transported to the tip. The impact of SLR1 deletion on hyphal formation and function thus may be partially due to a role in hyphal mRNA transport. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Huelgas-Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  5. A Map of the Arenavirus Nucleoprotein-Host Protein Interactome Reveals that Junín Virus Selectively Impairs the Antiviral Activity of Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Protein Kinase (PKR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin R; Hershkowitz, Dylan; Eisenhauer, Philip L; Weir, Marion E; Ziegler, Christopher M; Russo, Joanne; Bruce, Emily A; Ballif, Bryan A; Botten, Jason

    2017-08-01

    Arenaviruses are enveloped negative-strand RNA viruses that cause significant human disease. These viruses encode only four proteins to accomplish the viral life cycle, so each arenavirus protein likely plays unappreciated accessory roles during infection. Here we used immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify human proteins that interact with the nucleoproteins (NPs) of the Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the New World arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) strain Candid #1. Bioinformatic analysis of the identified protein partners of NP revealed that host translation appears to be a key biological process engaged during infection. In particular, NP associates with the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR), a well-characterized antiviral protein that inhibits cap-dependent protein translation initiation via phosphorylation of eIF2α. JUNV infection leads to increased expression of PKR as well as its redistribution to viral replication and transcription factories. Further, phosphorylation of PKR, which is a prerequisite for its ability to phosphorylate eIF2α, is readily induced by JUNV. However, JUNV prevents this pool of activated PKR from phosphorylating eIF2α, even following exposure to the synthetic dsRNA poly(I·C), a potent PKR agonist. This blockade of PKR function is highly specific, as LCMV is unable to similarly inhibit eIF2α phosphorylation. JUNV's ability to antagonize the antiviral activity of PKR appears to be complete, as silencing of PKR expression has no impact on viral propagation. In summary, we provide a detailed map of the host machinery engaged by arenavirus NPs and identify an antiviral pathway that is subverted by JUNV. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important human pathogens for which FDA-approved vaccines do not exist and effective antiviral therapeutics are needed. Design of antiviral treatment options and elucidation of the mechanistic basis of disease pathogenesis will depend

  6. RNA G-quadruplex secondary structure promotes alternative splicing via the RNA-binding protein hnRNPF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huilin; Zhang, Jing; Harvey, Samuel E; Hu, Xiaohui; Cheng, Chonghui

    2017-11-15

    It is generally thought that splicing factors regulate alternative splicing through binding to RNA consensus sequences. In addition to these linear motifs, RNA secondary structure is emerging as an important layer in splicing regulation. Here we demonstrate that RNA elements with G-quadruplex-forming capacity promote exon inclusion. Destroying G-quadruplex-forming capacity while keeping G tracts intact abrogates exon inclusion. Analysis of RNA-binding protein footprints revealed that G quadruplexes are enriched in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNPF)-binding sites and near hnRNPF-regulated alternatively spliced exons in the human transcriptome. Moreover, hnRNPF regulates an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated CD44 isoform switch in a G-quadruplex-dependent manner, which results in inhibition of EMT. Mining breast cancer TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) data sets, we demonstrate that hnRNPF negatively correlates with an EMT gene signature and positively correlates with patient survival. These data suggest a critical role for RNA G quadruplexes in regulating alternative splicing. Modulation of G-quadruplex structural integrity may control cellular processes important for tumor progression. © 2017 Huang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Transcriptomic analyses of RNA-binding proteins reveal eIF3c promotes cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangjian; Li, Shengli; Chen, Di; Chen, Bing; Yu, Tao; Zhao, Fangyu; Wang, Qifeng; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shenglin; Chen, Zhiao; He, Xianghuo

    2017-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play fundamental roles in the RNA life cycle. The aberrant expression of RBPs is often observed in human disease, including cancer. In this study, we screened for the expression levels of 1542 human RBPs in The Cancer Genome Atlas liver hepatocellular carcinoma samples and found 92 consistently upregulated RBP genes in HCC compared with normal samples. Additionally, we undertook a Kaplan-Meier analysis and found that high expression of 15 RBP genes was associated with poor prognosis in patients with HCC. Furthermore, we found that eIF3c promotes HCC cell proliferation in vitro as well as tumorigenicity in vivo. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that high eIF3c expression is positively associated with KRAS, vascular endothelial growth factor, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are closely associated with specific cancer-related gene sets. Our study provides the basis for further investigation of the molecular mechanism by which eIF3c promotes the development and progression of HCC. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. RNA-binding proteins of the NXF (nuclear export factor) family and their connection with the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, L A; Ginanova, V R; Kliver, S F; Yakimova, A O; Atsapkina, A A; Golubkova, E V

    2017-04-01

    The mutual relationship between mRNA and the cytoskeleton can be seen from two points of view. On the one hand, the cytoskeleton is necessary for mRNA trafficking and anchoring to subcellular domains. On the other hand, cytoskeletal growth and rearrangement require the translation of mRNAs that are connected to the cytoskeleton. β-actin mRNA localization may influence dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton. In the cytoplasm, long-lived mRNAs exist in the form of RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes, where they interact with RNA-binding proteins, including NXF (Nuclear eXport Factor). Dm NXF1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein in Drosophila melanogaster that has orthologs in different animals. The universal function of nxf1 genes is the nuclear export of different mRNAs in various organisms. In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the evidence demonstrating that Dm NXF1 fulfils not only universal but also specialized cytoplasmic functions. This protein is detected not only in the nucleus but also in the cytoplasm. It is a component of neuronal granules. Dm NXF1 marks nuclear division spindles during early embryogenesis and the dense body on one side of the elongated spermatid nuclei. The characteristic features of sbr mutants (sbr 10 and sbr 5 ) are impairment of chromosome segregation and spindle formation anomalies during female meiosis. sbr 12 mutant sterile males with immobile spermatozoa exhibit disturbances in the axoneme, mitochondrial derivatives and cytokinesis. These data allow us to propose that the Dm NXF1 proteins transport certain mRNAs in neurites and interact with localized mRNAs that are necessary for dynamic changes of the cytoskeleton. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Structure of noncoding RNA is a determinant of function of RNA binding proteins in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyoshi Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of the noncoding regions of mammalian genomes have been found to be transcribed to generate noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, resulting in intense interest in their biological roles. During the past decade, numerous ncRNAs and aptamers have been identified as regulators of transcription. 6S RNA, first described as a ncRNA in E. coli, mimics an open promoter structure, which has a large bulge with two hairpin/stalk structures that regulate transcription through interactions with RNA polymerase. B2 RNA, which has stem-loops and unstructured single-stranded regions, represses transcription of mRNA in response to various stresses, including heat shock in mouse cells. The interaction of TLS (translocated in liposarcoma with CBP/p300 was induced by ncRNAs that bind to TLS, and this in turn results in inhibition of CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity in human cells. Transcription regulator EWS (Ewing's sarcoma, which is highly related to TLS, and TLS specifically bind to G-quadruplex structures in vitro. The carboxy terminus containing the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG repeat domains in these proteins are necessary for cis-repression of transcription activation and HAT activity by the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain. Especially, the RGG domain in the carboxy terminus of EWS is important for the G-quadruplex specific binding. Together, these data suggest that functions of EWS and TLS are modulated by specific structures of ncRNAs.

  10. Meiotic messenger RNA and noncoding RNA targets of the RNA-binding protein Translin (TSN) in mouse testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Iguchi, Naoko; Yang, Juxiang; Handel, Mary Ann; Hecht, Norman B

    2005-10-01

    In postmeiotic male germ cells, TSN, formerly known as testis brain-RNA binding protein, is found in the cytoplasm and functions as a posttranscriptional regulator of a group of genes transcribed by the transcription factor CREM-tau. In contrast, in pachytene spermatocytes, TSN is found predominantly in nuclei. Tsn-null males show a reduced sperm count and high levels of apoptosis in meiotic cells, suggesting a critical function for TSN during meiosis. To identify meiotic target RNAs that associate in vivo with TSN, we reversibly cross-linked TSN to RNA in testis extracts from 17-day-old and adult mice and immunoprecipitated the complexes with an affinity-purified TSN antibody. Extracts from Tsn-null mice were used as controls. Cloning and sequencing the immunoprecipitated RNAs, we identified four new TSN target mRNAs, encoding diazepam-binding inhibitor-like 5, arylsulfatase A, a tetratricopeptide repeat structure-containing protein, and ring finger protein 139. In contrast to the population of postmeiotic translationally delayed mRNAs that bind TSN, these four mRNAs are initially expressed in pachytene spermatocytes. In addition, anti-TSN also precipitated a nonprotein-coding RNA (ncRNA), which is abundant in nuclei of pachytene spermatocytes and has a putative polyadenylation signal, but no open reading frame. A second similar ncRNA is adjacent to a GGA repeat, a motif frequently associated with recombination hot spots. RNA gel-shift assays confirm that the four new target mRNAs and the ncRNA specifically bind to TSN in testis extracts. These studies have, for the first time, identified both mRNAs and a ncRNA as TSN targets expressed during meiosis.

  11. Analysis of a predicted nuclear localization signal: implications for the intracellular localization and function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA-binding protein Scp160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykailo, Melissa A; McLane, Laura M; Fridovich-Keil, Judith; Corbett, Anita H

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by RNA-binding proteins that modulate the synthesis, processing, transport and stability of various classes of RNA. Some RNA-binding proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and are thought to bind to RNA transcripts in the nucleus and remain bound during translocation to the cytoplasm. One RNA-binding protein that has been hypothesized to function in this manner is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scp160 protein. Although the steady-state localization of Scp160 is cytoplasmic, previous studies have identified putative nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) signals. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that Scp160 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. We exploited a variety of yeast export mutants to capture any potential nuclear accumulation of Scp160 and found no evidence that Scp160 enters the nucleus. These localization studies were complemented by a mutational analysis of the predicted NLS. Results indicate that key basic residues within the predicted NLS of Scp160 can be altered without severely affecting Scp160 function. This finding has important implications for understanding the function of Scp160, which is likely limited to the cytoplasm. Additionally, our results provide strong evidence that the presence of a predicted nuclear localization signal within the sequence of a protein should not lead to the assumption that the protein enters the nucleus in the absence of additional experimental evidence.

  12. Fragmentation in DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhiyong; Suzhou Univ., Suzhou; Zhang Lihui; Li Ming; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are important lesions induced by irradiations. Random breakage model or quantification supported by this concept is suitable to analyze DNA double strand break data induced by low LET radiation, but deviation from random breakage model is more evident in high LET radiation data analysis. In this work we develop a new method, statistical fragmentation model, to analyze the fragmentation process of DNA double strand breaks. After charged particles enter the biological cell, they produce ionizations along their tracks, and transfer their energies to the cells and break the cellular DNA strands into fragments. The probable distribution of the fragments is obtained under the condition in which the entropy is maximum. Under the approximation E≅E 0 + E 1 l + E 2 l 2 , the distribution functions are obtained as exp(αl + βl 2 ). There are two components, the one proportional to exp(βl 2 ), mainly contributes to the low mass fragment yields, the other component, proportional to exp(αl), decreases slowly as the mass of the fragments increases. Numerical solution of the constraint equations provides parameters α and β. Experimental data, especially when the energy deposition is higher, support the statistical fragmentation model. (authors)

  13. Brassica RNA binding protein ERD4 is involved in conferring salt, drought tolerance and enhancing plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Archana N; Tamirisa, Srinath; Rao, K V; Kumar, Vinay; Suprasanna, P

    2016-03-01

    'Early responsive to dehydration' (ERD) genes are a group of plant genes having functional roles in plant stress tolerance and development. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a Brassica juncea 'ERD' gene (BjERD4) which encodes a novel RNA binding protein. The expression pattern of ERD4 analyzed under different stress conditions showed that transcript levels were increased with dehydration, sodium chloride, low temperature, heat, abscisic acid and salicylic acid treatments. The BjERD4 was found to be localized in the chloroplasts as revealed by Confocal microscopy studies. To study the function, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated and analyzed for various morphological and physiological parameters. The overexpressing transgenic lines showed significant increase in number of leaves with more leaf area and larger siliques as compared to wild type plants, whereas RNAi:ERD4 transgenic lines showed reduced leaf number, leaf area, dwarf phenotype and delayed seed germination. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BjERD4 gene also exhibited enhanced tolerance to dehydration and salt stresses, while the knockdown lines were susceptible as compared to wild type plants under similar stress conditions. It was observed that BjERD4 protein could bind RNA as evidenced by the gel-shift assay. The overall results of transcript analysis, RNA gel-shift assay, and transgenic expression, for the first time, show that the BjERD4 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance besides offering new clues about the possible roles of BjERD4 in plant growth and development.

  14. NF-κB-dependent role for cold-inducible RNA binding protein in regulating interleukin 1β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Brochu

    Full Text Available The cold inducible RNA binding protein (CIRBP responds to a wide array of cellular stresses, including short wavelength ultraviolet light (UVC, at the transcriptional and post-translational level. CIRBP can bind the 3'untranslated region of specific transcripts to stabilize them and facilitate their transport to ribosomes for translation. Here we used RNA interference and oligonucleotide microarrays to identify potential downstream targets of CIRBP induced in response to UVC. Twenty eight transcripts were statistically increased in response to UVC and these exhibited a typical UVC response. Only 5 of the 28 UVC-induced transcripts exhibited a CIRBP-dependent pattern of expression. Surprisingly, 3 of the 5 transcripts (IL1B, IL8 and TNFAIP6 encoded proteins important in inflammation with IL-1β apparently contributing to IL8 and TNFAIP6 expression in an autocrine fashion. UVC-induced IL1B expression could be inhibited by pharmacological inhibition of NFκB suggesting that CIRBP was affecting NF-κB signaling as opposed to IL1B mRNA stability directly. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS was used as an activator of NF-κB to further study the potential link between CIRBP and NFκB. Transfection of siRNAs against CIRBP reduced the extent of the LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB DNA binding activity and IL-1β expression. The present work firmly establishes a novel link between CIRBP and NF-κB signaling in response to agents with diverse modes of action. These results have potential implications for disease states associated with inflammation.

  15. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Overexpression of SERBP1 (Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA binding protein in human breast cancer is correlated with favourable prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serce Nuran Bektas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 overexpression is an important prognostic and predictive biomarker in human breast cancer. SERBP1, a protein that is supposed to regulate the stability of PAI-1 mRNA, may play a role in gynaecological cancers as well, since upregulation of SERBP1 was described in ovarian cancer recently. This is the first study to present a systematic characterisation of SERBP1 expression in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue at both the mRNA and the protein level. Methods Using semiquantitative realtime PCR we analysed SERBP1 expression in different normal human tissues (n = 25, and in matched pairs of normal (n = 7 and cancerous breast tissues (n = 7. SERBP1 protein expression was analysed in two independent cohorts on tissue microarrays (TMAs, an initial evaluation set, consisting of 193 breast carcinomas and 48 normal breast tissues, and a second large validation set, consisting of 605 breast carcinomas. In addition, a collection of benign (n = 2 and malignant (n = 6 mammary cell lines as well as breast carcinoma lysates (n = 16 were investigated for SERBP1 expression by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, applying non-radioisotopic in situ hybridisation a subset of normal (n = 10 and cancerous (n = 10 breast tissue specimens from the initial TMA were analysed for SERBP1 mRNA expression. Results SERBP1 is not differentially expressed in breast carcinoma compared to normal breast tissue, both at the RNA and protein level. However, recurrence-free survival analysis showed a significant correlation (P = 0.008 between abundant SERBP1 expression in breast carcinoma and favourable prognosis. Interestingly, overall survival analysis also displayed a tendency (P = 0.09 towards favourable prognosis when SERBP1 was overexpressed in breast cancer. Conclusions The RNA-binding protein SERBP1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer and may represent a

  17. Licensing of gametogenesis, dependent on RNA binding protein DAZL, as a gateway to sexual differentiation of fetal germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Mark E.; Hu, Yueh-Chiang; Lin, Yanfeng; Page, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes and spermatozoa derive from fetal cells shared by the sexes. These primordial germ cells (PGCs) migrate to the developing somatic gonad, giving rise to oocytes or spermatozoa. These opposing sexual fates are determined not by the PGCs’ own sex chromosome constitution (XX or XY), but by the sexual identity of the fetal gonad that they enter. We asked whether PGCs undergo a developmental transition that enables them to respond to feminizing or masculinizing cues from fetal ovary or testis. We conducted in vivo genetic studies of DAZL, an RNA-binding protein expressed in both ovarian and testicular germ cells. We found that germ cells in C57BL/6 Dazl-deficient fetuses—whether XX or XY—migrate to the gonad but do not develop either male or female features. Instead, they remain in a sexually undifferentiated state similar to that of migrating PGCs. Thus, germ cells in C57BL/6 Dazl-deficient fetuses do not respond to sexual cues from ovary or testis, whereas the earlier processes of germ cell specification and migration are unaffected. We propose that PGCs of both XX and XY fetuses undergo licensing, an active developmental transition that enables the resultant gametogenesis-competent cells to respond to feminizing or masculinizing cues produced by the fetal ovary or testis and hence to embark on oogenesis or spermatogenesis. In C57BL/6 mice, Dazl is required for licensing. Licensing serves as a gateway from the embryonic processes shared between the sexes—germ cell specification and migration—to the sex-specific pathways of oogenesis and spermatogenesis. PMID:21504946

  18. Different roles of glycine-rich RNA-binding protein7 in plant defense against Pectobacterium carotovorum, Botrytis cinerea, and tobacco mosaic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Jung; Kim, Jin Seo; Yoo, Seung Jin; Kang, Eun Young; Han, Song Hee; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Young Cheol; McSpadden Gardener, Brian; Kang, Hunseung

    2012-11-01

    Glycine-rich RNA-binding protein7 (AtGRP7) has previously been demonstrated to confer plant defense against Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Here, we show that AtGRP7 can play different roles in plant defense against diverse pathogens. AtGRP7 enhances resistance against a necrotrophic bacterium Pectobacterium carotovorum SCC1 or a biotrophic virus tobacco mosaic virus. By contrast, AtGRP7 plays a negative role in defense against a necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. These results provide evidence that AtGRP7 is a potent regulator in plant defense response to diverse pathogens, and suggest that the regulation of RNA metabolism by RNA-binding proteins is important for plant innate immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein interaction with the mRNA-binding protein IMP1 facilitates its trafficking into motor neuron axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallini, Claudia; Rouanet, Jeremy P; Donlin-Asp, Paul G; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Honglai; Singer, Robert H; Rossoll, Wilfried; Bassell, Gary J

    2014-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease specifically affecting spinal motor neurons. SMA is caused by the homozygous deletion or mutation of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The SMN protein plays an essential role in the assembly of spliceosomal ribonucleoproteins. However, it is still unclear how low levels of the ubiquitously expressed SMN protein lead to the selective degeneration of motor neurons. An additional role for SMN in the regulation of the axonal transport of mRNA-binding proteins (mRBPs) and their target mRNAs has been proposed. Indeed, several mRBPs have been shown to interact with SMN, and the axonal levels of few mRNAs, such as the β-actin mRNA, are reduced in SMA motor neurons. In this study we have identified the β-actin mRNA-binding protein IMP1/ZBP1 as a novel SMN-interacting protein. Using a combination of biochemical assays and quantitative imaging techniques in primary motor neurons, we show that IMP1 associates with SMN in individual granules that are actively transported in motor neuron axons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IMP1 axonal localization depends on SMN levels, and that SMN deficiency in SMA motor neurons leads to a dramatic reduction of IMP1 protein levels. In contrast, no difference in IMP1 protein levels was detected in whole brain lysates from SMA mice, further suggesting neuron specific roles of SMN in IMP1 expression and localization. Taken together, our data support a role for SMN in the regulation of mRNA localization and axonal transport through its interaction with mRBPs such as IMP1. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A deficiency in cold-inducible RNA-binding protein accelerates the inflammation phase and improves wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo, Juan Pablo; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng Lang; Wang, Zhimin; Yen, Hao Ting; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Chronic or non-healing wounds are a major concern in clinical practice and these wounds are mostly associated with diabetes, and venous and pressure ulcers. Wound healing is a complex process involving overlapping phases and the primary phase in this complex cascade is the inflammatory state. While inflammation is necessary for wound healing, a prolonged inflammatory phase leads to impaired healing. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) belongs to a family of cold-shock proteins that are expressed in high levels under stress conditions. Recently, we demonstrated that a deficiency in CIRP led to decreased inflammation and mortality in an experimental model of hemorrhagic shock. Thus, we hypothesized that a deficiency in CIRP would accelerate the inflammatory phase and lead to an improvement in cutaneous wound healing. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, a full-thickness wound was created on the dorsum of wild-type (WT) and CIRP-/- mice. The wound size was measured every other day for 14 days. The wound area was significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice by day 9 and continued to decrease until day 14 compared to the WT mice. In a separate cohort, mice were sacrificed on days 3 and 7 after wounding and the skin tissues were harvested for histological analysis and RNA measurements. On day 3, the mRNA expression of tumor necrossis factor (TNF)-α in the skin tissues was increased by 16-fold in the WT mice, whereas these levels were increased by 65-fold in the CIRP-/- mice. Of note on day 7, while the levels of TNF-α remained high in the WT mice, these levels were significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice. The histological analysis of the wounded skin tissue indicated an improvement as early as day 3 in the CIRP-/- mice, whereas in the WT mice, infiltrated immune cells were still present on day 7. On day 7 in the CIRP-/- mice, Gr-1 expression was low and CD31 expression was high, whereas in the WT mice, Gr-1 expression was high and CD31 expression was low

  2. Identification and molecular characterization of a new nonsegmented double-stranded RNA virus isolated from Culex mosquitoes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isawa, Haruhiko; Kuwata, Ryusei; Hoshino, Keita; Tsuda, Yoshio; Sakai, Kouji; Watanabe, Shumpei; Nishimura, Miho; Satho, Tomomitsu; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Bando, Hisanori; Yano, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    Two infectious agents were isolated from Culex species mosquitoes in Japan and were identified as distinct strains of a new RNA virus by a method for sequence-independent amplification of viral nucleic acids. The virus designated Omono River virus (OMRV) replicated in mosquito cells in which it produced a severe cytopathic effect. Icosahedral virus particles of approximately 40 nm in diameter were detected in the cytoplasm of infected cells. The OMRV genome was observed to consist of a nonsegmented, 7.6-kb double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and contain two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), namely ORF1 and ORF2. ORF1 was found to encode a putative dsRNA-binding protein, a major capsid protein, and other putative proteins, which might be generated by co- and/or post-translational processing of the ORF1 polyprotein precursor, and ORF2 was found to encode a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which could be translated as a fusion with the ORF1 product by a -1 ribosomal frameshift. Phylogenetic analysis based on RdRp revealed that OMRV is closely related to penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus and Drosophila totivirus, which are tentatively assigned to the family Totiviridae. These results indicated that OMRV is a new member of the family of nonsegmented dsRNA viruses infecting arthropod hosts, but not fungal or protozoan hosts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Innate immune recognition of double-stranded RNA triggers increased expression of NKG2D ligands after virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteso, Gloria; Guerra, Susana; Valés-Gómez, Mar; Reyburn, Hugh T

    2017-12-15

    Self/non-self-discrimination by the innate immune system relies on germline-encoded, non-rearranging receptors expressed by innate immune cells recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) receptor is a potent immune-activating receptor that binds human genome-encoded ligands, whose expression is negligible in normal tissues, but increased in stress and disease conditions for reasons that are incompletely understood. Here it is not clear how the immune system reconciles receptor binding of self-proteins with self/non-self-discrimination to avoid autoreactivity. We now report that increased expression of NKG2D ligands after virus infection depends on interferon response factors activated by the detection of viral double-stranded RNA by pattern-recognition receptors (RIG-I/MDA-5) and that NKG2D ligand up-regulation can be blocked by the expression of viral dsRNA-binding proteins. Thus, innate immunity-mediated recognition of viral nucleic acids triggers the infected cell to release interferon for NK cell recruitment and to express NKG2D ligands to become more visible to the immune system. Finally, the observation that NKG2D-ligand induction is a consequence of signaling by pattern-recognition receptors that have been selected over evolutionary time to be highly pathogen-specific explains how the risks of autoreactivity in this system are minimized. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K8 Is an RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Viral DNA Replication in Coordination with a Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongcheng; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Yan

    2018-01-10

    KSHV lytic replication and constant primary infection of fresh cells are crucial for viral tumorigenicity. Virus-encoded b-Zip family protein K8 plays an important role in viral DNA replication in both viral reactivation and de novo infection. The mechanism underlying the functional role of K8 in the viral life cycle is elusive. Here we report that K8 is a RNA binding protein, which also associates with many proteins including other RNA binding proteins. Many K8-involved protein-protein interactions are mediated by RNA. Using a c ross l inking and i mmuno p recipitation (CLIP) procedure combined with high-throughput sequencing, RNAs that are associated with K8 in BCBL-1 cells were identified, that include both viral (PAN, T1.4, T0.7 and etc.) and cellular (MALAT-1, MRP, 7SK and etc.) RNAs. An RNA-binding motif in K8 was defined, and mutation of the motif abolished the ability of K8 binding to many noncoding RNAs as well as viral DNA replication during de novo infection, suggesting that the K8 functions in viral replication are carried out through RNA association. The function of K8 and associated T1.4 RNA was investigated in details and results showed that T1.4 mediates the binding of K8 with ori-Lyt DNA. T1.4-K8 complex physically bound to KSHV ori-Lyt DNA and recruited other proteins and cofactors to assemble replication complex. Depletion of T1.4 abolished the DNA replication in primary infection. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the role of K8 in coordination with T1.4 RNA in regulating KSHV DNA replication during de novo infection. Importance Genome wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome revealed that a large proportion of sequence previously annotated as noncoding region are actually transcribed and give rise to stable RNAs. Emergence of a large number of noncoding RNAs suggests that functional RNA-protein complexes exampled by ribosome or spliceosome are not ancient relics of the last riboorganism but would be well adapted for

  5. Torsional regulation of hRPA-induced unwinding of double-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlaminck, I.; Vidic, I.; Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Kanaar, R.; Lebbink, J.H.G.; Dekker, C.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular single-stranded (ss) DNA is rapidly bound and stabilized by single stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs). Replication protein A, the main eukaryotic SSB, is able to unwind double-stranded (ds) DNA by binding and stabilizing transiently forming bubbles of ssDNA. Here, we study the

  6. Cell cycle-regulated centers of DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Antúnez de Mayolo, Adriana; Mortensen, Uffe H

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is an important pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have studied this process in living cells in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Rad52 as a cell biological marker. In response to DNA damage, Rad52 redistributes itself and forms...... foci specifically during S phase. We have shown previously that Rad52 foci are centers of DNA repair where multiple DNA double-strand breaks colocalize. Here we report a correlation between the timing of Rad52 focus formation and modification of the Rad52 protein. In addition, we show that the two ends...... of a double-strand break are held tightly together in the majority of cells. Interestingly, in a small but significant fraction of the S phase cells, the two ends of a break separate suggesting that mechanisms exist to reassociate and align these ends for proper DNA repair....

  7. The RNA-binding protein, ZC3H14, is required for proper poly(A) tail length control, expression of synaptic proteins, and brain function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Jennifer; Jones, Stephanie K; Fidler, Jonathan; Banerjee, Ayan; Leung, Sara W; Morris, Kevin J; Wong, Jennifer C; Inglis, George Andrew S; Shapiro, Lindsey; Deng, Qiudong; Cutler, Alicia A; Hanif, Adam M; Pardue, Machelle T; Schaffer, Ashleigh; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Moberg, Kenneth H; Bassell, Gary J; Escayg, Andrew; García, Paul S; Corbett, Anita H

    2017-10-01

    A number of mutations in genes that encode ubiquitously expressed RNA-binding proteins cause tissue specific disease. Many of these diseases are neurological in nature revealing critical roles for this class of proteins in the brain. We recently identified mutations in a gene that encodes a ubiquitously expressed polyadenosine RNA-binding protein, ZC3H14 (Zinc finger CysCysCysHis domain-containing protein 14), that cause a nonsyndromic, autosomal recessive form of intellectual disability. This finding reveals the molecular basis for disease and provides evidence that ZC3H14 is essential for proper brain function. To investigate the role of ZC3H14 in the mammalian brain, we generated a mouse in which the first common exon of the ZC3H14 gene, exon 13 is removed (Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13) leading to a truncated ZC3H14 protein. We report here that, as in the patients, Zc3h14 is not essential in mice. Utilizing these Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13mice, we provide the first in vivo functional characterization of ZC3H14 as a regulator of RNA poly(A) tail length. The Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13 mice show enlarged lateral ventricles in the brain as well as impaired working memory. Proteomic analysis comparing the hippocampi of Zc3h14+/+ and Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13 mice reveals dysregulation of several pathways that are important for proper brain function and thus sheds light onto which pathways are most affected by the loss of ZC3H14. Among the proteins increased in the hippocampi of Zc3h14Δex13/Δex13 mice compared to control are key synaptic proteins including CaMK2a. This newly generated mouse serves as a tool to study the function of ZC3H14 in vivo. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Facile synthesis of Graphene Oxide/Double-stranded DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    assembled liquid crystals and three-dimensional hydrogels of graphene oxidewith double-stranded DNA by simple mixing in an aqueous buffer media without unwinding double-strandedDNA to single-stranded DNA. The GO/dsDNA hydrogels have ...

  9. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Cell Migration and Invasion via Down-Regulation of RNA Binding Motif Protein 38 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR exerts regulatory functions in various biological processes in cancer cells, such as proliferation, apoptosis, mobility, and invasion. We previously found that HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits oncogenic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in promoting HCC cell migration and invasion. Firstly, we profiled its gene expression pattern by microarray analysis of HOTAIR loss in Bel-7402 HCC cell line. The results showed that 129 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 167 genes were significantly up-regulated (fold change >2, p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RNA binding proteins were involved in this biological process. HOTAIR suppression using RNAi strategy with HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38. Moreover, the expression levels of RBM38 in HCC specimens were significantly lower than paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, knockdown of HOTAIR resulted in a decrease of cell migration and invasion, which could be specifically rescued by down-regulation of RBM38. Taken together, HOTAIR could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells by inhibiting RBM38, which indicated critical roles of HOTAIR and RBM38 in HCC progression.

  10. Deficiency of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair Does Not Impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence in Multiple Animal Models of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Brook E.; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA bre...

  11. The Conserved, Disease-Associated RNA Binding Protein dNab2 Interacts with the Fragile X Protein Ortholog in Drosophila Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick S. Bienkowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila dNab2 protein is an ortholog of human ZC3H14, a poly(A RNA binding protein required for intellectual function. dNab2 supports memory and axon projection, but its molecular role in neurons is undefined. Here, we present a network of interactions that links dNab2 to cytoplasmic control of neuronal mRNAs in conjunction with the fragile X protein ortholog dFMRP. dNab2 and dfmr1 interact genetically in control of neurodevelopment and olfactory memory, and their encoded proteins co-localize in puncta within neuronal processes. dNab2 regulates CaMKII, but not futsch, implying a selective role in control of dFMRP-bound transcripts. Reciprocally, dFMRP and vertebrate FMRP restrict mRNA poly(A tail length, similar to dNab2/ZC3H14. Parallel studies of murine hippocampal neurons indicate that ZC3H14 is also a cytoplasmic regulator of neuronal mRNAs. Altogether, these findings suggest that dNab2 represses expression of a subset of dFMRP-target mRNAs, which could underlie brain-specific defects in patients lacking ZC3H14.

  12. Phosphorylation: The Molecular Switch of Double-Strand Break Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Summers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs is vital to maintaining genomic stability. In mammalian cells, DSBs are resolved in one of the following complex repair pathways: nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination (HR, or the inclusive DNA damage response (DDR. These repair pathways rely on factors that utilize reversible phosphorylation of proteins as molecular switches to regulate DNA repair. Many of these molecular switches overlap and play key roles in multiple pathways. For example, the NHEJ pathway and the DDR both utilize DNA-PK phosphorylation, whereas the HR pathway mediates repair with phosphorylation of RPA2, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Also, the DDR pathway utilizes the kinases ATM and ATR, as well as the phosphorylation of H2AX and MDC1. Together, these molecular switches regulate repair of DSBs by aiding in DSB recognition, pathway initiation, recruitment of repair factors, and the maintenance of repair mechanisms.

  13. Assembly of large icosahedral double-stranded RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poranen, Minna M; Bamford, Dennis H

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses are a diverse group of viruses infecting hosts from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Among the hosts are humans, domestic animals, and economically important plant species. Fine details of high-resolution virion structures have revealed common structural characteristics unique to these viruses including an internal icosahedral capsid built from 60 asymmetric dimers (120 monomers!) of the major coat protein. Here we focus mainly on the structures and assembly principles of large icosahedral dsRNA viruses belonging to the families of Cystoviridae and Reoviridae. It is obvious that there are a variety of assembly pathways utilized by different viruses starting from similar building blocks and reaching in all cases a similar capsid architecture. This is true even with closely related viruses indicating that the assembly pathway per se is not an indicator of relatedness and is achieved with minor changes in the interacting components.

  14. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cells...

  15. Prevention of the β-amyloid peptide-induced inflammatory process by inhibition of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in primary murine mixed co-cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terro F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There has been little success with anti-inflammatory drugs in AD, while the promise of anti-inflammatory treatment is more evident in experimental models. A new anti-inflammatory strategy requires a better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Among the plethora of signaling pathways activated by β-amyloid (Aβ peptides, the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB pathway could be an interesting target. In virus-infected cells, double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR controls the NF-κB signaling pathway. It is well-known that PKR is activated in AD. This led us to study the effect of a specific inhibitor of PKR on the Aβ42-induced inflammatory response in primary mixed murine co-cultures, allowing interactions between neurons, astrocytes and microglia. Methods Primary mixed murine co-cultures were prepared in three steps: a primary culture of astrocytes and microglia for 14 days, then a primary culture of neurons and astrocytes which were cultured with microglia purified from the first culture. Before exposure to Aβ neurotoxicity (72 h, co-cultures were treated with compound C16, a specific inhibitor of PKR. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-6 were assessed by ELISA. Levels of PT451-PKR and activation of IκB, NF-κB and caspase-3 were assessed by western blotting. Apoptosis was also followed using annexin V-FITC immunostaining kit. Subcellular distribution of PT451-PKR was assessed by confocal immunofluorescence and morphological structure of cells by scanning electron microscopy. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA followed by a Newman-Keuls' post hoc test Results In these co-cultures, PKR inhibition prevented Aβ42-induced activation of IκB and NF-κB, strongly decreased production and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL-1β, and limited apoptosis. Conclusion In spite of the

  16. Heterologous expression of a novel Zoysia japonica salt-induced glycine-rich RNA-binding protein gene, ZjGRP, caused salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ke; Tan, Penghui; Xiao, Guozeng; Han, Liebao; Chang, Zhihui; Chao, Yuehui

    2017-01-01

    A novel Zoysia japonica salt-induced glycine-rich RNA-binding protein gene was cloned in this study and its overexpression caused salt sensitivity in transgenic Arabidopsis. Glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs) play crucial roles in diverse plant developmental processes. However, the mechanisms and functions of GRPs in salinity stress responses remain largely unknown. In this study, rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) PCR methods was adopted to isolate ZjGRP from Zosyia japonica, a salt-tolerant grass species. ZjGRP cDNA was 456 bp in length, corresponding to 151 amino acids. ZjGRP was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was found particularly abundantly in stomatal guard cells. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that ZjGRP was expressed in the roots, stems, and leaves of Zoysia japonica, with the greatest expression seen in the fast-growing leaves. Furthermore, expression of ZjGRP was strongly induced by treatment with NaCl, ABA, MeJA, and SA. Overexpression of ZjGRP in Arabidopsis reduced the rate of germination and retarded seedling growth. ZjGRP-overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana exhibited weakened salinity tolerance, likely as a result of effects on ion transportation, osmosis, and antioxidation. This study indicates that ZjGRP plays an essential role in inducing salt sensitivity in transgenic plants.

  17. Insulin-Like Growth Factor II mRNA-Binding Protein 3 Expression Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Acral Lentiginous Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shuan Sheen

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3 is an RNA-binding protein expressed in multiple cancers, including melanomas. However, the expression of IMP-3 has not been investigated in acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM. This study sought to elucidate its prognostic value in ALMs. IMP-3 expression was studied in 93 patients diagnosed with ALM via immunohistochemistry. Univariate and multivariate analyses for survival were performed, according to clinical and histologic parameters, using the Cox proportional hazard model. Survival curves were graphed using the Kaplan-Meier method. IMP-3 was over-expressed in 70 out of 93 tumors (75.3%. IMP-3 expression correlated with thick and high-stage tumor and predicted poorer overall, melanoma-specific, recurrence-free and distant metastasis-free survivals (P = 0.002, 0.006, 0.008 and 0.012, respectively. Further analysis showed that patients with tumor thickness ≤ 4.0 mm and positive IMP-3 expression had a significantly worse melanoma-specific survival than those without IMP-3 expression (P = 0.048. IMP-3 (hazard ratio 3.67, 95% confidence intervals 1.35-9.97, P = 0.011 was confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for melanoma-specific survival in multivariate survival analysis. Positive IMP-3 expression was an important prognostic factor for ALMs.

  18. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus-Angel; Sauri, Ana; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed

  19. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Morales

    Full Text Available Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR and single strand annealing (SSA, which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the "error prone" non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair.

  20. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria E; Derbes, Rebecca S; Ade, Catherine M; Ortego, Jonathan C; Stark, Jeremy; Deininger, Prescott L; Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR) and single strand annealing (SSA), which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the "error prone" non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair.

  1. Spatial regulation of the KH domain RNA-binding protein Rnc1 mediated by a Crm1-independent nuclear export system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ryosuke; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Akitomo; Takada, Makoto; Ito, Yuna; Hagihara, Kanako; Inari, Masahiro; Kita, Ayako; Fukao, Akira; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Hirai, Shinya; Tani, Tokio; Sugiura, Reiko

    2017-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, including mRNA stability, transport and translation. Fission yeast rnc1 + encodes a K Homology (KH)-type RBP, which binds and stabilizes the Pmp1 MAPK phosphatase mRNA thereby suppressing the Cl - hypersensitivity of calcineurin deletion and MAPK signaling mutants. Here, we analyzed the spatial regulation of Rnc1 and discovered a putative nuclear export signal (NES) Rnc1 , which dictates the cytoplasmic localization of Rnc1 in a Crm1-independent manner. Notably, mutations in the NES Rnc1 altered nucleocytoplasmic distribution of Rnc1 and abolished its function to suppress calcineurin deletion, although the Rnc1 NES mutant maintains the ability to bind Pmp1 mRNA. Intriguingly, the Rnc1 NES mutant destabilized Pmp1 mRNA, suggesting the functional importance of the Rnc1 cytoplasmic localization. Mutation in Rae1, but not Mex67 deletion or overproduction, induced Rnc1 accumulation in the nucleus, suggesting that Rnc1 is exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via the mRNA export pathway involving Rae1. Importantly, mutations in the Rnc1 KH-domains abolished the mRNA-binding ability and induced nuclear localization, suggesting that Rnc1 may be exported from the nucleus together with its target mRNAs. Collectively, the functional Rae1-dependent mRNA export system may influence the cytoplasmic localization and function of Rnc1. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. RNA Binding Protein RBM38 Regulates Expression of the 11-kDa Protein of Parvovirus B19 which Facilitates Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Chen, Aaron Yun; Huang, Chun; Xu, Peng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Du, Aifang; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-02-07

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) expresses a single precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), which undergoes alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation to generate 12 viral mRNA transcripts that encode two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2) and three nonstructural proteins (NS1, 7.5-kDa, and 11-kDa). Splicing at the second 5' donor site (D2) of the B19V pre-mRNA is essential for the expression of VP2 and 11-kDa. We have previously identified that a cis -acting intronic splicing enhancer 2 (ISE2) that lies immediately after the D2 site facilitates recognition of the D2 donor for its efficient splicing. In this study, we report that ISE2 is critical for expression of the 11-kDa viral non-structural protein. We found that ISE2 harbors a consensus RNA-binding motif protein 38 (RBM38) binding sequence-5' -UGUGUG-3'. RBM38 is expressed during the middle stage of erythropoiesis. We first confirmed that the RBM38 binds specifically with the ISE2 element in vitro. Knockdown of RBM38 significantly decreases the level of the spliced mRNA at D2 that encodes 11-kDa protein and, thereafter, expression of the 11-kDa protein, but not the D2-spliced mRNA that encodes VP2. Importantly, we found that the 11-kDa protein enhances viral DNA replication and virion release. Accordingly, knockdown of RBM38 decreases virus replication via downregulating 11-kDa expression. Taken together, these results suggest that the 11-kDa protein facilitates B19V DNA replication, and that RBM38 is an essential host factor for B19V pre-mRNA splicing and for the expression of the 11-kDa protein. IMPORTANCE B19V is a human pathogen that can cause fifth disease, arthropathy, anemia in immune compromised patients and sickle cell disease patients, myocarditis, and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. Human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) are most susceptible to B19V infection and fully support viral DNA replication. The exclusive tropism of B19V to erythroid lineage cells is not only dependent on the expression of viral

  3. Neuroprotection via RNA-binding protein RBM3 expression is regulated by hypothermia but not by hypoxia in human SK-N-SH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal LM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lisa-Maria Rosenthal,1 Giang Tong,1 Christoph Walker,1 Sylvia J Wowro,1 Jana Krech,1 Constanze Pfitzer,1,2 Georgia Justus,1 Felix Berger,1,3 Katharina Rose Luise Schmitt1 1Department of Congenital Heart Disease/Pediatric Cardiology, German Heart Institute Berlin, 2Berlin Institute of Health (BIH, 3Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Charité – University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany Objective: Therapeutic hypothermia is an established treatment for perinatal asphyxia. Yet, many term infants continue to die or suffer from neurodevelopmental disability. Several experimental studies have demonstrated a beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate hypothermia after hypoxic injury, but the understanding of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains incomplete. In general, global protein synthesis is attenuated by hypothermia, but a small group of RNA-binding proteins including the RNA-binding motif 3 (RBM3 is upregulated in response to cooling. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model to investigate the effects of hypoxia and hypothermia on neuronal cell survival, as well as to examine the kinetics of concurrent cold-shock protein RBM3 gene expression. Methods: Experiments were performed by using human SK-N-SH neurons exposed to different oxygen concentrations (21%, 8%, or 0.2% O2 for 24 hours followed by moderate hypothermia (33.5°C or normothermia for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Cell death was determined by quantification of lactate dehydrogenase and neuron-specific enolase releases into the cell cultured medium, and cell morphology was assessed by using immunofluorescence staining. The regulation of RBM3 gene expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis.Results: Exposure to hypoxia (0.2% O2 for 24 hours resulted in significantly increased cell death in SK-N-SH neurons, whereas exposure to 8% O2 had no significant impact on cell viability. Post-hypoxia treatment with

  4. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Pezet-Valdez

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25 from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25 was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A polymerase (EhPAP that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite.

  5. The RNA binding protein Tudor-SN is essential for stress tolerance and stabilizes levels of stress-responsive mRNAs encoding secreted proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei dit Frey, Nicolas; Muller, Philippe; Jammes, Fabien; Kizis, Dimosthenis; Leung, Jeffrey; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Bianchi, Michele Wolfe

    2010-05-01

    Tudor-SN (TSN) copurifies with the RNA-induced silencing complex in animal cells where, among other functions, it is thought to act on mRNA stability via the degradation of specific dsRNA templates. In plants, TSN has been identified biochemically as a cytoskeleton-associated RNA binding activity. In eukaryotes, it has recently been identified as a conserved primary target of programmed cell death-associated proteolysis. We have investigated the physiological role of TSN by isolating null mutations for two homologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The double mutant tsn1 tsn2 displays only mild growth phenotypes under nonstress conditions, but germination, growth, and survival are severely affected under high salinity stress. Either TSN1 or TSN2 alone can complement the double mutant, indicating their functional redundancy. TSN accumulates heterogeneously in the cytosol and relocates transiently to a diffuse pattern in response to salt stress. Unexpectedly, stress-regulated mRNAs encoding secreted proteins are significantly enriched among the transcripts that are underrepresented in tsn1 tsn2. Our data also reveal that TSN is important for RNA stability of its targets. These findings show that TSN is essential for stress tolerance in plants and implicate TSN in new, potentially conserved mechanisms acting on mRNAs entering the secretory pathway.

  6. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Ruben G; van der Veer, Eric P; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M

    2016-02-24

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3'UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity.

  7. Involvement of an RNA binding protein containing Alba domain in the stage-specific regulation of beta-amastin expression in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Silva, Tais Caroline; Teixeira, Santuza M R

    2017-01-01

    Amastins are surface glycoproteins, first identified in amastigotes of T. cruzi but later found to be expressed in several Leishmania species, as well as in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Amastins are encoded by a diverse gene family that can be grouped into four subfamilies named α, β, γ, and δ amastins. Differential expression of amastin genes results from regulatory mechanisms involving changes in mRNA stability and/or translational control. Although distinct regulatory elements were identified in the 3' UTR of T. cruzi and Leishmania amastin mRNAs, RNA binding proteins involved with amastin gene regulation have only being characterized in L. infantum where an Alba-domain protein (LiAlba20) able to bind to the 3' UTR of a δ-amastin mRNA was identified. Here we investigated the role of TcAlba30, the LiAlba20 homologue in T. cruzi, in the post transcriptional regulation of amastin genes. TcAlba30 transcripts are present in all stages of the T. cruzi life cycle. RNA immunoprecipitation assays using a transfected cell line expressing a cMyc tagged TcAlba30 revealed that TcAlba30 can interact with β-amastin mRNA. In addition, over-expression of TcAlba30 in epimastigotes resulted in 50% decreased levels of β-amastin mRNAs compared to wild type parasites. Since luciferase assays indicated the presence of regulatory elements in the 3' UTR of β-amastin mRNA and reduced levels of luciferase mRNA were found in parasites over expressing TcAlba30, we conclude that TcAlba30 acts as a T. cruzi RNA binding protein involved in the negative control of β-amastin expression through interactions with its 3'UTR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Generation of mice deficient in RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and characterization of its role in innate immune responses and cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yanai, Hideyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Naka, Daiji [ZOEGENE Corp., 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 227-0033 (Japan); Goto, Ayana; Ao, Tomoka [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanno, Yuji [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Takeda, Kiyoshi [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshinori [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Honda, Kenya [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Taniguchi, Tadatsugu, E-mail: tada@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) as CpG-B DNA-binding protein. {yields} RBM3 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and co-localized with CpG-B DNA. {yields} We newly generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice. {yields} DNA-mediated cytokine gene induction was normally occured in Rbm3{sup -/-} cells. {yields}Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs showed poorer proliferation rate and increased number of G2-phase cells. -- Abstract: The activation of innate immune responses is critical to host defense against microbial infections, wherein nucleic acid-sensing pattern recognition receptors recognize DNA or RNA from viruses or bacteria and activate downstream signaling pathways. In a search for new DNA-sensing molecules that regulate innate immune responses, we identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), whose role has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth. In this study, we generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice to study the role of RBM3 in immune responses and cell growth. Despite evidence for its interaction with immunogenic DNA in a cell, no overt phenotypic abnormalities were found in cells from Rbm3{sup -/-} mice for the DNA-mediated induction of cytokine genes. Interestingly, however, Rbm3{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed poorer proliferation rates as compared to control MEFs. Further cell cycle analysis revealed that Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs have markedly increased number of G2-phase cells, suggesting a hitherto unknown role of RBM3 in the G2-phase control. Thus, these mutant mice and cells may provide new tools with which to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell cycle and oncogenesis.

  9. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23 0 )> rad51-1(30 0 )> rad54-3(36 0 ). At 36 0 , rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23 0 , they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36 0 shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation

  10. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)> rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23/sup 0/, they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36/sup 0/ shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation. (ERB)

  11. PTEN expression is upregulated by a RNA-binding protein RBM38 via enhancing its mRNA stability in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu-Jie; Wu, Jing; Shi, Liang; Li, Xiao-Xia; Zhu, Lei; Sun, Xi; Qian, Jia-Yi; Wang, Ying; Wei, Ji-Fu; Ding, Qiang

    2017-10-19

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog gene on chromosome 10), a well-characterized tumor suppressor, is a key regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway involved in cell survival, metastasis and cell renewal. PTEN expression is closely related to the phenotype, prognosis and drug selection in breast cancer. It is mainly regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional modifications. RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38), an RNA-binding protein (RBP) and a target of P53 family, plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular processing, especially in post-transcription regulation and gene transcription. In this study, we investigated a new post-transcription regulation mechanism of PTEN expression by RBM38 in breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry, lentivirus transfections, Western blotting analysis, qRT-PCR and ELISA were used to conduct the relation between RBM38 and PTEN. RNA immunoprecipitation, RNA electrophoretic mobility shift and dual-luciferase reporter assays were employed to identify the direct binding sites of RBM38 with PTEN transcript. Colony formation assay was conducted to confirm the function of PTEN in RBM38-induced growth suppression. PTEN expression was positively associated with the expression of RBM38 in breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cells. Moreover, RBM38 stabilized PTEN transcript to enhance PTEN expression via binding to multiple AU/U- rich elements (AREs) in 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of PTEN transcript. Additionally, specific inhibitors of PTEN activity and small interfering (siRNA) of PTEN expression inhibited RBM38-mediated suppression of proliferation, which implied that RBM38 acted as a tumor suppressor partly by enhancing PTEN expression. The present study revealed a new PTEN regulating mechanism that PTEN was positively regulated by RBM38 via stabilizing its transcript stability, which in turn alleviated RBM38-mediated growth suppression.

  12. Regulation of Gene Expression with Double-Stranded Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielinska, Anna; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Zhang, Liquan; Nabel, Gary J.

    1990-11-01

    Alteration of gene transcription by inhibition of specific transcriptional regulatory proteins is necessary for determining how these factors participate in cellular differentiation. The functions of these proteins can be antagonized by several methods, each with specific limitations. Inhibition of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins was achieved with double-stranded (ds) phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contained octamer or kappaB consensus sequences. The phosphorothioate oligonucleotides specifically bound either octamer transcription factor or nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. The modified oligonucleotides accumulated in cells more effectively than standard ds oligonucleotides and modulated gene expression in a specific manner. Octamer-dependent activation of a reporter plasmid or NF-kappaB-dependent activation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enhancer was inhibited when the appropriate phosphorothioate oligonucleotide was added to a transiently transfected B cell line. Addition of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contained the octamer consensus to Jurkat T leukemia cells inhibited interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion to a degree similar to that observed with a mutated octamer site in the IL-2 enhancer. The ds phosphorothioate oligonucleotides probably compete for binding of specific transcription factors and may provide anti-viral, immunosuppressive, or other therapeutic effects.

  13. Characterization of the Expression of the RNA Binding Protein eIF4G1 and Its Clinicopathological Correlation with Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfang Li

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most lethal type of malignant tumor in gynecological cancers and is associated with a high percentage of late diagnosis and chemotherapy resistance. Thus, it is urgent to identify a tumor marker or a molecular target that allows early detection and effective treatment. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs are crucial in various cellular processes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma, 1(eIF4G1, an RNA-binding protein, facilitates the recruitment of mRNA to the ribosome, which is a rate-limiting step during the initiation phase of protein synthesis. However, little is known regarding the characteristics of eIF4G1 expression and its clinical significance in ovarian cancer. Therefore, we propose to investigate the expression and clinicopathological significance of eIF4G1 in ovarian cancer patients.We performed Real-time PCR in 40 fresh serous ovarian cancer tissues and 27 normal ovarian surface epithelial cell specimens to assess eIF4G1mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was used to examine the expression of eIF4G1 at the protein level in 134 patients with serous ovarian cancer and 18 normal ovarian tissues. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the correlation of the eIF4G1 protein levels with the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in ovarian cancer.The expression of eIF4G1 was upregulated in serous ovarian cancer tissues at both the mRNA (P = 0.0375 and the protein (P = 0.0007 levels. The eIF4G1 expression was significantly correlated with the clinical tumor stage (P = 0.0004 and omentum metastasis (P = 0.024. Moreover, patients with low eIF4G1 protein expression had a longer overall survival time (P = 0.026.These data revealed that eIF4G1 is markedly expressed in serous ovarian cancer and that upregulation of the eIF4G1 protein expression is significantly associated with an advanced tumor stage. Besides, the patients with lower expression of eIF4G1 tend

  14. Extracellular vesicles shed by melanoma cells contain a modified form of H1.0 linker histone and H1.0 mRNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Puleo, Veronica; Colletta, Oriana; Fricano, Anna; Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are now recognized as a fundamental way for cell-to-cell horizontal transfer of properties, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Most of EV-mediated cross-talk among cells depend on the exchange of proteins, and nucleic acids, among which mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs such as different species of miRNAs. Cancer cells, in particular, use EVs to discard molecules which could be dangerous to them (for example differentiation-inducing proteins such as histone H1.0, or antitumor drugs), to transfer molecules which, after entering the surrounding cells, are able to transform their phenotype, and even to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance. Herein we report that melanoma cells not only secrete EVs which contain a modified form of H1.0 histone, but also transport the corresponding mRNA. Given the already known role in tumorigenesis of some RNA binding proteins (RBPs), we also searched for proteins of this class in EVs. This study revealed the presence in A375 melanoma cells of at least three RBPs, with apparent MW of about 65, 45 and 38 kDa, which are able to bind H1.0 mRNA. Moreover, we purified one of these proteins, which by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was identified as the already known transcription factor MYEF2.

  15. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein S8 from Thermus thermophilus reveals a high degree of structural conservation of a specific RNA binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskaya, N; Tishchenko, S; Nikulin, A; al-Karadaghi, S; Liljas, A; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C; Garber, M; Nikonov, S

    1998-05-29

    S8 is one of the core ribosomal proteins. It binds to 16 S RNA with high affinity and independently of other ribosomal proteins. It also acts as a translational repressor in Escherichia coli by binding to its own mRNA. The structure of Thermus thermophilus S8 has been determined by the method of multiple isomorphous replacement at 2.9 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 16.2% (Rfree 27.5%). The two domains of the structure have an alpha/beta fold and are connected by a long protruding loop. The two molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal interact through an extensive hydrophobic core and form a tightly associated dimer, while symmetry-related molecules form a joint beta-sheet of mixed type. This type of protein-protein interaction could be realized within the ribosomal assembly. A comparison of the structures of T. thermophilus and Bacillus stearothermophilus S8 shows that the interdomain loop is eight residues longer in the former and reveals high structural conservation of an extensive region, located in the C-terminal domain. From mutational studies this region was proposed earlier to be involved in specific interaction with RNA. On the basis of these data and on the comparison of the two structures of S8, it is proposed that the three-dimensional structure of specific RNA binding sites in ribosomal proteins is highly conserved among different species.

  16. Characterization of the mouse Dazap1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein that interacts with infertility factors DAZ and DAZL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salido Eduardo C

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DAZAP1 (DAZ Associated Protein 1 was originally identified by a yeast two-hybrid system through its interaction with a putative male infertility factor, DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia. In vitro, DAZAP1 interacts with both the Y chromosome-encoded DAZ and an autosome-encoded DAZ-like protein, DAZL. DAZAP1 contains two RNA-binding domains (RBDs and a proline-rich C-terminal portion, and is expressed most abundantly in the testis. To understand the biological function of DAZAP1 and the significance of its interaction with DAZ and DAZL, we isolated and characterized the mouse Dazap1 gene, and studied its expression and the subcellular localization of its protein product. Results The human and mouse genes have similar genomic structures and map to syntenic chromosomal regions. The mouse and human DAZAP1 proteins share 98% identity and their sequences are highly similar to the Xenopus orthologue Prrp, especially in the RBDs. Dazap1 is expressed throughout testis development. Western blot detects a single 45 kD DAZAP1 protein that is most abundant in the testis. Although a majority of DAZAP1 is present in the cytoplasmic fraction, they are not associated with polyribosomes. Conclusions DAZAP1 is evolutionarily highly conserved. Its predominant expression in testes suggests a role in spermatogenesis. Its subcellular localization indicates that it is not directly involved in mRNA translation.

  17. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Alexander; Axelrod, Kevin; Cohen, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Bare double-stranded DNA is a stiff biopolymer with a persistence length of roughly 53 nm under physiological conditions. Cells and viruses employ extensive protein machinery to overcome this stiffness and bend, twist, and loop DNA to accomplish tasks such as packaging, recombination, gene regulation, and repair. The mechanical properties of DNA are of fundamental importance to the mechanism and thermodynamics of these processes, but physiologically relevant curvature has been difficult to access experimentally. We designed and synthesized a DNA hairpin construct in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on a short segment of duplex DNA, inducing Euler buckling followed by bending to thermally inaccessible radii of curvature. The efficiency of F"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores covalently linked to the hairpin indicated the degree of buckling. Bulk and single-molecule measurements yielded distinctly different force-compression curves for intact DNA and for strands with single nicks, base pair mismatches, and damage sites. These results suggest that changes in local mechanical properties may play a significant role in the recognition of these features by DNA-binding proteins.

  18. Template role of double-stranded RNA in tombusvirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Pogany, Judit; Nagy, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    Replication of plus-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses of plants is a relatively simple process that involves complementary minus-strand RNA [(-)RNA] synthesis and subsequent (+)RNA synthesis. However, the actual replicative form of the (-)RNA template in the case of plant (+)RNA viruses is not yet established unambiguously. In this paper, using a cell-free replication assay supporting a full cycle of viral replication, we show that replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) leads to the formation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Using RNase digestion, DNAzyme, and RNA mobility shift assays, we demonstrate the absence of naked (-)RNA templates during replication. Time course experiments showed the rapid appearance of dsRNA earlier than the bulk production of new (+)RNAs, suggesting an active role for dsRNA in replication. Radioactive nucleotide chase experiments showed that the mechanism of TBSV replication involves the use of dsRNA templates in strand displacement reactions, where the newly synthesized plus strand replaces the original (+)RNA in the dsRNA. We propose that the use of dsRNA as a template for (+)RNA synthesis by the viral replicase is facilitated by recruited host DEAD box helicases and the viral p33 RNA chaperone protein. Altogether, this replication strategy allows TBSV to separate minus- and plus-strand syntheses in time and regulate asymmetrical RNA replication that leads to abundant (+)RNA progeny. Positive-stranded RNA viruses of plants use their RNAs as the templates for replication. First, the minus strand is synthesized by the viral replicase complex (VRC), which then serves as a template for new plus-strand synthesis. To characterize the nature of the (-)RNA in the membrane-bound viral replicase, we performed complete RNA replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in yeast cell-free extracts and in plant extracts. The experiments demonstrated that the TBSV (-)RNA is present as a double-stranded RNA that serves as the template for TBSV

  19. Novel Structure and Unexpected RNA-Binding Ability of the C-Terminal Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Tegument Protein UL21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metrick, Claire M.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E. (Tufts-MED)

    2016-04-06

    Proteins forming the tegument layers of herpesviral virions mediate many essential processes in the viral replication cycle, yet few have been characterized in detail. UL21 is one such multifunctional tegument protein and is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. While UL21 has been implicated in many processes in viral replication, ranging from nuclear egress to virion morphogenesis to cell-cell spread, its precise roles remain unclear. Here we report the 2.7-Å crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL21 (UL21C), which has a unique α-helical fold resembling a dragonfly. Analysis of evolutionary conservation patterns and surface electrostatics pinpointed four regions of potential functional importance on the surface of UL21C to be pursued by mutagenesis. In combination with the previously determined structure of the N-terminal domain of UL21, the structure of UL21C provides a 3-dimensional framework for targeted exploration of the multiple roles of UL21 in the replication and pathogenesis of alphaherpesviruses. Additionally, we describe an unanticipated ability of UL21 to bind RNA, which may hint at a yet unexplored function.

    IMPORTANCEDue to the limited genomic coding capacity of viruses, viral proteins are often multifunctional, which makes them attractive antiviral targets. Such multifunctionality, however, complicates their study, which often involves constructing and characterizing null mutant viruses. Systematic exploration of these multifunctional proteins requires detailed road maps in the form of 3-dimensional structures. In this work, we determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of UL21, a multifunctional tegument protein that is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. Structural analysis pinpointed surface areas of potential functional importance that provide a starting point for mutagenesis. In addition, the unexpected RNA-binding ability of UL21 may expand its functional repertoire

  20. RNA-Binding Protein FXR1 Regulates p21 and TERC RNA to Bypass p53-Mediated Cellular Senescence in OSCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinmoyee Majumder

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBP regulate numerous aspects of co- and post-transcriptional gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that RBP, fragile X-related protein 1 (FXR1, plays an essential role in cellular senescence by utilizing mRNA turnover pathway. We report that overexpressed FXR1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma targets (G-quadruplex (G4 RNA structure within both mRNA encoding p21 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A, Cip1 and the non-coding RNA Telomerase RNA Component (TERC, and regulates their turnover to avoid senescence. Silencing of FXR1 in cancer cells triggers the activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, p53, increases DNA damage, and ultimately, cellular senescence. Overexpressed FXR1 binds and destabilizes p21 mRNA, subsequently reduces p21 protein expression in oral cancer cells. In addition, FXR1 also binds and stabilizes TERC RNA and suppresses the cellular senescence possibly through telomerase activity. Finally, we report that FXR1-regulated senescence is irreversible and FXR1-depleted cells fail to form colonies to re-enter cellular proliferation. Collectively, FXR1 displays a novel mechanism of controlling the expression of p21 through p53-dependent manner to bypass cellular senescence in oral cancer cells.

  1. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitobe, Jiro; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Saito, Noriko; Shimuta, Ken; Koizumi, Nobuo; Koley, Hemanta

    2017-07-01

    Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  2. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vondrusková, Eva; van den Burg, Janny; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; Stuart, Kenneth; Benne, Rob; Lukes, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 occur in a heteromeric complex that appears to play a role in U-insertion/deletion editing in trypanosomes. Reduction in the levels of MRP1 (gBP21) and/or MRP2 (gBP25) mRNA by RNA interference in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei resulted in severe growth

  3. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  4. Does unpaired adenosine-66 from helix II of Escherichia coli 5S RNA bind to protein L18?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J; Douthwaite, S R; Christensen, A

    1985-01-01

    plasmid derived from pKK3535. Binding studies with protein L18 revealed that the protein bound much more weakly to the mutated 5S RNA. We consider the most likely explanation of this result is that L18 interacts with adenosine-66, and we present a tentative model for an interaction between the unpaired......Adenosine-66 is unpaired within helix II of Escherichia coli 5S RNA and lies in the binding site of ribosomal protein L18. It has been proposed as a recognition site for protein L18. We have investigated further the structural importance of this nucleotide by deleting it. The 5S RNA gene of the rrn...... adenosine and the adjacent guanosine-67 of the RNA and glutamine-19 of the protein L18....

  5. Does unpaired adenosine-66 from helix II of Escherichia coli 5S RNA bind to protein L18?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J; Douthwaite, S R; Christensen, A

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine-66 is unpaired within helix II of Escherichia coli 5S RNA and lies in the binding site of ribosomal protein L18. It has been proposed as a recognition site for protein L18. We have investigated further the structural importance of this nucleotide by deleting it. The 5S RNA gene of the r...... adenosine and the adjacent guanosine-67 of the RNA and glutamine-19 of the protein L18.......Adenosine-66 is unpaired within helix II of Escherichia coli 5S RNA and lies in the binding site of ribosomal protein L18. It has been proposed as a recognition site for protein L18. We have investigated further the structural importance of this nucleotide by deleting it. The 5S RNA gene of the rrn...... plasmid derived from pKK3535. Binding studies with protein L18 revealed that the protein bound much more weakly to the mutated 5S RNA. We consider the most likely explanation of this result is that L18 interacts with adenosine-66, and we present a tentative model for an interaction between the unpaired...

  6. Comparative analysis of hepatitis B virus polymerase sequences required for viral RNA binding, RNA packaging, and protein priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott A; Clark, Daniel N; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E; Hu, Jianming

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus replicates a DNA genome through reverse transcription of a pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) by using a multifunctional polymerase (HP). A critical function of HP is its specific association with a viral RNA signal, termed ε (Hε), located on pgRNA, which is required for specific packaging of pgRNA into viral nucleocapsids and initiation of viral reverse transcription. HP initiates reverse transcription by using itself as a protein primer (protein priming) and Hε as the obligatory template. HP is made up of four domains, including the terminal protein (TP), the spacer, the reverse transcriptase (RT), and the RNase H domains. A recently developed, Hε-dependent, in vitro protein priming assay was used in this study to demonstrate that almost the entire TP and RT domains and most of the RNase H domain were required for protein priming. Specific residues within TP, RT, and the spacer were identified as being critical for HP-Hε binding and/or protein priming. Comparison of HP sequence requirements for Hε binding, pgRNA packaging, and protein priming allowed the classification of the HP mutants into five groups, each with distinct effects on these complex and related processes. Detailed characterization of HP requirements for these related and essential functions of HP will further elucidate the mechanisms of its multiple functions and aid in the targeting of these functions for antiviral therapy.

  7. Demonstration that a mRNA Binding Protein is Responsible for GADD45 mRNA Destabilization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abcouwer, Steve

    2003-01-01

    ...) Using regions of the GADD45 mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in KNA gel shift assays, we have observed that glutamine causes distinct changes in RBP activities in cytoplasmic and nuclear protein extracts...

  8. The chaperonin of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is an RNA-binding protein that participates in ribosomal RNA processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggero, D; Ciammaruconi, A; Londei, P

    1998-01-01

    The 60 kDa molecular chaperones (chaperonins) are high molecular weight protein complexes having a characteristic double-ring toroidal shape; they are thought to aid the folding of denatured or newly synthesized polypeptides. These proteins exist as two functionally similar, but distantly related families, one comprising the bacterial and organellar chaperonins and another (the so-called CCT-TRiC family) including the chaperonins of the archaea and the eukaryotes. Although some evidence exist...

  9. Analysis of double-stranded RNA from microbial communities identifies double-stranded RNA virus-like elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Carolyn J; Parker, Roy

    2014-05-08

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can function as genetic information and may have served as genomic material before the existence of DNA-based life. By developing a method to purify dsRNA, we have investigated the diversity of dsRNA in microbial populations. We detect large dsRNAs in multiple microbial populations. Analysis of an aquatic microbial population reveals that some dsRNA sequences match metagenomic DNA, suggesting that microbes contain pools of sense-antisense transcripts. In addition, ∼30% of the dsRNA sequences are not present in the corresponding DNA pool and are strongly biased toward encoding novel proteins. Of these "dsRNA unique" sequences, only a small percentage share similarity to known viruses, a large fraction assemble into RNA virus-like contigs, and the remaining fraction has an unexplained origin. These results have uncovered dsRNA virus-like elements and underscore that dsRNA potentially represents an additional reservoir of genetic information in microbial populations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  11. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins.

  12. Structure and RNA-binding properties of the type III-A CRISPR-associated protein Csm3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrle, Ajla; Su, Andreas A H; Ebert, Judith; Benda, Christian; Randau, Lennart; Conti, Elena

    2013-11-01

    The prokaryotic adaptive immune system is based on the incorporation of genome fragments of invading viral genetic elements into clusters of regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The CRISPR loci are transcribed and processed into crRNAs, which are then used to target the invading nucleic acid for degradation. The large family of CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins mediates this interference response. We have characterized Methanopyrus kandleri Csm3, a protein of the type III-A CRISPR-Cas complex. The 2.4 Å resolution crystal structure shows an elaborate four-domain fold organized around a core RRM-like domain. The overall architecture highlights the structural homology to Cas7, the Cas protein that forms the backbone of type I interference complexes. Csm3 binds unstructured RNAs in a sequence non-specific manner, suggesting that it interacts with the variable spacer sequence of the crRNA. The structural and biochemical data provide insights into the similarities and differences in this group of Cas proteins.

  13. Differential requirement for SUB1 in chromosomal and plasmid double-strand DNA break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Yu

    Full Text Available Non homologous end joining (NHEJ is an important process that repairs double strand DNA breaks (DSBs in eukaryotic cells. Cells defective in NHEJ are unable to join chromosomal breaks. Two different NHEJ assays are typically used to determine the efficiency of NHEJ. One requires NHEJ of linearized plasmid DNA transformed into the test organism; the other requires NHEJ of a single chromosomal break induced either by HO endonuclease or the I-SceI restriction enzyme. These two assays are generally considered equivalent and rely on the same set of NHEJ genes. PC4 is an abundant DNA binding protein that has been suggested to stimulate NHEJ. Here we tested the role of PC4's yeast homolog SUB1 in repair of DNA double strand breaks using different assays. We found SUB1 is required for NHEJ repair of DSBs in plasmid DNA, but not in chromosomal DNA. Our results suggest that these two assays, while similar are not equivalent and that repair of plasmid DNA requires additional factor(s that are not required for NHEJ repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks. Possible roles for Sub1 proteins in NHEJ of plasmid DNA are discussed.

  14. In vivo detection of RNA-binding protein interactions with cognate RNA sequences by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huranová, Martina; Jablonski, J.A.; Benda, Aleš; Hof, Martin; Staněk, David; Caputi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 11 (2009), s. 2063-2071 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FRET * FLIM * RNA-protein interactions Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.198, year: 2009

  15. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 is an indicator of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Taguchi, Kenichi; Ohno, Shinji; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Kubo, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of the expressions of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Immunohistochemical staining for IMP3 and EGFR was performed in 130 cases of primary PTs (83 benign, 28 borderline, 19 malignant), 34 recurrent/metastatic PTs, and 26 fibroadenomas (FAs). Among the primary tumors, a high expression of IMP3 was significantly more frequently present in malignant PTs (17/19, 89%) than in the FAs (0/26, 0%), benign PTs (0/83, 0%) and borderline PTs (3/28, 11%). The recurrent and metastatic lesions of malignant PTs also showed high IMP3 expression (3/5 [60%] and 6/6 [100%], respectively). Most malignant PTs showed strong IMP3 expression at the interductal area or more diffusely, whereas weak and focal (low) expression of IMP3 was limited to the periductal area in FAs and benign PTs. EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor grade and high IMP3 expression. Overexpressions of IMP3 and EGFR were significantly associated with shorter periods of metastasis-free and disease-free survival. The results suggest that high expressions of IMP3 and EGFR with a characteristic staining pattern may be helpful for both identifying malignant PT and predicting the prognosis of these tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acceleration of leaf senescence is slowed down in transgenic barley plants deficient in the DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharewicz, Weronika; Distelfeld, Assaf; Bilger, Wolfgang; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Hensel, Götz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract WHIRLY1 in barley was isolated as a potential regulator of the senescence-associated gene HvS40. In order to investigate whether the plastid–nucleus-located DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1 plays a role in regulation of leaf senescence, primary foliage leaves from transgenic barley plants with an RNAi-mediated knockdown of the WHIRLY1 gene were characterized by typical senescence parameters, namely pigment contents, function and composition of the photosynthetic apparatus, as well as expression of selected genes known to be either down- or up-regulated during leaf senescence. When the plants were grown at low light intensity, senescence progression was similar between wild-type and RNAi-W1 plants. Likewise, dark-induced senescence of detached leaves was not affected by reduction of WHIRLY1. When plants were grown at high light intensity, however, senescence was induced prematurely in wild-type plants but was delayed in RNAi-W1 plants. This result suggests that WHIRLY1 plays a role in light sensing and/or stress communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus. PMID:28338757

  17. Acceleration of leaf senescence is slowed down in transgenic barley plants deficient in the DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharewicz, Weronika; Distelfeld, Assaf; Bilger, Wolfgang; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Hensel, Götz; Krupinska, Karin

    2017-02-01

    WHIRLY1 in barley was isolated as a potential regulator of the senescence-associated gene HvS40. In order to investigate whether the plastid-nucleus-located DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1 plays a role in regulation of leaf senescence, primary foliage leaves from transgenic barley plants with an RNAi-mediated knockdown of the WHIRLY1 gene were characterized by typical senescence parameters, namely pigment contents, function and composition of the photosynthetic apparatus, as well as expression of selected genes known to be either down- or up-regulated during leaf senescence. When the plants were grown at low light intensity, senescence progression was similar between wild-type and RNAi-W1 plants. Likewise, dark-induced senescence of detached leaves was not affected by reduction of WHIRLY1. When plants were grown at high light intensity, however, senescence was induced prematurely in wild-type plants but was delayed in RNAi-W1 plants. This result suggests that WHIRLY1 plays a role in light sensing and/or stress communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Cold stress and light signals induce the expression of cold-inducible RNA binding protein (cirp) in the brain and eye of the Japanese treefrog (Hyla japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kenkichi; Jiang, Huijie

    2008-12-01

    Hibernation is an important physiological animal behavior. However, the molecular mechanism by which hibernation is regulated remains unknown. The Japanese treefrog (Hyla japonica) usually hibernates in the winter. Since this treefrog is an ectothermic animal, its hibernation is thought to be linked to the environmental temperature. In murine cells, gene expression for the cold-inducible RNA binding protein (cirp) is induced simply by cold stress. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the treefrog would also have increased expression of cirp during the hibernation season. In this report, we describe the cloning of the treefrog cirp gene and a quantitative analysis of its expression with real-time PCR. Like its homologs, treefrog cirp was found to be expressed in response to a cold stress, and its transcript was detectable in the brain, eye and ovary. Furthermore, we found that light signals could also induce the expression of cirp, and the total amount of cirp expression in both the brain and eye was significantly higher in December than in July. These results suggest that the expression of cirp in this treefrog is physiologically induced by environmental factors, such as cold stress or light signals.

  19. An effector of RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis is an ARGONAUTE 4- and RNA-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin-Jian; Hsu, Yi-Feng; Zhu, Shihua; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T.; Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S.; Liu, Hai-Liang; Wang, Co-Shine; Jin, Hailing; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic mark in plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation can be triggered by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) through an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Here we report the identification of a new RdDM effector, RDM3/KTF1. Loss-of-function mutations in RDM3/KTF1 reduce DNA methylation and release the silencing of RdDM target loci without abolishing the siRNA triggers. KTF1 has similarity to the transcription elongation factor SPT5 and contains a C-terminal extension rich in GW/WG repeats. KTF1 colocalizes with ARGONAUTE 4 (AGO4) in punctate nuclear foci, and binds AGO4 and RNA transcripts. Our results suggest KTF1 as an adaptor protein that binds scaffold transcripts generated by Pol V and recruits AGO4 and AGO4-bound siRNAs to form an RdDM effector complex. The dual interaction of an effector protein with AGO and small RNA target transcripts may be a general feature of RNA silencing effector complexes. PMID:19410546

  20. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear.

  1. An RNA-binding protein, Qki5, regulates embryonic neural stem cells through pre-mRNA processing in cell adhesion signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa-Yano, Yoshika; Suyama, Satoshi; Nogami, Masahiro; Yugami, Masato; Koya, Ikuko; Furukawa, Takako; Zhou, Li; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Okano, Hideyuki; Yano, Masato

    2017-09-15

    Cell type-specific transcriptomes are enabled by the action of multiple regulators, which are frequently expressed within restricted tissue regions. In the present study, we identify one such regulator, Quaking 5 (Qki5), as an RNA-binding protein (RNABP) that is expressed in early embryonic neural stem cells and subsequently down-regulated during neurogenesis. mRNA sequencing analysis in neural stem cell culture indicates that Qki proteins play supporting roles in the neural stem cell transcriptome and various forms of mRNA processing that may result from regionally restricted expression and subcellular localization. Also, our in utero electroporation gain-of-function study suggests that the nuclear-type Qki isoform Qki5 supports the neural stem cell state. We next performed in vivo transcriptome-wide protein-RNA interaction mapping to search for direct targets of Qki5 and elucidate how Qki5 regulates neural stem cell function. Combined with our transcriptome analysis, this mapping analysis yielded a bona fide map of Qki5-RNA interaction at single-nucleotide resolution, the identification of 892 Qki5 direct target genes, and an accurate Qki5-dependent alternative splicing rule in the developing brain. Last, our target gene list provides the first compelling evidence that Qki5 is associated with specific biological events; namely, cell-cell adhesion. This prediction was confirmed by histological analysis of mice in which Qki proteins were genetically ablated, which revealed disruption of the apical surface of the lateral wall in the developing brain. These data collectively indicate that Qki5 regulates communication between neural stem cells by mediating numerous RNA processing events and suggest new links between splicing regulation and neural stem cell states. © 2017 Hayakawa-Yano et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. A shift in plant proteome profile for a Bromodomain containing RNA binding Protein (BRP1) in plants infected with Cucumber mosaic virus and its satellite RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A L N

    2016-01-10

    Host proteins are the integral part of a successful infection caused by a given RNA virus pathogenic to plants. Therefore, identification of crucial host proteins playing an important role in establishing the infection process is likely to help in devising approaches to curbing disease spread. Cucumber mosaic virus (Q-CMV) and its satellite RNA (QsatRNA) are important pathogens of many economically important crop plants worldwide. In a previous study, we demonstrated the biological significance of a Bromodomain containing RNA-binding Protein (BRP1) in the infection cycle of QsatRNA, making BRP1 an important host protein to study. To further shed a light on the mechanistic role of BRP1 in the replication of Q-CMV and QsatRNA, we analyzed the Nicotiana benthamiana host protein interactomes either for BRP1 alone or in the presence of Q-CMV or QsatRNA. Co-immunoprecipitation, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis of BRP1-FLAG on challenging with Q-CMV or QsatRNA has led us to observe a shift in the host protein interactome of BRP1. We discuss the significance of these results in relation to Q-CMV and its QsatRNA infection cycle. Host proteins play an important role in replication and infection of eukaryotic cells by a wide-range of RNA viruses pathogenic to humans, animals and plants. Since a given eukaryotic cell typically contains ~30,000 different proteins, recent advances made in proteomics and bioinformatics approaches allowed the identification of host proteins critical for viral replication and pathogenesis. Although Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and its satRNA are well characterized at molecular level, information concerning the network of host factors involved in their replication and pathogenesis is still on its infancy. We have recently observed that a Bromodomain containing host protein (BRP1) is obligatory to transport satRNA to the nucleus. Consequently, it is imperative to apply proteomics and bioinformatics approaches in deciphering how host interactome network

  3. Chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, Godelieve

    2012-01-01

    During my PhD project, I studied the role of several chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break (DSB) response. We discovered that both CHD4 and SMARCA5 are required for ubiquitin signaling through the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, which is a central signaling event in the response

  4. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Mitobe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  5. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates cold air inducible airway mucin production through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingxiu; Ran, Danhua; Xie, Wenyue; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and cold air stimulation has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production under cold stress remain elusive. Recently, the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) has been shown to be markedly induced after exposure to cold air. In this study, we sought to explore the expression of CIRP within bronchial biopsy specimens, the effect on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in cold air stimulation process. We found that CIRP protein expression was significantly increased in patients with COPD and in mice treated with cold air. Moreover, cold air stimulation induced MUC5AC expression in wild-type mice but not in CIRP(-/-) mice. In vitro, cold air stress significantly elevated the transcriptional and protein expression levels of MUC5AC in human bronchial epithelial cells. CIRP, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) increased significantly in response to cold stress and CIRP siRNA, TLR4 - neutralizing Ab and a specific inhibitor of NF-κB could attenuated cold stress inducible MUC5AC expression. In addition, CIRP siRNA could hindered the expression levels of TLR4 and p-p65 both induced by cold stress. Taken together, these results suggest that airway epithelial cells constitutively express CIRP in vitro and in vivo. CIRP is responsible for cold-inducible MUC5AC expression by activating TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. PAR-CLIP and streamlined small RNA cDNA library preparation protocol for the identification of RNA binding protein target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhalevy, Daniel; McFarland, Hannah L; Sarshad, Aishe A; Hafner, Markus

    2017-04-15

    The study of protein-RNA interactions is critical for our understanding of cellular processes and regulatory circuits controlled by RNA binding proteins (RBPs). Recent next generation sequencing-based approaches significantly promoted our understanding of RNA biology and its importance for cell function. We present a streamlined protocol for Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Crosslinking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP), a technique that allows for the characterization of RBP binding sites on target RNAs at nucleotide resolution and transcriptome-wide scale. PAR-CLIP involves irreversible UV-mediated crosslinking of RNAs labeled with photoreactive nucleosides to interacting proteins, followed by stringent purification steps and the conversion of crosslinked RNA into small RNA cDNA libraries compatible with next-generation sequencing. The defining hallmark of PAR-CLIP is a diagnostic mutation at the crosslinking site that is introduced into cDNA during the library preparation process. This feature allows for efficient computational removal of contaminating sequences derived from non-crosslinked fragments of abundant cellular RNAs. In the following, we present two different step-by-step procedures for PAR-CLIP, which differ in the small RNA cDNA library preparation procedure: (1) Standard library preparation involving gel size selections after each enzymatic manipulation, and (2) A modified PAR-CLIP procedure ("on-beads" PAR-CLIP), where most RNA manipulations including the necessary adapter ligation steps are performed on the immobilized RNP. This streamlined procedure reduces the protocol preparation time by three days compared to the standard workflow. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. CSP41a, a multifunctional RNA-binding protein, initiates mRNA turnover in tobacco chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbach, Thomas J; Tatman, Dana A; Stern, David B

    2003-12-01

    Expression of chloroplast stem-loop binding protein (CSP)41a, a highly conserved chloroplast endoribonuclease, was reduced >90% by the expression of antisense RNA in Nicotiana tabacum. The most striking effects of this silencing were two- to sevenfold decreases in the degradation rates of rbcL, psbA, and petD transcripts in lysed chloroplast extracts. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that CSP41a participates in initiating mRNA turnover through endonucleolytic cleavages. Surprisingly, rbcL and psbA mRNAs accumulated to similar levels in wild-type and antisense lines. This suggested that decreased degradation was compensated by reduced transcription, which was confirmed using run-on transcription assays. The collective accumulation of petD-containing mRNAs in antisense plants decreased by 25% compared to wild-type controls. However, the relative levels of petD processing intermediates in wild-type and antisense plants did not differ, and there were no changes in petD 3'-end maturation, suggesting that CSP41a is not required for petD RNA processing. CSP41a is a Mg2+-dependent enzyme; therefore, extracts from antisense plants were tested at different Mg2+ concentrations. These experiments showed that the half-life of rbcL decreased as the Mg2+ concentration was reduced, and at <1 mm free Mg2+, conditions where CSP41a is nearly inactive in vitro, the rbcL degradation rate was similar in wild-type and antisense extracts, suggesting that CSP41a is normally bypassed under these conditions. Mg2+ has been shown to mediate RNA stability during chloroplast biogenesis, and our data suggest that regulation of CSP41a activity by Mg2+ is a component of this process.

  8. Artificial intelligence in neurodegenerative disease research: use of IBM Watson to identify additional RNA-binding proteins altered in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, Nadine; Kovalik, Tina; Lorenzini, Ileana; Spangler, Scott; Lacoste, Alix; Sponaugle, Kyle; Ferrante, Philip; Argentinis, Elenee; Sattler, Rita; Bowser, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with no effective treatments. Numerous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have been shown to be altered in ALS, with mutations in 11 RBPs causing familial forms of the disease, and 6 more RBPs showing abnormal expression/distribution in ALS albeit without any known mutations. RBP dysregulation is widely accepted as a contributing factor in ALS pathobiology. There are at least 1542 RBPs in the human genome; therefore, other unidentified RBPs may also be linked to the pathogenesis of ALS. We used IBM Watson ® to sieve through all RBPs in the genome and identify new RBPs linked to ALS (ALS-RBPs). IBM Watson extracted features from published literature to create semantic similarities and identify new connections between entities of interest. IBM Watson analyzed all published abstracts of previously known ALS-RBPs, and applied that text-based knowledge to all RBPs in the genome, ranking them by semantic similarity to the known set. We then validated the Watson top-ten-ranked RBPs at the protein and RNA levels in tissues from ALS and non-neurological disease controls, as well as in patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. 5 RBPs previously unlinked to ALS, hnRNPU, Syncrip, RBMS3, Caprin-1 and NUPL2, showed significant alterations in ALS compared to controls. Overall, we successfully used IBM Watson to help identify additional RBPs altered in ALS, highlighting the use of artificial intelligence tools to accelerate scientific discovery in ALS and possibly other complex neurological disorders.

  9. Autotaxin Expression Is Regulated at the Post-transcriptional Level by the RNA-binding Proteins HuR and AUF1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuhong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Lyu, Lin; Li, Xixi; Yao, Siliang; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a key enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lysophospholipid mediator that regulates cellular activities through its specific G protein-coupled receptors. The ATX-LPA axis plays an important role in various physiological and pathological processes, especially in inflammation and cancer development. Although the transcriptional regulation of ATX has been widely studied, the post-transcriptional regulation of ATX is largely unknown. In this study, we identified conserved adenylate-uridylate (AU)-rich elements in the ATX mRNA 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). The RNA-binding proteins HuR and AUF1 directly bound to the ATX mRNA 3′UTR and had antagonistic functions in ATX expression. HuR enhanced ATX expression by increasing ATX mRNA stability, whereas AUF1 suppressed ATX expression by promoting ATX mRNA decay. HuR and AUF1 were involved in ATX regulation in Colo320 human colon cancer cells and the LPS-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells. HuR knockdown suppressed ATX expression in B16 mouse melanoma cells, leading to inhibition of cell migration. This effect was reversed by AUF1 knockdown to recover ATX expression or by the addition of LPA. These results suggest that the post-transcriptional regulation of ATX expression by HuR and AUF1 modulates cancer cell migration. In summary, we identified HuR and AUF1 as novel post-transcriptional regulators of ATX expression, thereby elucidating a novel mechanism regulating the ATX-LPA axis. PMID:27784781

  10. RNA-binding protein regulates plant DNA methylation by controlling mRNA processing at the intronic heterochromatin-containing gene IBM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Tang, Kai; Wang, Bangshing; Zhang, Huiming; Lei, Mingguang; Lu, Kun; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhu, Guohui; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2013-09-17

    DNA methylation-dependent heterochromatin formation is a conserved mechanism of epigenetic silencing of transposons and other repeat elements in many higher eukaryotes. Genes adjacent to repetitive elements are often also subjected to this epigenetic silencing. Consequently, plants have evolved antisilencing mechanisms such as active DNA demethylation mediated by the REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1) family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases to protect these genes from silencing. Some transposons and other repeat elements have found residence in the introns of genes. It is unclear how these intronic repeat elements-containing genes are regulated. We report here the identification of ANTI-SILENCING 1 (ASI1), a bromo-adjacent homology domain and RNA recognition motif-containing protein, from a forward genetic screen for cellular antisilencing factors in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASI1 is required to prevent promoter DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of some transgenes. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that ASI1 has a similar role to that of the histone H3K9 demethylase INCREASE IN BONSAI METHYLATION 1 (IBM1) in preventing CHG methylation in the bodies of thousands of genes. We found that ASI1 is an RNA-binding protein and ensures the proper expression of IBM1 full-length transcript by associating with an intronic heterochromatic repeat element of IBM1. Through mRNA sequencing, we identified many genes containing intronic transposon elements that require ASI1 for proper expression. Our results suggest that ASI1 associates with intronic heterochromatin and binds the gene transcripts to promote their 3' distal polyadenylation. The study thus reveals a unique mechanism by which higher eukaryotes deal with the collateral effect of silencing intronic repeat elements.

  11. Three zinc-finger RNA-binding proteins in cabbage (Brassica rapa) play diverse roles in seed germination and plant growth under normal and abiotic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ye Rin; Choi, Min Ji; Park, Su Jung; Kang, Hunseung

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing understanding of the stress-responsive roles of zinc-finger RNA-binding proteins (RZs) in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rice (Oryza sativa), the functions of RZs in cabbage (Brassica rapa) have not yet been elucidated. In this study, the functional roles of the three RZ family members present in the cabbage genome, designated as BrRZ1, BrRZ2 and BrRZ3, were investigated in transgenic Arabidopsis under normal and environmental stress conditions. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that all BrRZ proteins were exclusively localized in the nucleus. The expression levels of each BrRZ were markedly increased by cold, drought or salt stress and by abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. Expression of BrRZ3 in Arabidopsis retarded seed germination and stem growth and reduced seed yield of Arabidopsis plants under normal growth conditions. Germination of BrRZ2- or BrRZ3-expressing Arabidopsis seeds was delayed compared with that of wild-type seeds under dehydration or salt stress conditions and cold stress conditions, respectively. Seedling growth of BrRZ3-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants was significantly inhibited under salt, dehydration or cold stress conditions. Notably, seedling growth of all three BrRZ-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants was inhibited upon ABA treatment. Importantly, all BrRZs possessed RNA chaperone activity. Taken together, these results indicate that the three cabbage BrRZs harboring RNA chaperone activity play diverse roles in seed germination and seedling growth of plants under abiotic stress conditions as well as in the presence of ABA. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  12. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F

    2013-01-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial...... in other key regulators of HR repair, Rnf4 deficiency leads to age-dependent impairment in spermatogenesis. These findings identify Rnf4 as a critical component of the DDR in vivo and support the possibility that Rnf4 controls protein localization at DNA damage sites by integrating SUMOylation...

  13. Splice Variants of the Human ZC3H14 Gene Generate Multiple Isoforms of a Zinc Finger Polyadenosine RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sara W.; Apponi, Luciano H.; Cornejo, Omar E.; Kitchen, Chad M.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Pavlath, Grace K.; Dunham, Christine M.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2009-01-01

    finger polyadenosine RNA binding domain. PMID:19303045

  14. RNA-Binding Protein Dnd1 Promotes Breast Cancer Apoptosis by Stabilizing the Bim mRNA in a miR-221 Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feng; Pan, Ying; Lu, Yi-Min; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Shuzheng

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and miRNAs are capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. Both of them could determine RNA transcripts fate from synthesis to decay. One such RBP, Dead end (Dnd1), is essential for regulating germ-cell viability and suppresses the germ-cell tumors development, yet how it exerts its functions in breast cancer has remained unresolved. The level of Dnd1 was detected in 21 cancerous tissues paired with neighboring normal tissues by qRT-PCR. We further annotated TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) mRNA expression profiles and found that the expression of Dnd1 and Bim is positively correlated ( p = 0.04). Patients with higher Dnd1 expression level had longer overall survival ( p = 0.0014) by KM Plotter tool. Dnd1 knockdown in MCF-7 cells decreased Bim expression levels and inhibited apoptosis. While knockdown of Dnd1 promoted the decay of Bim mRNA 3'UTR, the stability of Bim-5'UTR was not affected. In addition, mutation of miR-221-binding site in Bim-3'UTR canceled the effect of Dnd1 on Bim mRNA. Knockdown of Dnd1 in MCF-7 cells confirmed that Dnd1 antagonized miR-221-inhibitory effects on Bim expression. Overall, our findings indicate that Dnd1 facilitates apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bim via its competitive combining with miR-221 in Bim-3'UTR. The new function of Dnd1 may contribute to a vital role in breast cancer development.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is a marker that predicts presence of invasion in papillary biliary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Motoko; Sato, Yasunori

    2017-04-01

    Biliary tumors showing intraductal papillary growth (Pap-BTs) include intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) and papillary cholangiocarcinoma (CC). A differential diagnosis between IPNB and papillary CC currently remains challenging. The aim of the present study is to identify histological features and immunohistochemical markers of malignant potential such as tumor invasion in Pap-BTs. Subjects comprised 37 patients with Pap-BT (intrahepatic and perihilar [proximal], 27: 17 noninvasive and 10 invasive; distal, 10: all invasive). We examined histological features and the expression of p53, enhancer of zeste homolog 2, insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3), and DNA methyltransferase-1 in the intraductal area in Pap-BTs. Noninvasive Pap-BT was characterized by the presence of a low-grade dysplastic area, edematous stroma, and the absence of necrosis. The expression of p53, enhancer of zeste homolog 2, IMP3, and DNA methyltransferase-1 was significantly weaker in noninvasive Pap-BTs than in invasive Pap-BTs (PBTs. IMP3 showed the greatest specificity to predict a presence of invasion. A heatmap demonstrated that proximal noninvasive Pap-BTs and distal Pap-BTs may be completely different. In bile duct biopsies, the expression of IMP3 was the most precise predictor of invasion in Pap-BTs. In conclusion, Pap-BTs may be separated into 3 subgroups: (1) proximal noninvasive Pap-BT, corresponding to IPNB; (2) distal invasive Pap-BT, corresponding to papillary CC; and (3) the remaining Pap-BT including IPNB with associated adenocarcinomas, based on histological and immunohistochemical features. IMP3 may be a useful marker for predicting invasion in Pap-BT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. RNA-Binding Protein Dnd1 Promotes Breast Cancer Apoptosis by Stabilizing the Bim mRNA in a miR-221 Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and miRNAs are capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. Both of them could determine RNA transcripts fate from synthesis to decay. One such RBP, Dead end (Dnd1, is essential for regulating germ-cell viability and suppresses the germ-cell tumors development, yet how it exerts its functions in breast cancer has remained unresolved. The level of Dnd1 was detected in 21 cancerous tissues paired with neighboring normal tissues by qRT-PCR. We further annotated TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas mRNA expression profiles and found that the expression of Dnd1 and Bim is positively correlated (p=0.04. Patients with higher Dnd1 expression level had longer overall survival (p=0.0014 by KM Plotter tool. Dnd1 knockdown in MCF-7 cells decreased Bim expression levels and inhibited apoptosis. While knockdown of Dnd1 promoted the decay of Bim mRNA 3′UTR, the stability of Bim-5′UTR was not affected. In addition, mutation of miR-221-binding site in Bim-3′UTR canceled the effect of Dnd1 on Bim mRNA. Knockdown of Dnd1 in MCF-7 cells confirmed that Dnd1 antagonized miR-221-inhibitory effects on Bim expression. Overall, our findings indicate that Dnd1 facilitates apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bim via its competitive combining with miR-221 in Bim-3′UTR. The new function of Dnd1 may contribute to a vital role in breast cancer development.

  17. Functions of Human Rad51 and Other Recombination Factors in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sigurdsson, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    ... of. DNA double strand breaks. Genetic and biochemical studies have suggested that the function of genes of the RAD52 group is highly conserved from yeast to humans and interestingly the efficiency of DNA double strand break...

  18. Characterization of the double stranded RNA dependent RNase activity associated with recombinant reverse transcriptases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Artzi, H; Zeelon, E; Le-Grice, S F; Gorecki, M; Panet, A

    1992-01-01

    An in situ gel assay was applied to the study of double stranded RNA dependent RNase activity associated with reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus. Polyacrylamide gels containing [32P] RNA/RNA substrate were used for electrophoresis of proteins under denaturing conditions. The proteins were renatured and in situ enzymatic degradation of 32P-RNA/RNA was followed. E. coli RNaseIII, but not E. coli RNaseH, was active in this in situ gel assay, indicating specificity of t...

  19. RNA-seq reveals the RNA binding proteins, Hfq and RsmA, play various roles in virulence, antibiotic production and genomic flux in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Nabil M; Reid, Adam J; Ramsay, Joshua P; Williamson, Neil R; Croucher, Nicholas J; Gatto, Laurent; Hester, Svenja S; Goulding, David; Barquist, Lars; Lilley, Kathryn S; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George Pc

    2013-11-22

    Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006) is a Gram-negative enterobacterium that is virulent in plant and animal models. It produces a red-pigmented trypyrrole secondary metabolite, prodigiosin (Pig), and a carbapenem antibiotic (Car), as well as the exoenzymes, pectate lyase and cellulase. Secondary metabolite production in this strain is controlled by a complex regulatory network involving quorum sensing (QS). Hfq and RsmA (two RNA binding proteins and major post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression) play opposing roles in the regulation of several key phenotypes within S39006. Prodigiosin and carbapenem production was abolished, and virulence attenuated, in an S39006 ∆hfq mutant, while the converse was observed in an S39006 rsmA transposon insertion mutant. In order to define the complete regulon of Hfq and RsmA, deep sequencing of cDNA libraries (RNA-seq) was used to analyse the whole transcriptome of S39006 ∆hfq and rsmA::Tn mutants. Moreover, we investigated global changes in the proteome using an LC-MS/MS approach. Analysis of differential gene expression showed that Hfq and RsmA directly or indirectly regulate (at the level of RNA) 4% and 19% of the genome, respectively, with some correlation between RNA and protein expression. Pathways affected include those involved in antibiotic regulation, virulence, flagella synthesis, and surfactant production. Although Hfq and RsmA are reported to activate flagellum production in E. coli and an adherent-invasive E. coli hfq mutant was shown to have no flagella by electron microscopy, we found that flagellar production was increased in the S39006 rsmA and hfq mutants. Additionally, deletion of rsmA resulted in greater genomic flux with increased activity of two mobile genetic elements. This was confirmed by qPCR and analysis of rsmA culture supernatant revealed the presence of prophage DNA and phage particles. Finally, expression of a hypothetical protein containing DUF364 increased prodigiosin production and was

  20. Modulation of the mRNA-binding protein HuR as a novel reversal mechanism of epirubicin-triggered multidrug resistance in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Liang Lin

    Full Text Available HuR (ELAVL1, a RNA-binding protein, plays a key role in posttranscriptional regulation of multidrug resistance (MDR-related genes. Among various HuR-regulated oncogenic transcripts, the activation of galectin-3/β-catenin survival pathway is critical to induce transcription of cyclin D1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp and/or multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs. In this study, we aim to elucidate the HuR-regulating pathways related to epirubicin-mediated resistance in human colorectal carcinoma cells. The effects and mechanisms of epirubicin treatment on the expressions of upstream survival signals (e.g., β-catenin and downstream MDR transporters (e.g., P-gp and anti-apoptotic pathways (e.g., Bcl-2 were assessed with or without HuR knockdown (siHuR or overexpression (overHuR; ectopic HuR or pcDNA3/HA-HuR. Our results showed that siHuR decreased transcriptional expressions of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, P-gp, MRP1, and MRP2 in epirubicin-treated colon cancer cells. Consistently, the co-treatment of epirubicin and siHuR diminished the expressions of galectin-3, ß-catenin, c-Myc, P-gp and MRP1. HuR silencing enhanced the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in colon cancer cells. On the other hand, overHuR abolished such effects. Furthermore, siHuR significantly intensified epirubicin-mediated apoptosis via increasing reactive oxygen species and thus promoted the cytotoxic effect of epirubicin. The combined treatments of siHuR and epirubicin significantly reduced the expression of Bcl-2, but increased the expression of Bax, as well as activity and expression levels of caspase-3 and -9. In contrast, overHuR abrogated these effects. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms by which siHuR potentiated epirubicin-induced cytotoxicity via inhibiting galectin-3/β-catenin signaling, suppressing MDR transporters and provoking apoptosis. To our best knowledge, this is an innovative investigation linking the post

  1. Expression of the RNA-binding protein RBM3 is associated with a favourable prognosis and cisplatin sensitivity in epithelial ovarian cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ehlen, Asa

    2010-08-20

    Abstract Background We recently demonstrated that increased expression of the RNA-binding protein RBM3 is associated with a favourable prognosis in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic value of RBM3 mRNA and protein expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and the cisplatin response upon RBM3 depletion in a cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cell line. Methods RBM3 mRNA expression was analysed in tumors from a cohort of 267 EOC cases (Cohort I) and RBM3 protein expression was analysed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in an independent cohort of 154 prospectively collected EOC cases (Cohort II). Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were applied to assess the relationship between RBM3 and recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Immunoblotting and IHC were used to examine the expression of RBM3 in a cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line A2780-Cp70 and its cisplatin-responsive parental cell line A2780. The impact of RBM3 on cisplatin response in EOC was assessed using siRNA-mediated silencing of RBM3 in A2780 cells followed by cell viability assay and cell cycle analysis. Results Increased RBM3 mRNA expression was associated with a prolonged RFS (HR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.47-0.86, p = 0.003) and OS (HR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.44-0.95, p = 0.024) in Cohort I. Multivariate analysis confirmed that RBM3 mRNA expression was an independent predictor of a prolonged RFS, (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.44-0.84, p = 0.003) and OS (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41-0.95; p = 0.028) in Cohort I. In Cohort II, RBM3 protein expression was associated with a prolonged OS (HR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.35-0.79, p = 0.002) confirmed by multivariate analysis (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.40-0.92, p = 0.017). RBM3 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in the cisplatin sensitive A2780 cell line compared to the cisplatin resistant A2780-Cp70 derivative. siRNA-mediated silencing of RBM3 expression in the A2780 cells resulted

  2. The ubiquitin-selective segregase VCP/p97 orchestrates the response to DNA double-strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meerang, Mayura; Ritz, Danilo; Paliwal, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signalling and repair proteins to the site of lesion. Protein modification with ubiquitin is crucial for the signalling ...... factor in ubiquitin-governed DNA-damage response, highlighting its importance in guarding genome stability.......Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signalling and repair proteins to the site of lesion. Protein modification with ubiquitin is crucial for the signalling...... proper association of 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51, three factors critical for DNA repair and genome surveillance mechanisms. Impairment of p97 activity decreases the level of DSB repair and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation. These findings identify the p97-UFD1-NPL4 complex as an essential...

  3. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  4. Herpetic keratoconjunctivitis: Therapy with synthetic double-stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Evans, C.; Meighan, C.W.; Foote, L.J.; Aiello, P.V.; Park, J.H.; Baron, S.

    1968-01-01

    A study was undertaken in rabbits to determine how late in the course of keratoconjunctivitis caused by herpes simplex recovery could be effected by an inducer of interferon. Interferon was induced by means of synthetic double-stranded RNA copolymer formed with polynosinic acid : polycytidilic acid RNA. Therapy promotes recovery from severe and fully established keratoconjunctivitis for which treatment was begun as late as 3 days after virus inoculation. No drug toxicity was observed in the therapeutic dose range. These findings further support the proposed role of the interferon mechanism in the natural recovery of already established viral infection. They also suggest the usefulness of interferon inducers in viral infections of man.

  5. Contribution of double-stranded RNA and CPSF30 binding domains of influenza virus NS1 to the inhibition of type I interferon production and activation of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Irene; Carnero, Elena; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Seibert, Christopher W; Westera, Liset; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2013-03-01

    The influenza virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) inhibits innate immunity by multiple mechanisms. We previously reported that NS1 is able to inhibit the production of type I interferon (IFN) and proinflammatory cytokines in human primary dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we used recombinant viruses expressing mutant NS1 from the A/Texas/36/91 and A/Puerto Rico/08/34 strains in order to analyze the contribution of different NS1 domains to its antagonist functions. We show that the polyadenylation stimulating factor 30 (CPSF30) binding function of the NS1 protein from A/Texas/36/91 influenza virus, which is absent in the A/Puerto Rico/08/34 strain, is essential for counteracting these innate immune events in DCs. However, the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain, present in both strains, specifically inhibits the induction of type I IFN genes in infected DCs, while it is essential only for inhibition of type I IFN proteins and proinflammatory cytokine production in cells infected with influenza viruses lacking a functional CPSF30 binding domain, such as A/Puerto Rico/08/34.

  6. New tools to study DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gomez-Cabello

    Full Text Available A broken DNA molecule is difficult to repair, highly mutagenic, and extremely cytotoxic. Such breaks can be repaired by homology-independent or homology-directed mechanisms. Little is known about the network that controls the repair pathway choice except that a licensing step for homology-mediated repair exists, called DNA-end resection. The choice between these two repair pathways is a key event for genomic stability maintenance, and an imbalance of the ratio is directly linked with human diseases, including cancer. Here we present novel reporters to study the balance between both repair options in human cells. In these systems, a double-strand break can be alternatively repaired by homology-independent or -dependent mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of distinct fluorescent proteins. These reporters thus allow the balance between both repair pathways to be analyzed in different experimental setups. We validated the reporters by analyzing the effect of protein downregulation of the DNA end resection and non-homologous end-joining pathways. Finally, we analyzed the role of the DNA damage response on double-strand break (DSB repair mechanism selection. Our reporters could be used in the future to understand the roles of specific factors, whole pathways, or drugs in DSB repair pathway choice, or for genome-wide screening. Moreover, our findings can be applied to increase gene-targeting efficiency, making it a beneficial tool for a broad audience in the biological sciences.

  7. New tools to study DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cabello, Daniel; Jimeno, Sonia; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Huertas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    A broken DNA molecule is difficult to repair, highly mutagenic, and extremely cytotoxic. Such breaks can be repaired by homology-independent or homology-directed mechanisms. Little is known about the network that controls the repair pathway choice except that a licensing step for homology-mediated repair exists, called DNA-end resection. The choice between these two repair pathways is a key event for genomic stability maintenance, and an imbalance of the ratio is directly linked with human diseases, including cancer. Here we present novel reporters to study the balance between both repair options in human cells. In these systems, a double-strand break can be alternatively repaired by homology-independent or -dependent mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of distinct fluorescent proteins. These reporters thus allow the balance between both repair pathways to be analyzed in different experimental setups. We validated the reporters by analyzing the effect of protein downregulation of the DNA end resection and non-homologous end-joining pathways. Finally, we analyzed the role of the DNA damage response on double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanism selection. Our reporters could be used in the future to understand the roles of specific factors, whole pathways, or drugs in DSB repair pathway choice, or for genome-wide screening. Moreover, our findings can be applied to increase gene-targeting efficiency, making it a beneficial tool for a broad audience in the biological sciences.

  8. Analysis of Double-Stranded RNA from Microbial Communities Identifies Double-Stranded RNA Virus-like Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Carolyn J.; Parker, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can function as genetic information and may have served as genomic material before the existence of DNA-based life. By developing a method to purify dsRNA, we have investigated the diversity of dsRNA in microbial populations. We detect large dsRNAs in multiple microbial populations. Analysis of an aquatic microbial population reveals that some dsRNA sequences match metagenomic DNA, suggesting that microbes contain pools of sense-antisense transcripts. In addition, ...

  9. The murine double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR and the murine 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-dependent RNase L are required for IFN-β-mediated resistance against herpes simplex virus type 1 in primary trigeminal ganglion culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-khatib, Khaldun; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Silverman, Robert H.; Halford, William; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2003-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of an adenoviral construct expressing the murine interferon-β (IFN-β) transgene (Ad:IFN-β) against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in a primary trigeminal ganglion (TG) cell culture. The transduction efficiency ranged from 0.2 to 11.0% depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) of the adenoviral vector (0.5-50.0). Moreover, neurons were the main target of the adenoviral transduction. TG cultures transduced with Ad:IFN-β displayed up to a 19-fold reduction in viral titers compared with cells transduced with an Ad:Null or nontransduced TG culture controls. Transduction with Ad:IFN-β up-regulated two critical antiviral genes, double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The absence of PKR or RNase L (downstream effector molecule of OAS) attenuated Ad:IFN-β efficacy against HSV-1 replication, implicating a critical role for PKR and OAS/RNase systems in the establishment of IFN-induced resistance against HSV-1 in TG cells

  10. Temperature-dependent conformations of exciton-coupled Cy3 dimers in double-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringle, Loni; Sawaya, Nicolas P. D.; Widom, Julia; Adams, Carson; Raymer, Michael G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the properties of electronically interacting molecular chromophores, which involve internally coupled electronic-vibrational motions, is important to the spectroscopy of many biologically relevant systems. Here we apply linear absorption, circular dichroism, and two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy to study the polarized collective excitations of excitonically coupled cyanine dimers (Cy3)2 that are rigidly positioned within the opposing sugar-phosphate backbones of the double-stranded region of a double-stranded (ds)-single-stranded (ss) DNA fork construct. We show that the exciton-coupling strength of the (Cy3)2-DNA construct can be systematically varied with temperature below the ds-ss DNA denaturation transition. We interpret spectroscopic measurements in terms of the Holstein vibronic dimer model, from which we obtain information about the local conformation of the (Cy3)2 dimer, as well as the degree of static disorder experienced by the Cy3 monomer and the (Cy3)2 dimer probe locally within their respective DNA duplex environments. The properties of the (Cy3)2-DNA construct we determine suggest that it may be employed as a useful model system to test fundamental concepts of protein-DNA interactions and the role of electronic-vibrational coherence in electronic energy migration within exciton-coupled bio-molecular arrays.

  11. 3'UTR AU-Rich Elements (AREs) and the RNA-Binding Protein Tristetraprolin (TTP) Are Not Required for the LPS-Mediated Destabilization of Phospholipase-Cβ-2 mRNA in Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Smita; Elson, Genie; Blackshear, Perry J; Lutz, Carol S; Leibovich, S Joseph

    2017-04-01

    We have shown previously that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated suppression of phospholipase-Cβ-2 (PLCβ-2) expression is involved in M1 (inflammatory) to M2-like (wound healing) phenotypic switching of macrophages triggered by adenosine. This suppression is mediated post-transcriptionally by destabilization of PLCβ-2 mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid). To investigate the mechanism of this LPS-mediated destabilization, we examined the roles of RNA-binding agents including microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins that are involved in regulating stability of mRNAs encoding growth factors, inflammatory mediators, and proto-oncogenes. Adenylate and uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) in 3'UTRs are specific recognition sites for RNA-binding proteins including tristetraprolin (TTP), HuR, and AUF1 and for microRNAs that are involved in regulating mRNA stability. In this study, we investigated the role of TTP and AREs in regulating PLCβ-2 mRNA stability. The 3'UTR of the PLCβ-2 gene was inserted into the pLightswitch luciferase reporter plasmid and transfected into RAW264.7 cells. LPS suppressed luciferase expression from this reporter. Luciferase expression from mutant 3'UTR constructs lacking AREs was similarly downregulated, suggesting that these regions are not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PLCβ-2. TTP was rapidly upregulated in both primary murine macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in response to LPS. Suppression of PLCβ-2 by LPS was examined using macrophages from mice lacking TTP (TTP -/- ). LPS suppressed PLCβ-2 expression to the same extent in wild type (WT) and TTP -/- macrophages. Also, the rate of decay of PLCβ-2 mRNA in LPS-treated macrophages following transcriptional blockade was similar in WT and TTP -/- macrophages, clearly indicating that TTP is not involved in LPS-mediated destabilization of PLCβ-2 mRNA in macrophages.

  12. Neddylation inhibits CtIP-mediated resection and regulates DNA double strand break repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno, Sonia; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Cepeda-García, Cristina; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Huertas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic lesions that can occur on the DNA. They can be repaired by different mechanisms and optimal survival requires a tight control between them. Here we uncover protein deneddylation as a major controller of repair pathway choice. Neddylation inhibition changes the normal repair profile toward an increase on homologous recombination. Indeed, RNF111/UBE2M-mediated neddylation acts as an inhibitor of BRCA1 and CtIP-mediated DNA end resection, a key process in repair pathway choice. By controlling the length of ssDNA produced during DNA resection, protein neddylation not only affects the choice between NHEJ and homologous recombination but also controls the balance between different recombination subpathways. Thus, protein neddylation status has a great impact in the way cells respond to DNA breaks. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Strong resistance against Rice grassy stunt virus is induced in transgenic rice plants expressing double-stranded RNA of the viral genes for nucleocapsid or movement proteins as targets for RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takumi; Ogamino, Takumi; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Nakajima, Masami; Akutsu, Katsumi; Omura, Toshihiro; Sasaya, Takahide

    2013-05-01

    Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV), a member of the genus Tenuivirus, causes significant economic losses in rice production in South, Southeast, and East Asian countries. Growing resistant varieties is the most efficient method to control RGSV; however, suitable resistance genes have not yet been found in natural rice resources. One of the most promising methods to confer resistance against RGSV is the use of RNA interference (RNAi). It is important to target viral genes that play important roles in viral infection and proliferation at an early stage of viral replication. Our recent findings obtained from an RNAi experiment with Rice stripe virus (RSV), a tenuivirus, revealed that the genes for nucleocapsid and movement proteins were appropriate targets for RNAi to confer resistance against RSV. In this study, we transformed rice plants by introducing an RNAi construct of the RGSV genes for the nucelocapsid protein pC5 or movement protein pC6. All progenies from self-fertilized transgenic plants had strong resistance against RGSV infection and did not allow the proliferation of RGSV. Thus, our strategy to target genes for nucleocapsid and movement proteins for conferring viral resistance might be applicable to the plant viruses in the genus Tenuivirus.

  14. DNA double-strand break repair in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Bennie B L G; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2011-02-01

    Faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is vital for animal development, as inappropriate repair can cause gross chromosomal alterations that result in cellular dysfunction, ultimately leading to cancer, or cell death. Correct processing of DSBs is not only essential for maintaining genomic integrity, but is also required in developmental programs, such as gametogenesis, in which DSBs are deliberately generated. Accordingly, DSB repair deficiencies are associated with various developmental disorders including cancer predisposition and infertility. To avoid this threat, cells are equipped with an elaborate and evolutionarily well-conserved network of DSB repair pathways. In recent years, Caenorhabditis elegans has become a successful model system in which to study DSB repair, leading to important insights in this process during animal development. This review will discuss the major contributions and recent progress in the C. elegans field to elucidate the complex networks involved in DSB repair, the impact of which extends well beyond the nematode phylum.

  15. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of pneumococcal Ser/Thr protein phosphatase phpP mutant and identification of a novel PhpP substrate, putative RNA binding protein Jag

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Aleš; Holečková, Nela; Goldová, Jana; Doubravová, Linda; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Halada, Petr; Branny, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, OCT 24 (2016), s. 247 ISSN 1471-2180 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0256; GA ČR GAP207/12/1568; GA MŠk LH12055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Signal transduction * Protein phosphatase * Protein kinase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.644, year: 2016

  17. In vivo quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsson, M.; Qvarnstroem, F.; Turesson, I.; Johansson, K.-A.; Nyman, J.; Hermansson, I.; Oden, A.; Book, M.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be introduced in the genome by exposure to exogenous agents such as ionising radiation and radio-mimetic chemicals. The biological importance of these breaks is significant even at low numbers. Inaccurate repair or lack of repair of a single DSB has the potential to kill a cell or lead to tumourigenesis. Thus the induction and repair of DSBs are crucial events in the onset of malignancies. Following the induction of DSBs, the core histone H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated at residue serine 139. This phosphorylated form of H2AX is referred to as gH2AX. Histones wrapped in megabase regions flanking these breaks are involved in this process, which results in the formation of discrete nuclear foci. It has previously been shown that a single DSB is sufficient to produce a detectable focus. So far there has been a lack of methods capable of measuring the amount of DSBs at clinically relevant quantities. Such a method would embrace a wide field of applications. It could be applied as a biological dosimeter when studying carcinogenic effects and provide the basis for an assay predicting individual radiosensitivity. We describe a measurement procedure that detects and quantifies small amounts of DSBs in vivo. This is accomplished using immunofluorescence detection of the molecular marker gH2AX. The gH2AX foci are quantified in histological sections using basic digital image analysis methods as the main component. In a primary assessment of the procedure we analysed the in vivo dose response of prostate cancer patients in clinical practice undergoing radiotherapy. Epidermal nucleated cells in skin biopsies taken 30 minutes following the first single dose delivered show linear dose response for low doses ranging from 0 - 1.2 Gy. The described procedure for double strand break quantification can detect dose changes as low as 0.18 Gy

  18. Oxidative DNA double strand breaks and autophagy in the antitumor effect of sterically hindered platinum(II) complexes in NSCLCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feihong; Wang, Xinyi; Jin, Xiufeng; Zhao, Jian; Gou, Shaohua

    2017-05-09

    A series of novel platinum(II) complexes with (1R,2R)-N1,N2-diisobutyl-1,2-diaminocyclohexane as a carrier ligand, while N1,N2-diisobutyl moiety serving as steric hindrance were designed, synthesized and characterized. The in vitro biological assays demonstrated that complex 3 had increased cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells, especially non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared to its mono-substituted complex 3a, indicating that the sterically hindered alkyl moieties have significant influences on its antitumor property. However, the mechanism still remains unclear. The further studies revealed that complex 3 could induce ROS overproduction, severe DNA double strands breaks and inhibit the activation of DNA damage repair proteins within nucleus, leading to cell-cycle arrest and cell death. Moreover, complex 3 could induce autophagy via the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and alterations of autophagic protein expression. Interestingly, the ROS scavengers, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) could reverse complex 3-induced DNA double strands breaks and autophagic responses more significantly compared to complex 3a. The results demonstrated that the ROS generation plays an important role in the DNA double strands breaks and autophagic responses in the antitumor effect of complex 3 with N1,N2-diisobutyl moiety. Our study offered a novel therapeutic strategy and put new insights into the anticancer research of the complexes with N1,N2-diisobutyl moiety served as steric hindrance.

  19. Visualization of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair at the Single-Molecule Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dynan, William S.; Li, Shuyi; Mernaugh, Raymond; Wragg, Stephanie; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2003-03-27

    Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is universal. The signature injury from ionizing radiation exposure is induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The first line of defense against DSBs is direct ligation of broken DNA ends via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Because even a relatively high environmental exposure induces only a few DSBs per cell, our current understanding of the response to this exposure is limited by the ability to measure DSB repair events reliably in situ at a single-molecule level. To address this need, we have taken advantage of biological amplification, measuring relocalization of proteins and detection of protein phosphorylation as a surrogate for detection of broken ends themselves. We describe the use of specific antibodies to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of repair of very small numbers of DSBs in human cells by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway.

  20. A double-stranded RNA as the genome of a potential virus infecting Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weixia; Chen, Jishuang

    2009-08-01

    Preparations of double-stranded (ds) RNAs extracted from naturally infected Vicia faba Linn. growing in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, Eastern China displayed 3 dominant bands (FaR1, FaR2, and FaR3). FaR2 and FaR3 were found to be identical to the genomic dsRNAs of a recently reported Vicia cryptic virus (VCV). The positive strand of FaR1 contained two large open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2. The putative proteins encoded by these ORFs were found to have certain similarities to the putative capsid protein [ABO36237] and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [ABC96788], respectively, of Tomato yellow stunt virus. Thus, FaR1 may represent the genome of a new dsRNA virus, which we have named Vicia cryptic virus M.

  1. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Gidrol, X.; Lemercier, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design. (authors)

  2. Double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase Irc3p is directly involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Tiina; Gaidutšik, Ilja; Villemson, Karin; Hou, YingJian; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-12-01

    Nucleic acid-dependent ATPases are involved in nearly all aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism. Previous studies have described a number of mitochondrial helicases. However, double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPases, including translocases or enzymes remodeling DNA-protein complexes, have not been identified in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. Here, we demonstrate that Irc3p is a mitochondrial double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase of the Superfamily II. In contrast to the other mitochondrial Superfamily II enzymes Mss116p, Suv3p and Mrh4p, which are RNA helicases, Irc3p has a direct role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Specific Irc3p-dependent mtDNA metabolic intermediates can be detected, including high levels of double-stranded DNA breaks that accumulate in irc3Δ mutants. irc3Δ-related topology changes in rho- mtDNA can be reversed by the deletion of mitochondrial RNA polymerase RPO41, suggesting that Irc3p counterbalances adverse effects of transcription on mitochondrial genome stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Hydroxylation of deoxyguanosine at 5' site of GG and GGG sequences in double-stranded DNA induced by carbamoyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2002-06-01

    Free radicals generated by chemicals can cause sequence-specific DNA damage and play important roles in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Carbamoyl group (CONH2) and its derived groups (CONR2) occur as natural products and synthetic chemical compounds. We have investigated the DNA damage by carbamoyl radicals .(CONH2), one of carbon-centered radicals. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study has demonstrated that carbamoyl radicals were generated from formamide by treatment with H2O2 plus Cu(II), and from azodicarbonamide by treatment with Cu(II). We have investigated sequence specificity of DNA damage induced by carbamoyl radicals using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes. Treatment of double-stranded DNA with carbamoyl radicals induced an alteration of guanine residues, and subsequent treatment with piperidine or Fpg protein led to chain cleavages at 5'-G of GG and GGG sequences. Carbamoyl radicals enhanced Cu(II)/H2O2-mediated formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in double-stranded DNA more efficiently than that in single-stranded DNA. These results shows that carbamoyl radicals specifically induced hydroxylation of deoxyguanosine at 5' site of GG and GGG sequences in double-stranded DNA.

  4. A link between double-strand break-related repair and V(D)J recombination: the scid mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, E.A.; Qin, X.Q.; Bump, E.A.; Schatz, D.G.; Oettinger, M.; Weaver, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    We show here that mammalian site-specific recombination and DNA-repair pathways share a common factor. The effects of DNA-damaging agents on cell lines derived from mice homozygous for the scid (severe combined immune deficiency) mutation were studied. Surprisingly, all scid cell lines exhibited a profound hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that caused double-strand breaks (x-irradiation and bleomycin) but not to other chemicals that caused single-strand breaks or cross-links. Neutral filter elution assays demonstrated that the x-irradiation hypersensitivity could be correlated with a deficiency in repairing double-strand breaks. These data suggest that the scid gene product is involved in two pathways: DNA repair of random double-strand breaks and the site-specific and lymphoid-restricted variable-(diversity)-joining [V(D)J] DNA rearrangement process. We propose that the scid gene product performs a similar function in both pathways and may be a ubiquitous protein

  5. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  6. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  7. Colocalization of multiple DNA double-strand breaks at a single Rad52 repair centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Rothstein, R.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an essential process for preserving genomic integrity in all organisms. To investigate this process at the cellular level, we engineered a system of fluorescently marked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to visualize in ...

  8. Study in regularities in the formation of double stranded DNA breaks in irradiated rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivannik, B.P.; ProskuryakoV, S.Ya.; Ryabchenko, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    Using low-gradient viscosimetry of neutral detergent nuclear lysates a study was made of postradiation changes in the molecular weight of double-stranded DNA of thymocytes. It was established that 375 eV are needed for one double-stranded break to appear, and a dose of 1 rad is required for 0.275 double-stranded break to occur at the site of DNA with m.w. 10 12 dalton. The repair of double-stranded breaks is only observed when rats are exposed to a dose of 500 R. It is assumed that the absence of repair of double-stranded DNA breaks and the presence of secondary postradiation degradation of DNA are responsible for thymocyte death

  9. Effects of tryptophan starvation on levels of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) and anti-TRAP regulatory protein and their influence on trp operon expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Jen; Yanofsky, Charles

    2005-03-01

    The anti-TRAP protein (AT), encoded by the rtpA gene of Bacillus subtilis, can bind to and inhibit the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). AT binding can prevent TRAP from promoting transcription termination in the leader region of the trp operon, thereby increasing trp operon expression. We show here that AT levels continue to increase as tryptophan starvation becomes more severe, whereas the TRAP level remains relatively constant and independent of tryptophan starvation. Assuming that the functional form of AT is a trimer, we estimate that the ratios of AT trimers per TRAP molecule are 0.39 when the cells are grown under mild tryptophan starvation conditions, 0.83 under more severe starvation conditions, and approximately 2.0 when AT is expressed maximally. As the AT level is increased, a corresponding increase is observed in the anthranilate synthase level. When AT is expressed maximally, the anthranilate synthase level is about 70% of the level observed in a strain lacking TRAP. In a nutritional shift experiment where excess phenylalanine and tyrosine could potentially starve cells of tryptophan, both the AT level and anthranilate synthase activity were observed to increase. Expression of the trp operon is clearly influenced by the level of AT.

  10. γ-H2AX as a biomarker for DNA double-strand breaks in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerić, Marko; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2014-07-01

    The visualisation of DNA damage response proteins enables the indirect measurement of DNA damage. Soon after the occurrence of a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the formation of γ-H2AX histone variants is to be expected. This review is focused on the potential use of the γ-H2AX foci assay in assessing the genotoxicity of environmental contaminants including cytostatic pharmaceuticals, since standard methods may not be sensitive enough to detect the damaging effect of low environmental concentrations of such drugs. These compounds are constantly released into the environment, potentially representing a threat to water quality, aquatic organisms, and, ultimately, human health. Our review of the literature revealed that this method could be used in the biomonitoring and risk assessment of aquatic systems affected by wastewater from the production, usage, and disposal of cytostatic pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...... of the cellular response to DSBs is the accumulation and local concentration of a plethora of DNA damage signaling and repair proteins in the vicinity of the lesion, initiated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation of H2AX (¿-H2AX) and culminating in the generation of distinct nuclear compartments, so-called Ionizing...... of such DNA repair foci still remains limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries on the mechanisms that govern the formation of IRIF, and discuss the implications of such findings in light of our understanding of the physiological importance of these structures....

  12. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2015-07-30

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA.

  13. Motif III in superfamily 2 "helicases" helps convert the binding energy of ATP into a high-affinity RNA binding site in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banroques, Josette; Doère, Monique; Dreyfus, Marc; Linder, Patrick; Tanner, N Kyle

    2010-03-05

    Motif III in the putative helicases of superfamily 2 is highly conserved in both its sequence and its structural context. It typically consists of the sequence alcohol-alanine-alcohol (S/T-A-S/T). Historically, it was thought to link ATPase activity with a "helicase" strand displacement activity that disrupts RNA or DNA duplexes. DEAD-box proteins constitute the largest family of superfamily 2; they are RNA-dependent ATPases and ATP-dependent RNA binding proteins that, in some cases, are able to disrupt short RNA duplexes. We made mutations of motif III (S-A-T) in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1 and analyzed in vivo phenotypes and in vitro properties. Moreover, we made a tertiary model of Ded1 based on the solved structure of Vasa. We used Ded1 because it has relatively high ATPase and RNA binding activities; it is able to displace moderately stable duplexes at a large excess of substrate. We find that the alanine and the threonine in the second and third positions of motif III are more important than the serine, but that mutations of all three residues have strong phenotypes. We purified the wild-type and various mutants expressed in Escherichia coli. We found that motif III mutations affect the RNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP (k(cat)), but not the affinity for ATP (K(m)). Moreover, mutations alter and reduce the affinity for single-stranded RNA and subsequently reduce the ability to disrupt duplexes. We obtained intragenic suppressors of the S-A-C mutant that compensate for the mutation by enhancing the affinity for ATP and RNA. We conclude that motif III and the binding energy of gamma-PO(4) of ATP are used to coordinate motifs I, II, and VI and the two RecA-like domains to create a high-affinity single-stranded RNA binding site. It also may help activate the beta,gamma-phosphoanhydride bond of ATP. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Double-Strand DNA Break Repair in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Discontinuity of both strands of the chromosome is a lethal event in all living organisms because it compromises chromosome replication. As such, a diversity of DNA repair systems has evolved to repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In part, this diversity of DSB repair systems has evolved to repair breaks that arise in diverse physiologic circumstances or sequence contexts, including cellular states of nonreplication or breaks that arise between repeats. Mycobacteria elaborate a set of three genetically distinct DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, nonhomologous end joining, and single-strand annealing. As such, mycobacterial DSB repair diverges substantially from the standard model of prokaryotic DSB repair and represents an attractive new model system. In addition, the presence in mycobacteria of a DSB repair system that can repair DSBs in nonreplicating cells (nonhomologous end joining) or when DSBs arise between repeats (single-strand annealing) has clear potential relevance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, although the exact role of these systems in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is still being elucidated. In this article we will review the genetics of mycobacterial DSB repair systems, focusing on recent insights.

  15. Do DNA Double-Strand Breaks Drive Aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ryan R; Vijg, Jan

    2016-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rare, but highly toxic, lesions requiring orchestrated and conserved machinery to prevent adverse consequences, such as cell death and cancer-causing genome structural mutations. DSBs trigger the DNA damage response (DDR) that directs a cell to repair the break, undergo apoptosis, or become senescent. There is increasing evidence that the various endpoints of DSB processing by different cells and tissues are part of the aging phenotype, with each stage of the DDR associated with specific aging pathologies. In this Perspective, we discuss the possibility that DSBs are major drivers of intrinsic aging, highlighting the dynamics of spontaneous DSBs in relation to aging, the distinct age-related pathologies induced by DSBs, and the segmental progeroid phenotypes in humans and mice with genetic defects in DSB repair. A model is presented as to how DSBs could drive some of the basic mechanisms underlying age-related functional decline and death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Signalling of double strand breaks and deprotected telomeres in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eAmiard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Failure to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB can lead to chromosomal rearrangements and eventually to cancer or cell death. Radiation and environmental pollutants induce DSB and this is of particular relevance to plants due to their sessile life style. DSB also occur naturally in cells during DNA replication and programmed induction of DSB initiates the meiotic recombination essential for gametogenesis in most eukaryotes. The linear nature of most eukaryotic chromosomes means that each chromosome has two "broken" ends. Chromosome ends, or telomeres, are protected by nucleoprotein caps which avoid their recognition as DSB by the cellular DNA repair machinery. Deprotected telomeres are recognized as DSB and become substrates for recombination leading to chromosome fusions, the "bridge-breakage-fusion" cycle, genome rearrangements and cell death. The importance of repair of DSB and the severity of the consequences of their misrepair have led to the presence of multiple, robust mechanisms for their detection and repair. After a brief overview of DSB repair pathways to set the context, we present here an update of current understanding of the detection and signalling of DSB in the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana.

  17. Ku recruits XLF to DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Wang, Shih-Ya; Uematsu, Naoya; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF)--also known as Cernunnos--has recently been shown to be involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the main pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. XLF is likely to enhance NHEJ by stimulating XRCC4-ligase IV-mediated joining of DSBs. Here, we report mechanistic details of XLF recruitment to DSBs. Live cell imaging combined with laser micro-irradiation showed that XLF is an early responder to DSBs and that Ku is essential for XLF recruitment to DSBs. Biochemical analysis showed that Ku-XLF interaction occurs on DNA and that Ku stimulates XLF binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, XRCC4 is dispensable for XLF recruitment to DSBs, although photobleaching analysis showed that XRCC4 stabilizes the binding of XLF to DSBs. Our observations showed the direct involvement of XLF in the dynamic assembly of the NHEJ machinery and provide mechanistic insights into DSB recognition.

  18. [Diverse double-stranded RNA viruses infecting fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Sotaro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Most of reported fungal viruses (mycoviruses) have double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes. This may reflect the simple, easy method for mycovirus hunting that entails detection of dsRNAs as a sign of viral infections. There are an increasing number of screens of various fungi, particularly phytopathogenic fungi for viruses pathogenic to host fungi or able to confer hypovirulence to them. This bases on an attractive research field of biological control of fungal plant diseases using viruses (virocontrol), mainly targeting important phytopathogenic fungi. While isolated viruses usually induce asymptomatic symptoms, they show a considerably high level of diversity. As of 2014, fungal dsRNA viruses are classified into six families: Reoviridae, Totiviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, Megabirnaviridae and Quadriviridae. These exclude unassigned mycoviruses which will definitely be placed into distinct families and/or genera. In this review article, dsRNA viruses isolated from the kingdom Fungi including as-yet-unclassified taxa are overviewed. Some recent achievements in the related field are briefly introduced as well.

  19. Enzymatic induction of DNA double-strand breaks in γ-irradiated Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonura, T.; Smith, K.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    The polA1 mutation increases the sensitivity of E. coli K-12 to killing by γ-irradiation in air by a factor of 2.9 and increases the yield of DNA double-strand breaks by a factor of 2.5. These additional DNA double-strand breaks appear to be due to the action of nucleases in the polA1 strain rather than to the rejoining of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in the pol + strain. This conclusion is based upon the observation that γ-irradiation at 3 0 did not affect the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the pol + strain, but decreased the yield in the polA1 strain by a factor of 2.2. Irradiation of the polA1 strain at 3 0 followed by incubation at 3 0 for 20 min before plating resulted in approximately a 1.5-fold increase in the D 0 . The yield of DNA double-strand breaks was reduced by a factor of 1.5. The pol + strain, however, did not show the protective effect of the low temperature incubation upon either survival or DNA double-strand breakage. We suggest that the increased yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the polA 1 strain may be the result of the unsuccessful excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced dna base damage

  20. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Double strand breaks in DNA in vivo and in vitro after 60Co-γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huelsewede, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The questions of what the correlation is between double strand breaks in DNA in the cell and lethal radiation damage and by means of which possible mechanisms DNA double strand breaks could occur were studied. E. coli served as test system. In addition to this the molecular weight of the DNA from irradiated E. coli as a function of the radiation dose under various conditions was measured. This data was compared on the one hand to the survival of the cell and on the other hand to the formation of DNA double strand breaks in an aqueous buffer system, which in its ionic characteristics was similar to cell fluids. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Elimination of double strand nuclease activity from S1 nuclease prepared from crude alpha amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, W E; Van Ness, J

    1976-01-01

    Single strand-specific s1 nuclease prepared as previously described from crude alpha amylase by DEAE-cellulose chromatography also contains nuclease which degrades double strand nucleic acid. The double strand activity can be removed by repeating the DEAE-cellulose chromatography procedure at least two additional times. S1 nuclease prepared by this procedure does not degrade double strand sheared DNA as measured by Sephadex chromatography. Under the same conditions single strand DNA is completely degraded. Thus, S1 nuclease prepared by this procedure is suitable for use in removing single strand regions in DNA/DNA duplexes and DNA/RNA hybrids. PMID:940774

  3. Manipulation of double-stranded DNA melting by force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2017-09-01

    By integrating elasticity—as described by the Gaussian network model—with bond binding energies that distinguish between different base-pair identities and stacking configurations, we study the force induced melting of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Our approach is a generalization of our previous study of thermal dsDNA denaturation [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 144101 (2016), 10.1063/1.4964285] to that induced by force at finite temperatures. It allows us to obtain semimicroscopic information about the opening of the chain, such as whether the dsDNA opens from one of the ends or from the interior, forming an internal bubble. We study different types of force manipulation: (i) "end unzipping," with force acting at a single end base pair perpendicular to the helix, (ii) "midunzipping," with force acting at a middle base pair perpendicular to the helix, and (iii) "end shearing," where the force acts at opposite ends along the helix. By monitoring the free-energy landscape and probability distribution of intermediate denaturation states, we show that different dominant intermediate states are stabilized depending on the type of force manipulation used. In particular, the bubble state of the sequence L60B36, which we have previously found to be a stable state during thermal denaturation, is absent for end unzipping and end shearing, whereas very similar bubbles are stabilized by midunzipping, or when the force location is near the middle of the chain. Ours results offer a simple tool for stabilizing bubbles and loops using force manipulations at different temperatures, and may implicate on the mechanism in which DNA enzymes or motors open regions of the chain.

  4. Role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of Dr+ Escherichia coli receptor protein decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Liebenthal, Daniel; Nowak, David E; Urvil, Petri; Yallampalli, Uma; Wilson, Gerald M; Kishor, Aparna; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported that nitric oxide (NO) reduces the rate of bacteremia and maternal mortality in pregnant rats with uterine infection by Escherichia coli expressing the Dr Fimbria (Dr(+) ). The epithelial invasion of Dr(+) E. coli is dependent on the expression level of its cellular receptor decay accelerating factor (DAF). NO reduces the rate of bacteremia by downregulating the expression of DAF. In this study, we elucidated the role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of human DAF by NO. We generated a series of deletion mutant constructs of DAF gene 5'-untranslated region and mapped the NO-response region upstream to the core promoter region of the DAF gene. One of the several Sp1 binding sites in the DAF 5'-untranslated region was located within the NO-response region. The binding of Sp1 to this site was inhibited by NO. Furthermore, NO also promoted the degradation of DAF mRNA. The 3'-untranslated region of DAF harbors an AU-rich element and this element destabilized the mRNA transcript. NO promoted the rapid degradation of DAF mRNA by inhibiting the binding of mRNA stabilizing protein HuR to this AU-rich region. The inhibition of binding of HuR to the AU-rich region was due to the S-nitrosylation of one or more cysteine residues by NO. Thus, these data reveal the molecular mediators of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of DAF by NO with implications in pathophysiology related to DAF. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  5. Phosphorylation of the spinach chloroplast 24 kDa RNA-binding protein (24RNP) increases its binding to petD and psbA 3' untranslated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Tavera, H; Vargas-Suárez, M; Díaz-Mireles, E; Torres-Márquez, M E; González de la Vara, L E; Moreno-Sánchez, R; Gruissem, W

    2006-09-01

    The chloroplast 24 kDa RNA binding protein (24RNP) from Spinacea oleracea is a nuclear encoded protein that binds the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of some chloroplast mRNAs and seems to be involved in some processes of mRNA metabolism, such as 3'UTR processing, maturation and stabilization. The 24RNP is similar to the 28RNP which is involved in the correct maturation of petD and psbA 3'UTRs, and when phosphorylated, decreases its binding affinity for RNA. In the present work, we determined that the recombinant 24RNP was phosphorylated in vitro either by an animal protein kinase C, a plant Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase, or a chloroplastic kinase activity present in a protein extract with 3'-end processing activity in which the 24RNP is also present. Phosphorylation of 24RNP increased the binding capacity (B(max)) 0.25 time for petD 3'UTR, and three times for psbA 3'UTR; the affinity for P-24RNP only increased when the interaction with petD was tested. Competition experiments suggested that B(max), not K(d), might be a more important factor in the P-24RNP-3'UTR interaction. The data suggested that the 24RNP role in chloroplast mRNA metabolism may be regulated in vivo by changes in its phosphorylation status carried out by a chloroplastic kinase.

  6. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Anja [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany) and Faculty of Biology, Pharmacy and Psychology, University of Leipzig (Germany)]. E-mail: afiedler@uni-leipzig.de; Reinert, Tilo [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, Judith [Clinic and Polyclinic for Radiation Oncology, University of Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Butz, Tilman [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone {gamma}H2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of {gamma}H2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as 'biological track detectors' for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of {gamma}H2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  7. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as 'biological track detectors' for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3 N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern

  8. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chen [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Lees-Miller, Susan P., E-mail: leesmill@ucalgary.ca [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

  9. The Mismatch-Binding Factor MutSβ Can Mediate ATR Activation in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdová, Kamila; Mihaljevic, B.; Sturzenegger, A.; Chappidi, N.; Janščák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2015), s. 603-614 ISSN 1097-2765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0281; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05743S Grant - others:Oncosuisse(CH) KLS-02344-02-2009; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A_146206; Novartis Foundation for Medical and Biological Research(CH) 11A16 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinase * DNA -damage response * DNA Double- Strand Breaks Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 13.958, year: 2015

  10. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading......-mediated invadopodia formation. Taken together, our results indicate that RNA-binding proteins exert profound effects on cellular adhesion and invasion during development and cancer formation....... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular...

  11. TrmBL2 from Pyrococcus furiosus Interacts Both with Double-Stranded and Single-Stranded DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wierer

    Full Text Available In many hyperthermophilic archaea the DNA binding protein TrmBL2 or one of its homologues is abundantly expressed. TrmBL2 is thought to play a significant role in modulating the chromatin architecture in combination with the archaeal histone proteins and Alba. However, its precise physiological role is poorly understood. It has been previously shown that upon binding TrmBL2 covers double-stranded DNA, which leads to the formation of a thick and fibrous filament. Here we investigated the filament formation process as well as the stabilization of DNA by TrmBL2 from Pyroccocus furiosus in detail. We used magnetic tweezers that allow to monitor changes of the DNA mechanical properties upon TrmBL2 binding on the single-molecule level. Extended filaments formed in a cooperative manner and were considerably stiffer than bare double-stranded DNA. Unlike Alba, TrmBL2 did not form DNA cross-bridges. The protein was found to bind double- and single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. In mechanical disruption experiments of DNA hairpins this led to stabilization of both, the double- (before disruption and the single-stranded (after disruption DNA forms. Combined, these findings suggest that the biological function of TrmBL2 is not limited to modulating genome architecture and acting as a global repressor but that the protein acts additionally as a stabilizer of DNA secondary structure.

  12. A mutation in the glutamate-rich region of RNA-binding motif protein 20 causes dilated cardiomyopathy through missplicing of titin and impaired Frank-Starling mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Bollen, I. A. E.; Rasmussen, T. B.

    2016-01-01

    -rich region of RBM20. Western blot analysis of endogenous RBM20 protein revealed strongly reduced protein levels in the heart of an RBM20(E913K/+) carrier. RNA deep-sequencing demonstrated massive inclusion of exons coding for the spring region of titin in the RBM20(E913K/+) carrier. Titin isoform analysis...

  13. Nucleolar Reorganization Upon Site-Specific Double-Strand Break Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, Michal; Kovaříková, Alena; Bártová, Eva; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2016-11-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) in ribosomal genes and mechanisms of DNA repair in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are less explored nuclear events. DDR in ESCs should be unique due to their high proliferation rate, expression of pluripotency factors, and specific chromatin signature. Given short population doubling time and fast progress through G1 phase, ESCs require a sustained production of rRNA, which leads to the formation of large and prominent nucleoli. Although transcription of rRNA in the nucleolus is relatively well understood, little is known about DDR in this nuclear compartment. Here, we directed formation of double-strand breaks in rRNA genes with I- PpoI endonuclease, and we studied nucleolar morphology, DDR, and chromatin modifications. We observed a pronounced formation of I- PpoI-induced nucleolar caps, positive on BRCA1, NBS1, MDC1, γH2AX, and UBF1 proteins. We showed interaction of nucleolar protein TCOF1 with HDAC1 and TCOF1 with CARM1 after DNA injury. Moreover, H3R17me2a modification mediated by CARM1 was found in I- PpoI-induced nucleolar caps. Finally, we report that heterochromatin protein 1 is not involved in DNA repair of nucleolar caps.

  14. Expression and localization of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and 2 and serpine mRNA binding protein 1 in the bovine corpus luteum during the estrous cycle and the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Magdalena K; Rekawiecki, Robert; Kotwica, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression and the localization of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), PGRMC2, and the PGRMC1 partner serpine mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1) in the bovine CL on Days 2 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 16, and 17 to 20 of the estrous cycle as well as during Weeks 3 to 5, 6 to 8, and 9 to 12 of pregnancy (n = 5-6 per each period). The highest levels of PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 mRNA expression were found on Days 6 to 16 (P cycle and during pregnancy (P cycle compared with the other stages of the estrous cycle and pregnancy, whereas PGRMC2 protein expression (P cycle and was at its lowest (P cows, the patterns of SERBP1 mRNA and protein expression remained constant and were comparable with those observed during the estrous cycle. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and PGRMC2 localized to both large and small luteal cells, whereas SERBP1 was observed mainly in small luteal cells and much less frequently in large luteal cells. All proteins were also localized in the endothelial cells of blood vessels. The data obtained indicate the variable expression of PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and SERBP1 mRNA and protein in the bovine CL and suggest that progesterone may regulate CL function via its membrane receptors during both the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CTCF facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by enhancing homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Khalid; Jangal, Maïka; Marques, Maud; Zhao, Tiejun; Saad, Amine; Zhang, Chenxi; Luo, Vincent M; Syme, Alasdair; Rejon, Carlis; Yu, Zhenbao; Krum, Asiev; Fabian, Marc R; Richard, Stéphane; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay; Orthwein, Alexander; McCaffrey, Luke; Witcher, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is mediated via two major pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) repair. DSB repair is vital for cell survival, genome stability, and tumor suppression. In contrast to NHEJ, HR relies on extensive homology and templated DNA synthesis to restore the sequence surrounding the break site. We report a new role for the multifunctional protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) in facilitating HR-mediated DSB repair. CTCF is recruited to DSB through its zinc finger domain independently of poly(ADP-ribose) polymers, known as PARylation, catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). CTCF ensures proper DSB repair kinetics in response to γ-irradiation, and the loss of CTCF compromises HR-mediated repair. Consistent with its role in HR, loss of CTCF results in hypersensitivity to DNA damage, inducing agents and inhibitors of PARP. Mechanistically, CTCF acts downstream of BRCA1 in the HR pathway and associates with BRCA2 in a PARylation-dependent manner, enhancing BRCA2 recruitment to DSB. In contrast, CTCF does not influence the recruitment of the NHEJ protein 53BP1 or LIGIV to DSB. Together, our findings establish for the first time that CTCF is an important regulator of the HR pathway.

  16. Autotaxin Expression Is Regulated at the Post-transcriptional Level by the RNA-binding Proteins HuR and AUF1*

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Shuhong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Lyu, Lin; Li, Xixi; Yao, Siliang; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a key enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lysophospholipid mediator that regulates cellular activities through its specific G protein-coupled receptors. The ATX-LPA axis plays an important role in various physiological and pathological processes, especially in inflammation and cancer development. Although the transcriptional regulation of ATX has been widely studied, the post-transcriptional regulation of ATX is largely unk...

  17. Role of RNA structure and RNA binding activity of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protein in VPg uridylylation and virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, A.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Woolaway, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The uridylylation of the VPg peptide primer is the first stage in the replication of picornavirus RNA. This process can be achieved in vitro using purified components, including 3B (VPg) with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), the precursor 3CD, and an RNA template containing the cre....../bus. We show that certain RNA sequences within the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 5' untranslated region but outside of the cre/bus can enhance VPg uridylylation activity. Furthermore, we have shown that the FMDV X protein alone can substitute for 3CD, albeit less efficiently. In addition, the VPg...... precursors, 3B(3)3C and 3B(123)3C, can function as substrates for uridylylation in the absence of added 3C or 3CD. Residues within the FMDV 3C protein involved in interaction with the cre/bus RNA have been identified and are located on the face of the protein opposite from the catalytic site. These residues...

  18. Novel RNA-binding protein P311 binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit b (eIF3b) to promote translation of transforming growth factor β1-3 (TGF-β1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Michael M; Lv, Kaosheng; Meredith, Stephen C; Martindale, Jennifer L; Gorospe, Myriam; Schuger, Lucia

    2014-12-05

    P311, a conserved 8-kDa intracellular protein expressed in brain, smooth muscle, regenerating tissues, and malignant glioblastomas, represents the first documented stimulator of TGF-β1-3 translation in vitro and in vivo. Here we initiated efforts to define the mechanism underlying P311 function. PONDR® (Predictor Of Naturally Disordered Regions) analysis suggested and CD confirmed that P311 is an intrinsically disordered protein, therefore requiring an interacting partner to acquire tertiary structure and function. Immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectroscopy identified eIF3 subunit b (eIF3b) as a novel P311 binding partner. Immunohistochemical colocalization, GST pulldown, and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that P311-eIF3b interaction is direct and has a Kd of 1.26 μm. Binding sites were mapped to the non-canonical RNA recognition motif of eIF3b and a central 11-amino acid-long region of P311, here referred to as eIF3b binding motif. Disruption of P311-eIF3b binding inhibited translation of TGF-β1, 2, and 3, as indicated by luciferase reporter assays, polysome fractionation studies, and Western blot analysis. RNA precipitation assays after UV cross-linking and RNA-protein EMSA demonstrated that P311 binds directly to TGF-β 5'UTRs mRNAs through a previously unidentified RNA recognition motif-like motif. Our results demonstrate that P311 is a novel RNA-binding protein that, by interacting with TGF-βs 5'UTRs and eIF3b, stimulates the translation of TGF-β1, 2, and 3. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Infectious Bursal disease virus: ribonucleoprotein complexes of a double-stranded RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Daniel; Saugar, Irene; Rejas, María Teresa; Carrascosa, José L; Rodríguez, José F; Castón, José R

    2009-02-27

    Genome-binding proteins with scaffolding and/or regulatory functions are common in living organisms and include histones in eukaryotic cells, histone-like proteins in some double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses, and the nucleocapsid proteins of single-stranded RNA viruses. dsRNA viruses nevertheless lack these ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and are characterized by sharing an icosahedral T=2 core involved in the metabolism and insulation of the dsRNA genome. The birnaviruses, with a bipartite dsRNA genome, constitute a well-established exception and have a single-shelled T=13 capsid only. Moreover, as in many negative single-stranded RNA viruses, the genomic dsRNA is bound to a nucleocapsid protein (VP3) and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VPg). We used electron microscopy and functional analysis to characterize these RNP complexes of infectious bursal disease virus, the best characterized member of the Birnaviridae family. Mild disruption of viral particles revealed that VP3, the most abundant core protein, present at approximately 450 copies per virion, is found in filamentous material tightly associated with the dsRNA. We developed a method to purify RNP and VPg-dsRNA complexes. Analysis of these complexes showed that they are linear molecules containing a constant amount of protein. Sensitivity assays to nucleases indicated that VP3 renders the genomic dsRNA less accessible for RNase III without introducing genome compaction. Additionally, we found that these RNP complexes are functionally competent for RNA synthesis in a capsid-independent manner, in contrast to most dsRNA viruses.

  20. Mycobacterial nonhomologous end joining mediates mutagenic repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Bongiorno, Paola; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described DNA repair pathway best characterized in mycobacteria. Bacterial NHEJ proteins LigD and Ku have been analyzed biochemically, and their roles in linear plasmid repair in vivo have been verified genetically; yet the contributions of NHEJ to repair of chromosomal DNA damage are unknown. Here we use an extensive set of NHEJ- and homologous recombination (HR)-deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis strains to probe the importance of HR and NHEJ in repairing diverse types of chromosomal DNA damage. An M. smegmatis Delta recA Delta ku double mutant has no apparent growth defect in vitro. Loss of the NHEJ components Ku and LigD had no effect on sensitivity to UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, or quinolone antibiotics. NHEJ deficiency had no effect on sensitivity to ionizing radiation in logarithmic- or early-stationary-phase cells but was required for ionizing radiation resistance in late stationary phase in 7H9 but not LB medium. In addition, NHEJ components were required for repair of I-SceI mediated chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), and in the absence of HR, the NHEJ pathway rapidly mutates the chromosomal break site. The molecular outcomes of NHEJ-mediated chromosomal DSB repair involve predominantly single-nucleotide insertions at the break site, similar to previous findings using plasmid substrates. These findings demonstrate that prokaryotic NHEJ is specifically required for DSB repair in late stationary phase and can mediate mutagenic repair of homing endonuclease-generated chromosomal DSBs.

  1. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Olitija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra [University of Belgrade, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Todorović, Danijela, E-mail: dtodorovic@medf.kg.ac.rs [University of Kragujevac, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac (Serbia)

    2016-03-15

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci. (author)

  2. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Olitija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci. (author)

  3. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Otilija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci.

  4. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANJA BULAT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX. Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany. Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci.

  5. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  6. Castration radiosensitizes prostate cancer tissue by impairing DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarish, Firas L; Schultz, Niklas; Tanoglidi, Anna; Hamberg, Hans; Letocha, Henry; Karaszi, Katalin; Hamdy, Freddie C; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-11-04

    Chemical castration improves responses to radiotherapy in prostate cancer, but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that this radiosensitization is caused by castration-mediated down-regulation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). To test this, we enrolled 48 patients with localized prostate cancer in two arms of the study: either radiotherapy first or radiotherapy after neoadjuvant castration treatment. We biopsied patients at diagnosis and before and after castration and radiotherapy treatments to monitor androgen receptor, NHEJ, and DSB repair in verified cancer tissue. We show that patients receiving neoadjuvant castration treatment before radiotherapy had reduced amounts of the NHEJ protein Ku70, impaired radiotherapy-induced NHEJ activity, and higher amounts of unrepaired DSBs, measured by γ-H2AX foci in cancer tissues. This study demonstrates that chemical castration impairs NHEJ activity in prostate cancer tissue, explaining the improved response of patients with prostate cancer to radiotherapy after chemical castration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Autophosphorylation of DNA-PKCS regulates its dynamics at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Naoya; Weterings, Eric; Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; van Gent, Dik C; Chen, Benjamin P C; Chen, David J

    2007-04-23

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) plays an important role during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is recruited to DNA ends in the early stages of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process, which mediates DSB repair. To study DNA-PK(CS) recruitment in vivo, we used a laser system to introduce DSBs in a specified region of the cell nucleus. We show that DNA-PK(CS) accumulates at DSB sites in a Ku80-dependent manner, and that neither the kinase activity nor the phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influences its initial accumulation. However, impairment of both of these functions results in deficient DSB repair and the maintained presence of DNA-PK(CS) at unrepaired DSBs. The use of photobleaching techniques allowed us to determine that the kinase activity and phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influence the stability of its binding to DNA ends. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK(CS) phosphorylation/autophosphorylation facilitates NHEJ by destabilizing the interaction of DNA-PK(CS) with the DNA ends.

  8. Widespread horizontal gene transfer from double-stranded RNA viruses to eukaryotic nuclear genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Li, Guoqing; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Peng, Youliang; Ghabrial, Said A; Yi, Xianhong

    2010-11-01

    Horizontal gene transfer commonly occurs from cells to viruses but rarely occurs from viruses to their host cells, with the exception of retroviruses and some DNA viruses. However, extensive sequence similarity searches in public genome databases for various organisms showed that the capsid protein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes from totiviruses and partitiviruses have widespread homologs in the nuclear genomes of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, arthropods, fungi, nematodes, and protozoa. PCR amplification and sequencing as well as comparative evidence of junction coverage between virus and host sequences support the conclusion that these viral homologs are real and occur in eukaryotic genomes. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these genes were likely transferred horizontally from viruses to eukaryotic genomes. Furthermore, we present evidence showing that some of the transferred genes are conserved and expressed in eukaryotic organisms and suggesting that these viral genes are also functional in the recipient genomes. Our findings imply that horizontal transfer of double-stranded RNA viral genes is widespread among eukaryotes and may give rise to functionally important new genes, thus entailing that RNA viruses may play significant roles in the evolution of eukaryotes.

  9. Detection and molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA viruses in Philippine Trichomonas vaginalis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Windell L; Justo, Christine Aubrey C; Relucio-San Diego, Mary Ann Cielo V; Loyola, Lorenz M

    2017-10-01

    The flagellated protozoon Trichomonas vaginalis that parasitizes the urogenital tract of humans was reported to harbor double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. These viruses, identified as Trichomonas vaginalis virus (TVV), belong to the genus Trichomonasvirus of the family Totiviridae. Four species, formally recognized by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), have been reported and distinguished by pairwise comparisons of the sequences of genes coding for major capsid protein (CP) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify the complimentary DNA of target virus genes coding for CP and RdRp. Sequence analyses confirmed the identity of the TVV isolates from T. vaginalis cultures. A total of 35 dsRNA viruses were identified from 18 (19%) T. vaginalis isolates. Multiple TVV species were observed in six of the 18 T. vaginalis cultures. Phylogenetic analyses show monophyly in TVV1 and TVV2 whereas TVV3 and TVV4 appear paraphyletic. The phylogeny of Philippine Trichomonasvirus reflects the global distribution of its host. This is the first study in the Philippines and one of the two reports worldwide to detect the four TVVs and their concurrent infection in a single T. vaginalis isolate. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Characterization of a novel double-stranded RNA mycovirus conferring hypovirulence from the phytopathogenic fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lifeng; Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Meixin; Fu, Min; Yang, Zuokun; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    A novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, designated as Botryosphaeria dothidea RNA virus 1 (BdRV1), isolated from a hypovirulent strain YZN115 of Botryosphaeria dothidea was biologically and molecularly characterized. The genome of BdRV1 comprises of five dsRNAs. Each dsRNA contains a single open reading frame. The proteins encoded by dsRNA1-4 shared significant amino acid identities of 55%, 47%, 43% and 53% with the corresponding proteins of Aspergillus fumigatus tetramycovirus-1. DsRNA1, 3, and 4 of BdRV1 encoded an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, a viral methyltransferase, and a P-A-S-rich protein, respectively. Function of proteins encoded by the dsRNA2 and dsRNA5 were unknown. BdRV1 conferred hypovirulence for its host and could be transmitted through conidia and hyphae contact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo selection of functional ribosomes with variations in the rRNA-binding site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S8: evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, H; Squires, C L; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C

    2000-01-18

    The highly conserved nature of rRNA sequences throughout evolution allows these molecules to be used to build philogenic trees of different species. It is unknown whether the stability of specific interactions and structural features of rRNA reflects an optimal adaptation to a functional task or an evolutionary trap. In the work reported here, we have applied an in vivo selection strategy to demonstrate that unnatural sequences do work as a functional replacement of the highly conserved binding site of ribosomal protein S8. However, growth competition experiments performed between Escherichia coli isolates containing natural and unnatural S8-binding sites showed that the fate of each isolate depended on the growth condition. In exponentially growing cells, one unnatural variant was found to be equivalent to wild type in competition experiments performed in rich media. In culture conditions leading to slow growth, however, cells containing the wild-type sequence were the ultimate winner of the competition, emphasizing that the wild-type sequence is, in fact, the most fit solution for the S8-binding site.

  12. A ribonuclease-resistant region of 5S RNA and its relation to the RNA binding sites of proteins L18 and L25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A; Wagner, R

    1979-01-01

    An RNA fragment, constituting three subfragments of nucleotide sequences 1-11, 69-87 and 89-120, is the most ribonuclease-resistant part of the native 5S RNA of Escherichia coli, at 0 degrees C. A smaller fragment of nucleotide sequence 69-87 and 90-110 is ribonuclease-resistant at 25 degrees....... Degradation of the L25-5S RNA complex with ribonuclease A or T2 yielded RNA fragments similar to those of the free 5S RNA at 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C; moreover L25 remained strongly bound to both RNA fragments and also produced some opening of the RNA structure in at least two positions. Protein L18...... initially protected most of the 5S RNA against ribonuclease digestion, at 0 degrees C, but was then gradually released prior to the formation of the larger RNA fragment. It cannot be concluded, therefore, as it was earlier (Gray et al., 1973), that this RNA fragment contains the primary binding site of L18....

  13. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Human CtIP mediates cell cycle control of DNA end resection and double strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Pablo; Jackson, Stephen P

    2009-04-03

    In G(0) and G(1), DNA double strand breaks are repaired by nonhomologous end joining, whereas in S and G(2), they are also repaired by homologous recombination. The human CtIP protein controls double strand break (DSB) resection, an event that occurs effectively only in S/G(2) and that promotes homologous recombination but not non-homologous end joining. Here, we mutate a highly conserved cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) target motif in CtIP and reveal that mutating Thr-847 to Ala impairs resection, whereas mutating it to Glu to mimic constitutive phosphorylation does not. Moreover, we show that unlike cells expressing wild-type CtIP, cells expressing the Thr-to-Glu mutant resect DSBs even after CDK inhibition. Finally, we establish that Thr-847 mutations to either Ala or Glu affect DSB repair efficiency, cause hypersensitivity toward DSB-generating agents, and affect the frequency and nature of radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements. These results suggest that CDK-mediated control of resection in human cells operates by mechanisms similar to those recently established in yeast.

  15. The helicase DinG responds to stress due to DNA double strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis (Nm is a Gram-negative nasopharyngeal commensal that can cause septicaemia and meningitis. The neisserial DNA damage-inducible protein DinG is a helicase related to the mammalian helicases XPD and FANCJ. These helicases belong to superfamily 2, are ATP dependent and exert 5' → 3' directionality. To better understand the role of DinG in neisserial genome maintenance, the Nm DinG (DinGNm enzymatic activities were assessed in vitro and phenotypical characterization of a dinG null mutant (NmΔdinG was performed. Like its homologues, DinGNm possesses 5' → 3' directionality and prefers DNA substrates containing a 5'-overhang. ATPase activity of DinGNm is strictly DNA-dependent and DNA unwinding activity requires nucleoside triphosphate and divalent metal cations. DinGNm directly binds SSBNm with a Kd of 313 nM. Genotoxic stress analysis demonstrated that NmΔdinG was more sensitive to double-strand DNA breaks (DSB induced by mitomycin C (MMC than the Nm wildtype, defining the role of neisserial DinG in DSB repair. Notably, when NmΔdinG cells grown under MMC stress assessed by quantitative mass spectrometry, 134 proteins were shown to be differentially abundant (DA compared to unstressed NmΔdinG cells. Among the DNA replication, repair and recombination proteins affected, polymerase III subunits and recombinational repair proteins RuvA, RuvB, RecB and RecD were significantly down regulated while TopA and SSB were upregulated under stress condition. Most of the other DA proteins detected are involved in metabolic functions. The present study shows that the helicase DinG is probably involved in regulating metabolic pathways as well as in genome maintenance.

  16. Three methods to determine the yields of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzgraeber, G.; Lapidus, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of determining the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in cells of the Chinese hamster (V79-4) by finding the amount of DNA released as a result of breaks and by determining the relative sedimentation velocity of DNA-membrane complexes affected by ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics is discussed. Results of the analysis are compared with the data obtained by a traditional method of sedimentation in the neutral sucrose density gradient. Comparative characterization of the methods is discussed. The yields of DNA double-strand breaks determined by the suggested independent methods are in good agreement, which opens possibilities of studying induction and repair of double-strand breaks by means of simpler and more reliable methods

  17. Repair and gamma radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Studies in the kinetics of repair of γ-radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of E. coli cells showed that double-strand DNA breaks are rejoined by the following two ways. The first way is conditioned by repair of single-strand breaks and represents the repair of ''oblique'' double-strand breaks in DNA, whereas the second way is conditioned by functioning of the recombination mechanisms and, to all appearance, represents the repair of ''direct'' double-strand breaks in DNA

  18. Elevated Subclinical Double-Stranded DNA Antibodies and Future Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica J.; Prince, Lisa K.; Baker, Thomas P.; Papadopoulos, Patricia; Edison, Jess; Abbott, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Elevated anti–double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibody and C-reactive protein are associated with proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN). Progression of quantitative anti-dsDNA antibody in patients with PLN has not been compared with that in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without LN before diagnosis. The temporal relationship between anti-dsDNA antibody and C-reactive protein elevation has also not been evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This case-control Department of Defense Serum Repository (established in 1985) study compared longitudinal prediagnostic quantitative anti-dsDNA antibody and C-reactive protein levels in 23 patients with biopsy-proven PLN (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 1993–2009) with levels in 21 controls with SLE but without LN matched for patient age, sex, race, and age of serum sample. The oldest (median, 2601 days; 25%, 1245 days, 75%, 3075 days), the second to last (368; 212, 635 days), and the last (180; 135, 477 days) serum sample before diagnosis were analyzed. Results More patients with PLN had an elevated anti-dsDNA antibody level than did the matched controls at any point (78% versus 5%; P4 years (33% versus 0%; P=0.04) before diagnosis. A rate of increase >1 IU/ml per year (70% versus 0%; P<0.001) was most specific for PLN. The anti-dsDNA antibody levels increased before C-reactive protein did in most patients with an antecedent elevation (92% versus 8%; P<0.001). Conclusions Elevated anti-dsDNA antibody usually precedes both clinical and subclinical evidence of proliferative LN, which suggests direct pathogenicity. Absolute anti-dsDNA antibody level and rate of increase could better establish risk of future PLN in patients with SLE. PMID:23833315

  19. Cell cycle-regulated centers of DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Antúnez de Mayolo, Adriana; Mortensen, Uffe H

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is an important pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have studied this process in living cells in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Rad52 as a cell biological marker. In response to DNA damage, Rad52 redistributes itself and forms...... of a double-strand break are held tightly together in the majority of cells. Interestingly, in a small but significant fraction of the S phase cells, the two ends of a break separate suggesting that mechanisms exist to reassociate and align these ends for proper DNA repair....

  20. BRCA-mutated Invasive Breast Carcinomas: Immunohistochemical Analysis of Insulin-like Growth Factor II mRNA-binding Protein (IMP3), Cytokeratin 8/18, and Cytokeratin 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Lai, Jin-Ping; Gordon, Ora K; Pradhan, Dinesh; Bose, Shikha; Dadmanesh, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (IMP3), CK8/18, and CK14 in BRCA mutated and sporadic invasive breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 was performed on 39 cases of invasive breast carcinomas with BRCA mutation (24 BRCA1, 14 BRCA2, and 1 dual BRCA1/BRCA2) and 54 cases of sporadic invasive breast carcinomas. The relationship between the IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 and the tumor grade and molecular phenotypes were analyzed. IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 positivity were present in 20 (51%), 22 (56%), and 14 (36%) of 39 BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas, and 11 (20%), 53 (98%), and 24 (44%) of 54 sporadic breast carcinomas respectively. The rates of IMP3 expression and absence of CK8/18 (44% versus 2%) in BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas was significantly higher than the sporadic breast carcinomas (p = 0.002 and p BRCA1-related and BRCA2-related breast carcinomas in the immunoprofile for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14. No significant correlation was identified between the expression of IMP3 and CK8/18 and the tumor grade in both BRCA-mutated and sporadic breast carcinomas (p > 0.05). In cases with luminal A and B phenotypes, the rates of expression of IMP3 and loss of CK8/18 were significantly higher in BRCA-mutated as compared to sporadic breast carcinoma (p BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas (54% versus 0%, p = 0.001), while no difference was observed for IMP3 expression (p = 0.435). Regardless of mutation type, histologic grade, or molecular phenotype, the absence of CK8/18 expression and presence of IMP3 expression are seen at much higher rate in BRCA mutated breast carcinomas. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Caenorhabditis elegans WRN helicase promotes double-strand DNA break repair by mediating end resection and checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jin-Sun; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2017-07-01

    The protein associated with Werner syndrome (WRN), is involved in DNA repair, checkpoint activation, and telomere maintenance. To better understand the involvement of WRN in double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair, we analyzed the combinatorial role of WRN-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans WRN helicase, in conjunction with EXO-1 and DNA-2 nucleases. We found that WRN-1 cooperates with DNA-2 to resect DSB ends in a pathway acting in parallel to EXO-1. The wrn-1 mutants show an aberrant accumulation of replication protein A (RPA) and RAD-51, and the same pattern of accumulation is also observed in checkpoint-defective strains. We conclude that WRN-1 plays a conserved role in the resection of DSB ends and mediates checkpoint signaling, thereby influencing levels of RPA and RAD-51. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. DNA polymerase θ (POLQ), double-strand break repair, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    DNA polymerase theta (pol θ) is encoded in the genomes of many eukaryotes, though not in fungi. Pol θ is encoded by the POLQ gene in mammalian cells. The C-terminal third of the protein is a family A DNA polymerase with additional insertion elements relative to prokaryotic homologs. The N-terminal third is a helicase-like domain with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Pol θ is important in the repair of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) from many sources. These include breaks formed by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase inhibitors, breaks arising at stalled DNA replication forks, breaks introduced during diversification steps of the mammalian immune system, and DSB induced by CRISPR-Cas9. Pol θ participates in a route of DSB repair termed "alternative end-joining" (altEJ). AltEJ is independent of the DNA binding Ku protein complex and requires DNA end resection. Pol θ is able to mediate joining of two resected 3' ends harboring DNA sequence microhomology. "Signatures" of Pol θ action during altEJ are the frequent utilization of longer microhomologies, and the insertion of additional sequences at joining sites. The mechanism of end-joining employs the ability of Pol θ to tightly grasp a 3' terminus through unique contacts in the active site, allowing extension from minimally paired primers. Pol θ is involved in controlling the frequency of chromosome translocations and preserves genome integrity by limiting large deletions. It may also play a backup role in DNA base excision repair. POLQ is a member of a cluster of similarly upregulated genes that are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome for breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancer types. Inhibition of pol θ is a compelling approach for combination therapy of radiosensitization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternaria inhibits double-stranded RNA-induced cytokine production through Toll-like receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kota; Kobayashi, Takao; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2013-01-01

    Fungi may be involved in asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CRS patients produce interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13 and interferon (IFN)-γ in the presence of Alternaria. In addition, Alternaria produces potent Th2-like adjuvant effects in the airway. Therefore, we hypothesized that Alternaria may inhibit Th1-type defense mechanisms against virus infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow. The functional responses were assessed by expression of cell surface molecules by FACS (MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and OX40L). Production of IL-6, chemokine CXCL10 (IP-10), chemokine CXCL11 (I-TAC) and IFN-β was measured by ELISA. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) mRNA and protein expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Alternaria and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) enhanced cell surface expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and OX40L, and IL-6 production in a concentration-dependent manner. However, Alternaria significantly inhibited production of IP-10, I-TAC and IFN-β, induced by viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mimic poly I:C. TLR3 mRNA expression and protein production by poly I:C were significantly inhibited by Alternaria. These reactions are likely caused by heat-stable factor(s) in Alternaria extract with >100 kDa molecular mass. These findings suggest that the fungus Alternaria may inhibit production of IFN-β and other cytokines by DCs by suppressing TLR3 expression. These results indicate that Alternaria may inhibit host innate immunity against virus infection. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Alternaria Inhibits Double-stranded RNA-Induced Cytokines Productions through TLR3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kota; Kobayashi, Takao; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background Fungi may be involved in asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). PBMCs from CRS patients produce IL-5, IL-13 and INF-γ by Alternaria. In addition, Alternaria produces potent Th2-like adjuvant effects in the airway. Therefore, we hypothesized that Alternaria may inhibit Th1-type defense mechanisms against virus infection. Methods Dendritic cells (DCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow. The functional responses were assessed by expression of cell surface molecules by FACS (MHC Class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and OX40L. Production of IL-6, IP-10, I-TAC and IFN -β were measured by ELISA. TLR3 mRNA and protein expression were detected by quantitative Real time-PCR and Western blot. Results Alternaria and poly I:C enhanced cell surface expression of MHC Class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and OX40L, and IL-6 production in a concentration-dependent manner. However, Alternaria significantly inhibited IP-10, I-TAC and IFN-β production induced by viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-mimic poly I:C. TLR3 mRNA expression and protein production by poly I:C were significantly inhibited by Alternaria. These reactions are likely caused by heat-stable factor(s) in Alternaria extract with >100 kDa molecular mass. Conclusion These findings suggest that fungus, Alternaria may inhibit production of IFN-β and other cytokines by DCs by suppressing TLR3 expression. These results indicate that Alternaria may inhibit host innate immunity against virus infection. PMID:23711857

  5. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 inhibitor (DPQ-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids.

  6. A comprehensive comparative review of sequence-based predictors of DNA- and RNA-binding residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Friedrich, Stefanie; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the pressing need to characterize protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions on large scale, we review a comprehensive set of 30 computational methods for high-throughput prediction of RNA- or DNA-binding residues from protein sequences. We summarize these predictors from several significant perspectives including their design, outputs and availability. We perform empirical assessment of methods that offer web servers using a new benchmark data set characterized by a more complete annotation that includes binding residues transferred from the same or similar proteins. We show that predictors of DNA-binding (RNA-binding) residues offer relatively strong predictive performance but they are unable to properly separate DNA- from RNA-binding residues. We design and empirically assess several types of consensuses and demonstrate that machine learning (ML)-based approaches provide improved predictive performance when compared with the individual predictors of DNA-binding residues or RNA-binding residues. We also formulate and execute first-of-its-kind study that targets combined prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues. We design and test three types of consensuses for this prediction and conclude that this novel approach that relies on ML design provides better predictive quality than individual predictors when tested on prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues individually. It also substantially improves discrimination between these two types of nucleic acids. Our results suggest that development of a new generation of predictors would benefit from using training data sets that combine both RNA- and DNA-binding proteins, designing new inputs that specifically target either DNA- or RNA-binding residues and pursuing combined prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and affects PARP inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Guotai; Chapman, J. Ross; Brandsma, Inger; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway(1). In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, the administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumour cells of patients with

  8. Chromatin mobility is increased at sites of DNA double-strand breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Borovski, T.; Stap, J.; Cijsouw, T.; ten Cate, R.; Medema, J. P.; Kanaar, R.; Franken, N. A. P.; Aten, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can efficiently kill cancer cells, but they can also produce unwanted chromosome rearrangements when DNA ends from different DSBs are erroneously joined. Movement of DSB-containing chromatin domains might facilitate these DSB interactions and promote the formation of

  9. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1215764109], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  10. On the linearity of the dose-effect relationship of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, K.H.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    Most radiation biologists believe that DNA double-strand breaks are induced linearly with radiation dose for all types of radiation. Since 1985, with the advent of elution and gel electrophoresis techniques which permit the measurement of DNA double-strand breaks induced in mammalian cells at doses having radiobiological relevance, the true nature of the dose-effect relationship has been brought into some doubt. Many investigators measured curvilinear dose-effect relationships and a few found good correlations between the induction of the DNA double-strand breaks and cell survival. We approach the problem pragmatically by assuming that the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by 125 I Auger electron emitters incorporated into the DNA of the cells is a linear function of the number of 125 I decays, and by comparing the dose-effect relationship for sparsely ionizing radiation against this standard. The conclusion drawn that the curvilinear dose-effect relationships and the correlations with survival are real. (Author)

  11. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  12. The Ku Heterodimer and the Metabolism of Single-Ended DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Balestrini (Alessia); D. Ristic (Dejan); I. Dionne (Isabelle); X.Z. Liu (Xiao); C. Wyman (Claire); R.J. Wellinger (Raymund); J.H.J. Petrini (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSingle-ended double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a common form of spontaneous DNA break, generated when the replisome encounters a discontinuity in the DNA template. Given their prevalence, understanding the mechanisms governing the fate(s) of single-ended DSBs is important. We describe the

  13. Zinc chromate induces chromosome instability and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hong; Holmes, Amie L.; Young, Jamie L.; Qin Qin; Joyce, Kellie; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Peng Cheng; Wise, Sandra S.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Wallace, William T.; Hammond, Dianne; Wise, John Pierce

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory toxicant and carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potential. Zinc chromate, a water insoluble or 'particulate' Cr(VI) compound, has been shown to be carcinogenic in epidemiology studies and to induce tumors in experimental animals, but its genotoxicity is poorly understood. Our study shows that zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, chromosome damage and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells. In response to zinc chromate-induced breaks, MRE11 expression was increased and ATM and ATR were phosphorylated, indicating that the DNA double strand break repair system was initiated in the cells. In addition, our data show that zinc chromate-induced double strand breaks were only observed in the G2/M phase population, with no significant amount of double strand breaks observed in G1 and S phase cells. These data will aid in understanding the mechanisms of zinc chromate toxicity and carcinogenesis

  14. Branch migration prevents DNA loss during double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia S P Mawer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks must be accurate to avoid genomic rearrangements that can lead to cell death and disease. This can be accomplished by promoting homologous recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes. Here, using a unique system for generating a site-specific DNA double-strand break in one copy of two replicating Escherichia coli sister chromosomes, we analyse the intermediates of sister-sister double-strand break repair. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that when double-strand breaks are formed in the absence of RuvAB, 4-way DNA (Holliday junctions are accumulated in a RecG-dependent manner, arguing against the long-standing view that the redundancy of RuvAB and RecG is in the resolution of Holliday junctions. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we explain the redundancy by showing that branch migration catalysed by RuvAB and RecG is required for stabilising the intermediates of repair as, when branch migration cannot take place, repair is aborted and DNA is lost at the break locus. We demonstrate that in the repair of correctly aligned sister chromosomes, an unstable early intermediate is stabilised by branch migration. This reliance on branch migration may have evolved to help promote recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes to prevent genomic rearrangements.

  15. TALEN-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair of CTG Trinucleotide Repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbach, Valentine; Poggi, Lucie; Viterbo, David; Charpentier, Marine; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2018-02-20

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break repair within CTG repeats, the only required genes being RAD50, SAE2, and RAD52. Resection was totally abolished in the absence of RAD50 on both sides of the break, whereas it was reduced in a sae2Δ mutant on the side of the break containing the longest repeat tract, suggesting that secondary structures at double-strand break ends must be removed by the Mre11-Rad50 complex and Sae2. Following the TALEN double-strand break, single-strand annealing occurred between both sides of the repeat tract, leading to repeat contraction. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ago2 facilitates Rad51 recruitment and DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Min; Wei, Wei; Li, Ming Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions and pose a major threat to genome stability if not properly repaired. We and others have previously shown that a class of DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) is produced from sequences around DSB sites. DiRNAs are associated with Argonaute...

  17. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose accurate repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genome integrity and is strongly influenced by the local chromatin environment. Here, we identify SCAI (suppressor of cancer...

  18. Baculovirus-mediated gene silencing in insect cells using intracellularly produced long double-stranded RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yi; Deng, F.; Hu, Z.H.; Vlak, J.M.; Wang, H.

    2007-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) has recently emerged as a powerful reverse genetics tool to silence gene expression in multiple organisms, including plants, nematodes and insects. In this study, DNA vectors capable of promoting the synthesis of long hairpin dsRNAs in vivo from a DNA

  19. DOUBLE-STRANDED-RNA MYCOVIRUSES IN MYCELIUM OF PLEUROTUS-OSTREATUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLENDE, TR; HARMSEN, MC; GO, SJ

    1995-01-01

    Mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus var. florida with a decreased growth rate contained seven double-stranded RNA segments and isometrical virus particles with diameters of 24 and 30 nm. Mycelium with a normal growth rate lacked dsRNA. Protoclones from virus-containing mycelium contained one to seven of

  20. Effects of the environment on the electric conductivity of double-stranded DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malyshev, A. V.; Diaz, E.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Malyshev, V. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the effects of the environment on charge transport in double-stranded synthetic poly(G)-poly(C) DNA molecules attached to two ideal leads. Coupling of the DNA to the environment results in two effects: (i) localization of carrier functions due to static disorder

  1. TALEN-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair of CTG Trinucleotide Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Mosbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break repair within CTG repeats, the only required genes being RAD50, SAE2, and RAD52. Resection was totally abolished in the absence of RAD50 on both sides of the break, whereas it was reduced in a sae2Δ mutant on the side of the break containing the longest repeat tract, suggesting that secondary structures at double-strand break ends must be removed by the Mre11-Rad50 complex and Sae2. Following the TALEN double-strand break, single-strand annealing occurred between both sides of the repeat tract, leading to repeat contraction.

  2. DNA double-strand break rejoining in human follicular lymphoma and glioblastoma tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macann, AMJ; Britten, RA; Poppema, S; Pearcey, R; Rosenberg, E; Allalunis-Turner, MJ; Murray, D

    2000-01-01

    Follicle center cell lymphoma is among the most radioresponsive of human cancers. To assess whether this radioresponsiveness might be a result of a compromised ability of the tumor cells to accomplish the biologically-effective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), we have measured i) the

  3. DMPD: Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15733829 Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. Sen GC, Sa...rkar SN. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2005 Feb;16(1):1-14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Transcriptional sign...aling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. PubmedID 15733829 Title Transcriptional signaling by double

  4. Normal formation and repair of γ-radiation-induced single and double strand DNA breaks in Down syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.E.; Woods, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) were examined for repair capability of γ-radiation-induced single strand and double strand DNA breaks. Formation and repair of DNA breaks were determined by DNA alkaline and non-denaturing elution techniques. Down syndrome fibroblasts were found to repair single strand and double strand breaks as well as fibroblasts from normal controls. (orig.)

  5. What is DNA damage? Risk of double-strand break and its individual variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaoka, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses about the title subject in an aspect of possible spreading of Fukushima radioactive substances mainly in eastern north area of Japan where carcinogenic incidence may be increased as the ionizing radiation injures the gene (DNA). At first, explained is that cancer is a disease of genes with infinitive proliferation of cells, there are systems to prevent it by repairing the damaged DNA and by other mechanisms like exclusion of cells damaged too much or killing cancer cells with immunity, and individual difference of the repairing capability exists. DNA is always damaged even under ordinary living conditions by sunlight UV ray, cosmic radiation and chemicals externally and by active oxygen species and thermal water movement internally. Concomitantly, DNA damaged by many mechanisms like deletion, dimmer formation, chemical modification of bases, single and double strand breaks is always repaired by concerned enzymes. Double-strand damage by high-energy radiation like gamma ray is quite risky because its repair sometimes accompanies error as concerned enzymes are from more multiple genes. There are many syndromes derived from gene deficit of those repairing enzymes. The diseases concerned with repair of the double-strand damage teach that fetus and infant are more sensitive to radiation than adult as their young body cells are more actively synthesizing DNA, during which, if DNA is injured by radiation, risk of repairing error is higher as the double strand break more frequently occurs. It cannot be simply said that a certain radiation dose limit is generally permissible. There is an individual difference of radiation sensitivity and a possible method to find out an individual weak to radiation is the lymphocyte screening in vitro using anticancer bleomycin which breaks the double strand. (T.T.)

  6. Evolution of susceptibility to ingested double-stranded RNAs in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Nuez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is able to take up external double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs and mount an RNA interference response, leading to the inactivation of specific gene expression. The uptake of ingested dsRNAs into intestinal cells has been shown to require the SID-2 transmembrane protein in C. elegans. By contrast, C. briggsae was shown to be naturally insensitive to ingested dsRNAs, yet could be rendered sensitive by transgenesis with the C. elegans sid-2 gene. Here we aimed to elucidate the evolution of the susceptibility to external RNAi in the Caenorhabditis genus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We study the sensitivity of many new species of Caenorhabditis to ingested dsRNAs matching a conserved actin gene sequence from the nematode Oscheius tipulae. We find ample variation in the Caenorhabditis genus in the ability to mount an RNAi response. We map this sensitivity onto a phylogenetic tree, and show that sensitivity or insensitivity have evolved convergently several times. We uncover several evolutionary losses in sensitivity, which may have occurred through distinct mechanisms. We could render C. remanei and C. briggsae sensitive to ingested dsRNAs by transgenesis of the Cel-sid-2 gene. We thus provide tools for RNA interference studies in these species. We also show that transgenesis by injection is possible in many Caenorhabditis species. CONCLUSIONS: The ability of animals to take up dsRNAs or to respond to them by gene inactivation is under rapid evolution in the Caenorhabditis genus. This study provides a framework and tools to use RNA interference and transgenesis in various Caenorhabditis species for further comparative and evolutionary studies.

  7. 3′-Terminated Overhangs Regulate DNA Double-Strand Break Processing in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Đermić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand breaks (DSBs are lethal DNA lesions, which are repaired by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. To study DSB processing in vivo, we induced DSBs into the E. coli chromosome by γ-irradiation and measured chromosomal degradation. We show that the DNA degradation is regulated by RecA protein concentration and its rate of association with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. RecA decreased DNA degradation in wild-type, recB, and recD strains, indicating that it is a general phenomenon in E. coli. On the other hand, DNA degradation was greatly reduced and unaffected by RecA in the recB1080 mutant (which produces long overhangs and in a strain devoid of four exonucleases that degrade a 3′ tail (ssExos. 3′–5′ ssExos deficiency is epistatic to RecA deficiency concerning DNA degradation, suggesting that bound RecA is shielding the 3′ tail from degradation by 3′–5′ ssExos. Since 3′ tail preservation is common to all these situations, we infer that RecA polymerization constitutes a subset of mechanisms for preserving the integrity of 3′ tails emanating from DSBs, along with 3′ tail’s massive length, or prevention of their degradation by inactivation of 3′–5′ ssExos. Thus, we conclude that 3′ overhangs are crucial in controlling the extent of DSB processing in E. coli. This study suggests a regulatory mechanism for DSB processing in E. coli, wherein 3′ tails impose a negative feedback loop on DSB processing reactions, specifically on helicase reloading onto dsDNA ends.

  8. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in Escherichia coli and constitute the major pathway of error-free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalysed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Pathways for double-strand break repair in genetically unstable Z-DNA-forming sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kha, Diem T; Wang, Guliang; Natrajan, Nithya; Harrison, Lynn; Vasquez, Karen M

    2010-05-14

    DNA can adopt many structures that differ from the canonical B-form, and several of these non-canonical DNA structures have been implicated in genetic instability associated with human disease. Earlier, we found that Z-DNA causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells that can result in large-scale deletions and rearrangements. In contrast, the same Z-DNA-forming CG repeat in Escherichia coli resulted in only small contractions or expansions within the repeat. This difference in the Z-DNA-induced mutation spectrum between mammals and bacteria might be due to different mechanisms for DSB repair; in mammalian cells, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major DSB repair pathway, while E. coli do not contain this system and typically use homologous recombination (HR) to process DSBs. To test the extent to which the different DSB repair pathways influenced the Z-DNA-induced mutagenesis, we engineered bacterial E.coli strains to express an inducible NHEJ system, to mimic the situation in mammalian cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NHEJ proteins Ku and ligase D (LigD) were expressed in E.coli cells in the presence or absence of HR, and the Z-DNA-induced mutations were characterized. We found that the presence of the NHEJ mechanism markedly shifted the mutation spectrum from small deletions/insertions to large-scale deletions (from 2% to 24%). Our results demonstrate that NHEJ plays a role in the generation of Z-DNA-induced large-scale deletions, suggesting that this pathway is associated with DNA structure-induced destabilization of genomes from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthetic double-stranded RNA induces interleukin-32 in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kyoko; Kawaguchi, Mio; Fujita, Junichi; Kokubu, Fumio; Huang, Shau-Ku; Morishima, Yuko; Matsukura, Satoshi; Kurokawa, Masatsugu; Ishii, Yukio; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Tohru; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 is a novel cytokine and is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases, including asthma and COPD. However, the regulatory mechanisms of IL-32 expression and its precise pathogenic role remain to be defined. Given that viral infections are known to potentially cause and exacerbate airway inflammation, in this study, we investigated the expression of IL-32 induced by synthetic double-stranded (ds) RNA, and its signaling mechanisms involved. Bronchial epithelial cells were stimulated with synthetic dsRNA poly I:C. The levels of IL-32 expression were analyzed using real-time PCR and ELISA. The involvement of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and a subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p65 was determined by western blot analyses. TAK1 inhibitor, 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol and NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 were added to the culture to identify key signaling events leading to the expression of IL-32. Finally, the effect of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting TAK1 and p65 was investigated. dsRNA significantly induced IL-32 gene and protein expression, concomitant with activation of TAK1 and p65. Pretreatment of 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol diminished dsRNA-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB. Both 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol and BAY 11-7082 significantly abrogated dsRNA-induced IL-32 production. Moreover, transfection of the cells with siRNAs targeting TAK1 and p65 inhibited the expression of IL-32. The expression of IL-32 is induced by dsRNA via the TAK1-NF-κB signaling pathway in bronchial epithelial cells. IL-32 is involved in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, and may be a novel therapeutic target for airway inflammatory diseases.

  11. Cap snatching in yeast L-BC double-stranded RNA totivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-08-16

    Yeast L-A double-stranded RNA virus furnishes its transcript with a 5' cap structure by a novel cap-snatching mechanism in which m(7)Gp from a host mRNA cap structure is transferred to the 5'-diphosphate terminus of the viral transcript. His-154 of the coat protein Gag forms an m(7)Gp adduct, and the H154R mutation abolishes both m(7)Gp adduct formation and cap snatching. Here we show that L-BC, another totivirus closely related to L-A, also synthesizes 5'-diphosphorylated transcripts and transfers m(7)Gp from mRNA to the 5' termini of the transcripts. L-BC Gag also covalently binds to the cap structure and the mutation H156R, which corresponds to H154R of L-A Gag, abolishes cap adduct formation. Cap snatching of the L-BC virus is very similar to that of L-A; N7 methylation of the mRNA cap is essential for cap donor activity, and only 5'-diphosphorylated RNA is used as cap acceptor. L-BC cap snatching is also activated by viral transcription. Furthermore, both viruses require Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) for cap snatching. These cations are not only required for transcription activation but also directly involved in the cap transfer process. These findings support our previous proposal that the cap-snatching mechanism of the L-A virus is shared by fungal totiviruses closely related to L-A. Interestingly, L-A and L-BC viruses accept either viral transcript as cap acceptor in vitro. Because L-A and L-BC viruses cohabit in many yeast strains, it raises the possibility that their cohabitation in the same host may be beneficial for their mutual cap acquisition.

  12. Two Novel Relative Double-Stranded RNA Mycoviruses Infecting Fusarium poae Strain SX63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luan; Zhang, Jingze; Zhang, Hailong; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-04-30

    Two novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses, termed Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 2 (FpV2) and Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 3 (FpV3), were isolated from the plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium poae strain SX63, and molecularly characterized. FpV2 and FpV3, with respective genome sequences of 9518 and 9419 base pairs (bps), are both predicted to contain two discontinuous open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2. A hypothetical polypeptide (P1) and a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) are encoded by ORF1 and ORF2, respectively. Phytoreo_S7 domain (pfam07236) homologs were detected downstream of the RdRp domain (RdRp_4; pfam02123) of the ORF2-coded proteins of both FpV2 and FpV3. The same shifty heptamers (GGAAAAC) were both found immediately before the stop codon UAG of ORF1 in FpV2 and FpV3, which could mediate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Phylogenetic analysis based on RdRp sequences clearly place FpV2 and FpV3 in a taxonomically unassigned dsRNA mycovirus group. Together, with a comparison of genome organization, a new taxonomic family termed Fusagraviridae is proposed to be created to include FpV2- and FpV3-related dsRNA mycoviruses, within which FpV2 and FpV3 would represent two distinct virus species.

  13. Evolution of susceptibility to ingested double-stranded RNAs in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, Isabelle; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is able to take up external double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and mount an RNA interference response, leading to the inactivation of specific gene expression. The uptake of ingested dsRNAs into intestinal cells has been shown to require the SID-2 transmembrane protein in C. elegans. By contrast, C. briggsae was shown to be naturally insensitive to ingested dsRNAs, yet could be rendered sensitive by transgenesis with the C. elegans sid-2 gene. Here we aimed to elucidate the evolution of the susceptibility to external RNAi in the Caenorhabditis genus. We study the sensitivity of many new species of Caenorhabditis to ingested dsRNAs matching a conserved actin gene sequence from the nematode Oscheius tipulae. We find ample variation in the Caenorhabditis genus in the ability to mount an RNAi response. We map this sensitivity onto a phylogenetic tree, and show that sensitivity or insensitivity have evolved convergently several times. We uncover several evolutionary losses in sensitivity, which may have occurred through distinct mechanisms. We could render C. remanei and C. briggsae sensitive to ingested dsRNAs by transgenesis of the Cel-sid-2 gene. We thus provide tools for RNA interference studies in these species. We also show that transgenesis by injection is possible in many Caenorhabditis species. The ability of animals to take up dsRNAs or to respond to them by gene inactivation is under rapid evolution in the Caenorhabditis genus. This study provides a framework and tools to use RNA interference and transgenesis in various Caenorhabditis species for further comparative and evolutionary studies.

  14. A novel role for the RNA-binding protein FXR1P in myoblasts cell-cycle progression by modulating p21/Cdkn1a/Cip1/Waf1 mRNA stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Davidovic

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fragile X-Related 1 gene (FXR1 is a paralog of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene (FMR1, whose absence causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. FXR1P plays an important role in normal muscle development, and its absence causes muscular abnormalities in mice, frog, and zebrafish. Seven alternatively spliced FXR1 transcripts have been identified and two of them are skeletal muscle-specific. A reduction of these isoforms is found in myoblasts from Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD patients. FXR1P is an RNA-binding protein involved in translational control; however, so far, no mRNA target of FXR1P has been linked to the drastic muscular phenotypes caused by its absence. In this study, gene expression profiling of C2C12 myoblasts reveals that transcripts involved in cell cycle and muscular development pathways are modulated by Fxr1-depletion. We observed an increase of p21--a regulator of cell-cycle progression--in Fxr1-knocked-down mouse C2C12 and FSHD human myoblasts. Rescue of this molecular phenotype is possible by re-expressing human FXR1P in Fxr1-depleted C2C12 cells. FXR1P muscle-specific isoforms bind p21 mRNA via direct interaction with a conserved G-quadruplex located in its 3' untranslated region. The FXR1P/G-quadruplex complex reduces the half-life of p21 mRNA. In the absence of FXR1P, the upregulation of p21 mRNA determines the elevated level of its protein product that affects cell-cycle progression inducing a premature cell-cycle exit and generating a pool of cells blocked at G0. Our study describes a novel role of FXR1P that has crucial implications for the understanding of its role during myogenesis and muscle development, since we show here that in its absence a reduced number of myoblasts will be available for muscle formation/regeneration, shedding new light into the pathophysiology of FSHD.

  15. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1 and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR, ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  16. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Repair on the go: E. coli maintains a high proliferation rate while repairing a chronic DNA double-strand break.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Darmon

    Full Text Available DNA damage checkpoints exist to promote cell survival and the faithful inheritance of genetic information. It is thought that one function of such checkpoints is to ensure that cell division does not occur before DNA damage is repaired. However, in unicellular organisms, rapid cell multiplication confers a powerful selective advantage, leading to a dilemma. Is the activation of a DNA damage checkpoint compatible with rapid cell multiplication? By uncoupling the initiation of DNA replication from cell division, the Escherichia coli cell cycle offers a solution to this dilemma. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break, which occurs once per replication cycle, induces the SOS response. This SOS induction is needed for cell survival due to a requirement for an elevated level of expression of the RecA protein. Cell division is delayed, leading to an increase in average cell length but with no detectable consequence on mutagenesis and little effect on growth rate and viability. The increase in cell length caused by chronic DNA double-strand break repair comprises three components: two types of increase in the unit cell size, one independent of SfiA and SlmA, the other dependent of the presence of SfiA and the absence of SlmA, and a filamentation component that is dependent on the presence of either SfiA or SlmA. These results imply that chronic checkpoint induction in E. coli is compatible with rapid cell multiplication. Therefore, under conditions of chronic low-level DNA damage, the SOS checkpoint operates seamlessly in a cell cycle where the initiation of DNA replication is uncoupled from cell division.

  18. Role of DNA-PK in cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are probably the most dangerous of the many different types of DNA damage that occur within the cell. DSBs are generated by exogenous agents such as ionizing radiation (IR) or by endogenously generated reactive oxygen species and occur as intermediates during meiotic and V(D)J recombination. The repair of DSBs is of paramount importance to the cell as misrepair of DSBs can lead to cell death or promote tumorigenesis. In eukaryotes there exists two distinct mechanisms for DNA DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In mammalian cells, however, it is clear that nonhomologous repair of DSBs is highly active and plays a major role in conferring radiation resistance to the cell. The NHEJ machinery minimally consists of the DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK) and a complex of XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV. The DNA-PK complex is composed of a 470 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and the heterodimeric Ku70 and Ku80 DNA end-binding complex. DNA-PKcs is a PI-3 kinase with homology to ATM and ATR in its C-terminal kinase domain. The DNA-PK complex protects and tethers the ends, and directs assembly and, perhaps, the activation of other NHEJ proteins. We have previously demonstrated that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is essential for DNA DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. It is, therefore, of immense interest to determine the in vivo targets of DNA-PKcs and the mechanisms by which phosphorylation of these targets modulates NHEJ. Recent studies have resulted in the identification of a number of protein targets that are phosphorylated by and/or interact with DNA-PKcs. Our laboratory has recently identified autophosphorylation site(s) on DNA-PKcs. We find that phosphorylation at these sites in vivo is an early and essential response to DSBs and demonstrate, for the first time, the localization of DNA-PKcs to the sites of DNA damage in vivo. Furthermore, mutation of these phosphorylation sites in mammalian

  19. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  20. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  1. Structure of the replicative form of bacteriophage φX174 : VI. Studies on alkali-denatured double-stranded φX DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, P.H.; Knijnenburg, C.M.; Rotterdam, J. van; Cohen, J.A.; Jansz, H.S.

    1968-01-01

    Double-stranded φX DNA which accumulates after infection with bacteriophage φX174 in the presence of chloramphenicol consists mainly of twisted circular double-stranded DNA with no single-strand breaks (component I) and of circular double-stranded DNA, in which single-strand breaks are present

  2. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA.

  3. Double strand DNA breaks response in Huntington´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Valášek, Jan; Rausová, Petra; Juhásová, Jana; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 15-15 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington´s disease * DNA damage * double strand DNA breaks Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Homing endonucleases catalyze double-stranded DNA breaks and somatic transgene excision in Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Traver, Brenna E.; Anderson, Michelle A. E.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2009-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is a major vector of arthropod-borne viruses such as yellow fever virus and dengue viruses. Efforts to discern the function of genes involved in important behaviors such as vector competence and host seeking through reverse genetics would greatly benefit from the ability to generate targeted gene disruptions. Homing endonucleases are selfish elements which catalyze double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks in a sequence-specific manner. In this report we demonstrate that the homing end...

  5. Gene Silencing in Adult Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes Through Oral Delivery of Double-Stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2 Beeologics Inc., Miami, Florida, USA Introduction Mosquitoes ( Diptera : Culicidae) are the most medi- cally important arthropods worldwide, vectoring...insecticides can create a long-term burden on species diversity and ecosystem sustainability. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an attractive alternative as a...insecticide against a variety of insect orders including Coleoptera (Baum et al. 2007; Whyard et al. 2009), Diptera (Walshe et al. 2009; Whyard et al. 2009

  6. Multinuclear non-heme iron complexes for double-strand DNA cleavage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; van den Berg, Tieme A.; de Bruijn, A. Dowine; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the antitumor drug BLM is believed to be related to the ability of the corresponding iron complex (Fe-BLM) to engage in oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage. The iron complex of the ligand N4Py (Fe-N4Py; N4Py - N,N-bis(2-pyridyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine has proven to be a

  7. Double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) promotes EIAV replication and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Fu, Li-Hua; Yang, Fei; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Tang, Li; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jia-Yi; Li, Zhan; Wang, Xue-Feng; Li, Cheng-Yao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) have been reported to be functional on various viruses. ADAR1 may exhibit antiviral or proviral activity depending on the type of virus. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is the most well-studied lentivirus with respect to its interaction with ADAR1, and variable results have been reported. In this study, we demonstrated that equine ADAR1 (eADAR1) was a positive regulator of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), another lentivirus of the Retroviridae family. First, eADAR1 significantly promoted EIAV replication, and the enhancement of viral protein expression was associated with the long terminal repeat (LTR) and Rev response element (RRE) regions. Second, the RNA binding domain 1 of eADAR1 was essential only for enhancing LTR-mediated gene expression. Third, in contrast with APOBEC proteins, which have been shown to reduce lentiviral infectivity, eADAR1 increased the EIAV infectivity. This study indicated that eADAR1 was proviral rather than antiviral for EIAV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-lapse crystallography snapshots of a double-strand break repair polymerase in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsen, Joonas A; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Shock, David D; Moon, Andrea F; Krahn, Juno M; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-08-15

    DNA polymerase (pol) μ is a DNA-dependent polymerase that incorporates nucleotides during gap-filling synthesis in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of double-strand break repair. Here we report time-lapse X-ray crystallography snapshots of catalytic events during gap-filling DNA synthesis by pol μ. Unique catalytic intermediates and active site conformational changes that underlie catalysis are uncovered, and a transient third (product) metal ion is observed in the product state. The product manganese coordinates phosphate oxygens of the inserted nucleotide and PP i . The product metal is not observed during DNA synthesis in the presence of magnesium. Kinetic analyses indicate that manganese increases the rate constant for deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate insertion compared to magnesium. The likely product stabilization role of the manganese product metal in pol μ is discussed. These observations provide insight on structural attributes of this X-family double-strand break repair polymerase that impact its biological function in genome maintenance.DNA polymerase (pol) μ functions in DNA double-strand break repair. Here the authors use time-lapse X-ray crystallography to capture the states of pol µ during the conversion from pre-catalytic to product complex and observe a third transiently bound metal ion in the product state.

  9. Offset configurations for single- and double-strand DNA inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding research area, and it is believed that the unique properties of molecules at the nano-scale will prove to be of substantial benefit to mankind, especially so in medicine and electronics. Here we use applied mathematical modelling exploiting the basic principles of mechanics and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential function together with the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities. We consider the equilibrium offset positions for both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules inside a single-walled carbon nanotube, and we predict offset positions with reference to the cross-section of the carbon nanotube. For the double-strand DNA, the potential energy is determined for the general case for any helical phase angle ϕ, but we also consider a special case when ϕ = π, which leads to a substantial simplification in the analytical expression for the energy. As might be expected, our results confirm that the global minimum energy positions for a single-strand DNA molecule and a double-strand DNA molecule will lie off axis and they become closer to the tube wall as the radius of the tube increases.

  10. Inhibition of APOBEC3G activity impedes double-stranded DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A; Kotler, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ionizing radiation. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G, and APOBEC3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, whereas replacing a single residue in the LYYF motif completely abrogates inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break repair after irradiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit double-strand break repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target that is amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition. © 2015 FEBS.

  11. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Viral phosphodiesterases that antagonize double-stranded RNA signaling to RNase L by degrading 2-5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2014-06-01

    The host interferon (IFN) antiviral response involves a myriad of diverse biochemical pathways that disrupt virus replication cycles at many different levels. As a result, viruses have acquired and evolved genes that antagonize the host antiviral proteins. IFNs inhibit viral infections in part through the 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)/RNase L pathway. OAS proteins are pathogen recognition receptors that exist at different basal levels in different cell types and that are IFN inducible. Upon activation by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern viral double-stranded RNA, certain OAS proteins synthesize 2-5A from ATP. 2-5A binds to the antiviral enzyme RNase L causing its dimerization and activation. Recently, disparate RNA viruses, group 2a betacoronaviruses, and group A rotaviruses, have been shown to produce proteins with 2',5'-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activities that eliminate 2-5A thereby evading the antiviral activity of the OAS/RNase L pathway. These viral proteins are members of the eukaryotic-viral LigT-like group of 2H phosphoesterases, so named for the presence of 2 conserved catalytic histidine residues. Here, we will review the biochemistry, biology, and implications of viral and cellular 2',5'-PDEs that degrade 2-5A. In addition, we discuss alternative viral and cellular strategies for limiting the activity of OAS/RNase L.

  13. Postreplicational formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli uvrB cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tzuchien V.; Smith, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The number of DNA double-strand breaks formed in UV-irradiated uvrB recF recB cells correlates with the number of unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps, and is dependent on DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation. These results are consistent with the model that the DNA double-strand breaks that are produced in UV-irradiated excision-deficient cells occur as the result of breaks in the parental DNA opposite unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps. By employing a temperature-sensitive recA200 mutation, we have devised an improved assay for studying the formation and repair of these DNA double-strand breaks. Possible mechanisms for the postreplication repair of DNA double-strand breaks are discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and more recently engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating......'-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  15. Gene Mapping of Rotavirus Double-Stranded RNA Segments by Northern Blot Hybridization: Application to Segments 7, 8, and 9

    OpenAIRE

    Dyall-Smith, Michael L.; Azad, Ahmed A.; Holmes, Ian H.

    1983-01-01

    Cloned DNA copies of double-stranded RNA segments 7, 8, and 9 of UK bovine rotavirus were nick-translated with [α-32P]ATP and hybridized to double-stranded RNA of various rotavirus strains which had been separated on long polyacrylamide gels and then transferred to o-aminophenylthioether paper. Specific hybridization of the UK calf clones to the separated RNA segments allowed the corresponding genes of four different rotaviruses to be rapidly determined.

  16. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain

  17. IER5 is involved in DNA Double-Strand Breaks Repair in Association with PAPR1 in Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin-Ping; Wu, Yu-Mei; Liu, Yang; Tian, Ming; Wang, Jian-Dong; Ding, Ku-Ke; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2017-01-01

    The immediate early response gene 5 ( IER 5) is a radiation response gene induced in a dose-independent manner, and has been suggested to be a molecular biomarker for biodosimetry purposes upon radiation exposure. Here, we investigated the function of IER5 in DNA damage response and repair. We found that interference on IER5 expression significantly decreased the efficiency of repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiations in Hela cells. We found that IER5 participates in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA breaks repair. Additionally, we identified a number of potential IER5-interacting proteins through mass spectrometry-based protein assays. The interaction of IER5 protein with poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and Ku70 was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. We also found that Olaparib, a PARP1 inhibitor, affected the stability of IER5. These results indicate that targeting of IER5 may be a novel DNA damage response-related strategy to use during cervical cancer radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

  18. OsRDR6 plays role in host defense against double-stranded RNA virus, Rice Dwarf Phytoreovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Qian, Dan; Sun, Runhong; Jiang, Lin; Wang, Yu; Wei, Chunhong; Zhang, Zhongkai; Li, Yi

    2015-07-13

    RNAi is a major antiviral defense response in plant and animal model systems. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) is an essential component of RNAi, which plays an important role in the resistance against viruses in the model plants. We found previously that rice RDR6 (OsRDR6) functioned in the defense against Rice stripe virus (RSV), and Rice Dwarf Phytoreovirus (RDV) infection resulted in down-regulation of expression of RDR6. Here we report our new findings on the function of OsRDR6 against RDV. Our result showed that down-regulation of OsRDR6 through the antisense (OsRDR6AS) strategy increased rice susceptibility to RDV infection while over-expression of OsRDR6 had no effect on RDV infection. The accumulation of RDV vsiRNAs was reduced in the OsRDR6AS plants. In the OsRDR6 over-expressed plants, the levels of OsRDR6 RNA transcript and protein were much higher than that in the control plants. Interestingly, the accumulation level of OsRDR6 protein became undetectable after RDV infection. This finding indicated that the translation and/or stability of OsRDR6 protein were negatively impacted upon RDV infection. This new finding provides a new light on the function of RDR6 in plant defense response and the cross-talking between factors encoded by host plant and double-stranded RNA viruses.

  19. Structural evidence for specific S8-RNA and S8-protein interactions within the 30S ribosomal subunit: ribosomal protein S8 from Bacillus stearothermophilus at 1.9 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C; Ramakrishnan, V; White, S W

    1996-09-15

    Prokaryotic ribosomal protein S8 is an important RNA-binding protein that occupies a central position within the small ribosomal subunit. It interacts extensively with 16S rRNA and is crucial for the correct folding of the central domain of the rRNA. S8 also controls the synthesis of several ribosomal proteins by binding to mRNA. It binds specifically to very similar sites in the two RNA molecules. S8 is divided into two tightly associated domains and contains three regions that are proposed to interact with other ribosomal components: two potential RNA-binding sites, and a hydrophobic patch that may interact with a complementary hydrophobic region of S5. The N-terminal domain fold is found in several proteins including two that bind double-stranded DNA. These multiple RNA-binding sites are consistent with the role of S8 in organizing the central domain and agree with the latest models of the 16S RNA which show that the S8 location coincides with a region of complicated nucleic-acid structure. The presence in a wide variety of proteins of a region homologous to the N-terminal domain supports the idea that ribosomal proteins must represent some of the earliest protein molecules.

  20. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes and glioma susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zou, Peng; Zhao, Lin; Yan, Wei; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in DNA double-strand break repair genes can influence the ability of a cell to repair damaged DNA and alter an individual’s susceptibility to cancer. We studied whether polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes are associated with an increased risk of glioma development. We genotyped 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes (XRCC3, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in a case–control study including 384 glioma patients and 384 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform. In the single-locus analysis there was a significant association between gliomas and the LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2 +54C>T, Thr9Ile) TT genotype (adjusted OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.87-5.71), as well as the TC genotype (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-2.18). We also found that the homozygous variant genotype (GG) of XRCC4 rs1805377 (IVS7-1A>G, splice-site) was associated with a significantly increased risk of gliomas (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12-2.80). Interestingly, we detected a significant additive and multiplicative interaction effect between the LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377 polymorphisms with an increasing risk of gliomas. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, LIG4 rs1805388 was associated with an increased glioma risk among smokers. These results indicate for the first time that LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377, alone or in combination, are associated with a risk of gliomas

  1. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ssDNA...... and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  3. String-nets, single and double-stranded quantum loop gases for non-Abelian anyons

    OpenAIRE

    Velenich, Andrea; Chamon, Claudio; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2009-01-01

    String-net condensation can give rise to non-Abelian anyons whereas loop condensation usually gives rise to Abelian anyons. It has been proposed that generalized quantum loop gases with non-orthogonal inner products can produce non-Abelian anyons. We detail an exact mapping between the string-net and the generalized loop models and explain how the non-orthogonal products arise. We also introduce a loop model of double-stranded nets where quantum loops with an orthogonal inner product and loca...

  4. Double strand break rejoining by the Ku-dependent mechanism of non-homologous end-joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.; Singleton, B.; Beamish, H.; Priestley, A.

    1999-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase functions in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and in V(D)J recombination. To gain insight into the function of DNA-PK in this process we have carried out a mutation analysis of Ku80 and DNA-PKcs. Mutations at multiple sites within the N-terminal two thirds of Ku80 result in loss of Ku70/80 interaction, loss of DNA end-binding activity and inability to complement Ku80 defective cell fines. In contrast, mutations in the carboxy terminal region of the protein do not impair DNA end-binding activity but decrease the ability of Ku to activate DNA-PK. To gain insight into important functional domains within DNA-PKcs, we have analysed defective mutants, including the mouse scid cell line, and the rodent mutants, ire-20 and V-3. Mutational changes in the carboxy terminal region have been identified in all cases. Our results strongly suggest that the C-terminus of DNA-PKcs is required for kinase activity. (author)

  5. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  6. Pleolipoviridae, a newly proposed family comprising archaeal pleomorphic viruses with single-stranded or double-stranded DNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Roine, Elina; Sencilo, Ana; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting archaea show a variety of virion morphotypes, and they are currently classified into more than ten viral families or corresponding groups. A pleomorphic virus morphotype is very common among haloarchaeal viruses, and to date, several such viruses have been isolated. Here, we propose the classification of eight such viruses and formation of a new family, Pleolipoviridae (from the Greek pleo for more or many and lipos for lipid), containing three genera, Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammapleolipovirus. The proposal is currently under review by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). The members of the proposed family Pleolipoviridae infect halophilic archaea and are nonlytic. They share structural and genomic features and differ from any other classified virus. The virion of pleolipoviruses is composed of a pleomorphic membrane vesicle enclosing the genome. All pleolipoviruses have two major structural protein species, internal membrane and spike proteins. Although the genomes of the pleolipoviruses are single- or double-stranded, linear or circular DNA molecules, they share the same genome organization and gene synteny and show significant similarity at the amino acid level. The canonical features common to all members of the proposed family Pleolipoviridae show that they are closely related and thus form a new viral family.

  7. Induction of double-strand breaks in DNA of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their repair. 1. Application of elastoviscosimetry for studying double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli induced by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresler, S.E.; Noskin, L.A.; Suslov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the method of elastoviscosimetry gives a possibility to record the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells induced by γ irradiation at doses close to D 37 . The dependence of changes of elastoviscosity parameter on the dose (tau 0 ) passes through the maximum. It is shown that the ascending section of this curve (at minimum γ irradiation doses) characterizes the relaxation process of the superspiralised chromosome in nucleotide of the E. coli. This relaxation is observed due to γ induced damages which are not double-strand breaks. By the maximum position one can judge on a dose yield of the first DNA double-strand break, the descending part of the dose curve describes the kinetics of accumulation of breaks with the dose increase. The analysis of the data obtained gives the possibility to come to the conclusion that when applying a usual technique of irradiation and lysis of cells not providing for special measures on inhibition of endo-and exonuclease activity in γ irradiated cells, the dose yield of double-strand breaks noticeably increases (by 4.2 times). In the case of an essential, though incomplete, inhibition of nuclease activities in γ irradiated cells the dose yield of breaks approximately corresponds to the dose curve of inactivation of these cells (D 37 12.5+-3.0 krad, the first double-strand break -at 14.5+-2.4 krad)

  8. The effects of microgravity on ligase activity in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A; Ohnishi, K; Takahashi, S; Masukawa, M; Sekikawa, K; Amano, T; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Ohnishi, T

    2000-06-01

    In recent years, contradictory data have been reported about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments. The aim of the present study was to clarify whether enzymatic repair of DNA double-strand breaks is affected by microgravity using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system. The DNA repair activity of T4 DNA ligase (EC 6.5.1.1) was measured in vitro for a DNA substrate damaged by restriction enzyme digestion during a US Space Shuttle mission (Discovery; STS-91). After the flight, the amount of ligated DNA molecules was measured using an electrophoresis method. Ligated products (closed circular DNA, open circular DNA and multimeric ligated products) were produced by T4 DNA ligase treatment of linear DNA containing double-strand breaks, and they increased with increasing T4 DNA ligase concentration (0-3 units per microg of plasmid DNA). Almost no difference in T4 DNA ligase activity was detected between the space experiments and the control ground experiments. No significant effect of microgravity on ligation of damaged DNA was found during space flight. Therefore, other mechanisms must account for the synergism between radiation and microgravity, if it exists.

  9. Evidence for multiple repair pathways of double-strand DNA breaks in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, A.J.; Weistein, R.; Stamato, T.D.; Roosa, R.

    1984-01-01

    XR-1 is a mutant of the Chinese hamster cell (CHO-K1) which is abnormally sensitive to killing by gamma rays in G/sub 1/ (D37 = 27 rads vs. 318 for parent) and early S phases of the cell cycle but has near normal resistance in late S and early G/sub 2/ (Somatic Cell Genetics, 9:165-173, 1983). Complementation studies between XR-1 and its parent indicate that this sensitivity to gamma rays is a recessive phenotype. Both the XR-1 and its parent cell are able to repair single strand DNA breaks. However, in comparison to its parental cell, the XR-1 cell is markedly deficient in the repair of double strand DNA breaks introduced by gamma irradiation during the sensitive G/sub 1/-early S period, while in the late S-G/sub 2/ resistant period the repair is similar in both cells. This correlation suggests that an unrepaired double strand DNA break is the lethal lesion and that at least two pathways for the repair of these lesions exist in mammalian cells

  10. Electrochemical molecular beacon biosensor for sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiangmin; Guo, Xiaoting; Xiao, Zhiyou; Ling, Liansheng

    2014-09-15

    Direct recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was crucial to disease diagnosis and gene therapy, because DNA in its natural state is double stranded. Here, a novel sensor for the sequence-specific recognition of dsDNA was developed based on the structure change of ferrocene (Fc) redox probe modified molecular beacon (MB). For constructing such a sensor, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were initially electrochemical-deposited onto glass carbon electrode (GCE) surface to immobilize thiolated MB in their folded states with Au-S bond. Hybridization of MB with target dsDNA induced the formation of parallel triplex DNA and opened the stem-loop structure of it, which resulted in the redox probe (Fc) away from the electrode and triggered the decrease of current signals. Under optimal conditions, dsDNA detection could be realized in the range from 350 pM to 25 nM, with a detection limit of 275 pM. Moreover, the proposed method has good sequence-specificity for target dsDNA compared with single base pair mismatch and two base pairs mismatches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Effects of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet on the Double-Stranded DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abasalt Hosseinzadeh Colagar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was toinvestigate the sterilization potential of atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ and interactions of this technology with double-stranded DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP techniques. Materials and Methods The plasma jet was produced through a high voltage sinusoidal power supplyusing a mixture of argon and oxygen gases with theflow rate of 1 L/min. Escherichia coli cells and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA fragments were amplified by T7 universal primer through the PCR technique and treated with argon/oxygen APPJ at different exposure times. The data were analyzed by the agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, SSCP and renewed PCR techniques. Results According to the results of the study, the APPJ could serve as an effective instrument for sterilization at > 30 sec discharge. The destruction of DNA was detectable by different techniques after 120 sec from APPJ discharge. Conclusion Our findings revealed that the active species of plasma can lead to cell death. These species may break or nick the dsDNA, exchange DNA nucleotides, and lead to transition and transversion mutations. These mutagenesis effects of APPJ might be the reason of microorganism cell death after the treatment in addition to other destructive effects of APPJ on macromolecules.

  12. Calibration of pulsed field gel electrophoresis for measurement of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.D.; Dewey, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay was calibrated for the measurement of X-ray induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Calibration was conducted by incorporating [ 125 I] deoxyuridine into DNA, which induces one double-strand break for every disintegration that occurs in frozen cells. Based on the percentage of DNA migrating into the gel, the number of breaks/dalton/Gy was estimated to be (9.3±1.0) x 10 -12 . This value is close to (10 to 12) x 10 -12 determined by neutral filter elution using similar cell lysis procedures at 24 o C and at pH8.0. The estimate is in good agreement with the value of (11.7±2) x 10 -12 breaks/dalton/Gy as measured in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells using the neutral sucrose gradient method (Bloecher 1988), and (6 to 9) x 10 -12 breaks/dalton/Gy as measured in mouse L and Chinese hamster V79 cells using neutral filter elution (Radford and Hodgson 1985). (author)

  13. Double-stranded DNA dissociates into single strands when dragged into a poor solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuxun; Yu, Jin; Kühner, Ferdinand; Schulten, Klaus; Gaub, Hermann E

    2007-11-28

    DNA displays a richness of biologically relevant supramolecular structures, which depend on both sequence and ambient conditions. The effect of dragging double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from water into poor solvent on the double-stranded structure is still unclear because of condensation. Here, we employed single molecule techniques based on atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the change in structure and mechanics of DNA during the ambient change. We found that the two strands are split apart when the dsDNA is pulled at one strand from water into a poor solvent. The findings were corroborated by MD simulations where dsDNA was dragged from water into poor solvent, revealing details of the strand separation at the water/poor solvent interface. Because the structure of DNA is of high polarity, all poor solvents show a relatively low polarity. We speculate that the principle of spontaneous unwinding/splitting of dsDNA by providing a low-polarity (in other word, hydrophobic) micro-environment is exploited as one of the catalysis mechanisms of helicases.

  14. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  15. DNA double-strand braks serve as a major factor for the expression of Arabidopsis Argonaute 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Beom; Chung, Moon Soo; Lee, Gun Woong; Chung, Byung Yeoup [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Argonaute 2 (AtAGO2) is a well characterized effector protein in Arabidopsis for its functionalities associated with DNA double-strand break (DSB)-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) and for its inducible expression upon γ-irradiation. However, its transcriptional regulation depending on the recovery time after the irradiation and on the specific response to DSBs has been poorly understood. We analyzed the 1,313 bp promoter sequence of the AtAGO2 gene (1.3kb{sub pro}) to characterize the transcriptional regulation of AtAGO2 at various recovery times after γ-irradiation. A stable transformant harboring 1.3kbpro fused with GUS gene showed that the AtAGO2 is highly expressed in response to γ-irradiation, after which the expression of the gene is gradually decreased until 5 days of DNA damage recovery. We also confrm that the AtAGO2 expression patterns are similar to that of γ-irradiation after the treatments of radiomimetic genotoxins (bleomycin and zeocin). However, methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C, which are associated with the inhibition of DNA replication, do not induce the expression of the AtAGO2, suggesting that the expression of the AtAGO2 is closely related with DNA DSBs rather than DNA replication.

  16. Effect of Pressure on Thermal Stability of G-Quadruplex DNA and Double-Stranded DNA Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuntaro Takahashi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pressure is a thermodynamic parameter that can induce structural changes in biomolecules due to a volumetric decrease. Although most proteins are denatured by pressure over 100 MPa because they have the large cavities inside their structures, the double-stranded structure of DNA is stabilized or destabilized only marginally depending on the sequence and salt conditions. The thermal stability of the G-quadruplex DNA structure, an important non-canonical structure that likely impacts gene expression in cells, remarkably decreases with increasing pressure. Volumetric analysis revealed that human telomeric DNA changed by more than 50 cm3 mol−1 during the transition from a random coil to a quadruplex form. This value is approximately ten times larger than that for duplex DNA under similar conditions. The volumetric analysis also suggested that the formation of G-quadruplex DNA involves significant hydration changes. The presence of a cosolute such as poly(ethylene glycol largely repressed the pressure effect on the stability of G-quadruplex due to alteration in stabilities of the interactions with hydrating water. This review discusses the importance of local perturbations of pressure on DNA structures involved in regulation of gene expression and highlights the potential for application of high-pressure chemistry in nucleic acid-based nanotechnology.

  17. End-specific strategies of attachment of long double stranded DNA onto gold-coated nanofiber arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peckys, Diana B; De Jonge, Niels; Simpson, Michael L; McKnight, Timothy E

    2008-01-01

    We report the effective and site-specific binding of long double stranded (ds)DNA to high aspect ratio carbon nanofiber arrays. The carbon nanofibers were first coated with a thin gold layer to provide anchorage for two controllable binding methods. One method was based on the direct binding of thiol end-labeled dsDNA. The second and enhanced method used amine end-labeled dsDNA bound with crosslinkers to a carboxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer. The bound dsDNA was first visualized with a fluorescent, dsDNA-intercalating dye. The specific binding onto the carbon nanofiber was verified by a high resolution detection method using scanning electron microscopy in combination with the binding of neutravidin-coated fluorescent microspheres to the immobilized and biotinylated dsDNA. Functional activity of thiol end-labeled dsDNA on gold-coated nanofiber arrays was verified with a transcriptional assay, whereby Chinese hamster lung cells (V79) were impaled upon the DNA-modified nanofibers and scored for transgene expression of the tethered template. Thiol end-labeled dsDNA demonstrated significantly higher expression levels than nanofibers prepared with control dsDNA that lacked a gold-binding end-label. Employing these site-specific and robust techniques of immobilization of dsDNA onto nanodevices can be of advantage for the study of DNA/protein interactions and for gene delivery applications.

  18. The importance of becoming double-stranded: Innate immunity and the kinetic model of HIV-1 central plus strand synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschla, Eric, E-mail: poeschla.eric@mayo.edu

    2013-06-20

    Central initiation of plus strand synthesis is a conserved feature of lentiviruses and certain other retroelements. This complication of the standard reverse transcription mechanism produces a transient “central DNA flap” in the viral cDNA, which has been proposed to mediate its subsequent nuclear import. This model has assumed that the important feature is the flapped DNA structure itself rather than the process that produces it. Recently, an alternative kinetic model was proposed. It posits that central plus strand synthesis functions to accelerate conversion to the double-stranded state, thereby helping HIV-1 to evade single-strand DNA-targeting antiviral restrictions such as APOBEC3 proteins, and perhaps to avoid innate immune sensor mechanisms. The model is consistent with evidence that lentiviruses must often synthesize their cDNAs when dNTP concentrations are limiting and with data linking reverse transcription and uncoating. There may be additional kinetic advantages for the artificial genomes of lentiviral gene therapy vectors. - Highlights: • Two main functional models for HIV central plus strand synthesis have been proposed. • In one, a transient central DNA flap in the viral cDNA mediates HIV-1 nuclear import. • In the other, multiple kinetic consequences are emphasized. • One is defense against APOBEC3G, which deaminates single-stranded DNA. • Future questions pertain to antiviral restriction, uncoating and nuclear import.

  19. Do Exogenous DNA Double-Strand Breaks Change Incomplete Synapsis and Chiasma Localization in the Grasshopper Stethophyma grossum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Calvente

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination occurs as a programmed event that initiates by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs that give rise to the formation of crossovers that are observed as chiasmata. Chiasmata are essential for the accurate chromosome segregation and the generation of new combinations of parental alleles. Some treatments that provoke exogenous DSBs also lead to alterations in the recombination pattern of some species in which full homologous synapsis is achieved at pachytene. We have carried out a similar approach in males of the grasshopper Stethophyma grossum, whose homologues show incomplete synapsis and proximal chiasma localization. After irradiating males with γ rays we have studied the distribution of both the histone variant γ-H2AX and the recombinase RAD51. These proteins are cytological markers of DSBs at early prophase I. We have inferred synaptonemal complex (SC formation via identification of SMC3 and RAD 21 cohesin subunits. Whereas thick and thin SMC3 filaments would correspond to synapsed and unsynapsed regions, the presence of RAD21 is only restricted to synapsed regions. Results show that irradiated spermatocytes maintain restricted synapsis between homologues. However, the frequency and distribution of chiasmata in metaphase I bivalents is slightly changed and quadrivalents were also observed. These results could be related to the singular nuclear polarization displayed by the spermatocytes of this species.

  20. Do Exogenous DNA Double-Strand Breaks Change Incomplete Synapsis and Chiasma Localization in the Grasshopper Stethophyma grossum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvente, Adela; Santos, Juan Luis; Rufas, Julio S

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination occurs as a programmed event that initiates by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that give rise to the formation of crossovers that are observed as chiasmata. Chiasmata are essential for the accurate chromosome segregation and the generation of new combinations of parental alleles. Some treatments that provoke exogenous DSBs also lead to alterations in the recombination pattern of some species in which full homologous synapsis is achieved at pachytene. We have carried out a similar approach in males of the grasshopper Stethophyma grossum, whose homologues show incomplete synapsis and proximal chiasma localization. After irradiating males with γ rays we have studied the distribution of both the histone variant γ-H2AX and the recombinase RAD51. These proteins are cytological markers of DSBs at early prophase I. We have inferred synaptonemal complex (SC) formation via identification of SMC3 and RAD 21 cohesin subunits. Whereas thick and thin SMC3 filaments would correspond to synapsed and unsynapsed regions, the presence of RAD21 is only restricted to synapsed regions. Results show that irradiated spermatocytes maintain restricted synapsis between homologues. However, the frequency and distribution of chiasmata in metaphase I bivalents is slightly changed and quadrivalents were also observed. These results could be related to the singular nuclear polarization displayed by the spermatocytes of this species.

  1. Ectromelia virus accumulates less double-stranded RNA compared to vaccinia virus in BS-C-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Tiffany R; Lehmann, Michael H; Ryan, Colton M; Pizzorno, Marie C; Sutter, Gerd; Hersperger, Adam R

    2017-09-01

    Most orthopoxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), contain genes in the E3L and K3L families. The protein products of these genes have been shown to combat PKR, a host defense pathway. Interestingly, ectromelia virus (ECTV) contains an E3L ortholog but does not possess an intact K3L gene. Here, we gained insight into how ECTV can still efficiently evade PKR despite lacking K3L. Relative to VACV, we found that ECTV-infected BS-C-1 cells accumulated considerably less double-stranded (ds) RNA, which was due to lower mRNA levels and less transcriptional read-through of some genes by ECTV. The abundance of dsRNA in VACV-infected cells, detected using a monoclonal antibody, was able to activate the RNase L pathway at late time points post-infection. Historically, the study of transcription by orthopoxviruses has largely focused on VACV as a model. Our data suggest that there could be more to learn by studying other members of this genus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chicken MDA5 senses short double-stranded RNA with implications for antiviral response against avian influenza viruses in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Chiaki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Tanikawa, Taichiro; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) selectively sense double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) according to length, as well as various RNA viruses to induce an antiviral response. RIG-I, which plays a predominant role in the induction of antiviral responses against influenza virus infection, has been considered to be lacking in chicken, putting the function of chicken MDA5 (chMDA5) under the spotlight. Here, we show that chMDA5, unlike mammalian MDA5, preferentially senses shorter dsRNA synthetic analogues, poly(I:C), in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts. A requirement for caspase activation and recruitment domains for chMDA5-mediated chicken interferon beta (chIFNβ) induction and its interaction with mitochondrial antiviral signaling proteins were demonstrated. We also found that chMDA5 is involved in chIFNβ induction against avian influenza virus infection. Our findings imply that chMDA5 compensates in part the function of RIG-I in chicken, and highlights the importance of chMDA5 in the innate immune response in chicken. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-03-03

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy.

  4. The complete genome sequence of a double-stranded RNA mycovirus from Fusarium graminearum strain HN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luan; Wang, Shuangchao; Yang, Xiufen; Zeng, Hongmei; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2017-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum dsRNA virus 5 (FgV5), was identified and characterized. The FgV5 genome comprises two dsRNA genome segments of 2030 bp and 1740 bp. FgV5 dsRNA1 contains a single open reading frame (ORF1), which is predicted to encode a protein of 613 amino acids (aa) with a molecular mass of 70.4 kDa and has a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) motif. FgV5 dsRNA2 is predicted to contain two discontinuous ORFs (ORF2 and ORF3) that code for products of unknown function. Sequence comparisons showed that FgV5 has the highest aa sequence identities to Fusarium graminearum virus 4 (FgV4) (83.01% for ORF1, 78.70% for ORF2, and 76.27% for ORF3), suggesting that FgV5 and FgV4 should be regarded as members of different species. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that FgV5 belongs to a taxonomically unassigned dsRNA mycovirus group that is related to the families Amalgaviridae and Partitiviridae. Here, we propose that FgV5 and related viruses are members of a yet to be named and formally recognized new family.

  5. Small Rad51 and Dmc1 Complexes Often Co-occupy Both Ends of a Meiotic DNA Double Strand Break.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Scott Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eukaryotic RecA-like proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 cooperate during meiosis to promote recombination between homologous chromosomes by repairing programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. Previous studies showed that Rad51 and Dmc1 form partially overlapping co-foci. Here we show these Rad51-Dmc1 co-foci are often arranged in pairs separated by distances of up to 400 nm. Paired co-foci remain prevalent when DSBs are dramatically reduced or when strand exchange or synapsis is blocked. Super-resolution dSTORM microscopy reveals that individual foci observed by conventional light microscopy are often composed of two or more substructures. The data support a model in which the two tracts of ssDNA formed by a single DSB separate from one another by distances of up to 400 nm, with both tracts often bound by one or more short (about 100 nt Rad51 filaments and also by one or more short Dmc1 filaments.

  6. Ubiquitin-specific protease 5 is required for the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available During the DNA damage response (DDR, ubiquitination plays an important role in the recruitment and regulation of repair proteins. However, little is known about elimination of the ubiquitination signal after repair is completed. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease 5 (USP5, a deubiquitinating enzyme, is involved in the elimination of the ubiquitin signal from damaged sites and is required for efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Depletion of USP5 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents, produces DSBs, causes delayed disappearance of γH2AX foci after Bleocin treatment, and influences DSB repair efficiency in the homologous recombination pathway but not in the non-homologous end joining pathway. USP5 co-localizes to DSBs induced by laser micro-irradiation in a RAD18-dependent manner. Importantly, polyubiquitin chains at sites of DNA damage remained for longer periods in USP5-depleted cells. Our results show that disassembly of polyubiquitin chains by USP5 at sites of damage is important for efficient DSB repair.

  7. The importance of becoming double-stranded: Innate immunity and the kinetic model of HIV-1 central plus strand synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeschla, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Central initiation of plus strand synthesis is a conserved feature of lentiviruses and certain other retroelements. This complication of the standard reverse transcription mechanism produces a transient “central DNA flap” in the viral cDNA, which has been proposed to mediate its subsequent nuclear import. This model has assumed that the important feature is the flapped DNA structure itself rather than the process that produces it. Recently, an alternative kinetic model was proposed. It posits that central plus strand synthesis functions to accelerate conversion to the double-stranded state, thereby helping HIV-1 to evade single-strand DNA-targeting antiviral restrictions such as APOBEC3 proteins, and perhaps to avoid innate immune sensor mechanisms. The model is consistent with evidence that lentiviruses must often synthesize their cDNAs when dNTP concentrations are limiting and with data linking reverse transcription and uncoating. There may be additional kinetic advantages for the artificial genomes of lentiviral gene therapy vectors. - Highlights: • Two main functional models for HIV central plus strand synthesis have been proposed. • In one, a transient central DNA flap in the viral cDNA mediates HIV-1 nuclear import. • In the other, multiple kinetic consequences are emphasized. • One is defense against APOBEC3G, which deaminates single-stranded DNA. • Future questions pertain to antiviral restriction, uncoating and nuclear import

  8. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2- or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2'-alkylated RNA monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas S; Guenther, Dale C; Gibbons, Bradley C; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-10-21

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and--more recently--engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating and modifying genes. Invaders, i.e., energetically activated DNA duplexes with interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, are emerging as an attractive approach toward this goal. Here, we characterize and compare Invaders based on 1-, 2- and 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2'-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA hairpins with single nucleotide fidelity. Intercalator-mediated unwinding and activation of the double-stranded probe, coupled with extraordinary stabilization of probe-target duplexes (ΔT(m)/modification up to +14.0 °C), provides the driving force for dsDNA recognition. In contrast, Z-modified Invaders show much lower dsDNA recognition efficiency. Thus, even very conservative changes in the chemical makeup of the intercalator-functionalized nucleotides used to activate Invader duplexes, affects dsDNA-recognition efficiency of the probes, which highlights the importance of systematic structure-property studies. The insight from this study will guide future design of Invaders for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics.

  9. A mathematical model for the detection mechanism of DNA double-strand breaks depending on autophosphorylation of ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Kazunari; Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    After IR stress, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur and repair proteins (RPs) bind to them, generating DSB-RP complexes (DSBCs), which results in repaired DSBs (RDSBs). In recent experimental studies, it is suggested that the ATM proteins detect these DNA lesions depending on the autophosphorylation of ATM which exists as a dimer before phosphorylation. Interestingly, the ATM proteins can work as a sensor for a small number of DSBs (approximately 18 DSBs in a cell after exposure to IR). Thus the ATM proteins amplify the small input signals based on the phosphorylation of the ATM dimer proteins. The true DSB-detection mechanism depending on ATM autophosphorylation has yet to be clarified. We propose a mathematical model for the detection mechanism of DSBs by ATM. Our model includes both a DSB-repair mechanism and an ATM-phosphorylation mechanism. We model the former mechanism as a stochastic process, and obtain theoretical mean values of DSBs and DSBCs. In the latter mechanism, it is known that ATM autophosphorylates itself, and we find that the autophosphorylation induces bifurcation of the phosphorylated ATM (ATM*). The bifurcation diagram depends on the total concentration of ATM, which makes three types of steady state diagrams of ATM*: monostable, reversible bistable, and irreversible bistable. Bistability exists depending on the Hill coefficient in the equation of ATM autophosphorylation, and it emerges as the total concentration of ATM increases. Combining these two mechanisms, we find that ATM* exhibits switch-like behaviour in the presence of bistability, and the detection time after DNA damage decreases when the total concentration of ATM increases. This work provides a mathematical model that explains the DSB-detection mechanism depending on ATM autophosphorylation. These results indicate that positive auto-regulation works both as a sensor and amplifier of small input signals.

  10. Killer toxin-secreting double-stranded RNA mycoviruses in the yeasts Hanseniaspora uvarum and Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M J; Neuhausen, F

    1994-01-01

    Killer toxin-secreting strains of the yeasts Hanseniaspora uvarum and Zygosaccharomyces bailii were shown to contain linear double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that persist within the cytoplasm of the infected host cell as encapsidated virus-like particles. In both yeasts, L- and M-dsRNAs were associated with 85-kDa major capsid protein, whereas the additional Z-dsRNA (2.8 kb), present only in the wild-type Z. bailii killer strain, was capsid protein, whereas the additional Z-dsRNA (2.8 kb), present only in the wild-type Z. bailii killer strain, was shown to be encapsidated by a 35-kDa coat protein. Although Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations indicated that L-dsRNA from Z. bailii is a LA species, additional peptide maps of the purified 85-kDa capsid from Z. bailii and the 88- and 80-kDa major coat proteins from K1 and K28 killer viruses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed distinctly different patterns of peptides. Electron microscopy of purified Z. bailii viruses (ZbV) identified icosahedral particles 40 nm in diameter which were undistinguishable from the S. cerevisiae killer viruses. We demonstrated that purified ZbVs are sufficient to confer the Z. bailii killer phenotype on transfected spheroplasts of a S. cerevisiae nonkiller strain and that the resulting transfectants secreted even more killer toxin that the original ZbV donor strain did. Curing experiments with ZbV-transfected S. cerevisiae strains indicated that the M-dsRNA satellite from Z. bailii contains the genetic information for toxin production, whereas expression of toxin immunity might be dependent on Z-dsRNA, which resembles a new dsRNA replicon in yeasts that is not dependent on an LA helper virus to be stably maintained and replicated within the cell. Images PMID:8107238

  11. Recognition, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells: the molecular choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry H

    2012-01-01

    The faithful maintenance of chromosome continuity in human cells during DNA replication and repair is critical for preventing the conversion of normal diploid cells to an oncogenic state. The evolution of higher eukaryotic cells endowed them with a large genetic investment in the molecular machinery that ensures chromosome stability. In mammalian and other vertebrate cells, the elimination of double-strand breaks with minimal nucleotide sequence change involves the spatiotemporal orchestration of a seemingly endless number of proteins ranging in their action from the nucleotide level to nucleosome organization and chromosome architecture. DNA DSBs trigger a myriad of post-translational modifications that alter catalytic activities and the specificity of protein interactions: phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation, followed by the reversal of these changes as repair is completed. "Superfluous" protein recruitment to damage sites, functional redundancy, and alternative pathways ensure that DSB repair is extremely efficient, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This review strives to integrate the information about the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair that has emerged over the last two decades with a focus on DSBs produced by the prototype agent ionizing radiation (IR). The exponential growth of molecular studies, heavily driven by RNA knockdown technology, now reveals an outline of how many key protein players in genome stability and cancer biology perform their interwoven tasks, e.g. ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, Chk1, Chk2, PARP1/2/3, 53BP1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BLM, RAD51, and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex. Thus, the nature of the intricate coordination of repair processes with cell cycle progression is becoming apparent. This review also links molecular abnormalities to cellular pathology as much a possible and provides a framework of temporal relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acquisition of functions on the outer capsid surface during evolution of double-stranded RNA fungal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos P; Luque, Daniel; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Rodríguez, Javier M; González, José M; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Ghabrial, Said A; Carrascosa, José L; Trus, Benes L; Castón, José R

    2017-12-01

    Unlike their counterparts in bacterial and higher eukaryotic hosts, most fungal viruses are transmitted intracellularly and lack an extracellular phase. Here we determined the cryo-EM structure at 3.7 Å resolution of Rosellinia necatrix quadrivirus 1 (RnQV1), a fungal double-stranded (ds)RNA virus. RnQV1, the type species of the family Quadriviridae, has a multipartite genome consisting of four monocistronic segments. Whereas most dsRNA virus capsids are based on dimers of a single protein, the ~450-Å-diameter, T = 1 RnQV1 capsid is built of P2 and P4 protein heterodimers, each with more than 1000 residues. Despite a lack of sequence similarity between the two proteins, they have a similar α-helical domain, the structural signature shared with the lineage of the dsRNA bluetongue virus-like viruses. Domain insertions in P2 and P4 preferential sites provide additional functions at the capsid outer surface, probably related to enzyme activity. The P2 insertion has a fold similar to that of gelsolin and profilin, two actin-binding proteins with a function in cytoskeleton metabolism, whereas the P4 insertion suggests protease activity involved in cleavage of the P2 383-residue C-terminal region, absent in the mature viral particle. Our results indicate that the intimate virus-fungus partnership has altered the capsid genome-protective and/or receptor-binding functions. Fungal virus evolution has tended to allocate enzyme activities to the virus capsid outer surface.

  13. Plant viruses of the Amalgaviridae family evolved via recombination between viruses with double-stranded and negative-strand RNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Dolja, Valerian V; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-03-29

    Plant viruses of the recently recognized family Amalgaviridae have monopartite double-stranded (ds) RNA genomes and encode two proteins: an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and a putative capsid protein (CP). Whereas the RdRp of amalgaviruses has been found to be most closely related to the RdRps of dsRNA viruses of the family Partitiviridae, the provenance of their CP remained obscure. Here we show that the CP of amalgaviruses is homologous to the nucleocapsid proteins of negative-strand RNA viruses of the genera Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae) and Tenuivirus. The chimeric genomes of amalgaviruses are a testament to the effectively limitless gene exchange between viruses that shaped the evolution of the virosphere.

  14. Fumarase is involved in DNA double-strand break resection through a functional interaction with Sae2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshets, Michael; Ramamurthy, Dharanidharan; Lisby, Michael

    2018-01-01

    One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are the......One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ...

  15. Visualization of complex DNA double-strand breaks in a tumor treated with carbon ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Niimi, Atsuko; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Murata, Kazutoshi; Matsumura, Akihiko; Noda, Shin-Ei; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Iwanaga, Mototaro; Tsuchida, Keisuke; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Shibata, Atsushi; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy shows great potential as a cure for X-ray-resistant tumors. Basic research suggests that the strong cell-killing effect induced by carbon ions is based on their ability to cause complex DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, evidence supporting the formation of complex DSBs in actual patients is lacking. Here, we used advanced high-resolution microscopy with deconvolution to show that complex DSBs are formed in a human tumor clinically treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, but not in a tumor treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Furthermore, analysis using a physics model suggested that the complexity of radiotherapy-induced DSBs is related to linear energy transfer, which is much higher for carbon ion beams than for X-rays. Visualization of complex DSBs in clinical specimens will help us to understand the anti-tumor effects of carbon ion radiotherapy.

  16. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B{sub 16}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Zengquan; Zhou Guangming; Wang Jufang; He Jing; Li Qiang; Li Wenjian; Xie Hongmei; Cai Xichen; Tao Huang; Dang Bingrong; Han Guangwu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Inst. of Modern Physics; Gao Qingxiang [Lanzhou Univ. (China)

    1997-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B{sub 16} induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B{sub 16}. Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau {proportional_to}85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  17. Cyclic perylene diimide: Selective ligand for tetraplex DNA binding over double stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasimalla, Suresh; Sato, Shinobu; Takenaka, Fuminori; Kurose, Yui; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2017-12-15

    Synthesized cyclic perylene diimide, cPDI, showed the binding constant of 6.3 × 10 6  M -1 with binding number of n = 2 with TA-core as a tetraplex DNA in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 7.4) containing 100 mM KCl using Schatchard analysis and showed a higher preference for tetraplex DNA than for double stranded DNA with over 10 3 times. CD spectra showed that TA-core induced its antiparallel conformation upon addition of cPDI in the absence or presence of K + or Na + ions. The cPDI inhibits the telomerase activity with IC 50 of 0.3 µM using TRAP assay which is potential anti-cancer drug with low side effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Homing endonucleases catalyze double-stranded DNA breaks and somatic transgene excision in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, B E; Anderson, M A E; Adelman, Z N

    2009-10-01

    Aedes aegypti is a major vector of arthropod-borne viruses such as yellow fever virus and dengue viruses. Efforts to discern the function of genes involved in important behaviours, such as vector competence and host seeking through reverse genetics, would greatly benefit from the ability to generate targeted gene disruptions. Homing endonucleases are selfish elements which catalyze double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks in a sequence-specific manner. In this report we demonstrate that the homing endonucleases I-PpoI, I-SceI, I-CreI and I-AniI are all able to induce dsDNA breaks in adult female Ae. aegypti chromosomes as well as catalyze the somatic excision of a transgene. These experiments provide evidence that homing endonucleases can be used to manipulate the genome of this important disease vector.

  19. Induction of virus resistance by exogenous application of double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Neena; Worrall, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Karl E; Xu, Zhi Ping; Carroll, Bernard J

    2017-10-01

    Exogenous application of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for virus resistance in plants represents a very attractive alternative to virus resistant transgenic crops or pesticides targeting virus vectors. However, the instability of dsRNA sprayed onto plants is a major challenge as spraying naked dsRNA onto plants provides protection against homologous viruses for only 5 days. Innovative approaches, such as the use of nanoparticles as carriers of dsRNA for improved stability and sustained release, are emerging as key disruptive technologies. Knowledge is still limited about the mechanism of entry, transport and processing of exogenously applied dsRNA in plants. Cost of dsRNA and regulatory framework will be key influencers towards practical adoption of this technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biotinylation of Deoxyguanosine at the Abasic Site in Double-Stranded Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotinylation of deoxyguanosine at an abasic site in double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. The biotinylation of deoxyguanosine is achieved by copper-catalyzed click reaction after the conjugation of the oligodeoxynucleotide with 2-oxohex-5-ynal. The biotinylation enables visualization of the biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides by chemiluminescence on a nylon membrane. In order to investigate the biotinylated site, the biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides were amplified by the DNA polymerase chain reaction. Replacement of guanine opposing the abasic site with adenine generated by the activity of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase of DNA polymerase was detected by DNA sequencing analysis and restriction endonuclease digestion. This study suggests that 2-oxohex-5-ynal may be useful for the detection of the unpaired deoxyguanosine endogenously generated at abasic sites in genomic DNA.

  1. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage, and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier-limited, length-dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length-independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation, which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry. PMID:26986356

  2. Twist-Bend Coupling and the Torsional Response of Double-Stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomidis, Stefanos K.; Kriegel, Franziska; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Carlon, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    Recent magnetic tweezers experiments have reported systematic deviations of the twist response of double-stranded DNA from the predictions of the twistable wormlike chain model. Here we show, by means of analytical results and computer simulations, that these discrepancies can be resolved if a coupling between twist and bend is introduced. We obtain an estimate of 40 ±10 nm for the twist-bend coupling constant. Our simulations are in good agreement with high-resolution, magnetic-tweezers torque data. Although the existence of twist-bend coupling was predicted long ago [J. Marko and E. Siggia, Macromolecules 27, 981 (1994), 10.1021/ma00082a015], its effects on the mechanical properties of DNA have been so far largely unexplored. We expect that this coupling plays an important role in several aspects of DNA statics and dynamics.

  3. [Bacterial infections as seen from the eukaryotic genome: DNA double strand breaks, inflammation and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemercier, Claudie

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies report that infection by pathogenic bacteria alters the host genome, producing highly hazardous DNA double strand breaks for the eukaryotic cell. Even when DNA repair occurs, it often leaves "scars" on chromosomes that might generate genomic instability at the next cell division. Chronic intestinal inflammation promotes the expansion of genotoxic bacteria in the intestinal microbiote which in turn triggers tumor formation and colon carcinomas. Bacteria act at the level of the host DNA repair machinery. They also highjack the host cell cycle to allow themselves time for replication in an appropriate reservoir. However, except in the case of bacteria carrying the CDT nuclease, the molecular mechanisms responsible for DNA lesions are not well understood, even if reactive oxygen species released during infection make good candidates. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. String-nets, single- and double-stranded quantum loop gases for non-Abelian anyons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velenich, Andrea; Chamon, Claudio [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wen Xiaogang, E-mail: velenich@bu.ed [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-04-30

    String-nets and quantum loop gases are two prominent microscopic lattice models to describe topological phases. String-net condensation can give rise to both Abelian and non-Abelian anyons, whereas loop condensation usually produces Abelian anyons. It has been proposed, however, that generalized quantum loop gases with non-orthogonal inner products could support non-Abelian anyons. We detail an exact mapping between the string-net and these generalized loop models and explain how the non-orthogonal products arise. We also introduce an equivalent loop model of double-stranded nets where quantum loops with an orthogonal inner product and local interactions supports non-Abelian Fibonacci anyons. Finally, we emphasize the origin of the sign problem in systems with non-Abelian excitations and its consequences on the complexity of their ground state wavefunctions. (fast track communication)

  5. Processing of double-stranded RNA in mammalian cells: a direct antiviral role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantier, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Processing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) contributes directly to an antiviral effect in plants and invertebrates, which is amplified through the recruitment of RNA interference (RNAi). In mammals, viral dsRNAs are the substrate of the innate immune response and limit viral spread by impacting on cellular translation and cytokine production, as well as promoting cell death. Recent studies suggest that viral siRNAs also exert a direct antiviral activity in mammalian cells. Here, I review the current knowledge of dsRNA processing in mammalian cells and discuss the recent findings in light of the complex interplay between RNAi and dsRNA-driven innate immune responses toward the common goal of virus restriction.

  6. Use of S1 nuclease in deep sequencing for detection of double-stranded RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Saya; Nagai, Makoto; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Satoshi; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Furuya, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Metagenomic approach using next-generation DNA sequencing has facilitated the detection of many pathogenic viruses from fecal samples. However, in many cases, majority of the detected sequences originate from the host genome and bacterial flora in the gut. Here, to improve efficiency of the detection of double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses from samples, we evaluated the applicability of S1 nuclease on deep sequencing. Treating total RNA with S1 nuclease resulted in 1.5-28.4- and 10.1-208.9-fold increases in sequence reads of group A rotavirus in fecal and viral culture samples, respectively. Moreover, increasing coverage of mapping to reference sequences allowed for sufficient genotyping using analytical software. These results suggest that library construction using S1 nuclease is useful for deep sequencing in the detection of dsRNA viruses.

  7. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data. (author)

  8. Long Double-Stranded Multiplex siRNAs for Dual Genes Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Chen, Jianxin; Qin, Yinchao; Yang, Zhenjun

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous suppression of multiple oncogenes is an attractive strategy to treat cancers. Herein we present a series of long double-stranded multiplex small interfering RNAs (multi-siRNAs) that is suitable for dual genes silencing through a sequence-specific RNA interference process without inducing significant immune responses. A gap feature structurally designed in either of the nucleotide strands of the multi-siRNAs was proved to be essential toward silencing target genes and avoiding immune responses. Furthermore, the silencing effect of multi-siRNAs against SURVIVIN and BCL-2 genes was shown to be effective and resulted in up-regulation of caspase-3 related apoptosis and, in turn, inhibition of bladder cancer cell proliferation. Our observation suggested that the rationally designed multi-siRNAs would have great potential for therapeutic siRNA design. PMID:23656495

  9. Double strand break repair: two mechanisms in competition but tightly linked to cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacote, F.

    2002-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are highly toxic damage although they can be induced to create genetic diversity. Two distinct pathways can repair DSB: Homologous Recombination (HR) and Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). If un- or mis-repaired, this damage can lead to cancer. Thus, it is essential to investigate how these two pathways are regulated for DSB repair. NHEJ inhibition leads to HR DSB repair stimulation. However, this channeling to HR is tightly linked to cell cycle since NHEJ and HR are active in G1/early S and late S/G2, respectively. Our results suggest that G1-unrepaired DSB go through S phase to be repaired by HR in G2. Those results allow a better understanding of DSB repair mechanisms regulation. (author)

  10. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zengquan; Zhou Guangming; Wang Jufang; He Jing; Li Qiang; Li Wenjian; Xie Hongmei; Cai Xichen; Tao Huang; Dang Bingrong; Han Guangwu

    1997-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B 16 induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B 16 . Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau ∝85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  11. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. ©2013 AACR.

  12. Studies on the interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-05-01

    Interaction of the food additive tartrazine with double-stranded DNA was studied by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Absorbance studies revealed that tartrazine exhibited hypochromism in the presence of DNA without any bathochromic effects. Minor groove displacement assay of DAPI and Hoechst 33258 suggested that tartrazine binds in the minor groove of DNA. The complexation was predominantly entropy driven with a smaller but favorable enthalpic contribution to the standard molar Gibbs energy. The equilibrium constant was evaluated to be (3.68 ± .08) × 10(4) M(-1) at 298.15 K. The negative standard molar heat capacity value along with an enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon proposed the involvement of dominant hydrophobic forces in the binding process. Tartrazine enhanced the thermal stability of DNA by 7.53 K under saturation conditions.

  13. A structural model of the genome packaging process in a membrane-containing double stranded DNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Hong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two crucial steps in the virus life cycle are genome encapsidation to form an infective virion and genome exit to infect the next host cell. In most icosahedral double-stranded (ds DNA viruses, the viral genome enters and exits the capsid through a unique vertex. Internal membrane-containing viruses possess additional complexity as the genome must be translocated through the viral membrane bilayer. Here, we report the structure of the genome packaging complex with a membrane conduit essential for viral genome encapsidation in the tailless icosahedral membrane-containing bacteriophage PRD1. We utilize single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM and symmetry-free image reconstruction to determine structures of PRD1 virion, procapsid, and packaging deficient mutant particles. At the unique vertex of PRD1, the packaging complex replaces the regular 5-fold structure and crosses the lipid bilayer. These structures reveal that the packaging ATPase P9 and the packaging efficiency factor P6 form a dodecameric portal complex external to the membrane moiety, surrounded by ten major capsid protein P3 trimers. The viral transmembrane density at the special vertex is assigned to be a hexamer of heterodimer of proteins P20 and P22. The hexamer functions as a membrane conduit for the DNA and as a nucleating site for the unique vertex assembly. Our structures show a conformational alteration in the lipid membrane after the P9 and P6 are recruited to the virion. The P8-genome complex is then packaged into the procapsid through the unique vertex while the genome terminal protein P8 functions as a valve that closes the channel once the genome is inside. Comparing mature virion, procapsid, and mutant particle structures led us to propose an assembly pathway for the genome packaging apparatus in the PRD1 virion.

  14. A structural model of the genome packaging process in a membrane-containing double stranded DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chuan; Oksanen, Hanna M; Liu, Xiangan; Jakana, Joanita; Bamford, Dennis H; Chiu, Wah

    2014-12-01

    Two crucial steps in the virus life cycle are genome encapsidation to form an infective virion and genome exit to infect the next host cell. In most icosahedral double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses, the viral genome enters and exits the capsid through a unique vertex. Internal membrane-containing viruses possess additional complexity as the genome must be translocated through the viral membrane bilayer. Here, we report the structure of the genome packaging complex with a membrane conduit essential for viral genome encapsidation in the tailless icosahedral membrane-containing bacteriophage PRD1. We utilize single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and symmetry-free image reconstruction to determine structures of PRD1 virion, procapsid, and packaging deficient mutant particles. At the unique vertex of PRD1, the packaging complex replaces the regular 5-fold structure and crosses the lipid bilayer. These structures reveal that the packaging ATPase P9 and the packaging efficiency factor P6 form a dodecameric portal complex external to the membrane moiety, surrounded by ten major capsid protein P3 trimers. The viral transmembrane density at the special vertex is assigned to be a hexamer of heterodimer of proteins P20 and P22. The hexamer functions as a membrane conduit for the DNA and as a nucleating site for the unique vertex assembly. Our structures show a conformational alteration in the lipid membrane after the P9 and P6 are recruited to the virion. The P8-genome complex is then packaged into the procapsid through the unique vertex while the genome terminal protein P8 functions as a valve that closes the channel once the genome is inside. Comparing mature virion, procapsid, and mutant particle structures led us to propose an assembly pathway for the genome packaging apparatus in the PRD1 virion.

  15. Numt-mediated double-strand break repair mitigates deletions during primate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Hazkani-Covo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is the major mechanism of double-strand break repair (DSBR in mammalian cells. NHEJ has traditionally been inferred from experimental systems involving induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Whether or not the spectrum of repair events observed in experimental NHEJ reflects the repair of natural breaks by NHEJ during chromosomal evolution is an unresolved issue. In primate phylogeny, nuclear DNA sequences of mitochondrial origin, numts, are inserted into naturally occurring chromosomal breaks via NHEJ. Thus, numt integration sites harbor evidence for the mechanisms that act on the genome over evolutionary timescales. We have identified 35 and 55 lineage-specific numts in the human and chimpanzee genomes, respectively, using the rhesus monkey genome as an outgroup. One hundred and fifty two numt-chromosome fusion points were classified based on their repair patterns. Repair involving microhomology and repair leading to nucleotide additions were detected. These repair patterns are within the experimentally determined spectrum of classical NHEJ, suggesting that information from experimental systems is representative of broader genetic loci and end configurations. However, in incompatible DSBR events, small deletions always occur, whereas in 54% of numt integration events examined, no deletions were detected. Numts show a statistically significant reduction in deletion frequency, even in comparison to DSBR involving filler DNA. Therefore, numts show a unique mechanism of integration via NHEJ. Since the deletion frequency during numt insertion is low, native overhangs of chromosome breaks are preserved, allowing us to determine that 24% of the analyzed breaks are cohesive with overhangs of up to 11 bases. These data represent, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive description of the structure of naturally occurring DSBs. We suggest a mo