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Sample records for dot nanoparticle cellular

  1. Dynamics and mechanisms of quantum dot nanoparticle cellular uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telford William G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of the nanotechnology industry and the wide application of various nanomaterials have raised concerns over their impact on the environment and human health. Yet little is known about the mechanism of cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. An array of nanomaterials has recently been introduced into cancer research promising for remarkable improvements in diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Among them, quantum dots (QDs distinguish themselves in offering many intrinsic photophysical properties that are desirable for targeted imaging and drug delivery. Results We explored the kinetics and mechanism of cellular uptake of QDs with different surface coatings in two human mammary cells. Using fluorescence microscopy and laser scanning cytometry (LSC, we found that both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells internalized large amount of QD655-COOH, but the percentage of endocytosing cells is slightly higher in MCF-7 cell line than in MCF-10A cell line. Live cell fluorescent imaging showed that QD cellular uptake increases with time over 40 h of incubation. Staining cells with dyes specific to various intracellular organelles indicated that QDs were localized in lysosomes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images suggested a potential pathway for QD cellular uptake mechanism involving three major stages: endocytosis, sequestration in early endosomes, and translocation to later endosomes or lysosomes. No cytotoxicity was observed in cells incubated with 0.8 nM of QDs for a period of 72 h. Conclusions The findings presented here provide information on the mechanism of QD endocytosis that could be exploited to reduce non-specific targeting, thereby improving specific targeting of QDs in cancer diagnosis and treatment applications. These findings are also important in understanding the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and in emphasizing the importance of strict environmental control of nanoparticles.

  2. Quantifying the cellular uptake of semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles by analytical electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondow, Nicole; Brown, M Rowan; Starborg, Tobias; Monteith, Alexander G; Brydson, Rik; Summers, Huw D; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andy

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles are in demand as optical biomarkers yet the cellular uptake process is not fully understood; quantification of numbers and the fate of internalized particles are still to be achieved. We have focussed on the characterization of cellular uptake of quantum dots using a combination of analytical electron microscopies because of the spatial resolution available to examine uptake at the nanoparticle level, using both imaging to locate particles and spectroscopy to confirm identity. In this study, commercially available quantum dots, CdSe/ZnS core/shell particles coated in peptides to target cellular uptake by endocytosis, have been investigated in terms of the agglomeration state in typical cell culture media, the traverse of particle agglomerates across U-2 OS cell membranes during endocytosis, the merging of endosomal vesicles during incubation of cells and in the correlation of imaging flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy to measure the final nanoparticle dose internalized by the U-2 OS cells. We show that a combination of analytical transmission electron microscopy and serial block face scanning electron microscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the internalization of an initial exposure dose of nanoparticles by an endocytically active cell population and how the internalized, membrane bound nanoparticle load is processed by the cells. We present a stochastic model of an endosome merging process and show that this provides a data-driven modelling framework for the prediction of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles in general. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  4. Polymersomes containing quantum dots for cellular imaging

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    Camblin M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine Camblin,1 Pascal Detampel,1 Helene Kettiger,1 Dalin Wu,2 Vimalkumar Balasubramanian,1,* Jörg Huwyler1,*1Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs are highly fluorescent and stable probes for cellular and molecular imaging. However, poor intracellular delivery, stability, and toxicity of QDs in biological compartments hamper their use in cellular imaging. To overcome these limitations, we developed a simple and effective method to load QDs into polymersomes (Ps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane-poly(2-methyloxazoline (PDMS-PMOXA diblock copolymers without compromising the characteristics of the QDs. These Ps showed no cellular toxicity and QDs were successfully incorporated into the aqueous compartment of the Ps as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Ps containing QDs showed colloidal stability over a period of 6 weeks if stored in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at physiological pH (7.4. Efficient intracellular delivery of Ps containing QDs was achieved in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2 and was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Ps containing QDs showed a time- and concentration-dependent uptake in HepG2 cells and exhibited better intracellular stability than liposomes. Our results suggest that Ps containing QDs can be used as nanoprobes for cellular imaging.Keywords: quantum dots, polymersomes, cellular imaging, cellular uptake

  5. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

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    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  6. Mechanisms of cellular adaptation to quantum dots--the role of glutathione and transcription factor EB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica

    2012-05-01

    Cellular adaptation is the dynamic response of a cell to adverse changes in its intra/extra cellular environment. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of: (i) the glutathione antioxidant system, and (ii) the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a newly revealed master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, in cellular adaptation to nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress. Intracellular concentrations of glutathione species and activation of TFEB were assessed in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells following treatment with uncapped CdTe quantum dots (QDs), using biochemical, live cell fluorescence and immunocytochemical techniques. Exposure to toxic concentrations of QDs resulted in a significant enhancement of intracellular glutathione concentrations, redistribution of glutathione species and a progressive translocation and activation of TFEB. These changes were associated with an enlargement of the cellular lysosomal compartment. Together, these processes appear to have an adaptive character, and thereby participate in the adaptive cellular response to toxic nanoparticles.

  7. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility.

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    Ebrahim Forati

    Full Text Available Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs with two different geometries (sphere and rod and quantum dots (QDs with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach.

  8. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  9. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  10. Non-specific cellular uptake of surface-functionalized quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Kelf, T A; Sun, J; Kim, E J; Goldys, E M; Zvyagin, A V; 10.1088/0957-4484/21/28/285105

    2010-01-01

    We report a systematic empirical study of nanoparticle internalization into cells via non-specific pathways. The nanoparticles were comprised of commercial quantum dots (QDs) that were highly visible under a fluorescence confocal microscope. Surface-modified QDs with basic biologically-significant moieties, e.g. carboxyl, amino, streptavidin were used, in combination with the surface derivatization with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in a range of immortalized cell lines. Internalization rates were derived from image analysis and a detailed discussion about the effect of nanoparticle size, charge and surface groups is presented. We find that PEG-derivatization dramatically suppresses the non-specific uptake while PEG-free carboxyl and amine functional groups promote QD internalization. These uptake variations displayed a remarkable consistency across different cell types. The reported results are important for experiments concerned with cellular uptake of surface-functionalized nanomaterials, both when non-specifi...

  11. Nanosensor Data Processor in Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Fenghui Yao; Mohamed Saleh Zein-Sabatto; Guifeng Shao; Mohammad Bodruzzaman; Mohan Malkani

    2014-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is an attractive nanotechnology with the potential alterative to CMOS technology. QCA provides an interesting paradigm for faster speed, smaller size, and lower power consumption in comparison to transistor-based technology, in both communication and computation. This paper describes the design of a 4-bit multifunction nanosensor data processor (NSDP). The functions of NSDP contain (i) sending the preprocessed raw data to high-level processor, (ii) counting...

  12. Quantum analysis of plasmonic coupling between quantum dots and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, SalmanOgli

    2016-10-01

    In this study, interaction between core-shells nanoparticles and quantum dots is discussed via the full-quantum-theory method. The electromagnetic field of the nanoparticles is derived by the quasistatic approximation method and the results for different regions of the nanoparticles are quantized from the time-harmonic to the wave equation. Utilizing the optical field quantization, the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' deriving amplitudes contributing to the excitation waves are determined. In the current model, two counterpropagating waves with two different frequencies are applied. We derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations from the Heisenberg-Langevin equations; thus the nanoparticles-quantum dots interaction is perused. Moreover, by full quantum analyzing of the analytical expression, the quantum-plasmonic coupling relation and the Purcell factor are achieved. We show that the spontaneous emission of quantum dots can be dramatically manipulated by engineering the plasmon-plasmon interaction in the core-shells nanoparticles. This issue is a very attractive point for designing a wide variety of quantum-plasmonic sensors. Through the investigation of the nanoparticle plasmonic interaction effects on absorbed power, the results show that the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' absorption saturation state can be switched to each other just by manipulation of their deriving amplitudes. In fact, we manage the interference between the two waves' deriving amplitudes just by the plasmonic interactions effect.

  13. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  14. A new phenomenon of quantum-dot cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Ifan external point charge and the movable charges of an isolated quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) cell have the same polarity, the point charge greatly affects the polarization (P) of the cell only when it is in a narrow band with periodically changing width. The center of the band is on a radius R circle. The ratio of R to the electric charge (q) is a constant determined by the parameters of the cell. A QCA cell can be used as charge detector based on the above phenomenon.

  15. Two Novel Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Full Adders

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdie Qanbari; Reza Sabbaghi-Nadooshan

    2013-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is an efficient technology to create computing devices. QCA is a suitable candidate for the next generation of digital systems. Full adders are the main member of computational systems because other operations can be implemented by adders. In this paper, two QCA full adders are introduced. The first one is implemented in one layer, and the second one is implemented in three layers. Five-input majority gate is used in both of them. These full adders are bett...

  16. Two Novel Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Full Adders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdie Qanbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is an efficient technology to create computing devices. QCA is a suitable candidate for the next generation of digital systems. Full adders are the main member of computational systems because other operations can be implemented by adders. In this paper, two QCA full adders are introduced. The first one is implemented in one layer, and the second one is implemented in three layers. Five-input majority gate is used in both of them. These full adders are better than pervious designs in terms of area, delay, and complexity.

  17. Nanosensor Data Processor in Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghui Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is an attractive nanotechnology with the potential alterative to CMOS technology. QCA provides an interesting paradigm for faster speed, smaller size, and lower power consumption in comparison to transistor-based technology, in both communication and computation. This paper describes the design of a 4-bit multifunction nanosensor data processor (NSDP. The functions of NSDP contain (i sending the preprocessed raw data to high-level processor, (ii counting the number of the active majority gates, and (iii generating the approximate sigmoid function. The whole system is designed and simulated with several different input data.

  18. A Novel Architecture for Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Multiplexer

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    Arman Roohi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA technology is attractive due to its low power consumption, fast speed and small dimension; therefore it is a promising alternative to CMOS technology. Additionally, multiplexer is a useful part in many important circuits. In this paper we propose a novel design of 2:1 MUX in QCA. Moreover, a 4:1 multiplexer, an XOR gate and a latch are proposed based on our 2:1 multiplexer design. The simulation results have been verified using the QCADesigner.

  19. Exploring Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Based Reversible Circuit

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    Saroj Kumar Chandra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA is a new technology for development of logic circuits based on nanotechnology, and it is an one of the alternative for designing high performance computing over existing CMOS technology. The basic logic in QCA does not use voltage level for logic representation rather it represent binary state by polarization of electrons on the Quantum Cell which is basic building block of QCA. Extensive work is going on QCA for circuit design due to low power consumption and regularity in the circuit.. Clocking is used in QCA circuit to synchronize and control the information flow and to provide the power to run the circuit. Reversible logic design is a well-known paradigm in digital computation, and if circuit developed is reversible then it consumes very low power . Here, in this paper we are presenting a Reversible Universal Gate (RUG based on Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA. The RUG implemented by QCA Designer tool and also its behavior is simulated by it.

  20. Exploring Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Based Reversible Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar Chandra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA is a new technology for development of logic circuits based on nanotechnology, and it is an one of the alternative for designing high performance computing over existing CMOS technology. The basic logic in QCA does not use voltage level for logic representation rather it represent binary state by polarization of electrons on the Quantum Cell which is basic building block of QCA. Extensive work is going on QCA for circuit design due to low power consumption and regularity in the circuit.. Clocking is used in QCA circuit to synchronize and control the information flow and to provide the power to run the circuit. Reversible logic design is a well-known paradigm in digital computation, and if circuit developed is reversible then it consumes very low power. Here, in this paper we are presenting a Reversible Universal Gate (RUG based on Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA. The RUG implemented by QCA Designer tool and also its behavior is simulated by it.

  1. Metallic nanoparticles and their medicinal potential. Part II: aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots and cochleates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Leena; Scarabelli, Tiziano

    2013-09-01

    Metallic miniaturization techniques have taken metals to nanoscale size where they can display fascinating properties and their potential applications in medicine. In recent years, metal nanoparticles such as aluminium, silicon, iron, cadmium, selenium, indium and calcium, which find their presence in aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots (Q-dots) and cochleates, have caught attention of medical industries. The increasing impact of metallic nanoparticles in life sciences has significantly advanced the production techniques for these nanoparticles. In this Review, the various methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles are outlined, followed by their physicochemical properties, some recent applications in wound healing, diagnostic imaging, biosensing, assay labeling, antimicrobial activity, cancer therapy and drug delivery are listed, and finally their toxicological impacts are revised. The first half of this article describes the medicinal uses of two noble nanoparticles - gold and silver. This Review provides further information on the ability of aluminum, silicon, iron, selenium, indium, calcium and zinc to be used as nanoparticles in biomedical sciences. Aluminosilicates find their utility in wound healing and antibacterial growth. Iron-oxide nanoparticles enhance the properties of MRI contrast agents and are also used as biomagnets. Cadmium, selenium, tellurium and indium form the core nanostructures of tiny Q-dots used in cellular assay labeling, high-resolution cell imaging and biosensing. Cochleates have the bivalent nano ions calcium, magnesium or zinc imbedded in their structures and are considered to be highly effective agents for drug and gene delivery. The aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, Q-dots and cochleates are discussed in the light of their properties, synthesis and utility.

  2. Evaluation of diverse peptidyl motifs for cellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Kelly Boeneman; Muttenthaler, Markus; Delehanty, James B; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have rapidly become a mainstay technology for facilitating the delivery of a wide variety of nanomaterials to cells and tissues. Currently, the library of CPPs to choose from is still limited, with the HIV TAT-derived motif still being the most used. Among the many materials routinely delivered by CPPs, nanoparticles are of particular interest for a plethora of labeling, imaging, sensing, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. The development of nanoparticle-based technologies for many of these uses will require access to a much larger number of functional peptide motifs that can both facilitate cellular delivery of different types of nanoparticles to cells and be used interchangeably in the presence of other peptides and proteins on the same surface. Here, we evaluate the utility of four peptidyl motifs for their ability to facilitate delivery of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in a model cell culture system. We find that an LAH4 motif, derived from a membrane-inserting antimicrobial peptide, and a chimeric sequence that combines a sweet arrow peptide with a portion originating from the superoxide dismutase enzyme provide effective cellular delivery of QDs. Interestingly, a derivative of the latter sequence lacking just a methyl group was found to be quite inefficient, suggesting that even small changes can have significant functional outcomes. Delivery was effected using 1 h incubation with cells, and fluorescent counterstaining strongly suggests an endosomal uptake process that requires a critical minimum number or ratio of peptides to be displayed on the QD surface. Concomitant cytoviability testing showed that the QD-peptide conjugates are minimally cytotoxic in the model COS-1 cell line tested. Potential applications of these peptides in the context of cellular delivery of nanoparticles and a variety of other (bio)molecules are discussed.

  3. Imaging cellular membrane potential through ionization of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J.; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J.; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A.; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Efros, Alexander L.; Huston, Alan L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in quantum dots (QDs) stems from the plethora of potential applications that arises from their tunable absorption and emission profiles, high absorption cross sections, resistance to photobleaching, functionalizable surfaces, and physical robustness. The emergent use of QDs in biological imaging exploits these and other intrinsic properties. For example, quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), which describes changes in the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs driven by the application of an electric field, provides an inherent means of detecting changes in electric fields by monitoring QD emission and thus points to a ready mean of imaging membrane potential (and action potentials) in electrically active cells. Here we examine the changing PL of various QDs subjected to electric fields comparable to those found across a cellular membrane. By pairing static and timeresolved PL measurements, we attempt to understand the mechanism driving electric-field-induced PL quenching and ultimately conclude that ionization plays a substantial role in initiating PL changes in systems where QCSE has traditionally been credited. Expanding on these findings, we explore the rapidity of response of the QD PL to applied electric fields and demonstrate changes amply able to capture the millisecond timescale of cellular action potentials.

  4. Non-specific cellular uptake of surface-functionalized quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelf, T A; Sreenivasan, V K A; Sun, J; Goldys, E M; Zvyagin, A V [MQ Photonics Centre, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Kim, E J, E-mail: azvyagin@science.mq.edu.au [Department of Science Education-Chemical Education Major, Daegu University, Gyeonbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-16

    We report a systematic empirical study of nanoparticle internalization into cells via non-specific pathways. The nanoparticles were comprised of commercial quantum dots (QDs) that were highly visible under a fluorescence confocal microscope. Surface-modified QDs with basic biologically significant moieties, e.g. carboxyl, amino, and streptavidin, were used, in combination with surface derivatization with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for a range of immortalized cell lines. Internalization rates were derived from image analysis and a detailed discussion about the effect of nanoparticle size, charge and surface groups is presented. We find that PEG derivatization dramatically suppresses the non-specific uptake while PEG-free carboxyl and amine functional groups promote QD internalization. These uptake variations displayed a remarkable consistency across different cell types. The reported results are important for experiments concerned with cellular uptake of surface-functionalized nanomaterials, both when non-specific internalization is undesirable and when it is intended for material to be internalized as efficiently as possible.

  5. Quantum dot multiplexing for the profiling of cellular receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Montiel, Felipe T.; Li, Peter; Imoukhuede, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    The profiling of cellular heterogeneity has wide-reaching importance for our understanding of how cells function and react to their environments in healthy and diseased states. Our ability to interpret and model cell behavior has been limited by the difficulties of measuring cell differences, for example, comparing tumor and non-tumor cells, particularly at the individual cell level. This demonstrates a clear need for a generalizable approach to profile fluorophore sites on cells or molecular assemblies on beads. Here, a multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous detection of five different angiogenic markers was developed. We targeted angiogenic receptors in the vascular endothelial growth factor family (VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3) and Neuropilin (NRP) family (NRP1 and NRP2), using multicolor quantum dots (Qdots). Copper-free click based chemistry was used to conjugate the monoclonal antibodies with 525, 565, 605, 655 and 705 nm CdSe/ZnS Qdots. We tested and performed colocalization analysis of our nanoprobes using the Pearson correlation coefficient statistical analysis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were tested. The ability to easily monitor the molecular indicators of angiogenesis that are a precursor to cancer in a fast and cost effective system is an important step towards personalized nanomedicine.The profiling of cellular heterogeneity has wide-reaching importance for our understanding of how cells function and react to their environments in healthy and diseased states. Our ability to interpret and model cell behavior has been limited by the difficulties of measuring cell differences, for example, comparing tumor and non-tumor cells, particularly at the individual cell level. This demonstrates a clear need for a generalizable approach to profile fluorophore sites on cells or molecular assemblies on beads. Here, a multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous detection of five different angiogenic markers was developed. We targeted angiogenic receptors

  6. Design of arithmetic circuits in quantum dot cellular automata nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Sridharan, K

    2015-01-01

    This research monograph focuses on the design of arithmetic circuits in Quantum Dot Cellular Automata (QCA). Using the fact that the 3-input majority gate is a primitive in QCA, the book sets out to discover hitherto unknown properties of majority logic in the context of arithmetic circuit designs. The pursuit for efficient adders in QCA takes two forms. One involves application of the new results in majority logic to existing adders. The second involves development of a custom adder for QCA technology. A QCA adder named as hybrid adder is proposed and it is shown that it outperforms existing multi-bit adders with respect to area and delay. The work is extended to the design of a low-complexity multiplier for signed numbers in QCA. Furthermore the book explores two aspects unique to QCA technology, namely thermal robustness and the role of interconnects. In addition, the book introduces the reader to QCA layout design and simulation using QCADesigner. Features & Benefits: This research-based book: ·  �...

  7. Specific cellular delivery and intracellular fate of quantum dot- peptide and quantum dot-polymer nanoassemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delehanty, James B.; Bradburne, Christopher E.; Medintz, Igor L.; Farrell, Dorothy; Pons, Thomas; Brunel, Florence M.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2008-02-01

    Luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) possess several unique optical and spectroscopic properties that are of great interest and promise in biology. These properties suggest that QDs will be integral to the development of the next generation of biosensors capable of detecting molecular processes in both living and fixed cells. We are developing robust and facile delivery schemes for the selective intracellular delivery of QD-based nanoassemblies. These schemes are based upon the self-assembly and subsequent cellular uptake of QD-peptide and QD-polymer bioconjugates. The QD-peptide structures are generated by the self-assembly of the peptide onto CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs via metal ion coordination between the peptide's polyhistidine motif and the Zn-rich QD shell. The polymer-based QD assemblies are formed via the electrostatic interaction of aqueous cationic liposomes with available carboxylate moieties on the QD surface ligands. Cellular delivery experiments utilizing both delivery schemes will be presented. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed, including the intracellular fate and stability of the QD-nanoassemblies.

  8. Surface chemistry governs cellular tropism of nanoparticles in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eric; Gaudin, Alice; King, Amanda R.; Seo, Young-Eun; Suh, Hee-Won; Deng, Yang; Cui, Jiajia; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Huttner, Anita; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles are of long-standing interest for the treatment of neurological diseases such as glioblastoma. Most past work focused on methods to introduce nanoparticles into the brain, suggesting that reaching the brain interstitium will be sufficient to ensure therapeutic efficacy. However, optimized nanoparticle design for drug delivery to the central nervous system is limited by our understanding of their cellular deposition in the brain. Here, we investigated the cellular fate of poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles presenting different surface chemistries, after administration by convection-enhanced delivery. We demonstrate that nanoparticles with `stealth' properties mostly avoid internalization by all cell types, but internalization can be enhanced by functionalization with bio-adhesive end-groups. We also show that association rates measured in cultured cells predict the extent of internalization of nanoparticles in cell populations. Finally, evaluating therapeutic efficacy in an orthotopic model of glioblastoma highlights the need to balance significant uptake without inducing adverse toxicity.

  9. Imaging dynamic cellular events with quantum dots The bright future

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Andrew M.; Wen, Mary M.; Nie, Shuming

    2010-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are tiny light-emitting particles that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for biology and medicine. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tuneable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colours.

  10. Design and Implementation of 16-bit Arithmetic Logic Unit using Quantum dot Cellular Automata (QCA Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Pandey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Dot Cellular Automata (QCA is an advanced nanotechnology that attempts to create general computational at the nano-scale by controlling the position of single electrons. Quantum dot cellular automata (QCA defines a new device architecture that permits the innovative design of digital systems. QCA technology has large potential in terms of high space density and power dissipation with the development of the faster computer with smaller size & low power consumption.QCA help us to overcome the limitations of CMOS technology. In this paper, A design 16-bit arithmetic logic unit (ALU based on the Quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is presented. The simulation result of 16 bit ALU is verified using QCA Designer tool.

  11. Excitons in quantum-dot quantum-well nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史俊杰

    2002-01-01

    A variational calculation is presented for the ground-state properties of excitons confined in spherical core-shell quantum-dot quantum-well (QDQW) nanoparticles. The relationship between the exciton states and structure parameters of QDQW nanoparticles is investigated, in which both the heavy-hole and the light-hole exciton states are considered. The results show that the confinement energies of the electron and hole states and the exciton binding energies depend sensitively on the well width and core radius of the QDQW structure. A detailed comparison between the heavy-hole and light-hole exciton states is given. Excellent agreement is found between experimental results and our calculated 1se-1sh transition energies.

  12. Quantum Electrodynamics of Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticles Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ridolfo, A; Fina, N; Saija, R; Savasta, S

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically the quantum optical properties of hybrid molecules composed of an individual quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle. We calculate the resonance fluorescence of this hybrid system. Its incoherent part, the one arising from nonlinear quantum processes, results to be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude as compared to that in the absence of the metallic nanoparticle. Scattering spectra at different excitation powers and nonperturbative calculations of intensity-field correlation functions show that this system can act as a nonlinear ultra-compact two-photon switch for incident photons, where the presence (or absence) of a single incident photon field is sufficient to allow (or prevent) the scattering of subsequent photons. We also find that a small frequency shift of the incident light field may cause changes in the intensity field correlation function of orders of magnitude.

  13. A comparative analysis of electronic and molecular quantum dot cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umamahesvari, H., E-mail: umamaheswarihema@gmail.com, E-mail: ajithavijay1@gmail.com [Sreenivasa Institute of Technology and Management Studies, (SITAMS) Autonomous, Chittoor (India); Ajitha, D., E-mail: umamaheswarihema@gmail.com, E-mail: ajithavijay1@gmail.com [JNTUCEA, Anatapuramu Andrapradesh (India)

    2015-06-24

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of electronic quantum-dot cellular automata (EQCA) and Magnetic quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA). QCA is a computing paradigm that encodes and processes information by the position of individual electrons. To enhance the high dense and ultra-low power devices, various researches have been actively carried out to find an alternative way to continue and follow Moore’s law, so called “beyond CMOS technology”. There have been several proposals for physically implementing QCA, EQCA and MQCA are the two important QCAs reported so far. This paper provides a comparative study on these two QCAs.

  14. Nanoparticles can cause DNA damage across a cellular barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhabra, Gevdeep; Sood, Aman; Fisher, Brenton; Cartwright, Laura; Saunders, Margaret; Evans, William Howard; Surprenant, Annmarie; Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Mann, Stephen; Davis, Sean A.; Hails, Lauren A.; Ingham, Eileen; Verkade, Paul; Lane, Jon; Heesom, Kate; Newson, Roger; Case, Charles Patrick

    2009-12-01

    The increasing use of nanoparticles in medicine has raised concerns over their ability to gain access to privileged sites in the body. Here, we show that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles (29.5 +/- 6.3 nm in diameter) can damage human fibroblast cells across an intact cellular barrier without having to cross the barrier. The damage is mediated by a novel mechanism involving transmission of purine nucleotides (such as ATP) and intercellular signalling within the barrier through connexin gap junctions or hemichannels and pannexin channels. The outcome, which includes DNA damage without significant cell death, is different from that observed in cells subjected to direct exposure to nanoparticles. Our results suggest the importance of indirect effects when evaluating the safety of nanoparticles. The potential damage to tissues located behind cellular barriers needs to be considered when using nanoparticles for targeting diseased states.

  15. Highly stable red-emitting polymer dots for cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelora, Jipsa; Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Rui; Thachoth Chandran, Hrisheekesh; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2017-07-01

    Polymer dots (Pdots) have emerged as a new type of fluorescent probe material for biomedical applications and have attracted great interest due to their excellent optical properties and biocompatability. In this work, we report on a red-emitting P3HT Pdot fluorescent probe for intracellular bioimaging. The as-prepared Pdot fluorescent probe exhibits good stability and has a large Stokes shift (121 nm) compared to molecules in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Furthermore, the probe shows low cytotoxicity, broad absorption spectrum, resistance against photodegradation, and good water dispersibility. These advantageous characteristics make P3HT Pdots a promising fluorescent probe material for bioimaging.

  16. Energy dissipation dataset for reversible logic gates in quantum dot-cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ali Newaz; Rahman, Mohammad Maksudur; Nahid, Nur Mohammad; Hassan, Md Kamrul

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an energy dissipation dataset of different reversible logic gates in quantum-dot cellular automata. The proposed circuits have been designed and verified using QCADesigner simulator. Besides, the energy dissipation has been calculated under three different tunneling energy level at temperature T=2 K. For estimating the energy dissipation of proposed gates; QCAPro tool has been employed.

  17. Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Pallab [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Giri, Jyotsnendu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Banerjee, Rinti [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bahadur, Dhirendra [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400076 (India)]. E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in

    2007-04-15

    In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles.

  18. Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Pallab; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Banerjee, Rinti; Bellare, Jayesh; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2007-04-01

    In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles.

  19. CdTe quantum dots induce activation of human platelets: implications for nanoparticle hemocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Stephen P; Santos-Martinez, Maria J; Medina, Carlos; Jain, Namrata; Radomski, Marek W; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Volkov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    New nanomaterials intended for systemic administration have raised concerns regarding their biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Quantum dots (QD) nanoparticles have been used for diagnostics, and recent work suggests their use for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging. However, the hemocompatibility of QDs and their constituent components has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, comprehensive investigation of QD–platelet interactions is presented. These interactions were shown using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of QDs on platelet function were investigated using light aggregometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, flow cytometry, and gelatin zymography. Platelet morphology was also analyzed by phase-contrast, immunofluorescence, atomic-force and transmission electron microscopy. We show that the QDs bind to platelet plasma membrane with the resultant upregulation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin receptors, and release of matrix metalloproteinase-2. These findings unravel for the first time the mechanism of functional response of platelets to ultrasmall QDs in vitro. PMID:25897218

  20. Enhanced Photoluminescence Property for Quantum Dot-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qianqian; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Jian; Pan, Jiangyong; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Zichen

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized ZnCdSeS quantum dots (QDs)-gold nanoparticle (Au NPs) hybrids in aqueous solution via bi-functional linker mercaptoacetic acid (MPA). The absorption peaks of ZnCdSeS QDs and Au are both located at 520 nm. It is investigated that PL intensity of QD-Au hybrid can be affected by the amounts of Au and pH value of hybrid solution. The located surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of QD-Au NPs has been demonstrated by increased fluorescence intensity. The phenomenon of fluorescence enhancement can be maximized under the optimized pH value of 8.5. LSPR-enhanced photoluminescence property of QD-Au hybrid will be beneficial for the potential applications in the area of biological imaging and detection.

  1. Modeling In Vitro Cellular Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (NPs have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a “stepping stone” for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions.

  2. Cyclic Strain Enhances Cellular Uptake of Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Hu; Yaling Liu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their potential use as drug carrier, imaging, and diagnostic agents in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. While many cells in vivo experience mechanical forces, little is known about the correlation of the mechanical stimulation and the internalization of NPs into cells. This paper investigates the effects of applied cyclic strain on NP uptake by cells. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were cultured on ...

  3. Ultrafast spontaneous emission modulation of graphene quantum dots interacting with Ag nanoparticles in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianwei; Lu, Jian; Wang, Liang; Tian, Linfan; Deng, Xingxia; Tian, Lijun; Pan, Dengyu; Wang, Zhongyang

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the strong interaction between graphene quantum dots and silver nanoparticles in solution using time-resolved photoluminescence techniques. In solution, the silver nanoparticles are surrounded by graphene quantum dots and interacted with graphene quantum dots through exciton-plasmon coupling. An ultrafast spontaneous emission process (lifetime 27 ps) was observed in such a mixed solution. This ultrafast lifetime corresponds to the emission rate exceeding 35 GHz, with the purcell enhancement by a factor of ˜12. These experiment results pave the way for the realization of future high speed light sources applications.

  4. Preparation of luminescent CdTe quantum dots doped core-shell nanoparticles and their application in cell recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhaohui; WANG Kemin; TAN Weihong; LI Jun; FU Zhiying; WANG Yilin; LIU Jianbo; YANG Xiaohai

    2005-01-01

    Based on the reverse microemulsion technique, luminescent quantum dots doped core-shell nanoparticles have been prepared by employing silica as the shell and CdTe quantum dots as the core of the nanoparticles, which have an excellent solubility and dispersibility, especially amine and phosphonate groups have been modified on their surface synchronously. In comparison with CdTe quantum dots, these nanoparticles show superiority in chemical and photochemical stability. The quantum dots doped core-shell nanoparticles were successfully linked with lactobionic acid by amine group on it, which was used to recognize living liver cells.

  5. A Novel Design of Half Subtractor using Reversible Feynman Gate in Quantum Dot cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Akter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Dot cellular Automata (QCA is an emerging, promising alternative to CMOS technology that performs its task by encoding binary information on electronic charge configuration of a cell. All circuit based on QCA has an advantages of high speed, high parallel processing, high integrityand low power consumption. Reversible logic gates are the leading part in Quantum Dot cellular Automata. Reversible logic gates have an extensive feature that does not lose information. In this paper, we present a novel architecture of half subtractor gate design by reversible Feynman gate. This circuit is designedbased on QCA logic gates such as QCA majority voter gate, majority AND gate, majority OR gate and inverter gate. This circuit will provide an effective working efficiency on computational units of the digital circuit system.

  6. Energy dissipation dataset for reversible logic gates in quantum dot-cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Newaz Bahar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an energy dissipation dataset of different reversible logic gates in quantum-dot cellular automata. The proposed circuits have been designed and verified using QCADesigner simulator. Besides, the energy dissipation has been calculated under three different tunneling energy level at temperature T=2 K. For estimating the energy dissipation of proposed gates; QCAPro tool has been employed.

  7. Release of quantum dot nanoparticles in porous media: Role of cation exchange and aging time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the fate and transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in subsurface environments is required for developing the best strategy for waste management and disposal of these materials. In this study, the deposition and release of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles were studied in saturated ...

  8. Cellular interactions with tissue-engineered microenvironments and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi

    Tissue-engineered hydrogels composed of intermolecularlly crosslinked hyaluronan (HA-DTPH) and fibronectin functional domains (FNfds) were applied as a physiological relevant ECM mimic with controlled mechanical and biochemical properties. Cellular interactions with this tissue-engineered environment, especially physical interactions (cellular traction forces), were quantitatively measured by using the digital image speckle correlation (DISC) technique and finite element method (FEM). By correlating with other cell functions such as cell morphology and migration, a comprehensive structure-function relationship between cells and their environments was identified. Furthermore, spatiotemporal redistribution of cellular traction stresses was time-lapse measured during cell migration to better understand the dynamics of cell mobility. The results suggest that the reinforcement of the traction stresses around the nucleus, as well as the relaxation of nuclear deformation, are critical steps during cell migration, serving as a speed regulator, which must be considered in any dynamic molecular reconstruction model of tissue cell migration. Besides single cell migration, en masse cell migration was studied by using agarose droplet migration assay. Cell density was demonstrated to be another important parameter to influence cell behaviors besides substrate properties. Findings from these studies will provide fundamental design criteria to develop novel and effective tissue-engineered constructs. Cellular interactions with rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were also studied. These particles can penetrate easily through the cell membrane and impair cell function, with the latter being more damaging. The exposure to nanoparticles was found to decrease cell area, cell proliferation, motility, and contractility. To prevent this, a dense grafted polymer brush coating was applied onto the nanoparticle surface. These modified nanoparticles failed to adhere to and penetrate

  9. Cyclic Strain Enhances Cellular Uptake of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their potential use as drug carrier, imaging, and diagnostic agents in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. While many cells in vivo experience mechanical forces, little is known about the correlation of the mechanical stimulation and the internalization of NPs into cells. This paper investigates the effects of applied cyclic strain on NP uptake by cells. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs were cultured on collagen-coated culture plates and placed under cyclic equal-axial strains. NPs of sizes ranging from 50 to 200 nm were loaded at a concentration of 0.02 mg/mL and cyclic strains from 5 to 15% were applied to the cells for one hour. The cyclic strain results in a significant enhancement in NP uptake, which increases almost linearly with strain level. The enhanced uptake also depends on size of the NPs with the highest uptake observed on 100 nm NP. The effect of enhanced NP uptake lasts around 13 hours after cyclic stretch. Such in vitro cell stretch systems mimic physiological conditions of the endothelial cells in vivo and could potentially serve as a biomimetic platform for drug therapeutic evaluation.

  10. Paramagnetic Liposome Nanoparticles for Cellular and Tumour Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Kamaly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss the development of paramagnetic liposomes incorporating MRI contrast agents and show how these are utilized in cellular imaging in vitro. Bi-functional, bi-modal imaging paramagnetic liposome systems are also described. Next we discuss the upgrading of paramagnetic liposomes into bi-modal imaging neutral nanoparticles for in vivo imaging applications. We discuss the development of such systems and show how paramagnetic liposomes and imaging nanoparticles could be developed as platforms for future multi-functional, multi-modal imaging theranostic nanodevices tailor-made for the combined imaging of early stage disease pathology and functional drug delivery.

  11. Synthesis of quantum dot nanocrystals and plasmonic nanoparticles using a segmented flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbwahnche, R. C.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Ryzhov, O. A.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop an automated method of synthesizing quantum dot nanocrystals and plasmonic nanoparticles using segmented flow rector synthesis as a new alternative to the batch method of synthesizing nanoparticles. A reactor was successfully applied to the synthesis of colloidal solutions of semiconductor (CdSe) and metal (Ag) nanoparticles. This instrument is applicable in both material science laboratories and industry.

  12. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosionis, Spyridon G; Terzis, Andreas F; Sadeghi, Seyed M; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-30

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  13. Enhanced cellular uptake of size-separated lipophilic silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusi-Appiah, Aubrey E.; Mastronardi, Melanie L.; Qian, Chenxi; Chen, Kenneth K.; Ghazanfari, Lida; Prommapan, Plengchart; Kübel, Christian; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Lenhert, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Specific size, shape and surface chemistry influence the biological activity of nanoparticles. In the case of lipophilic nanoparticles, which are widely used in consumer products, there is evidence that particle size and formulation influences skin permeability and that lipophilic particles smaller than 6 nm can embed in lipid bilayers. Since most nanoparticle synthetic procedures result in mixtures of different particles, post-synthetic purification promises to provide insights into nanostructure-function relationships. Here we used size-selective precipitation to separate lipophilic allyl-benzyl-capped silicon nanoparticles into monodisperse fractions within the range of 1 nm to 5 nm. We measured liposomal encapsulation and cellular uptake of the monodisperse particles and found them to have generally low cytotoxicities in Hela cells. However, specific fractions showed reproducibly higher cytotoxicity than other fractions as well as the unseparated ensemble. Measurements indicate that the cytotoxicity mechanism involves oxidative stress and the differential cytotoxicity is due to enhanced cellular uptake by specific fractions. The results indicate that specific particles, with enhanced suitability for incorporation into lipophilic regions of liposomes and subsequent in vitro delivery to cells, are enriched in certain fractions.

  14. Fabrication of bright and small size semiconducting polymer nanoparticles for cellular labelling and single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Qingxiu; Yang, Qiaoyu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo; Xiao, Lehui

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a convenient and robust strategy for efficient fabrication of high fluorescence quantum yield (QY, 49.8 +/- 3%) semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs), with size comparable with semiconductor quantum dots (Qdots). The SPNs were synthesized by co-precipitation of hydrophobic semiconducting polymer together with amphiphilic multidentate polymer. Comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic characterizations showed that the SPNs possess superior photophysical performance, with excellent fluorescence brightness and reduced photoblinking in contrast with Qdots, as well as good photostability compared to a fluorescent protein of a similar size, phycoerythrin. More importantly, by conjugating membrane biomarkers onto the surface of SPNs, it was found that they were not only suitable for specific cellular labelling but also for single particle tracking because of the improved optical performance.In this work, we demonstrate a convenient and robust strategy for efficient fabrication of high fluorescence quantum yield (QY, 49.8 +/- 3%) semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs), with size comparable with semiconductor quantum dots (Qdots). The SPNs were synthesized by co-precipitation of hydrophobic semiconducting polymer together with amphiphilic multidentate polymer. Comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic characterizations showed that the SPNs possess superior photophysical performance, with excellent fluorescence brightness and reduced photoblinking in contrast with Qdots, as well as good photostability compared to a fluorescent protein of a similar size, phycoerythrin. More importantly, by conjugating membrane biomarkers onto the surface of SPNs, it was found that they were not only suitable for specific cellular labelling but also for single particle tracking because of the improved optical performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and additional supporting results as noted in the text

  15. Fluorescence Emission Study of Cdse/ZnS Quantum Dot and Au Nanoparticles Composite for Application in Quantum Dot Solar Concentrators

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Subhash; Doran, John; Kennedy, Manus; McCormack, S.; Chatten, A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence of core shell (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs) composite has been studied for application in quantum dot solar concentrators (QDSC). We conclude two points from the particular QD/Au NP composite studied. One; for the particular Au NPs concentration, the relative fluorescence emission enhancement increases with decreasing QD concentration. Second; the enhancement is more pronounced for the Au nanoparticles whose surface plasmon resonance wavelength overlaps...

  16. Influences of tactile-dot height and tip radius of curvature on the operational performance of cellular phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Wataru; Doi, Kouki; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Tactile dots located on operation keys of consumer products such as cellular phones contribute to improving accessibility for older people and people with visual impairment. The Japanese Standards Association (2000) and the International Organization for Standardization (2011) standardized tactile dots. However, reliable data on the appropriate sizes and the shapes was not necessarily available. The purpose of this study is to evaluate influences of the height (0.1, 0.3, 0.55, and 0.75 mm) and the tip radius of curvature (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9 mm) of tactile dots on the operational performance of cellular phones in younger and older people. Sighted younger and older participants, whose hand was covered by a curtain, operated cellular phones with a tactile dot on its key 5 and without a tactile dot. As the result, both participants performed better at a particular height with larger tip radius of curvature. Furthermore, older participants operated better at high dots like 0.55-0.75 mm. In contrast, younger participants performed better at 0.3 mm and relatively poorly at 0.1 mm and 0.75 mm. Thus, comparatively high tactile dots are useful for improving the accessibility of products for the older and there is an appropriate height range for the younger.

  17. Nonpeturbative cavity-QED between a single quantum dot and a metal nanoparticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum optical properties of an excited single photon emitter (quantum dot) near the surface of a finite-size metal nanoparticle using a photon Green function technique that rigorously quantizes the electromagnetic fields. We obtain Purcell factors of up to 5 × 104 due to higher......|max/ωd = 1.28 × 10-2. Considering a small quantum-dot, positioned 2-nm from the metal nanoparticle surface, we demonstrate that the strong coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature and despite the non-propagating nature of the higher order...

  18. Four-wave parametric amplification in semiconductor quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle hybrid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Bo; He, Meng-Dong; Chen, Li-Qun

    2014-10-06

    We study theoretically four-wave parametric amplification arising from the nonlinear optical response of hybrid molecules composed of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanoparticles. It is shown that highly efficient four-wave parametric amplification can be achieved by adjusting the frequency and intensity of the pump field and the distance between the quantum dot and the metallic nanoparticle. Specifically, the induced probe-wave gain is tunable in a large range from 1 to 1.43 × 10⁵. This gain reaches its maximum at the position of three-photon resonance. Our findings hold great promise for developing four-wave parametric oscillators.

  19. The role of surface charge in cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of medical nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröhlich E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eleonore FröhlichCenter for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Graz, AustriaAbstract: Many types of nanoparticles (NPs are tested for use in medical products, particularly in imaging and gene and drug delivery. For these applications, cellular uptake is usually a prerequisite and is governed in addition to size by surface characteristics such as hydrophobicity and charge. Although positive charge appears to improve the efficacy of imaging, gene transfer, and drug delivery, a higher cytotoxicity of such constructs has been reported. This review summarizes findings on the role of surface charge on cytotoxicity in general, action on specific cellular targets, modes of toxic action, cellular uptake, and intracellular localization of NPs. Effects of serum and intercell type differences are addressed. Cationic NPs cause more pronounced disruption of plasma-membrane integrity, stronger mitochondrial and lysosomal damage, and a higher number of autophagosomes than anionic NPs. In general, nonphagocytic cells ingest cationic NPs to a higher extent, but charge density and hydrophobicity are equally important; phagocytic cells preferentially take up anionic NPs. Cells do not use different uptake routes for cationic and anionic NPs, but high uptake rates are usually linked to greater biological effects. The different uptake preferences of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells for cationic and anionic NPs may influence the efficacy and selectivity of NPs for drug delivery and imaging.Keywords: endocytosis, plasma membrane, lysosomes, polystyrene particles, quantum dots, dendrimers

  20. Designing quantum-dot cellular automata circuits using a robust one layer crossover scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hashemi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is a novel nanotechnology which is considered as a solution to the scaling problems in complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. In this Letter, a robust one layer crossover scheme is introduced. It uses only 90° QCA cells and works based on a proper clock assignment. The application of this new scheme is shown in designing a sample QCA circuit. Simulation results demonstrate that using this new scheme, significant improvements in terms of area and complexity can be achieved.

  1. Six-Correction Logic (SCL Gates in Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anisur Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Dot Cellular Automata (QCA is a promising nanotechnology in Quantum electronics for its ultra low power consumption, faster speed and small size features. It has significant advantages over the Complementary Metal–Oxide–Semiconductor (CMOS technology. This paper present, a novel QCA representation of Six-Correction Logic (SCL gate based on QCA logic gates: the Maj3, Maj AND gate and Maj OR. In order to design and verify the functionality of the proposed layout, QCADesigner a familiar QCA simulator has been employed. The simulation results confirm correctness of the claims and its usefulness in designing a digital circuits.

  2. A Three-Layer Full Adder/Subtractor Structure in Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barughi, Yashar Zirak; Heikalabad, Saeed Rasouli

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is one of the paramount modern technologies for designing logical structures at the nano-scale. This technology is being used in molecular levels and it is based on QCA cells. High speed data transfer and low consumable power are the advantages of this technology. In this paper, we are designing and simulating a fulladder/subtractor with minimum number of cells and complexities in three layers. QCA designer software has been used to simulate the proposed design.

  3. Green Synthesis of Bifunctional Fluorescent Carbon Dots from Garlic for Cellular Imaging and Free Radical Scavenging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shaojing; Lan, Minhuan; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Xue, Hongtao; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Meng, Xiangmin; Lee, Chun-Sing; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-08-12

    Nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from garlic by a hydrothermal method. The as-prepared CDs possess good water dispersibility, strong blue fluorescence emission with a fluorescent quantum yield of 17.5%, and excellent photo and pH stabilities. It is also demonstrated that the fluorescence of CDs are resistant to the interference of metal ions, biomolecules, and high ionic strength environments. Combining with low cytotoxicity properties, CDs could be used as an excellent fluorescent probe for cellular multicolor imaging. Moreover, the CDs were also demonstrated to exhibit favorable radical scavenging activity.

  4. New views on cellular uptake and trafficking of manufactured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuel, Lennart; Jiang, Xiue; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are of similar size to typical cellular components and proteins, and can efficiently intrude living cells. A detailed understanding of the involved processes at the molecular level is important for developing NPs designed for selective uptake by specific cells, for example, for targeted drug delivery. In addition, this knowledge can greatly assist in the engineering of NPs that should not penetrate cells so as to avoid adverse health effects. In recent years, a wide variety of experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying cellular NP uptake. Here, we review some select recent studies, which are often based on fluorescence microscopy and sophisticated strategies for specific labelling of key cellular components. We address the role of the protein corona forming around NPs in biological environments, and describe recent work revealing active endocytosis mechanisms and pathways involved in their cellular uptake. Passive uptake is also discussed. The current state of knowledge is summarized, and we point to issues that still need to be addressed to further advance our understanding of cellular NP uptake. PMID:23427093

  5. Iterative Cellular Screening System for Nanoparticle Safety Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Sambale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have the potential to exhibit risks to human beings and to the environment; due to the wide applications of nanoproducts, extensive risk management must not be neglected. Therefore, we have constructed a cell-based, iterative screening system to examine a variety of nanoproducts concerning their toxicity during development. The sensitivity and application of various cell-based methods were discussed and proven by applying the screening to two different nanoparticles: zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. They were used as benchmarks to set up our methods and to examine their effects on mammalian cell lines. Different biological processes such as cell viability, gene expression of interleukin-8 and heat shock protein 70, as well as morphology changes were investigated. Within our screening system, both nanoparticle suspensions and coatings can be tested. Electric cell impedance measurements revealed to be a good method for online monitoring of cellular behavior. The implementation of three-dimensional cell culture is essential to better mimic in vivo conditions. In conclusion, our screening system is highly efficient, cost minimizing, and reduces the need for animal studies.

  6. Self-doping of molecular quantum-dot cellular automata: mixed valence zwitterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuhui; Lent, Craig

    2011-09-07

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a promising paradigm for realizing molecular electronics. In molecular QCA, binary information is encoded in the distribution of intramolecular charge, and Coulomb interactions between neighboring molecules combine to create long-range correlations in charge distribution that can be exploited for signal transfer and computation. Appropriate mixed-valence species are promising candidates for single-molecule device operation. A complication arises because many mixed-valence compounds are ions and the associated counterions can potentially disrupt the correct flow of information through the circuit. We suggest a self-doping mechanism which incorporates the counterion covalently into the structure of a neutral molecular cell, thus producing a zwitterionic mixed-valence complex. The counterion is located at the geometrical center of the QCA molecule and bound to the working dots via covalent bonds, thus avoiding counterion effects that bias the system toward one binary information state or the other. We investigate the feasibility of using multiply charged anion (MCA) boron clusters, specifically closo-borate dianion, as building blocks. A first principle calculation shows that neutral, bistable, and switchable QCA molecules are possible. The self-doping mechanism is confirmed by molecular orbital analysis, which shows that MCA counterions can be stabilized by the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged counterions and positively charged working dots. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  7. CdTe quantum dots induce activation of human platelets: implications for nanoparticle hemocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel SP

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stephen P Samuel,1 Maria J Santos-Martinez,2–4 Carlos Medina,2,3 Namrata Jain,1 Marek W Radomski,2,3 Adriele Prina-Mello,1,5 Yuri Volkov1,5 1Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 3Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 4School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 5AMBER and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: New nanomaterials intended for systemic administration have raised concerns regarding their biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Quantum dots (QD nanoparticles have been used for diagnostics, and recent work suggests their use for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging. However, the hemocompatibility of QDs and their constituent components has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, comprehensive investigation of QD–platelet interactions is presented. These interactions were shown using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of QDs on platelet function were investigated using light aggregometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, flow cytometry, and gelatin zymography. Platelet morphology was also analyzed by phase-contrast, immunofluorescence, atomic-force and transmission electron microscopy. We show that the QDs bind to platelet plasma membrane with the resultant upregulation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin receptors, and release of matrix metalloproteinase-2. These findings unravel for the first time the mechanism of functional response of platelets to ultrasmall QDs in vitro. Keywords: platelets, quantum dots, aggregometry, flow cytometry, zymography, quartz crystal microbalance, transmission electron microscopy

  8. Selective Determination of Trinitrotoluene Based on Energy Transfer between Carbon Dots and Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoei, Yones Mosaei; Fattahi, Hassan; Hassanzadeh, Javad; Azar, Ali Mousavi

    2016-01-01

    A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system between carbon dots (C-dots) and amine-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed for the selective determination of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). C-dots have an intrinsic florescence emission depending on their exciting wavelength. In the presence of AuNPs, C-dots adsorb on the Au surfaces, and NPs treat as energy acceptor, which can receive light emitted by C-dots, leading to decrease the fluorescence intensity of C-dots. Furthermore, it is observed that nitroaromatic compounds, especially TNT, could restore this fluorescence due to selective interaction with AuNPs via amine groups, and so releasing the C-dots. Based on this effect, a sensitive and selective fluorescence turn-on probe was designed for the determination of TNT. Some important factors including AuNPs and C-dot concentrations and media pH, which would affect the efficiency of the probe, were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, good linear relationships in the range of 7 - 250 nmol L(-1) TNT with the detection limit of 2.2 nmol L(-1) were obtained. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of TNT in the environmental water samples. Compared with previous reports, the developed method has relatively high sensitivity, short analysis time, low cost and ease of operation.

  9. A Novel Seven Input Majority Gate in Quantum-dot Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Navi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Quantum Cellular Automaton (QCA is a nanotechnology which is an attractive alternative for transistor based technologies in the near future. A new seven input majority gate in quantum dot cellular automata is proposed in this paper. The basic elements in QCA are majority and inverter gates, therefore using a majority gate with more inputs in QCA circuit will cause reduction in cell count, latency and complexity. Furthermore, by using the proposed seven input majority gate we can design four inputs AND gate and OR gate in only two clock phases. By applying these kinds of gates QCA circuits could be simplified and optimized. In order to prove the functionality of the proposed device, QCADesigner tool and some physical proofs are utilized.

  10. A Customizable Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Building Block for the Synthesis of Classical and Reversible Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA are nanoscale digital logic constructs that use electrons in arrays of quantum dots to carry out binary operations. In this paper, a basic building block for QCA will be proposed. The proposed basic building block can be customized to implement classical gates, such as XOR and XNOR gates, and reversible gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli gates, with less cell count and/or better latency than other proposed designs.

  11. A Customizable Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Building Block for the Synthesis of Classical and Reversible Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed; Younes, Ahmed; Hassan, Yasser F

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) are nanoscale digital logic constructs that use electrons in arrays of quantum dots to carry out binary operations. In this paper, a basic building block for QCA will be proposed. The proposed basic building block can be customized to implement classical gates, such as XOR and XNOR gates, and reversible gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli gates, with less cell count and/or better latency than other proposed designs.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles as markers for cellular MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2005-03-01

    Cellular MR imaging is a rapidly growing field that aims to visualize targeted cells in living organisms. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, that induce a hypointense contrast on the MR images, have now widely been used to mark cells in vitro and in vivo. Following intravenous injection, the particles are rapidly taken up by phagocytic cells of the reticuloendothelial system, and imaging of this "macrophage activity" has been translated into the clinic for tumor staging of the liver and lymph nodes. A new, still experimental application of magnetic particles as cellular markers is its use to monitor cell migration and cell trafficking following labeling and transfer to living organisms. Further exploitation of this technique will allow a better understanding of the dynamics of in vivo cell biology as well as translation into the clinic to monitor (stem) cell-based therapies.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles as markers for cellular MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulte, Jeff W.M. [Department of Radiology and Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 217 Traylor, 720 Rutland Ave, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: jwmbulte@mri.jhu.edu

    2005-03-15

    Cellular MR imaging is a rapidly growing field that aims to visualize targeted cells in living organisms. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, that induce a hypointense contrast on the MR images, have now widely been used to mark cells in vitro and in vivo. Following intravenous injection, the particles are rapidly taken up by phagocytic cells of the reticuloendothelial system, and imaging of this 'macrophage activity' has been translated into the clinic for tumor staging of the liver and lymph nodes. A new, still experimental application of magnetic particles as cellular markers is its use to monitor cell migration and cell trafficking following labeling and transfer to living organisms. Further exploitation of this technique will allow a better understanding of the dynamics of in vivo cell biology as well as translation into the clinic to monitor (stem) cell-based therapies.

  14. Design and Analysis of Adders using Nanotechnology Based Quantum dot Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The area and complexity are the major issues in circuit design. Here, we propose different types of adder designs based on Quantum dot Cellular Automata (QCA that reduces number of QCA cells and area compare to previous designs. The quantum dot cellular automata is a novel computing paradigm in nanotechnology that can implement digital circuits with faster speed, smaller size and low power consumption. By taking the advantages of QCA we are able to design interesting computational architectures. The QCA cell is a basic building block of nanotechnology that can be used to make gates, wires and memories. The basic logic circuits used in this technology are the inverter and the Majority Gate (MG, using this other logical circuits can be designed. Approach: In this paper, the adders such as half, full and serial bit were designed and analyzed. These structures were designed with minimum number of cells by using cell minimization techniques. The techniques are (1 using two cells inverter and (2 suitable arrangement of cells without overlapping of neighboring cells. The proposed method can be used to minimize area and complexity. Results: These circuits were designed by majority gate and implemented by QCA cells. Then, they simulated using QCA Designer. The simulated results were verified according to the truth table. Conclusion: The performance analyses of those circuits are compared according to complexity, area and number of clock cycles and are also compared with previous designs.

  15. Graphene encapsulated gold nanoparticle-quantum dot heterostructures and their electrochemical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Chopra, Nitin, E-mail: nchopra@eng.ua.edu [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Patterning of multilayer graphene shell encapsulated gold nanoparticles (GNPs). • Binding of quantum dots to GNPs resulted in GNP-QD heterostructures. • The heterostructures were characterized for their electrochemical properties. - Abstract: A simple technique for patterning multilayer graphene shell encapsulated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the silicon substrate and their further surface decoration with semiconducting quantum dots (QDs) is reported. This leads to the fabrication of a novel silicon electrode decorated with GNP-QD hybrids or heterostructures. The morphology, structure, and composition of the GNPs and GNP-QD heterostructures were evaluated using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The heterostructures decorated silicon electrode was also evaluated for the electronic and electrochemical properties. The results showed that the electrical characteristics of the silicon substrate were significantly improved by decorating with GNPs and quantum dots. Furthermore, GNP-QD heterostructure electrode was observed to show significantly increased electrochemical charge transfer activity.

  16. Active cellular sensing with quantum dots: Transitioning from research tool to reality; a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delehanty, James B., E-mail: james.delehanty@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Susumu, Kimihiro, E-mail: susumu@ccs.nrl.navy.mil [Optical Sciences Division, Code 5611, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Manthe, Rachel L., E-mail: rmanthe@umd.edu [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Fischell Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Algar, W. Russ, E-mail: russ.algar.ctr.ca@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Medintz, Igor L., E-mail: igor.medintz@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-10-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum dots (QDs) have evolved beyond mere cellular labeling reagents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant advances have been made in QD materials, surface coatings and bioconjugation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular targeting/delivery has been achieved using polymers, peptides, proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous QD-based sensing applications: extracellular, membrane, intracellular. - Abstract: The application of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) within a wide range of biological imaging and sensing formats is now approaching its 15th year. The unique photophysical properties of these nanomaterials have long been envisioned as having the potential to revolutionize biosensing within cellular studies that rely on fluorescence. However, it is only now that these materials are making the transition towards accomplishing this goal. With the idea of understanding how to actively incorporate QDs into different types of cellular biosensing, we review the progress in many of the areas relevant to achieving this goal. This includes the synthesis of the QDs themselves, with an emphasis on minimizing potential toxicity, along with the general methods for making these nanocrystalline structures stable in aqueous media. We next survey some methods for conjugating QDs to biomolecules to allow them to participate in active biosensing. Lastly, we extensively review many of the applications where QDs have been demonstrated in an active role in cellular biosensing. These formats cover a wide range of possibilities including where the QDs have contributed to: monitoring the cell's interaction with its extracellular environment; elucidating the complex molecular interplay that characterizes the plasma membrane; understanding how cells continuously endocytose and exocytose materials across the cellular membrane; visualizing organelle trafficking; and, perhaps most importantly, monitoring the intracellular

  17. Luminescent behavior of CdTe quantum dots: Neodymium(III) complex-capped nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Margarida S. [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Algarra, Manuel, E-mail: magonzal@fc.up.pt [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Jimenez-Jimenez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n 29071, Malaga (Spain); Campos, Bruno B.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-02-15

    A water soluble complex of neodymium(III) with CdTe quantum dots nanoparticles was synthesized. The obtained homogeneous solutions were characterized by fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. The effect of the refluxing time of the reaction on the fluorescence intensity and emission wavelength has been studied. It was found that the emission wavelength of the solutions of neodymium(III) complex capped CdTe QDs nanoparticles shifted from about 540 to 735 nm. For an emission wavelength of 668 nm, the most reproducible nanoparticles obtained, the pH effect over the fluorescence emission and its intensity were studied. The purified and lyophilized solid obtained was morphologically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantitative composition was determined by fluorescence X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) and the X-ray photoelectron analysis (XPS) confirmed the presence of neodymium(III) at the surface of the CdTe nanoparticles forming a complex with the carboxylate groups from 3-mercaptopropanoic acid of the CdTe QDs. Due to the optical behavior of this complex, it could be of potential interest as a light source in optical devices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdTe quantum dots nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neodymium(III) complexed quantum dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong red fluorescent emission nanomaterial soluble in water.

  18. Fabrication of nanoscale heterostructures comprised of graphene-encapsulated gold nanoparticles and semiconducting quantum dots for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Chopra, Nitin

    2015-05-21

    Patterned growth of multilayer graphene shell encapsulated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and their covalent linking with inorganic quantum dots are demonstrated. GNPs were grown using a xylene chemical vapor deposition process, where the surface oxidized gold nanoparticles catalyze the multilayer graphene shell growth in a single step process. The graphene shell encapsulating gold nanoparticles could be further functionalized with carboxylic groups, which were covalently linked to amine-terminated quantum dots resulting in GNP-quantum dot heterostructures. The compositions, morphologies, crystallinity, and surface functionalization of GNPs and their heterostructures with quantum dots were evaluated using microscopic, spectroscopic, and analytical methods. Furthermore, optical properties of the derived architectures were studied using both experimental methods and simulations. Finally, GNP-quantum dot heterostructures were studied for photocatalytic degradation of phenol.

  19. Meta-analysis of cellular toxicity for cadmium-containing quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eunkeu; Liu, Rong; Nel, Andre; Gemill, Kelly Boeneman; Bilal, Muhammad; Cohen, Yoram; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the relationships between the physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials and their toxicity is critical for environmental and health risk analysis. However, this task is confounded by material diversity, heterogeneity of published data and limited sampling within individual studies. Here, we present an approach for analysing and extracting pertinent knowledge from published studies focusing on the cellular toxicity of cadmium-containing semiconductor quantum dots. From 307 publications, we obtain 1,741 cell viability-related data samples, each with 24 qualitative and quantitative attributes describing the material properties and experimental conditions. Using random forest regression models to analyse the data, we show that toxicity is closely correlated with quantum dot surface properties (including shell, ligand and surface modifications), diameter, assay type and exposure time. Our approach of integrating quantitative and categorical data provides a roadmap for interrogating the wide-ranging toxicity data in the literature and suggests that meta-analysis can help develop methods for predicting the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials.

  20. Quasi-classical modeling of molecular quantum-dot cellular automata multidriver gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ehsan; Nejad, Shahram Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (mQCA) has received considerable attention in nanoscience. Unlike the current-based molecular switches, where the digital data is represented by the on/off states of the switches, in mQCA devices, binary information is encoded in charge configuration within molecular redox centers. The mQCA paradigm allows high device density and ultra-low power consumption. Digital mQCA gates are the building blocks of circuits in this paradigm. Design and analysis of these gates require quantum chemical calculations, which are demanding in computer time and memory. Therefore, developing simple models to probe mQCA gates is of paramount importance. We derive a semi-classical model to study the steady-state output polarization of mQCA multidriver gates, directly from the two-state approximation in electron transfer theory. The accuracy and validity of this model are analyzed using full quantum chemistry calculations. A complete set of logic gates, including inverters and minority voters, are implemented to provide an appropriate test bench in the two-dot mQCA regime. We also briefly discuss how the QCADesigner tool could find its application in simulation of mQCA devices.

  1. Novel Design for Quantum Dots Cellular Automata to Obtain Fault-Tolerant Majority Gate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Farazkish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA is one of the most attractive technologies for computing at nanoscale. The principle element in QCA is majority gate. In this paper, fault-tolerance properties of the majority gate is analyzed. This component is suitable for designing fault-tolerant QCA circuits. We analyze fault-tolerance properties of three-input majority gate in terms of misalignment, missing, and dislocation cells. In order to verify the functionality of the proposed component some physical proofs using kink energy (the difference in electrostatic energy between the two polarization states and computer simulations using QCA Designer tool are provided. Our results clearly demonstrate that the redundant version of the majority gate is more robust than the standard style for this gate.

  2. A testable parity conservative gate in quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkaj, Ehsan Taher; Heikalabad, Saeed Rasouli

    2017-01-01

    There are important challenges in current VLSI technology such as feature size. New technologies are emerging to overcome these challenges. One of these technologies is quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) but it also has some disadvantages. One of the very important challenges in QCA is the occurrence of faults due to its very small area. There are different ways to overcome this challenge, one of which is the testable logic gate. There are two types of testable gate; reversible gate, and conservative gate. We propose a new testable parity conservative gate in this paper. This gate is simulated with QCADesigner and compared with previous structures. Power dissipation of proposed gate investigated using QCAPro simulator as an accurate power estimator tool.

  3. Design of efficient full adder in quantum-dot cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Bibhash; Rajoria, Ayush; Sikdar, Biplab K

    2013-01-01

    Further downscaling of CMOS technology becomes challenging as it faces limitation of feature size reduction. Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA), a potential alternative to CMOS, promises efficient digital design at nanoscale. Investigations on the reduction of QCA primitives (majority gates and inverters) for various adders are limited, and very few designs exist for reference. As a result, design of adders under QCA framework is gaining its importance in recent research. This work targets developing multi-layered full adder architecture in QCA framework based on five-input majority gate proposed here. A minimum clock zone (2 clock) with high compaction (0.01 μ m(2)) for a full adder around QCA is achieved. Further, the usefulness of such design is established with the synthesis of high-level logic. Experimental results illustrate the significant improvements in design level in terms of circuit area, cell count, and clock compared to that of conventional design approaches.

  4. Design of Efficient Full Adder in Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhash Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Further downscaling of CMOS technology becomes challenging as it faces limitation of feature size reduction. Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA, a potential alternative to CMOS, promises efficient digital design at nanoscale. Investigations on the reduction of QCA primitives (majority gates and inverters for various adders are limited, and very few designs exist for reference. As a result, design of adders under QCA framework is gaining its importance in recent research. This work targets developing multi-layered full adder architecture in QCA framework based on five-input majority gate proposed here. A minimum clock zone (2 clock with high compaction (0.01 μm2 for a full adder around QCA is achieved. Further, the usefulness of such design is established with the synthesis of high-level logic. Experimental results illustrate the significant improvements in design level in terms of circuit area, cell count, and clock compared to that of conventional design approaches.

  5. High-performance full adder architecture in quantum-dot cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Rashidi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is a new and promising computation paradigm, which can be a viable replacement for the complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor technology at nano-scale level. This technology provides a possible solution for improving the computation in various computational applications. Two QCA full adder architectures are presented and evaluated: a new and efficient 1-bit QCA full adder architecture and a 4-bit QCA ripple carry adder (RCA architecture. The proposed architectures are simulated using QCADesigner tool version 2.0.1. These architectures are implemented with the coplanar crossover approach. The simulation results show that the proposed 1-bit QCA full adder and 4-bit QCA RCA architectures utilise 33 and 175 QCA cells, respectively. Our simulation results show that the proposed architectures outperform most results so far in the literature.

  6. Defect-tolerance analysis of fundamental quantum-dot cellular automata devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is a burgeoning technology at the nano-scale range, with the potential for lower power consumption, smaller size and faster speed than conventional complementary metal–oxide semiconductor-based technology. Because of its ultra-density integration and its inherent physical properties, fault-tolerance is an important property to consider in the research and manufacture of QCA. In this paper, one type of defect, in which displacement and misalignment occur coinstantaneously, is investigated in detail on rudimentary QCA devices (majority voter (MV, inverter, wire with QCADesigner. Another MV with rotated cells is also proposed, and it is more robust than the original one. Simulation results present the defect-tolerance of these devices, that is, the maximum precise region the defective cell can be moved moreover, with correct logical function. These conclusions have a meaningful guiding significance for QCA physical implementation and fault-tolerance research.

  7. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Stimulates Extra-Cellular Matrix Production in Cellular Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Casco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologies have been integrated into drug delivery, and non-invasive imaging applications, into nanostructured scaffolds for the manipulation of cells. The objective of this work was to determine how the physico-chemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and their spatial distribution into cellular spheroids stimulated cells to produce an extracellular matrix (ECM. The MNP concentration (0.03 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL and 0.3 mg/mL, type (magnetoferritin, shape (nanorod—85 nm × 425 nm and incorporation method were studied to determine each of their effects on the specific stimulation of four ECM proteins (collagen I, collagen IV, elastin and fibronectin in primary rat aortic smooth muscle cell. Results demonstrated that as MNP concentration increased there was up to a 6.32-fold increase in collagen production over no MNP samples. Semi-quantitative Immunohistochemistry (IHC results demonstrated that MNP type had the greatest influence on elastin production with a 56.28% positive area stain compared to controls and MNP shape favored elastin stimulation with a 50.19% positive area stain. Finally, there are no adverse effects of MNPs on cellular contractile ability. This study provides insight on the stimulation of ECM production in cells and tissues, which is important because it plays a critical role in regulating cellular functions.

  8. Tuneable nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrate for improved cellular adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Ariana M; Toth, Tyler D; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a novel technique using a reverse potential electrospinning mode for fabricating nanoparticle-embedded composites that can be tailored to represent various fiber diameters, surface morphologies, and functional groups necessary for improved cellular adhesion. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun in both traditional positive (PP) and reverse potential (RP) electrical fields. The fibers were incorporated with 300nm polystyrene (PS) fluorescent particles, which contained carboxyl, amine groups, and surfactants. In the unconventional RP, the charged colloidal particles and surfactants were shown to have an exaggerated effect on Taylor cone morphology and fiber diameter caused by the changes in charge density and surface tension of the bulk solution. The RP mode was shown to lead to a decrease in fiber diameter from 1200±100nm (diameter±SE) for the nanofibers made with PCL alone to 440±80nm with the incorporation of colloidal particles, compared to the PP mode ranging from 530±90nm to 350±50nm, respectively. The nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrates were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and evaluated for cellular viability and adhesion for up to 5 days. Adhesion to the nanofibrous substrates was improved by 180±10% with the addition of carboxylated particles and by 480±60% with the functionalization of an RGD ligand compared to the PCL nanofibers. The novel approach of electrospinning in the RP mode with the addition of colloids in order to alter charge density and surface tension could be utilized towards many applications, one being implantable biomaterials and tissue engineered scaffolds as demonstrated in this work.

  9. Instabilities in the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanoparticle heterodimer : self-oscillations and chaos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugroho, Bintoro S.; Iskandar, Alexander A.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    We theoretically investigate the nonlinear optical response of a heterodimer comprising a semiconductor quantum dot strongly coupled to a metal nanoparticle. The quantum dot is considered as a three-level ladder system with ground, one-exciton, and bi-exction states. As compared to the case of a

  10. Quantum-biological control of energy transfer in hybrid quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Hood, Brady; Patty, Kira

    2016-09-01

    We show theoretically that when a semiconductor quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle system interacts with a laser field, quantum coherence can introduce a new landscape for the dynamics of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET). We predict adsorption of biological molecules to such a hybrid system can trigger dramatic changes in the way energy is transferred, blocking FRET while the distance between the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle (R) and other structural specifications remain unchanged. We study the impact of variation of R on the FRET rate in the presence of quantum coherence and its ultrafast decay, offering a characteristically different dependency than the standard 1/R6. Application of the results for quantum nanosensors is discussed.

  11. Hybrid light emitting diodes based on solution processed polymers, colloidal quantum dots, and colloidal metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    This dissertation focuses on solution-processed light-emitting devices based on polymer, polymer/PbS quantum dot, and polymer/silver nanoparticle hybrid materials. Solution based materials and organic/inorganic hybrid light emitting diodes attracted significant interest recently due to many of their advantages over conventional light emitting diodes (LEDs) including low fabrication cost, flexible, high substrate compatibility, as well as tunable emission wavelength of the quantum dot materials. However, the application of these novel solution processed materials based devices is still limited due to their low performances. Material properties and fabrication parameters need to be carefully examined and understood for further device improvement. This thesis first investigates the impact of solvent property and evaporation rate on the polymer molecular chain morphology and packaging in device structures. Solvent is a key component to make the active material solution for spin coating fabrication process. Their impacts are observed and examined on both polymer blend system and mono-polymer device. Secondly, PbS colloidal quantum dot are introduced to form hybrid device with polymer and to migrate the device emission into near-IR range. As we show, the dithiol molecules used to cross-link quantum dots determine the optical and electrical property of the resulting thin films. By choosing a proper ligand for quantum dot ligand exchange, a high performance polymer/quantum dot hybrid LED is fabricated. In the end, the interaction of polymer exciton with surface plasmon mode in colloidal silver nanoparticles and the use of this effect to enhance solution processed LEDs' performances are investigated.

  12. The effect of spherical metallic nanoparticles on electromagnetically induced transparency in spherical quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharinejad, A.; Askari, H. R.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a GaAs spherical quantum dot (SQD) with central potential in presence of spherical metallic nanoparticle (SMNP). Solving the Schrödinger equation in effective mass, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of SQD are obtained. By using the obtained eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, the susceptibility of SQD is found. In addition, dependence of EIT on radius of SQD and SMNP, distance between SMNP and SQD and Rabi and probe frequencies are investigated.

  13. Quantum dot bioconjugates: uptake into cells and induction of changes in normal cellular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Tore-Geir; Frerker, Nadine; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2009-02-01

    Can quantum dots (QDs) act as relevant intracellular probes to investigate routing of ligands in live cells? To answer this question we studied intracellular trafficking of QDs that were coupled to the plant toxin ricin, Shiga toxin or the ligand transferrin (Tf) by confocal fluorescence microscopy in three different cell lines. The Tf:QDs were internalized but instead of being recycled they accumulated within endosomes in all cell lines. However, for the HEp-2 and SW480 cells a higher fraction colocalized with a lysosomal marker as compared with HeLa cells. The Shiga:QD bioconjugate was internalized slowly and with poor efficiency in the HEp-2 and SW480 cells as compared with HeLa cells, and was not routed to the Golgi apparatus in any of the cell lines. The internalized ricin:QD bioconjugates localized to the same endosomes as ricin itself, but could in contrast to ricin not be visualized in the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, we find that the endosomal accumulation of either ricin:QDs or transferrin:QDs affects endosome-to-Golgi transport of both ricin and Shiga toxin: Transport of ricin was reduced whereas transport of Shiga toxin was increased. In conclusion, the data from different cells reveal that in general these ligand-coupled QD nanoparticles are arrested within endosomes, and somehow perturb the normal endosomal sorting in cells.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles to recover cellular organelles and study the time resolved nanoparticle-cell interactome throughout uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Filippo; Davies, Gemma-Louise; Monopoli, Marco P; Moloney, Micheal; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2014-08-27

    Nanoparticles in contact with cells and living organisms generate quite novel interactions at the interface between the nanoparticle surface and the surrounding biological environment. However, a detailed time resolved molecular level description of the evolving interactions as nanoparticles are internalized and trafficked within the cellular environment is still missing and will certainly be required for the emerging arena of nanoparticle-cell interactions to mature. In this paper promising methodologies to map out the time resolved nanoparticle-cell interactome for nanoparticle uptake are discussed. Thus silica coated magnetite nanoparticles are presented to cells and their magnetic properties used to isolate, in a time resolved manner, the organelles containing the nanoparticles. Characterization of the recovered fractions shows that different cell compartments are isolated at different times, in agreement with imaging results on nanoparticle intracellular location. Subsequently the internalized nanoparticles can be further isolated from the recovered organelles, allowing the study of the most tightly nanoparticle-bound biomolecules, analogous to the 'hard corona' that so far has mostly been characterized in extracellular environments. Preliminary data on the recovered nanoparticles suggest that significant portion of the original corona (derived from the serum in which particles are presented to the cells) is preserved as nanoparticles are trafficked through the cells.

  15. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yan

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs. When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine.

  16. Nanopatterned graphene quantum dots as building blocks for quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. F.; Liu, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Quantum cellular automata (QCA) is an innovative approach that incorporates quantum entities in classical computation processes. Binary information is encoded in different charge states of the QCA cells and transmitted by the inter-cell Coulomb interaction. Despite the promise of QCA, however, it remains a challenge to identify suitable building blocks for the construction of QCA. Graphene has recently attracted considerable attention owing to its remarkable electronic properties. The planar structure makes it feasible to pattern the whole device architecture in one sheet, compatible with the existing electronics technology. Here, we demonstrate theoretically a new QCA architecture built upon nanopatterned graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Using the tight-binding model, we determine the phenomenological cell parameters and cell-cell response functions of the GQD-QCA to characterize its performance. Furthermore, a GQD-QCA architecture is designed to demonstrate the functionalities of a fundamental majority gate. Our results show great potential in manufacturing high-density ultrafast QCA devices from a single nanopatterned graphene sheet.

  17. Quantum Dots Sensitized Solar Cell: Effect of CdSe Nanoparticles Purification Procedure of QD Sensitized Photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, K. A.; Ishak, M. N.; Alias, N. N.

    2013-04-01

    In this research the effect of purification of CdSe nanoparticles for application in quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSC) photoanodes are studied. The CdSe nanoparticles are attached to the titanium dioxide surface using a linker based approached (CdSe nanoparticles disperse in toluene) and direct mode attachment (CdSe re-disperse in dichloromethane (DCM)). Colloidal CdSe nanoparticles with estimated size of 3.0 nm were synthesized by hot injection method in trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as stabilizing solvent. Prior to the sensitization, the CdSe nanoparticles were purified using a common purification step involving the alternate cycles of precipitation / redispersion in non-polar solvent and polar solvent. With increasing the number of purification, the concentrations of CdSe nanoparticles attached to the titanium dioxide were also increased; from 2.47 × 1015 dots/cc for 3 × wash CdSe nanoparticles to 3.70 × 1015 dots/cc for 4 × wash CdSe nanoparticles. Polysulfide electrolyte and Cu2S counterelectrodes were used to assemble a complete QDSSC. The highest efficiency of 0.05% was obtained from 4 × wash CdSe nanoparticles; Voc = 0.2V, Jsc = 0.34 mA/cm2 and FF = 0.07).

  18. Synthesis of SnS nanoparticles by SILAR method for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukigase, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Berger, Marie-Hélène; Sagawa, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Susumu

    2011-03-01

    SnS-sensitized TiO2 electrodes were applied in quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) which are environmentally more favorable than conventional Cd or Pb-chalcogenide-sensitized electrodes. SnS nanoparticles were well-distributed over the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. Deposited SnS nanoparticles had diameter about 3 nm. Under AM1.5 irradiation with 100 mW/cm2 light intensity (at 1 sun), the energy conversion efficiency of obtained cells reached a value of 0.21% (0.25 cm2) at SILAR coating cycles of 5. In addition, the photovoltaic performance was improved by additional ZnS coating on the surface of SnS-sensitized TiO2 electrodes.

  19. Structure direction of II-VI semiconductor quantum dot binary nanoparticle superlattices by tuning radius ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying; O'Brien, Stephen

    2008-06-01

    We report a nanoparticle radius ratio dependent study of the formation of binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) of CdTe and CdSe quantum dots. While keeping all other parameters identical in the system, the effective nanoparticle radius ratio, gamma(eff), was tuned to allow the formation of five different BNSL structures, AlB(2), cub-NaZn(13), ico-NaZn(13), CaCu(5), and MgZn(2). For each structure, gamma(eff) is located close to a local maximum of its space-filling factor, based on a model for space filling principles. We demonstrate the ability to select specific BNSLs based solely on gamma(eff), highlighting the role of entropic forces as a driver for self-assembly.

  20. The synthesis of rhodium/carbon dots nanoparticles and its hydrogenation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Tan, Jing; Sang, Haitao; Zhang, Liqun; Yue, Dongmei

    2017-02-01

    Rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles have been widely used as potent hydrogenation catalysts. Herein, a new convenient method has been developed to synthesize rhodium nanoparticles, in which carbon dots (CDs) were used both as stabilizing and reducing agents. The fluorescent CDs were prepared by microwave-assisted heating method using chitosan as raw material and the presences of hydroxyl and carbonyl on the surface of CDs were supported by FTIR spectra. Subsequently, CDs could directly reduce Rh3+ to Rh0 without additional reducing and stabilizing agents by heating Rh3+ with CDs for 1 h at 120 °C. The resulting Rh nanoparticles have an average size of about 2.8 nm and the Rh/CDs nanoparticles also retain the fluorescent property of CDs. The hydrogenation activities of Rh/CDs nanoparticles were investigated. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles had highly catalytic activity in the hydrogenation reaction of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and hydroxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (HTBN). Also, the presence of CDs could improve the fluorescent properties of rubbers after hydrogenation.

  1. Rubpy Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticles as Signal Reporter in a Dot Fluorescence Immunoassay Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nualrahong Thepwiwatjit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application of Rubpy dye-doped silica nanoparticles (RSNPs as signal reporter in a dot fluorescence immunoassay strip for rapid screening of Vibrio cholera O1 (VCO1. These nanoparticles have a spherical shape with an average diameter of 45 nm. They appear luminescent orange when excited with a 312 nm UV lamp. Based on the sandwich immunoassay principle, a test strip was made of a nitrocellulose membrane dotted with monoclonal antibodies against VCO1 as analyte capture molecules. After introducing a test sample, followed by polyclonal rabbit anti-VCO1 antibody conjugated RSNPs as detection reporters and one washing step, the presence or absence of the target bacteria could be identified under UV light by naked eyes. A positive sample would signal a bright orange dot on the strip. The proposed assay had a detection limit of 4.3×103 cfu/mL and was successfully applied as a rapid screening test for VCO1 in food samples with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy.

  2. Role of quantum dots nanoparticles in the chemical treatment of colored wastewater: Catalysts or additional pollutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hrvoje Kusic; Danuta Leszczynska; Natalija Koprivanac; Igor Peternel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the presence and the activity of quantum dots nanoparficles in colored wastewaters.The special interest is devoted to the investigation of their role in the typical treatment of water or wastewater,studying their influence on the effectiveness of applied treatments methods.The standard chemical processes for water treatment and disinfection (direct UV photolysis and direct ozonation) were applied for the degradation of colored organic pollutant,reactive azo dye,in the presence/absence of CdSe/ZnS core-shells quantum dots.The obtained results indicated that investigated nanoparticles inhibit the overall efficiency of applied processes,especially in the case of direct UV photolysis,although catalytic effect might be expected in part due to the semiconductor nature of quantum dots.Such results lead to a conclusion that CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles behave as additional pollutants in the system.They should be removed from the system prior the treatment,because their presence could decrease the efficiency,i.e.,prolong the time of treatment and correspondingly increase the costs of the treatment process.

  3. Electrochemiluminescent detection of Pb2+ by graphene/gold nanoparticles and CdSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Jiao; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2016-12-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent detection method for lead ions (Pb(II)) was fabricated based on the distance-dependent quenching of the electrochemiluminescence from CdSe quantum dots by nanocomposites of graphene and gold nanoparticles. Graphene/gold nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode through the constant potential method. Thiol-labeled DNA was then assembled on the surface of the electrode via gold-sulfur bonding, following which the amino-labeled terminal of the DNA was linked to carboxylated CdSe quantum dots by the formation of amide bonds. The 27-base aptamer was designed with two different domains: the immobilization and detection sequences. The immobilization sequence was paired with 12 complementary bases and immobilized on the gold electrode; the single-stranded detection sequence, rich in G bases, formed a G-quadruplex (G4) structure in the presence of Pb2+. The formation of G4 shortens the distance between the CdSe quantum dots and the Au electrode, which decreases the electrochemiluminescent intensity in a linear fashion, proportional to the concentration of Pb(II). The linear range of the sensor was 10-10 to 10-8 mol/L (R = 0.9819) with a detection limit of 10-10 mol/L. This sensor detected Pb(II) in real water samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Additive interaction of carbon dots extracted from soluble coffee and biogenic silver nanoparticles against bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Patricia F.; Nakazato, Gerson; Durán, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    It is known the presence of carbon dots (CDs) in carbohydrate based foods. CDs extracted from coffee grounds and instant coffee was also published. CDs from soluble coffee revealed an average size of 4.4 nm. CDs were well-dispersed in water, fluorescent and we have characterized by XPS, XRD analysis, fluorescence and by FTIR spectra. The MIC value by serial micro-dilution assays for CDs on S. aureus ATCC 25923 was 250 μg/mL and E. coli ATCC 25922 >1000 ug/mL. For silver nanoparticles biogenically synthesized was 6.7 μg/mL. Following the checkerboard assay with combining ½ MIC values of the MICs of 125 μg/mL of carbon dots and 3.4 μg/mL of silver nanoparticles, following the fractionated inhibitory concentration (FIC) index methodology, on S. aureus gave a fractionated inhibitory concentration (FIC) value of 1.0, meaning additive interaction. In general, the unfunctionalized CDs showed to be inefficient as antibacterial compounds, however the CDs extracted from Coffee powder and together silver nanoparticles appeared interesting as antibacterial association.

  5. An enhanced high-speed multi-digit BCD adder using quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajitha, D.; Ramanaiah, K. V.; Sumalatha, V.

    2017-02-01

    The advent of development of high-performance, low-power digital circuits is achieved by a suitable emerging nanodevice called quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA). Even though many efficient arithmetic circuits were designed using QCA, there is still a challenge to implement high-speed circuits in an optimized manner. Among these circuits, one of the essential structures is a parallel multi-digit decimal adder unit with significant speed which is very attractive for future environments. To achieve high speed, a new correction logic formulation method is proposed for single and multi-digit BCD adder. The proposed enhanced single-digit BCD adder (ESDBA) is 26% faster than the carry flow adder (CFA)-based BCD adder. The multi-digit operations are also performed using the proposed ESDBA, which is cascaded innovatively. The enhanced multi-digit BCD adder (EMDBA) performs two 4-digit and two 8-digit BCD addition 50% faster than the CFA-based BCD adder with the nominal overhead of the area. The EMDBA performs two 4-digit BCD addition 24% faster with 23% decrease in the area, similarly for 8-digit operation the EMDBA achieves 36% increase in speed with 21% less area compared to the existing carry look ahead (CLA)-based BCD adder design. The proposed multi-digit adder produces significantly less delay of (N –1) + 3.5 clock cycles compared to the N* One digit BCD adder delay required by the conventional BCD adder method. It is observed that as per our knowledge this is the first innovative proposal for multi-digit BCD addition using QCA.

  6. Towards magnetic-enhanced cellular uptake, MRI and chemotherapeutics delivery by magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-10-01

    A type of nanoparticle with three functional modalities was prepared with the aim of providing a multifunctional drug delivery system. The nanoparticle was 50 nm in size, with 2.7 nm mesopores and a magnetic nanocrystal core, which was further doped with FITC to enable the tracking of cellular uptake. We demonstrated that the internalization of the nanoparticles in tumor cells could be enhanced by applying an external magnetic field and furthermore, this kind of nanoparticle could be used in magnetic targeted drug delivery. With high transverse relaxivity, the magnetic nanoparticles shortened proton relaxation time and induced high magnetic resonance imaging contrast in tumor cells. Studies on anticancer drug loading and delivery capacity of anticancer drugs also showed that this type of nanoparticles could load water-soluble doxorubicin, and produce a prominent inhibitive effect against tumor cells. Taken together, the presented nanoparticles could become a promising agent in cancer theranostics.

  7. Fluorescence Modified Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for High-Efficient Cellular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Labeling of cells with nanoparticles for living detection is of interest to various biomedical applications. In this study, novel fluorescent/magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and used in high-efficient cellular imaging. The nanoparticles coated with the modified chitosan possessed a magnetic oxide core and a covalently attached fluorescent dye. We evaluated the feasibility and efficiency in labeling cancer cells (SMMC-7721 with the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles exhibited a high affinity to cells, which was demonstrated by flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that cell-labeling efficiency of the nanoparticles was dependent on the incubation time and nanoparticles’ concentration. The minimum detected number of labeled cells was around 104by using a clinical 1.5-T MRI imager. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy instruments were used to monitor the localization patterns of the magnetic nanoparticles in cells. These new magneto-fluorescent nanoagents have demonstrated the potential for future medical use.

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2011-01-04

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO(2), TiO(2), and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO(2)) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO(2)). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency.

  9. Spontaneous emission spectra and quantum light-matter interactions from a strongly coupled quantum dot metal-nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum optical properties of a quantum-dot dipole emitter coupled to a finite-size metal nanoparticle using a photon Green-function technique that rigorously quantizes the electromagnetic fields. We first obtain pronounced Purcell factors and photonic Lamb shifts for both a 7......- and 20-nm-radius metal nanoparticle, without adopting a dipole approximation. We then consider a quantum-dot photon emitter positioned sufficiently near the metal nanoparticle so that the strong-coupling regime is possible. Accounting for nondipole interactions, quenching, and photon transport from...... the dot to the detector, we demonstrate that the strong-coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature. The vacuum-induced emission spectra show that the usual vacuum Rabi doublet becomes a rich spectral triplet or quartet with two of the four...

  10. Quantifying spectral changes experienced by plasmonic nanoparticles in a cellular environment to inform biomedical nanoparticle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen L.; Hu, Ying S.; Jackson, Meredith A.; Lin, Adam Y.; Young, Joseph K.; Langsner, Robert J.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2014-08-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) scatter and absorb light in precise, designable ways, making them agile candidates for a variety of biomedical applications. When NPs are introduced to a physiological environment and interact with cells, their physicochemical properties can change as proteins adsorb on their surface and they agglomerate within intracellular endosomal vesicles. Since the plasmonic properties of metal NPs are dependent on their geometry and local environment, these physicochemical changes may alter the NPs' plasmonic properties, on which applications such as plasmonic photothermal therapy and photonic gene circuits are based. Here we systematically study and quantify how metal NPs' optical spectra change upon introduction to a cellular environment in which NPs agglomerate within endosomal vesicles. Using darkfield hyperspectral imaging, we measure changes in the peak wavelength, broadening, and distribution of 100-nm spherical gold NPs' optical spectra following introduction to human breast adenocarcinoma Sk-Br-3 cells as a function of NP exposure dose and time. On a cellular level, spectra shift up to 78.6 ± 23.5 nm after 24 h of NP exposure. Importantly, spectra broaden with time, achieving a spectral width of 105.9 ± 11.7 nm at 95% of the spectrum's maximum intensity after 24 h. On an individual intracellular NP cluster (NPC) level, spectra also show significant shifting, broadening, and heterogeneity after 24 h. Cellular transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electromagnetic simulations of NPCs support the trends in spectral changes we measured. These quantitative data can help guide the design of metal NPs introduced to cellular environments in plasmonic NP-mediated biomedical technologies.

  11. Effects of nanoparticle size on cellular uptake and liver MRI with polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Bu, Lihong; Xie, Jin; Chen, Kai; Cheng, Zhen; Li, Xingguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-12-28

    The effect of nanoparticle size (30-120 nm) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hepatic lesions in vivo has been systematically examined using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-IOs). Such biocompatible PVP-IOs with different sizes were synthesized by a simple one-pot pyrolysis method. These PVP-IOs exhibited good crystallinity and high T(2) relaxivities, and the relaxivity increased with the size of the magnetic nanoparticles. It was found that cellular uptake changed with both size and surface physiochemical properties, and that PVP-IO-37 with a core size of 37 nm and hydrodynamic particle size of 100 nm exhibited higher cellular uptake rate and greater distribution than other PVP-IOs and Feridex. We systematically investigated the effect of nanoparticle size on MRI of normal liver and hepatic lesions in vivo. The physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles influenced their pharmacokinetic behavior, which ultimately determined their ability to accumulate in the liver. The contrast enhancement of PVP-IOs within the liver was highly dependent on the overall size of the nanoparticles, and the 100 nm PVP-IO-37 nanoparticles exhibited the greatest enhancement. These results will have implications in designing engineered nanoparticles that are optimized as MR contrast agents or for use in therapeutics.

  12. The influence of sodium nanoparticles formation on luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses containing molecular clusters and quantum dots of lead selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of sodium nanoparticles and secondary heat treatment conditions on the spectralluminescent characteristics of fluorophosphate glasses with PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots is studied. Experiments with glasses containing no sodium nanoparticles show that their thermal treatment leads to the formation of molecular clusters with subsequent formation of quantum dots having an intense luminescence. The results of numerical simulation for glasses with sodium nanoparticles shows that heat treatment leads to formation of a sodium fluoride shell on the nanoparticles surface. It is shown that quenching of the luminescence of PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots takes place in these glasses.

  13. Facile Synthesis of Biocompatible Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging and Targeted Detection of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu; Wang, Chun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong

    2015-11-18

    In this work, we report the facile synthesis of functional core-shell structured nanoparticles with fluorescence enhancement, which show specific targeting of cancer cells. Biopolymer poly-l-lysine was used to coat the silver core with various shell thicknesses. Then, the nanoparticles were functionalized with folic acid as a targeting agent for folic acid receptor. The metal-enhanced fluorescence effect was observed when the fluorophore (5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl ester) was conjugated to the modified nanoparticle surface. Cellular imaging assay of the nanoparticles in folic acid receptor-positive cancer cells showed their excellent biocompatibility and selectivity. The as-prepared functional nanoparticles demonstrate the efficiency of the metal-enhanced fluorescence effect and provide an alternative approach for the cellular imaging and targeting of cancer cells.

  14. Ground state of excitons in quantum-dot quantum-well nanoparticles:stochastic variational method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Heng; Shi Jun-Jie

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of effective mass approximation, the ground state of excitons confined in spherical core-shell quantum-dot quantum-well (QDQW) nanoparticles is solved by using the stochastic variational method, in which the finite band offset and the heavy (light) hole exciton states are considered. The calculated lse-lsh transition energies for the chosen CdS/HgS/CdS QDQW samples are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Moreover,some previous theoretical results are improved.

  15. Surface plasmon-assisted optical bistability in the quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chengjun; Qi, Yihong; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigated optical bistability (OB) of a coupled excition-plasmon hybrid system in a unidirectional ring cavity. It is found that the threshold and the region of OB can be tuned by adjusting the center-center distance between the quantum dot and metal nanoparticle (MNP), the Rabi frequency of the control field and the radius of the MNP. Due to the significantly enhanced optical nonlinearity by the surface plasmon effect, the threshold of OB can be decreased greatly when the probe field is parallel to the major axis of the hybrid system. The enhanced OB may have promising applications in optical switching and optical storage.

  16. Population Dynamics and the Optical Absorption in Hybrid Metal Nanoparticle - Semiconductor Quantum dot Nanosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; So, Guang Hyok; Kim, Il-Guang

    2015-01-01

    We studied theoretically the population dynamics and the absorption spectrum of hybrid nanosystem consisted of a matal nanoparticle (MNP) and a semiconductor quantum dot(SQD). We investigated the exciton-plasmon coupling effects on the population dynamics and the absorption properties of the nanostructure. Our results show that the nonlinear optical response of the hybrid nanosystem can be greatly enhanced or depressed due to the exciton-plasmon couplings. The results obtained here may have the potential applications of nanoscale optical devices such as optical switches and quantum devices such as a single photon transistor.

  17. Selective targeting of cellular nucleus using positively-charged quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghan; Choi, Youngseon; Cho, Yoojin; Song, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Developing highly selective probes for subcellular regions such as nucleus and cytoplamic organelles is of great interest for cellular imaging and high content screening analysis for biology and medicine. Cytoplasmic delivery of QDs has been well-understood, while nuclear delivery of QDs has been a challenge due to the unique structural characteristics of cell nucleus. In this study, we systematically investigated nucleus penetrating properties of small-sized ligand-exchanged QDs with either positive or negative surface charges in the similar size range of hydrodynamic diameter (7-10 nm). We found that the positively-charged QDs efficiently stain the nucleus in fixed HeLa cells as well as label nucleolar compartments in live HeLa cells. In contrast, the negatively charged QDs with the similar size range stain only the cytoplam in either fixed or live cells. The charge-dependent labeling pattern allowed us to simultaneously perform multiplex imaging of nuclues and cytoplasm. This study offers an insight into efficient nuclear delivery of nanoparticles such as QDs of which surface charge and size are critical for intracelllar localization and delivery.

  18. A miniemulsion polymerization technique for encapsulation of silicon quantum dots in polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Noor Aniza; Horrocks, Benjamin R.; Fulton, David A.

    2011-11-01

    Miniemulsion polymerization techniques were used to encapsulate luminescent alkylated silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) within polymer nanoparticles composed of styrene and 4-vinylbenzaldehyde monomers. The polymer nanoparticles had mean diameters in the range 90-150 nm depending on the reaction conditions, however all samples showed narrow particle size distributions, as determined by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. The Si-QDs were found to have a small, but beneficial effect on the polymerization process by reducing the polydispersity of the final polymer particles, which we attribute to co-surfactant action of the undecene used to form the alkyl capping layer on the Si-QDs. Confocal microspectroscopy was used to confirm that the luminescent alkylated Si-QDs were encapsulated within the polymer nanoparticles and also provided luminescence and Raman spectra which show peaks corresponding to both alkylated Si-QDs and the polymer nanoparticles. Treatment of the polymer nanoparticles with dilute aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, which is known to corrode Si and extinguish the luminescence of alkylated Si-QDs, results in only a partial reduction in luminescence suggesting that the majority of the alkylated Si-QDs are encapsulated sufficiently deep within the polymer matrix to protect them from alkaline attack. Miniemulsion polymerization of the monomers styrene and 4-vinylbenzaldehyde affords polymer nanoparticles displaying reactive aldehyde groups upon their surfaces, which could then be decorated with a selection of molecules through imine, oxime or hydrazone condensation reactions. We speculate that polymer-SiQD composite nanoparticles whose surfaces can be further decorated will increase the utility of luminescent Si-QDs in applications such as anti-counterfeiting and as probes of biological processes.

  19. Prospect of detection and recognition of single biological molecules using ultrafast coherent dynamics in quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Conventional plasmonic sensors are based on the intrinsic resonances of metallic nanoparticles. In such sensors wavelength shift of such resonances are used to detect biological molecules. Recently we introduced ultra-sensitive timedomain nanosensors based on the way variations in the environmental conditions influence coherent dynamics of hybrid systems consisting of metallic nanoparticles and quantum dots. Such dynamics are generated via interaction of these systems with a laser field, generating quantum coherence and coherent exciton-plasmon coupling. These sensors are based on impact of variations of the refractive index of the environment on such dynamics, generating time-dependent changes in the emission of the QDs. In this paper we study the impact of material properties of the metallic nanoparticles on this process and demonstrate the key role played by the design of the quantum dots. We show that Ag nanoparticles, even in a simple spherical shape, may allow these sensors to operate at room temperature, owing to the special properties of quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems that may allow coherent effects utilized in such sensors happen in the presence of the ultrafast polarization dephasing of quantum dots.

  20. Stable fluorescence conjugation of ZnO nanoparticles and their size dependent cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Min-Kyu; Paek, Hee-Jeong; Choi, Soo-Jin; Oh, Jae-Min

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated size dependent cellular uptake of ZnO nanoparticles utilizing stably introduced Cy5.5, which emits long-wavelength fluorescence. Through (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane modification, ZnO nanoparticles of different sizes (20 and 70nm) were functionalized with amine moiety, which was further reacted with Cy5.5-N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester to make covalently conjugated Cy5.5 dye on ZnO nanoparticles. Field emission-scanning electron microscopic images revealed that average particle size as well as particle morphology of ZnO nanoparticles were not altered by Cy5.5 conjugation. Zeta potential measurement confirmed that the positive surface charge of ZnO nanoparticles was well preserved after successive conjugation reactions. Based on infrared, ultraviolet-visible light and photoluminescence spectroscopies, we verify that the Cy5.5 was stably introduced to ZnO nanoparticles without serious aggregation. Surface conjugated Cy5.5 showed high stability in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline and cell culture medium, showing less than 2% of release during 85h. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis demonstrated that smaller ZnO nanoparticles were more taken up in greater quantities by HaCaT cells. Moreover, systematic study on cellular uptake pathway showed that smaller ZnO nanoparticles were internalized into cells mainly by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while larger ZnO nanoparticles entered cells via several pathways.

  1. Plasmon-enhanced second harmonic generation in semiconductor quantum dots close to metal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Bragas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the enhancement of the optical second harmonic signal in non-centrosymmetric semiconductor CdS quantum dots, when they are placed in close contact with isolated silver nanoparticles. The intensity enhancement is about 1000. We also show that the enhancement increases when the incoming laser frequency $omega$ is tuned toward the spectral position of the silver plasmon at $2omega$, proving that the silver nanoparticle modifies the nonlinear emission.Received: 8 March 2011, Accepted: 30 May 2011; Edited by: L. Viña; Reviewed by: R. Gordon, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; DOI: 10.4279/PIP.030002Cite as: P. M. Jais, C. von Bilderling, A. V. Bragas, Papers in Physics 3, 030002 (2011

  2. Fluorescent CdS Quantum Dots: Synthesis, Characterization, Mechanism and Interaction with Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Yu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-05-01

    CdS quantum dot (QD) is a typical kind of II-IV nanoparticles, which plays an important role in the common type of core-shell QDs. It is of great practical significance to synthesize the water-soluble CdS QDs used in multicolor biomarkers and prepare core-shell QDs. In our case, we came up with a novel green method to manufacture CdS QDs with high quality, different size, and adopted UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, FTIR, XPS, HRTEM, SAED and STEM-EDX to discuss their growth mechanism. We successfully constructed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system between CdS QDs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), then comprehensively and systematically studied the interaction between them.

  3. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...... with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  4. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...... with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  5. A functional immobilization of semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) on nanoporous aluminium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobler, Christian; Keusgen, Michael [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Bakowsky, Udo [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (so-called 'quantum dots', QDs) are investigated for about 20 years because of their unique fluorescent and semiconductive properties. QDs were mainly used for analytical systems outside and inside a living organism. However, for most of these analytical systems, surface of QDs has to be modified. Immobilization techniques for semiconductor nanoparticles are showing wide interests within solar-cell technologies and biosensor development. A functional inorganic/organic hybrid nanosystem could be realized by combination of an inorganic synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles with commonly used amino acid chemistry on the surface of extremely hydrophilic aluminium oxide filter membranes. 3-Aminopropyle-triethoxysilane (APTES), allyloxy-trimethylsilane and Fmoc-(S-t-Bu)-cystine were used for surface modification. After cleavage of protective groups Fmoc and t-Bu, semiconductor nanoparticles were immobilized by self-assembly on filter surface. The immobilization can be explained according to commonly used ligand-exchange reactions. This technique results in strongly fluorescent surfaces presenting an additional amino-group for further functionalization. The obtained membranes are suitable for various diagnostic applications like multi-parameter immunoassays and array applications at nanoscale. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Graphene Quantum Dots-Capped Magnetic Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as a Multifunctional Platform for Controlled Drug Delivery, Magnetic Hyperthermia, and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xianxian; Niu, Xingxing; Ma, Kexin; Huang, Ping; Grothe, Julia; Kaskel, Stefan; Zhu, Yufang

    2017-01-01

    A multifunctional platform is reported for synergistic therapy with controlled drug release, magnetic hyperthermia, and photothermal therapy, which is composed of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as caps and local photothermal generators and magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSN) as drug carriers and magnetic thermoseeds. The structure, drug release behavior, magnetic hyperthermia capacity, photothermal effect, and synergistic therapeutic efficiency of the MMSN/GQDs nanoparticles are investigated. The results show that monodisperse MMSN/GQDs nanoparticles with the particle size of 100 nm can load doxorubicin (DOX) and trigger DOX release by low pH environment. Furthermore, the MMSN/GQDs nanoparticles can efficiently generate heat to the hyperthermia temperature under an alternating magnetic field or by near infrared irradiation. More importantly, breast cancer 4T1 cells as a model cellular system, the results indicate that compared with chemotherapy, magnetic hyperthermia or photothermal therapy alone, the combined chemo-magnetic hyperthermia therapy or chemo-photothermal therapy with the DOX-loaded MMSN/GQDs nanosystem exhibits a significant synergistic effect, resulting in a higher efficacy to kill cancer cells. Therefore, the MMSN/GQDs multifunctional platform has great potential in cancer therapy for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency.

  7. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid complex as a carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Geng

    Full Text Available A quantum dot (QD-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS/poly(γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics.

  8. Application of quantum dot nanoparticles for potential non-invasive bio-imaging of mammalian spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feugang Jean M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various obstacles are encountered by mammalian spermatozoa during their journey through the female genital tract, and only few or none will reach the site of fertilization. Currently, there are limited technical approaches for non-invasive investigation of spermatozoa migration after insemination. As the knowledge surrounding sperm behavior throughout the female genital tract still remains elusive, the recent development of self-illuminating quantum dot nanoparticles may present a potential means for real-time in vitro and in vivo monitoring of spermatozoa. Results Here, we show the ability of boar spermatozoa to harmlessly interact and incorporate bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dot (BRET-QD nanoparticles. The confocal microscope revealed in situ fluorescence of BRET-QD in the entire spermatozoon, while the ultra-structural analysis using the transmission electron microscope indicated BRET-QD localization on the sperm plasma membrane and intracellular compartment. In controlled-in vitro assays, bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that spermatozoa incubated with BRET-QD and luciferase substrate (coelenterazine emit light (photons/sec above the background, which confirmed the in situ fluorescence imaging. Most importantly, sperm motility, viability, and fertilizing potential were not affected by the BRET-QD incorporation when used at an appropriated ratio. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that pig spermatozoa can incorporate BRET-QD nanoparticles without affecting their motility and capacity to interact with the oocyte when used at an appropriated balance. We anticipate that our study will enable in-depth exploration of the male components of in vivo migration, fertilization, and embryonic development at the molecular level using this novel approach.

  9. Hybrid composites of xanthan and magnetic nanoparticles for cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Vânia Blasques; Silva, Anielle Martins; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Catalani, Luiz Henrique; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; Cornejo, Daniel Reinaldo; Petri, Denise Freitas Siqueira

    2013-11-04

    We describe a fast and simple method to prepare composite films of magnetite nanoparticles and xanthan networks. The particles are distributed close to hybrid film surface, generating a coercivity of 27 ± 2 Oe at 300 K. The proliferation of fibroblast cells on the hybrid composites was successful, particularly when an external magnetic field was applied.

  10. Aptamer induced assembly of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots on gold nanoparticles for sensitive detection of AFB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Yanfen; Wu, Yuanya; Weng, Bo; Liu, Yingshuai; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Chang Ming; Yu, Cong

    2016-04-15

    Novel fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N,C-dots) were synthesized and assembled on aptamer modified gold nanoparticles (Aptamer/AuNPs) for the super sensitive detection of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Positively charged N,C-dots were synthesized by the hydrothermal treatment of pancreatin. The prepared N,C-dots were assembled on aptamer/AuNPs by electrostatic interactions. The fluorescence of the N,C-dots was efficiently quenched. When AFB1 was added to the assay solution, specific interactions between AFB1 and the aptamer caused release of the N,C-dots. The fluorescence of the N,C-dots recovered and the intensity increase could be used to calculate the amount of AFB1 added. The assay exhibits super-high sensitivity with a detection limit of 5 pg/mL (16 pM) and a wide range of linear response of 5 pg/mL to 2.00 ng/mL. A novel aptasensor is thus successfully constructed, it provides an efficient way for sensitive AFB1 sensing as well as a new technique for aptamer based novel sensor construction.

  11. Nanosensor composed of nitrogen-doped carbon dots and gold nanoparticles for highly selective detection of cysteine with multiple signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianhui; Lu, Qiujun; Hou, Yuxin; Liu, Meiling; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-02-17

    Biological thiols play a critical role in biological processes and are involved in a variety of diseases. The discrimination detection of biological thiols is of increasing importance in clinical diagnosis. In this paper, a novel nanosensor was developed to discriminate cysteine (Cys) from homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) with multiple signals: colorimetric, photoluminescence (PL), and up-conversional photoluminescence (UCP). The nanosensor (NC-dots/AuNPs) was constructed by nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NC-dots) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through assembling NC-dots "shell" on AuNPs and showed the obvious different response to Cys, Hcy, and GSH with colorimetric, PL, and UCP signals. The discrimination effect for Cys is originated from conformations and interaction difference of the thiols groups in Cys and Hcy and/or GSH with AuNPs. Among them, only Cys can quickly penetrate into the NC-dots "shell" of the composite and induce the dispersing of the aggregated NC-dots/AuNPs, which lead to the color change from purple to red and the recovery of PL and UCP of NC-dots. This assay was successfully applied for the detection of Cys in human serum with the detection limit of 4 nM.

  12. A novel nanosensor composed of aptamer bio-dots and gold nanoparticles for determination of thrombin with multiple signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Lan; Cao, Shu-Ping; Zhang, Li; Li, Qiu-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-11-15

    Thrombin is a crucial multifunctional enzyme involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Its detection is of great importance. In this work, a novel bio-dots nanosensor for detection of thrombin with colorimetric, fluorometric and light-scattering signals is developed. This nanosensor is composed of thrombin-binding aptamer bio-dots (TBA-dots) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), where TBA-dots serve as fluorometric reporter and AuNPs function as multiple roles as colorimetric reporter, light scattering reporter and fluorescence quencher. TBA-dots retain inherent structures of aptamer to specifically interact with thrombin and simultaneously induce the aggregation of AuNPs. The mechanism of the sensing system is based on distance-dependent aggregation of AuNPs and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The nanosensor needs no further surface functionalization required for the as-prepared bio-dots and AuNPs, which provides a sensitive method for the selective detection of thrombin with a detection limit as low as 0.59nM. In addition, it provides a brand new perspective for bio-dots and its potential use in bioanalysis.

  13. Effects of physicochemical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles on cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Baek, M.; Chung, H. E.; Choi, S. J.

    2011-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have been used as a source of zinc, an essential trace element in food industry and also widely applied to various cosmetic products. However, there are few researches demonstrating that the cellular uptake behaviours of ZnO with respect to the physicochemical characteristics such as particle size and surface charge in human cells. In this study, we evaluated the cellular uptake of ZnO with two different sizes (20 and 70 nm) and different charges (positive and negative). Human lung epithelial cells were exposed to ZnO for a given time, and then the uptake amount of ZnO was measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The results showed that the smaller sized ZnO could more easily enter the cells than the larger sized ZnO. In terms of surface charge, positively charged ZnO showed high cellular uptake compared to ZnO with negative charge. The internalization pathway of positively charged ZnO nanoparticles was determined to be primarily related to the energy-dependent endocytosis. It is, therefore, concluded that the particle size and surface charge of ZnO nanoparticles are critical factors influencing on their cellular uptake. Understanding the cellular uptake behaviours of nanoparticles with respect to physicochemical properties may be important to predict their toxicity potential on human.

  14. Uptake of ricinB-quantum dot nanoparticles by a macropinocytosis-like mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iversen Tore

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a huge effort in developing ligand-mediated targeting of nanoparticles to diseased cells and tissue. The plant toxin ricin has been shown to enter cells by utilizing both dynamin-dependent and -independent endocytic pathways. Thus, it is a representative ligand for addressing the important issue of whether even a relatively small ligand-nanoparticle conjugate can gain access to the same endocytic pathways as the free ligand. Results Here we present a systematic study concerning the internalization mechanism of ricinB:Quantum dot (QD nanoparticle conjugates in HeLa cells. Contrary to uptake of ricin itself, we found that internalization of ricinB:QDs was inhibited in HeLa cells expressing dominant-negative dynamin. Both clathrin-, Rho-dependent uptake as well as a specific form of macropinocytosis involve dynamin. However, the ricinB:QD uptake was not affected by siRNA-mediated knockdown of clathrin or inhibition of Rho-dependent uptake caused by treating cells with the Clostridium C3 transferase. RicinB:QD uptake was significantly reduced by cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin and by inhibitors of actin polymerization such as cytochalasin D. Finally, we found that uptake of ricinB:QDs was blocked by the amiloride analog EIPA, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Upon entry, the ricinB:QDs co-localized with dextran, a marker for fluid-phase uptake. Thus, internalization of ricinB:QDs in HeLa cells critically relies on a dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like mechanism. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that internalization of a ligand-nanoparticle conjugate can be dependent on other endocytic mechanisms than those used by the free ligand, highlighting the challenges of using ligand-mediated targeting of nanoparticles-based drug delivery vehicles to cells of diseased tissues.

  15. Stability and toxicity of ZnO quantum dots: Interplay between nanoparticles and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellanger, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.bellanger@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine and CNRS, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l’Environnement (LCPME), UMR 7564, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Billard, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.billard@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine and CNRS, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Environnements Continentaux (LIEC), UMR 7360, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Schneider, Raphaël, E-mail: raphael.schneider@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine and CNRS, Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés (LRGP), UMR 7274, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Balan, Lavinia, E-mail: lavinia.balan@uha.fr [Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), UMR 7361, CNRS, 15 rue Jean Starcky, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Merlin, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.merlin@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine and CNRS, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l’Environnement (LCPME), UMR 7564, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dilution of aminosilane-capped ZnO QDs dramatically increases their dissolution. • Bacteria limit Zn{sup 2+} leakage from ZnO QDs in a physiological-dependent process. • Implementation of biosensors for assessing free metal promotes QDs instability. • Dialysis combined to ICP allows studying QDs stability without prior dilution. - Abstract: The toxicity of quantum dots (QDs) has been commonly attributed to the release of metal ions from the core as well as to the production of reactive oxygen species. However, the information related to the stability of the nanoparticles are relatively scarce although this parameter may strongly influence their toxicity. The stability of aminosilane-capped ZnO QDs, here used as model nanoparticles, was investigated by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) and whole cell biosensors using a dialysis setup to separate the QDs from the leaked Zn{sup 2+} ions. The integrity of the ZnO QDs appeared strongly affected by their dilution in aqueous medium, whereas the nanoparticles were slightly stabilized by bacteria. Our results demonstrate some inadequacy between the implementation and use of whole cell biosensors, and the monitoring of metal release from QDs.

  16. Characterization of cellulose membranes modified with luminescent silicon quantum dots nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, B B; Gelde, L; Algarra, M; Esteves da Silva, J C G; Vázquez, M I; Benavente, J

    2016-10-20

    A highly hydrophilic planar membrane fabricated with regenerated cellulose (RC-4 membrane), a biocompatible polymer, was modified by inclusion of water-soluble silicon quantum dot nanoparticles (SiQDs). Both bare SiQDs and SiQDs coated with a PAMAM-OH dendrimer were employed in order to obtain luminescent and thermally stable membrane systems (RC-4/SiQDs and RC-4/SiQDs-PAMAM-OH membranes). Original and SiQDs-modified membranes were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy (steady and confocal), derivative thermogravimetric analysis and impedance spectroscopy measurements. According to these results, both SiQDs-regenerated cellulose composite membranes present luminescent character as well as higher thermal resistance and conductivity than the original sample, although the dendrimer coverage of the SiQDs might partially shield such effects. Moreover, the permanence of SiQDs nanoparticles in the structure of the cellulosic support in aqueous environments and their effect on diffusive transport were determined by water uptake as well as by membrane potential measurements at different concentrations of a model electrolyte (KCl). These results demonstrate the possible use of these stable nano-engineered membranes, which are based on SiQDs nanoparticles, in electrochemical devices under flow conditions.

  17. Highly entangled photon pairs generated from the biexciton cascade transition in a quantum-dot-metal-nanoparticle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, T.; Harouni, M. Bagheri; Naderi, M. H.

    2017-08-01

    The entanglement between photon pairs generated from the biexciton cascade transition in a semiconductor quantum dot located in the vicinity of a metal nanoparticle is theoretically investigated. In the model scheme, the biexciton-exciton and exciton-ground-state transitions are assumed to be coupled to two principal plasmon modes of orthogonal polarizations. For a broad spectral window, because the horizontal and vertical spectra overlap, the biexciton and exciton photons are degenerate in energy. This allows us to overcome the natural splitting between the intermediate exciton states. Moreover, the degree of entanglement depends on the geometrical parameters of the system, i.e., the radius of the metal nanoparticle and the distance between the quantum dot and the nanoparticle. The results reveal that such a hybrid system profoundly modifies the photon entanglement even in the absence of strong coupling between the emitter and the metal nanosphere.

  18. Flow cytometric assessment of reactive oxygen species generations that are directly related to cellular ZnO nanoparticle uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple flow cytometry protocol to evaluate nanoparticle associated biological response was proposed. Particularly, we have evaluated the effect of surface charge on the cellular nanoparticle associations and nanoparticle-induced apoptosis. Significant enhancement in side scattering intensity was observed for the HeLa cells treated with positively charged (PLL)ZnO nanoparticles, suggesting that the (PLL)ZnO nanoparticles may induce cell death via adsorption and endocytosis of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, the negatively charged (PAA)ZnO nanoparticle seems to cause cell death process indirectly via the released Zn ions, with less contribution from cellular association of nanoparticles. Time- and dose-dependent studies on cellular association of ZnO nanoparticles, and ZnO associated reactive oxygen species generation were also performed for the HeLa cells exposed to the (PLL)ZnO nanoparticle. For those cells associated with (PLL)ZnO nanoparticle, a significant enhancement in reactive oxygen species generation was observed even at a lower concentration (10 ppm), which was not observable for the results with the whole cell population. By using this approach, we are able to distinguish biological responses (e.g., reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation) directly related to the cellular associations of NPs from those indirectly related to the cellular associations of NPs, such as the cytotoxicity caused by the NP released metal ions.

  19. Parallel comparative studies on the toxic effects of unmodified CdTe quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, and carbon nanodots on live cells as well as green gram sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanchao; Feng, Duan; Shi, Wen; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2013-11-15

    By using confocal fluorescence microscopy and direct visualization, a parallel comparative investigation has been systematically made on the relative toxicity of three common nanomaterials, such as unmodified CdTe quantum dots (QDs), Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) and carbon nanodots (C-dots), to live cells as well as green gram sprouts. Bare CdTe QDs exert the most toxic effect on a variety of cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7, NIH/3T3 cells) as well as live plants (green gram sprouts). For cells, this toxic effect leads to the partial death of cells, the decrease of cell metabolic activity, the shrinkage of cells, the breakage of chromatin, the damage of cell membrane integrity, and the fragmentation of mitochondria; for green gram sprouts, the presence of CdTe QDs markedly inhibits their growth. Moreover, the toxic behaviors of CdTe QDs are dose- and time-dependent. Under the same conditions, Au NPs only decrease the metabolic activity of cells to a small extent, and do not affect the appearance of cellular/subcellular structures and the plant growth; interestingly, C-dots exert no obvious toxicity to both live cells and the growth of green gram sprouts, showing good biocompatibility. These parallel comparative studies clearly reveal that the relative toxicity of the three nanomaterials in their native forms is bare CdTe QDs>Au NPs>C-dots, whose IC50 values for normal NIH/3T3 cells are 0.98 μg/mL, 62 μg/mL, and >250 μg/mL, respectively. This quantitative information is of great importance for right choice of the nanomaterials in their practical applications.

  20. PEG-phospholipid-encapsulated bismuth sulfide and CdSe/ZnS quantum dot core–shell nanoparticle and its computed tomography/fluorescence performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Qin, Meng-Yao; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Xuan, Yang; Zhao, Yuan-Di, E-mail: zydi@mail.hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics-Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, polyethylene glycol-phospholipid structure is used to synthesize hybrid cluster of 40–50 nm diameter that contains hydrophobic bismuth sulfide nanoparticles and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The composite probe’s toxicity, CT imaging, and fluorescence imaging performance are also studied. Experimental results show that the nanocomposite hybrid cluster has obvious CT contrast enhancement and fluorescence imaging capability in vitro even after cellular uptake. It gives a CT number of 700 (Hounsfield units) at 15 mg/mL, higher than that of the current iobitridol CT contrast agent. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide experiment reveals that it has low cytotoxicity at concentration up to of 3.14 mg/mL of Bi, indicating the composite probe has potential ability for CT and fluorescence bimodal imaging.

  1. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles from different cellular fractions of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Kannan; Panda, Tapobrata

    2014-05-01

    The addition of varying concentrations of precursor gold salt to different cellular fractions of Fusarium oxysporum, viz., the culture filtrate and the intracellular extract obtained in the growing and resting phase of the cells had a profound influence on the size, shape, and state of aggregation of the nanoparticles. Multiply-twinned nanoparticles were obtained when the culture filtrate was used for synthesizing nanoparticles while mostly irregular shapes were obtained with the intracellular extract. The time taken for the formation of gold nanoparticles in the culture filtrate of resting cells was very less (synthesis of nanoparticles. There was a reduction in size of the nanoparticles with decreasing concentration of the gold salt from 1 mM to 0.05 mM. With the intracellular extract, the initial rate of increase in surface plasmon absorption maximum was linearly proportional to the initial concentration of the gold salt used. Gold nanoparticles were also obtained with the heat-inactivated culture filtrate which suggests alternatively the role of peptides and amino acids besides proteins in reducing and/or stabilizing the nanoparticles.

  2. New features of excitonic emission in metal nanoparticle/semiconductor quantum dot nanosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchenko, Yu. V.; Korbutyak, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    We study theoretically the excitonic emission properties of a hybrid nanosystem composed of a spherical metal nanoparticle (NP) and a spherical quantum dot (QD). We show that electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by a single QD has only dipole, quadrupole, and octupole components, i.e., QD cannot in principle be regarded as an oscillating point dipole, which emits infinite series of multipoles. This leads to a substantial deviation of the characteristics of QD excitonic emission from the emission characteristics of point dipole (molecular fluorophore) located in a vicinity of metal NP at small interparticle distances. The observed fluorescence spectra of the CdTe QD/Ag NP nanostructure are found to be in good agreement with the calculated ones.

  3. Au Nanoparticles as Interfacial Layer for CdS Quantum Dot-sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells based on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO/Au/TiO2/CdS photoanode and polysulfide electrolyte are fabricated. Au nanoparticles (NPs as interfacial layer between FTO and TiO2 layer are dip-coated on FTO surface. The structure, morphology and impedance of the photoanodes and the photovoltaic performance of the cells are investigated. A power conversion efficiency of 1.62% has been obtained for FTO/Au/TiO2/CdS cell, which is about 88% higher than that for FTO/TiO2/CdS cell (0.86%. The easier transport of excited electron and the suppression of charge recombination in the photoanode due to the introduction of Au NP layer should be responsible for the performance enhancement of the cell.

  4. In one harness: the interplay of cellular responses and subsequent cell fate after quantum dot uptake

    KAUST Repository

    Gladkovskaya, Olga

    2016-09-13

    Rapid growth and expansion of engineered nanomaterials will occur when the technology can be used safely. Quantum dots have excellent prospects in clinical applications, but the issue of toxicity has not yet been resolved. To enable their medical implementation, the effect on, and mechanisms in, live cells should be clearly known and predicted. A massive amount of experimental data dedicated to nanotoxicity has been accumulated to-date, but it lacks a logical structure. The current challenge is to organize existing knowledge into lucid biological and mathematical models. In our review we aim to describe the interplay of various cell death mechanisms triggered by quantum dots as a consequence of particle parameters and experimental conditions.

  5. Detection of micrometastases in lung cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Yali Wang, Yucheng Zhang*, Zhenwu Du, Mei Wu, Guizhen Zhang* Central Laboratory, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Detection of micrometastases plays an important role in early-stage and recurrent cancer diagnosis. In the study, a new method of screening micrometastases of lung cancer in peripheral blood by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and quantum dots (QDs was developed to achieve early diagnosis and recurrence prevention. MNPs were prepared by combining miniemulsion polymerization and Stöber coating methods. QDs were prepared by using Cd(Ac2 • 2H2O and oxygen-free NaHTe with thioglycolic acid as the stabilizer. The carbodiimide-mediated condensation method was used to couple pan-cytokeratin (pan-ck antibody (Ab to the surface of the MNPs, and Lunx and SP-A Abs to the surface of the QDs. After four kinds of epithelial tumor cells were enriched by MNPs coupled with pan-ck Ab (MNP-pan-ck, lung cancer cells A549 and SPC-A-1 were successfully identified by QDs with double-labeled Abs. Finally, 32 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC were collected, out of 26 cases with the enriched circulating tumor cells (CTCs, 21 cases were successfully identified by QDs. Therefore, a new method was established in which MNP-pan-ck collected CTCs and QDs with double-labeled Abs could be used simultaneously to identify CTCs from NSCLC patients.Keywords: micrometastases, lung cancer, magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots, Lunx, SP-A

  6. Enhancement effect of defect fluorescence of ZnSe quantum dots on a heterojuction of ZnSe quantum dots and gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhongchen; Hao, Licai; Huang, Zhaoling; Qin, Shuijie; Zhang, Zhengping

    2017-08-24

    We studied an enhancement effect of defect fluorescence of ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) on a heterojunction of ZnSe quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. The photoluminescence (PL) of Au /ZnSe heterojunction is excited by using a 150 nm diameter ultraviolet laser spot of a scanning near-field optical microscope. Owing to the charge transfer of photon-generated carriers from ZnSe QDs, the enhanced PL effect is observed, which results from the increase of the built-in electric field to hinder the electron transfer to gold nanoparticles and is trapped by the defect states of ZnSe QDs. The broadening of defect fluorescence spectra and the reduction of exctionic fluorescence in multi-heterojunction of ZnSe QDs and gold nanoparticles are also observed which is attributed to increase of their contact areas. We believe that enhanced defect fluorescence method described in this paper have potential applications in forming uniform optoelectronic heterojunction in controlling and boosting fluorescent efficiency of weak PL devices. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. A dual-mode nanosensor based on carbon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles for discriminative detection of glutathione in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yupeng; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Zhaomin; Li, Mei-Jin; Yi, Changqing; Yang, Mengsu

    2014-06-15

    Glutathione (GSH) plays key roles in biological systems and serves many cellular functions. Since biothiols all incorporate thiol, carboxylic and amino groups, discriminative detection of GSH over cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) is still challenging. We herein report a dual-mode nanosensor with both colorimetric and fluorometric readout based on carbon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles for discriminative detection of GSH over Cys/Hcy. The proposed sensing system consists of AuNPs and fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs), where CQDs function as fluorometric reporter, and AuNPs serve a dual function as colorimetric reporter and fluorescence quencher. The mechanism of the nanosensor is based on two distance-dependent phenomenons, color change of AuNPs and FRET. Through controlling the surface properties of as-prepared nanoparticles, the addition of CQDs into AuNPs colloid solution might induce the aggregation of AuNPs and CQDs, leading to AuNPs color changing from red to blue and CQDs fluorescence quench. However, the presence of GSH can protect AuNPs from being aggregated and enlarge the inter-particle distance, which subsequently produces color change and fluorescent signal recovery. The nanosensor described in this report reflects on its simplicity and flexibility, where no further surface functionalization is required for the as-prepared nanoparticles, leading to less laborious and more cost-effective synthesis. The proposed dual-mode nanosensor demonstrated highly selectivity toward GSH, and allows the detection of GSH as low as 50 nM. More importantly, the nanosensor could not only function in aqueous solution for GSH detection with high sensitivity but also exhibit sensitive responses toward GSH in complicated biological environments, demonstrating its potential in bioanalysis and biodection, which might be significant in disease diagnosis in the future.

  8. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barwal Indu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Results The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Conclusion Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver

  9. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darvishi, Behrad [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmoradi, Elnaz [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Ali [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Drug and Food Control, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javanbakht, Mehran [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dinarvand, Rassoul [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh, E-mail: atyabifa@tums.ac.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.57 ± 0.84 and 100%, respectively. • Nanoparticles demonstrated a superior cellular uptake over non-targeted nanoparticles. • IC{sub 50} of nanoparticles and IC{sub 50} of free paclitaxel were 4.86 ± 0.91 and 32.80 ± 3.80 nM, respectively. • The imprinted nanoparticles showed high affinity to paclitaxel in biological samples.

  10. Distal phenylalanine modification for enhancing cellular delivery of fluorophores, proteins and quantum dots by cell penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, E J; Cleal, K; Eissa, N G; Watson, P; Jones, A T

    2014-12-10

    For cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to fulfil their promise as effective delivery vectors we need a better understanding of their mechanisms of cell binding and uptake. This is especially the case when they are linked to different types of cargo. Here we describe new studies based on our previous findings suggesting that, for peptide-CPP chimeras, distal hydrophobic residues upstream of the CPP sequence can have profound effects on the way they interact with cells. We studied peptides bearing an N-terminal Glycine or Phenylalanine linked via a neutral and flexible bridging group, SGSGSGSG, to three well-studied CPPs: octaarginine, penetratin and TP10. Using a combination of flow cytometry, live-cell imaging and image analysis we examined the effects of this single amino acid change on binding and uptake of Alexa488-fluorophore, bovine serum albumin and quantum dot cargoes. The influence of the glycine-phenylalanine switch for fluorophore delivery was most dramatic in TP10, increasing cellular uptake by 4.4 and 9.9 fold in non-adherent and adherent cells, respectively. Only penetratin showed effective uptake of bovine serum albumin with the phenylalanine variant showing an increase of 1.6 fold over the glycine variant. The uptake of quantum dots was most efficiently demonstrated by octaarginine, with the glycine variant increasing uptake 4.8 fold and the phenylalanine variant increasing uptake 9.5 fold over quantum dots alone. Overall the data demonstrate that hydrophobicity distal to the CPP could be utilised to enhance their capacity to bind to the cell membrane and deliver a range of macromolecules to the insides of cells.

  11. Nonendosomal cellular uptake of ligand-free, positively charged gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ulrike; Klein, Sabine; Petersen, Svea; Kues, Wilfried; Barcikowski, Stephan; Rath, Detlef

    2010-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have interesting optical properties, such as exceptionally high quantum yields and virtually limitless photostability. Therefore, they show the potential for applications as biomarkers especially suitable for in vivo and long-term studies. The generation of GNPs using pulsed laser light rather than chemical means provides nanoparticles, which are remarkably stable in a variety of media without the need of stabilizing agents or ligands. This stabilization is achieved by partial oxidation of the gold surface resulting in positively charged GNPs. However, little is known about cellular uptake of such ligand-free nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, or cell viability after nanoparticle contact. The current work is aimed to explore the response of a bovine cell line to GNP exposure mainly using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) supported by other techniques. Cultured bovine immortalized cells (GM7373) were coincubated with GNP (average diameter 15 nm, 50 microM Au) for 2, 24, and 48 h. The detection of GNP-associated light scattering by the LSCM facilitated a clear distinction between GNP-containing cells and the negative controls. After 48 h, 75% of cells had visibly incorporated nanoparticles. No colocalization was detected with either Rab5a or Lamp1-positive structures, i.e., endosomes or lysosomes, respectivley. However, transmission electron microscope analysis of GNP-coincubated cells indicated the nanoparticles to be positioned within electron-dense structures. Coincubation at 4 degrees C did not inhibit nanoparticle uptake, suggesting diffusion as possible entrance mechanism. Although the assessment of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and apoptosis revealed no GNP-related loss of cell viability at a gold concentration of 25 microM or below, a cytotoxic effect was observed in a proliferation assay after exposing low cell numbers to 50 microM Au and above. In conclusion, this study confirmed the cellular uptake of ligand

  12. Sustainable microalgae for the simultaneous synthesis of carbon quantum dots for cellular imaging and porous carbon for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Li, Wen-Cui

    2017-05-01

    Microalgae biomass is a sustainable source with the potential to produce a range of products. However, there is currently a lack of practical and functional processes to enable the high-efficiency utilization of the microalgae. We report here a hydrothermal process to maximize the utilizability of microalgae biomass. Specifically, our concept involves the simultaneous conversion of microalgae to (i) hydrophilic and stable carbon quantum dots and (ii) porous carbon. The synthesis is easily scalable and eco-friendly. The microalgae-derived carbon quantum dots possess a strong two-photon fluorescence property, have a low cytotoxicity and an efficient cellular uptake, and show potential for high contrast bioimaging. The microalgae-based porous carbons show excellent CO2 capture capacities of 6.9 and 4.2mmolg(-1) at 0 and 25°C respectively, primarily due to the high micropore volume (0.59cm(3)g(-1)) and large specific surface area (1396m(2)g(-1)).

  13. Nanoimaging: photophysical and pharmaceutical characterization of poly-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles engineered with quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzoli, F.; Ruozi, B.; Pracucci, E.; Signore, G.; Zapparoli, Mauro; Forni, F.; Vandelli, M. A.; Ratto, G.; Tosi, G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are considered good binomials for the development of multifunctional nanomedicines for multimodal imaging. Fluorescent imaging of QDs can monitor the behavior of QD-labeled NPs in both cells and animals with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The comprehension of polymer interaction with the metallic QD surface must be considered to achieve a complete chemicophysical characterization of these systems and to describe the QD optical properties to be used for their unequivocal identification in the tissue. In this study, by comparing two different synthetic procedures to obtain polymeric nanoparticles labeled with QDs, we investigated whether their optical properties may change according to the formulation methods, as a consequence of the different polymeric environments. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy characterization demonstrated that NPs modified with QDs after the formulation process (post-NPs-QDs) conserved the photophysical features of the QD probe. In contrast, by using a polymer modified with QDs to formulate NPs (pre-NPs-QDs), a significant quenching of QD fluorescence and a blueshift in its emission spectra were observed. Our results suggest that the packaging of QDs into the polymeric matrix causes a modification of the QD optical properties: these effects must be characterized in depth and carefully considered when developing nanosystems for imaging and biological applications.

  14. Formation of fluorescent polydopamine dots from hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of polydopamine nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-06-21

    This study describes the synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine dots (PDs) through hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of polydopamine nanoparticles. The decomposition of polydopamine nanoparticles to fluorescent PDs was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy. The analysis of PDs by using laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that the PDs consisted of dopamine, 5,6-dihydroxyindole, and trihydroxyindole units. Oligomerization and self-assembly of these units produced a broad adsorption band, resulting in an excitation-wavelength-dependent emission behavior. The maximal fluorescence of PDs appeared at 440 nm with a quantum yield of 1.2%. The coordination between the catechol groups of PDs and ferric ions (Fe(3+)) quenched the fluorescence of PDs; the limit of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for Fe(3+) was determined to be 0.3 μM. The presence of pyrophosphate switched on the fluorescence of the PD-Fe(3+) complexes. Compared to the other reported methods for sensing Fe(3+), PDs provided simple, low-cost, and reusable detection of Fe(3+).

  15. Ternary CuBiS2 nanoparticles as a sensitizer for quantum dot solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyawong, Nipapon; Aragaw, Belete; Shi, Jen-Bin; Lee, Ming-Way

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the synthesis and application in solar cells of a novel solar absorber material CuBiS2. Ternary copper chalcogenide CuBiS2 nanoparticles were grown on a mesoporous TiO2 electrode by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The synthesized CuBiS2 nanoparticles, size 5-10nm, have an energy gap Eg of 2.1eV. Liquid-junction quantum dot-sensitized solar cells were fabricated from the CuBiS2-sensitized electrode using a polysulfide electrolyte. Three types of counter electrodes (CEs) - Pt, Au and Cu2S - were tested. The photovoltaic performance depends on the CBD reaction time and the CE. The best cell, obtained with the Cu2S CE, exhibited the photovoltaic performance of a short-circuit current density Jsc of 6.87mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.25V, a fill factor FF of 36% and a power conversion efficiency η of 0.62%. The present work demonstrates the feasibility of CuBiS2 as a solar energy material.

  16. A novel multiplexer-based structure for random access memory cell in quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji Asfestani, Mazaher; Rasouli Heikalabad, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a new technology in scale of nano and perfect replacement for CMOS circuits in the future. Memory is one of the basic components in any digital system, so designing the random access memory (RAM) with high speed and optimal in QCA is important. In this paper, by employing the structure of multiplexer, a novel RAM cell architecture is proposed. The proposed architecture is implemented without the coplanar crossover approach. The proposed architecture is simulated using the QCADesigner version 2.0.3 and QCAPro. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed QCA RAM architecture has the best performance in terms of delay, circuit complexity, area, cell count and energy consumption in comparison with other QCA RAM architectures.

  17. A unique structure for the multiplexer in quantum-dot cellular automata to create a revolution in design of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji Asfestani, Mazaher; Rasouli Heikalabad, Saeed, E-mail: s.rasouli@iaut.ac.ir

    2017-05-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is the advent of technology and suitable replacement for semiconductor transistor technology. In this paper, a unique structure for the 2:1 multiplexer is presented in QCA. The structure of this component is simple, ultra-efficient and very useful to implement the various logical functions. The proposed structure does not follow any Boolean function. It takes advantage of the inherent characteristics of quantum technology to produce the desired output. Based on these principles, we design the new and efficient structures for the 4:1 multiplexer and 8:1 multiplexer in the QCA technology. These structures are designed with QCADesigner simulator and simulation results are examined. Investigation results indicate the amazing performance of proposed structure compared to existing structures in terms of area, complexity, power consumption and latency.

  18. Electric Field Modulation of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Photoluminescence: Insights Into the Design of Robust Voltage-Sensitive Cellular Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Efros, Alexander L; Huston, Alan L; Delehanty, James B

    2015-10-14

    The intrinsic properties of quantum dots (QDs) and the growing ability to interface them controllably with living cells has far-reaching potential applications in probing cellular processes such as membrane action potential. We demonstrate that an electric field typical of those found in neuronal membranes results in suppression of the QD photoluminescence (PL) and, for the first time, that QD PL is able to track the action potential profile of a firing neuron with millisecond time resolution. This effect is shown to be connected with electric-field-driven QD ionization and consequent QD PL quenching, in contradiction with conventional wisdom that suppression of the QD PL is attributable to the quantum confined Stark effect.

  19. Mimicking cellular transport mechanism in stem cells through endosomal escape of new peptide-coated quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Yen, Swee Kuan; Dou, Qingqing; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Ahmed, Sohail; Ying, Jackie Y.; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport is an important phenomenon in biological systems. Proteins are transported via several mechanisms to reach their destined compartment of cell for its complete function. One such mechanism is the microtubule mediated protein transport. Up to now, there are no reports on synthetic systems mimicking the biological protein transport mechanism. Here we report a highly efficient method of mimicking the microtubule mediated protein transport using newly designed biotinylated peptides encompassing a microtubule-associated sequence (MTAS) and a nuclear localization signaling (NLS) sequence, and their final conjugation with streptavidin-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). Our results demonstrate that these novel bio-conjugated QDs enhance the endosomal escape and promote targeted delivery into the nucleus of human mesenchymal stem cells via microtubules. Mimicking the cellular transport mechanism in stem cells is highly desirable for diagnostics, targeting and therapeutic applications, opening up new avenues in the area of drug delivery.

  20. Cellular trafficking and anticancer activity of Garcinia mangostana extract-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-In P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Porntip Pan-In,1,2 Supason Wanichwecharungruang,3,4 Justin Hanes,2,5 Anthony J Kim2,6,7 1Program in Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Nanotec-CU Center of Excellence on Food and Agriculture, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Neurosurgery, and Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 7Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Garcinia mangostana Linn extract (GME is a natural product that has received considerable attention in cancer therapy, and has the potential to reduce side effects of chemotherapeutics and improve efficacy. We formulated GME-encapsulated ethyl cellulose (GME-EC and a polymer blend of ethyl cellulose and methyl cellulose (GME-EC/MC nanoparticles. We achieved high drug-loading and encapsulation efficiency using a solvent-displacement method with particle sizes around 250 nm. Cellular uptake and accumulation of GME was higher for GME-encapsulated nanoparticles compared to free GME. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis showed effective anticancer activity of GME-EC and GME-EC/MC nanoparticles in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. GME-EC/MC nanoparticles showed approximately twofold-higher anticancer activity compared to GME-EC nanoparticles, likely due to their enhanced bioavailability. GME-encapsulated nanoparticles primarily entered HeLa cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficked through the endolysosomal pathway. As far as we know, this is the first report on the cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking mechanism of drug-loaded cellulose-based nanoparticles

  1. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility.

  2. Cellular entry of nanoparticles via serum sensitive clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and plasma membrane permeabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith PJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Philip J Smith1, Maude Giroud2, Helen L Wiggins2, Florence Gower2, Jennifer A Thorley2, Bjorn Stolpe3, Julie Mazzolini2, Rosemary J Dyson4, Joshua Z Rappoport21Physical Sciences of Imaging for the Biomedical Sciences (PSIBS Doctoral Training Center, School of Chemistry, 2School of Biosciences, 3School of Geography, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, 4School of Mathematics, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United KingdomAbstract: Increasing production and application of nanomaterials raises significant questions regarding the potential for cellular entry and toxicity of nanoparticles. It was observed that the presence of serum reduces the cellular association of 20 nm carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene beads up to 20-fold, relative to cells incubated in serum-free media. Analysis by confocal microscopy demonstrated that the presence of serum greatly reduces the cell surface association of nanoparticles, as well as the potential for internalization. However, both in the presence and absence of serum, nanoparticle entry depends upon clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Finally, experiments performed with cells cooled to 4°C suggest that a proportion of the accumulation of nanoparticles in cells was likely due to direct permeabilization of the plasma membrane.Keywords: nanoparticles, polystyrene beads, serum, endocytosis, dynamin, clathrin, permeabilization

  3. Cellular network formation of hydrophobic alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles on mica surface mediated by water islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Neena S.; Raina, Gargi; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2010-09-01

    Dendritic and cellular networks of nanoparticles are known to form commonly either by random diffusion-limited aggregation or by solvent evaporation dynamics. Using alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles deposited on mica imaged under ambient and controlled water vapor conditions by atomic force microscope and in situ scanning electron microscope, respectively, we show a third mechanism in action. The cellular network consisting of open and closed polygons is formed by the nucleation and lateral growth of adsorbed water islands, the contact lines of which push the randomly distributed hydrophobic nanoparticles along the growth directions, eventually leading to the polygonal structure formation as the boundaries of the growing islands meet. Such nanoparticle displacement has been possible due to the weakly adhering nature of the hydrophilic substrate, mica. These results demonstrate an important but hitherto neglected effect of adsorbed water in the structure formation on hydrophilic substrates and provide a facile tool for the fabrication of nanoparticle networks without specific particle or substrate modifications and without a tight control on particle deposition conditions during the solvent evaporation.

  4. Anchoring Dipalmitoyl Phosphoethanolamine to Nanoparticles Boosts Cellular Uptake and Fluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiczies, Sonia; Lepore, Stefano; Sydow, Karl; Drechsler, Susanne; Ku, Min-Chi; Martin, Conrad; Lorenz, Dorothea; Schütz, Irene; Reimann, Henning M.; Purfürst, Bettina; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Waiczies, Helmar; Dathe, Margitta; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods to detect and quantify fluorine (19F) nuclei provide the opportunity to study the fate of cellular transplants in vivo. Cells are typically labeled with 19F nanoparticles, introduced into living organisms and tracked by 19F MR methods. Background-free imaging and quantification of cell numbers are amongst the strengths of 19F MR-based cell tracking but challenges pertaining to signal sensitivity and cell detection exist. In this study we aimed to overcome these limitations by manipulating the aminophospholipid composition of 19F nanoparticles in order to promote their uptake by dendritic cells (DCs). As critical components of biological membranes, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were studied. Both microscopy and MR spectroscopy methods revealed a striking (at least one order of magnitude) increase in cytoplasmic uptake of 19F nanoparticles in DCs following enrichment with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE). The impact of enriching 19F nanoparticles with PE on DC migration was also investigated. By manipulating the nanoparticle composition and as a result the cellular uptake we provide here one way of boosting 19F signal per cell in order to overcome some of the limitations related to 19F MR signal sensitivity. The boost in signal is ultimately necessary to detect and track cells in vivo.

  5. Plasmonic nanograting enhanced quantum dots excitation for cellular imaging on-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Gauri; Lee, Youngkyu; Chen, Peng; Zhang, John X. J.

    2015-09-01

    We present the design and integration of a two-dimensional (2D) plasmonic nanogratings structure on the electrode of colloidal quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QDLEDs) as a compact light source towards arrayed on-chip imaging of tumor cells. Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) were used as the emission layer due to their unique capabilities, including multicolor emission, narrow bandwidth, tunable emission wavelengths, and compatibility with silicon fabrication. The nanograting, based on a metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguide, aims to enhance the light intensity through the resonant reflection of surface plasmon (SP) waves. The key parameters of plasmonic nanogratings, including periodicity, slit width, and thicknesses of the metal and dielectric layers, were designed to tailor the frequency bandgap such that it matches the wavelength of operation. We fabricated QDLEDs with the integrated nanogratings and demonstrated an increase in electroluminescence intensity, measured along the direction perpendicular to the metal electrode. We found an increase of 34.72% in QDLED electroluminescence intensity from the area of the pattern and an increase of 32.63% from the photoluminescence of QDs deposited on a metal surface. We performed ex vivo transmission-mode microscopy to evaluate the nucleus-cytoplasm ratios of MDA-MB 231 cultured breast cancer cells using QDLEDs as the light source. We showed wavelength dependent imaging of different cell components and imaging of cells at higher magnification using enhanced emission from QDLEDs with integrated plasmonic nanogratings.

  6. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    There has been significant improvement in the performance of VLSI devices, in terms of size, power consumption, and speed, in recent years and this trend may also continue for some near future. However, it is a well known fact that there are major obstacles, i.e., physical limitation of feature size reduction and ever increasing cost of foundry, that would prevent the long term continuation of this trend. This has motivated the exploration of some fundamentally new technologies that are not dependent on the conventional feature size approach. Such technologies are expected to enable scaling to continue to the ultimate level, i.e., molecular and atomistic size. Quantum computing, quantum dot-based computing, DNA based computing, biologically inspired computing, etc., are examples of such new technologies. In particular, quantum-dots based computing by using Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) has recently been intensely investigated as a promising new technology capable of offering significant improvement over conventional VLSI in terms of reduction of feature size (and hence increase in integration level), reduction of power consumption, and increase of switching speed. Quantum dot-based computing and memory in general and QCA specifically, are intriguing to NASA due to their high packing density (10(exp 11) - 10(exp 12) per square cm ) and low power consumption (no transfer of current) and potentially higher radiation tolerant. Under Revolutionary Computing Technology (RTC) Program at the NASA/JPL Center for Integrated Space Microelectronics (CISM), we have been investigating the potential applications of QCA for the space program. To this end, exploiting the intrinsic features of QCA, we have designed novel QCA-based circuits for co-planner (i.e., single layer) and compact implementation of a class of data permutation matrices, a class of interconnection networks, and a bit-serial processor. Building upon these circuits, we have developed novel algorithms and QCA

  7. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    There has been significant improvement in the performance of VLSI devices, in terms of size, power consumption, and speed, in recent years and this trend may also continue for some near future. However, it is a well known fact that there are major obstacles, i.e., physical limitation of feature size reduction and ever increasing cost of foundry, that would prevent the long term continuation of this trend. This has motivated the exploration of some fundamentally new technologies that are not dependent on the conventional feature size approach. Such technologies are expected to enable scaling to continue to the ultimate level, i.e., molecular and atomistic size. Quantum computing, quantum dot-based computing, DNA based computing, biologically inspired computing, etc., are examples of such new technologies. In particular, quantum-dots based computing by using Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) has recently been intensely investigated as a promising new technology capable of offering significant improvement over conventional VLSI in terms of reduction of feature size (and hence increase in integration level), reduction of power consumption, and increase of switching speed. Quantum dot-based computing and memory in general and QCA specifically, are intriguing to NASA due to their high packing density (10(exp 11) - 10(exp 12) per square cm ) and low power consumption (no transfer of current) and potentially higher radiation tolerant. Under Revolutionary Computing Technology (RTC) Program at the NASA/JPL Center for Integrated Space Microelectronics (CISM), we have been investigating the potential applications of QCA for the space program. To this end, exploiting the intrinsic features of QCA, we have designed novel QCA-based circuits for co-planner (i.e., single layer) and compact implementation of a class of data permutation matrices, a class of interconnection networks, and a bit-serial processor. Building upon these circuits, we have developed novel algorithms and QCA

  8. Augmented cellular uptake of nanoparticles using tea catechins: effect of surface modification on nanoparticle-cell interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Luo, Pei-Chun; Huang, Chun-Wan; Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2014-08-01

    Nanoparticles may serve as carriers in targeted therapeutics; interaction of the nanoparticles with a biological system may determine their targeting effects and therapeutic efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of tea catechins, has been conjugated with nanoparticles and tested as an anticancer agent. We investigated whether EGCG may enhance nanoparticle uptake by tumor cells. Cellular uptake of a dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was determined by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry or a potassium thiocyanate colorimetric method. We demonstrated that EGCG greatly enhanced interaction and/or internalization of MNPs (with or without polyethylene glycol) by glioma cells, but not vascular endothelial cells. The enhancing effects are both time- and concentration-dependent. Such effects may be induced by a simple mix of MNPs with EGCG at a concentration as low as 1-3 μM, which increased MNP uptake 2- to 7-fold. In addition, application of magnetic force further potentiated MNP uptake, suggesting a synergetic effect of EGCG and magnetic force. Because the effects of EGCG were preserved at 4 °C, but not when EGCG was removed from the culture medium prior to addition of MNPs, a direct interaction of EGCG and MNPs was implicated. Use of an MNP-EGCG composite produced by adsorption of EGCG and magnetic separation also led to an enhanced uptake. The results reveal a novel interaction of a food component and nanocarrier system, which may be potentially amenable to magnetofection, cell labeling/tracing, and targeted therapeutics.

  9. Augmented cellular uptake of nanoparticles using tea catechins: effect of surface modification on nanoparticle-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Luo, Pei-Chun; Huang, Chun-Wan; Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2014-09-07

    Nanoparticles may serve as carriers in targeted therapeutics; interaction of the nanoparticles with a biological system may determine their targeting effects and therapeutic efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of tea catechins, has been conjugated with nanoparticles and tested as an anticancer agent. We investigated whether EGCG may enhance nanoparticle uptake by tumor cells. Cellular uptake of a dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was determined by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry or a potassium thiocyanate colorimetric method. We demonstrated that EGCG greatly enhanced interaction and/or internalization of MNPs (with or without polyethylene glycol) by glioma cells, but not vascular endothelial cells. The enhancing effects are both time- and concentration-dependent. Such effects may be induced by a simple mix of MNPs with EGCG at a concentration as low as 1-3 μM, which increased MNP uptake 2- to 7-fold. In addition, application of magnetic force further potentiated MNP uptake, suggesting a synergetic effect of EGCG and magnetic force. Because the effects of EGCG were preserved at 4 °C, but not when EGCG was removed from the culture medium prior to addition of MNPs, a direct interaction of EGCG and MNPs was implicated. Use of an MNP-EGCG composite produced by adsorption of EGCG and magnetic separation also led to an enhanced uptake. The results reveal a novel interaction of a food component and nanocarrier system, which may be potentially amenable to magnetofection, cell labeling/tracing, and targeted therapeutics.

  10. Lipid Reconstitution-Enabled Formation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters for Mimetic Cellular Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs encapsulated within reconstituted phospholipid bilayers have been utilized in various bioapplications due to their improved cellular uptake without compromising their advantages. Studies have proved that clustering AuNPs can enhance the efficacy of theranostic effects, but controllable aggregation or oligomerization of AuNPs within lipid membranes is still challenging. Here, we successfully demonstrate the formation of gold nanoparticle clusters (AuCLs, supported by reconstituted phospholipid bilayers with appropriate sizes for facilitating cellular uptake. Modulation of the lipid membrane curvatures influences not only the stability of the oligomeric state of the AuCLs, but also the rate of cellular uptake. Dynamic light scattering (DLS data showed that 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE, with its relatively small head group, is crucial for establishing an effective membrane curvature to encapsulate the AuCLs. The construction of phospholipid bilayers surrounding AuCLs was confirmed by analyzing the secondary structure of M2 proteins incorporated in the lipid membrane surrounding the AuCLs. When AuCLs were incubated with cells, accumulated clusters were found inside the cells without the lipids being removed or exchanged with the cellular membrane. We expect that our approach of clustering gold nanoparticles within lipid membranes can be further developed to design a versatile nanoplatform.

  11. The distribution and degradation of radiolabeled superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bargheer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 51Cr-labeled, superparamagnetic, iron oxide nanoparticles (51Cr-SPIOs and 65Zn-labeled CdSe/CdS/ZnS-quantum dots (65Zn-Qdots were prepared using an easy, on demand, exchange-labeling technique and their particokinetic parameters were studied in mice after intravenous injection. The results indicate that the application of these heterologous isotopes can be used to successfully mark the nanoparticles during initial distribution and organ uptake, although the 65Zn-label appeared not to be fully stable. As the degradation of the nanoparticles takes place, the individual transport mechanisms for the different isotopes must be carefully taken into account. Although this variation in transport paths can bring new insights with regard to the respective trace element homeostasis, it can also limit the relevance of such trace material-based approaches in nanobioscience. By monitoring 51Cr-SPIOs after oral gavage, the gastrointestinal non-absorption of intact SPIOs in a hydrophilic or lipophilic surrounding was measured in mice with such high sensitivity for the first time. After intravenous injection, polymer-coated, 65Zn-Qdots were mainly taken up by the liver and spleen, which was different from that of ionic 65ZnCl2. Following the label for 4 weeks, an indication of substantial degradation of the nanoparticles and the release of the label into the Zn pool was observed. Confocal microscopy of rat liver cryosections (prepared 2 h after intravenous injection of polymer-coated Qdots revealed a colocalization with markers for Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC, but not with hepatocytes. In J774 macrophages, fluorescent Qdots were found colocalized with lysosomal markers. After 24 h, no signs of degradation could be detected. However, after 12 weeks, no fluorescent nanoparticles could be detected in the liver cryosections, which would confirm our 65Zn data showing a substantial degradation of the polymer-coated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Qdots in

  12. Mathematical Modeling of the Subsurface Behavior of Quantum Dot Nanoparticles in the Presence of Stabilizing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M. D.; Wang, Y.; Pennell, K. D.; Abriola, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    As the manufacture and use of nanomaterials become more prevalent, the development of mathematical models capable of predicting nanomaterial transport and retention in subsurface systems is crucial to assessing their environmental fate. To enhance aqueous solubility, nanoparticle production often involves the use of a surfactant or other stabilizing agent. The presence of stabilizing agents, whether natural or synthetic, could significantly influence nanoparticle mobility and fate in the subsurface. In this study, quantum dot (QD) mobility experiments were performed in columns packed with three size fractions of Ottawa sand (d50 = 125, 165, and 335 μm) at two different pore-water velocities (0.8 m/d and 7.6 m/d). The QDs synthesized for these experiments consisted of a CdSe core embedded in a CdZnS shell with a poly(acrylic acid)-octylamine (PAA) coating to promote suspension stability. The QDs were negatively charged (measured zeta potential ca. -35 mV) with a hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 30 nm. Experimental observations consistently revealed low amounts of QD deposition near the column inlet, results that were inconsistent with expectations based upon clean bed filtration theory. This phenomenon was hypothesized to be related to competitive adsorption of residual aqueous PAA to the sand surface. A systematic modeling approach was undertaken to explore mechanisms controlling the transport and deposition of QDs in the presence of competitively adsorbing aqueous PAA. The model incorporated a coupled system of equations governing the fate and transport of both nanoparticles and chemical additives. QD retention was described using a modification of a traditional clean bed filtration governing equation that assumes irreversible first-order attachment and incorporates a maximum or limiting retention capacity. Simultaneous transport and adsorption of PAA were modeled using a traditional advection-dispersion-reaction equation that incorporates a first

  13. Manipulating quantum dot fluorescence by utilizing Brownian induced near-field interactions with plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Nola

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with size-dependent optical properties; thus making them supreme fluorophores. Plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs), such as gold and silver nanoparticles, support localized surface plasmons on their surface. When the localized surface plasmons are excited, a highly concentrated electromagnetic field is formed near the particle. Therefore, if a QD is within the near-field of a PNP, the emission or excitation of the QD can be enhanced. However, due to Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), the QD fluorescence could instead be quenched by the proximity of PNPs. Whether enhancement or quenching occurs, is dependent upon the distance and geometry of the nanoparticles. Enhanced QD fluorescence would be helpful in biomedical sensing and imaging and solar energy conversion applications. In addition, quenched QD fluorescence caused by FRET could be applied to FRET-based sensing and imaging in medical diagnosis. This master's thesis first theoretically models the stochastic movement of QDs and PNPs in an aqueous solution. The simulation is based upon the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method coupled with Langevin equations. Using this simulation, we were able to predict the percentage of QDs in the near-field region of PNPs. The percentage of QDs in the near-field region of GNPs for a concentration of 1 × 1013 QDs/mL and 5 × 108 GNPs/mL, is a very small percentage of 2 × 10-5%. Yet, the concentration of QDs in the near-field region of GNPs was calculated to be 1,510,000 QDs mL-1. In addition, this master's thesis experimentally explores the enhancement and quenching of QD emission for different concentrations and sizes of PNPs in aqueous solutions. The fluorescence spectra of two types of QD-PNP mixtures were measured. The first mixture was QDs and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) dispersed in distilled water, where the emission wavelength of the QDs matches the localized surface plasmon excitation wavelength of the GNPs. The second

  14. Preparation of Gold-Carbon Dots and Ratiometric Fluorescence Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingyang; Wang, Donghui; Huang, Haowen; Liu, Lanfang; Zhou, Yuan; Xia, Xiaodong; Deng, Keqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we synthesized novel gold-carbon dots (GCDs) with unique properties by microwave-assisted method. The characterization of high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), XRD, high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscope (HAADF-STEM), and energy dispersive spectrometer demonstrates that GCDs are composed of carbon and Au. Tiny Au clusters are dispersed in a 2 nm-size carbon skeleton, which integrates the properties of typical CDs and gold nanoclusters (AuNCs), displaying fascinating peroxidase-like activity and single excitation/dual emission. Dual emission of the GCDs exhibits different fluorescent response to the target species and enables the GCDs to be exploited for sensing and bioimaging. The highly photostable and biocompatible GCDs were applied to dual fluorescent imaging for breast cancer cells and normal rat osteoblast cells under a single excitation. Moreover, ratiometric fluorescence imaging was used to monitor Fe(3+) level in normal rat osteoblast cells.

  15. DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajadhar Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of pEGFP (plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-encapsulated PEGylated (meaning polyethylene glycol coated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles (referred to as MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles for the induction of immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles induced enhanced serum antibody and antigen-specific T-lymphocyte responses, as well as increased IFN-γ and IL-12 levels compared to naked pEGFP when administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal or intramuscular routes. A significant macrophage response, both in size and activity, was also observed when mice were immunized with the nanoparticle formulation. The response was highly specific for the antigen, as the increase in interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte proliferation took place only when they were re-stimulated with recombinant green fluorescence protein (rGFP. Thus the nanoparticle formulation elicited both humoral as well as cellular responses. Cytokine profiling revealed the induction of Th-1 type responses. The results suggest DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate (MgPi nanoparticles may constitute a safer, more stable and cost-efficient DNA vaccine formulation.

  16. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Liu, Ru-Shi [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hwu, Yeu-Kuang [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Din Ping [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S, E-mail: rsliu@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhsiao@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  17. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Liu, Ru-Shi; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tsai, Din Ping; Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  18. Cellular uptake of folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Kyoungja [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kjwoo@kist.re.kr; Moon, Jihyung [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-Dong, Sungbook-Ku, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu-Sil [Division of Molecular Imaging, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Tae-Yeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-Dong, Sungbook-Ku, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kwon-Ha [Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, 344-2, Shinyong, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    We prepared five folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (F{sub 5}-Liposuperparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles(SPIONs), 5.5 and 11 nm) and investigated their cellular uptake with KB cells, which is one of the representative folate-receptor over-expressing human epidermoid carcinoma cells, using MRI. The cellular uptake tests with the respective 5.5 and 11 nm F{sub 5}-LipoSPIONs at a fixed particle concentration showed appreciable amount of receptor-mediated uptakes and the specificity was higher in 5.5 nm SPIONs, due to its higher folic acid (FA) density, without inhibition. However, the numbers of the particles taken up under FA inhibition were similar, irrespective of their sizes.

  19. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    OpenAIRE

    Simón-Vázquez R; Lozano-Fernández T; Dávila-Grana A; González-Fernández A

    2016-01-01

    Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO) and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI), University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps) can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune respon...

  20. Capping of Mn-Doped ZnS Quantum Dots with DHLA for Their Stabilization in Aqueous Media: Determination of the Nanoparticle Number Concentration and Surface Ligand Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cortes, Marta; Sotelo González, Emma; Fernández-Argüelles, María T; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernández, José M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2017-06-27

    Colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized, surface modified, and thoroughly characterized using a pool of complementary techniques. Cap exchange of the native l-cysteine coating of the QDs with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) ligands is proposed as a strategy to produce nanocrystals with a strong phosphorescent-type emission and improved aqueous stability. Moreover, such a stable DHLA coating can facilitate further bioconjugation of these QDs to biomolecules using established reagents such as cross-linker molecules. First, a structural and morphological characterization of the l-cysteine QD core was performed by resorting to complementary techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and microscopy tools. XRD patterns provided information about the local structure of ions within the nanocrystal structure and the number of metal atoms constituting the core of a QD. The judicious combination of the data obtained from these complementary characterization tools with the analysis of the QDs using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allowed us to assess the number concentration of nanoparticles in an aqueous sample, a key parameter when such materials are going to be used in bioanalytical or toxicological studies. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled online to ICP-MS detection proved to be an invaluable tool to compute the number of DHLA molecules attached to the surface of a single QD, a key feature that is difficult to estimate in nanoparticles and that critically affects the behavior of nanoparticles when entering the biological media (e.g., cellular uptake, biodistribution, or protein corona formation). This hybrid technique also allowed us to demonstrate that the elemental composition of the nanoparticle core remains unaffected after the ligand exchange process. Finally, the photostability and robustness of the DHLA-capped QDs, critical parameters for bioanalytical applications, were assessed by molecular

  1. Monitoring cellular stress responses to nanoparticles using a lab-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lukas; Charwat, Verena; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Bellutti, Florian; Brueckl, Hubert; Ertl, Peter

    2011-08-07

    As nanotechnology moves towards widespread commercialization, new technologies are needed to adequately address the potential health impact of nanoparticles (NPs). Assessing the safety of over 30,000 NPs through animal testing would not only be expensive, but it would also raise a number of ethical considerations. Furthermore, existing in vitro cell-based assays are not sufficient in scope to adequately address the complexity of cell-nanoparticle interactions including NP translocation, accumulation and co-transport of e.g. allergens. In particular, classical optical/fluorescent endpoint detection methods are known to provide irreproducible, inaccurate and unreliable results since these labels can directly react with the highly catalytic surfaces of NP. To bridge this technological gap we have developed a lab-on-a-chip capable of continuously and non-invasively monitoring the collagen production of primary human fibroblast cells (NHDF) using contactless dielectric microsensors. Human dermal fibroblast cells are responsible for the maintenance of soft tissue integrity, are found throughout the human body and their primary function is collagen expression. We show that cellular collagen production can be readily detected and used to assess cellular stress responses to a variety of external stimuli, including exposure to nanoparticles. Results of the study showed a 20% and 95% reduction of collagen production following 4 hour exposure to 10 μg mL(-1) gold and silver nanoparticles (dia.10 nm), respectively. Furthermore a prolonged perfusion of sub-toxic concentrations (0.1 μg mL(-1)) of silver NP reduced NHDF collagen production by 40% after 10 h indicating increased NP take up and accumulation. We demonstrate that the application of microfluidics for the tailored administration of different NP treatments constitutes a powerful new tool to study cell-nanoparticle interactions and nanoparticle accumulation effects in small cell populations.

  2. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with future perspectives

  3. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with

  4. Composite nanoparticle of Au and quantum dots for X-ray computed tomography and fluorescence dual-mode imaging in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Yan, Dong-Mei; Yao, Ming-Hao; Qin, Meng-Yao; Zhao, Yuan-Di, E-mail: zydi@mail.hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics - Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2015-12-15

    In this study, composite nanoparticles comprising Au nanoparticle and quantum dots were built and used for contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging (CT) and fluorescence dual-mode imaging in vivo. The nanoparticle exhibited good monodispersity and good biocompatibility, and had excellent CT contrast-enhancement effect and fluorescence imaging capability. They were appropriate for being used as dual-mode imaging probe in vivo.

  5. Biocompatibility of hydrophilic silica-coated CdTe quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jing; Wang, Kan; Song, Hua; Xu, Xin; Ji, Jiajia; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles exhibit great application prospects in biomedical engineering. Herein, we reported the effects of hydrophilic silica-coated CdTe quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) on human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and mice with the aim of investigating their biocompatibility. FMNPs with 150 nm in diameter were prepared, and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectra and magnetometer. HEK293 cells were cultured with different doses of FMNPs (20, 50, and 100μ g/ml) for 1-4 days. Cell viability and adhesion ability were analyzed by CCK8 method and Western blotting. 30 mice were randomly divided into three groups, and were, respectively, injected via tail vein with 20, 60, and 100 μg FMNPs, and then were, respectively, raised for 1, 7, and 30 days, then their lifespan, important organs, and blood biochemical parameters were analyzed. Results show that the prepared water-soluble FMNPs had high fluorescent and magnetic properties, less than 50 μg/ml of FMNPs exhibited good biocompatibility to HEK293 cells, the cell viability, and adhesion ability were similar to the control HEK293 cells. FMNPs primarily accumulated in those organs such as lung, liver, and spleen. Lung exposed to FMNPs displayed a dose-dependent inflammatory response, blood biochemical parameters such as white blood cell count (WBC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), displayed significant increase when the FMNPs were injected into mice at dose of 100μg. In conclusion, FMNPs exhibit good biocompatibility to cells under the dose of less than 50 μg/ml, and to mice under the dose of less than 2mg/kg body weight. The FMNPs' biocompatibility must be considered when FMNPs are used for in vivo diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Fluorometric immunoassay for human serum albumin based on its inhibitory effect on the immunoaggregation of quantum dots with silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marukhyan, Seda S.; Gasparyan, Vardan K.

    2017-02-01

    Quantitative determination of HSA was conducted by competitive immunoassay. Inhibition of aggregation of antibody conjugated quantum dots (QD) with albumin conjugated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the presence of HSA was conducted. If antibody-loaded CdSe QDs aggregate with HSA-coated silver nanoparticles the distance between the two kinds of nanoparticles will be reduced enough to cause fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case the yellow fluorescence of the Ab-QDs is quenched. However if HSA (antigen) is added to the Ab-QDs their surface will be blocked and they cannot aggregate any longer with the HSA-AgNPs. Hence, fluorescence will not be quenched. The drop of the intensity of fluorescence (peaking at 570 nm) is inversely correlated with the concentration of HSA in the sample. The method allows to determine HSA in the 30-600 ng·mL-1 concentration range.

  7. Great blue-shift of luminescence of ZnO nanoparticle array constructed from ZnO quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nengwen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanoparticle array has been fabricated on the Si substrate by a simple thermal chemical vapor transport and condensation without any metal catalysts. This ZnO nanoparticles array is constructed from ZnO quantum dots (QDs, and half-embedded in the amorphous silicon oxide layer on the surface of the Si substrate. The cathodoluminescence measurements showed that there is a pronounced blue-shift of luminescence comparable to those of the bulk counterpart, which is suggested to originate from ZnO QDs with small size where the quantum confinement effect can work well. The fabrication mechanism of the ZnO nanoparticle array constructed from ZnO QDs was proposed, in which the immiscible-like interaction between ZnO nuclei and Si surface play a key role in the ZnO QDs cluster formation. These investigations showed the fabricated nanostructure has potential applications in ultraviolet emitters.

  8. CdTe quantum dots and gold nanoparticle based spectral methods for determination of lincomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Baoyu; Li, Zhigang; Xie, Yuanzhe; Yang, Lingling; Wang, Ruiyong

    2015-05-01

    Two novel and convenient methods for the determination of lincomycin (LCM) in aqueous solutions have been developed. The first method was based on the enhanced fluorescence of thioglycolic acidcapped CdTe quantum dots (TGA-CdTe QDs) by LCM. For the second method, the introduction of LCM could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), displaying distinct changes in color and in UVvis spectra. Under optimal conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity was linearly proportional to LCM concentration in the range of 1-240 μg mL-1 with a detection limit of 2.63 × 10-1 μg mL-1. The second platform is capable of determining LCM in ranges from 1.00 × 10-3 to 2.00 × 10-2 μg mL-1 and from 3.00 × 10-2 to 1.20 × 10-1 μg mL-1 with a detection limit of 1.27 × 10-4 μg mL-1. Both methods were used for rapid detection of LCM in real samples with satisfactory results. Comparisons between the two methods were made.

  9. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  10. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction. PMID:28632165

  11. Hyaluronic Acid Conjugated Magnetic Prussian Blue@Quantum Dot Nanoparticles for Cancer Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongbo; Jing, Lijia; Li, Xiaoda; Lin, Li; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2017-01-01

    A multifunctional nanotheranostic agent was developed by conjugating both hyaluronic acid and bovine serum albumin coated CuInS2-ZnS quantum dots onto the surface of magnetic Prussian blue nanoparticles. The obtained nanoagent could serve as an efficient contrast agent to simultaneously enhance near infrared (NIR) fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging greatly. The coexistence of magnetic core and CD44 ligand hyaluronic acid was found to largely improve the specific uptake of the nanoagent by CD44 overexpressed HeLa cells upon applying an external magnetic field. Both NIR fluorescence and MR imaging in vivo proved high accumulation of the nanoagent at tumor site due to its excellent CD44 receptor/magnetic dual targeting capability. After intravenous injection of the nanoagent and treatment of external magnetic field, the tumor in nude mice was efficiently ablated upon NIR laser irradiation and the tumor growth inhibition was more than 89.95%. Such nanotheranostic agent is of crucial importance for accurately identifying the size and location of the tumor before therapy, monitoring the photothermal treatment procedure in real-time during therapy, assessing the effectiveness after therapy. PMID:28255343

  12. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  13. Tuning the Surface of Nanoparticles: Impact of Poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) on Protein Adsorption in Serum and Cellular Uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshkina, O.; Westmeier, D.; Lang, T.; Bantz, C.; Hahlbrock, A.; Wurth, C.; Resch-Genger, U.; Braun, U.; Thiermann, R.; Weise, C.; Eravci, M.; Mohr, B.; Schlaad, H.; Stauber, R.H.; Docter, D.; Bertin, A.; Maskos, M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the adsorption of biomolecules, the control of the biodistribution of nanoparticles is still one of the major challenges of nanomedicine. Poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEtOx) for surface modification of nanoparticles is applied and both protein adsorption and cellular uptake of PEtOxylated

  14. Effect of surface properties of silica nanoparticles on their cytotoxicity and cellular distribution in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagano Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surface properties are often hypothesized to be important factors in the development of safer forms of nanomaterials (NMs. However, the results obtained from studying the cellular responses to NMs are often contradictory. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the surface properties of silica nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity against a murine macrophage cell line (RAW264.7. The surface of the silica nanoparticles was either unmodified (nSP70 or modified with amine (nSP70-N or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C. First, the properties of the silica nanoparticles were characterized. RAW264.7 cells were then exposed to nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, and any cytotoxic effects were monitored by analyzing DNA synthesis. The results of this study show that nSP70-N and nSP70-C have a smaller effect on DNA synthesis activity by comparison to unmodified nSP70. Analysis of the intracellular localization of the silica nanoparticles revealed that nSP70 had penetrated into the nucleus, whereas nSP70-N and nSP70-C showed no nuclear localization. These results suggest that intracellular localization is a critical factor underlying the cytotoxicity of these silica nanoparticles. Thus, the surface properties of silica nanoparticles play an important role in determining their safety. Our results suggest that optimization of the surface characteristics of silica nanoparticles will contribute to the development of safer forms of NMs.

  15. Antimicrobial activity and cellular toxicity of nanoparticle-polymyxin B conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Wong, Jody; Nadeau, Jay L, E-mail: jay.nadeau@mcgill.ca [Department of Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal QC, H3A 2B4 (Canada)

    2011-05-06

    We investigate the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of conjugates of the peptide antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) to Au nanoparticles and CdTe quantum dots. Au nanoparticles fully covered with PMB are identical in antimicrobial activity to the free drug alone, whereas partially-conjugated Au particles show decreased effectiveness in proportion to the concentration of Au. CdTe-PMB conjugates are more toxic to Escherichia coli than PMB alone, resulting in a flattening of the steep PMB dose-response curve. The effect is most pronounced at low concentrations of PMB, with a greater effect on the concentration required to reduce growth by half (IC50) than on the concentration needed to inhibit all growth (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC). The Gram positive organism Staphylococcus aureus is resistant to both PMB and CdTe, showing minimal increased sensitivity when the two are conjugated. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation shows a significant reduction in photo-generated hydroxyl and superoxide radicals with CdTe-PMB as compared with bare CdTe. There is a corresponding reduction in toxicity of QD-PMB versus bare CdTe to mammalian cells, with nearly 100% survival in fibroblasts exposed to bactericidal concentrations of QD-PMB. The situation in bacteria is more complex: photoexcitation of the CdTe particles plays a small role in IC50 but has a significant effect on the MIC, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms are responsible for the antimicrobial action seen. These results show that it is possible to create antimicrobial agents using concentrations of CdTe quantum dots that do not harm mammalian cells.

  16. Antimicrobial activity and cellular toxicity of nanoparticle-polymyxin B conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Wong, Jody; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of conjugates of the peptide antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) to Au nanoparticles and CdTe quantum dots. Au nanoparticles fully covered with PMB are identical in antimicrobial activity to the free drug alone, whereas partially-conjugated Au particles show decreased effectiveness in proportion to the concentration of Au. CdTe-PMB conjugates are more toxic to Escherichia coli than PMB alone, resulting in a flattening of the steep PMB dose-response curve. The effect is most pronounced at low concentrations of PMB, with a greater effect on the concentration required to reduce growth by half (IC50) than on the concentration needed to inhibit all growth (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC). The Gram positive organism Staphylococcus aureus is resistant to both PMB and CdTe, showing minimal increased sensitivity when the two are conjugated. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation shows a significant reduction in photo-generated hydroxyl and superoxide radicals with CdTe-PMB as compared with bare CdTe. There is a corresponding reduction in toxicity of QD-PMB versus bare CdTe to mammalian cells, with nearly 100% survival in fibroblasts exposed to bactericidal concentrations of QD-PMB. The situation in bacteria is more complex: photoexcitation of the CdTe particles plays a small role in IC50 but has a significant effect on the MIC, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms are responsible for the antimicrobial action seen. These results show that it is possible to create antimicrobial agents using concentrations of CdTe quantum dots that do not harm mammalian cells.

  17. Silica coating of luminescent quantum dots prepared in aqueous media for cellular labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yunfei; Li, Yan, E-mail: yli@ecust.edu.cn; Zhong, Xinhua, E-mail: zhongxh@ecust.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile route based on modified Stöber method was used for the synthesis of silica coated QDs (QD@SiO{sub 2}) starting from aqueously prepared CdTe/CdS QDs. The resultant QD@SiO{sub 2} exhibited a significant increase in emission efficiency compared with that of the initial QDs, along with a small size (∼5 nm in diameter), great stability and low cytotoxicity, which makes it a good candidate as robust biomarker. - Highlights: • We present a facile modified Stöber method to prepare highly luminescent QD@SiO{sub 2}. • The PL efficiency of QDs increases significantly after silica coating. • QD@SiO{sub 2} exhibits small size (∼5 nm) and great dispersibility in aqueous solution. • QD@SiO{sub 2} presents extraordinary photo and colloidal stability. • The silica shell eliminates QD cytotoxicity, providing the access of bioconjugation. - Abstract: Silica coating is an effective approach for rendering luminescent quantum dots (QDs) with water dispersibility and biocompatibility. However, it is still challenging to prepare silica-coated QDs (QD@SiO{sub 2}) with high emission efficiency, small size and great stability in favor for bioapplication. Herein, we reported a modified Stöber method for silica coating of aqueously-prepared CdTe/CdS QDs. With the coexistence of Cd{sup 2+} and thioglycolic acid (TGA), a thin silica shell was formed around QDs by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The resultant QD@SiO{sub 2} with a small size (∼5 nm in diameter) exhibits significantly higher emission efficiencies than that of the initial QDs. Also, QD@SiO{sub 2} has extraordinary photo and colloidal stability (pH range of 5–13, 4.0 M NaCl solution). Protected by the silica shell, the cytotoxicity of QDs could be reduced. Moreover, the QD@SiO{sub 2} conjugated with folic acid (FA) presents high specific binding toward receptor-positive HeLa cells over receptor-negative A549 cells.

  18. A novel power-efficient high-speed clock management unit using quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutaleb, M. M.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is one of the most attractive alternatives for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. The QCA widely supports a new paradigm in the field of nanotechnology that has the potential for high density, low power, and high speed. The clock manager is an essential building block in the new microwave and radio frequency integrated circuits. This paper describes a novel QCA-based clock management unit (CMU) that provides innovative clocking capabilities. The proposed CMU is achieved by utilizing edge-triggered D-type flip-flops (D-FFs) in the design of frequency synthesizer and phase splitter. Edge-triggered D-FF structures proposed in this paper have the successful QCA implementation and simulation with the least complexity and power dissipation as compared to earlier structures. The frequency synthesizer is used to generate new clock frequencies from the reference clock frequency based on a combination of power-of-two frequency dividers. The phase splitter is integrated with the frequency synthesizer to generate four clock signals that are 90o out of phase with each other. This paper demonstrates that the proposed QCA CMU structure has a superior performance. Furthermore, the proposed CMU is straightforwardly scalable due to the use of modular component architecture.

  19. Quantum-dot cellular automata based reversible low power parity generator and parity checker design for nanocommunication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jadav Chandra DAS; Debashis DE

    2016-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is an emerging area of research in reversible computing. It can be used to design nanoscale circuits. In nanocommunication, the detection and correction of errors in a received message is a major factor. Besides, device density and power dissipation are the key issues in the nanocommunication architecture. For the first time, QCA-based designs of the reversible low-power odd parity generator and odd parity checker using the Feynman gate have been achieved in this study. Using the proposed parity generator and parity checker circuit, a nanocommunication architecture is pro-posed. The detection of errors in the received message during transmission is also explored. The proposed QCA Feynman gate outshines the existing ones in terms of area, cell count, and delay. The quantum costs of the proposed conventional reversible circuits and their QCA layouts are calculated and compared, which establishes that the proposed QCA circuits have very low quantum cost compared to conventional designs. The energy dissipation by the layouts is estimated, which ensures the possibility of QCA nano-device serving as an alternative platform for the implementation of reversible circuits. The stability of the proposed circuits under thermal randomness is analyzed, showing the operational efficiency of the circuits. The simulation results of the proposed design are tested with theoretical values, showing the accuracy of the circuits. The proposed circuits can be used to design more complex low-power nanoscale lossless nanocommunication architecture such as nano-transmitters and nano-receivers.

  20. Cellular uptake and intracellular pathways of PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühmann, Tessa; Rimann, Markus; Bittermann, Anne Greet; Hall, Heike

    2008-09-01

    Polycationic molecules form condensates with DNA and are used for gene therapy as an alternative to viral vectors. As clinical efficacy corresponds to cellular uptake, intracellular stability of the condensates, and bioavailability of the DNA, it is crucial to analyze uptake mechanisms and trafficking pathways. Here, a detailed study of uptake, stability, and localization of PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles within COS-7 cells is presented, using FACS analysis to assess the involvement of different uptake mechanisms, colocalization studies with markers indicative for different endocytotic pathways, and immunofluorescence staining to analyze colocalization with intracellular compartments. PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles were internalized in an energy-dependent manner after 2 h and accumulated in the perinuclear region after >6 h. The nanoparticles were found to be stable within the cytoplasm for at least 24 h and did not colocalize with the endosomal pathway. Nanoparticle uptake was approximately 50% inhibited by genistein, an inhibitor of the caveolae-mediated pathway. However, genistein did not inhibit gene expression, and PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles were not colocalized with caveolin-1 indicating that caveolae-mediated endocytosis is not decisive for DNA delivery. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis pathways were reduced by 17 and 24%, respectively, in the presence of the respective inhibitors. When cells were transfected in the presence of double and triple inhibitors, transfection efficiencies were increasingly reduced by 40 and 70%, respectively; however, no differences were found between the different uptake mechanisms. These findings suggest that PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles enter by several pathways and might therefore be an efficient and versatile tool to deliver therapeutic DNA.

  1. Tuning the color and photostability of perylene diimides inside polymer nanoparticles: towards biodegradable substitutes of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofymchuk, Kateryna; Reisch, Andreas; Shulov, Ievgen; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescent organic nanoparticles (NPs) are attractive alternatives to quantum dots due to their potential biodegradability. However, preparation of fluorescent organic NPs is challenging due to the problem of self-quenching of the encapsulated dyes. Moreover, the photostability of organic dyes is much lower than that of quantum dots. To address both problems, we studied encapsulation into biodegradable polymer PLGA NPs of perylene diimide (PDI) derivatives, which are among the most photostable dyes reported to date. Two PDIs were tested, one bearing bulky hydrophobic groups at the imides, while the other was substituted in both imide and bay regions (Lumogen Red). Encapsulation of the former resulted in aggregation, which was accompanied by the emission color change from green to red, some decrease in the fluorescence quantum yield and a significant drop in the photostability, unexpected for PDI dyes. In contrast, Lumogen Red showed nearly no aggregation inside polymer NPs and maintained high quantum yield and photostability. According to wide-field fluorescence microscopy with a 532 nm excitation laser, our 40 nm PLGA NPs loaded with 1 wt% Lumogen Red were >10-fold brighter than quantum dots (QD-585). These NPs were stable in biological media, including serum, and entered spontaneously into HeLa cells by endocytosis showing no sign of cytotoxicity. Due to excellent photostability, these nanoparticles could be considered as biodegradable substitutes of quantum dots in bioimaging.Fluorescent organic nanoparticles (NPs) are attractive alternatives to quantum dots due to their potential biodegradability. However, preparation of fluorescent organic NPs is challenging due to the problem of self-quenching of the encapsulated dyes. Moreover, the photostability of organic dyes is much lower than that of quantum dots. To address both problems, we studied encapsulation into biodegradable polymer PLGA NPs of perylene diimide (PDI) derivatives, which are among the most

  2. Dispersion Behaviour of Silica Nanoparticles in Biological Media and Its Influence on Cellular Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamoda-Kenzaoui, Blanka; Ceridono, Mara; Colpo, Pascal; Valsesia, Andrea; Urbán, Patricia; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Gioria, Sabrina; Gilliland, Douglas; Rossi, François; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing variety of manufactured nanomaterials, suitable, robust, standardized in vitro screening methods are needed to study the mechanisms by which they can interact with biological systems. The in vitro evaluation of interactions of nanoparticles (NPs) with living cells is challenging due to the complex behaviour of NPs, which may involve dissolution, aggregation, sedimentation and formation of a protein corona. These variable parameters have an influence on the surface properties and the stability of NPs in the biological environment and therefore also on the interaction of NPs with cells. We present here a study using 30 nm and 80 nm fluorescently-labelled silicon dioxide NPs (Rubipy-SiO2 NPs) to evaluate the NPs dispersion behaviour up to 48 hours in two different cellular media either supplemented with 10% of serum or in serum-free conditions. Size-dependent differences in dispersion behaviour were observed and the influence of the living cells on NPs stability and deposition was determined. Using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy techniques we studied the kinetics of the cellular uptake of Rubipy-SiO2 NPs by A549 and CaCo-2 cells and we found a correlation between the NPs characteristics in cell media and the amount of cellular uptake. Our results emphasize how relevant and important it is to evaluate and to monitor the size and agglomeration state of nanoparticles in the biological medium, in order to interpret correctly the results of the in vitro toxicological assays.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Mucoadhesive Nanoparticles for Enhancing Cellular Uptake of Coenzyme Q10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Suh, Ji Woon; Kim, Eun Suh; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2017-10-02

    The mucoadhesive nanoparticles (NPs) for oral delivery of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) were prepared using natural mucoadhesive polysaccharides, chitosan (CS), and dextran sulfate sodium salt (DS) in order to improve the solubility, cellular uptake, and thermo- and photostability of CoQ10. CoQ10-loaded NPs were prepared in the range of 340-450 nm with an entrapment efficiency of 60-98%. The mucoadhesiveness and cellular uptake of NPs were evaluated by measuring the amount of mucin adsorbed on NPs and CoQ10 absorbed in Caco-2 cells, respectively. CS/DS NPs had higher mucoadhesive strength than CS/sodium triphosphate pentabasic NPs (control group). Moreover, the solubility, cellular uptake, thermo- and photostability of CS/DS NPs were significantly improved compared with non-nanoencapsulated free CoQ10. Particularly, CS/DS NPs prepared with 0.5 mg/mL of CS and DS produced the highest mucoadhesiveness, solubility, cellular uptake, and cellular antioxidant activity. Thus, mucoadhesive CS/DS NPs may be an effective oral delivery platform for improving bioavailability of CoQ10.

  4. The role of substrate topography on the cellular uptake of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changjin; Ozdemir, Tugba; Xu, Li-Chong; Butler, Peter J; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Brown, Justin L; Zhang, Sulin

    2016-04-01

    Improving targeting efficacy has been a central focus of the studies on nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery nanocarriers over the past decades. As cells actively sense and respond to the local physical environments, not only the NP design (e.g., size, shape, ligand density, etc.) but also the cell mechanics (e.g., stiffness, spreading, expressed receptors, etc.) affect the cellular uptake efficiency. While much work has been done to elucidate the roles of NP design for cells seeded on a flat tissue culture surface, how the local physical environments of cells mediate uptake of NPs remains unexplored, despite the widely known effect of local physical environments on cellular responses in vitro and disease states in vivo. Here, we report the active responses of human osteosarcoma cells to fibrous substrate topographies and the subsequent changes in the cellular uptake of NPs. Our experiments demonstrate that surface topography modulates cellular uptake efficacy by mediating cell spreading and membrane mechanics. The findings provide a concrete example of the regulative role of the physical environments of cells on cellular uptake of NPs, therefore advancing the rational design of NPs for enhanced drug delivery in targeted cancer therapy.

  5. Cellular and molecular responses of E. fetida coelomocytes exposed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigorgne, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.bigorgne@univ-lorraine.fr; Foucaud, Laurent [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France); Caillet, Celine [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire Environnement et Mineralurgie (LEM) CNRS UMR7569 (France); Giamberini, Laure; Nahmani, Johanne [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France); Thomas, Fabien [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire Environnement et Mineralurgie (LEM) CNRS UMR7569 (France); Rodius, Francois [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France)

    2012-07-15

    An in vitro approach using coelomocytes of Eisenia fetida was investigated to evaluate toxicity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Coelomocytes were exposed to well-dispersed suspension of small aggregates (130 nm) of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (1-25 {mu}g/ml) during 4, 12 and 24 h. Intracellular localisation suggested that the main route of uptake was endocytosis. Cellular responses showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were not cytotoxic and had no effect on phagocytosis at any of the four concentrations for each time tested. Concerning molecular responses, an increase of fetidin and metallothionein mRNA expression was observed starting from 4 h of exposure. In contrast, expression of coelomic cytolytic factor mRNA decreased for 10 and 25 {mu}g/ml after 4 h. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase expression were not modified suggesting that oxidative stress was not induced by TiO{sub 2} in our experimental conditions. This in vitro approach showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were taken up by coelomocytes and they could modify the molecular response of immune and detoxification system.

  6. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  7. 量子点在细胞以及体内生物中成像的研究进展%Development of Quantum Dots for Cellular and in Vivo Animals Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱月琴; 蔡继业

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent quantum dots (QDs)-semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising alternative to organic dyes for fluorescence-based applications. They have unique optical and electronic properties, with size-tunable light emission, superior signal brightness, resistance to photobleaching, and broad absorption spectra for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. Also QDs provide a versatile nanoscale scaffold for designing multifunctional nanoparticles with both imaging and therapeutic functioa When linked with targeting ligands such as antibodies, peptides or small molecules, QDs can be used to target cells biomarkers as well as tumor vasculatures with high affinity and specificity. Researchers have developed procedures for using QDs cellular and in vivo animals imaging so far, demonstrated their use for long-term multicolor imaging of live cells and in vivo. The photo-characters are introduced and the implications of quantum dots in biological imaging are illustrated, and the future of quantum dots is look ahead.%量子点是一种荧光半导体纳米材料,与生物分子结合成一种高亮度而稳定的荧光探针应用于生物成像.通过生物成像可观察量子点标记分子与其靶标的相互作用,实时观测其在活细胞及活体中的运行轨迹,实现对细胞水平及在活体层次的研究.利用这种生物成像技术还可以研究疾病的发生发展过程.介绍了量子点的光学特性,重点综述了量子点在细胞、体内生物成像中的应用,并展望了其发展前景.

  8. Cellular Internalization and Biocompatibility of Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphologies: From Nanospheres to Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen

    2017-01-10

    This work describes the sol-gel syntheses of para-substituted phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable morphologies ranging from nanowires to nanospheres. The findings show the key role of the addition of organic co-solvents in the aqueous templates on the final morphologies of PMO NPs. Other factors such as the temperature, the stirring speed, and the amount of organic solvents also influence the shape of PMO NPs. The tuning of the shape of the PMO nanomaterials made it possible to study the influence of the particle morphology on the cellular internalization and biocompatibility.

  9. Dynamic SERS imaging of cellular transport pathways with endocytosed gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Smith, Nicholas I; Kawata, Satoshi

    2011-12-14

    Dynamic SERS imaging inside a living cell is demonstrated with the use of a gold nanoparticle, which travels through the intracellular space to probe local molecular information over time. Simultaneous tracking of particle motion and SERS spectroscopy allows us to detect intracellular molecules at 65 nm spatial resolution and 50 ms temporal resolution, providing molecular maps of organelle transport and lisosomal accumulation. Multiplex spectral and trajectory imaging will enable imaging of specific dynamic biological functions such as membrane protein diffusion, nuclear entry, and rearrangement of cellular cytoskeleton.

  10. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  11. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of positively charged chitosan gold nanoparticles in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seon Young; Jang, Soo Hwa [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Veterinary Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin; Jeong, Saeromi; Park, Jin Ho; Ock, Kwang Su [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kangtaek [Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sung Ik [Kyung Hee University, College of Environment and Applied Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang-Woo, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Veterinary Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and mechanisms of cytotoxicity of the positively charged Au nanoparticles (NPs) were examined in A549 cells, which are one of the most characterized pulmonary cellular systems. Positively charged Au NPs were prepared by chemical reduction using chitosan. The dimension and surface charge of Au NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. The uptake of Au NPs into A549 cells was also monitored using TEM and dark-field microscopy (DFM) and z-stack confocal microRaman spectroscopy. DFM live cell imaging was also performed to monitor the entry of chitosan Au NPs in real time. The cytotoxic assay, using both methylthiazol tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase assays revealed that positively charged Au NPs decreased cell viability. Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR, and western blot analysis suggest that positively charged chitosan Au NPs provoke cell damage through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways.

  12. Surface Charge Convertible and Biodegradable Synthetic Zwitterionic Nanoparticles for Enhancing Cellular Drug Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Luyan; Ni, Caihua; Zhang, Liping; Shi, Gang; Bai, Xue; Zhou, Yamin; He, Fei

    2016-03-01

    To enhance drug cellular uptake, a biodegradable terpolymer is synthesized using taurine, N,N-Bis (acryloyl) cystamine, and dodecylamine as raw materials by Michael addition terpolymerization. The terpolymer is transformed to zwitterionic nanoparticles (NPs) through self-assembly. The surface charge of the NPs is convertible from negative at pH 7.4 to positive at pH 6.5, which endows the NPs' excellent nonfouling feature in bloodstream and effective uptake in tumor cells. The NPs display varied morphologies from solid micelles to polymersomes and nanorods depending on molar ratios of the structural units involved. The NPs can be biodegraded in l-glutathione (GSH) solution due to the split of disulfide bonds in main chains of the terpolymers. The NPs demonstrate good pH/reducing responsiveness in drug delivery and can be potentially used as anticancer drug vehicles for enhancement of cellular uptake of anticancer drug.

  13. Surface decoration by Spirulina polysaccharide enhances the cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy of selenium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fang Yang1*, Quanming Tang1,2*, Xueyun Zhong3, Yan Bai1, Tianfeng Chen1, Yibo Zhang1, Yinghua Li1, Wenjie Zheng11Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; 2South China Seas Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China; 3Department of Pathology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A simple and solution-phase method for functionalization of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs with Spirulina polysaccharides (SPS has been developed in the present study. The cellular uptake and anticancer activity of SPS-SeNPs were also evaluated. Monodisperse and homogeneous spherical SPS-SeNPs with diameters ranging from 20 nm to 50 nm were achieved under optimized conditions, which were stable in the solution phase for at least 3 months. SPS surface decoration significantly enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of SeNPs toward several human cancer cell lines. A375 human melanoma cells were found extremely susceptible to SPS-SeNPs with half maximal (50% inhibitory concentration value of 7.94 µM. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed that SPS-SeNPs inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by an increase in sub-G1 cell population, deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and phosphatidylserine translocation. Results suggest that the strategy to use SPS as a surface decorator could be an effective way to enhance the cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy of nanomaterials. SPS-SeNPs may be a potential candidate for further evaluation as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent against human cancers.Keywords: selenium nanoparticles, Spirulina polysaccharide, cellular uptake, anticancer, apoptosis

  14. Truly Fluorescent Excitation-Dependent Carbon Dots and Their Applications in Multicolor Cellular Imaging and Multidimensional Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lulu; Sun, Shan; Zhang, Aidi; Jiang, Kai; Zhang, Ling; Dong, Chaoqing; Huang, Qing; Wu, Aiguo; Lin, Hengwei

    2015-12-16

    Truly fluorescent excitation-dependent carbon dots are prepared, and the relationship between their chemical composition and fluorescent emission is discussed. Furthermore, potential applications of the as-prepared carbon dots to multicolor bio-labeling and multidimodal sensing are demonstrated.

  15. Carbon nanotube-quantum dot nanocomposites as new fluorescence nanoparticles for the determination of trace levels of PAHs in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; Simonet, Bartolome M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2009-10-12

    Amplification of fluorescence is a nanoscale phenomenon which is particularly pronounced in close proximity to metal nanostructures. We have demonstrated for first time that fluorescence amplification can also be produced by single-walled carbon nanotube-quantum dot nanocomposites (SWCNT-QDs). Concretely we exploit the adsorption capabilities of SWCNTs to facilitate the interaction of analytes with the nanoparticle. The fluorescence amplification mechanism is discussed in the paper. The analytical potential of these nanocomposites has been demonstrated for the detection of trace levels of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) in river water samples. Compared with QDs nanoparticles, the fluorescence enhancement achieved with the SWCNT-QDs nanocomposites was 3.6-5.5 times higher.

  16. Bio-nanoplatforms based on carbon dots conjugating with F-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite for cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yafei; Shi, Liyi; Fang, Jianhui; Feng, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great promise in a wide range of bioapplications due to their tunable optical properties and noncytotoxicity. For the first time, a rational strategy was designed to construct new bio-nanoplatforms based on carboxylic acid terminated CDs (CDs-COOH) conjugating with amino terminated F-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite (NFAp) via EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. The monodisperse NFAp nanorods were functionalized with o-phosphoethanolamine (PEA) to provide them with amino groups and render them hydrophilic with respect to the ligand exchange process. The CDs-COOH@PEA-NFAp conjugates exhibits bright blue fluorescence under UV illumination, excellent photostability and colloidal stability. Due to their low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, the CDs-COOH@PEA-NFAp conjugates were successfully applied as bio-nanoplatforms to MCF-7 breast cancer cells for cellular imaging in vitro. More importantly, the functional CDs conjugated to NFAp provide an extended and general approach to construct different water-soluble NFAp bio-nanoplatforms for other easily functionalised luminescent materials. Therefore, these green nanoplatforms may be a prospective candidate for applications in bioimaging or targeted biological therapy and drug delivery.Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great promise in a wide range of bioapplications due to their tunable optical properties and noncytotoxicity. For the first time, a rational strategy was designed to construct new bio-nanoplatforms based on carboxylic acid terminated CDs (CDs-COOH) conjugating with amino terminated F-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite (NFAp) via EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. The monodisperse NFAp nanorods were functionalized with o-phosphoethanolamine (PEA) to provide them with amino groups and render them hydrophilic with respect to the ligand exchange process. The CDs-COOH@PEA-NFAp conjugates exhibits bright blue fluorescence under UV illumination

  17. Fe3O4 nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery; synthesis, characterization and cellular studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palihawadana Arachchige, Maheshika

    with dextran functionalized FITC conjugated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and our results demonstrate that there is a time-dependent distribution of these nanoparticles into different cellular compartments. Moreover, a novel conjugation of anti-cancer drug, Doxorubicin (Dox) with a labeling dye (FITC) onto dextran coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles was developed using existing EDC/NHS technique for specific drug targeting. The experiments on this unique drug-dye dual conjugation with human pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) show that association of Dox onto the surface of nanoparticles enhances its penetration into the cancer cells as compared to the unconjugated drug while releasing Dox into the nucleus of the malignant cells.

  18. An improved, non-functionalized route to plasmonic nanoparticle based cellular probing through osmolyte mediation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddhanta, Soumik; Barman, Ishan

    2017-02-01

    Engineering nanostructured probes for ultra-sensitive detection of specific molecular species, our research seeks to capture the complex changes in cells and tissues that can predict disease progression in an individual. While such nanoparticle-based platforms are rapidly gaining a foothold in cancer diagnostics, one of the most concerning factors is the vulnerability of cells to the interaction with functional nanoparticles thereby raising the specter of systemic toxicity. The nanoparticles end up damaging the cells and disrupting cellular functions thereby impeding their imaging aim. Furthermore, PEGylation, and similar routes, force a tradeoff between desired nanoparticle properties (recognition, uptake, and reduced toxicity) and sensitivity of plasmon-enhanced spectroscopic sensing methods, such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) where the proximal presence of noble metal NP and the organic molecule of interest is key. In this work, we report a trehalose-mediated, non-surface functionalized route for cell-nanoparticle interactions that maintains cell viability while allowing selective interaction of the nanoparticle with the cell surface receptors and subsequent internalization. Through careful electron microscopy of nanoparticle-prostate cancer cells interactions, we elucidated that there exists a dynamic equilibrium between "free" cytosolic diffusion of the nanoparticles and endocytosis through vesicle formation - and trehalose tilts the scale in favor of the latter to mask the toxic effects of the nanoparticles. The precise molecular interpretation of this behavior was further probed through SERS, which directly points towards the protein stabilization properties of trehalose mediation during interaction of the nanoparticles with the plasma membrane components.

  19. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  20. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stirling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake.

  1. Use of colloidal quantum dots as a digitally switched swept light source for gold nanoparticle based hyperspectral microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Kazunori; Joshi, Pratixa. P.; Bhave, Gauri.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to utilize colloidal quantum dots (QDs) as a swept light source for hyperspectral microscopy. The use of QD allows for uniform multicolor emission which covers visible-NIR wavelengths. We used 8 colors of CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots with the peak emission wavelengths from 520 nm to 800 nm. The QDs are packed in a compact enclosure, composing a low-cost, solid-state swept light source that can be easily used in most microscopes. Multicolor emission from the QDs is simply controlled by digitally switching excitation UVLEDs, eliminating the use of mechanically-driven gratings or filters. We used gold nanoparticles as optical markers for hyperspectral microscopy. Due to the effect of localized surface plasmon resonance, gold nanoparticles demonstrate size and shape-dependent absorption spectra. Employed in a standard microscope, the QD light source enabled multispectral absorption imaging of macrophage cells labeled with gold nanorods and nanospheres. PMID:24877018

  2. Cellular uptake and transcytosis of lipid-based nanoparticles across the intestinal barrier: Relevance for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ana Rute; Queiroz, Joana Fontes; Costa Lima, Sofia A; Figueiredo, Francisco; Fernandes, Rui; Reis, Salette

    2016-02-01

    Oral administration is the preferred route for drug delivery and nanosystems represent a promising tool for protection and transport of hardly soluble, chemically unstable and poorly permeable drugs through the intestinal barrier. In the present work, we have studied lipid nanoparticles cellular uptake, internalization pathways and transcytosis routes through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Both lipid nanosystems presented similar size (∼180nm) and surface charge (-30mV). Nanostructured lipid carriers showed a higher cellular uptake and permeability across the barrier, but solid lipid nanoparticles could enter cells faster than the former. The internalization of lipid nanoparticles occurs mainly through a clathrin-mediated endocytosis mechanism, although caveolae-mediated endocytosis is also involved in the uptake. Both lipid nanoparticles were able to cross the intestinal barrier by a preferential transcellular route. This work contributed to a better knowledge of the developed nanosystems for the oral delivery of a wide spectrum of drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of hydrophobically modified pullulan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Liqin Jiang,1 Xuemin Li,1 Lingrong Liu,1 Qiqing Zhang1,21Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs of cholesterol-modified pullulan (CHSP by human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells were investigated. Covalent conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC yielded stably labeled CHSP (FITC-CHSP, which was successfully formulated into NPs (mean particle size 63.0 ± 1.9 nm by dialysis. A cytotoxicity assay clearly indicated that the CHSP NPs did not show significant toxicity in HepG2 cells. The effects of NP concentration, incubation time, and temperature on the cellular uptake of the NPs were systematically evaluated by fluorometry, and the results suggested that cellular uptake of the NPs was concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent. In vitro experiments with endocytic inhibitors revealed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization of CHSP NPs. The intracellular trafficking study demonstrated that CHSP NPs were entrapped in the lysosomes at 1 hour after incubation; colocalization of NPs with either the Golgi apparatus or the endoplasmic reticula was not observed during the entire course of the study. These results suggested that the CHSP NPs may serve as a versatile carrier for intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents.Keywords: cholesterol-modified pullulan, self-assembled nanoparticles, FITC, endocytosis, intracellular trafficking

  4. Aptamer/Graphene Quantum Dots Nanocomposite Capped Fluorescent Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Intracellular Drug Delivery and Real-Time Monitoring of Drug Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fen-Fen; Zhang, Peng-Hui; Xi, Yu; Chen, Jing-Jia; Li, Ling-Ling; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Great challenges in investigating the release of drug in complex cellular microenvironments necessitate the development of stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems with real-time monitoring capability. In this work, a smart drug nanocarrier based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is fabricated by capping graphene quantum dots (GQDs, the acceptor) onto fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs, the donor) via ATP aptamer for real-time monitoring of ATP-triggered drug release. Under extracellular conditions, the fluorescence of FMSNs remains in the "off" state in the low ATP level which is unable to trigger the release of drug. Once specifically recognized and internalized into the target tumor cells by AS1411 aptamer, in the ATP-rich cytoplasm, the conformation switch of the ATP aptamer causes the shedding of the GQDs from the nanocarriers, leading to the release of the loaded drugs and consequently severe cytotoxicity. Simultaneously, the fluorescence of FMSNs turns "on" along with the dissociation of GQDs, which allows real-time monitoring of the release of drug from the pores. Such a drug delivery system features high specificity of dual-target recognition with AS1411 and ATP aptamer as well as high sensitivity of the FRET-based monitoring strategy. Thus, the proposed multifunctional ATP triggered FRET-nanocarriers will find potential applications for versatile drug-release monitoring, efficient drug transport, and targeted cancer therapeutics.

  5. Cellular Delivery of Nanoparticles Revealed with Combined Optical and Isotopic Nanoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proetto, Maria T.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Zhu, Zihua; Patterson, Joseph P.; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K.; Nilewski, Lizanne G.; Rush, Anthony M.; Bell, Nia C.; Evans, James E.; Orr, Galya; Howell, Stephen B.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2016-03-07

    Synthetic drug-carrying nanomaterials offer great potential as targeted cellular delivery vehicles. Typically, their size, morphology, surface chemistry and stability are optimized in order to control their effect on drug release kinetics, cellular uptake pathways, efficiency and site of action. However, methods to track the carriers and their cargo independently at the micro- and nanoscale have been severely underutilized preventing the correlation between structure and function. Here we show that by using combined optical and isotopic nanoscopy we can track the uptake in cancer cells and subsequent drug release of a Pt(II)-loaded anticancer nanoparticle (NP) system. We found that by directly polymerizing an oxaliplatin analogue containing a norbornyl moiety amenable to polymerization via ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) we could generate amphiphiles in one pot. Spontaneous self-assembly of the drug-containing polymers in aqueous solution led to well-defined NPs in a reproducible manner. Our results demonstrate that the covalently loaded NPs are equipotent with free oxaliplatin and are taken up intact via endocytic pathways before release of the cytotoxic cargo. This was confirmed by super resolution fluorescence structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). We anticipate that this type of multimodal cellular tracking of NP and drug will bridge the knowledge gap between particle structure and performance for the vast array of currently generalizable systems in the literature. Furthermore, the use of covalently loaded NP drug systems should allow development of more stable, reproducible and site specific nanodelivery agents.

  6. Direct translocation as major cellular uptake for CADY self-assembling peptide-based nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rydström

    Full Text Available Cell penetrating peptides constitute a potent approach to overcome the limitations of in vivo siRNA delivery. We recently proposed a peptide-based nanoparticle system, CADY, for efficient delivery of siRNA into numerous cell lines. CADY is a secondary amphipathic peptide that forms stable complexes with siRNA thereby improving both their cellular uptake and biological response. With the aim of understanding the cellular uptake mechanism of CADY:siRNA complexes, we have combined biochemical, confocal and electron microscopy approaches. In the present work, we provide evidence that the major route for CADY:siRNA cellular uptake involves direct translocation through the membrane but not the endosomal pathway. We have demonstrated that CADY:siRNA complexes do not colocalize with most endosomal markers and remain fully active in the presence of inhibitors of the endosomal pathway. Moreover, neither electrostatic interactions with cell surface heparan sulphates nor membrane potential are essential for CADY:siRNA cell entry. In contrast, we have shown that CADY:siRNA complexes clearly induce a transient cell membrane permeabilization, which is rapidly restored by cell membrane fluidity. Therefore, we propose that direct translocation is the major gate for cell entry of CADY:siRNA complexes. Membrane perturbation and uptake are driven mainly by the ability of CADY to interact with phospholipids within the cell membrane, followed by rapid localization of the complex in the cytoplasm, without affecting cell integrity or viability.

  7. Surface decoration by Spirulina polysaccharide enhances the cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy of selenium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Tang, Quanming; Zhong, Xueyun; Bai, Yan; Chen, Tianfeng; Zhang, Yibo; Li, Yinghua; Zheng, Wenjie

    2012-01-01

    A simple and solution-phase method for functionalization of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with Spirulina polysaccharides (SPS) has been developed in the present study. The cellular uptake and anticancer activity of SPS-SeNPs were also evaluated. Monodisperse and homogeneous spherical SPS-SeNPs with diameters ranging from 20 nm to 50 nm were achieved under optimized conditions, which were stable in the solution phase for at least 3 months. SPS surface decoration significantly enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of SeNPs toward several human cancer cell lines. A375 human melanoma cells were found extremely susceptible to SPS-SeNPs with half maximal (50%) inhibitory concentration value of 7.94 μM. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed that SPS-SeNPs inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by an increase in sub-G1 cell population, deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and phosphatidylserine translocation. Results suggest that the strategy to use SPS as a surface decorator could be an effective way to enhance the cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy of nanomaterials. SPS-SeNPs may be a potential candidate for further evaluation as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent against human cancers. PMID:22359460

  8. Quantification of the cellular dose and characterization of nanoparticle transport during in vitro testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischitor, Grigore; Parracino, Mariantonietta; La Spina, Rita; Urbán, Patricia; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Bellido, Elena; Valsesia, Andrea; Gioria, Sabrina; Capomaccio, Robin; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Gilliland, Douglas; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2016-08-24

    The constant increase of the use of nanomaterials in consumer products is making increasingly urgent that standardized and reliable in vitro test methods for toxicity screening be made available to the scientific community. For this purpose, the determination of the cellular dose, i.e. the amount of nanomaterials effectively in contact with the cells is fundamental for a trustworthy determination of nanomaterial dose responses. This has often been overlooked in the literature making it difficult to undertake a comparison of datasets from different studies. Characterization of the mechanisms involved in nanomaterial transport and the determination of the cellular dose is essential for the development of predictive numerical models and reliable in vitro screening methods. This work aims to relate key physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) to the kinetics of their deposition on the cellular monolayer. Firstly, an extensive characterization of NPs in complete culture cell medium was performed to determine the diameter and the apparent mass density of the formed NP-serum protein complexes. Subsequently, the kinetics of deposition were studied by UV-vis absorbance measurements in the presence or absence of cells. The fraction of NPs deposited on the cellular layer was found to be highly dependent on NP size and apparent density because these two parameters influence the NP transport. The NP deposition occurred in two phases: phase 1, which consists of cellular uptake driven by the NP-cell affinity, and phase 2 consisting mainly of NP deposition onto the cellular membrane. The fraction of deposited NPs is very different from the initial concentration applied in the in vitro assay, and is highly dependent of the size and density of the NPs, on the associated transport rate and on the exposure duration. This study shows that an accurate characterization is needed and suitable experimental conditions such as initial concentration of NPs and liquid height in

  9. Cellular distribution and degradation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmorato, Patrick; Ceccone, Giacomo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Pascolo, Lorella; Ponti, Jessica; Rossi, François; Salomé, Murielle; Kaulich, Burkhard; Kiskinova, Maya

    2011-11-30

    The effect of the concentration of cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) on their intracellular location and distribution has been explored by synchrotron radiation X-ray and fluorescence microscopy (SR-XRF) monitoring the evolution of NPs elemental composition as well. In cells exposed to low concentrations of CoFe(2)O(4) NPs, the NPs preferentially segregate in the perinuclear region preserving their initial chemical content. At concentrations exceeding 500 μM the XRF spectra indicate the presence of Co and Fe also in the nuclear region, accompanied by sensible changes in the cellular morphology. The increase of the Co/Fe ratio measured in the nuclear compartment indicates that above certain concentrations the CoFe(2)O(4) NPs intracellular distribution could be accompanied by biodegradation resulting in Co accumulation in the nucleus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot Profiled with High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis and High Content Cellomics Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tingting; Stilwell, Jackie L.; Gerion, Daniele; Ding, Lianghao; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Cooke, Patrick A.; Gray, Joe W.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dots (Qdots) are now used extensively for labeling in biomedical research, and this use is predicted to grow because of their many advantages over alternative labeling methods. Uncoated Qdots made of core/shell CdSe/ZnS are toxic to cells because of the release of Cd2+ ions into the cellular environment. This problem has been partially overcome by coating Qdots with polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), or other inert molecules. The most promising coating to date, for reducing toxici...

  11. Cellular uptake and activity of heparin functionalised cerium oxide nanoparticles in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S R Simon; Whitelock, John M; Tomic, Romana; Gunawan, Cindy; Teoh, Wey Yang; Amal, Rose; Lord, Megan S

    2013-06-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are effective in scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study nanoceria synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (dXRD = 12 nm) were functionalised with heparin via an organosilane linker, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Nanoceria were functionalised with approximately 130 heparin molecules per nanoparticle as determined by thermo gravimetric analysis. Heparin functionalised nanoceria were more effectively internalised by the human monocyte cell line, U937, and U937 cells that had been activated with phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA) than bare nanoceria. The heparin functionalised nanoceria were also more effective in scavenging ROS than nanoceria in both activated and unactivated U937 cells. Heparin coupled nanoceria were found to be biologically active due to their ability to bind fibroblast growth factor 2 and signal through FGF receptor 1. Additionally, the heparin-coupled nanoceria, once internalised by the cells, were found to be degraded by 48 h. Together these data demonstrated that heparin enhanced the biological properties of nanoceria in terms of cellular uptake and ROS scavenging, while the nanoceria themselves were more effective at delivering heparin intracellularly than exposing cells to heparin in solution.

  12. Magnetic field-enhanced cellular uptake of doxorubicin loaded magnetic nanoparticles for tumor treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Indu; Pernal, Sebastian; Duproz, Alexandra; Bentley, Jeromy; Engelhard, Herbert; Linninger, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Cancer remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. In recent years, several varieties of nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized with the intent of being utilized as tumor drug delivery vehicles. We have produced superparamagnetic, gold-coated magnetite (Fe3O4@Au) NPs and loaded them with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) for magnetic drug targeting (MDT) of tumors. The synthetic strategy uses the food thickening agent gellan gum (Phytagel) as a negatively charged shell around the Fe3O4@Au NP onto which the positively charged DOX molecules are loaded via electrostatic attraction. The resulting DOX-loaded magnetic nanoparticles (DOX-MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, surface area electron diffraction, zeta potential measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity of the DOX-MNPs was demonstrated using the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay on C6 glioma cells. Cellular uptake of DOX-MNPs was enhanced with magnetic fields, which was quantitatively determined using flow cytometry. This improved uptake also led to greater tumor cell death, which was measured using MTT assay. These MDT results are promising for a new therapy for cancer.

  13. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles increase macrophage atherogenicity: Stimulation of cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and triglycerides accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Paland, Nicole; Aviram, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle research has focused on their toxicity in general, while increasing evidence points to additional specific adverse effects on atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophage cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmark of early atherogenesis, leading to cardiovascular events. To investigate the in vitro atherogenic effects of silicon dioxide (SiO2 ), J774.1 cultured macrophages (murine cell line) were incubated with SiO2 nanoparticle (SP, d = 12 nm, 0-20 µg/mL), followed by cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, TG and cholesterol metabolism analyses. A significant dose-dependent increase in oxidative stress (up to 164%), in cytotoxicity (up to 390% measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release), and in TG content (up to 63%) was observed in SiO2 exposed macrophages compared with control cells. A smaller increase in macrophage cholesterol mass (up to 22%) was noted. TG accumulation in macrophages was not due to a decrease in TG cell secretion or to an increased TG biosynthesis rate, but was the result of attenuated TG hydrolysis secondary to decreased lipase activity and both adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein expression (by 42 and 25%, respectively). Overall, SPs showed pro-atherogenic effects on macrophages as observed by cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and TG accumulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 713-723, 2016.

  14. Fast intracellular dissolution and persistent cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles in CHO-K1 cells: implication for cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xiumei; Miclaus, Teodora; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular stability and chemical state of Ag NPs are still not very well studied. In this work, we systematically investigated the cellular uptake pathways, intracellular dissolution and chemic...

  15. Comparison of organic and inorganic germanium compounds in cellular radiosensitivity and preparation of germanium nanoparticles as a radiosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hsing; Hsu, Tzu-Sheng; Yang, Pei-Ming; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Perng, Tsong-Pyng; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the radiosensitizing effect between organic and inorganic germanium compounds and to investigate whether nanometer-sized germanium particles can act as radiosensitizers. Bis (2-carboxyethylgermanium) sesquioxide (Ge-132), germanium oxide (GeO(2)) and germanium nanoparticles were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by clonogenic survival assay. Cellular DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay, confocal microscopy and the cellular level of phospho-histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX). Nanometer-sized germanium particles were fabricated. They have a similar radiosensitizing effect as that of GeO(2). Conversely, Ge-132 did not enhance the radiosensitivity of cells. Comet assay was employed to evaluate the level of DNA damage and confirmed that inorganic germanium compounds enhanced cellular radiosensitivity. Notably, the comet assay indicated that the nanoparticle itself caused a higher level of DNA damage. The possibility that germanium nanoparticles per se caused DNA damage was ruled out when the cellular level of gamma-H2AX was examined. We demonstrated that inorganic but not organic germanium compounds exerted radiosensitizing effect in cells. Nanometer-sized germanium particles were fabricated and were able to enhance the radiosensitivity of cells. Confounding effect may occur when comet assay is used to estimate the level of DNA damage in the presence of germanium nanoparticles.

  16. Cellular Recognition and Trafficking of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles by Macrophage Scavenger Receptor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Cassens, Kaylyn J.; Tan, Ruimin; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Zangar, Richard C.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2011-09-01

    The internalization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into cells is known to involve active transport mechanisms, yet the precise biological molecules involved are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the uptake of amorphous silica ENPs (92 nm) by macrophage cells is strongly inhibited by silencing expression of scavenger receptor A (SR-A). In addition, ENP uptake is augmented by introducing SR-A expression into human cells that are normally non-phagocytic. Confocal fluorescent microscopy analyses show that the majority of single or small clusters of silica ENPs co-localize intracellularly with SR-A and are internalized through a pathway characteristic of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In contrast, larger silica NP agglomerates (>500 nm) are poorly co-localized with the receptor, suggesting independent trafficking or internalization pathways are involved. SR-A silencing also caused decreased cellular secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to silica ENPs. As SR-A is expressed in macrophages throughout the reticulo-endothelial system, this pathway is likely an important determinant of the biodistribution of, and cellular response to ENPs.

  17. Selective cellular uptake and induction of apoptosis of cancer-targeted selenium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyu; He, Lizhen; Liu, Wen; Fan, Cundong; Zheng, Wenjie; Wong, Yum-Shing; Chen, Tianfeng

    2013-09-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential cancer therapeutic payloads. However, the in vivo targeting drug delivery has been challenging. Herein, we describe the synthesis of tansferrin (Tf)-conjugated SeNPs and its use as a cancer-targeted drug delivery system to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy. Tf as targeting ligand significantly enhances the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded SeNPs through clathrin-mediated and caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis in cancer cells overexpressing transferrin receptor, and increases their selectivity between cancer and normal cells. DOX-loaded and Tf-conjugated SeNPs (Tf-SeNPs) exhibits unprecedented enhanced cytotoxicity toward cancer cells through induction of apoptosis with the involvement of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Internalized Tf-SeNPs triggers intracellular ROS overproduction, thus activates p53 and MAPKs pathways to promote cell apoptosis. In the nude mice xenograft experiment, Tf-SeNPs significantly inhibits the tumor growth via induction of p53-mediated apoptosis. This cancer-targeted design of SeNPs opens a new path for synergistic treating of cancer with higher efficacy and decreased side effects.

  18. Compound Cellular Imaging of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy by Using Gold Nanoparticles and Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Woei Liaw

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Combining the scattered light of gold nanoparticles (GNPs and the fluorescence of dye molecules, a compound cellular imaging of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM is obtained. The human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-435S, BCRC 60429 is used for experiment. These cells are incubated with a glucose medium containing GNPs for 26 hours, and then are stained by Prodium Iodide (PI for their nuclei. By using a single laser to illuminate these cells and adjusting the ranges of two bandpass filters for the detection, the scattered light from the GNPs and the fluorescence of PI can be induced simultaneously, but be detected separately without crosstalk. Furthermore, a compound cellular image can be obtained by merging the two images of the expressions of GNP and PI together. From the TEM images of these cells, it is observed that GNPs are aggregated in the vesicles of the cytoplasm due to the cell’s endocytosis. The aggregation of GNPs makes the surface plasmon resonance band of GNPs broadened, so that strong scattered light from GNPs can be generated by the illumination of different-wavelength lasers (458, 488, 514, 561, and 633 nm.

  19. Ambient-processed colloidal quantum dot solar cells via individual pre-encapsulation of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Ratan; Tang, Jiang; Barkhouse, D Aaron; Wang, Xihua; Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G; Brzozowski, Lukasz; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2010-05-05

    We report colloidal quantum dot solar cells fabricated under ambient atmosphere with an active area of 2.9 mm(2) that exhibit 3.6% solar power conversion efficiency. The devices are based on PbS tuned via the quantum size effect to have a first excitonic peak at 950 nm. Because the formation of native oxides and sulfates on PbS leads to p-type doping and deep trap formation and because such dopants and traps dramatically influence device performance, prior reports of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have insisted on processing under an inert atmosphere. Here we report a novel ligand strategy in which we first encapsulate the quantum dots in the solution phase with the aid of a strongly bound N-2,4,6-trimethylphenyl-N-methyldithiocarbamate ligand. This allows us to carry out film formation and all subsequent device fabrication under an air atmosphere.

  20. Ambient-Processed Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Individual Pre-Encapsulation of Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Debnath, Ratan

    2010-05-05

    We report colloidal quantum dot solar cells fabricated under ambient atmosphere with an active area of 2.9 mm2 that exhibit 3.6% solar power conversion efficiency. The devices are based on PbS tuned via the quantum size effect to have a first excitonic peak at 950 nm. Because the formation of native oxides and sulfates on PbS leads to p-type doping and deep trap formation and because such dopants and traps dramatically influence device performance, prior reports of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have insisted on processing under an inert atmosphere. Here we report a novel ligand strategy in which we first encapsulate the quantum dots in the solution phase with the aid of a strongly bound N-2,4,6-trimethylphenyl-N-methyldithiocarbamate ligand. This allows us to carry out film formation and all subsequent device fabrication under an air atmosphere. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Segmented flow reactor for synthesis of quantum dot nanocrystals and plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbwahnche, R. C.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Ryzhov, O. A.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    This research presents an automated method of synthesizing semiconductor and metal nanoparticles using flow rector synthesis as a new alternative to the batch method of synthesizing nanoparticles. Experiments were carried out to determine the optimal flow rates of reagents droplets. The reactor was successfully applied to the synthesis of colloidal solutions of semiconductor (CdSe) and metal (Ag) nanoparticles. This instrument is applicable both in material science laboratories and in industry.

  2. Camphor-mediated synthesis of carbon nanoparticles, graphitic shell encapsulated carbon nanocubes and carbon dots for bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Goldie; Ravichandran, M.; Merupo, Victor-Ishrayelu; Shinde, Sachin; Mewada, Ashmi; Ramirez, Jose Tapia; Velumani, S.; Sharon, Madhuri; Sharon, Maheshwar

    2016-01-01

    A green method for an efficient synthesis of water-soluble carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), graphitic shell encapsulated carbon nanocubes (CNCs), Carbon dots (CDs) using Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora) is demonstrated. Here, we describe a competent molecular fusion and fission route for step-wise synthesis of CDs. Camphor on acidification and carbonization forms CNPs, which on alkaline hydrolysis form CNCs that are encapsulated by thick graphitic layers and on further reduction by sodium borohydride yielded CDs. Though excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence is observed in all the three carbon nanostructures, CDs possess enhanced photoluminescent properties due to more defective carbonaceous structures. The surface hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups make them water soluble in nature. They possess excellent photostability, higher quantum yield, increased absorption, decreased cytotoxicity and hence can be utilized as a proficient bio imaging agent. PMID:26905737

  3. A Self-Consistent Scheme for Optical Response of large Hybrid Networks of Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Hayati, L.; Lane, C.; Bansil, A.; Mosallaei, H.

    We discuss a self-consistent scheme for treating the optical response of large, hybrid networks of semiconducting quantum dots (SQDs) and plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our method is efficient and scalable and becomes exact in the limiting case of weakly interacting SQDs. The self-consistent equations obtained for the steady state are analogous to the Heisenberg equations of motion for the density matrix of a SQD placed in an effective electric field computed within the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). Illustrative applications of the theory to square and honeycomb SQD, MNP and hybrid SDQ/MNP lattices as well as SQD-MNP dimers are presented. Our results demonstrate that hybrid SQD-MNP lattices can provide flexible platforms for light manipulation with tunable resonant characteristics.

  4. Self-consistent scheme for optical response of large hybrid networks of semiconductor quantum dots and plasmonic metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, L.; Lane, C.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.; Mosallaei, H.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a self-consistent scheme for treating the optical response of large, hybrid networks of semiconducting quantum dots (SQDs) and plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our method is efficient and scalable and becomes exact in the limiting case of weakly interacting SQDs. The self-consistent equations obtained for the steady state are analogous to the von Neumann equations of motion for the density matrix of a SQD placed in an effective electric field computed within the discrete dipole approximation. Illustrative applications of the theory to square and honeycomb SQD, MNP, and hybrid SDQ-MNP lattices as well as SQD-MNP dimers are presented. Our results demonstrate that hybrid SQD-MNP lattices can provide flexible platforms for light manipulation with tunable resonant characteristics.

  5. Development of carbon dots modified fluorescent molecular imprinted Polymer@Ag/AgCl nanoparticle for hepatocellular carcinoma marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karfa, Paramita; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a sensitive and selective fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was developed for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarker i.e. alpha feto protein (AFP) using Ag/AgCl as platform. Here, the carbon dots and Ag/AgCl nanoparticles were functionalized with vinyl groups and used as functional monomer for synthesis of AFP-imprinted polymer. The imprinted polymer shows a linear range of 3.96 ng mL-1 to 80.0 ng mL-1 with detection limit of 0.42 ng mL-1.The adsorption property of the MIP@Ag/AgCl was studied and shows the high affinity binding towards their target analyte without any cross-reactivity and false-positive or false-negative results.

  6. Directly deposited quantum dot solids using a colloidally stable nanoparticle ink

    KAUST Repository

    Fischer, Armin H.

    2013-08-12

    We develop a photovoltaic colloidal quantum dot ink that allows for lossless, single-step coating of large areas in a manufacturing-compatible process. Our materials strategy involves a solution-phase ligand exchange to transport compatible linkers that yield 1-thioglycerol-capped PbS quantum dots in dimethyl sulfoxide with a photoluminescence quantum yield of 24%. A proof-of-principle solar cell made from the ink exhibits 2.1% power conversion efficiency. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cobalt-doped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles as efficient strategy to enhance performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozi, Najmeh; Dehghani, Hossein; Afrooz, Malihe

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Co2+ ion incorporation into CdS layer on the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). Quantum dots are deposited by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method on the mesoporous TiO2 film. The doped system modifies the structure of photoanode that leads to an increase in short circuit current density (Jsc) from 13.16 mA cm-2 to 16.6 mA cm-2 in the un-doped system. Electrochemical impedance analysis (EIS) reveals a decrease in charge transfer resistance at the TiO2/QDs/electrolyte interface that arises from the presence of an internal recombination pathway. The highest energy conversion efficiency (η) of 3.16% is obtained under standard air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) simulated sun light by doping the optimized amount of Co2+ ion in CdS nanoparticles, corresponding to efficiency increment (35%) compared to the un-doped system. The origin of the increase in the efficiency is attributed to the dominance of charge collection to recombination. To further investigation of the electron transport time in the photoanode, the intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) is performed under standard conditions. Our obtained results can help to develop a simple and effective method to enhance the efficiency in the QDSSCs.

  8. Experimental investigation of energy transfer between CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and different-sized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yusheng; Wang, Qilong; Qi, Zhiyang; Li, Chen; Xia, Jun; Li, Xiaohua

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid nanostructures of quantum dots(QDs) and metallic nanostructure are attractive for future use in a variety of optoelectronic devices. For photodetection applications, it is important that the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs is quenched by the metallic nanostructures. Here, the quenching efficiency of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) with different sized gold nanoparticles (NPs) films through energy transfer is investigated by measuring the PL intensity of the hybrid nanostructures. In our research, the gold NPs films are formed by the post-annealing of the deposited Au films on the quartz substrate. We find that the energy transfer from the QDs to the Au NPs strongly depends on the sizes of the Au NPs. For CdSe/ZnS QDs direct contact with the Au NPs films, the largest energy transfer efficiency are detected when the resonance absorption peak of the Au NPs is nearest to the emission peak of the CdSe/ZnS QDs. However, when there is a PMMA spacer between the QDs layer and the Au NPs films, firstly, we find that the energy transfer efficiency is weakened, and the largest energy transfer efficiency is obtained when the resonant absorption peak of the Au NPs is farthest to the emission peak wavelength of CdSe/ZnS QDs. These results will be useful for the potential design of the high efficiency QDs optoelectronic devices.

  9. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  10. A high-throughput homogeneous immunoassay based on Förster resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Jing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhengjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Chengquan [Changzhou College of Information Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Pan, Xiaohu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Liu, Songqin, E-mail: liusq@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2013-02-06

    Graphical abstract: A Förster resonance energy transfer system by using polyclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as donor and monoclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as acceptor for sensitive detection of tumor marker was proposed. Highlights: ► A homogeneous immunosensing strategy based on FRET for detection of tumor marker was proposed. ► Close of QDs and AuNPs allow the occurrence of quenching the photoluminescence of nano-bio-probes. ► Signal quenching was monitored by a self-developed image analyzer. ► The fluorometric assay format is attractive for widespread carcinoma screening and even field use. -- Abstract: A novel homogeneous immunoassay based on Förster resonance energy transfer for sensitive detection of tumor, e.g., marker with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), was proposed. The assay was consisted of polyclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as donor and monoclonal goat anti-CEA antibody labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as acceptor. In presence of CEA, the bio-affinity between antigen and antibody made the QDs and AuNPs close enough, thus the photoluminescence (PL) quenching of CdTe QDs occurred. The PL properties could be transformed into the fluorometric variation, corresponding to the target antigen concentration, and could be easily monitored and analyzed with the home-made image analysis software. The fluorometric results indicated a linear detection range of 1–110 ng mL{sup −1} for CEA, with a detection limit of 0.3 ng mL{sup −1}. The proposed assay configuration was attractive for carcinoma screening or single sample in point-of-care testing, and even field use. In spite of the limit of available model analyte, this approach could be easily extended to detection of a wide range of biomarkers.

  11. Protein Corona Influences Cellular Uptake of Gold Nanoparticles by Phagocytic and Nonphagocytic Cells in a Size-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaju; Tian, Xin; Wu, Anqing; Li, Jianxiang; Tian, Jian; Chong, Yu; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Ge, Cuicui

    2015-09-23

    The interaction at nanobio is a critical issue in designing safe nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Recent studies have reported that it is nanoparticle-protein corona rather than bare nanoparticle that determines the nanoparticle-cell interactions, including endocytic pathway and biological responses. Here, we demonstrate the effects of protein corona on cellular uptake of different sized gold nanoparticles in different cell lines. The experimental results show that protein corona significantly decreases the internalization of Au NPs in a particle size- and cell type-dependent manner. Protein corona exhibits much more significant inhibition on the uptake of large-sized Au NPs by phagocytic cell than that of small-sized Au NPs by nonphagocytic cell. The endocytosis experiment indicates that different endocytic pathways might be responsible for the differential roles of protein corona in the interaction of different sized Au NPs with different cell lines. Our findings can provide useful information for rational design of nanomaterials in biomedical application.

  12. The toxicity of plastic nanoparticles to green algae as influenced by surface modification, medium hardness and cellular adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Tom M; Hartmann, Nanna B; Kleijn, J Mieke; Garnæs, Jørgen; van de Meent, Dik; Jan Hendriks, A; Baun, Anders

    2017-02-01

    To investigate processes possibly underlying accumulation and ecological effects of plastic nano-particles we have characterized their interaction with the cell wall of green algae. More specifically, we have investigated the influence of particle surface functionality and water hardness (Ca(2+) concentration) on particle adsorption to algae cell walls. Polystyrene nanoparticles with different functional groups (non-functionalized, -COOH and -NH2) as well as coated (starch and PEG) gold nanoparticles were applied in these studies. Depletion measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that adsorption of neutral and positively charged plastic nanoparticles onto the cell wall of P. subcapitata was stronger than that of negatively charged plastic particles. Results indicated that binding affinity is a function of both inter-particle and particle-cell wall interactions which are in turn influenced by the medium hardness and particle concentration. Physicochemical modelling using DLVO theory was used to interpret the experimental data, using also values for interfacial surface free energies. Our study shows that material properties and medium conditions play a crucial role in the rate and state of nanoparticle bio-adsorption for green algae. The results show that the toxicity of nanoparticles can be better described and assessed by using appropriate dose metrics including material properties, complexation/agglomeration behavior and cellular attachment and adsorption. The applied methodology provides an efficient and feasible approach for evaluating potential accumulation and hazardous effects of nanoparticles to algae caused by particle interactions with the algae cell walls.

  13. Investigation of biomimetic shear stress on cellular uptake and mechanism of polystyrene nanoparticles in various cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taehee; Park, Chulhun; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment are affected by fluid shear stress generated by blood flow in the vascular microenvironment and interstitial flows in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, we investigated how fluidic shear stress affects cellular uptake as well as the endocytosis mechanism of nanoparticles using a biomimetic microfluidic system that mimics the human dynamic environment. Positively charged amino-modified polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNs) at 100 μg/mL were delivered to cancer cells under static and biomimetic dynamic conditions (0.5 dyne/cm(2)). Additionally, the experiment was done in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors specific for one of the endocytosis pathways. To evaluate cellular uptake of cationic PSNs, the fluorescence intensity of cationic PSNs in cancer cells was measured by flow cytometer and fluorescence images were taken using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cancer cells in dynamic conditions exhibited higher cellular uptake of PSNs and showed different cellular uptake mechanisms compared with those in static conditions. From these results, it suggested that biomimetic dynamic conditions stimulated specific endocytosis and prompted cellular uptake. It was also important to consider fluidic shear stress as one of the critical factors because cellular uptake and drug delivery could play a key role in cancer cells and metastasis.

  14. Effects of transport inhibitors on the cellular uptake of carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles in different cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago dos Santos

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is expected to play a vital role in the rapidly developing field of nanomedicine, creating innovative solutions and therapies for currently untreatable diseases, and providing new tools for various biomedical applications, such as drug delivery and gene therapy. In order to optimize the efficacy of nanoparticle (NP delivery to cells, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms by which NPs are internalized by cells, as this will likely determine their ultimate sub-cellular fate and localisation. Here we have used pharmacological inhibitors of some of the major endocytic pathways to investigate nanoparticle uptake mechanisms in a range of representative human cell lines, including HeLa (cervical cancer, A549 (lung carcinoma and 1321N1 (brain astrocytoma. Chlorpromazine and genistein were used to inhibit clathrin and caveolin mediated endocytosis, respectively. Cytochalasin A and nocodazole were used to inhibit, respectively, the polymerisation of actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Uptake experiments were performed systematically across the different cell lines, using carboxylated polystyrene NPs of 40 nm and 200 nm diameters, as model NPs of sizes comparable to typical endocytic cargoes. The results clearly indicated that, in all cases and cell types, NPs entered cells via active energy dependent processes. NP uptake in HeLa and 1321N1 cells was strongly affected by actin depolymerisation, while A549 cells showed a stronger inhibition of NP uptake (in comparison to the other cell types after microtubule disruption and treatment with genistein. A strong reduction of NP uptake was observed after chlorpromazine treatment only in the case of 1321N1 cells. These outcomes suggested that the same NP might exploit different uptake mechanisms to enter different cell types.

  15. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2014-10-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ~70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using

  16. Changes in Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in Cellular Environments are Modulated by Nanoparticle PEGylation and Serum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen L.; Jackson, Meredith A.; Lin, Adam Y.; Figueroa, Elizabeth R.; Hu, Ying S.; Evans, Emily R.; Asthana, Vishwaratn; Young, Joseph K.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2016-06-01

    When plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are internalized by cells and agglomerate within intracellular vesicles, their optical spectra can shift and broaden as a result of plasmonic coupling of NPs in close proximity to one another. For such optical changes to be accounted for in the design of plasmonic NPs for light-based biomedical applications, quantitative design relationships between designable factors and spectral shifts need to be established. Here we begin building such a framework by investigating how functionalization of gold NPs (AuNPs) with biocompatible poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG), and the serum conditions in which the NPs are introduced to cells impact the optical changes exhibited by NPs in a cellular context. Utilizing darkfield hyperspectral imaging, we find that PEGylation decreases the spectral shifting and spectral broadening experienced by 100 nm AuNPs following uptake by Sk-Br-3 cells, but up to a 33 ± 12 nm shift in the spectral peak wavelength can still occur. The serum protein-containing biological medium also modulates the spectral changes experienced by cell-exposed NPs through the formation of a protein corona on the surface of NPs that mediates NP interactions with cells: PEGylated AuNPs exposed to cells in serum-free conditions experience greater spectral shifts than in serum-containing environments. Moreover, increased concentrations of serum (10, 25, or 50 %) result in the formation of smaller intracellular NP clusters and correspondingly reduced spectral shifts after 5 and 10 h NP-cell exposure. However, after 24 h, NP cluster size and spectral shifts are comparable and become independent of serum concentration. By elucidating the impact of PEGylation and serum concentration on the spectral changes experienced by plasmonic NPs in cells, this study provides a foundation for the optical engineering of plasmonic NPs for use in biomedical environments.

  17. A Novel Chitosan CpG Nanoparticle Regulates Cellular and Humoral Immunity of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To develop a safe and novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity and resistance of animals against E.coli infection. Methods An 88-base immunostimulatory oligodeoxynuleotide containing eleven CpG motifs (CpG ODN)was synthesized and amplified by PCR. The chitosan nanoparticle (CNP) was prepared by ion linking method to entrap the CpG ODN that significantly promotes the proliferation of lymphocytes of pig in vitro. Then the CpG- CNP was inoculated into 21-day old Kunming mice, which were orally challenged with virulent K88/K99 E. Coli 35 days after inoculation. Blood was collected from the tail vein of mice on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, and 49 after inoculation to detect the changes and content of immunoglobulins, cytokines and immune cells by ELISA, such as IgG, IgA, IgM, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6. Results The CpG provoked remarkable proliferation of lymphocytes of pig in vitro in comparison with that of control group (P<0.05). The inoculation with CpG-CNP significantly raised the content of IgG, IgM, and IgA in the sera of immunized mice (P<0.05). The levels of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 in the mice significantly increased in comparison with those in controls (P<0.05), so was the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in immunized mice. The humoral and cellular immunities were significantly enhanced in immunized mice, which resisted the infection of E. coli and survived, while the control mice manifested evident symptoms and lesions of infection. Conclusions CpG-CNP can significantly promote cellular and humoral immunity and resistance of mice against E. coli infection, and can be utilized as an effective adjuvant to improve the immunoprotection and resistance of porcine against infectious disease.

  18. Augmented cellular trafficking and endosomal escape of porous silicon nanoparticles via zwitterionic bilayer polymer surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick V; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-08-01

    The development of a stable vehicle with low toxicity, high cellular internalization, efficient endosomal escape, and optimal drug release profile is a key bottleneck in nanomedicine. To overcome all these problems, we have developed a successful layer-by-layer method to covalently conjugate polyethyleneimine (PEI) and poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE-MA) copolymer on the surface of undecylenic acid functionalized thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs), forming a bilayer zwitterionic nanocomposite containing free positive charge groups of hyper-branched PEI disguised by the PMVE-MA polymer. The surface smoothness, charge and hydrophilicity of the developed NPs considerably improved the colloidal and plasma stabilities via enhanced suspensibility and charge repulsion. Furthermore, despite the surface negative charge of the bilayer polymer-conjugated NPs, the cellular trafficking and endosomal escape were significantly increased in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we also showed that the conjugation of surface free amine groups of the highly toxic UnTHCPSi-PEI (Un-P) NPs to the carboxylic groups of PMVE-MA renders acceptable safety features to the system and preserves the endosomal escape properties via proton sponge mechanism of the free available amine groups located inside the hyper-branched PEI layer. Moreover, the double layer protection not only controlled the aggregation of the NPs and reduced the toxicity, but also sustained the drug release of an anticancer drug, methotrexate, with further improved cytotoxicity profile of the drug-loaded particles. These results provide a proof-of-concept evidence that such zwitterionic polymer-based PSi nanocomposites can be extensively used as a promising candidate for cytosolic drug delivery.

  19. The effect of blood protein adsorption on cellular uptake of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouni, Zouhir E; Gjerdet, Nils R; Cimpan, Mihaela R; Høl, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto nanoparticles (NPs) in biological fluids has emerged as an important factor when testing biological responses to NPs, as this may influence both uptake and subsequent toxicity. The aim of the present study was to quantify the adsorption of proteins onto TiO2 NPs and to test the influence on cellular uptake. The surface composition of the particles was characterized by thermal analysis and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of three blood proteins, ie, human serum albumin (HSA), γ-globulins (Glbs), and fibrinogen (Fib), onto three types of anatase NPs of different sizes was quantified for each protein. The concentration of the adsorbed protein was measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry using the Bradford method. The degree of cellular uptake was quantified by inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, and visualized by an ultra-high resolution imaging system. The proteins were adsorbed onto all of the anatase NPs. The quantity adsorbed increased with time and was higher for the smaller particles. Fib and Glbs showed the highest affinity to TiO2 NPs, while the lowest was seen for HSA. The adsorption of proteins affected the surface charge and the hydrodynamic diameter of the NPs in cell culture medium. The degree of particle uptake was highest in protein-free medium and in the presence HSA, followed by culture medium supplemented with Glbs, and lowest in the presence of Fib. The results indicate that the uptake of anatase NPs by fibroblasts is influenced by the identity of the adsorbed protein.

  20. Dust evolution, a global view I. Nanoparticles, nascence, nitrogen and natural selection … joining the dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The role and importance of nanoparticles for interstellar chemistry and beyond is explored within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), focusing on their active surface chemistry, the effects of nitrogen doping and the natural selection of interesting nanoparticle sub-structures. Nanoparticle-driven chemistry, and in particular the role of intrinsic epoxide-type structures, could provide a viable route to the observed gas phase OH in tenuous interstellar clouds en route to becoming molecular clouds. The aromatic-rich moieties present in asphaltenes probably provide a viable model for the structures present within aromatic-rich interstellar carbonaceous grains. The observed doping of such nanoparticle structures with nitrogen, if also prevalent in interstellar dust, could perhaps have important and observable consequences for surface chemistry and the formation of precursor pre-biotic species.

  1. A Novel DNA Nanosensor Based on CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots and Synthesized Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hushiarian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticle-enhanced biosensors have been extensively researched, few studies have systematically characterized the roles of nanoparticles in enhancing biosensor functionality. This paper describes a successful new method in which DNA binds directly to iron oxide nanoparticles for use in an optical biosensor. A wide variety of nanoparticles with different properties have found broad application in biosensors because their small physical size presents unique chemical, physical, and electronic properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Of all nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are proving to be a versatile tool, an excellent case in point being in DNA bioassays, where magnetic nanoparticles are often used for optimization of the hybridization and separation of target DNA. A critical step in the successful construction of a DNA biosensor is the efficient attachment of biomolecules to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. To date, most methods of synthesizing these nanoparticles have led to the formation of hydrophobic particles that require additional surface modifications. As a result, the surface to volume ratio decreases and nonspecific bindings may occur so that the sensitivity and efficiency of the device deteriorates. A new method of large-scale synthesis of iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles which results in the magnetite particles being in aqueous phase, was employed in this study. Small modifications were applied to design an optical DNA nanosensor based on sandwich hybridization. Characterization of the synthesized particles was carried out using a variety of techniques and CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots were used as the reporter markers in a spectrofluorophotometer. We showed conclusively that DNA binds to the surface of ironoxide nanoparticles without further surface modifications and that these magnetic nanoparticles can be efficiently utilized as biomolecule carriers in biosensing devices.

  2. Comparison of cellular toxicity between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seunghyon [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Eun [Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Center for NanoSafety Metrology, Division of Convergence Technology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Daegyu [LG Electronics (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Chang Gyu [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Environmental and Energy Systems Research Division (Korea, Republic of); Pikhitsa, Peter V. [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing, E-mail: mchotox@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mansoo, E-mail: mchoi@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The cellular toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles (SCNPs) was investigated by analyzing the comparative cell viability. For the reasonable comparison, physicochemical characteristics were controlled thoroughly such as crystallinity, carbon bonding characteristic, hydrodynamic diameter, and metal contents of the particles. To understand relation between cellular toxicity of the particles and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we measured unpaired singlet electrons of the particles and intracellular ROS, and analyzed cellular toxicity with/without the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Regardless of the presence of NAC, the cellular toxicity of SCNPs was found to be lower than that of MWCNTs. Since both particles show similar crystallinity, hydrodynamic size, and Raman signal with negligible contribution of remnant metal particles, the difference in cell viability would be ascribed to the difference in morphology, i.e., spherical shape (aspect ratio of one) for SCNP and elongated shape (high aspect ratio) for MWCNT.

  3. New generation of β-cyclodextrin-chitosan nanoparticles encapsulated quantum dots loaded with anticancer drug for tumor-target drug delivery and imaging of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Guo, Jin; Ding, Li; Zhong, Wenying

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to report the drug delivery system that can integrate the functional building blocks for optical pH-sensing, cancer cell imaging and controlled drug release into a single nanoparticle. The CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were prepared by in-situ immobilization of ZnSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in β-cyclodextrin (CD) and chitosan (CS) polymer loaded with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Synthetic CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were approximately 100 nm in size and with blue fluorescence. The drug encapsulation efficiency of nanoparticles was 22.36 % and the encapsulated drug was released via a controlled release mechanism after a 9 h plateau was reached. The efficiency of the drug release in tumor microenvironments (pH 5.3 buffer solutions) was higher than that in physiological pH 7.4. In vitro cytotoxicity assay results showed that the blank nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity and therefore can be used as the fluorescence tracer, and the SAHA-encapsulated nanoparticles expressed an anticancer effect. Confocal microscopy and in vivo imaging studies showed that the developed nanoparticles had cytotoxicity in resistant cancer cells and preferentially accumulated in tumors. CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles with excellent long-term optical properties have great prospects for the development of targeting tracers and anti-tumor biomedical research.

  4. Coupling of InAs/InP quantum dots to the plasmon resonance of In nanoparticles grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiayue; Jin, C. Y.; Skacel, Matthias; Urbańczyk, Adam; Xia, Tian; van Veldhoven, P. J.; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-05-01

    We report strongly modified optical emission of InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) coupled to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of In nanoparticles grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. With increasing In deposition time, the In nanoparticle size increases and the SPR redshifts significantly. When overlapping with the SPR, the excited state photoluminescence of the QDs is strongly enhanced due to QD-SPR coupling while the ground state photoluminescence is quenched due to non-radiative energy transfer. This is underpinned by the wavelength dependence of the spontaneous emission decay time which shows an opposite trend compared to that of bare QDs.

  5. Overcoming the polyethylene glycol dilemma via pathological environment-sensitive change of the surface property of nanoparticles for cellular entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Susumu; Itakura, Shoko; Nakai, Mayumi; Nakayama, Kayoko; Morimoto, Satoshi; Suzuki, Satoko; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-05-28

    Modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is currently considered an important strategy for anti-cancer drug delivery, because PEGylated-nanoparticles would be effectively delivered to tumor tissue by enhanced permeation and retention effects. However, PEGylation suppresses the cellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) to target cells (known as the PEG dilemma). Here, we propose a novel strategy, namely conferring a pathological environment-sensitive property of nanoparticles for overcoming the PEG dilemma. Specifically, although nanoparticles have an overall negative surface charge to avoid interactions with biogenic substances in blood circulation, inversion of surface charge (to positive) at the pH of the tumor microenvironment may allow the nanoparticles to be taken up by cancer cells. To prove this concept, charge-invertible nanoparticles modified with novel slightly acidic pH-sensitive peptide (SAPSP-NPs) were developed. The negatively-charged SAPSP-NPs were delivered to tumor tissue, and were successfully taken up by cancer cells upon inversion of the surface charge to positive at intratumoral pH. SAPSP-NPs may serve as an alternative carrier to the PEGylated NP for anti-cancer drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunostimulatory properties and enhanced TNF- α mediated cellular immunity for tumor therapy by C60(OH)20 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Jiao, Fang; Qiu, Yang; Li, Wei; Qu, Ying; Tian, Chixia; Li, Yufeng; Bai, Ru; Lao, Fang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2009-10-01

    Publications concerning the mechanism of biological activity, especially the immunological mechanism of C60(OH)20 nanoparticles, are relatively limited. However, the structure and characteristics of this carbon allotrope have been widely investigated. In this paper, we have demonstrated that water-soluble C60(OH)20 nanoparticles have an efficient anti-tumor activity in vivo, and show specific immunomodulatory effects to the immune cells, such as T cells and macrophages, both in vivo and in vitro. For example, C60(OH)20 nanoparticles can increase the production of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines (IL-2, IFN- γ and TNF-α), and decrease the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6) in serum samples. On the other hand, C60(OH)20 nanoparticles show almost no adverse effect to the viability of immune cells in vitro but stimulate the immune cells to release more cytokines, in particular TNF- α, which plays a key role in the cellular immune process to help eliminate abnormal cells. TNF- α production increased almost three-fold in treated T lymphocytes and macrophages. Accordingly, we conclude that C60(OH)20 nanoparticles have an efficient anti-tumor activity and this effect is associated with an increased CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio and the enhancement of TNF- α production. The data suggest that C60(OH)20 nanoparticles can improve the immune response to help to scavenge and kill tumor cells.

  7. Improving the luminescence properties of aequorin by conjugating to CdSe/ZnS quantum dot nanoparticles: Red shift and slowing decay rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nezam; Shanehsaz, Maryam; Sajedi, Reza H; Gharaat, Morteza; Ghahremanzadeh, Ramin

    2016-09-01

    Changing the properties of photoprotein aequorin such as the wavelength emission and decay half-life by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) phenomenon is the main aim in this paper. BRET system was set up with CdSe/ZnS quantum dot nanoparticles as an acceptor molecule and photoprotein as an energy donor molecule. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles with very interesting optical properties, including broad excitation spectra, narrow and the symmetric band width emission spectra, tunable by their sizes, compositions, negligible photo-bleaching and good chemical and photo-stability. In this QD-BRET system, aequorin is conjugated to the carboxyl groups on quantum dot surface by EDC/NHS chemistry as cross linker. Bioluminescence energy generates by aequorin upon adding Ca(2+) and transfers to the quantum dots in a radiationless manner and emits at a longer wavelength. The determined bioluminescent parameters for this method included aequorin activity, emission spectra and decay half-life time. In fact, this spectrum tuning strategy resulted in a change in bioluminescent properties of photoprotein, therefore, the maximum emission wavelength shifted from 455 to 540nm and the decay time increased from 3.76 to 12.11s. Nowadays, photoproteins with different characteristics are capable of being employed as a reporter in multi-analyte detections and in vivo imaging.

  8. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Mohr, Anne; Goertz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar [RWTH Aachen University, Laboratory for Biomaterials, Institute of Biotechnology and Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering (Germany); Mueller-Newen, Gerhard [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Simon, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.simon@ac.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di-N-acetyllactosamine-(di-LacNAc, [3Gal({beta}1-4)GlcNAc({beta}1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA-di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  9. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie; Mohr, Anne; Görtz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie; Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Simon, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di- N-acetyllactosamine-( di-LacNAc, [3Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA- di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  10. Synthesis of Carbohydrate Capped Silicon Nanoparticles and their Reduced Cytotoxicity, In Vivo Toxicity, and Cellular Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahire, Jayshree H; Behray, Mehrnaz; Webster, Carl A; Wang, Qi; Sherwood, Victoria; Saengkrit, Nattika; Ruktanonchai, Uracha; Woramongkolchai, Noppawan; Chao, Yimin

    2015-08-26

    The development of smart targeted nanoparticles (NPs) that can identify and deliver drugs at a sustained rate directly to cancer cells may provide better efficacy and lower toxicity for treating primary and advanced metastatic tumors. Obtaining knowledge of the diseases at the molecular level can facilitate the identification of biological targets. In particular, carbohydrate-mediated molecular recognitions using nano-vehicles are likely to increasingly affect cancer treatment methods, opening a new area in biomedical applications. Here, silicon NPs (SiNPs) capped with carbohydrates including galactose, glucose, mannose, and lactose are successfully synthesized from amine terminated SiNPs. The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] analysis shows an extensive reduction in toxicity of SiNPs by functionalizing with carbohydrate moiety both in vitro and in vivo. Cellular uptake is investigated with flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscope. The results show the carbohydrate capped SiNPs can be internalized in the cells within 24 h of incubation, and can be taken up more readily by cancer cells than noncancerous cells. Moreover, these results reinforce the use of carbohydrates for the internalization of a variety of similar compounds into cancer cells.

  11. Kinetics of cellular uptake of viruses and nanoparticles via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anand; Berezhkovskii, Alexander; Nossal, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Several viruses exploit clathrin-mediated endocytosis to gain entry into host cells. This process is also used extensively in biomedical applications to deliver nanoparticles (NPs) to diseased cells. The internalization of these nano-objects is controlled by the assembly of a clathrin-containing protein coat on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, which drives the invagination of the membrane and the formation of a cargo-containing endocytic vesicle. Current theoretical models of receptor-mediated endocytosis of viruses and NPs do not explicitly take coat assembly into consideration. In this paper we study cellular uptake of viruses and NPs with a focus on coat assembly. We characterize the internalization process by the mean time between the binding of a particle to the membrane and its entry into the cell. Using a coarse-grained model which maps the stochastic dynamics of coat formation onto a one-dimensional random walk, we derive an analytical formula for this quantity. A study of the dependence of the mean internalization time on NP size shows that there is an upper bound above which this time becomes extremely large, and an optimal size at which it attains a minimum. Our estimates of these sizes compare well with experimental data. We also study the sensitivity of the obtained results on coat parameters to identify factors which significantly affect the internalization kinetics.

  12. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón-Vázquez R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune response mediated by the exposure of human lymphoid cells to metal oxide Nps (moNps was characterized using four different moNps (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO to study the three most relevant mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamilies and the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of the activated B-cell inhibitor, IκBα, as well as the expression of several genes by immune cells incubated with these Nps. The moNps activated different signaling pathways and altered the gene expression in human lymphocyte cells. The ZnO Nps were the most active and the release of Zn2+ ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. CeO2 Nps induced the smallest changes in gene expression and in the IκBα protein. The effects of the particles were strongly dependent on the type and concentration of the Nps and on the cell activation status prior to Np exposure. Keywords: Jurkat, MAPK, NFκB, qPCR, inflammation, metabolism

  13. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peng Ji, Tong Yu, Ying Liu, Jie Jiang, Jie Xu, Ying Zhao, Yanna Hao, Yang Qiu, Wenming Zhao, Chao WuCollege of Pharmacy, Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Naringenin (NRG, a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only ~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle

  14. Subcellular distribution and cellular self-repair ability of fluorescent quantum dots emitting in the visible to near-infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; He, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor II-VI quantum dots (QDs), as high-performance fluorescent biological probes, have garnered significant attention due to their superior optical properties. To enable QDs for wide-ranging bioapplications, concerns about their in vitro behavior need to be fully addressed. Herein, for the first time, cellular behaviors of aqueous synthesized-QDs (aqQDs), whose maximum emission wavelength (λ emission) covers the visible to near-infrared spectral window, are systematically investigated. Our results demonstrate that three different sized aqQDs feature distinct cellular distributions, i.e. aqQD530 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 530 nm) and aqQD620 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 620 nm) mainly distribute in the cytoplasm and nucleus, while aqQD730 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 730 nm) mainly accumulates in the cytoplasm. Most significantly, the phenomenon that cellular self-repair ability is dependent on diameters of aqQDs is revealed for the first time. In particular, small-sized QDs (e.g. aqQD530 and aqQD620) severely deteriorate cellular self-repair ability, leading to an irreversible decrease in cell viability. In striking contrast, large-sized QDs (e.g. aqQD730) have little effect on cellular self-repair ability, and the cell viability is restored after removal of aqQD730 from the culture medium. Our results provide invaluable information for QD-relevant biosafety analysis, as well as suggest available guidance for the design of biocompatible QDs for wide utilization in biological and biomedical studies.

  15. Delivery of kinesin spindle protein targeting siRNA in solid lipid nanoparticles to cellular models of tumor vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Bo; Campbell, Robert B., E-mail: robert.campbell@mcphs.edu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • siRNA-lipid nanoparticles are solid particles not lipid bilayers with aqueous core. • High, but not low, PEG content can prevent nanoparticle encapsulation of siRNA. • PEG reduces cellular toxicity of cationic nanoparticles in vitro. • PEG reduces zeta potential while improving gene silencing of siRNA nanoparticles. • Kinesin spindle protein can be an effective target for tumor vascular targeting. - Abstract: The ideal siRNA delivery system should selectively deliver the construct to the target cell, avoid enzymatic degradation, and evade uptake by phagocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the importance of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on lipid-based carrier systems for encapsulating, and delivering, siRNA to tumor vessels using cellular models. Lipid nanoparticles containing different percentage of PEG were evaluated based on their physical chemical properties, density compared to water, siRNA encapsulation, toxicity, targeting efficiency and gene silencing in vitro. siRNA can be efficiently loaded into lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) when DOTAP is included in the formulation mixture. However, the total amount encapsulated decreased with increase in PEG content. In the presence of siRNA, the final formulations contained a mixed population of particles based on density. The major population which contains the majority of siRNA exhibited a density of 4% glucose, and the minor fraction associated with a decreased amount of siRNA had a density less than PBS. The inclusion of 10 mol% PEG resulted in a greater amount of siRNA associated with the minor fraction. Finally, when kinesin spindle protein (KSP) siRNA was encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles containing a modest amount of PEG, the proliferation of endothelial cells was inhibited due to the efficient knock down of KSP mRNA. The presence of siRNA resulted in the formation of solid lipid nanoparticles when prepared using the thin film and hydration method. LNPs with a relatively modest amount of

  16. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Suhua; Song Haipeng; Huang Dejian [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Ong Weiyi [Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, 119260 (Singapore); Han Mingyong, E-mail: chmhdj@nus.edu.s [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore)

    2009-10-21

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  17. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suhua; Song, Haipeng; Ong, Wei Yi; Han, Ming Yong; Huang, Dejian

    2009-10-01

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  18. Quantum dot bio-conjugate: as a western blot probe for highly sensitive detection of cellular proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sonia; Kale, Anup; Gholap, Haribhau; Rana, Abhimanyu; Desai, Rama; Banpurkar, Arun; Ogale, Satishchandra; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, we report a quantum dot (QD)-tailored western blot analysis for a sensitive, rapid and flexible detection of the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Highly luminescent CdTe and (CdTe)ZnS QDs are synthesized by aqueous method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to characterize the properties of the quantum dots. The QDs are functionalized with antibodies of prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and β actin to specifically bind with the proteins localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells, respectively. The QD-conjugated antibodies are used to overcome the limitations of conventional western blot technique. The sensitivity and rapidity of protein detection in QD-based approach is very high, with detection limits up to 10 pg of protein. In addition, these labels provide the capability of enhanced identification and localization of marker proteins in intact cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  19. Facile synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots for Fe{sup 3+} sensing and cellular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Lu, Wenjing [Institute of Environmental Science, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Paau, Man Chin; Hu, Qin [Partner State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, and Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wu, Xin; Shuang, Shaomin [Institute of Environmental Science, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Dong, Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Choi, Martin M.F., E-mail: mmfchoi@gmail.com [Partner State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, and Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • Fast synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) by microwave method. • Optimization of synthesis of N-CDs. • Fluorescence sensing of Fe{sup 3+} by N-CDs. • Cell imaging and detecting Fe{sup 3+} in biosystem by N-CDs. - Abstract: A fast and facile approach to synthesize highly nitrogen (N)-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) by microwave-assisted pyrolysis of chitosan, acetic acid and 1,2-ethylenediamine as the carbon source, condensation agent and N-dopant, respectively, is reported. The obtained N-CDs are fully characterized by elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Doping N heteroatoms benefits the generation of N-CDs with stronger fluorescence emission. As the emission of N-CDs is efficiently quenched by Fe{sup 3+}, the as-prepared N-CDs are employed as a highly sensitive and selective probe for Fe{sup 3+} detection. The detection limit can reach as low as 10 ppb, and the linear range is 0.010–1.8 ppm Fe{sup 3+}. The as-synthesized N-CDs have been successfully applied for cell imaging and detecting Fe{sup 3+} in biosystem.

  20. Hybrid nanoparticle architecture for cellular uptake and bioimaging: direct crystallization of a polymer immobilized with magnetic nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depan, D; Misra, R D K

    2012-10-21

    We describe here the success of an innovative approach of direct immobilization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The approach involved functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles and consequent covalent linkage to a copolymer (PE-b-PEG). Next, the immobilized magnetic nanoparticles on the copolymer were directly crystallized on the long axis of CNTs, where the interfacial adhesion comes from electrostatic and van der Waals interaction. The intracellular trafficking of a hybrid nanoparticle system [(PE-b-PEG)-MNP-CNT-FITC] in HeLa cells was monitored using a fluorescent marker, FITC, conjugated to the nanoparticle system. The distribution of the nanoparticle system inside cells was studied by fluorescence microscopy in a time and dose dependent manner, and it was observed that the nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and no apparent cell death was observed at the concentration studied. Also, the effect of an externally applied magnetic field on actin cytoskeleton, cell morphology and intracellular uptake of iron was studied. The approach described here is promising for simultaneous imaging and monitoring intracellular uptake.

  1. Photoluminescence enhancement of CdSe quantum dots: a case of organogel-nanoparticle symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhavane, Prashant D; Galian, Raquel E; Izquierdo, M Angeles; Aguilera-Sigalat, Jordi; Galindo, Francisco; Schmidt, Luciana; Burguete, M Isabel; Pérez-Prieto, Julia; Luis, Santiago V

    2012-12-19

    Highly fluorescent organogels (QD-organogel), prepared by combining a pseudopeptidic macrocycle and different types of CdSe quantum dots (QDs), have been characterized using a battery of optical and microscopic techniques. The results indicate that the presence of the QDs not only does not disrupt the supramolecular organization of the internal fibrillar network of the organogel to a significant extent, but it also decreases the critical concentration of gelator needed to form stable and thermoreversible organogels. Regarding the photophysical properties of the QDs, different trends were observed depending on the presence of a ZnS inorganic shell around the CdSe core. Thus, while the core-shell QDs preserve their photophysical properties in the organogel medium, a high to moderate increase of the fluorescence intensity (up to 528%) and the average lifetime (up to 1.7), respectively, was observed for the core QDs embedded in the organogel. The results are relevant for the development of luminescent organogels based on quantum dots, which have potential applications as advanced hybrid materials in different fields.

  2. Impact of food components during in vitro digestion of silver nanoparticles on cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Dajana; Ebmeyer, Johanna; Knappe, Patrick; Juling, Sabine; Böhmert, Linda; Selve, Sören; Niemann, Birgit; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    Because of the rising application of nanoparticles in food and food-related products, we investigated the influence of the digestion process on the toxicity and cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles for intestinal cells. The main food components--carbohydrates, proteins and fatty acids--were implemented in an in vitro digestion process to simulate realistic conditions. Digested and undigested silver nanoparticle suspensions were used for uptake studies in the well-established Caco-2 model. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to estimate particle core size, size distribution and stability in cell culture medium. Particles proved to be stable and showed radii from 3.6 to 16.0 nm. Undigested particles and particles digested in the presence of food components were comparably taken up by Caco-2 cells, whereas the uptake of particles digested without food components was decreased by 60%. Overall, these findings suggest that in vivo ingested poly (acrylic acid)-coated silver nanoparticles may reach the intestine in a nanoscaled form even if enclosed in a food matrix. While appropriate for studies on the uptake into intestinal cells, the Caco-2 model might be less suited for translocation studies. Moreover, we show that nanoparticle digestion protocols lacking food components may lead to misinterpretation of uptake studies and inconclusive results.

  3. Real-time and label-free monitoring of nanoparticle cellular uptake using capacitance-based assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rimi; Jo, Dong hyun; Chung, Sang J.; Na, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Tae Geol

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown great potential as vehicles for the delivery of drugs, nucleic acids, and therapeutic proteins; an efficient, high-throughput screening method to analyze nanoparticle interaction with the cytomembrane would substantially improve the efficiency and accuracy of the delivery. Here, we developed a capacitance sensor array that monitored the capacitance values of nanoparticle-treated cells in a real-time manner, without the need for labeling. Upon cellular uptake of the nanoparticles, a capacitance peak was observed at a low frequency (e.g., 100 Hz) as a function of time based on zeta potential changes. In the high frequency region (e.g., 15–20 kHz), the rate of decreasing capacitance slowed as a function of time compared to the cell growth control group, due to increased cytoplasm resistance and decreased membrane capacitance and resistance. The information provided by our capacitance sensor array will be a powerful tool for scientists designing nanoparticles for specific purposes. PMID:27641838

  4. Endocrine and cellular stress effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles and nifedipine in marsh frogs Pelophylax ridibundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falfushynska, Halina; Gnatyshyna, Lesya; Horyn, Oksana; Sokolova, Inna; Stoliar, Oksana

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater organisms including amphibians experience increasing exposures to emerging pollutants such as nanoparticles and pharmaceuticals, which can affect their fitness and performance. We studied the effects of two common pollutants extensively used in industry, pharmaceutical and personal care products, nano-zinc oxide (nZnO) and a Ca-channel blocker nifedipine (Nfd), on endocrine status and cellular stress markers of the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus. Males were exposed for 14days to nZnO (3.1μM), Zn(2+) (3.1μM, as a positive control for nZnO exposures), Nfd (10μM), and combination of nZnO and Nfd (nZnO+Nfd). Exposure to nZnO and Zn(2+) led to an increase in Zn burdens, elevated concentrations of the metal-bound metallothioneins (MT-Me) in the liver and increased vitellogenin in the serum, whereas exposures to Nfd and nZnO+Nfd resulted in the metal release from MTs and a significant increase in the ratio of total to metal-bound MTs. This likely reflects oxidative stress caused by Nfd exposures as manifested in the elevated levels of oxyradical production, upregulation of superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) and increase in the total and oxidized glutathione concentrations in Nfd-exposed frogs. Zn-containing exposures upregulated activity of deiodinase (in nZnO and nZnO+Nfd exposures) and serum thyrotropin level (in the case of Zn(2+)). All exposures caused an increase in DNA fragmentation, lipofuscin accumulation as well as upregulation of caspase-3 and CYP450 levels reflecting cytotoxicity of the studied compounds in the liver. Across all experimental treatments, nZnO exposures in the absence of Nfd had the least impact on the cellular stress traits or redox status in frogs. This indicates that at the low environmentally relevant levels of pollution, pharmaceuticals such as Nfd and free metals (such as Zn(2+)) may represent a stronger threat to the health of the frogs than nZnO particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular uptake of magnetite nanoparticles enhanced by NdFeB magnets in staggered arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Chang, Fan-Yu; Tu, Shu-Ju; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic force may greatly enhance uptake of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by cultured cells; however, the effects of non-uniformity of magnetic field/ magnetic gradient on MNP internalization in culture has not been elucidated. Cellular uptake of polyacrylic acid coated-MNP by LN229 cells was measured with cylindrical NdFeB magnets arranged in a staggered pattern. The magnetic field generated by placing a magnet underneath (H-field) elicited a homogenous distribution of MNPs on the cells in culture; whereas the field without magnet underneath (L-field) resulted in MNP distribution along the edge of the wells. Cell-associated MNP (MNPcell) appeared to be magnetic field- and concentration-dependent. In H-field, MNPcell reached plateau within one hour of exposure to MNP with only one-min application of the magnetic force in the beginning of incubation; continuous presence of the magnet for 2 h did not further increase MNPcell, suggesting that magnetic force-induced uptake may be primarily contributed to enhanced MNP sedimentation. Although MNP distribution was much inhomogeneous in L-field, averaged MNPcell in the L-field may reach as high as 80% of that in H-field during 1-6 h incubation, suggesting high capacity of MNP internalization. In addition, no significant difference was observed in MNPcell analyzed by flow cytometry with the application of H-field of staggered plate vs. filled magnet plate. Therefore, biological variation may dominate MNP internalization even under relatively uniformed magnetic field; whereas non-uniformed magnetic field may serve as a model for tumor targeting with MNPs in vivo.

  6. The bright side of plasmonic gold nanoparticles; activation of Nrf2, the cellular protective pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alona; Soroka, Yoram; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Lewis, Aaron; Kohen, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely investigated for cancer therapy, due to their ability to strongly absorb light and convert it to heat and thus selectively destroy tumor cells. In this study we shed light on a new aspect of AuNPs and their plasmonic excitation, wherein they can provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection by stimulating the cellular protective Nrf2 pathway. Our study was carried out on cells of the immune system, macrophages, and on skin cells, keratinocytes. A different response to AuNPs was noted in the two types of cells, explained by their distinct uptake profiles. In keratinocytes, the exposure to AuNPs, even at low concentrations, was sufficient to activate the Nrf2 pathway, without any irradiation, due to the presence of free AuNPs inside the cytosol. In contrast, in macrophages, the plasmonic excitation of the AuNPs by a low, non-lethal irradiation dose was required for their release from the constraining vesicles. The mechanism by which AuNPs activate the Nrf2 pathway was studied. Direct and indirect activation were suggested, based on the inherent ability of the AuNPs to react with thiol groups and to generate reactive oxygen species, in particular, under plasmonic excitation. The ability of AuNPs to directly activate the Nrf2 pathway renders them good candidates for treatment of disorders in which the up-regulation of Nrf2 is beneficial, specifically for topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  7. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H. [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Podila, Ramakrishna [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Brown, Jared M., E-mail: jared.brown@ucdenver.edu [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf-α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure.

  8. Fabrication of quantum dot/silica core-shell particles immobilizing Au nanoparticles and their dual imaging functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Matsudo, Hiromu; Li, Ting-ting; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Kubota, Yohsuke; Oikawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes preparation methods for quantum dot/silica (QD/SiO2) core-shell particles that immobilize Au nanoparticles (QD/SiO2/Au). A colloid solution of QD/SiO2 core-shell particles with an average size of 47.0 ± 6.1 nm was prepared by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of the QDs with an average size of 10.3 ± 2.1 nm. A colloid solution of Au nanoparticles with an average size of 17.9 ± 1.3 nm was prepared by reducing Au3+ ions with sodium citrate in water at 80 °C. Introduction of amino groups to QD/SiO2 particle surfaces was performed using (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (QD/SiO2-NH2). The QD/SiO2/Au particles were fabricated by mixing the Au particle colloid solution and the QD/SiO2-NH2 particle colloid solution. Values of radiant efficiency and computed tomography for the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution were 2.23 × 107 (p/s/cm2/sr)/(μW/cm2) at a QD concentration of 8 × 10-7 M and 1180 ± 314 Hounsfield units and an Au concentration of 5.4 × 10-2 M. The QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was injected into a mouse chest wall. Fluorescence emitted from the colloid solution could be detected on the skin covering the chest wall. The colloid solution could also be X-ray-imaged in the chest wall. Consequently, the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was found to have dual functions, i.e., fluorescence emission and X-ray absorption in vivo, which makes the colloid solution suitable to function as a contrast agent for dual imaging processes.

  9. NANOPARTICLES IN NUCLEAR IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vicky V Mody PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review article summarizes the current state radiolabeled nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications mainly targeting cancer. Due to their enormous flexibility, and versatility the radiolabeled nanoparticles have shown their potential in the diagnosis and therapy. As the matter of fact, these radiolabeled imaging agents enable the visualization of the cellular function and the follow-up of the molecular process in living organisms. Moreover, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has provided various innovative radionuclides and delivery systems, such as liposomes, magnetic agents, polymers, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes to cope up with the hurdles which have been posed by various disease states.

  10. Enhanced Performance of Quantum Dot-Based Light-Emitting Diodes with Gold Nanoparticle-Doped Hole Injection Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Lin, Qingli; Wang, Hongzhe; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fengjuan; Du, Zuliang; Shen, Huaibin; Li, Lin Song

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the performance of quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) comprising ZnCdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs as an emitting layer were enhanced by employing Au-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) hole injection layer (HIL). By varying the concentration and dimension of Au nanoparticle (NP) dopants in PEDOT:PSS, the optimal devices were obtained with ~22-nm-sized Au NP dopant at the concentration with an optical density (OD) of 0.21. Highly bright green QLEDs with a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 8.2 % and a current efficiency of 29.1 cd/A exhibit 80 % improvement compared with devices without Au NP dopants. The improved performance may be attributed to the significant increase in the hole injection rate as a result of the introduction of Au NPs and the good matching between the resonance frequency of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) generated by the Au NPs and the emission band of QD layer, as well as the suppressed Auger recombination of QD layer due to the LSPR-induced near-field enhanced radiative recombination rate of excitons. These results are helpful for fabricating high-performance QD-based applications, such as full-color displays and solid-state lighting.

  11. Sensitive arginine sensing based on inner filter effect of Au nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijian; Li, Ming; Jiang, Linye; Shen, Feng; Hu, Yufeng; Ren, Xueqin

    2017-02-01

    Arginine plays an important role in many biological functions, whose detection is very significant. Herein, a sensitive, simple and cost-effective fluorescent method for the detection of arginine has been developed based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of thioglycolic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs). When citrate-stabilized AuNPs were mixed with thioglycolic acid-capped CdTe QDs, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was significantly quenched by AuNPs via the IFE. With the presence of arginine, arginine could induce the aggregation and corresponding absorption spectra change of AuNPs, which then IFE-decreased fluorescence could gradually recover with increasing amounts of arginine, achieving fluorescence "turn on" sensing for arginine. The detection mechanism is clearly illustrated and various experimental conditions were also optimized. Under the optimum conditions, a decent linear relationship was obtained in the range from 16 to 121 μg L- 1 and the limit of detection was 5.6 μg L- 1. And satisfactory results were achieved in arginine analysis using arginine injection, compound amino acid injection, even blood plasma as samples. Therefore, the present assay showed various merits, such as simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity and selectivity, making it promising for sensing arginine in biological samples.

  12. Synthesis of Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Supported on Pristine Graphene by Dynamically Self-Assembled Graphene Quantum Dots for Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Weiyong; Yu, Yanan; Li, Chang Ming

    2017-03-09

    A highly active, durable, and low-cost hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst is desirable for energy storage through water splitting but its fabrication presents great challenges. Herein, mediated by dynamically self-assembled graphene quantum dots (GQDs), small, uniform, high-density, and well-dispersed CoP nanoparticles were grown in situ on pristine graphene for the first time. This hybrid nanostructure was then employed as HER electrocatalyst, showing an onset potential of 7 mV, an overpotential of 91.3 mV to achieve 10 mA cm(-2) , a Tafel slope of 42.6 mV dec(-1) , and an exchange current density of 0.1225 mA cm(-2) , all of which compare favorably to those of most reported non-noble-metal catalysts. The developed catalyst also exhibits excellent durability with negligible current loss after 2000 cyclic voltammetry cycles (+0.01 to -0.17 V vs. RHE) or 34 h of chronoamperometric measurement at an overpotential of 91.3 mV. This work not only develops a new strategy for the fabrication of high-performance and inexpensive electrocatalysts for HER but also provides scientific insight into the mechanism of the dynamically self-assembled GQDsmediated synthesis process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Silver nanoparticles in combination with acetic acid and zinc oxide quantum dots for antibacterial activities improvement—A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedira, Sofiane, E-mail: sofianebilel@gmail.com [Ceramic Laboratory, University of Constantine1, Constantine (Algeria); Ayachi, Ahmed Abdelhakim, E-mail: ayachi-med@hotmail.fr [Ceramic Laboratory, University of Constantine1, Constantine (Algeria); Lakehal, Sihem, E-mail: lakehal.lakehal@gmail.com [Ceramic Laboratory, University of Constantine1, Constantine (Algeria); Fateh, Merouane, E-mail: merouane.fateh@gmail.com [Microbiological Laboratory Engineering and Application, University of Constantine1, Constantine (Algeria); Achour, Slimane, E-mail: achourslimane11@yahoo.fr [Ceramic Laboratory, University of Constantine1, Constantine (Algeria)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag NPs and ZnO Qds were synthesized using polyol and hydrothermal method. • Ag NPs exert their bactericidal effect mainly by Ag{sup +} ions. • CH{sub 3}COOH addition to Ag NPs improves bactericidal effect more than ZnO Qds addition. • E. coli and P. aeruginosa are more sensitive to NPs than K. pneumonia and S. aureus. - Abstract: Due to their remarkable antibacterial/antivirus properties, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide quantum dots (ZnO Qds) have been widely used in the antimicrobial field. The mechanism of action of Ag NPs on bacteria was recently studied and it has been proven that Ag NPs exerts their antibacterial activities mainly by the released Ag{sup +}. In this work, Ag NPs and ZnO Qds were synthesized using polyol and hydrothermal method, respectively. It was demonstrated that Ag NPs can be oxidized easily in aqueous solution and the addition of acetic acid can increase the Ag{sup +} release which improves the antibacterial activity of Ag NPs. A comparative study between bactericidal effect of Ag NPs/acetic acid and Ag NPs/ZnO Qds on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus was undertaken using agar diffusion method. The obtained colloids were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy, Raman spectrometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)

  14. Application on Gold Nanoparticles-Dotted 4-Nitrophenylazo Graphene in a Label-Free Impedimetric Deoxynivalenol Immunosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Edozie Sunday

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a new concept to construct a label-free electrochemical inhibition-based immunosensor for the detection of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON in cereal samples. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of tris(bipyridine ruthenium (II chloride was used as a marker enhanced with gold nanoparticles-dotted 4-nitrophenylazo functionalized graphene (AuNp/G/PhNO2 nanocatalyst mediated in Nafion on a glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized conditions, the formation of immunocomplexes inhibited electron flow and increased the charge transfer resistance of the sensing interface linearly. The change in impedance was proportional to DON concentrations in the range of 6–30 ng/mL with a sensitivity and detection limit of 32.14 ΩL/ng and 0.3 µg/mL, respectively, which compares favorably with the ELISA result. The proposed sensor had a stability of 80.3%, good precision and selectivity in DON standard solution containing different interfering agents, indicating promising application prospect for this strategy in designing impedimetric, electrochemiluminescent, voltammetric or amperometric sensors.

  15. Nanodiamond-based nanostructures for coupling nitrogen-vacancy centres to metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianxiao; Steinsultz, Nat; Ouyang, Min

    2016-06-01

    The ability to control the interaction between nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and photonic and/or broadband plasmonic nanostructures is crucial for the development of solid-state quantum devices with optimum performance. However, existing methods typically employ top-down fabrication, which restrict scalable and feasible manipulation of nitrogen-vacancy centres. Here, we develop a general bottom-up approach to fabricate an emerging class of freestanding nanodiamond-based hybrid nanostructures with external functional units of either plasmonic nanoparticles or excitonic quantum dots. Precise control of the structural parameters (including size, composition, coverage and spacing of the external functional units) is achieved, representing a pre-requisite for exploring the underlying physics. Fine tuning of the emission characteristics through structural regulation is demonstrated by performing single-particle optical studies. This study opens a rich toolbox to tailor properties of quantum emitters, which can facilitate design guidelines for devices based on nitrogen-vacancy centres that use these freestanding hybrid nanostructures as building blocks.

  16. Energy transfer from an individual silica nanoparticle to graphene quantum dots and resulting enhancement of photodetector responsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jungkil; Jang, Chan Wook; Kang, Soo Seok; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Ju Hwan; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Jung Hyun; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Sung Won

    2016-06-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), referred to as the transfer of the photon energy absorbed in donor to acceptor, has received much attention as an important physical phenomenon for its potential applications in optoelectronic devices as well as for the understanding of some biological systems. If one-atom-thick graphene is used for donor or acceptor, it can minimize the separation between donor and acceptor, thereby maximizing the FRET efficiency (EFRET). Here, we report first fabrication of a FRET system composed of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donors and acceptors, respectively. The FRET from SNPs to GQDs with an EFRET of ∼78% is demonstrated from excitation-dependent photoluminescence spectra and decay curves. The photodetector (PD) responsivity (R) of the FRET system at 532 nm is enhanced by 100∼101/102∼103 times under forward/reverse biases, respectively, compared to the PD containing solely GQDs. This remarkable enhancement is understood by network-like current paths formed by the GQDs on the SNPs and easy transfer of the carriers generated from the SNPs into the GQDs due to their close attachment. The R is 2∼3 times further enhanced at 325 nm by the FRET effect.

  17. Quantum dot/plasmonic nanoparticle metachromophores with quantum yields that vary with excitation wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munechika, Keiko; Chen, Yeechi; Tillack, Andreas F; Kulkarni, Abhishek P; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Munro, Andrea M; Ginger, David S

    2011-07-13

    Coupled plasmonic/chromophore systems are of interest in applications ranging from fluorescent biosensors to solar photovoltaics and photoelectrochemical cells because near-field coupling to metal nanostructures can dramatically alter the optical performance of nearby materials. We show that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) near single silver nanoprisms can exhibit photoluminescence lifetimes and quantum yields that depend on the excitation wavelength, in apparent violation of the Kasha-Vavilov rule. We attribute the variation in QD lifetime with excitation wavelength to the wavelength-dependent coupling of higher-order plasmon modes to different spatial subpopulations of nearby QDs. At the QD emission wavelength, these subpopulations are coupled to far-field radiation with varying efficiency by the nanoprism dipolar resonance. These results offer an easily accessible new route to design metachromophores with tailored optical properties.

  18. Quantum dot nanoparticle for optimization of breast cancer diagnostics and therapy in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenkovic, Dina; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Remsey-Semmelweis, Ernö; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the world. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is used for staging of axillary lymph nodes. Organic dyes and radiocolloid are currently used for SLN mapping, but expose patients to ionizing radiation, are unstable during surgery and cause local tissue damage. Quantum dots (QD) could be used for SLN mapping without the need for biopsy. Surgical resection of the primary tumor is the optimal treatment for early-diagnosed breast cancer, but due to difficulties in defining tumor margins, cancer cells often remain leading to reoccurrences. Functionalized QD could be used for image-guided tumor resection to allow visualization of cancer cells. Near Infrared QD are photostable and have improved deep tissue penetration. Slow elimination of QD raises concerns of potential accumulation. Nevertheless, promising findings with cadmium-free QD in recent in vivo studies and first in-human trial suggest huge potential for cancer diagnostic and therapy.

  19. Rapid solid-phase microwave synthesis of highly photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for Fe3+ detection and cellular bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guili; Xu, Minghan; Shu, Mengjun; Li, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Liling; Su, Yanjie; Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-09-01

    Recently, carbon dots (CDs) have been playing an increasingly important role in industrial production and biomedical field because of their excellent properties. As such, finding an efficient method to quickly synthesize a large scale of relatively high purity CDs is of great interest. Herein, a facile and novel microwave method has been applied to prepare nitrogen doped CDs (N-doped CDs) within 8 min using L-glutamic acid as the sole reaction precursor in the solid phase condition. The as-prepared N-doped CDs with an average size of 1.64 nm are well dispersed in aqueous solution. The photoluminescence of N-doped CDs is pH-sensitive and excitation-dependent. The N-doped CDs show a strong blue fluorescence with relatively high fluorescent quantum yield of 41.2%, which remains stable even under high ionic strength. Since the surface is rich in oxygen-containing functional groups, N-doped CDs can be applied to selectively detect Fe3+ with the limit of detection of 10-5 M. In addition, they are also used for cellular bioimaging because of their high fluorescent intensity and nearly zero cytotoxicity. The solid-phase microwave method seems to be an effective strategy to rapidly obtain high quality N-doped CDs and expands their applications in ion detection and cellular bioimaging.

  20. Quantitative characterization of nanoparticle agglomeration within biological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondow, Nicole, E-mail: n.hondow@leeds.ac.uk; Brydson, Rik [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom); Wang, Peiyi [University of Leeds, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology (United Kingdom); Holton, Mark D.; Brown, M. Rowan; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D. [Swansea University, Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle dispersion state within biological media is essential to understanding cellular uptake and the roles of diffusion, sedimentation, and endocytosis in determining nanoparticle dose. The dispersion of polymer-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots in water and cell growth medium with and without fetal bovine serum was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. Characterization by TEM of samples prepared by plunge freezing the blotted solutions into liquid ethane was sensitive to the dispersion state of the quantum dots and enabled measurement of agglomerate size distributions even in the presence of serum proteins where DLS failed. In addition, TEM showed a reduced packing fraction of quantum dots per agglomerate when dispersed in biological media and serum compared to just water, highlighting the effect of interactions between the media, serum proteins, and the quantum dots. The identification of a heterogeneous distribution of quantum dots and quantum dot agglomerates in cell growth medium and serum by TEM will enable correlation with the previously reported optical metrology of in vitro cellular uptake of this quantum dot dispersion. In this paper, we present a comparative study of TEM and DLS and show that plunge-freeze TEM provides a robust assessment of nanoparticle agglomeration state.

  1. Mortalin imaging in normal and cancer cells with quantum dot immunoconjugates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZEENIA KAUL; TOMOKO YAGUCHI; SUNIL C KAUL; TAKASHI HIRANO; RENU WADHWA; KAZUNARI TAIRA

    2003-01-01

    Quantum dots are the nanoparticles that are recently emerging as an alternative to organic fluorescence probes in cell biology and biomedicine,and have several predictive advantages.These include their i)broad absorption spectra allowing visualization with single light source,ii)exceptional photo-stability allowing long term studies and iii)narrow and symmetrical emission spectrum that is controlled by their size and material composition.These unique properties allow simultaneous excitation of different size of quantum dots with a single excitation light source,their simultaneous resolution and visualization as different colors.At present there are only a few studies that have tested quantum dots in cellular imaging.We describe here the use of quantum dots in mortalin imaging of normal and cancer cells.Mortalin staining pattern with quantum dots in both normal and cancer cells mimicked those obtained with organic florescence probes and were considerably stable.

  2. The effect of oil-water partition coefficient on the distribution and cellular uptake of liposome-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Quan-Ying; Liu, Ai-Yun; Ma, Yu; Chen, Huan; Hong, Jin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Can; Ding, Ya

    2016-10-01

    The shape, size, and surface features of nanoparticles greatly influence the structure and properties of resulting hybrid nanosystems. In this work, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were modified via S-Au covalent bonding by glycol monomethyl ether thioctate with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of different molecular weights (i.e., 350, 550, and 750Da). These modified GNPs (i.e., GNP350, GNP550, and GNP750) showed different oil-water partition coefficients (Kp), as detected using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The different Kp values of the gold conjugates (i.e., 13.98, 2.11, and 0.036 for GNP350, GNP550, and GNP750, respectively) resulted in different conjugate localization within liposomes, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the cellular uptake of hybrid liposomes co-encapsulating gold conjugates and Nile red was evaluated using intracellular fluorescence intensity. The results indicated that precise GNP localization in the hydrophilic or hydrophobic liposome cavity could be achieved by regulating the GNP oil-water partition coefficient via surface modification; such localization could further affect the properties and functions of hybrid liposomes, including their cellular uptake profiles. This study furthers the understanding not only of the interaction between liposomes and inorganic nanoparticles but also of adjusting liposome-gold hybrid nanostructure properties via the surface chemistry of gold materials.

  3. Multi-functionality Redefined with Colloidal Carotene Carbon Nanoparticles for Synchronized Chemical Imaging, Enriched Cellular Uptake and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Chang, Huei-Huei; Tiwari, Saumya; Gryka, Mark; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-07-01

    Typically, multiplexing high nanoparticle uptake, imaging, and therapy requires careful integration of three different functions of a multiscale molecular-particle assembly. Here, we present a simpler approach to multiplexing by utilizing one component of the system for multiple functions. Specifically, we successfully synthesized and characterized colloidal carotene carbon nanoparticle (C3-NP), in which a single functional molecule served a threefold purpose. First, the presence of carotene moieties promoted the passage of the particle through the cell membrane and into the cells. Second, the ligand acted as a potent detrimental moiety for cancer cells and, finally, the ligands produced optical contrast for robust microscopic detection in complex cellular environments. In comparative tests, C3-NP were found to provide effective intracellular delivery that enables both robust detection at cellular and tissue level and presents significant therapeutic potential without altering the mechanism of intracellular action of β-carotene. Surface coating of C3 with phospholipid was used to generate C3-Lipocoat nanoparticles with further improved function and biocompatibility, paving the path to eventual in vivo studies.

  4. A paper-based resonance energy transfer nucleic acid hybridization assay using upconversion nanoparticles as donors and quantum dots as acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughan, Samer; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca

    2015-06-09

    Highlights: • Covalent immobilization of upconversion nanoparticles on paper. • LRET-based label free DNA detection using quantum dots as acceptors. • Use of polyethylene glycol to eliminate non-specific adsorption of quantum dots. • Improved analytical performance compared to analogous assays. - Abstract: Monodisperse aqueous upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were covalently immobilized on aldehyde modified cellulose paper via reduction amination to develop a luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET)-based nucleic acid hybridization assay. This first account of covalent immobilization of UCNPs on paper for a bioassay reports an optically responsive method that is sensitive, reproducible and robust. The immobilized UCNPs were decorated with oligonucleotide probes to capture HPRT1 housekeeping gene fragments, which in turn brought reporter conjugated quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to the UCNPs for LRET. This sandwich assay could detect unlabeled oligonucleotide target, and had a limit of detection of 13 fmol and a dynamic range spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The use of QDs, which are excellent LRET acceptors, demonstrated improved sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range and selectivity compared to similar assays that have used molecular fluorophores as acceptors. The selectivity of the assay was attributed to the decoration of the QDs with polyethylene glycol to eliminate non-specific adsorption. The kinetics of hybridization were determined to be diffusion limited and full signal development occurred within 3 min.

  5. [Preparation, characterization and Calu-3 cellular uptake of three kinds of poly(b-benzyl-L-amino)block-poly(ethylene glycol) nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yin; Lu, Li-Na; Xin, Xue; Huo, Dong-Feng; Wu, Hong-Bing; Qiu, Ming-Feng

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake efficiency of three kinds of poly(b-benzyl-L-amino) block-poly(ethylene glycol) nanoparticles (PXA-PEG-NPs) using Calu-3 cells, and select one as a nasal drug delivery vector for curcumin (Cur). Poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) block-poly(ethylene glycol) nanoparticles (PBLG-PEG-NPs), poly(gamma-benzyl-L-lysine) block-poly(ethyleneglycol) nanoparticles (PZLL-PEG-NPs) and poly(gamma-benzyl-L-aspartate) block-poly(ethylene glycol) nanoparticles (PBLA-PEG-NPs) were prepared by emulsion-solvent evaporation method. MTT assays were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of PXA-PEG-NPs against Calu-3 cells. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was visualized by an inverted fluorescence microscope and quantified by a flow cytometer. The results indicated that even at high concentration of 2 mg x mL(-1) the three nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity on Calu-3 cells. Compared to the curcumin solution, the three curcumin-loaded PXA-PEG-NPs showed significantly higher cellular uptake efficiency on Calu-3 cells (at equal concentration of curcumin with 5 microg x mL(-1) Cur solution), PBLG-PEG-NPs group was the highest. The cellular uptake increased with incubation time, and has positive correlation with nanoparticle concentration. In brief, PXA-PEG-NPs are conducive to delivery Cur into cells, and PBLG-PEG-NPs might be provided as a good nasal drug delivery carrier.

  6. Evaluation of in-vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake efficiency of zidovudine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles modified with Aloe Vera in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K S, Joshy; Sharma, Chandra P; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Sandeep, K; Thomas, Sabu; Pothen, Laly A

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine loaded solid lipid nanoparticles of stearic acid modified with Aloe Vera (AV) have been prepared via simple emulsion solvent evaporation method which showed excellent stability at room temperature and refrigerated condition. The nanoparticles were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), which revealed the overlap of the AV absorption peak with the absorption peak of modified stearic acid nanoparticles. The inclusion of AV to stearic acid decreased the crystallinity and improved the hydrophilicity of lipid nanoparticles and thereby improved the drug loading efficacy of lipid nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed that, the average particle size of unmodified (bare) nanoparticles was 45.66±12.22nm and modified solid lipid nanoparticles showed an average size of 265.61±80.44nm. Solid lipid nanoparticles with well-defined morphology were tested in vitro for their possible application in drug delivery. Cell culture studies using C6 glioma cells on the nanoparticles showed enhanced growth and proliferation of cells without exhibiting any toxicity. In addition, normal cell morphology and improved uptake were observed by fluorescence microscopy images of rhodamine labeled modified solid lipid nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles. The cellular uptake study suggested that these nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system to enhance the uptake of antiviral drug by brain cells and it could be a suitable drug carrier system for the treatment of HIV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of cell cycle on the cellular uptake and dilution of nanoparticles in a cell population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jong Ah; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    Nanoparticles are considered a primary vehicle for targeted therapies because they can pass biological barriers and enter and distribute within cells by energy-dependent pathways(1-3). So far, most studies have shown that nanoparticle properties, such as size(4-6) and surface(7,8), can influence how

  8. Role of cell cycle on the cellular uptake and dilution of nanoparticles in a cell population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jong Ah; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles are considered a primary vehicle for targeted therapies because they can pass biological barriers and enter and distribute within cells by energy-dependent pathways(1-3). So far, most studies have shown that nanoparticle properties, such as size(4-6) and surface(7,8), can influence how

  9. Surface charge-specific cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of tri-block copolymer nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Ershov, D.S.; Gucht, van der J.; Alink, G.M.; Rietjens, I.; Zuilhof, H.; Marcelis, A.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of monodisperse (45 ± 5 nm) fluorescent nanoparticles from tri-block copolymers (polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs)) bearing different surface charges were synthesised and investigated for cytotoxicity in NR8383 and Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs were more cytotoxic and induced a higher intrac

  10. Role of toll-like receptors 3, 4 and 7 in cellular uptake and response to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen, Koki Kanehira and Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune response is believed to be among the earliest provisional cellular responses, and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical to these interactions. We hypothesize that TLRs also play an important role in interactions between nanoparticles (NPs and cells, although little information has been reported concerning such an interaction. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 in cellular uptake of titanium dioxide NP (TiO2 NP agglomerates and the resulting inflammatory responses to these NPs. Our data indicate that TLR4 is involved in the uptake of TiO2 NPs and promotes the associated inflammatory responses. The data also suggest that TLR3, which has a subcellular location distinct from that of TLR4, inhibits the denaturation of cellular protein caused by TiO2 NPs. In contrast, the unique cellular localization of TLR7 has middle-ground functional roles in cellular response after TiO2 NP exposure. These findings are important for understanding the molecular interaction mechanisms between NPs and cells.

  11. Fluorescent chitosan functionalized magnetic polymeric nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and in vitro evaluation of cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Jangpatarapongsa, Kulachart; Tangchaikeeree, Tienrat; Polpanich, Duangporn; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles possessing magnetic and fluorescent properties were fabricated by the covalent attachment of fluorescein isothiocyanate onto magnetic polymeric nanoparticles functionalized by chitosan. The synthesized magnetic polymeric nanoparticles-chitosan/fluorescein isothiocyanate were successfully used for labeling the living organ and blood-related cancer cells, i.e., HeLa, Hep G2, and K562 cells. The cytotoxicity test of nanoparticles at various incubation times indicated the high cell viability (>90%) without morphological change. The confocal microscopy revealed that they could pass through cell membrane within 2 h for K562 cells and 3 h for HeLa and Hep G2 cells and then confine inside cytoplasm of all types of tested cells for at least 24 h. Therefore, the synthesized magnetic polymeric nanoparticles-chitosan/fluorescein isothiocyanate would potentially be used as cell tracking in theranostic applications.

  12. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Darvishi, Behrad; Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi; Shahmoradi, Elnaz; Mohammadi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells.

  13. Glycosaminoglycan-functionalized poly-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytocompatibility, and cellular uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamichhane SP

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surya P Lamichhane,1 Neha Arya,1,2 Nirdesh Ojha,3 Esther Kohler,1 V Prasad Shastri1,2,41Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, 2Helmholtz Virtual Institute on “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine”, 3Laboratory for Process Technology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, 4Centre for Biological Signaling Studies (BIOSS, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, GermanyAbstract: The efficient delivery of chemotherapeutics to the tumor via nanoparticle (NP-based delivery systems remains a significant challenge. This is compounded by the fact that the tumor is highly dynamic and complex environment composed of a plurality of cell types and extracellular matrix. Since glycosaminoglycan (GAG production is altered in many diseases (or pathologies, NPs bearing GAG moieties on the surface may confer some unique advantages in interrogating the tumor microenvironment. In order to explore this premise, in the study reported here poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA NPs in the range of 100–150 nm bearing various proteoglycans were synthesized by a single-step nanoprecipitation and characterized. The surface functionalization of the NPs with GAG moieties was verified using zeta potential measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To establish these GAG-bearing NPs as carriers of therapeutics, cellular toxicity assays were undertaken in lung epithelial adenocarcinoma (A549 cells, human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC, and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. In general NPs were well tolerated over a wide concentration range (100–600 µg/mL by all cell types and were taken up to appreciable extents without any adverse cell response in A549 cells and HPMEC. Further, GAG-functionalized PLGA NPs were taken up to different extents in A459 cells and HPMEC. In both cell systems, the uptake of heparin-modified NPs was diminished by 50%–65% in comparison to that of

  14. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of -31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  15. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-08-27

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions.

  16. Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensing Using Carbon Quantum Dots Decorated with Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houcem Maaoui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in glucose homeostasis is critical for human health, as hyperglycemia (defining diabetes leads to premature death caused by macrovascular and microvascular complications. However, the simple and accurate detection of glucose in the blood at low cost remains a challenging task, although it is of great importance for the diagnosis and therapy of diabetic patients. In this work, carbon quantum dots decorated with copper oxide nanostructures (CQDs/Cu2O are prepared by a simple hydrothermal approach, and their potential for electrochemical non-enzymatic glucose sensing is evaluated. The proposed sensor exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity towards glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions. The glucose sensor is characterized by a wide concentration range from 6 µM to 6 mM, a sensitivity of 2.9 ± 0.2 µA·µM−1·cm−2, and a detection limit of 6 µM at a signal-to-noise ratio S/N = 3. The sensors are successfully applied for glucose determination in human serum samples, demonstrating that the CQDs/Cu2O-based glucose sensor satisfies the requirements of complex sample detection with adapted potential for therapeutic diagnostics.

  17. Ferrocene-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots as electroactive nanoparticles hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorokhin, Denis; Vancso, G Julius [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, Faculty of Science and Technology and MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Tomczak, Nikodem [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Reinhoudt, David N; Velders, Aldrik H, E-mail: g.j.vancso@utwente.nl [Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology and MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2010-07-16

    Electrochemical properties of core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in a non-aqueous solution are presented. Cathodic reduction and anodic oxidation processes involving the QD HOMO and LUMO levels as well as defect states were identified by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical bandgap was estimated from the anodic and cathodic redox peaks and found to match well with the optical bandgap estimated from the absorption spectrum. The trioctylphosphine oxide ligands on the surface of the QDs were exchanged to electroactive ferrocenyl thiols and the resulting material was characterized by NMR and optical spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry showed that the redox potentials of the QDs are modified due to the presence of ferrocene on the surface of the QD. The QD oxidation peak decreased and the reduction peak shifted to more negative potentials. The concurrent shift of the ferrocene redox peaks indicates that the system displays features of a 'molecular hybrid', where both the QD and the ligand influence each other.

  18. Design and synthesis of temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid nanoparticles and application to thermally controlled cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Yuki; Nemoto, Ryo; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2017-05-01

    This study reports the development of temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid nanoparticles and their application to temperature-dependent intracellular uptake of hydrophobic encapsulated fluorescence molecules. Amphiphilic diblock copolymer comprising a temperature-responsive segment, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N-dimethylacrylamide) [P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm)] and a trimethyoxysilyl-containing hydrophobic segment was synthesized (PBM-b-ND); this amphiphilic diblock copolymer self-assembled in an aqueous solution, and temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid fluorescence nanoparticles were fabricated via a base-catalyzed sol-gel process. The fluorescence probe rhodamine DHPE or boron dipyrromethene derivative was encapsulated into the polymer core with a silica network in a stable manner. Other types of polymer/silica hybrid fluorescence nanoparticles were also developed using either homo-PNIPAAm (PBM-b-N) or homo-PDMAAm (PBM-b-D) segments, instead of P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm). While PBM-b-D did not exhibit a temperature-dependent phase transition (hydrophilic characteristic), PBM-b-N and PBM-b-ND exhibited temperature-dependent phase transition (hydrophilic/hydrophobic) at 32°C and 38°C, respectively. The cellular uptake of PBM-b-N was clearly observed at both 37°C and 42°C, while the cellular uptake of PBM-b-D was minimal at these temperatures. On the other hand, significant enhancement in the intracellular uptake of PBM-b-ND was observed at 42°C, compared to its uptake at a lower temperature of 37°C. These results indicated that temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid nanoparticle, PBM-b-ND demonstrate potential for applications in theranostics with cancer therapy via the combination of local drug delivery and local hyperthermia, as well as for monitoring treatment effectiveness with fluorescence imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of cerium oxide nanoparticles shape on their in vitro cellular toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Valérie; Leclerc, Lara; Hochepied, Jean-François; Trouvé, Adeline; Sarry, Gwendoline; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2017-02-01

    Cerium oxides (CeO2) nanoparticles, also referred to as nanoceria, are extensively used with a wide range of applications. However, their impact on human health and on the environment is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the CeO2 nanoparticles morphology on their in vitro toxicity. CeO2 nanoparticles of similar chemical composition and crystallinity were synthesized, only the shape varied (rods or octahedrons/cubes). Macrophages from the RAW264.7 cell line were exposed to these different samples and the toxicity was evaluated in terms of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Results showed no ROS production, whatever the nanoparticle shape. The LDH release and the TNF-α production were significantly and dose-dependently enhanced by rod-like nanoparticles, whereas they did not vary with cubic/octahedral nanoparticles. In conclusion, a strong impact of CeO2 nanoparticle morphology on their in vitro toxicity was clearly demonstrated, underscoring that nanoceria shape should be carefully taken in consideration, especially in a "safer by design" context.

  20. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Sun, Jiantang; Bickford, Lissett R.; Lin, Alex W. H.; Halas, Naomi J.; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  1. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Kun [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Sun Jiantang [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Bickford, Lissett R [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Lin, Alex W H [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Halas, Naomi J [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Yu, T-K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Box 1202, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Drezek, Rebekah A [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2008-01-30

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  2. Mixed-valence molecular four-dot unit for quantum cellular automata: Vibronic self-trapping and cell-cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukerblat, Boris, E-mail: tsuker@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: andrew.palii@uv.es [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Palii, Andrew, E-mail: tsuker@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: andrew.palii@uv.es [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Kishinev (Moldova, Republic of); Clemente-Juan, Juan Modesto; Coronado, Eugenio [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular (ICMol), Universidad de Valencia, Paterna (Spain)

    2015-10-07

    Our interest in this article is prompted by the vibronic problem of charge polarized states in the four-dot molecular quantum cellular automata (mQCA), a paradigm for nanoelectronics, in which binary information is encoded in charge configuration of the mQCA cell. Here, we report the evaluation of the electronic levels and adiabatic potentials of mixed-valence (MV) tetra-ruthenium (2Ru(II) + 2Ru(III)) derivatives (assembled as two coupled Creutz-Taube complexes) for which molecular implementations of quantum cellular automata (QCA) was proposed. The cell based on this molecule includes two holes shared among four spinless sites and correspondingly we employ the model which takes into account the two relevant electron transfer processes (through the side and through the diagonal of the square) as well as the difference in Coulomb energies for different instant positions of localization of the hole pair. The combined Jahn-Teller (JT) and pseudo JT vibronic coupling is treated within the conventional Piepho-Krauzs-Schatz model adapted to a bi-electronic MV species with the square-planar topology. The adiabatic potentials are evaluated for the low lying Coulomb levels in which the antipodal sites are occupied, the case just actual for utilization in mQCA. The conditions for the vibronic self-trapping in spin-singlet and spin-triplet states are revealed in terms of the two actual transfer pathways parameters and the strength of the vibronic coupling. Spin related effects in degrees of the localization which are found for spin-singlet and spin-triplet states are discussed. The polarization of the cell is evaluated and we demonstrate how the partial delocalization caused by the joint action of the vibronic coupling and electron transfer processes influences polarization of a four-dot cell. The results obtained within the adiabatic approach are compared with those based on the numerical solution of the dynamic vibronic problem. Finally, the Coulomb interaction between

  3. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for enhanced stability and cellular internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick V; Mäkilä, Ermei; Correia, Alexandra; Ferreira, Mónica P A; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-03-01

    Currently, developing a stable nanocarrier with high cellular internalization and low toxicity is a key bottleneck in nanomedicine. Here, we have developed a successful method to covalently conjugate poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE-MA) copolymer on the surface of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-functionalized thermally carbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (APSTCPSi NPs), forming a surface negatively charged nanovehicle with unique properties. This polymer conjugated NPs could modify surface smoothness, charge, and hydrophilicity of the developed NPs, leading to considerable improvement in the colloidal and plasma stabilities via enhanced suspensibility and charge repulsion. Furthermore, despite the surface negative charge of the polymer-conjugated NPs, the cellular internalization was increased in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These results provide a proof-of-concept evidence that such polymer-based PSi nanocomposite can be extensively used as a promising candidate for intracellular drug delivery.

  4. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical...

  5. Effect of surface charge on the cellular uptake of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Slavko; Rojnik, Matija; Romih, Rok; Jagodič, Marko; Kos, Janko; Makovec, Darko

    2012-10-01

    We report on the nanoparticle uptake into MCF10A neoT and PC-3 cells using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the nanoparticles' surface charge on the uptake efficiency. The surface of the superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles was modified using amino functionalization for the positive surface charge (CNPs), and carboxyl functionalization for the negative surface charge (ANPs). The CNPs and ANPs exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 500 μg/cm3 in 24 h. The CNPs, bound to a plasma membrane, were intensely phagocytosed, while the ANPs entered cells through fluid-phase endocytosis in a lower internalization degree. The ANPs and CNPs were shown to be co-localized with a specific lysosomal marker, thus confirming their presence in lysosomes. We showed that tailoring the surface charge of the nanoparticles has a great impact on their internalization.

  6. Effect of surface charge on the cellular uptake of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kralj, Slavko, E-mail: slavko.kralj@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Materials Synthesis (Slovenia); Rojnik, Matija [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy (Slovenia); Romih, Rok [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Cell Biology (Slovenia); Jagodic, Marko [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics (Slovenia); Kos, Janko [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy (Slovenia); Makovec, Darko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Materials Synthesis (Slovenia)

    2012-10-15

    We report on the nanoparticle uptake into MCF10A neoT and PC-3 cells using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the nanoparticles' surface charge on the uptake efficiency. The surface of the superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles was modified using amino functionalization for the positive surface charge (CNPs), and carboxyl functionalization for the negative surface charge (ANPs). The CNPs and ANPs exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 500 {mu}g/cm{sup 3} in 24 h. The CNPs, bound to a plasma membrane, were intensely phagocytosed, while the ANPs entered cells through fluid-phase endocytosis in a lower internalization degree. The ANPs and CNPs were shown to be co-localized with a specific lysosomal marker, thus confirming their presence in lysosomes. We showed that tailoring the surface charge of the nanoparticles has a great impact on their internalization.

  7. Gold Nanoparticle-Quantum Dot Fluorescent Nanohybrid: Application for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance-induced Molecular Beacon Ultrasensitive DNA Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-11-01

    In biosensor design, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-induced signal from gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-conjugated reporter can produce highly sensitive nanohybrid systems. In order to retain the physicochemical properties of AuNPs upon conjugation, high colloidal stability in aqueous solution is needed. In this work, the colloidal stability with respect to the zeta potential (ZP) of four negatively charged thiol-functionalized AuNPs, thioglycolic (TGA)-AuNPs, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-AuNPs, l-cysteine-AuNPs and l-glutathione (GSH)-AuNPs, and a cationic cyteamine-capped AuNPs was studied at various pHs, ionic strength, and NP concentration. A strong dependence of the ZP charge on the nanoparticle (NP) concentration was observed. High colloidal stability was exhibited between pH 3 and 9 for the negatively charged AuNPs and between pH 3 and 7 for the cationic AuNPs. With respect to the ionic strength, high colloidal stability was exhibited at ≤104 μM for TGA-AuNPs, l-cysteine-AuNPs, and GSH-AuNPs, whereas ≤103 μM is recommended for MPA-AuNPs. For the cationic AuNPs, very low ionic strength of ≤10 μM is recommended due to deprotonation at higher concentration. GSH-AuNPs were thereafter bonded to SiO2-functionalized alloyed CdZnSeS/ZnSe1.0S1.3 quantum dots (SiO2-Qdots) to form a plasmon-enhanced AuNP-SiO2-Qdots fluorescent nanohybrid. The AuNP-SiO2-Qdots conjugate was afterward conjugated to a molecular beacon (MB), thus forming an ultrasensitive LSPR-induced SiO2-Qdots-MB biosensor probe that detected a perfect nucleotide DNA sequence at a concentration as low as 10 fg/mL. The limit of detection was 11 fg/mL (1.4 fM) while the biosensor probe efficiently distinguished between single-base mismatch and noncomplementary sequence target.

  8. Plasmonic Effect on the Population Dynamics and the Optical Response in a Hybrid V-Type Three-Level Quantum Dot-Metallic Nanoparticle Nanosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; So, Gwang-Hyok; Kim, Pong-Ryol Jang Yong-Jin; Kim, Il-Gwang; Li, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated theoretically the exciton-plasmon coupling effects on the population dynamics and the absorption properties of a hybrid nanosystem composed of a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and a V-type three level semiconductor quantum dot (SQD), which are created by the interaction with the induced dipole moments in the SQD and the MNP, respectively. Excitons of the SQD and the plasmons of the MNP in such a hybrid nanosystem could be coupled strongly or weakly to demonstrate novel properties of the hybrid system. Our results show that the nonlinear optical response of the hybrid nanosystem can be greatly enhanced or depressed due to the exciton-plasmon couplings.

  9. The role of ligand density and size in mediating quantum dot nuclear transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peter S; Sathiamoorthy, Sarmitha; Lustig, Lindsay C; Ponzielli, Romina; Inamoto, Ichiro; Penn, Linda Z; Shin, Jumi A; Chan, Warren C W

    2014-10-29

    Studying the effects of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials on cellular uptake, toxicity, and exocytosis can provide the foundation for designing safer and more effective nanoparticles for clinical applications. However, an understanding of the effects of these properties on subcellular transport, accumulation, and distribution remains limited. The present study investigates the effects of surface density and particle size of semiconductor quantum dots on cellular uptake as well as nuclear transport kinetics, retention, and accumulation. The current work illustrates that cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of nanoparticles depend on surface density of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptides with nuclear transport reaching a plateau at 20% surface NLS density in as little as 30 min. These intracellular nanoparticles have no effects on cell viability up to 72 h post treatment. These findings will set a foundation for engineering more sophisticated nanoparticle systems for imaging and manipulating genetic targets in the nucleus.

  10. Curcumin Encapsulated into Methoxy Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Nanoparticles Increases Cellular Uptake and Neuroprotective Effect in Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marslin, Gregory; Sarmento, Bruno Filipe Carmelino Cardoso; Franklin, Gregory; Martins, José Alberto Ribeiro; Silva, Carlos Jorge Ribeiro; Gomes, Andreia Ferreira Castro; Sárria, Marisa Passos; Coutinho, Olga Maria Fernandes Pereira; Dias, Alberto Carlos Pires

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa) with well-demonstrated neuroprotective and anticancer activities. Although curcumin is safe even at high doses in humans, it exhibits poor bioavailability, mainly due to poor absorption, fast metabolism, and rapid systemic elimination. To overcome these issues, several approaches, such as nanoparticle-mediated targeted delivery, have been undertaken with different degrees of success. The present study was conducted to compare the neuroprotective effect of curcumin encapsulated in poly(ε-caprolactone) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles in U251 glioblastoma cells. Prepared nanoparticles were physically characterized by laser doppler anemometry, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results from laser doppler anemometry confirmed that the size of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles ranged between 200-240 nm for poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles and 30-70 nm for poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles, and transmission electron microscopy images revealed their spherical shape. Treatment of U251 glioma cells and zebrafish embryos with poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles loaded with curcumin revealed efficient cellular uptake. The cellular uptake of poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles was higher in comparison to poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles. Moreover, poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) di-block copolymer-loaded curcumin nanoparticles were able to protect the glioma cells against tBHP induced-oxidative damage better than free curcumin. Together, our results show that curcumin-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) di-block copolymer nanoparticles possess significantly stronger neuroprotective effect in U251 human glioma cells compared to free curcumin and curcumin

  11. Metal Dependence of Signal Transmission through MolecularQuantum-Dot Cellular Automata (QCA: A Theoretical Studyon Fe, Ru, and Os Mixed-Valence Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Tokunaga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behavior of signal transmission through metal complexes [L5M-BL-ML5]5+ (M=Fe, Ru, Os, BL=pyrazine (py, 4,4’-bipyridine (bpy, L=NH3, which are simplified models of the molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (molecular QCA, is discussed from the viewpoint of one-electron theory, density functional theory. It is found that for py complexes, the signal transmission time (tst is Fe(0.6 fs < Os(0.7 fs < Ru(1.1 fs and the signal amplitude (A is Fe(0.05 e < Os(0.06 e < Ru(0.10 e. For bpy complexes, tst and A are Fe(1.4 fs < Os(1.7 fs < Ru(2.5 fs and Os(0.11 e < Ru(0.12 e

  12. The cytotoxicity and cellular stress by temperature-fabricated polyshaped gold nanoparticles using marine macroalgae, Padina gymnospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj; Saurav, Kumar; Majouga, Alexander; Kumari, Mamta; Kumar, Manish; Manikandan, S; Kumaraguru, A K

    2015-01-01

    Bioreduction of metal ions for the synthesis of stable nanoparticles (NPs) in physiological environment has been a great challenge in the field of nanotechnology and its application. In the present study, well-defined biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were developed following a biomimetic approach for an enhanced anticancer activity. The fucoxanthins-capped crystalline AuNPs showed a particle size of 14 nm. The temperature-mediated biosynthesized NPs were characterized by UV-vis, dynamic light scattering, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of the NPs was analyzed on liver (HepG2) and lung (A549) cancerous cells. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay infers that the biofunctionalized polyshaped AuNPs synthesized with an aqueous macroalgae extract showed a satisfactory anticancer effect on the cell lines, as evaluated by changes in cell morphology, cell viability, and metabolic activity. An altered cellular function and the morphology of cancer cell lines suggest a potential for in vivo application of AuNPs and the need to understand the interactions between nanomaterials, biomolecules, and cellular components. With continued improvements, these NPs may prove to be potential drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

  13. Four-wave mixing signal enhancement and optical bistability of a hybrid metal nanoparticle-quantum dot molecule in a nanomechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Bo; Liang, Shan; Xiao, Si; He, Meng-Dong; Kim, Nam-Chol; Chen, Li-Qun; Wu, Gui-Hong; Peng, Yu-Xiang; Luo, Xiao-Yu; Guo, Ze-Ping

    2016-02-08

    We investigate theoretically four-wave mixing (FWM) response and optical bistability (OB) in a hybrid nanosystem composed of a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) coupled to a nanomechanical resonator (NR). It is shown that the FWM signal is enhanced by more than three orders of magnitude as compared to that of the system without exciton-phonon interaction, and the FWM signal can also be suppressed significantly and broadened due to the exciton-plasmon interaction. As the MNP couples strongly with the SQD, the bistable FWM response can be achieved by adjusting the SQD-MNP distance and the pumping intensity. For a given pumping constant and a fixed SQD-MNP distance, the enhanced exciton-phonon interaction can promote the occurrence of bistability. Our findings not only present a feasible way to detect the spacing between two nanoparticles, but also hold promise for developing quantum switches and nanoscale rulers.

  14. PLGA nanoparticles codeliver paclitaxel and Stat3 siRNA to overcome cellular resistance in lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su WP

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Wen-Pin Su,1,2 Fong-Yu Cheng,3 Dar-Bin Shieh,3–6 Chen-Sheng Yeh,5–7 Wu-Chou Su1,2,81Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 2Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 3Institute of Oral Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 4Department of Stomatology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University; 5Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center; 6Center for Frontier Materials and Micro/Nano Science and Technology, and 7Department of Chemistry, National Cheng Kung University; 8Cancer Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.Abstract: Background: Effective cancer chemotherapy remains an important issue in cancer treatment, and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3 activation leads to cellular resistance of anticancer agents. Polymers are ideal vectors to carry both chemotherapeutics and small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA to enhance antitumor efficacy. In this paper, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel and Stat3 siRNA were successfully synthesized, and their applications in cancer cells were investigated.Methods: Firstly, paclitaxel was enclosed by PLGA nanoparticles through solvent evaporation. They were then coated with cationic polyethylenimine polymer (PLGA-PEI-TAX, enabling it to carry Stat3 siRNA on its surface through electrostatic interactions (PLGA-PEI-TAX-S3SI. The size, zeta potential, deliver efficacy, and release profile of the PLGA nanocomplexes were characterized in vitro. The cellular uptake, intracellular nanoparticle trajectory, and subsequent cellular events were evaluated after treatment with various PLGA nanocomplexes in human lung cancer A549 cells and A549-derived paclitaxel

  15. Dual-drug delivery by porous silicon nanoparticles for improved cellular uptake, sustained release, and combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang-Fang; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Hagström, Marja V; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-04-01

    Dual-drug delivery of antiangiogenic and chemotherapeutic drugs can enhance the therapeutic effect for cancer therapy. Conjugation of methotrexate (MTX) to porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles (MTX-PSi) with positively charged surface can improve the cellular uptake of MTX and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Herein, MTX-PSi conjugates sustained the release of MTX up to 96 h, and the released fragments including MTX were confirmed by mass spectrometry. The intracellular distribution of the MTX-PSi nanoparticles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Compared to pure MTX, the MTX-PSi achieved similar inhibition of cell proliferation in folate receptor (FR) over-expressing U87 MG cancer cells, and a higher effect in low FR-expressing EA.hy926 cells. Nuclear fragmentation analysis demonstrated programmed cell apoptosis of MTX-PSi in the high/low FR-expressing cancer cells, whereas PSi alone at the same dose had a minor effect on cell apoptosis. Finally, the porous structure of MTX-PSi enabled a successful concomitant loading of another anti-angiogenic hydrophobic drug, sorafenib, and considerably enhanced the dissolution rate of sorafenib. Overall, the MTX-PSi nanoparticles can be used as a platform for combination chemotherapy by simultaneously enhancing the dissolution rate of a hydrophobic drug and sustaining the release of a conjugated chemotherapeutic drug.

  16. Surface interactions with compartmentalized cellular phosphates explain rare earth oxide nanoparticle hazard and provide opportunities for safer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dunphy, Darren R; Cai, Xiaoming; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Haiyuan; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, Andre; Xia, Tian

    2014-02-25

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use.

  17. Classification and Segmentation of Nanoparticle Diffusion Trajectories in Cellular Micro Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Alexandra; Haramagatti, Chandrashekara R.; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd; Wiemann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Darkfield and confocal laser scanning microscopy both allow for a simultaneous observation of live cells and single nanoparticles. Accordingly, a characterization of nanoparticle uptake and intracellular mobility appears possible within living cells. Single particle tracking allows to measure the size of a diffusing particle close to a cell. However, within the more complex system of a cell’s cytoplasm normal, confined or anomalous diffusion together with directed motion may occur. In this work we present a method to automatically classify and segment single trajectories into their respective motion types. Single trajectories were found to contain more than one motion type. We have trained a random forest with 9 different features. The average error over all motion types for synthetic trajectories was 7.2%. The software was successfully applied to trajectories of positive controls for normal- and constrained diffusion. Trajectories captured by nanoparticle tracking analysis served as positive control for normal diffusion. Nanoparticles inserted into a diblock copolymer membrane was used to generate constrained diffusion. Finally we segmented trajectories of diffusing (nano-)particles in V79 cells captured with both darkfield- and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The software called “TraJClassifier” is freely available as ImageJ/Fiji plugin via https://git.io/v6uz2. PMID:28107406

  18. Cellular entry of nanoparticles via serum sensitive clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and plasma membrane permeabilization [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith PJ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrigendum  Smith PJ, Giroud M, Wiggins HL, et al. Int J Nanomedicine. 2012;7:2045–2055.Page 2054, Figure 11, the text “Average no of NPs in lumen: Nf =2.1×10-3” should read “Average no of NPs in lumen:Nf =2.1×10-2”. Page 2054, Figure 11, the figure legend “Figure 11 A series of calculations to estimate the number of nanoparticles that could enter a vesicle under the incubation conditions described in materials and methods. It is estimated that nanoparticles are nearly 25,000 times more likely to enter cells when they are bound to the membrane than in the fluid phase.” should read “Figure 11 A series of calculations to estimate the number of nanoparticles that could enter a vesicle under the incubation conditions described in materials and methods. It is estimated that nanoparticles are nearly 2,500 times more likely to enter cells when they are bound to the membrane than in the fluid phase.” Page 2054, first column, line 13, the sentence “Even though the latter might be an overestimation, the current analyses suggest that under these conditions nanoparticles are nearly 25,000 times more likely to enter cells bound to the inner membrane of a vesicle than through the fluid phase.” should read “Even though the latter might be an overestimation, the current analyses suggest that under these conditions nanoparticles are nearly 2,500 times more likely to enter cells bound to the inner membrane of a vesicle than through the fluid phase”.Read the original article

  19. Stabilization and cellular delivery of chitosan-polyphosphate nanoparticles by incorporation of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Giovanna; Hillaireau, Hervé; Capiau, Pauline; Chacun, Hélène; Reynaud, Franceline; Fattal, Elias

    2014-11-28

    Chitosan (CS) nanoparticles are typically obtained by complexation with tripolyphosphate (TPP) ions, or more recently using triphosphate group-containing drugs such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is an active molecule we aim to deliver in order to restore its depletion in macrophages, when associated with their death leading to plaque rupture in atherosclerotic lesions. Despite high interest in CS nanoparticles for drug delivery, due to the biodegradability of CS and to the ease of the preparation process, these systems tend to readily disintegrate when diluted in physiological media. Some stabilization strategies have been proposed so far but they typically involve the addition of a coating agent or chemical cross-linkers. In this study, we propose the complexation of CS with iron ions prior to nanoparticle formation as a strategy to improve the carrier stability. This can be achieved thanks to the ability of iron to strongly bind both chitosan and phosphate groups. Nanoparticles were obtained from either TPP or ATP and chitosan-iron (CS-Fe) complexes containing 3 to 12% w/w iron. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the binding affinity of TPP and ATP to CS-Fe increased with the iron content of CS-Fe complexes. The stability of these nanoparticles in physiological conditions was evaluated by turbidity and by fluorescence fluctuation in real time upon dilution by electrolytes, and revealed an important stabilization effect of CS-Fe compared to CS, increasing with the iron content. Furthermore, in vitro studies on two macrophage cell lines (J774A.1 and THP-1) revealed that ATP uptake is improved consistently with the iron content of CS-Fe/ATP nanoparticles, and correlated to their lower dissociation in biological medium, allowing interesting perspectives for the intracellular delivery of ATP.

  20. Biomechanics and thermodynamics of nanoparticle interactions with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids in cellular uptake and endosomal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Jin, Shihua; Weimer, Jonathan; Elegbede, Adekunle; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2014-07-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  1. The Effect of Β-casein Nanoparticles on Bioavailability and Cellular Uptake of Platinum Complex as a Cancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Razmi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Due to the low solubility and high toxicity of drugs, treatment of cancers is problematic therefore, the encapsulation and targeted delivery of therapeutic effect is required. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on cellular uptake and bioavailability of beta-casein on platinum complexes as cancer drugs. Methods: In the present experimental study, the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles as drug carriers of beta-casein devices using dynamic light scattering (DLS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were investigated. In order to evaluate the toxicity effects of platinum complexes, the colon cancer cells in the absence or presence of free platinum complex concentration and nanoparticle loaded with platinum complexes were incubated for 24 and 48 hours. LD50 Values (concentration of compound causing 50% mortality in the cells was determined using the MTT assay. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc test. Results: At a concentration of 1 mg ml, beta-casein nanoparticle drug carriers were synthesized in the range of 100 to 300 µM. In addition, the mortality rate in cancer cells by the release of platinum complexes (without and with the capsule, were 70 and 26 in 24 hours, and 60 µM and 21 µM in 48 hours respectively, Conclusion: The study showed that the bioavailability of the encapsulated platinum complexes increases and new drug delivery system may be a good candidate for the treatment of cancer. Key words: Beta-casein, Pt (II Complex, Bioavalibility, Nanocarrier, Micelle

  2. Correlation of particle properties with cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xinhui [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liang, Tong [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Changsheng [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yuan, Yuan, E-mail: yyuan@ecust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Qian, Jiangchao, E-mail: jiangchaoqian@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Three types of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAPNs) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method by changing microwave power (from 200 to 300 W) or using calcination treatment: L200 (200 W, lyophilization), L300 (300 W, lyophilization) and C200 (200 W, lyophilization & calcination). Their physiochemical properties were characterized and correlated with cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3). The major differences among these HAPN preparations were their size and specific surface area, with the L200 showing a smaller size and higher specific surface area. Although all HAPNs inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of cancer cells, L200 exhibited the greatest toxicity. All types of HAPNs were internalized through energy-dependent pathways, but the L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells. Inhibitor studies with dynasore and methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggested that caveolae-mediated endocytosis and, to a much lesser extent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, were involved in cellular uptake of the various preparations, whereas the inhibition of endocytosis was more obvious for L200. Using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HAPNs and laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we found that all forms of nanoparticles were present in the cytoplasm, and some L200 HAPNs were even found within nuclei. Treatment with all HAPN preparations led to the increase in the intracellular calcium level with the highest level detected for L200. - Highlights: • Three types of HAPNs (L200, L300 and C200) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method. • L200 exhibited the greatest cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer (MGC80-3) cells. • L200 showed a smaller size and higher specific surface area. • The L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells through energy-dependent pathways. • L200 caused the most significant increase in the intracellular calcium level.

  3. An ultrasensitive hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on electrocatalytic synergy of graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Zhiguo; Yang Shuping [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Li Zaijun, E-mail: zaijunli@263.net [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Sun Xiulan [School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang Guangli [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Fang Yinjun [Zhejiang Zanyu Technology Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310009 (China); Liu Junkang [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2011-09-02

    Graphical abstract: We first reported an ultrasensitive hydrogen peroxide biosensor in this work, which was fabricated by coating graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dots, gold nanoparticles and horseradish peroxidase in sequence on the surface of gold electrode. Since a promising their electrocatalytic synergy towards hydrogen peroxide was achieved, the biosensor displayed very high sensitivity, low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3.2 x 10{sup -11} M) and good long-term stability (20 weeks). Highlights: {center_dot} We for the first time integrated novel hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on G-AuNP, CdTe-CdS and AuNPs. {center_dot} Three nanomaterials show remarkable synergistic electrocatalysis towards hydrogen peroxide. {center_dot} The biosensor provides the best sensitivity in all biosensors based on graphene for detection of glucose up to now. - Abstract: We first reported an ultrasensitive hydrogen peroxide biosensor in this work. The biosensor was fabricated by coating graphene-gold nanocomposite (G-AuNP), CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dots (CdTe-CdS), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in sequence on the surface of gold electrode (GE). Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to investigate electrochemical performances of the biosensor. Since promising electrocatalytic synergy of G-AuNP, CdTe-CdS and AuNPs towards hydrogen peroxide was achieved, the biosensor displayed a high sensitivity, low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3.2 x 10{sup -11} M), wide calibration range (from 1 x 10{sup -10} M to 1.2 x 10{sup -8} M) and good long-term stability (20 weeks). Moreover, the effects of omitting G-AuNP, CdTe-CdS and AuNP were also examined. It was found that sensitivity of the biosensor is more 11-fold better if G-AuNP, CdTe-CdS and AuNPs are used. This could be ascribed to improvement of the conductivity between graphene nanosheets in the G-AuNP due to introduction of the AuNPs, ultrafast charge transfer

  4. Synthesis of Monometallic (Au and Pd) and Bimetallic (AuPd) Nanoparticles Using Carbon Nitride (C3N4) Quantum Dots via the Photochemical Route for Nitrophenol Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fageria, Pragati; Uppala, Shravan; Nazir, Roshan; Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Basu, Mrinmoyee; Pande, Surojit

    2016-10-04

    In this study, we report the synthesis of monometallic (Au and Pd) and bimetallic (AuPd) nanoparticles (NPs) using graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) quantum dots (QDs) and photochemical routes. Eliminating the necessity of any extra stabilizer or reducing agent, the photochemical reactions have been carried out using a UV light source of 365 nm where C3N4 QD itself functions as a suitable stabilizer as well as a reducing agent. The g-C3N4 QDs are excited upon irradiation with UV light and produce photogenerated electrons, which further facilitate the reduction of metal ions. The successful formation of Au, Pd, and AuPd alloy nanoparticles is evidenced by UV-vis, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photon spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy techniques. The morphology and distribution of metal nanoparticles over the C3N4 QD surface has been systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and SAED analysis. To explore the catalytic activity of the as-prepared samples, the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol with excellent performance is also investigated. It is noteworthy that the synthesis of both monometallic and bimetallic NPs can be accomplished by using a very small amount of g-C3N4, which can be used as a promising photoreducing material as well as a stabilizer for the synthesis of various metal nanoparticles.

  5. One-pot synthesis of quantum dot-labeled hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for direct optosensing of folic acid in real, undiluted biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaqiong; Wang, Zhengzheng; Niu, Hui; Zhang, Huiqi

    2016-12-15

    A facile and efficient one-pot approach for the synthesis of quantum dot (QD)-labeled hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles for direct optosensing of folic acid (FA) in the undiluted bovine and porcine serums is described. Hydrophilic macromolecular chain transfer agent-mediated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization was used to implement the molecular imprinting of FA in the presence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The resulting FA-imprinted polymer nanoparticles with surface-grafted hydrophilic poly(glyceryl monomethacrylate) brushes and QDs labeling not only showed outstanding specific molecular recognition toward FA in biological samples, but also exhibited good photostability, rapid binding kinetics, and obvious template binding-induced fluorescence quenching. These characteristics make them a useful fluorescent chemosensor for directly and selectively optosensing FA in the undiluted bovine and porcine serums, with its limit of detection being 0.025μM and average recoveries ranging from 98% to 102%, even in the presence of several interfering compounds. This advanced fluorescent MIP chemosensor is highly promising for rapid quantification of FA in such applications as clinical diagnostics and food analysis.

  6. Behaviour of fluorescence emission of cyanine dyes, cyanine based fluorescent nanoparticles and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in water solution upon specific thermal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortati, Leonardo; Miletto, Ivana; Alberto, Gabriele; Caputo, Giuseppe; Sassi, Maria Paola

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used as detection methods in a wide range of biological imaging and analytical applications. The purpose of this work is to determine a measurement method which leads to a comparison between different classes of fluorophores in term of stability of the fluorescence signal upon thermal treatment cycles. This kind of investigation can determine whether the fluorophore performance is affected by heating/cooling cycles and to what extent. The fluorophores considered in this work were organic fluorophores belonging to the family of indocyanine dyes (IRIS3 by Cyanine Technologies S.p.A.) in their molecular form or encapsulated within silica nanoparticles, and CdSe/ZnS carboxyl quantum dots (Qdots 565 ITK by Invitrogen). The NIST Standard Reference Material® SRM 1932 fluorescein solution was used in the certified concentration as reference material in order to evaluate the repeatability of the used spectrofluorimeter. The proposed measurement protocol allows to characterize all kind of fluorophores upon thermal treatments. This allows direct comparison of their performance under temperature changes, giving useful guidelines for the selection of the most suitable fluorophore for the envisaged application. Moreover the method appears to be a promising tool for the characterisation of reference fluorescent materials. The experimental results demonstrate that each fluorophore class shows a specific behaviour. The experimental data analysis points out an important hysteresis effect for quantum dots that was not detected for cyanine molecules and was only slightly detected for cyanine doped silica nanoparticles.

  7. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Prasana, E-mail: prasanasahoo@gmail.com [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Murthy, P. Sriyutha [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Dhara, S., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Venugopalan, V. P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India)

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga{sup 3+} (ionic radius {approx}0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe{sup 2+} (ionic radius {approx}0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism.

  8. Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Inflammatory Response via Toll-Like Receptor 4 to Lipopolysaccharide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs and promote inflammatory responses. In this paper, we compared role of cellular uptake and inflammatory response via TLR 4 to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and TiO2 NPs. In the case of LPS, LPS binds to LPS binding protein (LBP and CD 14, and then this complex binds to TLR 4. In the case of TiO2 NPs, the necessity of LBP and CD 14 to induce the inflammatory response and for uptake by cells was investigated using over-expression, antibody blocking, and siRNA knockdown experiments. Our results suggested that for cellular uptake of TiO2 NPs, TLR 4 did not form a complex with LBP and CD 14. In the TiO2 NP-mediated inflammatory response, TLR 4 acted as the signaling receptor without protein complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. The results suggested that character of TiO2 NPs might be similar to the complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. These results are important for development of safer nanomaterials.

  9. Cellular recognition and macropinocytosis-like internalization of nanoparticles targeted to integrin α2β1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, P.; Tiitta, S.; Bergman, L.; Puranen, A.-B.; von Haartman, E.; Lindén, M.; Heino, J.

    2015-10-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to desired intracellular compartments is a major challenge. Integrin-type adhesion receptors are connected to different endocytosis routes in a receptor-specific manner. According to our previous observations, the internalization of an α2β1-integrin-echovirus-1 complex takes place via a macropinocytosis-like mechanism, suggesting that the receptor could be used to target nanoparticles to this specific entry route. Here, silica-based nanoparticles, carrying monoclonal antibodies against the α2β1 integrin as address labels, were synthesized. Studies with flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy showed the particles to attach to the cell surface via the α2β1 integrin. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nanoparticle trafficking inside the cell performed with the BioImageXD software indicated that the particles enter cells via a macropinocytosis-like process and end up in caveolin-1 positive structures. Thus, we suggest that different integrins can guide particles to distinct endocytosis routes and, subsequently, also to specific intracellular compartments. In addition, we show that with the BioImageXD software it is possible to conduct sensitive and complex analyses of the behavior of small fluorescent particles inside cells, using basic confocal microscopy images.Targeting nanoparticles to desired intracellular compartments is a major challenge. Integrin-type adhesion receptors are connected to different endocytosis routes in a receptor-specific manner. According to our previous observations, the internalization of an α2β1-integrin-echovirus-1 complex takes place via a macropinocytosis-like mechanism, suggesting that the receptor could be used to target nanoparticles to this specific entry route. Here, silica-based nanoparticles, carrying monoclonal antibodies against the α2β1 integrin as address labels, were synthesized. Studies with flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy showed the

  10. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-01-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  11. An electrochemical DNA biosensor for evaluating the effect of mix anion in cellular fluid on the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanwu; Zhang, Yan; Qin, Fei; Yao, Xin

    2015-08-15

    CeO2 nanoparticles are of particular interest as a novel antioxidant for scavenging free radicals. However, some studies showed that they could cause cell damage or death by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Up to now, it is not well understood about these paradoxical phenomena. Therefore, many attentions have been paid to the factors that could affect the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles. CeO2 nanoparticles would inevitably encounter body fluid environment for its potential medical application. In this work the antioxidant activity behavior of CeO2 nanoparticles is studied in simulated cellular fluid, which contains main body anions (HPO4(2-), HCO3(-), Cl(-) and SO4(2-)), by a method of electrochemical DNA biosensor. We found that in the solution of Cl(-) and SO4(2-), CeO2 nanoparticles can protect DNA from damage by hydroxyl radicals, while in the presence of HPO4(2-) and HCO3(-), CeO2 nanoparticles lose the antioxidant activity. This can be explained by the cerium phosphate and cerium carbonate formed on the surface of the nanoparticles, which interfere with the redox cycling between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+). These results not only add basic knowledge to the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles under different situations, but also pave the way for practical applications of nanoceria. Moreover, it also shows electrochemical DNA biosensor is an effective method to explore the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles.

  12. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  13. Enhancement of the optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Suarez, A; Benami, A; Tamayo-Rivera L; Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Cheang-Wong, J C; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Crespo-Sosa, A; Oliver, A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); R Rangel-Rojo [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Torres-Torres, C, E-mail: rrangel@cicese.mx [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Z, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We present nonlinear refractive results for three different systems produced by ion implantation: high purity silica substrates with silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs), silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), and one sample containing both. We used a femtosecond optical Kerr gate (OKG) with 80 fs pulses at 830 nm to investigate the magnitude and response time of their nonlinear response. The Ag-NPs samples were prepared implanting 2 MeV Ag{sup 2+} ions at different fluencies. A sample with 1x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} showed no discernible Kerr signal, while for one with 2.4x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} we measured |{chi}{sup (3)}|{sub 1111} = 5.1x10{sup -11} esu. The Si-QDs sample required irradiation with 1.5 MeV Si{sup 2+} ions, at a 2.5x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence in order that the OKG results for this sample yielded a similar |{chi}{sup (3)}|{sub 1111} value. The sample containing the Si-QDs was then irradiated by 1 MeV Ag2+ ions at a 4.44 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence and thermally treated, for which afterward we measured |{chi}{sup (3)}|{sub 1111} 1.7x10{sup -10} esu. In all cases the response time was quasi-instantaneous. These results imply that the inclusion of Ag-NPs at low fluence, enhances the nonlinearity of the composite by a factor of around three, and that this is purely electronic in nature. Pump-probe results show that there is not any nonlinear absorption present. We estimate that the confinement effect of the Si-QDs in the sample plays an important role for the excitation of the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) related to the Ag-NPs. A theoretical model that describes the modification of the third order nonlinearity is also presented.

  14. Evaluation of in-vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake efficiency of zidovudine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles modified with Aloe Vera in glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshy, K.S. [Department of Chemistry, CMS College Kottayam, Kerala (India); International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Sharma, Chandra P. [Division of Biosurface Technology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Science and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); Kalarikkal, Nandakumar [International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Sandeep, K. [International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Thomas, Sabu, E-mail: sabuchathukulam@yahoo.co.uk [International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Pothen, Laly A. [Department of Chemistry, Bishop Moore College, Mavelikkara, Kerala (India)

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine loaded solid lipid nanoparticles of stearic acid modified with Aloe Vera (AV) have been prepared via simple emulsion solvent evaporation method which showed excellent stability at room temperature and refrigerated condition. The nanoparticles were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), which revealed the overlap of the AV absorption peak with the absorption peak of modified stearic acid nanoparticles. The inclusion of AV to stearic acid decreased the crystallinity and improved the hydrophilicity of lipid nanoparticles and thereby improved the drug loading efficacy of lipid nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed that, the average particle size of unmodified (bare) nanoparticles was 45.66 ± 12.22 nm and modified solid lipid nanoparticles showed an average size of 265.61 ± 80.44 nm. Solid lipid nanoparticles with well-defined morphology were tested in vitro for their possible application in drug delivery. Cell culture studies using C6 glioma cells on the nanoparticles showed enhanced growth and proliferation of cells without exhibiting any toxicity. In addition, normal cell morphology and improved uptake were observed by fluorescence microscopy images of rhodamine labeled modified solid lipid nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles. The cellular uptake study suggested that these nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system to enhance the uptake of antiviral drug by brain cells and it could be a suitable drug carrier system for the treatment of HIV. - Highlights: • SLN of AZT-SA, AZT-SA-AV was developed • Better drug loading efficacy • Good uptake.

  15. Design and Cellular Fate of Bioinspired Au-Ag Nanoshells@Hybrid Silica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulé, Samantha; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Faucher, Stéphane; Haye, Bernard; Aimé, Carole; Allouche, Joachim; Dupin, Jean-Charles; Lespes, Gaëtane; Coradin, Thibaud; Martinez, Hervé

    2016-10-04

    Silica-coated gold-silver alloy nanoshells were obtained via a bioinspired approach using gelatin and poly-l-lysine (PLL) as biotemplates for the interfacial condensation of sodium silicate solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used as an efficient tool for the in-depth and complete characterization of the chemical features of nanoparticles during the whole synthetic process. Cytotoxicity assays using HaCaT cells evidenced the detrimental effect of the gelatin nanocoating and significant induction of late apoptosis after silicification. In contrast, PLL-modified nanoparticles had less biological impact that was further improved by the silica layer, and uptake rates of up to 50% of those of the initial particles could be achieved. These results are discussed considering the effect of nanosurface confinement of the biopolymers on their chemical and biological reactivity.

  16. A comparative study of CdTe quantum dots and CdTe@SiO2 nanoparticles: fabrication and cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, Asma; Zeshan, Basit; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zhang, Ruohu; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Chunlei; Yang, Jing; Cui, Yiping

    2012-09-01

    Quantum Dots have shown remarkable potentials in biomedical research. Herein, we reported the effects of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and CdTe@SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293A) cells with the aim of investigating their in vitro cytotoxicity. The CdTe@SiO2 particles were prepared by reverse microemulsion method. The structural morphology of the CdTe and hydrophilic silica-coated CdTe particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectrometry. The in vitro cytotoxicity of CdTe QDs and CdTe@SiO2 nanoparticles was assessed in 293A cells using standard MTT assay, western blot and fluorescent microscopy. The results showed that the CdTe and CdTe@SiO2 particles were relatively uniform with the diameter of about 3.8 nm, 75 nm respectively. The cell viability and the adhesion ability were similar to the control 293A cells. The level of the fibronectin protein expression was decreased with the increasing concentration of CdTe while the no effects were observed on expression of beta-actin in CdTe as well as CdTe@SiO2 treated cells even at highest concentration of 45 microg/mL which demonstrated their good biocompatibility to 293A cells. The results indicate that the CdTe@SiO2 nanoparticles are attractive candidates for biological imaging studies as expected.

  17. Transdermal cellular membrane penetration of proteins with gold nanoparticles: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh; Kashyap, Nishi; Rai, Beena

    2017-03-15

    Transdermal delivery, where the skin acts as the route for local or systemic distribution, presents a lot of advantages over conventional routes such as oral and intravenous and intramuscular injections. However, the delivery of large biomolecules like proteins through the skin is challenging due to their size and structural properties. A molecular level understanding of their transport across the skin barrier is desirable to design successful formulations. We have employed constrained and unconstrained coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation techniques to obtain the molecular mechanism of penetration of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) protein into the skin, in the presence and absence of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Unconstrained simulations show that HRP, when considered individually, was not able to breach the skin barrier, while in the presence of AuNPs, it first binds to the AuNPs and then breaches the barrier. The constrained simulations revealed that there was a free energy barrier for HRP to permeate inside the skin lipid layer when taken alone, while in the presence of gold nanoparticles, no barrier was found. Our study opens up the field of computational modeling based design of nanoparticle carriers for a given protein's transdermal delivery.

  18. Overview about the localization of nanoparticles in tissue and cellular context by different imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ostrowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interest and recent developments in nanotechnology pose previously unparalleled challenges in understanding the effects of nanoparticles on living tissues. Despite significant progress in in vitro cell and tissue culture technologies, observations on particle distribution and tissue responses in whole organisms are still indispensable. In addition to a thorough understanding of complex tissue responses which is the domain of expert pathologists, the localization of particles at their sites of interaction with living structures is essential to complete the picture. In this review we will describe and compare different imaging techniques for localizing inorganic as well as organic nanoparticles in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments. The visualization techniques include well-established methods, such as standard light, fluorescence, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy as well as more recent developments, such as light and electron microscopic autoradiography, fluorescence lifetime imaging, spectral imaging and linear unmixing, superresolution structured illumination, Raman microspectroscopy and X-ray microscopy. Importantly, all methodologies described allow for the simultaneous visualization of nanoparticles and evaluation of cell and tissue changes that are of prime interest for toxicopathologic studies. However, the different approaches vary in terms of applicability for specific particles, sensitivity, optical resolution, technical requirements and thus availability, and effects of labeling on particle properties. Specific bottle necks of each technology are discussed in detail. Interpretation of particle localization data from any of these techniques should therefore respect their specific merits and limitations as no single approach combines all desired properties.

  19. Cellular Interactions and Formation of an Epithelial “Nanocoating-Like Barrier” with Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosa as the front-line barrier in the mouth is constantly exposed to a complex microenvironment with multitudinous microbes. In this study, the interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs with primary human gingival epithelial cells were analyzed for up to 72 h, and their diffusion capacity in the reconstructed human gingival epithelia (RHGE and porcine ear skin models was further assessed at 24 h. It was found that the synthesized fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (RITC-NPs with low cytotoxicity could be uptaken, degraded, and/or excreted by the human gingival epithelial cells. Moreover, the RITC-NPs penetrated into the stratum corneum of RHGE in a time-dependent manner, while they were unable to get across the barrier of stratum corneum in the porcine ear skins. Consequently, the penetration and accumulation of RITC-NPs at the corneum layers of epithelia could form a “nanocoating-like barrier”. This preliminary proof-of-concept study suggests the feasibility of developing nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agents through topical application for oral healthcare.

  20. The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Clare

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's have an increasing number of biomedical applications. As such in vitro characterisation is essential to ensure the bio-safety of these particles. Little is known on the cellular interaction or effect on membrane integrity upon exposure to these MNPs. Here we synthesised Fe3O4 and surface coated with poly(ethylenimine (PEI and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG to achieve particles of varying surface positive charges and used them as model MNP's to evaluate the relative utility and limitations of cellular assays commonly applied for nanotoxicity assessment. An alternative approach, atomic force microscopy (AFM, was explored for the analysis of membrane structure and cell morphology upon interacting with the MNPs. The particles were tested in vitro on human SH-SY5Y, MCF-7 and U937 cell lines for reactive oxygen species (ROS production and lipid peroxidation (LPO, LDH leakage and their overall cytotoxic effect. These results were compared with AFM topography imaging carried out on fixed cell lines. Results Successful particle synthesis and coating were characterised using FTIR, PCS, TEM and ICP. The particle size from TEM was 30 nm (−16.9 mV which increased to 40 nm (+55.6 mV upon coating with PEI and subsequently 50 nm (+31.2 mV with PEG coating. Both particles showed excellent stability not only at neutral pH but also in acidic environment of pH 4.6 in the presence of sodium citrate. The higher surface charge MNP-PEI resulted in increased cytotoxic effect and ROS production on all cell lines compared with the MNP-PEI-PEG. In general the effect on the cell membrane integrity was observed only in SH-SY5Y and MCF-7 cells by MNP-PEI determined by LDH leakage and LPO production. AFM topography images showed consistently that both the highly charged MNP-PEI and the less charged MNP-PEI-PEG caused cell morphology changes possibly due to membrane disruption and cytoskeleton remodelling. Conclusions

  1. Recent advances in interactions of designed nanoparticles and cells with respect to cellular uptake, intracellular fate, degradation and cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-10-01

    The unique features of nanomaterials have led to their rapid development in the biomedical field. In particular, functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are extensively used in the delivery of drugs and genes, bio-imaging and diagnosis. Hence, the interaction between NPs and cells is one of the most important issues towards understanding the true nature of the NP-mediated biological effects. Moreover, the intracellular safety concern of the NPs as a result of intracellular NP degradation remains to be clarified in detail. This review presents recent advances in the interactions of designed NPs and cells. The focus includes the governing factors on cellular uptake and the intracellular fate of NPs, and the degradation of NPs and its influence on nanotoxicity. Some basic consideration is proposed for optimizing the NP-cell interaction and designing NPs of better biocompatiblity for biomedical application.

  2. Fast intracellular dissolution and persistent cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles in CHO-K1 cells: implication for cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiumei; Miclăuş, Teodora; Wang, Liming; Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Sutherland, Duncan S; Autrup, Herman; Chen, Chunying; Beer, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular stability and chemical state of Ag NPs are still not very well studied. In this work, we systematically investigated the cellular uptake pathways, intracellular dissolution and chemical species, and cytotoxicity of Ag NPs (15.9 ± 7.6 nm) in Chinese hamster ovary cell subclone K1 cells, a cell line recommended by the OECD for genotoxicity studies. Quantification of intracellular nanoparticle uptake and ion release was performed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) was employed to assess the chemical state of intracellular silver. The toxic potential of Ag NPs and Ag(+) was evaluated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and live-dead cell staining. The results suggest that cellular uptake of Ag NPs involves lipid-raft-mediated endocytosis and energy-independent diffusion. The degradation study shows that Ag NPs taken up into cells dissolved quickly and XANES results directly indicated that the internalized Ag was oxidized to Ag-O- species and then stabilized in silver-sulfur (Ag-S-) bonds within the cells. Subsequent cytotoxicity studies show that Ag NPs decrease cell viability and increase ROS production. Pre-incubation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an efficient antioxidant and Ag(+) chelator, diminished the cytotoxicity caused by Ag NPs or Ag(+) exposure. Our study suggests that the cytotoxicity mechanism of Ag NPs is related to the intracellular release of silver ions, followed by their binding to SH-groups, presumably coming from amino acids or proteins, and affecting protein functions and the antioxidant defense system of cells.

  3. Cellular uptake and degradation behaviour of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol-graft-methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles crosslinked with dimethacryloyl hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Stefan; Kitzan, Martina; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-01-17

    Crosslinked polymers with hydrolytically cleavable linkages are highly interesting materials for the design of biodegradable drug carriers. The aim of this study was to investigate if nanoparticles made of such polymers have the potential to be used also for intracellular drug delivery. PEGylated nanoparticles were prepared by copolymerization of methacrylic acid esters and N,O-dimethacryloylhydroxylamine (DMHA). The particles were stable at pH 5.0. At pH 7.4 and 9.0 the degradation covered a time span of about 14 days, following first-order kinetics with higher crosslinked particles degrading slower. Cellular particle uptake and cytotoxicity were tested with L929 mouse fibroblasts. The particle uptake rate was found to correlate linearly with the surface charge and to increase as the zeta potential becomes less negative. Coating of the particle surface with polysorbate 80 drops the internalization rate close to zero and the charge dependence disappears. This indicates the existence of a second effect apart from surface charge. A similar pattern of correlation with zeta potential and coating was also found for the degree of membrane damage while there was no effect of polysorbate on the cell metabolism which increased as the negative charge decreased. It is discussed whether exocytotic processes may explain this behaviour.

  4. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-06-07

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.

  5. The Protein Corona of Plant Virus Nanoparticles Influences their Dispersion Properties, Cellular Interactions, and In Vivo Fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitek, Andrzej S; Wen, Amy M; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-04-06

    Biomolecules in bodily fluids such as plasma can adsorb to the surface of nanoparticles and influence their biological properties. This phenomenon, known as the protein corona, is well established in the field of synthetic nanotechnology but has not been described in the context of plant virus nanoparticles (VNPs). The interaction between VNPs derived from Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and plasma proteins is investigated, and it is found that the VNP protein corona is significantly less abundant compared to the corona of synthetic particles. The formed corona is dominated by complement proteins and immunoglobulins, the binding of which can be reduced by PEGylating the VNP surface. The impact of the VNP protein corona on molecular recognition and cell targeting in the context of cancer and thrombosis is investigated. A library of functionalized TMV rods with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide ligands targeting integrins or fibrin(ogen) show different dispersion properties, cellular interactions, and in vivo fates depending on the properties of the protein corona, influencing target specificity, and non-specific scavenging by macrophages. Our results provide insight into the in vivo properties of VNPs and suggest that the protein corona effect should be considered during the development of efficacious, targeted VNP formulations.

  6. Biocompatible magnetite nanoparticles with varying silica-coating layer for use in biomedicine: physicochemical and magnetic properties, and cellular compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajendra K; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Patel, Kapil D; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are considered highly useful in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, MNPs require surface modification to promote dispersibility in aqueous solutions and thus biocompatibility. In this article, the authors modified MNPs with inorganic silica layer to create silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNP@Si) via sol-gel process. Synthesis involves hydrolysis and condensation steps using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in methanol/ polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution and ammonia catalyst. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, crystalline phase, chemical-bond structure, surface charge and magnetic properties: in particular, the MNP@Si size was easily tunable through alteration of the Fe(3) O(4) -to-TEOS ratio. As this ratio increased, the MNP@Si size decreased from 270 to 15 nm whilst maintaining core 12-nm MNP particle size, indicating decrease in thickness of the silica coating. All MNP@Si, in direct contrast to uncoated MNPs, showed excellent stability in aqueous solution. The particles' physicochemical and magnetic properties systematically varied with size (coating thickness), and the zeta potential diminished toward negative values, while magnetization increased as the coating thickness decreased. 15-nm MNP@Si showed excellent magnetization (about 64.1 emu/g), almost comparable to that of uncoated MNPs (70.8 emu/g). Preliminary in vitro assays confirmed that the silica layer significantly reduced cellular toxicity as assessed by increase in cell viability and reduction in reactive oxygen species production during 48 h of culture. Newly-developed MNP@Si, with a high capacity for magnetization, water-dispersibility, and diminished cell toxicity, may be potentially useful in diverse biomedical applications, including delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic biomolecules.

  7. Bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles: preparation, cellular uptake, tissue distribution, and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peihao; Wang, Yan; Qiu, YanYan; Hou, LiLi; Liu, Xuan; Qin, Jianmin; Duan, Yourong; Liu, Peifeng; Qiu, Ming; Li, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that bufalin has a good antitumor effect but has high toxicity, poor water solubility, a short half-life, a narrow therapeutic window, and a toxic dose that is close to the therapeutic dose, which all limit its clinical application. This study aimed to determine the targeting efficacy of nanoparticles (NPs) made of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), poly-L-lysine (PLL), and cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) loaded with bufalin, ie, bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles (BNPs), in SW620 colon cancer-bearing mice. BNPs showed uniform size. The size, shape, zeta potential, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and release of these nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The tumor targeting, cellular uptake, and growth-inhibitory effect of BNPs in vivo were tested. BNPs were of uniform size with an average particle size of 164 ± 84 nm and zeta potential of 2.77 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 81.7% ± 0.89%, and the drug load was 3.92% ± 0.16%. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that although the blank NPs were nontoxic, they enhanced the cytotoxicity of bufalin in BNPs. Drug release experiments showed that the release of the drug was prolonged and sustained. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that BNPs could effectively bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In the SW620 xenograft mice model, the BNPs could effectively target the tumor in vivo. The BNPs were significantly more effective than other NPs in preventing tumor growth. BNPs had even size distribution, were stable, and had a slow-releasing and tumor-targeting effect. BNPs significantly inhibited colon cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. As a novel drug carrier system, BNPs are a potentially promising targeting treatment for colon cancer.

  8. Quantum dots as cellular probes in plant cell biology%量子点标记及其在植物细胞生物学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓娟; 王钦丽; 苏月; 林金星

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals whose diameters are 1-100 run and increasingly becoming the popular cellular probes in biological research due to their unique physical and chemical properties. We review the approaches of the synthesis of quantum dots and the validation of their applications in cell biology, especially in the plant cell biology. Additionally, we introduce the potential use of quantum dots for the study of intracellular processes at the single molecular level with high resolution cellular imaging and long-term in vivo observation.%量子点是一种直径在1-100 nm,能接受激发光产生荧光的半导体纳米晶粒,由于其独特的物理、化学特性,在生物学中的应用不断扩大.本文介绍了量子点的合成及功能方面的进展,同时也对其在细胞生物学中的应用进展,特别是对其在植物细胞生物学中的应用进行了评述.此外,对量子点在单分子检测、高分辨率细胞成像及活体动态长时追踪方面的应用前景进行了展望.

  9. Influence of TiO2 nanoparticles on cellular antioxidant defense and its involvement in genotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Jana; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of two types of TiO2 nanoparticles (production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and up-regulation of mRNA expression of DNA-damage-responsive genes (p53, p21, gadd45α and mdm2). In the present study, we measured changes in mRNA expression of several antioxidant enzymes: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, nitric oxide synthase, glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase. As reduced glutathione has a central role in cellular antioxidant defense, we determined the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on changes in the intracellular glutathione content. To confirm a role for glutathione in protection against TiO2-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage, we compared the extent of TiO2-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells that were glutathione depleted with buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine pretreatment and in nonglutathione-depleted cells. Our data show that both types of TiO2 nanoparticles up-regulate mRNA expression of oxidative-stress-related genes, with TiO2-Ru being a stronger inducer than TiO2-An. Both types of TiO2 nanoparticles also induce dose-dependent increases in intracellular glutathione levels, and in glutathione-depleted cells, TiO2-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage was significantly greater than in nonglutathione-depleted cells. Interestingly, the glutathione content and the extent of DNA damage were significantly higher in TiO2-An- than TiO2-Ru-exposed cells. Thus, we show that TiO2 nanoparticles cause activation of cellular antioxidant processes, and that intracellular glutathione has a critical role in defense against this TiO2-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage.

  10. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  11. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  12. Comparison of cellular effects of starch-coated SPIONs and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) matrix nanoparticles on human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, Dominik; Qu, Ying; Langer, Klaus; Öztürk, Cengiz; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Seebohm, Guiscard; Düfer, Martina; Fuchs, Harald; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Within the last years, progress has been made in the knowledge of the properties of medically used nanoparticles and their toxic effects, but still, little is known about their influence on cellular processes of immune cells. The aim of our comparative study was to present the influence of two different nanoparticle types on subcellular processes of primary monocytes and the leukemic monocyte cell line MM6. We used core-shell starch-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and matrix poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for our experiments. In addition to typical biocompatibility testing like the detection of necrosis or secretion of interleukins (ILs), we investigated the impact of these nanoparticles on the actin cytoskeleton and the two voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.3 and Kv7.1. Induction of necrosis was not seen for PLGA nanoparticles and SPIONs in primary monocytes and MM6 cells. Likewise, no alteration in secretion of IL-1β and IL-10 was detected under the same experimental conditions. In contrast, IL-6 secretion was exclusively downregulated in primary monocytes after contact with both nanoparticles. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments revealed that both nanoparticles reduce currents of the aforementioned potassium channels. The two nanoparticles differed significantly in their impact on the actin cytoskeleton, demonstrated via atomic force microscopy elasticity measurement and phalloidin staining. While SPIONs led to the disruption of the respective cytoskeleton, PLGA did not show any influence in both experimental setups. The difference in the effects on ion channels and the actin cytoskeleton suggests that nanoparticles affect these subcellular components via different pathways. Our data indicate that the alteration of the cytoskeleton and the effect on ion channels are new parameters that describe the influence of nanoparticles on cells. The results are highly relevant for medical application and further

  13. Cellular responses of eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian D; Gilbert, Samantha L; Khan, Bushra; Carroll, David L; Ringwood, Amy H

    2015-10-01

    Because of the continued development and production of a variety of nanomaterials and nanoparticles, their uptake and effects on the biota of marine ecosystems must be investigated. Filter feeding bivalve molluscs are highly adapted for capturing particles from the external environment and readily internalize nano- and micro-sized particles through endocytosis, so they are commonly used as valuable indicator species for nanoparticle studies. In these studies, adult eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were exposed to a range of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2-NP) concentrations (5, 50, 500, and 5000 μg/L) in conjunction with natural sunlight. Isolated hepatopancreas tissues were also exposed to the same TiO2-NP concentrations using particles exposed to similar light and dark conditions. Dose-dependent decreases in lysosomal stability were observed in the adult oyster studies as well as in the isolated tissues, at exposures as low as 50 μg/L. Titanium accumulation in isolated hepatopancreas tissue studies was directly correlated to lysosomal destabilization. Based on measurements of lipid peroxidation as an indicator of oxidative stress, TiO2-NPs toxicity was not related to increased ROS production over the short-term course of these exposures. Analysis of particle size using dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that concentration had a significant impact on agglomeration rates, and the small agglomerates as well as individual particles are readily processed by oysters. Overall, this study illustrates that low concentrations of TiO2-NPs may cause sublethal toxicity on oysters, which might be enhanced under natural sunlight conditions. In estuarine environments, where these nanomaterials are likely to accumulate, agglomeration rates, interaction with organics, and responses to sunlight are critical in determining the extent of their bioreactivity and biological impacts.

  14. Fluorescent/magnetic micro/nano-spheres based on quantum dots and/or magnetic nanoparticles: preparation, properties, and their applications in cancer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Cong-Ying; Xie, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Ling-Ling; Hu, Jiao; Tang, Man; Wu, Min; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The study of cancer is of great significance to human survival and development, due to the fact that cancer has become one of the greatest threats to human health. In recent years, the rapid progress of nanoscience and nanotechnology has brought new and bright opportunities to this field. In particular, the applications of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have greatly promoted early diagnosis and effective therapy of cancer. In this review, we focus on fluorescent/magnetic micro/nano-spheres based on QDs and/or MNPs (we may call them ``nanoparticle-sphere (NP-sphere) composites'') from their preparation to their bio-application in cancer research. Firstly, we outline and compare the main four kinds of methods for fabricating NP-sphere composites, including their design principles, operation processes, and characteristics (merits and limitations). The NP-sphere composites successfully inherit the unique fluorescence or magnetic properties of QDs or MNPs. Moreover, compared with the nanoparticles (NPs) alone, the NP-sphere composites show superior properties, which are also discussed in this review. Then, we summarize their recent applications in cancer research from three aspects, that is: separation and enrichment of target tumor cells or biomarkers; cancer diagnosis mainly through medical imaging or tumor biomarker detection; and cancer therapy via targeted drug delivery systems. Finally, we provide some perspectives on the future challenges and development trends of the NP-sphere composites.

  15. Cellular toxicity and bioaccumulationof silver nanoparticles in the marine polychaete, Nereis diversicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    cong, Yi; Banta, Gary Thomas; Selck, Henriette

    In this study, the toxicities of commercial silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) were compared with the toxicities of Ag+ ions in the marine sediment-dwelling polychaete, Nereis diversicolor, after 10 d of sediment exposure, using lysosomal membrane stability (neutral red assay), DNA damage...... (comet assay) and bioaccumulation as endpoints. Prior to the toxicity experiment, the physical-chemical properties of Ag NPs were fully characterized. The nominal concentrations used in all exposure scenarios were 0, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 µg Ag/g dry weight (dw) sediment. Lysosomal membrane stability...

  16. Multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets based on chitosan derivative and layered double hydroxide: cellular uptake mechanism and application for topical ocular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Huibo; Gu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Cao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    To study the cellular uptake mechanism of multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets, new chitosan–glutathione–valine–valine-layered double hydroxide (CG-VV-LDH) nanosheets with active targeting to peptide transporter-1 (PepT-1) were prepared, characterized and further compared with CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles. Both organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets showed a sustained release in vitro and prolonged precorneal retention time in vivo, but CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles showed superior permeability in the isolated cornea of rabbits than CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. Furthermore, results of cellular uptake on human corneal epithelial primary cells (HCEpiC) and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells indicated that both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and active transport of PepT-1 are involved in the internalization of CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles and CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. In summary, the CG-VV-LDH nanoparticle may be a promising carrier as a topical ocular drug delivery system for the treatment of ocular diseases of mid-posterior segments, while the CG-VV-LDH nanosheet may be suitable for the treatment of ocular surface diseases. PMID:28280329

  17. Comparative Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Cellular Dosimetry and Response in Mice by the Inhalation and Liquid Cell Culture Exposure Routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Minard, Kevin R.; Forsythe, William C.; Wang, Wei; Sharma, Gaurav; Karin, Norman J.; Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    testing the rapidly growing number of nanomaterials requires large scale use of in vitro systems under the presumption that these systems are sufficiently predictive or descriptive of responses in in vivo systems for effective use in hazard ranking. We hypothesized that improved relationships between in vitro and in vivo models of experimental toxicology for nanomaterials would result from placing response data in vitro and in vivo on the same dose scale, the amount of material associated with cells (target cell dose). Methods: Balb/c mice were exposed nose-only to an aerosol of 12.8 nm (68.6 nm CMD, 19.9 mg/m3, 4 hours) super paramagnetic iron oxide particles, target cell doses were calculated and biomarkers of response anchored with histological evidence were identified by global transcriptomics. Representative murine epithelial and macrophage cell types were exposed in vitro to the same material in liquid suspension for four hours and levels nanoparticle regulated cytokine transcripts identified in vivo were quantified as a function of measured nanoparticle cellular dose. Results. Target tissue doses of 0.009-0.4 μg SPIO/cm2 lung led to an inflammatory response in the alveolar region characterized by interstitial inflammation and macrophage infiltration. In vitro, higher target tissue doses of ~1.2-4 μg SPIO/ cm2 of cells were required to induce transcriptional regulation of markers of inflammation, CXCL2 CCL3, in C10 lung epithelial cells. Estimated in vivo macrophage SPIO nanoparticle doses ranged from 1-100 pg/cell, and induction of inflammatory markers was observed in vitro in macrophages at doses of 8-35 pg/cell. Conclusions: Application of target tissue dosimetry revealed good correspondence between target cell doses triggering inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo in the alveolar macrophage population, but not in the epithelial cells of the alveolar region. These findings demonstrate the potential for target tissue dosimetry to enable the more

  18. Carbon-Dot and Quantum-Dot-Coated Dual-Emission Core-Satellite Silica Nanoparticles for Ratiometric Intracellular Cu(2+) Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chenchen; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Tan, Xuecai; Shao, Kang; Wu, Long; Lu, Zhicheng; Bahlol, Hagar Shendy; Han, Heyou

    2016-07-19

    Copper (Cu(2+)) is physiologically essential, but excessive Cu(2+) may cause potential risk to plants and animals due to the bioaccumulative properties. Hence, sensitive recognition is crucial to avoid overintake of Cu(2+), and visual recognition is more favored for practical application. In this work, a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe was developed possessing the required intensity ratio, which can facilitate the sensitive identification of Cu(2+) by the naked eye. The probe hybridizes two fluorescence nanodots (quantum dots (QDs) and carbon dots (CDs)). Although both of them can be viable fluorescence probes for metal ion detection, rarely research has coupled this two different kinds of fluorescence material in one nanosensor to fabricate a selectively ratiometric fluorescence probe for intracellular imaging. The red emitting CdTe/CdS QDs were capped around the silica microsphere to serve as the response signal label, and the blue-emitting CDs, which is insensitive to the analyte, were covalently attached to the QDs surface to act as the reference signal. This core-satellite hybrid sphere not only improves the stability and brightness of QDs significantly but also decreases the cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells tremendously. Moreover, the Cu(2+) could quench the QDs emission effectively but have no ability for reduction of the CDs emission. Accordingly, a simple, efficient, and precise method for tracing Cu(2+) was proposed. The increase of Cu(2+) concentration in the series of 0-3 × 10(-6) M was in accordance with linearly decrease of the F650/F425 ratio. As for practical application, this nanosensor was utilized to the ratiometric fluorescence imaging of copper ions in HeLa cells.

  19. Solid lipid nanoparticles for oral drug delivery: chitosan coating improves stability, controlled delivery, mucoadhesion and cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yangchao; Teng, Zi; Li, Ying; Wang, Qin

    2015-05-20

    The poor stability of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) under acidic condition resulted in large aggregation in gastric environment, limiting their application as oral delivery systems. In this study, a series of SLN was prepared to investigate the effects of surfactant/cosurfactant and chitosan coating on their physicochemical properties as well as cellular uptake. SLN was prepared from Compritol 888 ATO using a low-energy method combining the solvent-diffusion and hot homogenization technique. Poloxamer 188 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were effective emulsifiers to produce SLN with better physicochemical properties than SLN control. Chitosan-coated SLN exhibited the best stability under acidic condition by forming a thick layer around the lipid core, as clearly observed by transmission electron microscope. The intermolecular interactions in different formulations were monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Chitosan coating also significantly improved the mucoadhesive property of SLN as determined by Quartz Crystal Microbalance. In vitro drug delivery assays, cytotoxicity, and cellular uptake of SLN were studied by incorporating coumarin 6 as a fluorescence probe. Overall, chitosan-coated SLN was superior to other formulations and held promising features for its application as a potential oral drug delivery system for hydrophobic drugs.

  20. Preparation and application of various nanoparticles in biology and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Gasparyan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper considers prospects for application of various nanoparticles in biology and medicine. Here are presented data on preparation of gold and silver nanoparticles, and effects of shape of these nanoparticles on their optical properties. Application of these nanoparticles in diagnostics, for drug delivery and therapy, and preparation of magnetic nanoparticles from iron and cobalt salts are also discussed. Application of these nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and as vehicles for drug delivery, and preparation of quantum dots and their application as prospective nanoparticles for multiplex analysis and for visualization of cellular processes will be tackled. Finally, prospects for new types of nanocomposites (metallic nano-shells will be not overlooked.

  1. External stimulation by nanosecond pulsed electric fields to enhance cellular uptake of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Samantha; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Nash, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    As an increasing number of studies use gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for potential medicinal, biosensing and therapeutic applications, the synthesis and use of readily functional, bio-compatible nanoparticles is receiving much interest. For these efforts, the particles are often taken up by the cells to allow for optimum sensing or therapeutic measures. This process typically requires incubation of the particles with the cells for an extended period. In an attempt to shorten and control this incubation, we investigated whether nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) exposure of cells will cause a controlled uptake of the particles. NsPEF are known to induce the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane, so we hypothesized that by controlling the number, amplitude or duration of the nsPEF exposure, we could control the size of the nanopores, and thus control the particle uptake. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were incubated sub-10 nm AuNPs with and without exposure to 600-ns electrical pulses. Contrary to our hypothesis, the nsPEF exposure was found to actually decrease the particle uptake in the exposed cells. This result suggests that the nsPEF exposure may be affecting the endocytotic pathway and processes due to membrane disruption.

  2. Counterintuitive cooperative endocytosis of like-charged nanoparticles in cellular internalization: computer simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Xianren; Yan, Bing; Cao, Dapeng

    2017-02-01

    The nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with charged ligands are of particular significance due to their potential drug/gene delivery and biomedical applications. However, the molecular mechanism of endocytosis of the charged NPs by cells, especially the effect of the NP-NP and NP-biomembrane interactions on the internalization pathways is still poorly understood. In this work, we systematically investigate the internalization behaviors of the positively charged NPs by combining experiment technology and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation. We experimentally find an interesting but highly counterintuitive phenomenon, i.e. the multiple positively charged NPs prefer to enter cells cooperatively although the like-charged NPs have obvious electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we adopt the DPD simulation to confirm the experimental findings, and reveal that the mechanism of the cooperative endocytosis between like-charged NPs is definitely caused by the interplay of particle size, the charged ligand density on particle surface and local concentration of NPs. Importantly, we not only observe the normal cooperative endocytosis of like-charged NPs in cell biomembrane like neutral NP case, but also predict the ‘bud’ cooperative endocytosis of like-charged NPs which is absence in the neutral NP case. The results indicate that electrostatic repulsion between the positively charged nanoparticles plays an important role in the ‘bud’ cooperative endocytosis of like-charged NPs.

  3. Cellular effect of high doses of silica-coated quantum dot profiled with high throughput gene expression analysis and high content cellomics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Stilwell, Jackie L; Gerion, Daniele; Ding, Lianghao; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Cooke, Patrick A; Gray, Joe W; Alivisatos, A Paul; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2006-04-01

    Quantum dots (Qdots) are now used extensively for labeling in biomedical research, and this use is predicted to grow because of their many advantages over alternative labeling methods. Uncoated Qdots made of core/shell CdSe/ZnS are toxic to cells because of the release of Cd2+ ions into the cellular environment. This problem has been partially overcome by coating Qdots with polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), or other inert molecules. The most promising coating to date, for reducing toxicity, appears to be PEG. When PEG-coated silanized Qdots (PEG-silane-Qdots) are used to treat cells, toxicity is not observed, even at dosages above 10-20 nM, a concentration inducing death when cells are treated with polymer or mercaptoacid coated Qdots. Because of the importance of Qdots in current and future biomedical and clinical applications, we believe it is essential to more completely understand and verify this negative global response from cells treated with PEG-silane-Qdots. Consequently, we examined the molecular and cellular response of cells treated with two different dosages of PEG-silane-Qdots. Human fibroblasts were exposed to 8 and 80 nM of these Qdots, and both phenotypic as well as whole genome expression measurements were made. PEG-silane-Qdots did not induce any statistically significant cell cycle changes and minimal apoptosis/necrosis in lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) as measured by high content image analysis, regardless of the treatment dosage. A slight increase in apoptosis/necrosis was observed in treated human skin fibroblasts (HSF-42) at both the low and the high dosages. We performed genome-wide expression array analysis of HSF-42 exposed to doses 8 and 80 nM to link the global cell response to a molecular and genetic phenotype. We used a gene array containing approximately 22,000 total probe sets, containing 18,400 probe sets from known genes. Only approximately 50 genes (approximately 0.2% of all the genes tested) exhibited a statistically significant

  4. [Cellular distribution and behavior of metallothionein in mammalian cells following exposure to silver nanoparticles and silver ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Arai, Yuta; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Hirano, Seishiro

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are commercially used mainly as antibacterial reagents in wound dressing and deodorant powders. However, the mechanisms underlying Ag toxicity in mammals are not fully understood. In the present study, we assessed cellular distribution and toxicity of AgNPs and AgNO3 in mouse macrophage cell line (J774.1) and those of AgNO3 in human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) focusing on behavior of metallothionein (MT). J774.1 cells were exposed to 0-100 μg Ag/mL AgNPs or AgNO3 and BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 0-100 μM AgNO3 for 24 h. The cytotoxicity was assayed by a modified MTT method. The cellular concentration and distribution of Ag were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectorometry (ICP-MS) and laser scanning microscopy. Distribution of Ag to MT and other proteins was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. Most AgNPs were found in lysosomes in J774.1 at 3 h after post exposure. Ag was distributed to high molecular weight proteins in AgNPs-exposed cells, while most Ag was bound to MT in AgNO3-exposed cells. In AgNO3-exposed BEAS-2B cells cellular Ag concentration and Ag-bound MT (Ag-MT) were sharply increased up to 3 h and then decreased. ROS production appeared to cause relocation of MT-bound Ag to mitochondria, which evoked inhibition of electron transport chain. AgNPs were sequestered by high-molecular weight proteins rather than MT, probably because they were taken up by lysosomes before induction of MT.

  5. Bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles: preparation, cellular uptake, tissue distribution, and anticancer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan YR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Peihao Yin,1,* Yan Wang,1,* YanYan Qiu,1 LiLi Hou,1 Xuan Liu,1 Jianmin Qin,1 Yourong Duan,2 Peifeng Liu,2 Ming Qiu,3 Qi Li11Department of Clinical Oncology, Putuo Hospital and Interventional Cancer Institute of Integrative Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China; 2Shanghai Cancer Institute, Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China; 3Department of General Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent studies have shown that bufalin has a good antitumor effect but has high toxicity, poor water solubility, a short half-life, a narrow therapeutic window, and a toxic dose that is close to the therapeutic dose, which all limit its clinical application. This study aimed to determine the targeting efficacy of nanoparticles (NPs made of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, poly-L-lysine (PLL, and cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD loaded with bufalin, ie, bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles (BNPs, in SW620 colon cancer-bearing mice.Methods: BNPs showed uniform size. The size, shape, zeta potential, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and release of these nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The tumor targeting, cellular uptake, and growth-inhibitory effect of BNPs in vivo were tested.Results: BNPs were of uniform size with an average particle size of 164 ± 84 nm and zeta potential of 2.77 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 81.7% ± 0.89%, and the drug load was 3.92% ± 0.16%. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that although the blank NPs were nontoxic, they enhanced the cytotoxicity of bufalin in BNPs. Drug release experiments showed that the release of the drug was prolonged and sustained. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that BNPs could effectively bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In the SW620

  6. An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose using CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Zhiguo; Yang Shuping [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Li Zaijun, E-mail: zaijunli@263.net [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Sun Xiulan [School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang Guangli [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Fang Yinjun [Zhejiang Zanyu Technology Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310009 (China); Liu Junkang [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2011-10-30

    Graphical abstract: We first reported an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose using CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle. Since promising their electrocatalytic synergy towards glucose was achieved, the biosensor showed high sensitivity (5762.8 nA nM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3 x 10{sup -12} M) and fast response time (0.045 s). - Abstract: The paper reported an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose which was based on CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle. Since efficient electron transfer between glucose oxidase and the electrode was achieved, the biosensor showed high sensitivity (5762.8 nA nM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3 x 10{sup -12} M), fast response time (0.045 s), wide calibration range (from 1 x 10{sup -11} M to 1 x 10{sup -8} M) and good long-term stability (26 weeks). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of the glucose oxidase on the medium, 5.24 x 10{sup -6} mM, indicates excellent bioelectrocatalytic activity of the immobilized enzyme towards glucose oxidation. Moreover, the effects of omitting graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and gold nanoparticle were also investigated. The result showed sensitivity of the biosensor is 7.67-fold better if graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and gold nanoparticle are used. This could be ascribed to improvement of the conductivity between graphene nanosheets due to introduction of gold nanoparticles, ultrafast charge transfer from CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot to graphene nanosheets and gold nanoparticle due to unique electrochemical properties of the CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and good biocompatibility of gold nanoparticle for glucose oxidase. The biosensor is of best sensitivity in all glucose

  7. N-hexanoyl chitosan stabilized magnetic nanoparticles: Implication for cellular labeling and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khil Myung S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This project involved the synthesis of N-hexanoyl chitosan or simply modified chitosan (MC stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (MC-IOPs and the biological evaluation of MC-IOPs. IOPs containing MC were prepared using conventional methods, and the extent of cell uptake was evaluated using mouse macrophages cell line (RAW cells. MC-IOPs were found to rapidly associate with the RAW cells, and saturation was typically reached within the 24 h of incubation at 37°C. Nearly 8.53 ± 0.31 pg iron/cell were bound or internalized at saturation. From these results, we conclude that MC-IOPs effectively deliver into RAW cells in vitro and we also hope MC-IOPs can be used for MRI enhancing agents in biomedical fields.

  8. Cellular Endocytosis and Trafficking of Cholera Toxin B-Modified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William A.; Tarannum, Mubin; Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were functionalized with Cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB) protein to influence their intracellular trafficking pathways. The CTxB-MSN carrier was synthesized, and its chemical and structural properties were characterized. Endocytic pathway inhibition assays showed that the uptake of CTxB-MSNs in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells was partially facilitated by both chlatrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis mechanisms. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) experiments demonstrated that CTxB-MSNs were taken up by the cells and partially trafficked through the trans-Golgi network into to the endoplasmic reticulum in a retrograde fashion. The delivery abilities of CTxB-MSNs were evaluated using propidium iodide, an impermeable cell membrane dye. LSCM images depicted the release of propidium iodide in the endoplasmic reticulum and cell nucleus of HeLa cells. PMID:27134749

  9. Transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid exciton of a metal nanoparticle-semiconductor quantum dot system coupled to a plasmonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Li, Jian-Bo; Im, Song-Jin; Ko, Yong-Hae; Jo, Chon-Gyu; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-11-01

    The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) and a metal nanoparticle (MNP) coupled to a one-dimensional surface plasmonic waveguide are investigated theoretically via the real-space approach. We considered that the MNP-SQD interaction leads to the formation of a hybrid exciton and the transmission and reflection of a single incident plasmon could be controlled by adjusting the frequency of the classical control field applied to the MNP-SQD hybrid nanosystem, the kinds of MNPs and the background media. The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with such a hybrid nanosystem discussed here could find applications in the design of next-generation quantum devices, such as single-photon switching and nanomirrors, and in quantum information processing.

  10. Transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid exciton of a metal nanoparticle-semiconductor quantum dot system coupled to a plasmonic waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Li, Jian-Bo; Im, Song-Jin; Ko, Yong-Hae; Jo, Chon-Gyu; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-11-18

    The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) and a metal nanoparticle (MNP) coupled to a one-dimensional surface plasmonic waveguide are investigated theoretically via the real-space approach. We considered that the MNP-SQD interaction leads to the formation of a hybrid exciton and the transmission and reflection of a single incident plasmon could be controlled by adjusting the frequency of the classical control field applied to the MNP-SQD hybrid nanosystem, the kinds of MNPs and the background media. The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with such a hybrid nanosystem discussed here could find applications in the design of next-generation quantum devices, such as single-photon switching and nanomirrors, and in quantum information processing.

  11. Synthesis and in vitro cellular interactions of superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles with a crystalline gold shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit, E-mail: sulalit.bandyopadhyay@ntnu.no [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering (Norway); Singh, Gurvinder [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering (Norway); Sandvig, Ioanna [MI Lab and Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Sandvig, Axel [MI Lab and Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå (Sweden); Mathieu, Roland; Anil Kumar, P. [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Glomm, Wilhelm Robert [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering (Norway); Sector for Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel synthetic protocol for Fe@Au nanoparticles (NPs) has been optimized. • Surface functionalization and characterization of Fe@Au NPs. • NPs retain superparamagnetic properties after Au coating. • No toxic effects on two different cell types. • NPs suitable for theranostic applications. - Abstract: Fe@Au core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit multiple functionalities enabling their effective use in applications such as medical imaging and drug delivery. In this work, a novel synthetic method was developed and optimized for the synthesis of highly stable, monodisperse Fe@Au NPs of average diameter ∼24 nm exhibiting magneto-plasmonic characteristics. Fe@Au NPs were characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques, including scanning (transmission) electron microscopy (S(T)EM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The formed particles comprise an amorphous iron core with a crystalline Au shell of tunable thickness, and retain the superparamagnetic properties at room temperature after formation of a crystalline Au shell. After surface modification, PEGylated Fe@Au NPs were used for in vitro studies on olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and human neural stem cells (hNSCs). No adverse effects of the Fe@Au particles were observed post-labeling, both cell types retaining normal morphology, viability, proliferation, and motility. It can be concluded that no appreciable toxic effects on both cell types, coupled with multifunctionality and chemical stability make them ideal candidates for therapeutic as well as diagnostic applications.

  12. Cellular effects and gene expression after exposure to amorphous silica nanoparticles in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Beer, Christiane; Wang, Jing

    ). Accordingly, the present study focused on the cytotoxicity of amorphous silica NPs in six different cell lines selected to explore the significance of tissue type and species. The cells were selected as three pairs of human/mouse cell lines derived from lung epithelium (A549 and ASB-XIV), colon epithelium (Ca...... lung cell line, A549, to investigate the mechanism of action. A concentration-dependent increase of cellular reactive oxygen species was demonstrated in silica NP exposed A549 cells. However, induction of oxidative stress related pathways was not found after silica NP exposure in gene array studies...

  13. Long-term exposure of CdTe quantum dots on PC12 cellular activity and the determination of optimum non-toxic concentrations for biological use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Valérie A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unique and tuneable photonic properties of Quantum Dots (QDs have made them potentially useful tools for imaging biological entities. However, QDs though attractive diagnostic and therapeutic tools, have a major disadvantage due to their inherent cytotoxic nature. The cellular interaction, uptake and resultant toxic influence of CdTe QDs (gelatinised and non-gelatinised Thioglycolic acid (TGA capped have been investigated with pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12 cells. In conjunction to their analysis by confocal microscopy, the QD - cell interplay was explored as the QD concentrations were varied over extended (up to 72 hours co-incubation times. Coupled to this investigation, cell viability, DNA quantification and cell proliferation assays were also performed to compare and contrast the various factors leading to cell stress and ultimately death. Results Thioglycolic acid (TGA stabilised CdTe QDs (gel and non - gel were co-incubated with PC12 cells and investigated as to how their presence influenced cell behaviour and function. Cell morphology was analysed as the QD concentrations were varied over co-incubations up to 72 hours. The QDs were found to be excellent fluorophores, illuminating the cytoplasm of the cells and no deleterious effects were witnessed at concentrations of ~10-9 M. Three assays were utilised to probe how individual cell functions (viability, DNA quantification and proliferation were affected by the presence of the QDs at various concentrations and incubation times. Cell response was found to not only be concentration dependant but also influenced by the surface environment of the QDs. Gelatine capping on the surface acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic atoms, thus reducing the negative impact of the QDs. Conclusion This study has shown that under the correct conditions, QDs can be routinely used for the imaging of PC12 cells with minimal adverse effects. We have found that PC12 cells are highly

  14. 量子元胞自动机器件和电路的研究进展%Research Progress of Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Devices and Circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓阔; 蔡理; 李政操; 陈祥叶

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) is a novel nanotechnology, the information of QCA is calculated and transferred not by the voltage or current, but by the field interaction. The computation principles, basic logic gates and clockings of two kinds of QCA (EQCA and MQCA) devices are introduced firstly. It shows that different wire structures comprised of QCA cells could realize planar crossover and transmit signals in a single layer independently. Furthermore, the experiment methods and materials to fabricate QCA devices and function arrays or circuits are summarized, and the conclusion is obtained that the development of MQCA and molecular EQCA devices would bring QCA up to the actual application level gradually. The research progresses and existent issues of QCA devices and circuits (particularly memory cell architecture) are discussed in detail. The open projects and directions in theory and application research of QCA are presented.%量子元胞自动机(QCA)是一种新颖的纳米技术,该技术不再通过电流或电压而是基于场相互作用进行信息的计算和传递.首先,综述了两种量子元胞自动机(EQCA和MQCA)器件的计算原理、基本逻辑门和时钟.指出了QCA元胞构成的不同线结构可在相同层交叉传递信号而不受影响.然后,进一步总结了制备QCA器件和功能阵列或电路的实验方法和材料,得出MQCA器件和分子EQCA器件的发展将使该器件逐步达到实际应用水平的结论.详细讨论了目前QCA器件和电路(尤其是存储单元结构)研究取得的重要进展以及面临的问题.提出了QCA器件未来理论和应用研究中的开放课题和方向.

  15. Long-term exposure of CdTe quantum dots on PC12 cellular activity and the determination of optimum non-toxic concentrations for biological use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prasad, Babu R

    2010-03-25

    Abstract Background The unique and tuneable photonic properties of Quantum Dots (QDs) have made them potentially useful tools for imaging biological entities. However, QDs though attractive diagnostic and therapeutic tools, have a major disadvantage due to their inherent cytotoxic nature. The cellular interaction, uptake and resultant toxic influence of CdTe QDs (gelatinised and non-gelatinised Thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped) have been investigated with pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. In conjunction to their analysis by confocal microscopy, the QD - cell interplay was explored as the QD concentrations were varied over extended (up to 72 hours) co-incubation times. Coupled to this investigation, cell viability, DNA quantification and cell proliferation assays were also performed to compare and contrast the various factors leading to cell stress and ultimately death. Results Thioglycolic acid (TGA) stabilised CdTe QDs (gel and non - gel) were co-incubated with PC12 cells and investigated as to how their presence influenced cell behaviour and function. Cell morphology was analysed as the QD concentrations were varied over co-incubations up to 72 hours. The QDs were found to be excellent fluorophores, illuminating the cytoplasm of the cells and no deleterious effects were witnessed at concentrations of ~10-9 M. Three assays were utilised to probe how individual cell functions (viability, DNA quantification and proliferation) were affected by the presence of the QDs at various concentrations and incubation times. Cell response was found to not only be concentration dependant but also influenced by the surface environment of the QDs. Gelatine capping on the surface acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic atoms, thus reducing the negative impact of the QDs. Conclusion This study has shown that under the correct conditions, QDs can be routinely used for the imaging of PC12 cells with minimal adverse effects. We have found that PC12 cells are highly susceptible to

  16. Cytotoxicity and cellular mechanisms involved in the toxicity of CdS quantum dots in hemocytes and gill cells of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsumiti, A. [CBET Research Group, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology and Research Centre for Experimental Marine Biology and Biotechnology PIE, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Basque Country (Spain); Gilliland, D. [EU Commission–Joint Research Centre, Institute of Health and Consumer Protection, NSB Unit, Ispra (Italy); Arostegui, I. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Statistics and Operations Research, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Leioa (Spain); Cajaraville, M.P., E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es [CBET Research Group, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology and Research Centre for Experimental Marine Biology and Biotechnology PIE, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Basque Country (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • CdS QDs were cytotoxic for mussel hemocytes and gill cells in vitro. • Ionic Cd was the most toxic form, followed by CdS QDs and bulk CdS. • CdS QDs altered oxidative balance and caused DNA damage in mussel cells. • CdS QDs caused a particle-specific immunostimulation on phagocytosis of hemocytes. • Conceptual models for cellular handling and toxicity of CdS QDs are proposed. - Abstract: CdS quantum dots (QDs) show a great promise for treatment and diagnosis of cancer and for targeted drug delivery, due to their size-tunable fluorescence and ease of functionalization for tissue targeting. In spite of their advantages it is important to determine if CdS QDs can exert toxicity on biological systems. In the present work, cytotoxicity of CdS QDs (5 nm) at a wide range of concentrations (0.001–100 mg Cd/L) was screened using neutral red (NR) and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays in isolated hemocytes and gill cells of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The mechanisms of action of CdS QDs were assessed at sublethal concentrations (0.31–5 mg Cd/L) in the same cell types through a series of functional in vitro assays: production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), catalase (CAT) activity, DNA damage, lysosomal acid phosphatase (AcP) activity, multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) transport activity, Na-K-ATPase activity (only in gill cells) and phagocytic activity and damage to actin cytoskeleton (only in hemocytes). Exposures to CdS QDs lasted for 24 h and were performed in parallel with exposures to bulk CdS and ionic Cd. Ionic Cd was the most toxic form to both cell types, followed by CdS QDs and bulk CdS. ROS production, DNA damage, AcP activity and MXR transport were significantly increased in both cell types exposed to the 3 forms of Cd. CAT activity increased in hemocytes exposed to the three forms of Cd while in gill cells only in those exposed to ionic Cd. No effects were found on hemocytes cytoskeleton integrity. Effects on

  17. CdS/CdSe quantum dots and ZnPc dye co-sensitized solar cells with Au nanoparticles/graphene oxide as efficient modified layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Cheng, Yu; Jin, Junjie; Dai, Qilin; Song, Hongwei

    2016-10-15

    Co-sensitization by using two or more sensitizers with complementary absorption spectra to expand the spectral response range is an effective approach to enhance device performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). To improve the light-harvesting in the visible/near-infrared (NIR) region, organic dye zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was combined with CdS/CdSe quantum dots (QDs) for co-sensitized solar cells based on ZnO inverse opals (IOs) as photoanode. The resulting co-sensitized device shows an efficient panchromatic spectral response feature to ∼750nm and presents an overall conversion efficiency of 4.01%, which is superior to that of the individual ZnPc-sensitized solar cells and CdS/CdSe-sensitized solar cells. Meanwhile, an Au nanoparticles/graphene oxide (Au NPs/GO) composite layer was successfully prepared to modify Cu2S counter electrode for the co-sensitized solar cells. Reducing the carrier recombination process by GO and catalytic process of Au NPs leads to increased power conversion efficiency(PCE) from 4.01 to 4.60% and sustainable stability remains ∼85% of its original value after 60min light exposure. In this paper, introduction of the organic dyes as co-sensitizer and Au NPs/GO as counter electrode modified layer has been proved to be an effective route to improve the performance of QDSSCs.

  18. Improved performance of CdS/CdSe quantum dots sensitized solar cell by incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as photoelectrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreishi, F. S.; Ahmadi, V.; Samadpour, M.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present novel quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC) based on ZnO nanoparticles (NPs)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposite photoanodes for better light harvesting and energy conversion. Photoelectrodes are prepared by doctor blading ZnO NPs/GO nanocomposite paste on a fluorine doped tin oxide substrate which are then sintered at 450 °C to obtain ZnO NPs/RGO nanocomposites. The partial reduction of GO after thermal reduction, is studied by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots are deposited on the films through successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction and chemical bath deposition methods, respectively. The unique properties of ZnO NPs/RGO photoanodes, lead to a significant enhancement in the photovoltaic properties of solar cells in comparison with bare ZnO photoanodes. Current-voltage characteristics of cells are studied and the best results are obtained from ZnO NPs-RGO/CdS/CdSe with photoelectric conversion efficiency of 2.20% which is almost two times higher than cells which are made by pure ZnO NPs as photoanode (1.28%). Electrochemical impedance measurements show that the enhancement can be attributed to the increase of electron transfer rate in the ZnO NPs/RGO nanocomposite photoanode which arises from the ultrahigh electron mobility in graphene (RGO) sheets.

  19. Influence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on cellular antioxidant defense and its involvement in genotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkovic, Jana; Zegura, Bojana; Filipic, Metka, E-mail: metka.filipic@nib.si [Department of Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, National Institute of Biology, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-07-06

    We investigated the effects of two types of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (<25 nm anatase, TiO{sub 2}-An; <100 nm rutile, TiO{sub 2}-Ru) on cellular antioxidant defense in HepG2 cells. We previously showed that in HepG2 cells, TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are not toxic, although they induce oxidative DNA damage, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and up-regulation of mRNA expression of DNA-damage-responsive genes (p53, p21, gadd45{alpha} and mdm2). In the present study, we measured changes in mRNA expression of several antioxidant enzymes: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, nitric oxide synthase, glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase. As reduced glutathione has a central role in cellular antioxidant defense, we determined the effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on changes in the intracellular glutathione content. To confirm a role for glutathione in protection against TiO{sub 2}-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage, we compared the extent of TiO{sub 2}-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells that were glutathione depleted with buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine pretreatment and in nonglutathione-depleted cells. Our data show that both types of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles up-regulate mRNA expression of oxidative-stress-related genes, with TiO{sub 2}-Ru being a stronger inducer than TiO{sub 2}-An. Both types of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles also induce dose-dependent increases in intracellular glutathione levels, and in glutathione-depleted cells, TiO{sub 2}-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage was significantly greater than in nonglutathione-depleted cells. Interestingly, the glutathione content and the extent of DNA damage were significantly higher in TiO{sub 2}-An- than TiO{sub 2}-Ru-exposed cells. Thus, we show that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles cause activation of cellular antioxidant processes, and that intracellular glutathione has a critical role in defense against this TiO{sub 2}-nanoparticle-induced DNA damage.

  20. UV Nano-Lights: Nonlinear Quantum Dot-Plasmon Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    method is also applicable to bare nanoparticles in polar solvents. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Dots, Nonlinear Optical Materials , Energy...TERMS Quantum Dots, Nonlinear Optical Materials , Energy Conservation, Up-conversion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  1. Membrane lipid profiles of coral responded to zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced perturbations on the cellular membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Ho; Lin, Ching-Yu; Lee, Shu-Hui; Wang, Wei-Hsien

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnOs) released from popular sunscreens used during marine recreation apparently endanger corals; however, the known biological effects are very limited. Membrane lipids constitute the basic structural element to create cell a dynamic structure according to the circumstance. Nano-specific effects have been shown to mechanically perturb the physical state of the lipid membrane, and the cells accommodating the actions of nZnOs can be involved in the alteration of the membrane lipid composition. To gain insight into the effects of nanoparticles on coral, glycerophosphocholine (GPC) profiling of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum exposed to nZnOs was performed in this study. Increasing lyso-GPCs, docosapentaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and docosahexaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and decreasing arachidonic acid-possessing GPCs were the predominant changes responded to nZnO exposure in the coral. A backfilling of polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines was observed in the coral exposed to nZnO levels over a threshold. These changes can be logically interpreted as an accommodation to nZnOs-induced mechanical disturbances in the cellular membrane based on the biophysical properties of the lipids. Moreover, the coral demonstrated a difference in the changes in lipid profiles between intra-colonial functionally differentiated polyps, indicating an initial membrane composition-dependent response. Based on the physicochemical properties and physiological functions of these changed lipids, some chronic biological effects can be incubated once the coral receives long-term exposure to nZnOs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluorescent labeling of degradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) for cellular nanoparticles tracking in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freichels, Hélène; Danhier, Fabienne; Préat, Véronique; Lecomte, Philippe; Jérôme, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescent-labeled aliphatic polyesters are essential materials for in vitro and in vivo studies of the behavior of these biodegradable polymers in interaction with cells or in a body. In particular, the direct cellular localization of drug delivery systems based on these materials allows better understanding of the internalization mechanism and determination of the pharmacokinetics. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) is a rapidly degradable copolymer widely used in pharmaceutics and nanomedecine. It was prepared by ring-opening polymerization of lactide and glycolide in order to obtain a well-defined material to investigate conditions allowing the covalent linkage of a fluorescent dye (fluorescein) while preserving the macromolecular characteristics of the polymer. The success of the functionalization was ascertained by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  3. Interaction of non-aqueous dispersions of silver nanoparticles with cellular membrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Gustavo Bonomi; da Silva Oliveira, Roselaine; Camilo, Fernanda Ferraz; Caseli, Luciano

    2017-02-13

    In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) dispersed in non-aqueous media and stabilized with polyether block polymers amide (PEBA) were incorporated in Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which served as a cell membrane model. The AgNPs presented surface activity, disturbing the viscoelastic properties of the floating film. They expanded the monolayers decreasing their surface elasticity as observed with surface pressure-area isotherms. Polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy showed that the permanence of AgNPs at the air-water interface is favored by PEBA, affecting both the hydrophilic and the hydrophobic groups of the phospholipid. Brewster angle microscopy showed that the AgNPs lead to the formation of aggregates at the air-water interface, establishing domains that shear with each other due to the low lateral viscosity of irregular and non-monomolecular domains. These data can be correlated to the possible toxicity and microbicide effect of AgNPs in lipidic surfaces such as in mammalian and microbial membranes.

  4. Cellular compatibility of biomineralized ZnO nanoparticles based on prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Danhong; Yin, Guangfu; Huang, Zhongbing; Li, Liang; Liao, Xiaoming; Chen, Xianchun; Yao, Yadong; Hao, Baoqing

    2011-11-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) with the size of ∼100 nm were prepared via a facile biomineralization process in the template of silk fibroin (SF) peptide at room temperature. These ZnO NPs have shown the remarkable behavior of low toxicity to gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus agalactiae), gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli), and eukaryotic cells (mouse L929 fibroblasts). Bacteriological testing indicated that ZnO NPs presented a 50% inhibitory effect on Streptococcus agalactiae at the concentrations of >100 mM, whereas at the same concentrations, the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were hardly inhibited. On the other hand, a remarkable proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli was observed at the concentrations of ZnO NPs cell ultrastructure, endocytosis of NPs into the cytoplasm can be detected and the ultrastructure of the cell underwent few changes. The cell membrane retained integrity, euchromatin dispersed homogenously inside the cytoplasm, the mitochondrial architecture remained intact, and no intracellular vacuoles were observed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images and selected area electron diffraction patterns of ultrathin cell sections indicated that the crystal structure of NPs was not damaged by the organelle or cytoplasm. All these observations indicated that ZnO NPs mineralized with the SF peptide possess good cytocompatibility.

  5. Impact of protein pre-coating on the protein corona composition and nanoparticle cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Park, Soyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are functionalized with targeting ligands to enable selectively delivering drugs to desired locations in the body. When these functionalized NPs enter the blood stream, plasma proteins bind to their surfaces, forming a protein corona that affects NP uptake and targeting efficiency. To address this problem, new strategies for directing the formation of a protein corona that has targeting capabilities are emerging. Here, we have investigated the feasibility of directing corona composition to promote targeted NP uptake by specific types of cells. We used the well-characterized process of opsonin-induced phagocytosis by macrophages as a simplified model of corona-mediated NP uptake by a desired cell type. We demonstrate that pre-coating silica NPs with gamma-globulins (γ-globulins) produced a protein corona that was enriched with opsonins, such as immunoglobulins. Although immunoglobulins are ligands that bind to receptors on macrophages and elicit phagocytois, the opsonin-rich protein corona did not increase NP uptake by macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Immunolabeling experiments indicated that the binding of opsonins to their target cell surface receptors was impeded by other proteins in the corona. Thus, corona-mediated NP targeting strategies must optimize both the recruitment of the desired plasma proteins as well as their accessibility and orientation in the corona layer.

  6. The prospective protective effect of selenium nanoparticles against chromium-induced oxidative and cellular damage in rat thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanin KMA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamel MA Hassanin,1 Samraa H Abd El-Kawi,2 Khalid S Hashem1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Department of Histology, Faculty of Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt Background: Nanotechnology has enabled researchers to synthesize nanosize particles that possess increased surface areas. Compared to conventional microparticles, it has resulted in increased interactions with biological targets. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the protective ability of selenium nanoparticles against hexavalent chromium-induced thyrotoxicity. Design: Twenty male rats were used in the study, and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given phosphate-buffered saline. Group 2 was the chromium-treated group and was given K2Cr2O7 60 µg/kg body weight intraperitoneally as a single dose on the third day of administration. Group 3 was the nano-selenium-treated group and was given selenium nanoparticles (size 3–20 nm 0.5 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally daily for 5 consecutive days. Group 4 was the nano-selenium chromium-treated group, which received selenium nanoparticles for 5 days and a single dose of K2Cr2O7 on the third day of administration. Materials and methods: Blood samples were collected from rats for measuring thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine [T3] and free thyroxine [T4] and oxidative and antioxidant parameters (malondialdehyde [MDA], reduced glutathione [GSH], catalase, and superoxide dismutase [SOD]. Upon dissection, thyroid glands were taken for histopathological examination by using paraffin preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and Masson’s trichrome. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for detecting cellular proliferation using Ki67 antibodies. Results: The present study shows that K2Cr2O7 has a toxic effect on the thyroid gland as a result of inducing a marked oxidative damage and release of reactive oxygen species

  7. Multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets based on chitosan derivative and layered double hydroxide: cellular uptake mechanism and application for topical ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Huibo Chi,1,2,* Yan Gu,1,* Tingting Xu,1 Feng Cao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2State Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Pharmacokinetics, Tianjin Institute of Pharmaceutical Research Co., Ltd., Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: To study the cellular uptake mechanism of multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets, new chitosan–glutathione–valine–valine-layered double hydroxide (CG-VV-LDH nanosheets with active targeting to peptide transporter-1 (PepT-1 were prepared, characterized and further compared with CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles. Both organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets showed a sustained release in vitro and prolonged precorneal retention time in vivo, but CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles showed superior permeability in the isolated cornea of rabbits than CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. Furthermore, results of cellular uptake on human corneal epithelial primary cells (HCEpiC and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19 cells indicated that both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and active transport of PepT-1 are involved in the internalization of CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles and CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. In summary, the CG-VV-LDH nanoparticle may be a promising carrier as a topical ocular drug delivery system for the treatment of ocular diseases of mid-posterior segments, while the CG-VV-LDH nanosheet may be suitable for the treatment of ocular surface diseases. Keywords: LDH nanoparticles, LDH nanosheets, ocular drug delivery, human corneal epithelial primary cell, retinal pigment cell, ARPE-19, active targeting

  8. Copper oxide nanoparticles stimulate glycolytic flux and increase the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins in cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are frequently used for industrial or medical applications and are known for their high toxic potential. As little is known so far on the consequences of an exposure of brain cells to such particles, we applied CuO-NPs to cultured primary rat astrocytes and investigated whether such particles affect cell viability and alter their metabolic properties. Astrocytes efficiently accumulated CuO-NPs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The cells remained viable during a 24 h incubation with 100 µM copper in the form of CuO-NPs, while higher concentrations of CuO-NPs severely compromised the cell viability. Astrocytes that were exposed for 24 h to 100 µM CuO-NPs showed significantly enhanced extracellular lactate concentrations and increased cellular levels of glutathione and metallothioneins. The CuO-NP-induced increase in lactate release and metallothionein content were prevented by the presence of the membrane-permeable copper chelator tetrathiomolybdate, while this chelator increased already in the absence of CuO-NPs the cellular glutathione content. After removal of the CuO-NPs following a 24 h pre-incubation with 100 µM CuO-NPs, astrocytes maintained during a further 6 h incubation an elevated glycolytic lactate release and exported significantly more glutathione than control cells that had been pre-incubated without CuO-NPs. These data suggest that copper ions which are liberated from internalized CuO-NPs stimulate glycolytic flux as well as the synthesis of glutathione and metallothioneins in cultured viable astrocytes.

  9. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles alter cellular morphology via disturbing the microtubule dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhilei; Xu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Minjian; Han, Xiumei; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder, disruption, retraction, and decreased intensity of the microtubules after TiO2 NPs treatment. Both α and β tubule expressions did not change in the TiO2 NP-treated group, but the percentage of soluble tubules was increased. A microtubule dynamic study in living cells indicated that TiO2 NPs caused a lower growth rate and a higher shortening rate of microtubules as well as shortened lifetimes of de novo microtubules. TiO2 NPs did not cause changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of tau proteins, but a tau-TiO2 NP interaction was observed. TiO2 NPs could interact with tubule heterodimers, microtubules and tau proteins, which led to the instability of microtubules, thus contributing to the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder

  10. Microglial cells (BV-2) internalize titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles: toxicity and cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihane, Naima; Nury, Thomas; M'rad, Imen; El Mir, Lassaad; Sakly, Mohsen; Amara, Salem; Lizard, Gérard

    2016-05-01

    Because of their whitening and photocatalytic effects, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are widely used in daily life. These NPs can be found in paints, plastics, papers, sunscreens, foods, medicines (pills), toothpastes, and cosmetics. However, the biological effect of TiO2-NPs on the human body, especially on the central nervous system, is still unclear. Many studies have demonstrated that the brain is one of the target organs in acute or chronic TiO2-NPs toxicity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of TiO2-NPs at different concentrations (0.1 to 200 μg/mL) on murine microglial cells (BV-2) to assess their activity on cell growth and viability, as well as their neurotoxicity. Different parameters were measured: cell viability, cell proliferation and DNA content (SubG1 peak), mitochondrial depolarization, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (especially superoxide anions), and ultrastructural changes. Results showed that TiO2-NPs induced some cytotoxic effects with a slight inhibition of cell growth. Thus, at high concentrations, TiO2-NPs were not only able to inhibit cell adhesion but also enhanced cytoplasmic membrane permeability to propidium iodide associated with a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and an overproduction of superoxide anions. No induction of apoptosis based on the presence of a SubG1 peak was detected. The microscopic observations also indicated that small groups of nanosized particles and micron-sized aggregates were engulfed by the BV-2 cells and sequestered as intracytoplasmic aggregates after 24-h exposure to TiO2-NPs. Altogether, our data show that the accumulation TiO2-NPs in microglial BV-2 cells favors mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress.

  11. Selective turn-on fluorescence sensor for Ag+ using cysteamine capped CdS quantum dots: determination of free Ag+ in silver nanoparticles solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantaw, Thitima; Boonmee, Chanida; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Ngeontae, Wittaya

    2013-10-15

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots capped with cysteamine (Cys-CdS QDs) were demonstrated as a selective fluorescence probe for sensing of free trace silver ions. The fluorescence intensity of the Cys-CdS QDs can be enhanced only in the presence of free Ag(+) and the fluorescence spectrum was slightly red shift from the original spectra. In addition, the fluorescence intensities were linearly increased upon increasing Ag(+) concentration. At the optimized condition for Ag(+) detection, when adding other metal ions to the Cys-CdS QDs solution, fluorescence spectra of Cys-CdS QDs did not change significantly revealing good selectivity of the sensors towards Ag(+). The working linear concentration range was found to be 0.1-1.5 µM with LOD of 68 nM. The proposed sensor was then applied to detect free Ag(+) in the silver nanoparticles solution. The results showed that the proposed sensor can be efficiently used with good accuracy and precision providing the simple method for detection of free Ag(+) in silver nanoparticles of quality control products.

  12. A layer-by-layer ZnO nanoparticle-PbS quantum dot self-assembly platform for ultrafast interfacial electron injection

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed Samir

    2014-08-28

    Absorbent layers of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now used as material platforms for low-cost, high-performance solar cells. The semiconductor metal oxide nanoparticles as an acceptor layer have become an integral part of the next generation solar cell. To achieve sufficient electron transfer and subsequently high conversion efficiency in these solar cells, however, energy-level alignment and interfacial contact between the donor and the acceptor units are needed. Here, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique is used to assemble ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), providing adequate PbS QD uptake to achieve greater interfacial contact compared with traditional sputtering methods. Electron injection at the PbS QD and ZnO NP interface is investigated using broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 120 femtosecond temporal resolution. The results indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to ZnO NPs occurs on a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This observation is supported by the interfacial electronic-energy alignment between the donor and acceptor moieties. Finally, due to the combination of large interfacial contact and ultrafast electron injection, this proposed platform of assembled thin films holds promise for a variety of solar cell architectures and other settings that principally rely on interfacial contact, such as photocatalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Biological Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular and Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Glüer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles (SPIO are used in different ways as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: Particles with high nonspecific uptake are required for unspecific labeling of phagocytic cells whereas those that target specific molecules need to have very low unspecific cellular uptake. We compared iron-oxide particles with different core materials (magnetite, maghemite, different coatings (none, dextran, carboxydextran, polystyrene and different hydrodynamic diameters (20–850 nm for internalization kinetics, release of internalized particles, toxicity, localization of particles and ability to generate contrast in MRI. Particle uptake was investigated with U118 glioma cells und human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, which exhibit different phagocytic properties. In both cell types, the contrast agents Resovist, B102, non-coated Fe3O4 particles and microspheres were better internalized than dextran-coated Nanomag particles. SPIO uptake into the cells increased with particle/iron concentrations. Maximum intracellular accumulation of iron particles was observed between 24 h to 36 h of exposure. Most particles were retained in the cells for at least two weeks, were deeply internalized, and only few remained adsorbed at the cell surface. Internalized particles clustered in the cytosol of the cells. Furthermore, all particles showed a low toxicity. By MRI, monolayers consisting of 5000 Resovist-labeled cells could easily be visualized. Thus, for unspecific cell labeling, Resovist and microspheres show the highest potential, whereas Nanomag particles are promising contrast agents for target-specific labeling.

  14. Coupled elasticity-diffusion model for the effects of cytoskeleton deformation on cellular uptake of cylindrical nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizeng; Li, Long

    2015-01-06

    Molecular dynamic simulations and experiments have recently demonstrated how cylindrical nanoparticles (CNPs) with large aspect ratios penetrate animal cells and inevitably deform cytoskeletons. Thus, a coupled elasticity-diffusion model was adopted to elucidate this interesting biological phenomenon by considering the effects of elastic deformations of cytoskeleton and membrane, ligand-receptor binding and receptor diffusion. The mechanism by which the binding energy drives the CNPs with different orientations to enter host cells was explored. This mechanism involved overcoming the resistance caused by cytoskeleton and membrane deformations and the change in configurational entropy of the ligand-receptor bonds and free receptors. Results showed that deformation of the cytoskeleton significantly influenced the engulfing process by effectively slowing down and even hindering the entry of the CNPs. Additionally, the engulfing depth was determined quantitatively. CNPs preferred or tended to vertically attack target cells until they were stuck in the cytoskeleton as implied by the speed of vertically oriented CNPs that showed much faster initial engulfing speeds than horizontally oriented CNPs. These results elucidated the most recent molecular dynamics simulations and experimental observations on the cellular uptake of carbon nanotubes and phagocytosis of filamentous Escherichia coli bacteria. The most efficient engulfment showed the stiffness-dependent optimal radius of the CNPs. Cytoskeleton stiffness exhibited more significant influence on the optimal sizes of the vertical uptake than the horizontal uptake. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. A quasi-QSPR modelling for the photocatalytic decolourization rate constants and cellular viability (CV%) of nanoparticles by CORAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-01-01

    Most quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) predict various endpoints related to organic compounds. Gradually, the variety of organic compounds has been extended to inorganic, organometallic compounds and polymers. However, the so-called molecular descriptors cannot be defined for super-complex substances such as different nanomaterials and peptides, since there is no simple and clear representation of their molecular structure. Some possible ways to define approaches for a predictive model in the case of super-complex substances are discussed. The basic idea of the approach is to change the traditionally used paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of the molecular structure' with another paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of available eclectic information'. The eclectic data can be (i) conditions of a synthesis, (ii) technological attributes, (iii) size of nanoparticles, (iv) concentration, (v) attributes related to cell membranes, and so on. Two examples of quasi-QSPR/QSAR analyses are presented and discussed. These are (i) photocatalytic decolourization rate constants (DRC) (10(-5)/s) of different nanopowders; and (ii) the cellular viability under the effect of nano-SiO(2).

  16. Pathogen-Mimicking Polymeric Nanoparticles based on Dopamine Polymerization as Vaccines Adjuvants Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Fan, Qingze; Wang, Lianyan; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-06

    Aiming to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines, a novel antigen delivery and adjuvant system based on dopamine polymerization on the surface of poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic-acid) nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple mechanisms of immunity enhancement is developed. The mussel-inspired biomimetic polydopamine (pD) not only serves as a coating to NPs but also functionalizes NP surfaces. The method is facile and mild including simple incubation of the preformed NPs in the weak alkaline dopamine solution, and incorporation of hepatitis B surface antigen and TLR9 agonist unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motif with the pD surface. The as-constructed NPs possess pathogen-mimicking manners owing to their size, shape, and surface molecular immune-activating properties given by CpG. The biocompatibility and biosafety of these pathogen-mimicking NPs are confirmed using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Pathogen-mimicking NPs hold great potential as vaccine delivery and adjuvant system due to their ability to: 1) enhance cytokine secretion and immune cell recruitment at the injection site; 2) significantly activate and maturate dendritic cells; 3) induce stronger humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. Furthermore, this simple and versatile dopamine polymerization method can be applicable to endow NPs with characteristics to mimic pathogen structure and function, and manipulate NPs for the generation of efficacious vaccine adjuvants. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Quantification and visualization of cellular uptake of TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles: comparison of different ICP-MS techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, I-Lun; Bierkandt, Frank S.; Reichardt, Philipp; Luch, Andreas; Huang, Yuh-Jeen; JAKUBOWSKI, Norbert; Tentschert, Jutta; Haase, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Safety assessment of nanoparticles (NPs) requires techniques that are suitable to quantify tissue and cellular uptake of NPs. The most commonly applied techniques for this purpose are based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Here we apply and compare three different ICP-MS methods to investigate the cellular uptake of TiO2 (diameter 7 or 20 nm, respectively) and Ag (diameter 50 or 75 nm, respectively) NPs into differentiated mouse neuroblastoma cells (Neuro-2...

  18. Ligand exchange on the surface of cadmium telluride quantum dots with fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyun; Zhang, Hongxia; Lu, Chao; Zhao, Lixia

    2014-01-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) can provide high-intensity and photostable luminescent signals when they are used as labeling materials for sensing trace amounts of bioanalytes. However, a major concern is whether the capping ligands of CdTe QDs cause toxic effects in living systems. In the current study, we address this problem through the complete ligand transformation of CdTe QDs from toxic thiolglycolic acid (TGA) to green citrate, which is attributed to the Cd-S bond breaking and the Au-S bond formation. The highly efficient depletion of S atom from the surface of the CdTe QDs occurs after the addition of fluorosurfactant (FSN)-capped gold nanoparticles into TGA-capped CdTe QDs, accompanying with the rapid aggregation of FSN-capped gold nanoparticles via noncrosslinking mechanism in the presence of high salt. After the ligand transformation, negligible differences are observed on both photoluminescence spectra and luminescent quantum yield. In addition, the cytotoxicity of the original and new-born CdTe QDs is detected by measuring cell viability after the nanoparticle treatment. In comparison with the original TGA-capped QDs, the new-born CdTe QDs can induce minimal cytotoxicity against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells even at high dosages. Our study indicates that the extremely simple method herein opens up novel pathways for the synthesis of green CdTe QDs, and the as-prepared citrate-capped CdTe QDs might have great potential for biological labeling and imaging applications.

  19. Hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) are associated with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage in fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, James F.; Davies, Simon J.; Dodd, Nicholas J.F. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter) have been reported to cause oxidative stress related effects, including inflammation, cytotoxicity and genomic instability, either alone or in the presence of UVA irradiation in mammalian studies. Despite the fact that the aquatic environment is often the ultimate recipient of all contaminants there is a paucity of data pertaining to the potential detrimental effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms. Therefore, these investigations aimed to evaluate the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on goldfish skin cells (GFSk-S1), either alone or in combination with UVA. Whilst neutral red retention (NRR) assay (a measure of lysosomal membrane integrity) was used to evaluate cell viability, a modified Comet assay using bacterial lesion-specific repair endonucleases (Endo-III, Fpg) was employed to specifically target oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies with different spin traps were carried out for qualitative analysis of free radical generation. For cell viability, TiO{sub 2} alone (0.1-1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) had little effect whereas co-exposure with UVA (0.5-2.0 kJ m{sup -2}) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease which was dependent on both the concentration of TiO{sub 2} and the dose of UVA administered. For the Comet assay, doses of 1, 10 and 100 {mu}g ml{sup -1} in the absence of UVA caused elevated levels of Fpg-sensitive sites, indicating the oxidation of purine DNA bases (i.e. guanine) by TiO{sub 2}. UVA irradiation of TiO{sub 2}-treated cells caused further increases in DNA damage. ESR studies revealed that the observed toxic effects of nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} were most likely due to hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) formation.

  20. Visual and fluorescent assays for selective detection of beta-amyloid oligomers based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ning; Zhou, Binbin; Huang, Nanbing; Jiang, Mengsha; Zhang, Jiebing; Liu, Lin

    2016-11-15

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are the major constituents of senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Aβ monomers (AβMs) can coalesce to form small, soluble oligomers (AβOs), followed by reorganization and assembly into long, thread-like fibrils (AβFs). Recently, soluble AβOs have been regarded as reliable molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD because of their high toxicity for neuronal synapse and high concentration levels in the brains of AD patients. In this work, we reported a label-free, sensitive and selective method for visual and fluorescent detection of AβOs based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). Specifically, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was quenched significantly by AuNPs through the IFE. PrP(95-110), an AβOs-specific binding peptide from cellular prion protein, triggered the aggregation and color change of AuNPs suspension; thus, the IFE of AuNPs on the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was weakened and the fluorescence intensity was recovered. However, in the presence of AβOs, the specific interaction of AβOs and PrP(95-110) prevented the absorption of PrP(95-110) onto the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the aggregation of AuNPs was inhibited and the fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs was quenched again. This label-free method is specific for detection of AβOs but not for AβMs and AβFs. The detection limits were found to be 0.5nM for the visual assay and 0.2nM for the fluorescent detection. We believe that this work would be valuable for many investigations related to AD diagnosis and drug discovery.

  1. Preparation and applications of noble metal nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots nanocomposites%贵金属纳米粒子/碳量子点复合材料的制备及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林振华; 唐志姣; 胡玉玲; 李攻科

    2016-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots possesses the merits of both noble metal nanoparticles (AuNPs and AgNPs) and carbon quantum dots(CDs), which has be regraded as a kind of promising functional materials. In recent years, the research on the preparation methods and application of noble metal nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots has gradually increased. AuNPs and AgNPs are widely used in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), sensor, catalysis and antibacterial,etc. Carbon quantum dots are served not only as excellent electron donors, but also as electron acceptors because of the rich functional groups at the surface. What’s more, the preparation process of the noble metal nanoparticles is efficient, environment friendly and controllable, enabling noble metal nanoparticles to be more extensively applied. In this paper, the preparation and application of noble metal nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots in resent years as well as the prospects were summarized.%贵金属纳米粒子/碳量子点纳米材料结合了贵金属纳米粒子和碳量子点的优点,是一种非常有前途的功能材料。近年来,国内外对其制备方法及应用研究逐渐增多,已广泛应用于表面增强拉曼光谱、传感、催化和抗菌等方面。碳量子点表面含有丰富的基团,既可以作为电子供体也可作为电子受体,在贵金属纳米粒子的制备中已经得到了很好的应用,制备过程高效、环保且形态可控。本文概述了近年来银纳米粒子/碳量子点和金纳米粒子/碳量子点复合纳米材料的制备方法及其应用,并对前景进行了展望。

  2. A role of cellular glutathione in the differential effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on antigen-specific T cell cytokine expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen CC

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Chien-Chang Shen1, Hong-Jen Liang2, Chia-Chi Wang3, Mei-Hsiu Liao4, Tong-Rong Jan1 1Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 2Innovation and Incubation Center, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, 3School of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 4Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan Background: Accumulating evidence indicates that iron oxide nanoparticles modulate immune responses, and induce oxidative stress in macrophages. It was recently reported that iron oxide nanoparticles attenuated antigen-specific immunity in vivo, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The present study investigates the direct effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on antigen-specific cytokine expression by T cells, and potential underlying mechanisms. Methods: Ovalbumin-primed splenocytes were exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles, followed by restimulation with ovalbumin. Cell viability, cytokine production, and cellular levels of glutathione and reactive oxygen species were measured. Results: The splenocyte viability and the production of interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 were unaffected, whereas interferon-γ production was markedly attenuated by iron oxide nanoparticles (10–100 µg iron/mL in a concentration-dependent manner. Iron oxide nanoparticles also transiently diminished the intracellular level of glutathione, with a peak response at 6 hours posttreatment. The effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on interferon-γ and glutathione were attenuated by the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. However, iron oxide nanoparticles did not influence the generation of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion: Iron oxide nanoparticles induced a differential effect on antigen-specific cytokine expression by T cells, in which the T helper 1 cytokine IFN-γ was sensitive, whereas the T helper 2 cytokine interleukin-4 was

  3. Nanoparticles and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Stevenson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nanoscale molecular probes capable of diagnosis, characterization, and clinical treatment of disease is leading to a new generation of imaging technologies. Such probes are particularly relevant to inflammation, where the detection of subclinical, early disease states could facilitate speedier detection that could yield enhanced, tailored therapies. Nanoparticles offer robust platforms capable of sensitive detection, and early research has indicated their suitability for the detection of vascular activation and cellular recruitment at subclinical levels. This suggests that nanoparticle techniques may provide excellent biomarkers for the diagnosis and progression of inflammatory diseases with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, fluorescent quantum dots (QDs, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS probes being just some of the new methodologies employed. Development of these techniques could lead to a range of sensitive probes capable of ultrasensitive, localized detection of inflammation. This article will discuss the merits of each approach, with a general overview to their applicability in inflammatory diseases.

  4. Preferential killing of cancer cells using silicon carbide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognetti, Barbara; Barberis, Alessandro; Marino, Silvia; Di Carlo, Francesco; Lysenko, Vladimir; Marty, Olivier; Géloën, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Silicon carbide quantum dots are highly luminescent biocompatible nanoparticles whose properties might be of particular interest for biomedical applications. In this study we investigated Silicon Carbide Quantum Dots (3C-SiC QDs) cellular localisation and influence on viability and proliferation on oral squamous carcinoma (AT-84 and HSC) and immortalized cell lines (S-G). They clearly localize into the nuclei, but the presence of 3C-SiC QDs in culture medium provoke morphological changes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that 3C-SiC QDs display dose- and time-dependent selective cytotoxicity on cancer versus immortalized cells in vitro. Since one of the limitations of classical antineoplastic drugs is their lack of selectivity, these results open a new way in the search for antiproliferative drugs.

  5. Self-assembled PEG-b-PDPA-b-PGEM copolymer nanoparticles as protein antigen delivery vehicles to dendritic cells: preparation, characterization and cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Zhou, Junhui; Huang, Pingsheng; Zhang, Chuangnian; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2017-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells (DCs) is a key step for initiating antigen-specific T cell immunity. In the present study, novel synthetic polymeric nanoparticles were prepared as antigen delivery vehicles to improve the antigen uptake by DCs. Well-defined cationic and acid-responsive copolymers, monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(2-(diisopropyl amino) ethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(2-(guanidyl) ethyl methacrylate) (mPEG-b-PDPA-b-PGEM, PEDG) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization of 2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl) amino ethyl methacrylate monomers, followed by deprotection of tert-butyl protective groups and guanidinylation of obtained primary amines. 1H NMR, 13C NMR and GPC results indicated the successful synthesis of well-defined PEDG copolymers. PEDG copolymers could self-assemble into nanoparticles in aqueous solution, which were of cationic surface charges and showed acid-triggered disassembly contributed by PGEM and PDPA moieties, respectively. Significantly, PEDG nanoparticles could effectively condense with negatively charged model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) to form OVA/PEDG nanoparticle formulations with no influence on its secondary and tertiary structures demonstrating by far-UV circular dichroism and UV–vis spectra. In vitro antigen cellular uptake by bone marrow DCs (BMDCs) indicated using PEDG nanoparticles as antigen delivery vehicles could significantly improve the antigen uptake efficiency of OVA compared with free OVA or the commercialized Alum adjuvant. Moreover, as the surface cationic charges of OVA/PEDG nanoparticle formulations reduced, the uptake efficiency decreased correspondingly. Collectively, our work suggests that guanidinylated, cationic and acid-responsive PEDG nanoparticles represent a new kind of promising antigen delivery vehicle to DCs and hold great potential to serve as immunoadjuvants in the development of vaccines. PMID:28149525

  6. A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on carboxymethyl chitosan-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Hua; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-08-17

    In this work, we report a novel label-free fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for lectin detection. The highly sensitive and selective sensing system is based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CHIT), CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs). Firstly, CuInS{sub 2} QDs featuring carboxyl groups were directly synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the carboxyl groups on the CuInS{sub 2} QDs surface were interacted with the amino groups (−NH{sub 2}), carboxyl groups (−COOH) and hydroxyl groups (−OH) within CM-CHIT polymeric chains via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding to form CM-CHIT-QDs assemblies. Introduction of Au NPs could quench the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs through electron and energy transfer. In the presence of lectin, lectin could bind exclusively with CM-CHIT-QDs by means of specific multivalent carbohydrate-protein interaction. Thus, the electron and energy transfer process between CM-CHIT-QDs and Au NPs was inhibited, and as a result, the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs was effectively “turned on”. Under the optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I{sub 0} (I and I{sub 0} were the fluorescence intensity of CM-CHIT-QDs-Au NPs in the presence and absence of lectin, respectively) and lectin concentration in the range of 0.2–192.5 nmol L{sup −1}, And the detection limit could be down to 0.08 nmol L{sup −1}. Furthermore, the proposed biosensor was employed for the determination of lectin in fetal bovine serum samples with satisfactory results. - Graphical abstract: A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan, CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A label-free near-infrared fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for detection of lectin was established. • The highly sensitive biosensor was based on the

  7. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He, E-mail: mzhang_he@126.com; Fu, Xin; Hu, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhenjun

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: A microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dots labels was developed. The chip-based CTCs analysis could detect reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell (e.g. CEA expressing cell) in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. -- Highlights: •Combination of microfluidic bead-based platform and enzyme–probe–AuNPs is proposed. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to 5 fM of tumor associated DNA. •Microfluidic platform and multienzyme-labeled AuNPs greatly enhanced sensitivity. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to RT-PCR products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell in 1 mL blood sample. •We report a sensitive nucleic acid sensor for detection of circulating tumor cells. -- Abstract: This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro

  8. Hybrid nanostructures of well-organized arrays of colloidal quantum dots and a self-assembled monolayer of gold nanoparticles for enhanced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoying; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials comprised of well-organized arrays of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to metal nanoparticles (NPs) represent an appealing system for high-performance, spectrum-tunable photon sources with controlled photoluminescence. Experimental realization of such materials requires well-defined QD arrays and precisely controlled QD-metal interspacing. This long-standing challenge is tackled through a strategy that synergistically combines lateral confinement and vertical stacking. Lithographically generated nanoscale patterns with tailored surface chemistry confine the QDs into well-organized arrays with high selectivity through chemical pattern directed assembly, while subsequent coating with a monolayer of close-packed Au NPs introduces the plasmonic component for fluorescence enhancement. The results show uniform fluorescence emission in large-area ordered arrays for the fabricated QD structures and demonstrate five-fold fluorescence amplification for red, yellow, and green QDs in the presence of the Au NP monolayer. Encapsulation of QDs with a silica shell is shown to extend the design space for reliable QD/metal coupling with stronger enhancement of 11 times through the tuning of QD-metal spatial separation. This approach provides new opportunities for designing hybrid nanomaterials with tailored array structures and multiple functionalities for applications such as multiplexed optical coding, color display, and quantum transduction.

  9. A colorimetric and fluorometric dual-signal sensor for arginine detection by inhibiting the growth of gold nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Li, Na; Dong, Jiang Xue; Zhang, Ying; Fan, Yu Zhu; Lin, Shu Min; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2017-01-15

    A bidimensional optical sensing platform which combines the advantages of fluorescence and colorimetry has been designed for arginine (Arg) detection. The system was established by monitoring the influence of Arg on the growth of gold nanoparticles/carbon quantum dots (Au/CQDs) composite, and the CQDs synthesized by ethylene glycol were used as the reducing and stabilizing agent in this paper. Considering that Arg is the only amino acid with guanidine group and has the highest isoelectric point (pI) value at 10.76, Arg would carry positive charges at pH 7.4. Consequently, the positively charged guanidine group of Arg could attract AuCl4(-) and CQDs through electrostatic interaction, which inhibited the growth of Au/CQDs composite. Thereby, the color of the system almost did not change and the fluorescence quenching of CQDs was prevented in the presence of Arg. Based on the color change a low detection limit for Arg was 37nM, and a detection limit of 450nM was obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, this dual-signal sensor also revealed excellent selectivity toward Arg over other amino acids. Besides, Arg can be detected in urine samples with satisfactory results, which demonstrate the potential applications for real analysis.

  10. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Au-electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles-coated conducting oxide for the quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeung-Pil; Kim, Jae-Hong; Kang, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Hyunsoo; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kim, Kyong-Kook; Ahn, Kwang-Soon

    2014-08-01

    Au was electrodeposited potentiostatically at 0.3 V for 5 min on nanoporous Pt nanoparticle-coated F-doped SnO2 (FTO/Pt) substrates. For comparison, Au-electrodeposited FTO (FTO/Au) and Au-uncoated FTO/Pt were prepared. FTO/Au showed large-sized Au clusters dispersed sparsely over FTO, which resulted in lower electrocatalytic activity than FTO/Pt. In contrast, FTO/Pt exhibited poor stability unlike FTO/Au due to poisoning by the adsorption of sulfur species. The Au-electrodeposited FTO/Pt (FTO/Pt/Au) consisted of small Au clusters deposited over the entire area of Pt due to the effective Au nucleation provided by nanoporous metallic Pt. FTO/Pt/Au exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability because the small Au particles well-dispersed over the nanoporous metallic Pt network provided numerous electrochemical reaction sites, and the Pt surface was not exposed to the electrolyte. When FTO/Pt/Au was used as the counter electrode (CE) of a quantum dot-sensitized solar cell, the significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the FTO/Pt/Au CE facilitated the reduction reaction of Sn2- + 2e- (CE) → Sn-12- + S2- at the CE/electrolyte interface, resulting in a significantly hindered recombination reaction, Sn2- + 2e- (TiO2 in the photoanode) → Sn-12- + S2-, and significantly improved overall energy conversion efficiency.

  11. Simultaneous detection of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in blood by ICP-MS with gold nanoparticles and quantum dots as elemental tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoting; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Wang, Han; Xiao, Guangyang; Yang, Bin; Hu, Bin

    2017-04-15

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel method based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and quantum dots (QDs) labeling for the simultaneous counting of two circulating tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and HepG2 cells) in human blood. MCF-7 and HepG2 cells were captured by magnetic beads coupled with anti-EpCAM and then specifically labeled by CdSe QDs-anti-ASGPR and Au NPs-anti-MUC1, respectively, which were used as signal probes for ICP-MS measurement. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection of 50 MCF-7, 89 HepG2 cells and the linear ranges of 200-40000 MCF-7, 300-30000 HepG2 cells were obtained, and the relative standard deviations for seven replicate detections of 800 MCF-7 and HepG2 cells were 4.6% and 5.7%, respectively. This method has the advantages of high sensitivity, low sample consumption, wide linear range and can be extended to the simultaneous detection of multiple CTC lines in human peripheral blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Water repellent spray-type encapsulation of quantum dot light-emitting diodes using super-hydrophobic self-assembled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Junebeom; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung [Department of Physics, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do, 443-760 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Heon; Yang, Heesun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Sanghyun, E-mail: shju@kgu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do, 443-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A spray-type encapsulation method capable of being applied to flexible and concave/convex substrates has been demonstrated to have no negative effect on the luminance and efficiency of QD-LEDs. • The highly dense thin-film provided by SAM-NP encapsulation can increase the effective lifetime of QD-LED devices by a factor of 16. • The QD-LEDs with SAM-NP encapsulation were found to have an effective lifetime in ambient air and a stable light emission in water. - Abstract: We have developed a spray-type encapsulation method for quantum dot light-emitting diode (QD-LED) displays designed to prevent the penetration of oxygen and moisture in ambient air and repel water. The non-wettability and oxygen/moisture repellency afforded by the super-hydrophobic (contact angle of ∼158°) self-assembled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (SAM-NP) is attributed to a reduction in the number of defects sites such as pin-holes or cracks during the formation of the thin-film. The QD-LEDs with SAM-NP encapsulation were found to have an effective lifetime in ambient air and a stable light emission in water compared to those of equivalent QD-LEDs without encapsulation.

  13. Enhancing the Performance of Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes Using Room-Temperature-Processed Ga-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles as the Electron Transport Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Sheng

    2017-04-19

    Colloidal ZnO nanoparticle (NP) films are recognized as efficient electron transport layers (ETLs) for quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with good stability and high efficiency. However, because of the inherently high work function of such films, spontaneous charge transfer occurs at the QD/ZnO interface in such a QD-LED, thus leading to reduced performance. Here, to improve the QD-LED performance, we prepared Ga-doped ZnO NPs with low work functions and tailored band structures via a room-temperature (RT) solution process without the use of bulky organic ligands. We found that the charge transfer at the interface between the CdSe/ZnS QDs and the doped ZnO NPs was significantly weakened because of the incorporated Ga dopants. Remarkably, the as-assembled QD-LEDs, with Ga-doped ZnO NPs as the ETLs, exhibited superior luminances of up to 44 000 cd/m2 and efficiencies of up to 15 cd/A, placing them among the most efficient red-light QD-LEDs ever reported. This discovery provides a new strategy for fabricating high-performance QD-LEDs by using RT-processed Ga-doped ZnO NPs as the ETLs, which could be generalized to improve the efficiency of other optoelectronic devices.

  14. Coherent control of optical absorption and the energy transfer pathway of an infrared quantum dot hybridized with a VO2 nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatef, Ali; Zamani, Naser; Johnston, William

    2017-04-01

    We systematically investigate the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) hybridized with a vanadium dioxide nanoparticle (VO2NP) in the infrared (IR) region. The VO2NP features a semiconductor to metal phase change characteristic below and above a critical temperature that leads to an abrupt change in the particle’s optical properties. This feature means that the QD-VO2NP hybrid system can support the coherent coupling of exciton-polaritons and exciton-plasmon polaritons in the semiconductor and metal phases of the VO2NP, respectively. In our calculations, the VO2NP phase transition is modelled with a filling fraction (f), representing the fraction of the VO2NP in the metallic phase. The phase transition is driven by the hybrid system’s interaction with a continuous wave (CW) IR laser field. In this paper, we show how control over the filling fraction results in the enhancement or suppression of the QD’s linear absorption. These variations in the QD absorption is due to dramatic changes in the effective local field experienced by the QD and the non-radiative energy transfer from the QD to the VO2NP. The presented results have the potential to be applied to the design of thermal sensors at the nanoscale.

  15. The extra cellular synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles and their free radical scavenging and antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, C H; Padma, M; samadanam, I Daisy mariya; Mareeswaran, R; Suyavaran, A; Kumar, M Suresh; Premkumar, K; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2013-02-01

    The bio reduction of chloro auric acid (HAuCl(4)) and silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) is achieved extracellularly by using the aqueous extract of Solanum torvum (S. torvum) fruit. The nanoparticle formation was screened by UV-visible spectroscopy through color conversion due to surface plasma resonance bands at 560 nm and 430 nm for gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. The spherical shapes with smooth surface of gold and silver nanoparticles were analyzed through scanning electron microscope and its presence was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). The functional groups in the gold and silver salts and the bio interactive functional groups present in the S. torvum extract were characterized by employing Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). The biomedical properties of gold and silver nanoparticles were premeditated as free radical scavenging activity and antibacterial static agents. Gold and silver nanoparticles serve as strong hydroxyl, superoxide, nitric oxide and DPPH radical scavengers in contrast to their corresponding metal oxides. The radical quenching properties of gold and silver nanoparticles were found to correlate with in vitro DNA protective effect. The silver nanoparticles show strong zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas and Bacillus whereas, gold nanoparticles exhibit fair zone of inhibition. To our knowledge this is the first report that S. torvum extract can reduce metal acids to nano materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Treatment Media on the Agglomeration of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Impact on Genotoxicity, Cellular Interaction, and Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT The widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in consumer products increases the probability of exposure to humans and the environment. Although TiO2 nanoparticles have been shown to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and chromosome damage (micronucleus ass...

  17. Effect of treatment media on size and cellular uptake of Ti02 nanoparticles: impact on genotoxicity in human respiratory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide (Ti02) nanoparticles in consumer products increases the probability of exposure to humans and the environment. Although Ti02 nanoparticles have been shown to induce DNA damage and micronuclei in vitro, no study has systematically assessed th...

  18. The softer and more hydrophobic the better: influence of the side chain of polymethacrylate nanoparticles for cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Steffen; Hauser, Christoph P; Autenrieth, Benjamin; Weiss, Clemens K; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker

    2010-09-09

    Intracellular uptake of nanoparticles is highly interesting for labeling of cells, drug delivery, or non-viral gene delivery. In this study we have synthesized a wide variety of poly(alkyl methacrylate) nanoparticles with the same size and investigated their uptake into cells. The nanoparticles were prepared from alkylmethacrylates with different linear and branched ester chains as well as from benzylmethacrylate using the miniemulsion polymerizaiton technique. By adding a fluorescent dye as a marker, the internalization of the nanoparticles could be investigated quantitatively with flow cytometry and qualitatively with confocal laser scanning microscopy. With increasing side chain of the ester and therefore increasing hydrophobicity and at glass transition temperature (T(g)), below the incubation temperature of 37 degrees C the uptake of the nanoparticles into cells is favored.

  19. Near-infrared dye loaded polymeric nanoparticles for cancer imaging and therapy and cellular response after laser-induced heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingjun Lei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the past decade, researchers have focused on developing new biomaterials for cancer therapy that combine imaging and therapeutic agents. In our study, we use a new biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, termed poly(glycerol malate co-dodecanedioate (PGMD, for the synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs and loading of near-infrared (NIR dyes. IR820 was chosen for the purpose of imaging and hyperthermia (HT. HT is currently used in clinical trials for cancer therapy in combination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One of the potential problems of HT is that it can up-regulate hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 expression and enhance vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion.Results: We explored cellular response after rapid, short-term and low thermal dose laser-IR820-PGMD NPs (laser/NPs induced-heating, and compared it to slow, long-term and high thermal dose heating by a cell incubator. The expression levels of the reactive oxygen species (ROS, HIF-1 and VEGF following the two different modes of heating. The cytotoxicity of NPs after laser/NP HT resulted in higher cell killing compared to incubator HT. The ROS level was highly elevated under incubator HT, but remained at the baseline level under the laser/NP HT. Our results show that elevated ROS expression inside the cells could result in the promotion of HIF-1 expression after incubator induced-HT. The VEGF secretion was also significantly enhanced compared to laser/NP HT, possibly due to the promotion of HIF-1. In vitro cell imaging and in vivo healthy mice imaging showed that IR820-PGMD NPs can be used for optical imaging.Conclusion: IR820-PGMD NPs were developed and used for both imaging and therapy purposes. Rapid and short-term laser/NP HT, with a low thermal dose, does not up-regulate HIF-1 and VEGF expression, whereas slow and long term incubator HT, with a high thermal dose, enhances the expression of both transcription factors.

  20. 纳米粒摄取机制的研究进展%Research progress on the cellular uptake mechanism of nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超; 马桂蕾

    2015-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology,nanomaterials have great application potential in drug delivery system.Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism of nanoparticles has important scientific significance and application value in understanding life processes in cellular level,mechanisms of drug action and gene therapy,which provides the basis for developing safer and more effective nanosized drug carrier.This review summarizes the latest advancement about cellular uptake mechanisms of nanopatricles.Based on a brief introduction of the endocytic pathway of nanoparticles,influencing factors of endocytosis pathway are discussed,and the common methods used to study nanoparticle endocytosis pathways are also introduced in detail.%随着纳米技术的发展,纳米材料在药物传输领域有着潜在的应用空间.研究细胞对纳米粒的细胞摄取机制,有助于从细胞层次上理解生命体的生理过程和药物的作用机制,掌握细胞治疗的机理;同时也可为构建更加安全有效的纳米药物载体提供依据.综述了纳米粒摄取机制的最新研究进展,在简要介绍纳米粒内吞途径的基础上着重讨论了影响内吞的因素,同时详细介绍了纳米粒内吞途径的常用研究方法.

  1. Carbon dots (C-dots) from cow manure with impressive subcellular selectivity tuned by simple chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelis do E S Barbosa, Cintya; Corrêa, José R; Medeiros, Gisele A; Barreto, Gabrielle; Magalhães, Kelly G; de Oliveira, Aline L; Spencer, John; Rodrigues, Marcelo O; Neto, Brenno A D

    2015-03-23

    Improved cellular selectivity for nucleoli staining was achieved by simple chemical modification of carbon dots (C-dots) synthesized from waste carbon sources such as cow manure (or from glucose). The C-dots were characterized and functionalized (amine-passivated) with ethylenediamine, affording amide bonds that resulted in bright green fluorescence. The new modified C-dots were successfully applied as selective live-cell fluorescence imaging probes with impressive subcellular selectivity and the ability to selectively stain nucleoli in breast cancer cell lineages (MCF-7). The C-dots were also tested in four other cellular models and showed the same cellular selection in live-cell imaging experiments.

  2. Carbon nanotube surface modification with polyelectrolyte brushes endowed with quantum dots and metal oxide nanoparticles through in situ synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llarena, Irantzu; Romero, Gabriela; Moya, Sergio E [CIC biomaGUNE Paseo Miramon, 182 Edificio Empresarial C, E-20009 San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Ziolo, Ronald F, E-mail: smoya@cicbiomagune.es [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blv. Enrique Reyna No. 140, Saltillo, Coahuila 25253 (Mexico)

    2010-02-05

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully coated with a covalently bonded polymer brush of negatively charged poly(3-sulfopropylamino methacrylate) (PSPM) by in situ polymerization employing atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from initiating silanes attached to the CNTs before the polymerization. The CNT-bonded brush forms a polymer layer or shell-like structure around the CNTs and provides colloidal stabilization for the CNTs in aqueous media. In situ syntheses of nanocrystalline CdS and magnetic iron oxide in the polymer brushes lead to the formation of hybrid nanocomposites consisting of nanoparticle-containing PSPM-coated CNTs that remain readily dispersible and stable in aqueous media. The hybrid nanostructures are synthesized by ion exchange with the cations of the sulfonate groups of the PSPM followed by precipitation and were followed by stepwise zeta potential measurements and TEM. Such structures could have applications in the design of more complex structures and devices. The general synthetic scheme can be extended to include other nanoparticles as brush cargo to broaden the utility or functionality of the CNTs. TEM data shows nanocrystalline CdS in the range of 5-8 nm embedded in the PSPM brush and nanocrystalline iron oxide with a size between 2 and 4 nm, with the former consistent with UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence measurements.

  3. Controllable photoluminescence enhancement of CdTe/CdS quantum dots thin films incorporation with Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Renqi; Ge, Zhaoyun; Zhang, Wenping; Xu, Jun; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji

    2015-01-01

    Au nanoparticles (Au NPs)/CdTe/CdS QDs nanocomposite films were fabricated by deposition of Au NPs and layer-by-layer self-assembly of colloidal CdTe/CdS QDs. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed that Au NPs incorporation resulted in an increase of PL intensity about 16-fold compared with that of the samples without Au NPs. PL enhancement of Au NPs/CdTe/CdS QDs nanocomposite films can be controlled by tuning the thickness of spacer layer between the metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and QDs. Optical absorption spectra exhibited the incorporation of Au NPs boosted the absorption of Au NPs/CdTe/CdS QDs nanocomposite films. The results of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation indicated that the increased sizes of Au NPs resulted in stronger localization of electric field, which boosted the PL intensity of QDs in the vicinity of Au NPs. We thought that these were mainly attributed to localized SP enhancement effects of the Au NPs. Our experiment results demonstrated that Au NPs/QDs nanocomposite films would be a promising candidate for optoelectronic devices application. PACS 78.55.-m; 82.33.Ln; 68.65.Hb.

  4. Formation of self-assembled quantum dot-chlorin e6 complex: influence of nanoparticles phospholipid coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabanovas, V.; Skripka, A.; Valanciunaite, J.; Kubiliute, R.; Poderys, V.; Rotomskis, R.

    2014-07-01

    The clinical use of phospholipid-coated quantum dots (QDs)-photosensitizer complexes as therapeutic nanoagents depends on colloidal stability of these complexes and efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer from QDs to bound photosensitizer molecules. In this study, we demonstrate modification of CdSe/ZnS QDs with different phospholipids such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (PEG-DPPE); 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (PEG-DOPE) and 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the complex formation with photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6). QDs were successfully solubilized in water by coating QDs with PEG-DPPE and PEG-DOPE phospholipids. However, an attempt to solubilize QDs using PEG-free phospholipids (DOPC) was ineffective. While QDs modified with DOPC:PEG-DOPE mixtures at molar ratios of 1:1 and 2:1 showed long-term stability in aqueous solution, colloidal solution of QDs modified by DOPC:PEG-DPPE (molar ratio 2:1) was unstable. We showed that Ce6 forms a stable complex only with QDs coated with unsaturated phospholipids PEG-DOPE and DOPC:PEG-DOPE. Close localization of Ce6 molecules to the core of QDs ensures efficient energy transfer from QDs to bound Ce6 molecules that is crucial for its further application in photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  5. The toxicity of plastic nanoparticles to green algae as influenced by surface modification, medium hardness and cellular adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Tom M.; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Kleijn, J. Mieke

    2017-01-01

    To investigate processes possibly underlying accumulation and ecological effects of plastic nano-particles we have characterized their interaction with the cell wall of green algae. More specifically, we have investigated the influence of particle surface functionality and water hardness (Ca2......+ concentration) on particle adsorption to algae cell walls. Polystyrene nanoparticles with different functional groups (non-functionalized, −COOH and −NH2) as well as coated (starch and PEG) gold nanoparticles were applied in these studies. Depletion measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed...... that adsorption of neutral and positively charged plastic nanoparticles onto the cell wall of P. subcapitata was stronger than that of negatively charged plastic particles. Results indicated that binding affinity is a function of both inter-particle and particle-cell wall interactions which are in turn influenced...

  6. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles. The first step toward T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Björkdahl, O; Sørensen, P G; Hansen, T; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

  7. Comparison of cellular effects of starch-coated SPIONs and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid matrix nanoparticles on human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonnissen D

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Gonnissen,1 Ying Qu,1,2 Klaus Langer,3 Cengiz Öztürk,4 Yuliang Zhao,2 Chunying Chen,2 Guiscard Seebohm,5 Martina Düfer,6 Harald Fuchs,1 Hans-Joachim Galla,7 Kristina Riehemann11Center for Nanotechnology, Institute of Physics, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 2National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University of Münster, Münster, 4chemicell GmbH, Berlin, 5Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Institute for Genetics of Heart Diseases, University Hospital Münster, 6Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, 7Department of Cell Biology/Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: Within the last years, progress has been made in the knowledge of the properties of medically used nanoparticles and their toxic effects, but still, little is known about their influence on cellular processes of immune cells. The aim of our comparative study was to present the influence of two different nanoparticle types on subcellular processes of primary monocytes and the leukemic monocyte cell line MM6. We used core-shell starch-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and matrix poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles for our experiments. In addition to typical biocompatibility testing like the detection of necrosis or secretion of interleukins (ILs, we investigated the impact of these nanoparticles on the actin cytoskeleton and the two voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.3 and Kv7.1. Induction of necrosis was not seen for PLGA nanoparticles and SPIONs in primary monocytes and MM6 cells. Likewise, no alteration in secretion of IL-1β and IL-10 was detected under the same experimental conditions. In contrast, IL-6 secretion was exclusively downregulated in primary monocytes after contact with both

  8. Photovoltaic performance enhancement of CdS quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} photoanodes with plasmonic gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Aiping, E-mail: liuaiping1979@gmail.com [Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ren, Qinghua; Zhao, Ming; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Tingyu [Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Tang, Weihua [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communication, Beijing University Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • CdS QD-sensitized TiO{sub 2} porous photoanode with plasmonic gold. • A prominent light absorption enhancement of hybrid was attained by gold plasmon. • The photovoltaic response of hybrid was tunable by CdS amount. • The Au/TiO{sub 2}/CdS hybrid had a potential application in energy conversion devices. -- Abstract: The CdS quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} films with plasmonic gold nanoparticles were designed as photoanodes by the electrodeposition of gold combined with the “successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction” (SILAR) method for CdS deposition on porous TiO{sub 2} films. A prominent enhancement in light absorption of Au/TiO{sub 2}/CdS hybrid was attained by efficient light scattering of gold plasmons as sub-wavelength antennas and concentrators. The photogenerated electron formed in the near-surface region of TiO{sub 2} and CdS were facilitated to transfer to the plasmonic gold, resulting in the enhancement of photocurrent and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of hybrid photoanode upon photoirradiation. Furthermore, the photovoltaic response of hybrid was highly tunable with respect to the number of SILAR cycles applied to deposit CdS. The thicker absorber layer with less porous structure and larger CdS crystals might limit the electrolyte diffusion into the hybrid electrode and impose a barrier for electron tunneling and transferring. The highly versatile and tunable properties of Au/TiO{sub 2}/CdS photoanodes demonstrated their potential application in energy conversion devices.

  9. In situ decoration of plasmonic Au nanoparticles on graphene quantum dots-graphitic carbon nitride hybrid and evaluation of its visible light photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Gone; Choudhury, Biswajit; Giri, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    This work spotlights the development of a plasmonic photocatalyst showing surface plasmon induced enhanced visible light photocatalytic (PC) performance. Plasmonic Au nanoparticles (NPs) are decorated over the hybrid nanosystem of graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) and graphene quantum dots (GQD) by citrate reduction method. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) induced enhancement of Raman G and 2D band intensity is encountered on excitation of the Plasmonic hybrid at 514.5 nm, which is near to the 532 nm absorption band of Au NPs. Time-resolved photoluminescence and XPS studies show charge transfer interaction between GQD-GCN and Au NPs. Plasmonic hybrid exhibits an enhanced PC activity over the other catalysts in the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light illumination. Plasmonic photocatalyst displays more than 6 fold enhancement in the photodecomposition rate of MB over GQD and nearly 2 fold improvement over GCN and GQD-GCN. GQD-GCN absorbs mostly in the near visible region and can be photoexcited by visible light of wavelength (λ ) UV–visible light for photocatalysis. Furthermore, plasmonic Au act as antennas for accumulation and enhancement of localized electromagnetic field at the interface with GQD-GCN, and thereby promotes photogeneration of large numbers of carriers on GQD-GCN. The carriers are separated by charge transfer migration from hybrid to Au NPs. Finally, the carriers on the plasmonic Au nanostructures initiate MB degradation under visible light. Our results have shown that plasmon decoration is a suitable strategy to design a carbon based hybrid photocatalyst for solar energy conversion.

  10. Enhanced electrochemiluminescence of RuSi nanoparticles for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A by energy transfer with CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingling; Chen, Miaomiao; Zhang, Haiqing; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-05-15

    This paper develops a new approach to enhance the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) emission of the Ru(bpy)3(2+)-tripropyl amine (TPrA) system for ultrasensitive determination of ochratoxin A (OTA). Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped silica nanoparticles (RuSi NPs) act as ECL materials, which are immobilized on the surface of electrode by chitosan to fabricate a solid-state ECL sensor. CdTe quantum dots (QDs) can enhance the ECL emission of the Ru(bpy)3(2+)-TPrA ECL system by energy transfer. This strategy can improve the sensitivity of the sensor. In this assay, we combine the ECL with molecular imprinting technique to improve the selectivity of this sensor. The template molecule could be eluted from the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), and the formed cavities could then selectively recognize the target. The cavities could also work as the tunnel for the transfer of coreactant TPrA to produce responsive signal. With the increase of the concentration of OTA in samples, more cavities were filled because of the rebinding of OTA to the MIP surface, resulting in a gradual decrease in ECL intensity. The results showed that the ECL decrease value depended linearly on the logarithm of the OTA concentration in the range from 1.00×10(-5) to 11.13 ng mL(-1) with lower detection limit of 3.0 fg mL(-1) (S/N=3). This ECL sensor has also been applied to detect OTA concentration in the real samples with satisfied results, and the recoveries range from 85.1% to 107.9%.

  11. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots@SiO2 Nanoparticles as Electrochemiluminescence and Fluorescence Signal Indicators for Magnetically Controlled Aptasensor with Dual Detection Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Hua, Mengjuan; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan; You, Tianyan; Huang, Xingyi

    2015-12-09

    We proposed a facile method to prepare the nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) doped silica (NGQDs@SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs). The NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were further explored as a versatile signal indicator for ochratoxin A (OTA) aptasensing by combination with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and fluorescence (FL) detection. In this strategy, the core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic beads (MBs) acted as a nanocarrier to immobilize the thiolated aptamer specific for OTA, and the amino modified capture DNA (cDNA) was efficiently tagged with NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The multifunctional aptasensor was thus fabricated by assembly of the NGQDs@SiO2 NPs onto the surface of Fe3O4@Au MBs through the high specific DNA hybridization between aptamer and cDNA. Upon OTA incubation, the aptamer linked with Fe3O4@Au MBs preferred to form an aptamer-OTA complex, which resulted in the partial release of the preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The more OTA molecules in the detection system, the more NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were released into the bulk solution and the less preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were accumulated on the magnetic electrode surface. This provided a dual channel for OTA detection by combination with the enriched solid-state ECL and homogeneous FL detection. The FL assay exhibits a wide dynamic range and is more reproducible due to the homogeneous detection while the ECL assay possesses a lower detection limit and is preferable by using a cheaper instrument. One can obtain a preliminary screen from FL assay and a more accurate result from ECL assay. Integrating the virtues of dual analytical modality, this aptasensing strategy well-balanced the rapidity, sensitivity, and dynamic range, making it promising to other targets with aptamer sequences.

  12. Pd Nanoparticles Decorated N-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots@N-Doped Carbon Hollow Nanospheres with High Electrochemical Sensing Performance in Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xie, Chuyi; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Xiao, Jian; Duan, Xianming; Ren, Jinghua; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai

    2016-08-31

    The development of carbon based hollow-structured nanospheres (HNSs) materials has stimulated growing interest due to their controllable structure, high specific surface area, large void space, enhanced mass transport, and good biocompatibility. The incorporation of functional nanomaterials into their core and/or shell opens new horizons in designing functionalized HNSs for a wider spectrum of promising applications. In this work, we report a new type of functionalized HNSs based on Pd nanoparticles (NPs) decorated double shell structured N-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs)@N-doped carbon (NC) HNSs, with ultrafine Pd NPs and "nanozyme" NGQDs as dual signal-amplifying nanoprobes, and explore their promising application as a highly efficient electrocatalyst in electrochemical sensing of a newly emerging biomarker, i.e., hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for cancer detection. Due to the synergistic effect of the robust and conductive HNS supports and catalytically active Pd NPs and NGQD in facilitating electron transfer, the NGQD@NC@Pd HNS hybrid material exhibits high electrocatalytic activity toward the direct reduction of H2O2 and can promote the electrochemical reduction reaction of H2O2 at a favorable potential of 0 V, which effectively restrains the redox of most electroactive species in physiological samples and eliminates interference signals. The resultant electrochemical H2O2 biosensor based hybrid HNSs materials demonstrates attractive performance, including low detection limit down to nanomole level, short response time within 2 s, as well as high sensitivity, reproducibility, selectivity, and stability, and have been used in real-time tracking of trace amounts of H2O2 secreted from different living cancer cells in a normal state and treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  13. Uptake, retention and internalization of quantum dots in Daphnia is influenced by particle surface functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feswick, A., E-mail: afeswick@yahoo.ca [Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, PO Box 5050, Saint John NB, CA (United States); Griffitt, R.J., E-mail: joe.griffitt@usm.edu [Department of Coastal Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi, 703 East Beach Drive, Ocean Springs, MS 39564 (United States); Siebein, K., E-mail: kerry.siebein@nist.gov [Major Analytical Instrumentation Center, University of Florida, PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Barber, D.S., E-mail: barberd@vetmed.ufl.edu [Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Daphnia underwent a waterborne exposure of PEG, NH{sub 2} and COOH functionalized quantum dot nanoparticles. ► There was preferential retention of COOH nanoparticles. ► TEM demonstrated that NH{sub 2} and COOH nanoparticles were internalized in cells adjacent to the GI tract. ► This cellular internalization was confirmed using energy dispersive spectroscopy. -- Abstract: Nanomaterials are a diverse group of compounds whose inevitable release into the environment warrants study of the fundamental processes that govern the ingestion, uptake and accumulation in aquatic organisms. Nanomaterials have the ability to transfer to higher trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems, and recent evidence suggests that the surface chemistry of both the nanoparticle and biological membrane can influence uptake kinetics. Therefore, our study investigates the effect of surface functionalization on uptake, internalization and depuration in Daphnia spp. Uncharged (polyethylene glycol; PEG), positively charged (amino-terminated: NH{sub 2}) and negatively charged (carboxyl-modified; COOH) cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide quantum dots were used to monitor ingestion, uptake and depuration of nanometals in Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia over 24 h of exposure. These studies demonstrated that particles with higher negative charge (COOH quantum dots) were taken up to a greater extent by Daphnia (259.17 ± 17.70 RFU/20 Daphnia) than either the NH{sub 2} (150.01 ± 18.91) or PEG quantum dots (95.17 ± 9.78), however this is likely related to the functional groups attached to the nanoparticles as there were no real differences in zeta potential. Whole body fluorescence associates well with fluorescent microscopic images obtained at the 24 h timepoint. Confocal and electron microscopic analysis clearly demonstrated that all three types of quantum dots could cross the intestinal epithelial barrier and be translocated to other cells. Upon cessation of exposure, elimination of

  14. Antidepressant effects of curcumin and HU-211 coencapsulated solid lipid nanoparticles against corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaolie; Zhu, Yanjing; Wang, Mei; Jing, Guoxin; Zhu, Rongrong; Wang, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Major depression is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with few treatment approaches. The use of nontargeted antidepressants induced many side effects with their low efficacy. A more precise targeting strategy is to develop nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems; hence, we employed solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to encapsulate HU-211 and curcumin (Cur). The antidepressant effects of the dual-drug nanoparticles (Cur/SLNs-HU-211) for major depression treatment were investigated in corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can effectively protect PC12 cells from corticosterone-induced apoptosis and can release more dopamine, which may be associated with the higher uptake of Cur/SLNs-HU-211 shown by cellular uptake behavior analysis. Additionally, Cur/SLNs-HU-211 significantly reduced the immobility time in forced swim test, enhanced fall latency in rotarod test, and improved the level of dopamine in mice blood. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can deliver more Cur to the brain and thus produce a significant increase in neurotransmitters level in brain tissue, especially in the hippocampus and striatum. The results of Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can significantly enhance the expression of CB1, p-MEK1, and p-ERK1/2. Our study suggests that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 may have great potential for major depression treatment. PMID:27757031

  15. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-03-01

    Solar cells based on solution-processed semiconductor nanoparticles -- colloidal quantum dots -- have seen rapid advances in recent years. By offering full-spectrum solar harvesting, these cells are poised to address the urgent need for low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  16. Efficacious cellular codelivery of doxorubicin and EGFP siRNA mediated by the composition of PLGA and PEI protected gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishan; Vulugundam, Gururaja; Jaiswal, Pradeep Kumar; Shyamlal, Bharti Rajesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Sandeep

    2017-09-15

    This study reports the simultaneous delivery of EGFP siRNA and the chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin by means of the composition that results from the electrostatic interaction between positively charged siRNA-complexes of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with PEI, 25kDa (P25-AuNPs) and negatively charged carboxymethyl cellulose formulated PLGA nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin. The nanoparticles and their facile interaction were studied by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements. The flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis evidenced the simultaneous internalization of both labelled siRNA and doxorubin into around 55% of the HeLa cancer cell population. Fluorescence microscopic studies enabled the visual analysis of EGFP expressing HeLa cells which suggested that the composition mediated codelivery resulted in a substantial downregulation of EGFP expression and intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. Interestingly, codelivery treatment resulted in an increased cellular delivery of doxorubicin when compared to PLGA-DOX alone treatment. On the other hand, the activity of siRNA complexes of PEI-AuNPs was completely retained even when they were part of composition. The results suggest that this formulation can serve as promising tool for delivery applications in combinatorial anticancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis of an excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction with supercritical fluid: Graphene cellular monolith with ultrafine and highly dispersive multimetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yazhou; Cheng, Xiaonong; Yen, Clive H.; Wai, Chien M.; Wang, Chongmin; Yang, Juan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-04-01

    Graphene cellular monolith (GCM) can be used as an excellent support for nanoparticles in widespread applications. However, it's still a great challenge to deposit the desirable nanoparticles in GCM that have small size, controllable structure, composition, and high dispersion using the current methods. Here we demonstrate a green, efficient and large-scale method to address this challenge using supercritical fluid (SCF). By this superior method, graphene hydrogel can be transferred into GCM while being deposited with ultrafine and highly dispersive nanoparticles. Specifically, the bimetallic PtFe/GCM and the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM catalysts are successfully synthesized, and their electrocatalytic performances toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are also studied. The resultant PtFe/GCM shows the significant enhancement in ORR activity, including a factor of 8.47 enhancement in mass activity (0.72 A mgPt-1), and a factor of 7.67 enhancement in specific activity (0.92 mA cm-2), comparing with those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.085 A mgPt-1, 0.12 mA cm-2). Importantly, by introducing the Co, the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM exhibits the further improved ORR activities (1.28 A mgPt-1, 1.80 mA cm-2). The high ORR activity is probably attributed to the alloying structure, ultrafine size, highly dispersive, well-defined, and a better interface with 3D porous graphene support.

  18. Synthesis of an excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction with supercritical fluid: Graphene cellular monolith with ultrafine and highly dispersive multimetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yazhou; Cheng, Xiaonong; Yen, Clive H.; Wai, Chien M.; Wang, Chongmin; Yang, Juan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-04-01

    Graphene cellular monolith (GCM) can be used as an excellent support for nanoparticles in widespread applications. However, it's still a great challenge to deposit the desirable nanoparticles in GCM that have small size, controllable structure, composition, and high dispersion using the current methods. Here we demonstrate a green, efficient and large-scale method to address this challenge using supercritical fluid (SCF). By this superior method, graphene hydrogel can be transferred into GCM while being deposited with ultrafine and highly dispersive nanoparticles. Specifically, the bimetallic PtFe/GCM and the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM catalysts are successfully synthesized, and their electrocatalytic performances toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are also studied. The resultant PtFe/GCM shows the significant enhancement in ORR activity, including a factor of 8.47 enhancement in mass activity (0.72 A mgPt-1), and a factor of 7.67 enhancement in specific activity (0.92 mA cm-2), comparing with those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.085 A mgPt-1, 0.12 mA cm-2). Importantly, by introducing the Co, the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM exhibits the further improved ORR activities (1.28 A mgPt-1, 1.80 mA cm-2). The high