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Sample records for dose radiation induced

  1. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  2. Low-dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantak, S.S.; Onoda, J.M.; Diglio, C.A.; Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI

    1993-01-01

    The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema. (author)

  3. Dose rate effectiveness in radiation-induced teratogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Norimura, T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of p53 gene in tissue repair of teratogenic injury, we compared incidence of radiation-induced malformations in homozygous p53(-/-) mice, heterozygous p53(+/-) mice and wild-type p53(+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy at high dose rate on 9.5 days of gestation, p53(-/-) mice showed higher incidences of anomalies and higher resistance to prenatal deaths than p53(+/+) mice. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and deaths supports the notion that embryos or fetuses have a p53-dependent 'guardian' that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. In fact, after X-irradiation, the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in p53(+/+) fetuses but not in p53(-/-) fetuses. The same dose of γ-ray exposure at low dose rate on 9.5-10.5 day of gestation produced significant reduction of radiation-induced malformation in p53(+/+) and p53(+/-) mice, remained teratogenic for p53(-/-) mice. These results suggest that complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires the concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and the p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. When concerted DNA repair and apoptosis functions efficiently, there is a threshold dose-rate for radiation-induced malformations. (author)

  4. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Genes Promoting Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shu-Zheng; Chen, Dong; Mu, Ying

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important process controlling homeostasis of the body. It is influenced by stimuli constantly arising from the external and internal environment of the organism. It is well known that radiation could induce apoptosis of cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the dose-effect relationship of apoptosis extending to the low-dose range has scarcely been studied. Here, the molecular basis of the phenomenon is explored by examining the changes in expression of some of the proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes

  5. Galactic cosmic ray-induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra; Hariharan, B; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-10-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground- and space-based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets that reside in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Planetary systems around M dwarfs are considered to be prime candidates to search for life beyond the Solar System. Such planets are likely to be tidally locked and have close-in habitable zones. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in the case of super-Earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin that strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another factor governing the radiation dose is the depth of the planetary atmosphere. The higher the depth of the planetary atmosphere, the lower the flux of secondary particles will be on the surface. If the secondary particles are energetic enough, and their flux is sufficiently high, the radiation from muons can also impact the subsurface regions, such as in the case of Mars. If the radiation dose is too high, the chances of sustaining a long-term biosphere on the planet are very low. We have examined the dependence of the GCR-induced radiation dose on the strength of the planetary magnetic field and its atmospheric depth, and found that the latter is the decisive factor for the protection of a planetary biosphere.

  6. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  7. Low dose radiation prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Hong, Yaqiong; Zhao, Di; Meng, Xinxin; Zhao, Lijing; Du, Yanwei; Wang, Zan; Zheng, Yan; Cai, Lu; Jiang, Hongyu

    2018-01-02

    This study aimed to develop a novel and non-invasive approach, low-dose radiation (LDR, 75 mGy X-rays), to prevent doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups, Control, LDR (a single exposure), Sham (treated same as LDR group except for irradiation), DOX (a single intraperitoneal injection of DOX at 7.5 mg/kg), and LDR/DOX (received LDR and 72 h later received DOX). Electrocardiogram analysis displayed several kinds of abnormal ECG profiles in DOX-treated mice, but less in LDR/DOX group. Cardiotoxicity indices included histopathological changes, oxidative stress markers, and measurements of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Pretreatment of DOX group with LDR reduced oxidative damages (reactive oxygen species formation, protein nitration, and lipid peroxidation) and increased the activities of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) in the heart of LDR/DOX mice compared to DOX mice. Pretreatment of DOX-treated mice with LDR also decreased DOX-induced cardiac cell apoptosis (TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3) and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway (increased p53, Bax, and caspase-9 expression and decreased Bcl2 expression and ΔΨm dissipation). These results suggest that LDR could induce adaptation of the heart to DOX-induced toxicity. Cardiac protection by LDR may attribute to attenuate DOX-induced cell death via suppressing mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress and apoptosis signaling.

  8. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism is dose-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littley, M.D.; Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; Robinson, E.L.; Sutton, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation-induced hypopituitarism has been studies prospectively for up to 12 years in 251 adult patients treated for pituitary disease with external radiotherapy, ranging in dose from 20 Gy in eight fractions over 11 days to 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 21 days. Ten further patients were studied 2-4 years after whole-body irradiation for haematological malignancies using 12 Gy in six fractions over 3 days and seven patients were studied 3-11 years after whole-brain radiotherapy for a primary brain tumour (30 Gy, eight fractions, 11 days). Five years after treatment, patients who received 20 Gy had an incidence of TSH deficiency of 9% and in patients treated with 35-37 Gy, 40 Gy and 42-45 Gy, the incidence of TSH deficiency increased significantly with increasing dose. A similar relationship was observed for both ACTH and gonadotrophin deficiencies when the 20 Gy group was compared to patients treated with 35-45 Gy. Growth hormone deficiency was universal by 5 years over the dose range 35-45 Gy. In seven patients who were treated with 30 Gy in eight fractions over 11 days, deficiencies were observed at a similar frequency to the 40 Gy group (15 fractions, 21 days). No evidence of pituitary dysfunction was detected in the ten patients who received 12 Gy (six fractions, 3 days). (author)

  9. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  10. Radiation Sialadenitis Induced by High-dose Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Jaetae

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive iodine ( 131 I) is accumulated in the thyroid tissue and plays an important role in the treatment of differentiated papillary and follicular cancers after thyroidectomy. Simultaneously, 131 I is concentrated in the salivary glands and secreted into the saliva. Dose-related damage to the salivary parenchyma results from the 131 I irradiation. Salivary gland swelling and pain, usually involving the parotid, can be seen. The symptoms may develop immediately after a therapeutic dose of 131 I and/or months later and progress in intensity with time. In conjunction with the radiation sialadenitis, secondary complications reported include xerostomia, taste alterations, infection, increases in caries, facial nerve involvement, candidiasis, and neoplasia. Prevention of 131 I sialadenitis may involve the use of sialogogic agents to hasten the transit time of the radioactive iodine through the salivary glands. However, studies are not available to delineate the efficacy of this approach. Treatment of the varied complications that may develop encompass numerous approaches and include gland massage, sialogogic agents, duct probing, antibiotics, mouthwashes, good oral hygiene, and adequate hydration. Recently interventional sialoendoscopy has been introduced an effective tool for the management of patients with 131 I-induced sialadenitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment.

  11. Radiation Sialadenitis Induced by High-dose Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Jaetae [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) is accumulated in the thyroid tissue and plays an important role in the treatment of differentiated papillary and follicular cancers after thyroidectomy. Simultaneously, {sup 131}I is concentrated in the salivary glands and secreted into the saliva. Dose-related damage to the salivary parenchyma results from the {sup 131}I irradiation. Salivary gland swelling and pain, usually involving the parotid, can be seen. The symptoms may develop immediately after a therapeutic dose of {sup 131}I and/or months later and progress in intensity with time. In conjunction with the radiation sialadenitis, secondary complications reported include xerostomia, taste alterations, infection, increases in caries, facial nerve involvement, candidiasis, and neoplasia. Prevention of {sup 131}I sialadenitis may involve the use of sialogogic agents to hasten the transit time of the radioactive iodine through the salivary glands. However, studies are not available to delineate the efficacy of this approach. Treatment of the varied complications that may develop encompass numerous approaches and include gland massage, sialogogic agents, duct probing, antibiotics, mouthwashes, good oral hygiene, and adequate hydration. Recently interventional sialoendoscopy has been introduced an effective tool for the management of patients with {sup 131}I-induced sialadenitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment.

  12. Risk of radiation-induced cancer at low doses and low dose rates for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an updated, comprehensive review of the data available for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer for radiation protection purposes. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing risks at low doses and low dose rates. The review brings together the results of epidemiological investigations and fundamental studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in radiation damage. Additionally, this information is supplemented by studies with experimental animals which provide further guidance on the form of the dose-response relationship for cancer induction, as well as on the effect of dose rate on the tumour yield. The emphasis of the report is on cancer induction resulting from exposure to radiations with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The work was performed under contract for the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris, France, whose agreement to publish is gratefully ackowledged. It extends the advice on radiation risks given in Documents of the NRPB, 4 No. 4 (1993). (Author)

  13. Effect of dose on radiation-induced conductivity in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutnev, A.P.; Saenko, V.S.; Pozhidaev, E.D.; Ikhsanov, R.Sh.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulation of radiation-induced conductivity in polymers upon long-term irradiation on the basis of the generalized Rose-Fowler-Vaisberg model, which allows for both dipolar carrier transport and generation of radiation traps during irradiation, was performed. The unusual properties of radiation-induced conductivity, such as the appearance of a maximum on current transients, the absence of a steady state, and a substantial difference between these curves for the first and subsequent irradiation, are rationalized in terms of the formation of free radicals, the major feature of radiolysis in the chemical aspect. This interpretation does not require the involvement of degradation or crosslinking processes, unlike other interpretations that appear in the literature. With the use of low-density polyethylene as an example, it was shown that radiation-induced conductivity both upon pulse and continuous irradiation can satisfactorily be described with the unified set of parameters of the generalized Rose-Fowler-Vaisberg model [ru

  14. Radiation induced skeletal changes in beagle: dose rates, dose, and age effect analysis from 226Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Williams, J.R.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced skeletal injury (E) and the rate of skeletal injury were studied as a function of time and dose in beagles administered 226 Ra Cl 2 in eight semimonthly iv injections starting at 2, 4, or 14 months of age. Skeletal changes were evaluated with a radiographic x-ray scoring system in 20 skeletal regions; each region was scored on a 0 to 6 scale. Bone changes in six regions of humeri were qualitatively analyzed for comparison with total skeletal changes. Skeletal changes were classified by endosteal or periosteal cortical sclerosis and thickening, fractures, osteolytic lesions, and trabecular coarsening

  15. Immunologic mechanism of the suppressive effect of low dose radiation on thymic lymphoma induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiujuan; Yang Ying; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    To study immunologic mechanism of the suppressive effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on thymic lymphoma (TL) induced by high dose radiation (HDR). The authors adopted the model that C57BL/6J mice were administered whole body irradiation with 1.75 Gy X-rays one time every week for 4 weeks to induce TL. It was examined that splenic NK cytotoxic activity, IL-2 and γ-IFN secretion activity, peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and its TNF-α secretion activity in mice with different dose 1 month after irradiation. The results showed that all the immunologic functions mentioned above in mice given 75 mGy 12 h before 1.75 Gy every time were higher than that in mice given only 1.75 Gy, and approached to the sham-irradiation mice. It suggested that the suppressive effect of LDR on TL induced by HDR may be related to the adaptive response induced by LDR and decreasing immunological functions damage caused by HDR

  16. Pretreatment of low dose radiation reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse lymphoma (EL4) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Hyun, S J; Yoon, M Y; Ji, Y H; Cho, C K; Yoo, S Y

    1997-06-01

    Induction of an adaptive response to ionizing radiation in mouse lymphoma (EL4) cells was studied by using cell survival fraction and apoptotic nucleosomal DNA fragmentation as biological end points. Cells in early log phase were pre-exposed to low dose of gamma-rays (0.01 Gy) 4 or 20 hrs prior to high dose gamma-ray (4, 8 and 12 Gy for cell survival fraction analysis; 8 Gy for DNA fragmentation analysis) irradiation. Then cell survival fractions and the extent of DNA fragmentation were measured. Significant adaptive response, increase in cell survival fraction and decrease in the extent of DNA fragmentation were induced when low and high dose gamma-ray irradiation time interval was 4 hr. Addition of protein or RNA synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide or 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRFB), respectively during adaptation period, the period from low dose gamma-ray irradiation to high dose gamma-ray irradiation, was able to inhibit the induction of adaptive response, which is the reduction of the extent DNA fragmentation in irradiated EL4 cells. These data suggest that the induction of adaptive response to ionizing radiation in EL4 cells required both protein and RNA synthesis.

  17. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  18. Adaptive repair induced by small doses of γ radiation in repair-defective human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasukhina, G.D.; L'vova, G.N.; Vasil'eva, I.M.; Sinel'shchikova, T.A.; Semyachkina, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive repair induced by small doses of gamma radiation was studied in repair-defective xeroderma pigmentosum, gout, and homocystinuria cells. The adaptation of cells induced by small doses of radiation was estimated after subsequent exposure to gamma radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine by three methods: (1) by the reduction in DNA breaks; (2) by induction of resistant DNA synthesis; and (3) by increased reactivation of vaccinia virus. The three cell types in response to the three different mutagens revealed differences in the mechanism of cell defense in excision repair, in the adaptive response, and in Weigl reactivation

  19. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  20. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  1. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

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    Krokosz, Anita [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)]. E-mail: krokosz@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Koziczak, Renata [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Gonciarz, Marta [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2006-01-15

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with {gamma}-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min{sup -1} in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect.

  2. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Koziczak, Renata; Gonciarz, Marta; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with γ-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min -1 in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect

  3. Okadaic acid for radiation dose estimation using drug-induced premature chromosome condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunyan; Zhang Wei; Su Xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish simple biological method for high irradiation dose estimation using drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) aberrations. Methods: Peripheral blood was taken from healthy adults and irradiated by 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. Then the blood samples were cultured for 48 hrs. One hr before the end of culture , okadaic acid was added into culture medium to induce PCC rings, which were counted for each dose point. Results: The yield of PCC rings was increased with the dose of radiation until 20 Gy. Within the range of 1 to 20 Gy, there was a good dose-response relationship between the yield of PCC rings and radiation dose. Conclusion: Compared with the analysis of frequency of dicentrics, the yield of PCC rings could be a good biodosimetry indicator for estimation of high dose irradiation. (authors)

  4. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced breast cancer

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    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-12-01

    A survey of past case reports concerning radiation-induced breast cancer was carried out in order to find the lowest irradiation dose. The search of literature published since 1951 revealed 10 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer. Only 5 cases had precise descriptions of the irradiation dose. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1470 rads in the case of external X-ray irradiation for tuberous angioma. All of cases of radiation-induced breast cancer had received radiation for the treatment of nonmalignant tumors, such as pulmonary tuberculosis, mastitis, and tuberous angioma. There also were three statistical studies. The first concerned atomic bomb survivors, the second, pulmoanry tuberculous patients subjected to frequent fluoroscopies, and the third, patients of acute post partum mastitis. These statistical studies had revealed a significant increase in the incidence of breast cancer in the irradiated group, but there was little information about the lowest irradiation dose. It was noticed that radiation-induced breast cancer was more numerous in the upper inner quadrant of the breast. Most histopathological findings of radiation-induced breast cancer involved duct cell carcinoma. The latent period was about 15 years.

  5. Radiation effect and response of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yujie; Su Liaoyuan; Zou Huawei; Kong Xiangrong

    1999-01-01

    The ability of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes were measured by using 3 H-TdR incorporation method. This method was used to observe the damage of lymphocytes irradiated by several challenge doses (0.5-0.8 Gy) and adaptive response induced by previous low dose irradiation. The results show that DNA synthesis was inhibited by challenge dose of radiation and was adapted by previous 0.048 Gy irradiation

  6. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1976-01-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups. (auth.)

  7. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1976-05-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups.

  8. Dose rate effect on the yield of radiation induced response with thermal fading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Rogalev, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-01-01

    A model describing the dependences of the accumulation of thermally unstable radiation induced defects on the dose and dose rate is proposed. The model directly takes into account the track nature of the ionizing radiation represented as accumulation processes of defects in tracks averaged over a crystal volume considering various degrees of overlapping in space and time. The accumulation of the defects in the tracks is phenomenologically described. General expressions are obtained that allows radiation yield simulation of defects involving known creation and transformation processes. The cases considered, of linear accumulation (constant increment of the defects in tracks) and accumulation with saturation (complete saturation of the defects in one track), lead to a set of linear dose dependences with saturation, which are routinely used in luminescence and ESR dating. The accumulation, with increase of sensitivity in regions overlapped by two or more tracks, gave a set of dose dependences, from linear-sublinear-linear-saturation, distinctive of quartz up to linear-supralinear-linear-saturation. It is shown that the effect of the dose rate on dose dependences is determined by a dimensionless parameter a=Pτ/D0, where P is the dose rate, τ is the defect lifetime and D0 is the track dose. At a-bar 1 the dose rate influences basically the accumulation of thermally unstable defects. In the reverse case the dose dependences did not seems to be influenced by the dose rate

  9. The role of radiation types and dose in induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim Munira, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Genomic Instability (GI) is defined as long-term alterations induced by low-dose exposure to a variety of genotoxic agents in mammalian cells that act to increase the 'apparent' spontaneous mutation frequency.GI is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression and is observed in the progeny of irradiated and bystander cells as the delayed and stochastic appearance of de novo chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and delayed lethal mutations both in vitro and in vivo. It occurs at a frequency several orders of magnitude greater than would be expected for mutation in a single gene, implying that GI is a multigenic phenomenon. The expression of GI can be influenced by genotype, cell type and radiation quality; however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. While several studies have demonstrated GI induction by high and low LET radiation, our work on human and mouse primary cell systems has shown significant differences in the capacity to induce GI and the spectrum of alterations depending on LET. These differences might be attributed to differences in radiation track structure, radiation dose and radiation exposure regime (distribution of hit and un hit cells). In this presentation I shall review the role of radiation quality; describe the possible mechanisms underlining the observed differences between radiation type and present results of experiments demonstrating that the dose of low LET radiation might be the most significant factor in determining the role of radiation type in the induction of GI.

  10. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  11. Tests of the linearity assumption in the dose-effect relationship for radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.F.; Cohen, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    The validity of the BEIR linear extrapolation to low doses of the dose-effect relationship for radiation induced cancer is tested by use of natural radiation making use of selectivity on type of cancer, sex, age group, geographic area, and time period. For lung cancer, a linear interpolation between zero dose-zero effect and the data from radon-induced cancers in miners over-estimates the total number of observed lung cancers in many countries in the early years of this century; the discrepancy is substantially increased if the 30-44 year age range and/or if only females are considered, and by the fact that many other causes of lung cancer are shown to have been important at that time. The degree to which changes of diagnostic efficiency with time can influence the analysis is considered at some length. It is concluded that the linear relationship substantially over-estimates effects of low radiation doses. A similar analysis is applied to leukemia induced by natural radiation, applying selectivity by age, sex, natural background level, and date, and considering other causes. It is concluded that effects substantially larger than those obtained from linear extrapolation are excluded. The use of the selectivities mentioned above is justified by the fact that the incidence of cancer or leukemia is an upper limit on the rate at which it is caused by radiation effects; in determining upper limits it is justifiable to select situations which minimize it. (author)

  12. Radiation-induced attenuation in polarization maintaining fibers: low dose rate response, stress, and materials effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Hickey, S.J.; Brambani, L.A.; Onstott, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The loss induced in polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers by low dose rate <0.01 Gy/h, where 1 Gy = 100 rads(Si) radiation exposure has been found to vary from <0.4 to ∼6 dB/km-10 Gy, depending on the wavelength of measurement and the fiber. Correlations have been established between low dose rate response and the ''permanent'' induced loss determined by fitting the recovery of the induced loss following high dose rate exposure to nth-order kinetics. Using this technique, both 0.85- and 1.3-μm PM fibers have been found which show virtually no permanent incremental loss and would therefore appear to be resistant to low dose rate radiation environments. The asymmetric stress inherent in PM fibers has been shown to reduce the permanent induced loss, while the recovery of the radiation-induced attenuation was found to be enhanced in fibers with Ge-F-doped silica clads

  13. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  14. Low dose radiation induced protein and its effect on expression of CD25 molecule in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To find the substantial basis for effects of low dose radiation, on development, extraction, and the biogical activity of the low-dose radiation-induced proteins, and the effects of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Methods: 1. Healthy Kumning male mice exposed to radiation of 226 Ra γ-rays at 5, 10 and 15 cGy respectively. The mice were killed 2 hours after exposure, the spleen cells were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultra-centrifugalized at low temperature (4 degree C). The LDR-induced proteins were obtained in the supernatant solution. Then the changes of CD25 molecule was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) with immunofluorescence technique, which was used to reflect the effect of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Results: LDR induced proteins were obtained from spleen cells in mice exposed to 5-15 cGy whole body radiation. Conclusion: The expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes was increased significantly after use of LDR induced proteins. LDR induced proteins can enhance expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes slightly

  15. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1975-01-01

    A survey of past case reports on radiation-induced cancer of the uterus was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of literature published since 1912 revealed 548 cases of radiation-induced cancer of the uterus. All of these cases of radiation-induced cancer had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant disease. The primary gynecological conditions which were the object of radiation therapy were functional bleeding, endometrial hyperplasia, myoma, endometritis, and polyps. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1000-1450 rad in the case of external X-ray irradiation, and 100 mg.hr for intrauterine radium therapy, which corresponds to 100-1000 rad. It was noted that were more cases of corpus cancer than cervical cancer. Histopathological findings of radiation-induced uterine cancer were carcinoma, sarcoma, and mixed mesodermal tumors. The latent period was distributed in the range of 1 to 40 years, with the average of 10.1 years. (auth.)

  16. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced bone tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T; Morimoto, K [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1977-04-01

    A survey of past case reports of bone tumor induced by external radiation was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1922 revealed 262 cases of radiation-induced bone tumor. These patients, except a patient with occupational exposure, had received radiation for treatment. The primary conditions as object of radiation therapy were nonmalignan bone diseases such as tuberclosis, giant cell tumor, fibrous dysplasia and bone cyst, and extra-skeletal diseases such as retinoblastoma, breast cancer and uterus cancer. The ratio of male to female patients with radiation-induced bone tumor was 1:1.3. The age of the patient ranged between 5 and 98 years, with an average of 37.6 years. Skeletal distribution of radiation-induced bone tumor was as follows: 20% the frontal and face bones, 17% the femur, 10% the humerus, 9% the vertebral column, and 44% other. The lowest absorbed dose reported was 800 rads in patients irradiated for the treatment of bone disease, but 1800 rads in patients with extra-skeletal disease. The latent period ranged between 2 and 42 years, with an average of 11.7 years. The histopathological findings were as follows: 60% osteosarcoma, 25% fibrosarcoma, 7% chondrosarcoma, and 8% other.

  17. Relaxation behavior and dose dependence of radiation induced radicals in irradiated mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Kakita, Daisuke; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2010-01-01

    Mangoes are imported to Japan after treated with hot water. Recently, irradiated mangoes imported to U. S. are widely used. This paper reports on the ESR method for analyzing the radiation induced radicals of irradiated mangoes. Upon the γ ray irradiation, a strong single peak in the flesh and skin of mangoes was observed at g=2.004. This singlet peak may be attributed to organic free radicals. The ESR spectra of the flesh and skin of mangoes showed the radiation induced radicals due to cellulose by irradiation over 12 kGy. The relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) of the singlet signal were calculated. T 2 showed dose response according to increasing the irradiation dose levels, while T 1 was almost constant. The value of (T 1 T 2 ) 1/2 showed the dependence of irradiation dose level. (author)

  18. Total-dose radiation-induced degradation of thin film ferroelectric capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwank, J.R.; Nasby, R.D.; Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; Dressendorfer, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    Thin film PbZr y Ti 1-y O 3 (PZT) ferroelectric memories offer the potential for radiation-hardened, high-speed nonvolatile memories with good retention and fatigue properties. In this paper we explore in detail the radiation hardness of PZT ferroelectric capacitors. Ferroelectric capacitors were irradiated using x-ray and Co-60 sources to dose levels up to 16 Mrad(Si). The capacitors were characterized for their memory properties both before and after irradiation. The radiation hardness was process dependent. Three out of four processes resulted in capacitors that showed less than 30% radiation-induced degradation in retained polarization charge and remanent polarization after irradiating to 16 Mrad(Si). On the other hand, one of the processes showed significant radiation-induced degradation in retained polarization charge and remanent polarization at dose levels above 1 Mrad(Si). The decrease in retained polarization charge appears to be due to an alteration of the switching characteristics of the ferroelectric due to changes in the internal fields. The radiation-induced degradation is recoverable by a postirradiation biased anneal and can be prevented entirely if devices are cycled during irradiation. The authors have developed a model to simulate the observed degradation

  19. Low dose radiation induced protein and its experimental and ophthalmic clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Su Liaoyuan; Liu Fenju; Ding Jie; Li Longbiao; Pan Chengsi

    2001-01-01

    The protective effects of low dose radiation (LDR) induced protein on cellular impairments caused by some harmful chemical and physical factors were studied. Male Kunming mice were irradiated with LDR, then the spleen cells of the mice were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultracentrifugalized. The supernatant solution contained with LDR induced protein. The newly emerging protein was detected by gel filtration and its molecular weight was determined by gel electrophoresis. The content of newly emerging protein (LDR induced protein) was determined by Lowry's method. The method of isotope incorporation was used to observe the biological activity and its influence factors, the protective effects of LDR induced protein on the cells impaired by irradiating with ultraviolet (UV), high doses of 60 Co γ-rays and exposed to heat respectively, and the stimulative effects of LDR induced protein on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Newly emerging protein has been observed in the experiment. The molecular weight of the protein is in the region 76.9 KD+- - 110.0 KD+-, the yield of the protein was 613.33 +- 213.42 μg per 3 x 10 7 spleen cells. DPM values (isotope were incorporated) of normal and injured mice spleen cells increased significantly after stimulating with the solution contained LDR induced protein. It is concluded that LDR induced protein could be obtained from mice spleen cells exposed to 5 - 15 cGy radiation for 2 - 16 h. The protein had biological activity and was able to stimulate the transformation of the spleen cells in vitro. It had obvious protective effects on some impaired cells caused by high dose radiation, UV radiation, heat and so on. It also had stimulative effects on the transformation of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes of healthy individual and patients with eye diseases. It indicates that LDR induced protein increased immune function of human

  20. Radiation induced bystander effects: mechanisms and implication for low dose radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.L.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Zhou, H.

    2003-01-01

    Using a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction of cells in a population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each, we found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non-hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. Although the bystander observations have been well established, the underlying mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. There are indications that multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon and different cell types respond differently to the bystander signaling. In confluent monolayers, there is evident that gap junctional communication is crucial in mediating the bystander effect whereas reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species have been implicated as the mediating molecules in sub-confluent cultures. Although p53 is not necessary for the expression of bystander effect, there is evident that repair deficient cells may express a higher bystander response. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signaling genes have been shown to be differentially expressed among bystander cells. The functional roles of these genes in the bystander effect will be discussed. The bystander observations imply that the relevant target for various radiobiological endpoints is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimate for low dose radiation exposure. (Work supported by NIH grants CA 49062 and CA-RR11623)

  1. Dose and effect relationship of radiation induced cancer and its influencing factors in experimental animals, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shunsaku; Sato, Fumiaki; Eto, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    The data of risk evaluation of external irradiation were integrated with animal experiments from the aspects of qualitative generalizations of characteristics of radiation induced tumors. Studies covered competition of cause of death, figure of dose-to-effect relationship, characteristics of low dose rate of irradiation, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high LET radiation, effects of feactionated irradiation, complex actions with chemical substances, effects of protectional medium, differences of radiosensitivity by species and strains, and age dependency of sensitivities. Competition of cause of death by time length of latent period and degree of malignancy of the disease. Discussion on competition of death suggested the following idea: 1) incidence of tumor induction in the individual level did not correspond to transformation in the cellular level, and 2) relative incidence of tumor induction after a certain dose of whole body irradiation did not indicate the relative sensitivity of each tissue, for the relationship between tumor incidence and exposure dose was not a linear relationship. The dose-to-effect relationship of tumor induction was decided by following factors: i) sensitivity on transformation of cells, ii) sensitivity on the death of potential tumor cells, and iii) competition of the cause of death. Tumor induction by low dose rate irradiation was also studied by comparing qualitative and quantitative differences between high dose rate single irradiation and a series of low dose rate irradiation. (Serizawa, K.)

  2. Low-dose radiation induces drosophila innate immunity through toll pathway activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, Byung-Sub; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Jin, Young-Woo; Park, Joong-Jean; Min, Kyung-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report that exposing certain organisms to low-dose radiation induces beneficial effects on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and immunity. By analyzing survival after bacterial infection and antimicrobial peptide gene expression in irradiated flies, we demonstrate that low-dose irradiation of Drosophila enhances innate immunity. Low-dose irradiation of flies significantly increased resistance against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections, as well as expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes. Additionally, low-dose irradiation also resulted in a specific increase in expression of key proteins of the Toll signaling pathway and phosphorylated forms of p38 and N-terminal kinase (JNK). These results indicate that innate immunity is activated after low-dose irradiation through Toll signaling pathway in Drosophila. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced cell mutations as a function of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review of the data in the literature is presented and forms the background of the experimental data given by the author obtained with exponential long-term cultures of V79 hamster cells exposed over a period of up to 35 days to different dose rates of gamma radiation. The experimental results show that at a dose rate of 40 mGy/hour the number of induced mutations is reduced, - which is in agreement with literature data - , but a dose rate of less than 30 mGy/hour makes the induced mutations leap to a value clearly higher than those induced by acute irradiation. As in addition to the mutations recombination is a significant factor of the radiation risk, experiments with a heterozygotic yeast strain have been made, as there is to date no reliable mammalian cell system available for this kind of research. Long-term radiation exposure of the yeast cells over a period of six weeks drastically increased the rate of recombinations, to a value higher by a factor of about 4 than that induced by acute irradiation. (orig.) [de

  4. Tumor sterilization dose and radiation induced change of the brain tissue in radiotherapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Maki, Yutaka; Takano, Shingo

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-seven patients with brain tumors (38 gliomas, 26 brain metastases, 18 sellar tumors, 15 others) were treated by cobalt gamma ray or proton radiotherapy. In this study, normal brain injury due to radiation was analysed in terms of time-dose-fractionation (TDF), nominal standard dose (NSD) by the Ellis formula and NeuNSD by a modification in which the N exponent was -0.44 and the T exponent was -0.06. Their calculated doses were analysed in relationship to the normal brain radiation induced change (RIC) and the tumor sterilization dose. All brain tumors with an exception of many patients with brain metastases were received a surgical extirpation subtotally or partially prior to radiotherapy. And all patients with glioma and brain metastasis received also immuno-chemotherapy in the usual manner during radiotherapy. The calculated dose expressed by NeuNSD and TDF showed a significant relationship between a therapeutic dose and a postradiation time in terms of the appearance of RIC. It was suggested that RIC was caused by a dose over 800 in NeuNSD and a dose over 70 in TDF. Furthermore, it was suggested that an aged patient and a patient who had the vulnerable brain tissue to radiation exposure in the irradiated field had the high risk of RIC. On the other hand, our results suggested that the tumor sterilization dose should be over 1,536 NeuNSD and the irradiated method should be further considered in addition to the radiobiological concepts for various brain tumors. (author)

  5. High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo

    2005-01-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed. (author)

  6. High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo [National Hospital Organization Osaka Minami Medical Center, Kawachinagano (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed. (author)

  7. Tests of the linearity assumption in the dose-effect relationship for radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.F.; Cohen, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    The validity of the BEIR linear extrapolation to low doses of the dose-effect relationship for radiation induced cancer is tested by use of natural radiation making use of selectivity on type of cancer, smoking habits, sex, age group, geographic area and/or time period. For lung cancer, a linear interpolation between zero dose-zero effect and the data from radon-induced cancers in miners implies that the majority of all lung cancers among non-smokers are due to radon; since lung cancers in miners are mostly small-cell undifferentiated (SCU), a rather rare type in general, linearity over predicts the frequency of SCU lung cancers among non smokers by a factor of 10, and among non-smoking females age 25-44 by a factor of 24. Similarly, linearity predicts that the majority of all lung cancers early in this century were due to radon even after due consideration is given to cases missed by poor diagnostic efficiency (this matter is considered in some detail). For the 30-40 age range, linearity over predicts the total lung cancer rate at that time by a factor of 3-6; for SCU lung cancer, the over-prediction is by at least a factor of 10. Other causes of lung cancer are considered which further enhance the degree to which the linearity assumption over-estimates the effects of low level radiation. A similar analysis is applied to leukemia induced by natural radiation. It is concluded that the upper limit for this is not higher than estimates from the linearity hypothesis. (author)

  8. Long-term biological effects induced by ionizing radiation--implications for dose mediated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, S D; Astărăstoae, V

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are considered to be risk agents that are responsible for the effects on interaction with living matter. The occurring biological effects are due to various factors such as: dose, type of radiation, exposure time, type of biological tissue, health condition and the age of the person exposed. The mechanisms involved in the direct modifications of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA are reviewed. Classical target theory of energy deposition in the nucleus that causes DNA damages, in particular DNA double-strand breaks and that explanation of the biological consequences of ionizing radiation exposure is a paradigm in radiobiology. Recent experimental evidences have demonstrated the existence of a molecular mechanism that explains the non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation exposure. Among these novel data, genomic instability and a variety of bystander effects are discussed here. Those bystander effects of ionizing radiation are fulfilled by cellular communication systems that give rise to non-targeted effects in the neighboring non irradiated cells. This paper provides also a commentary on the synergistic effects induced by the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and various physical agents such as electromagnetic fields and the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and chemical environmental contaminants such as metals. The biological effects of multiple stressors on genomic instability and bystander effects are also discussed. Moreover, a brief presentation of the methods used to characterize cyto- and genotoxic damages is offered.

  9. Induction of somatic mutations by low-dose X-rays: the challenge in recognizing radiation-induced events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Haruki; Shiraishi, Kumiko; Ohkawa, Saori; Sakamoto, Yuki; Komatsu, Kenshi; Matsuura, Shinya; Tachibana, Akira; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-19

    It is difficult to distinguish radiation-induced events from spontaneous events during induction of stochastic effects, especially in the case of low-dose or low-dose-rate exposures. By using a hypersensitive system for detecting somatic mutations at the HPRT1 locus, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by low-dose X-rays. The mutant frequencies induced by doses of >0.15 Gy were statistically significant when compared with the spontaneous frequency, and a clear dose dependency was also observed for mutant frequencies at doses of >0.15 Gy. In contrast, mutant frequencies at doses of 0.2 Gy. Our observations suggest that there could be a critical dose for mutation induction at between 0.1 Gy and 0.2 Gy, where mutagenic events are induced by multiple DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These observations also suggest that low-dose radiation delivered at doses of <0.1 Gy may not result in DSB-induced mutations but may enhance spontaneous mutagenesis events. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  10. Dose dependence of radiation-induced segregation in Ni-1 at% Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Okamoto, P.R.; Wiedersich, H.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of alloy composition as a function of depth from the external surface in Ni-1 at% Si specimens after irradiation with 3-MeV 58 Ni + ions to several different doses at nominal temperatures of 525 and 600 0 C. Very rapid segregation of Si toward the external surface ocurred during irradiation. Surface concentrations of Si in excess of the 10 at% solubility limit were found at both irradiation temperatures after a dose of only approximately 0.05 dpa. The rate of segregation decreased markedly in the dose range from approximately 1-10 dpa. Qualitative agreement was found between the experimental observations and calculations made using a modified Johnson-Lam segregation mode (1976). The present investigation suggests that radiation-induced segregation may significantly alter the mechanical behavior of irradiated alloys long before the onset of void swelling. (Auth.)

  11. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  12. Bimodal cell death induced by high radiation doses in the radioresistant sf9 insect cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandna, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: This study was conducted to investigate the mode(s) of cell death induced by high radiation doses in the highly radioresistant Sf9 insect ovarian cell line. Methods: Cells were exposed to γ-radiation doses 200Gy and 500Gy, harvested at various time intervals (6h-72h) following irradiation, and subjected to cell morphology assay, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) and Annexin-V labeling for the detection of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization. Cell morphology was assessed in cells entrapped and fixed in agarose gel directly from the cell suspension, thus preventing the possible loss of fragments/ apoptotic bodies. Surviving fraction of Sf9 cells was 0.01 at 200Gy and 98%) undergoing extensive DNA fragmentation at 500Gy, whereas the frequency of cells with DNA fragmentation was considerably less (∼12%) at 200Gy. Conclusions: While the mode of cell death at 200Gy seems to be different from typical apoptosis, a dose of 500Gy induced bimodal cell death, with typical apoptotic as well as the atypical cell death observed at 200Gy

  13. Comparative transcriptome analysis of rice seedlings induced by different doses of heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Yeqing; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as a main factor causing biological effects on plant seeds. To investigate the different effects on genome-wide gene expression of low-dose and high-dose ion radiation, we carried out ground-base carbon particle HZE experiments with different cumulative doses (0Gy, 0.2Gy, 2Gy) to rice seeds and then performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the rice seedlings. We identified a total of 2551 and 1464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in low-dose and high-dose radiation groups, respectively. Gene ontology analyses indicated that low-dose and high-dose ion radiation both led to multiple physiological and biochemical activities changes in rice. By Gene Ontology analyses, the results showed that only one process-oxidation reduction process was enriched in the biological process category after high-dose ion radiation, while more processes such as response to biotic stimulus, heme binding, tetrapyrrole binding, oxidoreductase activity, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were significantly enriched after low-dose ion radiation. The results indicated that the rice plants only focused on the process of oxidation reduction to response to high-dose ion radiation, whereas it was a coordination of multiple biological processes to response to low-dose ion radiation. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of radiation stress-responsive genes, we identified several DEGs-encoding TFs. AP2/EREBP, bHLH, C2H2, MYB and WRKY TF families were altered significantly in response to ion radiation. Mapman analysis speculated that the biological effects on rice seedlings caused by the radiation stress might share similar mechanisms with the biotic stress. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of radiation response genes, metabolic pathways, and TF-encoding genes in rice seedlings exposed to low-dose and high-dose ion radiation.

  14. Ultraviolet Radiation Induces Dose-Dependent Pigment Dispersion in Crustacean Chromatophores

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia, Glauce Ribeiro; Lopes, Thaís Martins; Neves, Carla Amorim; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2004-01-01

    Pigment dispersion in chromatophores as a response to UV radiation was investigated in two species of crustaceans, the crab Chasmagnathus granulata and the shrimp Palaemonetes argentinus. Eyestalkless crabs and shrimps maintained on either a black or a white background were irradiated with different UV bands. In eyestalkless crabs the significant minimal effective dose inducing pigment dispersion was 0.42 J/cm2 for UVA and 2.15 J/cm2 for UVB. Maximal response was achieved with 10.0 J/cm...

  15. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano G. Masciullo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED on the target (BED = 76Gy10. Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05. Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002, secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001. This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  16. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gridley, Daila S.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to radiation above levels normally encountered on Earth can occur during wartime, accidents such as those at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and detonation of 'dirty bombs' by terrorists. Relatively high levels of radiation exposure can also occur in certain occupations (low-level waste sites, nuclear power plants, nuclear medicine facilities, airline industry, and space agencies). Depression or dysfunction of the highly radiosensitive cells of the immune system can lead to serious consequences, including increased risk for infections, cancer, hypersensitivity reactions, poor wound healing, and other pathologies. The focus of this research was on the T helper (Th) subset of lymphocytes that secrete cytokines (proteins), and thus control many actions and interactions of other cell types that make up what is collectively known as the immune system. The Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Program is concerned with mechanisms altered by exposure to high energy photons (x- and gamma-rays), protons and electrons. This study compared, for the first time, the low-dose effects of two of these radiation forms, photons and protons, on the response of Th cells, as well as other cell types with which they communicate. The research provided insights regarding gene expression patterns and capacity to secrete potent immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, some of which are implicated in pathophysiological processes. Furthermore, the photon versus proton comparison was important not only to healthy individuals who may be exposed, but also to patients undergoing radiotherapy, since many medical centers in the United States, as well as worldwide, are now building proton accelerators. The overall hypothesis of this study was that whole-body exposure to low-dose photons (gamma-rays) will alter CD4+ Th cell function. We further proposed that exposure to low-dose proton radiation will induce a different pattern of gene and functional changes compared to

  17. Ultraviolet radiation induces dose-dependent pigment dispersion in crustacean chromatophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Glauce Ribeiro; Lopes, Thaís Martins; Neves, Carla Amorim; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2004-10-01

    Pigment dispersion in chromatophores as a response to UV radiation was investigated in two species of crustaceans, the crab Chasmagnathus granulata and the shrimp Palaemonetes argentinus. Eyestalkless crabs and shrimps maintained on either a black or a white background were irradiated with different UV bands. In eyestalkless crabs the significant minimal effective dose inducing pigment dispersion was 0.42 J/cm(2) for UVA and 2.15 J/cm(2) for UVB. Maximal response was achieved with 10.0 J/cm(2) UVA and 8.6 J/cm(2) UVB. UVA was more effective than UVB in inducing pigment dispersion. Soon after UV exposure, melanophores once again reached the initial stage of pigment aggregation after 45 min. Aggregated erythrophores of shrimps adapted to a white background showed significant pigment dispersion with 2.5 J/cm(2) UVA and 0.29 J/cm(2) UVC. Dispersed erythrophores of shrimps adapted to a black background did not show any significant response to UVA, UVB or UVC radiation. UVB did not induce any significant pigment dispersion in shrimps adapted to either a white or a black background. As opposed to the tanning response, which only protects against future UV exposure, the pigment dispersion response could be an important agent protecting against the harmful effects of UV radiation exposure.

  18. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  19. Gamma radiation-induced Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis, comparison of single and fractionated dose regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshbin khoshnazar, A. R; Jahanshahi, M; Azami, N. S

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the brain is associated with many consequences, including cognitive disorders. Pathogenesis of radiation induced cognitive disorder is not clear, but reduction of neurogenesis in hippocampus may be an underlying reason. 24 adult male rats entered to study. Radiation absorbed dose to midbrain was 10 Gy, delivered by routine cobalt radiotherapy machine which its output was measured 115.24 cGy/min. The rats were divided in four groups of sixes, including groups of control, single fraction 10 Gy, fractionated 10 Gy and finally anaesthesia sham group. Number of pyramidal nerve cells was counted in two regions of hippocampus formation (CA1 and CA3). The radiation could reduce the number of cells in two regions of hippocampus significantly (p=0.000). It seems fractionated 10 Gy irradiation to more efficient than single fraction, while role of anaesthesia drug should be cautiously assessed. Moreover the rate of neurogenesis reduction was determined the same in these regions of hippocampus meaning the same radiosensitivity of cells

  20. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  1. Radiation-induced polymerization of water-saturated styrene in a wide range of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezaki, J.; Okada, T.; Sakurada, I.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization of water-saturated styrene (water content 3.5 x 10 -2 mole/liter) was carried out in a wide range of dose rate between 1.2 x 10 3 and 1.8 x 10 7 rad/sec, and compared with the polymerization of the moderately dried styrene (water content 3.2 x 10 -3 mole/liter). Molecular weight distribution curves of the polymerization products showed that they were generally consisted of four parts, namely, oligomers, radical, cationic, and super polymers. Contributions of the four constituents to the polymerization and the number average degrees of polymerization (DP) of the four kinds of polymers were calculated by the graphical analysis of the curves. The rate of radical polymerization and DP of radical polymers are independent of the water content; the dose rate dependences of the polymerization rate and DP agree with the well known square root and inverse square root laws, respectively, of the radical polymerization of styrene. The rate of ionic polymerization is directly proportional to the dose rate, but it decreases, at a given dose rate, inversely proportional to the water content of styrene. DP of ionic polymer is independent of the dose rate but decreases with increasing water content. The super polymer of DP about 10 4 is not formed in the case of the moderately dried styrene. G values for the initiating radical and ion formation are calculated to be independently of the dose rate and water content, 0.66 and 0.027, respectively. It was suggested that oligomer was formed in the early stage by the interaction of cation with anion and only those cations which had survived underwent polymerization. 10 figures, 4 tables

  2. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  3. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlong, Hayley; Mothersill, Carmel; Lyng, Fiona M.; Howe, Orla

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  4. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  5. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  6. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  7. Adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frati, Diego Libkind; Bunge, Maria M.

    2001-01-01

    The term adaptive response (AR) applies to the phenomenon of protection or enhanced repair induced by a small dose of a mutagenic agent. In order to determine the existence of AR in human lymphocytes for two different irradiation schemes, microcultures of blood from 4 donors were irradiated. Samples were exposed 24 hours (hr) after phytohemagglutinin stimulation to an adapting dose of 0,01 Gy and to a challenging dose of 1,5 Gy either 6 or 24 hr later (irradiation scheme 24+30 or 24+48, respectively). Gamma radiation from a 2,5 MeV Linac was used in all experiments. A cytogenetic analysis of unstable chromosome aberrations was applied as the endpoint. High inter-individual variability was found for the first irradiation scheme: one expressed AR, two did not and the last showed an apparent synergistic response. For the second irradiation scheme, low mitotic indices (MI) were found, suggesting a G2 arrest. When a series of harvesting times were applied for the last donor, normal MI were obtained only harvesting after 58 hr. An AR was found when harvesting at 72 hr but not at 58 hr. (author)

  8. Low-dose radiation-induced adaptive response in bone marrow cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Zeba; Kesavan, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    Using bone marrow cells of whole body irradiated mice, the cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low conditioning doses of gamma-rays was investigated. The conditioning doses (0.025 and 0.05 Gy) were given at a dose-rate of 1.67 Gy/min. The challenging dose of 1 Gy was given at a dose-rate of 0.045 Gy/s. The challenging dose was given at different time intervals after the conditioning dose. The time intervals between the conditioning dose and challenging dose were 2, 7.5, 13, 18.5 and 24 h. When the time interval between the conditioning dose and the challenging dose was 2 h, both conditioning doses (0.025 and 0.05 Gy) reduced the frequency of MNPCEs and chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells. The data collected at different time intervals (7.5, 13, 18.5 h) reveal that the radioadaptive response persisted for a longer time when the lower conditioning dose (0.025 Gy) was given. With the higher conditioning dose (0.05 Gy), the radioadaptive response disappeared after a time interval of 13 h. When the time interval between the conditioning dose and the challenging doses was 18.5 or 24 h, only the lower conditioning dose appeared effective in inducing the radioadaptive response

  9. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  10. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  11. Protective and Therapeutic Role of Low Dose Gamma Radiation on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetes in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, H.H.; Hafez, H.F.; Shouman, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-factorial disease which is characterized by vascular and renal complication. This study was initiated to investigate the protective and the therapeutic effect of low dose of gamma radiation (LDR) on diabetic complications. A total of 30 adult male rats were divided into 5 groups: Group I: served as control and injected intraperitoneally with 0.2 ml of 0.1 mol/l citrate buffer (ph 4.5), group II: rats became diabetic via intraperitoneal injection with 60 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) dissolved in 0.2 ml of 0.1 mol/l citrate buffer (ph 4.5), group III irradiated rats (IRR): submitted to fractionated dose of whole body gamma rays; 0.25 Gy for 2 consecutive days (whole dose 0.5 Gy), group IV diabetic irradiated rats (STZ + IRR): rats became diabetic as group II then four weeks after diabetes induction (day 28), rats were submitted to 2 fractions of whole body gamma rays as in group III, and group V irradiated diabetic rats (IRR + STZ): rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0.2 ml of 0.1 mol/l citrate buffer then submitted to whole body gamma rays; 0.25 Gy for 2 consecutive days then one hour after the last IRR dose, rats were made diabetic as group II. In pre and post-irradiation of STZ rats, significant changes were observed in serum lipid profiles, hepatic and cardiac serum enzymes. Significant decrease in hepatic and cardiac malondialdehyde (MDA) and total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) levels, and significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels were observed as compared to diabetic group. The study suggests that LDR may provide useful protective and therapeutic option in the reversal of oxidative stress induced in diabetic rats

  12. What kind of prior low dose radiation does the adaptive response induce?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Described are the adaptive response (AR) and genetic instability (GI) induced by different kind of low dose radiation (LDR) and their relation with the bystander effect. For this, human normal cells were placed at 2.65 m distance from the target of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) to see the biological effect of LDR of mixed radiations (1-1.5 mGy/day; mixture of 94% gamma ray, 1.9% neutron (N) and particle ions mainly containing proton (P) in the rest). Cells were then irradiated with 1.5 Gy X-ray. No effect on the lethality was observed as compared with control cells without LDR. The mutation on hprt gene was found significantly elevated 2-30 days after LDR, suggesting that GI had been induced. To see the effect of each radiation on GI, gamma ray ( 137 Cs), N ( 241 Am-Be) and heavy ion (HIMAC He, C and Fe) as LDR were separately irradiated to cells with total 1 mGy/7-8 hr and then acutely with the X-ray. He and C ions were found to promote mutation 1.9 and 4.0 times higher on frequencies, respectively, and N, to reduce the mutation rate to 15% (AR). Results indicated that cell responses were quite different dependently on linear energy transfer. The probability of hit number of ions in the cell population was calculated to be 61, 15 and 2% for He, C and Fe, respectively, suggesting an existence of considerable number of cells not irradiated. Presence of a gap-junction specific inhibitor (GSI) at LDR resulted in normalization of mutation rate in all groups of cells, suggesting that the bystander effect through cell-cell signal transduction affected the cell response to X-irradiation. For AR induction by N, when 1.5% of cells in culture were irradiated by P in NIRS SPICE as LDR, AR in mutation was observed and was inhibited by GSI, suggesting that N completely destroyed the hit cell but concomitantly yielded recoil P substantially acted as LDR. Above findings indicated that the exact radiation risk can

  13. Possible radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Gisel; Ponzinibbio, María Virginia; Seoane, Analia I

    2016-08-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA damage through production of single and double-strand breaks and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Folic acid (FA) prevents radiation-induced DNA damage by modification of DNA synthesis and/or repair and as a radical scavenger. We hypothesized that in vitro supplementation with FA will decrease the sensitivity of cells to genetic damage induced by low dose of ionizing radiation. Annexin V, comet and micronucleus assays were performed in cultured CHO cells. After 7 days of pre-treatment with 0, 100, 200 or 300 nM FA, cultures were exposed to radiation (100 mSv). Two un-irradiated controls were executed (0 and 100 nM FA). Data were statistically analyzed with X2-test and linear regression analysis (P 0.05). We observed a significantly decreased frequency of apoptotic cells with the increasing FA concentration (P <0.05). The same trend was observed when analyzing DNA damage and chromosomal instability (P <0.05 for 300 nM). Only micronuclei frequencies showed significant differences for linear regression analysis (R2=94.04; P <0.01). Our results have demonstrated the radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro; folate status should be taken into account when studying the effect of low dose radiation in environmental or occupational exposure.

  14. Natural radioactivity contents in tobacco and radiation dose induced from smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, H. A.; Ahmad, F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the causative factors for cancer-inducing mechanisms in humans is radioactive elements present in tobacco leaves used in the manufacture of cigarettes. Smoking of tobacco and its products increases the internal intake and radiation dose due to naturally occurring radionuclides that are considered to be one of the most significant causes of lung cancer. In this work, different commercial types of cigarettes, cigar and moassel were collected from market. Naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra and 214 Bi ( 238 U series), 228 Ac and 228 Ra ( 232 Th series), 40 K and man-made 137 Cs were measured in tobacco using gamma-ray spectrometer. Results show that the average concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were 4.564, 3.940 and 1289.53 Bq kg -1 , respectively. This reflects their origin from the soil by root uptake and fertilisers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Concentration of 137 Cs was 0.348 Bq kg -1 due to root uptake or deposition onto the leaf foliage. For smokers, the annual effective dose due to inhalation of 238 U varied from 49.35 to 139.40 μSv -1 (average 104.27 μSv y -1 ), while of 232 Th from 23.86 to 111.06 μSv y -1 (average 65.52 μSv y -1 ). The annual effective dose resulting from 137 Cs was varied from 10.96 to 24.01 nSv y -1 (average 19.41 nSv y -1 ). (authors)

  15. Radiation-chemical discussion on inverse dose-rate effect observed in radiation-induced strand breaks of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiro

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results of inverse dose-rate effect, so-called Kada Effects, which was published by Takakura and her coworkers on radiation-induced strand breaks of plasmid DNA in aerated aqueous solution, have been kinetically analyzed and discussed on the basis of radiation chemistry. the kinetic analysis indicates that there are two possible mechanisms; 1) equilibrium mixture of O 2 - and HO 2 is responsible for strand breaks of DNA, and 2) peroxyl radical produced from citrate is effective for the strand breaks. However, the detailed kinetic analysis revealed that the latter is improbable because unimolecular decay of the peroxyl radical must be assumed to be negligible for its participation despite fast decay of analogous organic peroxyl radicals. The analysis has also given 9.93±0.10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 per nucleotide unit, which corresponds to 7.62 x 10 4 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 per DNA molecule, as the rate constant for the reaction of the equilibrium mixture with plasmid pBR 322 DNA. Furthermore the probability that the reaction of the mixture with a nucleotide unit of DNA leads to strand breaks was obtained to be 3.36 x 10 -3 for gamma-irradiated system and 1.98 x 10 -3 for beta-irradiated system, respectively. (author)

  16. A Voxel-Based Approach to Explore Local Dose Differences Associated With Radiation-Induced Lung Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Giuseppe [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Monti, Serena [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); D' Avino, Vittoria [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Conson, Manuel [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Liuzzi, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Pressello, Maria Cristina [Department of Health Physics, S. Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome (Italy); Donato, Vittorio [Department of Radiation Oncology, S. Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome (Italy); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Quarantelli, Mario [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Pacelli, Roberto [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Cella, Laura, E-mail: laura.cella@cnr.it [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, Naples (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To apply a voxel-based (VB) approach aimed at exploring local dose differences associated with late radiation-induced lung damage (RILD). Methods and Materials: An interinstitutional database of 98 patients who were Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors treated with postchemotherapy supradiaphragmatic radiation therapy was analyzed in the study. Eighteen patients experienced late RILD, classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system. Each patient's computed tomographic (CT) scan was normalized to a single reference case anatomy (common coordinate system, CCS) through a log-diffeomorphic approach. The obtained deformation fields were used to map the dose of each patient into the CCS. The coregistration robustness and the dose mapping accuracy were evaluated by geometric and dose scores. Two different statistical mapping schemes for nonparametric multiple permutation inference on dose maps were applied, and the corresponding P<.05 significance lung subregions were generated. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-based test was performed on the mean dose extracted from each subregion. Results: The coregistration process resulted in a geometrically robust and accurate dose warping. A significantly higher dose was consistently delivered to RILD patients in voxel clusters near the peripheral medial-basal portion of the lungs. The area under the ROC curves (AUC) from the mean dose of the voxel clusters was higher than the corresponding AUC derived from the total lung mean dose. Conclusions: We implemented a framework including a robust registration process and a VB approach accounting for the multiple comparison problem in dose-response modeling, and applied it to a cohort of HL survivors to explore a local dose–RILD relationship in the lungs. Patients with RILD received a significantly greater dose in parenchymal regions where low doses (∼6 Gy) were delivered. Interestingly, the relation between differences in the high-dose

  17. Radiation doses to Finns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantalainen, L.

    1996-01-01

    The estimated annual radiation doses to Finns have been reduced in the recent years without any change in the actual radiation environment. This is because the radiation types have been changed. The risk factors will probably be changed again in the future, because recent studies show discrepancies in the neutron dosimetry concerning the city of Hiroshima. Neutron dosimetry discrepancy has been found between the predicted and estimated neutron radiation. The prediction of neutron radiation is calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, which have also been used when designing recommendations for the limits of radiation doses (ICRP60). Estimation of the neutron radiation is made on the basis of measured neutron activation of materials in the city. The estimated neutron dose beyond 1 km is two to ten, or more, times as high as the predicted dose. This discrepancy is important, because the most relevant distances with respect to radiation risk evaluation are between 1 and 2 km. Because of this discrepancy, the present radiation risk factors for gamma and neutron radiation, which rely on the Monte Carlo calculations, are false, too. The recommendations of ICRP60 have been adopted in a few countries, including Finland, and they affect the planned common limits of the EU. It is questionable whether happiness is increased by adopting false limits, even if they are common. (orig.) (2 figs., 1 tab.)

  18. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ruiping; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► α-Particle induced MN had a biphasic dose–response followed by a bystander model. ► MN dose–response of α- and γ-combination IR was similar to that of α-particle. ► α-Particles followed by γ-rays yielded a synergistic effect on MN induction. ► Low dose γ-rays triggered antagonistic and adaptive responses against α-particle. - Abstract: Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose–response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose–response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4 h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles.

  19. Radiation dose in vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizade, A.; Lovblad, K.O.; Wilhelm, K.E.; Somon, T.; Wetzel, S.G.; Kelekis, A.D.; Yilmaz, H.; Abdo, G.; Martin, J.B.; Viera, J.M.; Ruefenacht, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    We wished to measure the absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopically controlled vertebroplasty and to assess the possibility of deterministic radiation effects to the operator. The dose was measured in 11 consecutive procedures using thermoluminescent ring dosimeters on the hand of the operator and electronic dosimeters inside and outside of the operator's lead apron. We found doses of 0.022-3.256 mGy outside and 0.01-0.47 mGy inside the lead apron. Doses on the hand were higher, 0.5-8.5 mGy. This preliminary study indicates greater exposure to the operator's hands than expected from traditional apron measurements. (orig.)

  20. Radiation doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Butler, P.; Horrocks, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Patient radiation doses during interventional radiology (IR) procedures may reach the thresholds for radiation-induced skin and eye lens injuries. This study investigates the radiation doses received by patients undergoing cerebral embolization. Measurements were conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Radiotherapy verification films were used in order to visualise the radiation field. For each procedure the fluoroscopic and digital dose-area product, the fluoroscopic time, the total number of acquired images and entrance-skin dose calculated by the angiographic unit were recorded. In this paper, the skin, eye and thyroid glands doses on a sample of patients are presented. From a preliminary study of 13 patients having undergone cerebral embolization, it was deduced that six of them have received a dose above 1 Gy. Detailed dose data from patients undergoing IR procedures will be collected in the future with the aim of developing a model to allow estimation of the dose prior to the procedure as well as to look at techniques of dose reduction. (author)

  1. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  2. Characterization of the adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X-rays to Vibrio cholerae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, Jayasri

    1996-01-01

    Pretreatment with sublethal doses of X-rays induced an adaptive response in Vibrio cholerae cells as indicated by their greater resistance to the subsequent challenging doses of X-irradiation. The adaptive response was maximum following a pre-exposure dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays and an optimum incubation period of 40 min at 37C. Pre-exposure to a sublethal dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays made the Vibrio cholerae cells 3.38-fold more resistant to the subsequent challenge by X-rays. Pretreatment with a sublethal dose of hydrogen peroxide offered a similar degree of protection to the bacterial cells against subsequent treatment with challenging doses of X-ray radiation. However, exposure of Vibrio cholerae cells to mild heat (42C for 10 min) before X-ray irradiation decreased their survival following X-irradiation

  3. Effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G.

    1986-01-01

    The term 'small radiation dosis' means doses of about (1 rem), fractions of one rem as well as doses of a few rem. Doses like these are encountered in various practical fields, e.g. in X-ray diagnosis, in the environment and in radiation protection rules. The knowledge about small doses is derived from the same two forces, on which the radiobiology of human beings nearly is based: interpretation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data, as well as the experience from radiotherapy. Careful interpretation of Hiroshima dates do not provide any evidence that small doses can induce cancer, fetal malformations or genetic damage. Yet in radiotherapy of various diseases, e.g. inflammations, doses of about 1 Gy (100 rad) do no harm to the patients. According to a widespread hypothesis even very small doses may induce some types of radiation damage ('no threshold'). Nevertheless an alternative view is justified. At present no decision can be made between these two alternatives, but the usefullness of radiology is definitely better established than any damage calculated by theories or extrapolations. Based on experience any exaggerated fear of radiations can be met. (author)

  4. Dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Li Yanbo; Kang Shunai; Gong Shouliang; Zhao Wenju

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro in order to reveal the possible mechanism of biological effect and adaptive response induced by low dose radiation. Methods: The experiment was divided into D2 (challenging dose), D1 (inductive dose) + D2 and sham-irradiation groups. EL-4 lymphoma cells were irradiated with D1 (75 mGy, 6.25-200.00 mGy·mm -1 ) and D2(1.5 Gy, 287 mGy·min -1 ), the time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The percentage of apoptosis and each cell cycle phase were measured with flow cytometry. Results: When the dose rates of D1 were 6.25-50.00 mGy·min -1 , the percentages of apoptosis in the D1 + D2 group were significantly lower than those in the D2 group (P 0 /G 1 phase cells decreased significantly (P -1 , D2 is 1.5 Gy (287 mGy·min -1 ), and the time interval between D1 and D2 is 6 h, the adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro could be induced. (authors)

  5. Dose-response relationship of cadmium or radiation-induced embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kiyohito; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Matsuoka, Masato; Wakisaka, Takashi; Fujiki, Yoshishige

    1988-01-01

    Mouse embryos of B6C3F 1 strain were exposed in vitro to 1.2 to 2.2 μM cadmium chloride (Cd) or to 100 to 320 R x-rays, and the effects of the exposure on development were examined after 39 h of culture. Development of embryos was assessed from lethality, formation of the neural tube defect, diameter and protein of yolk sac, crown-rump and head lengths, embryonic protein, and number of somites. Incidence of the neural tube defect increased from 3.4 to 100% by 1.2 to 2.0 μM Cd, while embryo deaths increased from 13.8 to 93.3% by 2.0 to 2.2 μM Cd. Embryonic protein was significantly reduced at the teratogenic range, but the number of somites was only affected by 1.6 to 2.0 μM Cd. X-irradiation at 100 to 320 R induced the neural tube defect in 2.9 to 72.7% of the embryos. An embryolethal effect was observed only at the 320 R dose. Crown-rump and head lengths and embryonic protein were significantly affected at the teratogenic range, but the diameter and protein of yolk sac and number of somites were hardly affected. Cadmium- or radiation-induced response data of both teratogenicity and endpoints indicating inhibition of embryonic development were acceptably fitted to a linear log-probit regression. These regressions suggest that as an estimation of interference in development of embryos, embryonic protein and head length are sensitive endpoints while the number of somites is an insensitive criterion. (author)

  6. Retrospective Cohort Study of Bronchial Doses and Radiation-Induced Atelectasis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors Located Close to the Bronchial Tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Kristin; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia; Wersäll, Peter; Drugge, Ninni; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Persson, Jan-Olov; Rutkowska, Eva; Tullgren, Owe; Lax, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose–response relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm 3 up to 2.0 cm 3 ]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Results: Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm 3 (D 0.1cm3 ) was used for further analysis. The median value of D 0.1cm3 (α/β = 3 Gy) was EQD 2,LQ = 147 Gy 3 (range, 20-293 Gy 3 ). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD 2,LQ = 210 Gy 3 , and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD 2,LQ = 105 Gy 3 . Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). Conclusion: In this retrospective study a significant dose–response relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown

  7. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of gamma rays in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Chang, Ok Suh; Gwi, Eon Kim

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the adaptive response could be induced in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and human tumor cell lines. The time necessary for the expression of the adaptive response was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Three lymphoblastoid cell lines from ataxia telangiectasia (AT) homozygote (GM 1526), AT heterozygote (GM 3382), and normal individual (3402p) and two hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and Hep 3B, were used in this study. Experiments were carried out by delivering 0.01 Gy followed by 0.5 Gy of gamma radiation to the exponentially growing cells. The time necessary for the expression of the adaptive response was determined by varying the time interval between the two doses from 1 to 72 h. In some experiments, 3-aminobenzamide, a potent inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added immediately after the 0.5 Gy exposure. The cultures were fixed 30 min (for the G 2 chromatid) and 6 h (for the S chromatid) after the 0.5 Gy exposure. Metaphase chromosome assay was carried out to score chromatid breaks as an end point. Results: A prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of gamma rays significantly reduced the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher doses (0.5 Gy) in all the tested cell lines. The magnitude of the adaptive response was similar among the cell lines despite their different radiosensitivities. In the G 2 chromatids, the adaptive response was observed both at short-time intervals, as early as 1 h, and at long-time intervals. In the S chromatids, however, the adaptive response was shown only at long-time intervals. When 3-aminobenzamide was added after the 0.5 Gy, the adaptive responses were abolished in all the experimental groups. Conclusion: The adaptive response was observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and hepatoma cell lines. The magnitude of the adaptive response did not seem to be related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The elimination of the adaptive response with 3

  8. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Arya; Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56–87.5 Gy; 1.5–2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade ≥2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4–37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512–67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm 3 of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966–24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267–17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future

  9. Radiation-induced coloration of nitro blue tetrazolium gel dosimeter for low dose applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Beshir, W.B.; Hassan, H.M.; Soliman, Y.S.

    2017-01-01

    A radiochromic sensor of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) in gelatin was evaluated as a new gel dosimeter for radiation applications. The NBT gel has the advantage of visual color change from faint yellow to violet at low absorbed doses (10–1000 Gy). This color change appears as a result of the reduction of NBT to colored formazan then to diformazan species with further increase of absorbed doses. Responses of the gel at different NBT concentrations were analyzed at the absorption maximum centered at 527 nm. An increase of NBT concentrations in the gel enhances the radiation dose sensitivity. Energy dependent study implies the tissue equivalency of the gel in the energy range of 0.15–20 MeV. Dependence of the gel response on irradiation temperature, and color stability before and after irradiation were also studied. The combined uncertainty associated with the dose monitoring (10–1000 Gy) is 6.26% (2σ). Thus, the NBT gel shows its suitability for food irradiation, insect population control, and some food irradiation applications. - Highlights: • Preparation of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) gel for the dose range of 10–1000 Gy. • The sensitivity of it increases with increasing NBT concentrations. • The response of irradiated dosimeter is stable after 5 h from irradiation. • The prepared gel dosimeter is a tissue equivalent. • Its combined uncertainty is equal to 6.26% for 10–1000 Gy dose level.

  10. Doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H-G.; Harrison, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection’s (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP’s 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effective dose. In preparation for the calculation of new dose coefficients, Committee 2 and its task groups have provided updated nuclear decay data (ICRP Publication 107) and adult reference computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). New dose coefficients for external exposures of workers are complete (ICRP Publication 116), and work is in progress on a series of reports on internal dose coefficients to workers from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Reference phantoms for children will also be provided and used in the calculation of dose coefficients for public exposures. Committee 2 also has task groups on exposures to radiation in space and on the use of effective dose.

  11. Dose effect relationships for radiation induced cancer: relevance of animal evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    This article is based upon a paper which was presented at the SRP meeting on the Biological Bases of Radiation Protection Standards, October 1981. It is suggested that experimental radiation carcinogenesis data derived from animal studies will probably never provide numerical evidence of risk that is applicable to man. The uncertainties involved in any extrapolation of risk estimates from mice to men surely outweigh the uncertainties in the human epidemiological data. It is also suggested that at least in the foreseeable future animal data will not solve the perennial problem of the shape at low doses of the dose response curve for radiogenic cancer. At most the data may clarify the debate over linearity-non linearity and over the existence or otherwise of a threshold. However, the paper does suggest a very positive role for animal data in providing semi-quantitative generalisations for radiological protection concerning such variables as dose rate, radiation quality, partial body/organ exposure and in situations where the dose is received in a highly inhomogeneous fashion, e.g. the special problems of internal emitters. (author)

  12. cDNA cloning and transcriptional controlling of a novel low dose radiation-induced gene and its function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Pingkun; Sui Jianli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clone a novel low dose radiation-induced gene (LRIGx) and study its function as well as its transcriptional changes after irradiation. Methods: Its cDNA was obtained by DDRT-PCR and RACE techniques. Northern blot hybridization was used to investigate the gene transcription. Bioinformatics was employed to analysis structure and function of this gene. Results: LRIGx cDNA was cloned. The sequence of LRIGx was identical to a DNA clone located in human chromosome 20 q 11.2-12 Bioinformatics analysis predicted an encoded protein with a conserved helicase domain. Northern analysis revealed a ∼8.5 kb transcript which was induced after 0.2 Gy as well as 0.02 Gy irradiation, and the transcript level was increased 5 times at 4 h after 0.2 Gy irradiation. The induced level of LRIGx transcript by 2.0 Gy high dose was lower than by 0.2 Gy. Conclusion: A novel low dose radiation-induced gene has been cloned. It encodes a protein with a conserved helicase domain that could involve in DNA metabolism in the cellular process of radiation response

  13. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  14. Low dose radiation induced hormesis and its mechanism of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Huo Hongmei; Zhang Yusong; Zhao Peifeng; Li Wei; Jiang Jiagui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the supernatant (the stimulating fluid) centrifuged from myeloid cells suspension after low dose radiation in vitro can produce hormesis on the normal or radiation damage cells. The mechanism of free radical was probed. Methods: Mouse myeloid cell suspension was irradiated respectively by 0, 2 and 5 Gy, and cultured in vitro. MTT method was used to measure the reproductive activity of cells. Meanwhile, Cytochrome C reduction method was used to determine the concentration of O 2 - . Lastly, the concentration of O 2 - was decreased or increased by adding DPI or PMA, and the effect of such changes on 'the stimulating fluid' was observed. Results: Co-cultured with 'the stimulating fluid', the reproductive activity of the myeloid cells after large dose radiation or the normal myeloid cells were enhanced. Decreasing the concentration of O 2 - ; may degrade the proliferation of the cells after radiation damage; while increasing it may lead to the opposite result. Conclusions: The stimulating fluid can enhance the proliferation of the myeloid cells after radiation damage and also the normal ones. The mechanism of above-mentioned phenomena might be related with the changes of O 2 - concentration. (authors)

  15. Cosmic-ray-induced radiation environment and dose to man for low-orbit space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandmeier, H.A.; Hansen, G.E.; Battat, M.E.; O'Brien, K.

    1981-09-01

    Neutrons and photons resulting from the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the material of an orbiting satellite or an orbiting space station at an altitude of some few hundreds of kilometers, and below the level of the radiation belts, have been calculated as a function of geomagnetic latitude and solar activity level. The photon and neutron leakage currents from the top of the atmosphere have been computed. The radiation dose-equivalent rate to an unshielded astronaut has also been calculated. The maximum dose-equivalent rate, near the magnetic poles, was 2 mrem/h. In deep space this would amount to 18 rem/y, indicating that for a prolonged stay in space, shielding would be needed

  16. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify kera...

  17. Simulation and measurement of total ionizing dose radiation induced image lag increase in pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an (China); Chen, Wei, E-mail: chenwei@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an (China); Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an (China); Xue, Yuanyuan; Yao, Zhibin; He, Baoping; Ma, Wuying; Jin, Junshan; Sheng, Jiangkun; Dong, Guantao [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an (China)

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of total ionizing dose (TID) induced image lag sources in pinned photodiodes (PPD) CMOS image sensors based on radiation experiments and TCAD simulation. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the Cobalt −60 gamma-ray source. The experimental results show the image lag degradation is more and more serious with increasing TID. Combining with the TCAD simulation results, we can confirm that the junction of PPD and transfer gate (TG) is an important region forming image lag during irradiation. These simulations demonstrate that TID can generate a potential pocket leading to incomplete transfer.

  18. Low-dose radiation (LDR) induces hematopoietic hormesis: LDR-induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells into peripheral blood circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Cui, Jiuwei; Xue, Lu; Cai, Lu

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stimulating effect of low-dose radiation (LDR) on bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) proliferation and peripheral blood mobilization. Mice were exposed to 25- to 100-mGy x-rays. Bone marrow and peripheral blood HPCs (BFU-E, CFU-GM, and c-kit+ cells) were measured, and GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-3 protein and mRNA expression were detected using ELISA, slot blot hybridization, and Northern blot methods. To functionally evaluate LDR-stimulated and -mobilized HPCs, repopulation of peripheral blood cells in lethally irradiated recipients after transplantation of LDR-treated donor HPCs was examined by WBC counts, animal survival, and colony-forming units in the recipient spleens (CFUs-S). 75-mGy x-rays induced a maximal stimulation for bone marrow HPC proliferation (CFU-GM and BFU-E formation) 48 hours postirradiation, along with a significant increase in HPC mobilization into peripheral blood 48 to 72 hours postradiation, as shown by increases in CFU-GM formation and proportion of c-kit+ cells in the peripheral mononuclear cells. 75-mGy x-rays also maximally induced increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF mRNA expression in splenocytes and levels of serum GM-CSF. To define the critical role of these hematopoietic-stimulating factors in HPC peripheral mobilization, direct administration of G-CSF at a dose of 300 microg/kg/day or 150 microg/kg/day was applied and found to significantly stimulate GM-CFU formation and increase c-kit+ cells in the peripheral mononuclear cells. More importantly, 75-mGy x-rays plus 150 microg/kg/day G-CSF (LDR/150-G-CSF) produced a similar effect to that of 300 microg/kg/day G-CSF alone. Furthermore, the capability of LDR-mobilized donor HPCs to repopulate blood cells was confirmed in lethally irradiated recipient mice by counting peripheral WBC and CFUs-S. These results suggest that LDR induces hematopoietic hormesis, as demonstrated by HPC proliferation and peripheral mobilization, providing a

  19. Radiation-induced rectal complications are not influenced by age: a dose fractionation study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Aardweg, Gerard J M J; Olofsen-van Acht, Manouk J J; van Hooije, Christel M C; Levendag, Peter C

    2003-05-01

    Radiation-induced complications of the rectum are an important dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy of pelvic malignancies. In general, animal studies demonstrated no differences in acute and late normal tissue toxicity with age, but little is known about rectal complications in relation to age. For this purpose, an extensive histological and dose fractionation study was carried out on the rectum of young (12 weeks) and older (77-80 weeks) rats. In this paper, the results of dose fractionation are presented in relation to age at the time of irradiation. Young and older animals were irradiated with single and fractionated doses. After irradiation, rectal complications could lead to occlusion and stenosis, eventually resulting in the clinical symptoms of a megacolon and a possible fistula. For each dose group, cumulative survival rates were obtained with Kaplan-Meier analysis, from which dose-effect curves and the associated LD(50) values for a megacolon/fistula were calculated. The majority of responders died between 8 and 24 weeks after irradiation, irrespective of age. For both age groups, only the fractionation data showed a reduction in the mean latency with increasing dose. In the older age group, 39% of the responders developed a fistula compared to 26% for the younger animals. The LD(50) values increased from around 30 Gy after single doses to nearly 65 Gy after 10 fractions. The increases in LD(50) values with the number of fractions were independent of the age of the rats. For each of the dose fractionation schedules, log-rank testing indicated no significant differences in cumulative survival rates between younger and older animals (P > 0.10). The high alpha/beta ratios obtained for both the young and older animals strongly suggested that the late rectal complications were a consequence of early epithelial injury. Associated histological findings indicated that blood vessel damage, which was already evident at a high incidence at 4 weeks after irradiation

  20. Comments on 'Reconsidering the definition of a dose-volume histogram'-dose-mass histogram (DMH) versus dose-volume histogram (DVH) for predicting radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Plataniotis, Georgios A; Gorka, Magdalena Adamus; Lind, Bengt K

    2006-01-01

    In a recently published paper (Nioutsikou et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 L17) the authors showed that the use of the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept is a more accurate descriptor of the dose delivered to lung than the traditionally used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept. Furthermore, they state that if a functional imaging modality could also be registered to the anatomical imaging modality providing a functional weighting across the organ (functional mass) then the more general and realistic concept of the dose-functioning mass histogram (D[F]MH) could be an even more appropriate descriptor. The comments of the present letter to the editor are in line with the basic arguments of that work since their general conclusions appear to be supported by the comparison of the DMH and DVH concepts using radiobiological measures. In this study, it is examined whether the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept deviated significantly from the widely used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept regarding the expected lung complications and if there are clinical indications supporting these results. The problem was investigated theoretically by applying two hypothetical dose distributions (Gaussian and semi-Gaussian shaped) on two lungs of uniform and varying densities. The influence of the deviation between DVHs and DMHs on the treatment outcome was estimated by using the relative seriality and LKB models using the Gagliardi et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 46 373) and Seppenwoolde et al (2003 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 55 724) parameter sets for radiation pneumonitis, respectively. Furthermore, the biological equivalent of their difference was estimated by the biologically effective uniform dose (D-bar) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) concepts, respectively. It is shown that the relation between the DVHs and DMHs varies depending on the underlying cell density distribution and the applied dose distribution. However, the range of their deviation in terms of

  1. A comparison of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles in men with and without prostate brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Dorsey, Anthony T.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Donzella, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    thresholds and side of the gland. The dose distribution over the length of the prostate rose smoothly from the base and apex to peak at midgland in 125 I implants while 103 Pd implants had a relatively constant dose over the length of the prostate. Considering the calculation grid as forming a 6-mm wide ribbon along each side of the prostate, the average patient had 70 mm 2 area receiving at least 300% of mPD. Conclusion: In this study, no relationship between radiation dose to the NVB and the development of post brachytherapy erectile dysfunction was discernible. Such a difference may become evident with additional follow-up. If long-term brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction is related to the radiation dose to the NVB, the ultimate preservation of potency following prostate brachytherapy may be markedly inferior to what has been reported. Nevertheless, the majority of this patient population responded favorably to sildenafil

  2. SU-F-J-221: Adjusted Dose and Its Relation to Radiation Induced Liver Disease During Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, P; Gang, Y; Qin, S; Li, D [Shandong Province Key Laboratory of Medical Physics and Image Processing Technology, School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University (China); Li, H; Chen, J; Ma, C; Yin, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) had hepatic anatomy variations as a result of inter-fraction deformation during fractionated radiotherapy, which may result in difference from the planned dose. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between adjusted dose and radiation induced liver disease (RILD) in HCC patients receiving three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Methods: Twenty-three HCC patients received conventional fractionated 3DCRT were enrolled in this retrospective investigation. Among them, seven patients had been diagnosed of RILD post-radiotherapy, including 4 cases of grade 2, 3 cases of grade 3 according to the CTCAE Version 3.0. Daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired throughout the whole treatment course for each patient. To reconstruct the daily dose to a patient considering the interfraction anatomy variations, the planned beams from each patient’s treatment plan were firstly applied to each daily modified CBCT (mCBCT). The daily doses were then summed together with the help of deformable image registration (DIR) to obtain the adjusted dose (Dadjusted) of the patient. Finally, the dose changes in normal liver between planned dose (Dplan) and Dadjusted were evaluated by V20, V30, V40 and the mean dose to normal liver (MDTNL). Univariate analysis was performed to identify the significant dose changes. Results: Among the twenty-three patients, the adjusted liver V20, V30, V40 and MDTNL showed significant changes from the planned ones (p<0.05) and averagely increased by 4.1%, 4.7%, 4.5% and 3.9Gy, respectively. And the adjusted liver dose in twenty-one patients (91%) were higher than planned value, the adjusted dose of patients with RILD (6/7) exceeds to the hepatic radiation tolerance. Conclusion: The adjusted dose of all the studied patients significantly differs from planned dose, and mCBCT-based dose reconstruction can aid in evaluating the robustness of the planning solutions, and adjusted dose

  3. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis

  4. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  5. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h"−"1 up to 1.5 Gy h"−"1. Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h"−"1. A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR_1_0) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h"−"1, followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h"−"1 and 169 ± 12 mGy h"−"1 on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h"−"1, antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h"−"1 which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic

  6. Gamma radiation-induced conditioned taste aversions in rats: A comparison of the protective effects of area postrema lesions with differing doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossenkopp, K.P.; Giugno, L.

    1989-01-01

    Lesions which destroy the area postrema (AP) and damage the adjacent nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) attenuate or abolish conditioned taste aversions (CTA) induced by a variety of pharmacological agents as well as exposure to radiation. In the present experiment, 4 groups of male rats received lesions of AP and 4 groups were given sham lesions. One sham-lesioned and one AP-lesioned group were given a single pairing of 1-hr access to a novel 0.10% sodium saccharin solution followed immediately with exposure to 0, 100, 200, or 400 rad of gamma radiation, respectively. Four days later all groups were given daily two-bottle preference tests (saccharin vs. water) on 4 consecutive days. The sham-lesioned groups exposed to the radiation (100, 200, or 400 rad) developed profound aversions to the saccharin on all test days (p less than 0.001). In contrast, all of the AP-lesioned groups as well as the sham-irradiated (0 rad) sham-lesioned group exhibited strong, comparable (p greater than 0.30) preferences for saccharin. Thus, lesion of AP abolished the radiation-induced CTA at all dose levels of radiation. These results raise the possibility of pharmacological intervention at the level of AP to prevent radiation-induced CTA in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

  7. Fiber optics in high dose radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partin, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the behavior of state-of-the-art optical fiber waveguides in high dose (greater than or equal to 10 5 rad), steady state radiation fields is presented. The influence on radiation-induced transmission loss due to experimental parameters such as dose rate, total dose, irradiation history, temperature, wavelength, and light intensity, for future work in high dose environments are given

  8. Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measured by Acridine Orange Stained Micronuleus Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee-Sun, K.; Kwang-Hee, Y.; Cha-Soom, K.; Jung-Mi, C.; Gu-Choul, S.; Suk-Young, P.; Kyoung-H, C.; Chong-Soom, K.; Young-Khi, L.; Jae-Ho, W.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange dye stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: An adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed [1- 4]. However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose [3]. This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. Materials and Methods: Specific pathogen free 5-week-old C3H/He mice, purchased from Shizuoka Laboratory Center (Japan), were kept in clean and conventional environment. When 6 weeks old, the animal were whole body irradiated using irradiator of IBL-437 (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min). After various time intervals, the two groups were administrated to adaptation dose and challenge dose of 0.01Gy and 2Gy, respectively. For experiments, sham-irradiated, only adaptive and challenge dose irradiated groups were run concurrently. Smears were stained and scored using Acridine orange dye method [2]. Statistically significant differences in MN-PCE frequency were determined by comparing tie individual values at each group with the respective control values (challenge dose irradiated group) by using the paired ttest. Results and Discussions: Induced MN by the challenge dose (2Gy) after the pretreatment with 0.01Gy is low to the one induced by the challenge dose alone. In the present study, this estimation for the

  9. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  10. Dose-Related Effects of Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on Gamma Radiation-Induced Teratogenicity in Pregnant Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Reviews of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a widely used nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drug, has consistently suggested a possible association between prenatal ASA ingestion and adverse effects in the pregnant mothers and their developing fetuses. The objective of the current study was to comprehensively define the effect of relatively low and high doses of ASA (25 mg/kg body wt. and 200 mg/kg body wt. respectively) on gestating rats and their possible impact on the irradiated ones. Therefore 36 pregnant rats were randomly divided into 6 equal groups. Three rat groups were daily orally gavaged from the 7th to the 18th gestational days with: distilled water (Group 1), 25 mg/kg body wt. ASA (Group 2) and 200 mg/kg body wt. ASA (Group 3). The other three groups similarly received the same previous treatments besides 2 Gy whole body gamma irradiation of each, to serve as: Group 4 (distilled water + irradiation), Group 5 (25 mg/kg body wt. ASA + irradiation) and Group 6 (200 mg/kg body wt. ASA + irradiation). All rat groups were sacrificed on the 20th day of pregnancy and the uterine contents were examined. The lower ASA dose (25 mg/kg body wt.) treated group (Group 2) displayed healthy mothers and fetuses whereas that of the higher dose (200 mg/kg body wt.) (Group 3) despite not showing significant maternal or fetal mortalities, yet the intrauterine contents presented fetal developmental disorders including stunted growth and resorption together with some head and limb anomalies including plagiocephaly, marked acampsia and acrocontracture. Meanwhile, results have unexpectedly shown a radioprotective role of the lower ASA dose (25 mg/kg. body wt.) (Group 5) to pregnant rats and their fetuses as inspected by its efficacy in retrieving the radiation induced maternal weight loss together with its noticeable ameliorating effects on the intrauterine lethality of the affected fetuses and their externally detected abnormalities in addition toits effectiveness in retaining some

  11. Radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    About 200 scientists from 28 countries and 5 international organizations met at a symposium on radiation dosimetry held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in June 1960. The aim of the symposium was not so much the description of a large number of measuring instruments as a discussion of the methods used, with special emphasis on those problems which had become important in the context of recent developments, such as the measurement of mixed or very large doses

  12. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses. Do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Maeda, Munetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced by-stander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. (author)

  13. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Radiation Sources Michael G. Stabin, PhD, CHP Introduction Radiation exposures from diagnostic medical examinations are generally ... of exposure annually to natural background radiation. Plain Film X Rays Single Radiographs Effective Dose, mSv Skull ( ...

  14. Effect of Bcl-2/Bax gene expression on apoptosis of spermatogenic cells of mouse testes induced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Wang Chunyan; Lu Zhe; Liu Shunchun; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    The different kinds of spermatogenic cells were separated using density gradient centrifugation and their apoptosis and Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression were measured with flow cytometry and immunohistochemical method, respectively. The results showed the apoptosis in all kinds of spermatogenic cells induced by low dose radiation (LDR) had a obvious regularity. When the doses were 0.025 and 0.05 Gy, spermatogonia apoptosis was dominant. With the increase of irradiation dose (0.075-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic percentage of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after LDR. Bax protein was primarily expressed in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, and the former was significantly higher than that of the latter after LDR. With the increase of irradiation dose, Bax protein expression showed a upgrading tendency, but that of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred. Bcl-2 protein was primarily expressed in spermatids and spermatozoa, but the Bcl-2 protein expressions of spermatogonia and spermatocytes scarcely occurred after LDR. These results imply that the interacting regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax gene expression might be involved in selective apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR, which provided an experimental evidence for further exploring the apoptotic mechanism of adaptive response of spermatogenic cells by LDR

  15. Signalling detection of DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, M.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals spontaneously present different sensitivities to ionizing radiation, measured by the severity of their post-radiotherapy side-effects. Cells from some patients with extreme clinical radiosensitivity have shown altered cellular radiosensitivity measured by different endpoints as apoptosis or DNA damage. Linking clinical and cellular sensitivity is of fundamental importance to establish a clinical test capable of predicting a person's radiosensitivity from a sample. Easily sampled, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are an appealing cellular model to study individual radiosensitivity as they have been shown to be the most radiosensitive hematopoietic cells. DNA damages and repair can be visualized by observing the kinetics of appearance and disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci on DNA double-strand breaks through immunofluorescence microscopy. The experimental strategy chosen here was to follow lymphocyte gamma-H2AX foci kinetics in response to different levels of irradiation as delayed gamma-H2AX foci disappearance has been observed in cells of individuals with high clinical radiosensitivity. For our initial study we irradiated in vitro samples of radiotherapy patients with different clinical radiosensitivities. The groups of distinct clinical sensitivities showed no corresponding differences in their cellular gamma-H2AX response. In addition, several samples were lost, mainly due to the long transportation period before being treated in our lab. To render this method usable for clinical applications, several changes were made: after improving sample viability, speed was increased by automation of image acquisition (Metasystem) and gamma-H2AX focus scoring (freeware CellProfiler). This technique was able to detect doses as low as 0.005 Gy and gave similar results to manual focus scoring. The possibility of discriminating different lymphocyte subsets (CD4, CD8 and CD19) during analysis was added to identify among the lymphocyte subsets the one producing more

  16. Radiation-induced temporary partial epilation in the pig: a biological indicator of radiation dose and dose distribution to the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieber, V.K.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation damage to the matrix cells of actively growing hairs can result in transient epilation in the pig, the severity of which can be assessed using a visual scoring system. The extent of hair loss was found to be dose-dependent for single doses in the range 6 - 14 Gy for 250 kV X rays. The ED 50 for detectable hair loss was 9.83 ± 0.58 Gy whilst that for the loss of > 50% of hairs was 13.78 ± 0.90 Gy. The system is simple, non-invasive and would appear to have considerable potential for use in biological dosimetry for high exposures that are likely to require local treatment. (author)

  17. Dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Urata, Yoshishige; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells (CDCs), a mixed cell population grown from heart tissues. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0, 10, 50 and 250 mGy γ-rays for 7 days and atrial tissues were collected for experiments 24 hours after last exposure. The number of CDCs was significantly decreased by daily exposure to over 250 mGy. Interestingly, daily exposure to over 50 mGy significantly decreased the c-kit expression and telomerase activity, increased 53BP1 foci in the nuclei of CDCs. However, CD90 expression and growth factors production in CDCs were not significantly changed even after daily exposure to 250 mGy. We further evaluated the reversibility of radiation-induced injury in CDCs at 1 week and 3 weeks after a single exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays. The number and growth factors production of CDCs were soon recovered at 1 week. However, the increased expression of CD90 were retained at 1 week, but recovered at 3 weeks. Moreover, the decreased expression of c-kit, impaired telomerase activity, and increased 53BP1 foci were poorly recovered even at 3 weeks. These data may help us to find the most sensitive and reliable bio-parameter(s) for evaluating radiation-induced injury in CDCs. PMID:28098222

  18. Predicting radiation effects on the development of leukemic stem cells based on studies of leukemias induced by high- and low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirouchi, Tokuhisa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important causes of radiation-induced cancers, particularly leukemia, is gene mutations resulting from single and double strand breaks in the DNA. Tanaka et al. (2003) reported life shortening in specific pathogen free male and female B6C3F1 mice continuously exposed to γ rays at a low dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/d for 400 days from 8 weeks of age. Early death due to cancer, mostly malignant lymphomas, was observed in both sexes. A significant increase in the incidence of myeloid leukemia, resulting in early death, was also reported in males. It is expected however, that at 20 mGy/22 h/d, which is equivalent to a dose of 15 μGy/min, DNA strand breaks induced in these cells are repaired soon after they occur. Murine leukemias induced by high-dose-rate radiation were also found in males, and 80% of the mice with leukemia had hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 around the PU.1 gene and they appeared to be derived from DNA strand breaks. Majority of these leukemia showing hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 revealed point mutations in the remaining alleles resulting in PU.1 inactivation, which was reported to be related to leukemogenesis. These point mutations are assumed to be independent of DNA strand breaks that occur immediately after irradiation, as they appear at later time after irradiation. This review discusses the effect of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and also mutagenesis induced independently of DNA strand breaks in hematopoietic cells contributing to the development of the first leukemic stem cell. (author)

  19. Lumbosacral plexus delineation, dose distribution, and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunio M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutahir Tunio,1 Mushabbab Al Asiri,1 Yasser Bayoumi,2 Ali Abdullah O Balbaid,1 Majed AlHameed,3 Stanciu Laura Gabriela,1 Ahmad Amir O Ali1 1Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Neurology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: To evaluate the dose distribution to the lumbosacral plexus (LSP and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP in patients with cervical cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy.Materials and methods: After meeting eligibility criteria, 50 patients with cervical cancer were selected who were treated with IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and the LSP was contoured. Mean volume; percentages of LSP volume absorbing 40, 50, 55, and 60 Gy (V30, V40, V50, V55, and V60 and point doses (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, and P10; and RILSP incidence were calculated.Results: At 60 months of follow-up, four patients (8% were found to have grade 2/3 RILSP. The mean maximal LSP dose in patients with RILSP was 59.6 Gy compared with 53.9 Gy in patients without RILSP (control; P=0.04. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 in patients with RILSP versus control were 61.8% versus 52.8%, 44.4% versus 27.7%, 8.0% versus 0.3% and 1.8% versus 0%, respectively (P=0.01, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively.Conclusion: The delineation of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce the risk for RILSP. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 for LSP should be less than 55%, 30%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively; however, further studies are warranted.Keywords: cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, lumbosacral plexus delineation, radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy, dosimetric analysis

  20. Radiation induced wheat-rye chromosomal translocations in triticale. Optimizing the dose using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Comeau, A.; Chen, Q.; Collin, J.; St-Pierre, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was utilized to monitor the level of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co source) in their ability to cause intra- and intergeneric chromosomal aberrations in triticale seeds. Seeds were irradiated with 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy doses. The root growth of irradiated seeds was greatly inhibited at 200 Gy and above. Various types of aberrations including wheat-rye, wheat-wheat, rye-rye, wheat-rye-wheat, rye-wheat-rye translocations and acentric fragments with or without translocations were observed. There was a consistent increase in proportion of aberrations per cell with an increase in radiation dose. It was concluded that for an optimal level of chromosomal translocation and least number of acentric fragments, a 20 Gy dose was quite sufficient for inducing a desirable level of wheat-rye chromosomal translocations. The excellent efficiency and importance of utilizing FISH in such studies of alien-introgression via chromosomal translocations are discussed. (author)

  1. Radiation induced wheat-rye chromosomal translocations in triticale. Optimizing the dose using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, F. [Brandon Univ., Manitoba (Canada); Comeau, A.; Chen, Q.; Collin, J.; St-Pierre, C.A.

    2000-03-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was utilized to monitor the level of ionizing radiation ({sup 60}Co source) in their ability to cause intra- and intergeneric chromosomal aberrations in triticale seeds. Seeds were irradiated with 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy doses. The root growth of irradiated seeds was greatly inhibited at 200 Gy and above. Various types of aberrations including wheat-rye, wheat-wheat, rye-rye, wheat-rye-wheat, rye-wheat-rye translocations and acentric fragments with or without translocations were observed. There was a consistent increase in proportion of aberrations per cell with an increase in radiation dose. It was concluded that for an optimal level of chromosomal translocation and least number of acentric fragments, a 20 Gy dose was quite sufficient for inducing a desirable level of wheat-rye chromosomal translocations. The excellent efficiency and importance of utilizing FISH in such studies of alien-introgression via chromosomal translocations are discussed. (author)

  2. Thermal annealing of high dose radiation induced damage at room temperature in alkali halides. Stored energy, thermoluminiscence and colouration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible relation between stored energy, thermoluminiscence and colour centre annealing in gamma and electron irradiated alkali halides is studied. Thermoluminiscence occurs at temperature higher than the temperature at which the main stored energy peak appears. No stored energy release is detected in additively coloured KCl samples. Plastic deformation and doping with Ca and Sr induce a stored energy spectrum different from the spectrum observed in pure and as cleaved samples, but the amount of stored energy does not change for a given irradiation dose. Capacity of alkali halides to sotore energy by irradiation increases as the cation size decreases. It appears that most of the observed release is not related to annealing processes of the radiation induced anion Frenkel pairs. The existence of damage in the cation sublattice with which this energy release might be related is considered. (auth.)

  3. 1090 nm infrared radiation at close to threshold dose induces cataract with a time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per G

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether infrared radiation (IRR)-induced cataract is instant or is associated with a time delay between the exposure and the onset of lens light scattering after an exposure to just above threshold dose. Six-weeks-old albino Sprague-Dawley female rats were unilaterally exposed to 197 W/cm2 IRR at 1090 nm within the dilated pupil. In the first experiment, the animals were exposed with four exposure times of 5, 8, 13 and 20 second, respectively. At 24 hr after exposure, the light scattering in both exposed and contralateral not exposed lenses was measured. Based on the first experiment, four postexposure time groups were exposed unilaterally to 1090 nm IRR of 197 W/cm2 for 8 second. At 6, 18, 55 and 168 hr after exposure, the light scattering in both lenses was measured. A 197 W/cm2 IRR-induced light scattering in the lens with exposures of at least 8 second. Further, after exposure to IRR of 197 W/cm2 for 8 second, the light-scattering increase in the lens was delayed approximately 16 hr after the exposure. There is a time delay between the exposure and the onset of cataract after exposure to close to threshold dose implicating that either near IRR cataract is photochemical or there is a time delay in the biological expression of thermally induced damage. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Radiation sources providing increased UVA/UVB ratios induce photoprotection dependent on the UVA dose in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Vivienne E; Domanski, Diane; Slater, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In studies involving mice in which doses of UVA (320-400 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm) radiation were administered alone or combined sequentially, we observed a protective effect of UVA against UVB-induced erythema/edema and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The UVA immunoprotection was mediated by the induction of the stress enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the skin, protection of the cutaneous Th1 cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-12 and inhibition of the UVB-induced expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-10. In this study, we seek evidence for an immunological waveband interaction when UVA and UVB are administered concurrently to hairless mice as occurs during sunlight exposure in humans. A series of spectra providing varying ratios of UVA/UVB were developed, with the UVA ratio increased to approximately 3.5 times the UVA component in solar simulated UV (SSUV). We report that progressively increasing the UVA component of the radiation while maintaining a constant UVB dose resulted in a reduction of both the erythema/edema reaction and the degree of systemic immunosuppression, as measured as contact hypersensitivity. The UVA-enhanced immunoprotection was abrogated in mice treated with a specific HO enzyme inhibitor. UVA-enhanced radiation also upregulated the expression of cutaneous IFN-gamma and IL-12 and inhibited expression of both IL-6 and IL-10, compared with the activity of SSUV. The results were consistent with the previously characterized mechanisms of photoprotection by the UVA waveband alone and suggest that the UVA component of solar UV may have beneficial properties for humans.

  5. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  6. Radiation-induced liver disease after stereotactic body radiotherapy for small hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical and dose-volumetric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jinhong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, So Yeon; Cho, Byungchul; Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Su Ssan; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Sang-wook; Ahn, Seung Do

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and dose–volumetric parameters that predict the risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) for patients with small, unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Between March 2007 and December 2009, 92 patients with HCC treated with SBRT were reviewed for RILD within 3 months of completing treatment. RILD was evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A dose of 10–20 Gy (median, 15 Gy) per fraction was given over 3–4 consecutive days for a total dose of 30–60 Gy (median, 45 Gy). The following clinical and dose–volumetric parameters were examined: age, gender, Child-Pugh class, presence of hepatitis B virus, gross tumor volume, normal liver volume, radiation dose, fraction size, mean dose to the normal liver, and normal liver volumes receiving from < 5 Gy to < 60 Gy (in increments of 5 Gy). Seventeen (18.5%) of the 92 patients developed grade 2 or worse RILD after SBRT (49 patients in grade 1, 11 in grade 2, and 6 in ≥ grade 3). On univariate analysis, Child-Pugh class was identified as a significant clinical parameter, while normal liver volume and normal liver volumes receiving from < 15 Gy to < 60 Gy were the significant dose–volumetric parameters. Upon multivariate analysis, only Child-Pugh class was a significant parameter for predicting grade 2 or worse RILD. The Child-Pugh B cirrhosis was found to have a significantly greater susceptibility to the development of grade 2 or worse RILD after SBRT in patients with small, unresectable HCC. Additional efforts aimed at testing other models to predict the risk of RILD in a large series of HCC patients treated with SBRT are needed

  7. Radiation-induced heart disease due to intrathonacic tumor radiotherapy of a single dose to the rabbits' heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weibing; Feng Yan; Chen Jiayi; Luo Quanyong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the changes of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) in the rabbits irradiated in clinical related dose, and to evaluate the apoptosis and hypoxia in the irradiated heart by the new scintigraphic agents of 99 Tc m -HL91 and 99 Tc m -Annexin V of heart SPECT. Methods: Tenty-four New Zealand white rabbits 4-month old and 2-3 kg by weight were divided into two groups. Group 1 (clinical related dose group): 16 irradiated by a single close from 0 to 18 Gy. Group 2 (high dose group): 8 irradiated dose from 22 to 80 Gy. The serum cTnI/CKMB, ECG, and heart SPECT(using 99 Tc m -MIBI, 99 Tc m -HL91 and 99 Tc m -Annexin V as agents) were detected before and after irradiation. The animals were followed for 5 months. Then biopsy of rabbit heart was performed and pathologic examination was made by H.E. stain. Results: In the 16 rabbits of clinical related dose group, none died of RIHD. Whereas 2 rabbits died of RIHD in the high dose group. One died of myocardial infarction and the other of congestive heart failure. According to the Stewart introduced heart lesion grading system, of the clinical close ann, there were moderate in 1 rabbit, minimal in 14; and of the high dose ann, it was severe in 2, marked in 1, moderate in 5. The parallel relation was observed between the ECG results and the pathological changes (χ 2 =0.08, P=0.771). Serum value of cTnI, was elevated at the 12th hour after irradiation reaching the peak and maintained for 4 months. However, it came down in the 5th month. The difference of serum cTnI value before and after radiation was statistically significant. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy tested by heart SPECT ( 99 Tc m -MIBI) showed defects was present in all irradiated rabbits. The relationship between the defects and radiation dose or between the defects and the real RIHD was uncertain. The SPECT images displayed that 99 Tc m -HL91 and 99m Tc-Annexin V did not accumulate in the irradiated heart. Conclusions: No serious damage is

  8. The evolutionary reserve cell concept and model of cellular response induced by low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitkovsky, D.M.; Talyzina, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    The model is based on the concept of programmed initiation of genetic damage in sub-populations of specific evolutionary reserve cells (ERC). The model quantitatively predicts a dose response of genetic lesions at low dose range and furnishes an explanation of the minimum observed in the dose-response curve at doses corresponding to one (on the average) event of energy deposition per ERC. The complex shape of the dose-response curve is demonstrated to result from superposition of processes in different sub-populations within the exposed cell population (at low doses mainly in ERC). Programmed initiation of genetic lesions in ERC requires two hits to cell membrane and probably, at the same time, to the cell nucleus. The equation for dicentric yield in human lymphocytes as a function of dose describes the experimental observations rather well. (Author)

  9. Radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Harumi

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active process of gene-directed cellular self-destruction that can be induced in many cell types via numerous physiological and pathological stimuli. We found that interphasedeath of thymocytes is a typical apoptosis showing the characteristic features of apoptosis including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation. Moderate dose of radiation induces extensive apoptosis in rapidly proliferating cell population such as the epithelium of intestinal crypt. Recent reports indicate that the ultimate form of radiation-induced mitotic death in several cells is also apoptosis. One of the hallmarks of apoptosis is the enzymatic internucleosomal degradation of chromatin DNA. We identified an endonuclease responsible for the radiation-induced DNA degradation in rat thymocytes. The death-sparing effects of interrupting RNA and protein synthesis suggested a cell genetic program for apoptosis. Apoptosis of thymocytes initiated by DNA damage, such as radiation and radio mimetic substance, absolutely requires the protein of p53 cancer suppresser gene. The cell death induced by glucocorticoid, or aging, has no such requirement. Expression of oncogene bcl-2 rescues cells from the apoptosis. Massive apoptosis in radiosensitive cells induced by higher dose radiation may be fatal. It is suggested that selective apoptotic elimination of cells would play an important role for protection against carcinogenesis and malformation through removal of cells with unrepaired radiation-induced DNA damages. Data to evaluate the significance of apoptosis in the radiation risk are still poor. Further research should be done in order to clarify the roles of the cell death on the acute and late effects of irradiation. (author)

  10. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  11. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 02: Imaging dose distributions through the detection of radiation-induced acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickling, Susannah; Lei, Hao; Hobson, Maritza; Leger, Pierre; Wang, Xueding; El Naqa, Issam [University of Michigan, McGill University, McGill University , University of Michigan, University of Michigan/McGill University (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is an emerging technique that images the dose deposited within an object following linac irradiation by detecting acoustic waves induced via the photoacoustic effect. This work shows that XACT images can be formed in soft-tissue equivalent material and that dosimetric information can be extracted from such images. Methods: Acoustic waves induced in a water tank following irradiation by a 10 MV flattening filter free photon beam were detected with an immersion ultrasound transducer at 60 angles surrounding the radiation field. A back-projection algorithm was used to reconstruct an XACT image from the detected transducer signals. Profiles extracted from XACT images were compared to profiles measured with ion chambers as per the current clinical protocol. Results: XACT images were successfully formed of simple 4 cm × 4 cm and 6 cm × 3 cm fields, as well as of more complicated multi-leaf collimator defined fields. For the 6 cm × 3 cm field, 74% and 87% of the XACT profile points in the 6 cm and 3 cm dimensions, respectively, passed a 7% / 4 mm gamma test when compared to ion chamber measurements. In a complicated puzzle piece shaped field, 86% of the pixels in an extracted profile passed a 7% / 4 mm gamma test. Conclusions: XACT is capable of imaging the dose distribution delivered by a variety of field sizes and shapes in water, and is a viable technique for both water tank and in vivo dosimetry.

  12. Labour cost of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.; Lockett, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to optimise capital expenditure on measures to protect workers against radiation it would be useful to have a means to measure radiation dose in money terms. Because labour has to be employed to perform radiation work there must be some relationship between the wages paid and the doses received. Where the next increment of radiation dose requires additional labour to be recruited the cost will at least equal the cost of the extra labour employed. This paper examines some of the factors which affect the variability of the labour cost of radiation dose and notes that for 'in-plant' exposures the current cost per rem appears to be significantly higher than values quoted in ICRP Publication 22. An example is given showing how this concept may be used to determine the capital it is worth spending on installed plant to prevent regular increments of radiation dose to workers. (author)

  13. Radiation doses from residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo; Fujita, Shoichiro; Harley, John H.

    1987-01-01

    requires knowing the location of the person to within about 200 m from the time of the explosion to a few weeks afterwards. This is an effort that might be comparable to the present shielding study for survivors. The sizes of the four exposed groups are relatively small; however, the number has been estimated only for those exposed to fallout in the Nishiyama district of Nagasaki. Okajima listed the population of Nishiyama as about 600 at the time of the bomb. No figures are available for the other three groups. The individual exposures from residual radiation may not be significant compared with the direct radiation at the time of the bomb. On the other hand, individuals with potential exposure from these sources are dubious candidates for inclusion in a cohort that was presumably not exposed. For comparison with organ doses estimated in other parts of this program, the exposure estimates are converted to absorbed dose in tissue. The first conversion of exposure to absorbed dose in air uses the factor rad in air 0.87 x exposure in R. UNSCEAR uses an average combined factor of 0.7 to convert absorbed dose in air to absorbed dose in tissue for the whole body. This factor accounts for the change in material (air to tissue) and for backscatter and the shielding afforded by other tissues of the body. No allowance for shielding by buildings has been included here. The cumulative fallout exposures given above become absorbed doses in tissue of 12 to 24 rad for Nagasaki and 0.6 to 2 rad for Hiroshima. The cumulative exposures from induced radioactivity become absorbed doses in tissue of 18 to 24 rad for Nagasaki and about 50 rad for Hiroshima. (author)

  14. Changes of mitochondrial structure, ATPase and Ca2+ concentration in spermatogenic cells of mouse testes induced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhicheng; Liu Shuchun; Li Pengwu; Kang Shunai; Liang Shuo; Zhao Gang; Gong Shouliang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the ultrastructure, ATPase activity and Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ]i) of mitochondria in the sperematogenic cells of mouse testes 3-24 h after low dose radiation with 0.025-0.200 Gy X-rays, and illuminate the effects of mitochondrion structure and relative biological function on apoptosis. Methods: The ultrastructure changes of mitochondria in the spermatogenic cells were observed with transmission electron microscope; the ATPase activity was measured with protein enzymic method; [Ca 2+ ]i was measured indirectly by flow cytometry with Fluo-3 probes. Results: The mitochondria swelled and vacuolizated, and their cristae were broken in the spermatogonia and spermatocytes 12 h after irradiation, and their nuclei were karyopyknosis, the acrosomal vesicle structure was ambiguity, the membrane structure was unclear, and the mitochondria in spermatids were vacuolization. The activities of Na + -K + -ATPase in mouse testis tissue 12 h after irradiated with 0.025-0.200 Gy decreased compared with those with 0 Gy, the Na + -K + -ATPase activities of the cells irradiated with 0.05-0.200 Gy decreased significantly compared with those with 0 Gy (P 2+ -ATPase of the cells irradiated with 0.025-0.200 Gy decreased significantly compared with those with 0 Gy (P 2+ ]i in mouse testis spermatogenic cells had similar dose-response relationship, [Ca 2+ ]i after irradiated with 0.075 Gy decreased compared with those with 0 Gy (P + -K + -ATPase in mouse testis tissues decreased obviously compared with those at 0 h (P 2+ -ATPase in mouse testis tissues increased slightly at 3 h, then decreased at 6-24 h compared with those at 0 h (P 2+ ]i in mouse testis spermatogenic cells had similar time course-response relationship, [Ca 2+ ]i at 12 h decreased significantly compared with at 0 h (P 2+ ]i induced by low dose radiation. (authors)

  15. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  16. Study of gamma radiation induced damages and variation of oxygen enhancement ratio with radiation dose using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairy, R.K.; Yerol Narayana; Bhat, N.N.; Anjaria, K.B.; Sreedevi, B.; Sapra, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to quantify Oxygen Enhancement Ratio (OER) and variation of OER as a function of dose with experimental and theoretical formulations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7, X2180 and rad 52. The study confirms that, the variation of OER with dose depends upon type of cell and repair proficiency of cells. A theoretical model has been formulated to estimate OER values. With the help of this model, OER value for any dose can be calculated in the exponential region of the survival curve without actually extending the experiment in that dose region. (author)

  17. Radiation-Induced Color Centers in LiF for Dosimetry at High Absorbed Dose Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Ellis, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Color centers formed by irradiation of optically clear crystals of pure LiF may be analyzed spectrophotometrically for dosimetry in the absorbed dose range from 102 to 107 Gy. Routine monitoring of intense electron beams is an important application. Both 6LiF and 7LiF forms are commercially...... available, and when used with filters as albedo dosimeters in pairs, they provide discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray doses....

  18. Radiation-induced myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaenshirt, H [Heidelberg Univ. (F.R. Germany). Neurologische Klinik

    1975-10-01

    12 cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after /sup 60/Co teletherapy are reported on. Among these were 10 thoracal lesions, one cerviothoracal lesion, and one lesion of the medulla oblongata. In 9 cases, Hodgkin's disease had been the primary disease, tow patients had been irradiated because of suspected vertebral metastases of cancer of the breast, and one patient had suffered from a glomus tumour of the petrous bone. The spinal doses had exceeded the tolerance doses recommended in the relevant literature. There was no close correlation between the radiation dose and the course of the disease. The latency periods between the end of the radiotherapy and the onset of the neurological symptons varied from 6 to 16 mouths and were very constant in 7 cases with 6 to 9 months. The segmental height of the lesion corresponded to the level of irradiation. The presenting symptons of radiation-induced myelopathy are buruing dysaesthesias and Brown-Sequard's paralysis which may develop into transverse lesion of the cord with paraplegia still accompanied by dissociated perception disorders. The disease developed intermittently. Disturbances of the bladder function are frequent. The fluid is normal in most cases. Myelographic examinations were made in 8 cases. 3 cases developed into stationary cases exhibiting. Brown-Sequard syndrome, while 9 patients developed transverse lesion of the cord with paraplegia. 3 patients have died; antopsy findings are given for two of these. In the pathogenesis of radiation-induced myelopathy, the vascular factor is assumed to be of decisive importance.

  19. Dose response relationships and analysis of primary processes of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    1977-02-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 220 kV X-rays, 3 MeV electrons and 15 MeV neutrons. The frequency of dicentric, acentric and atypical chromosomes and the exhange aberrations were measured and dose effect curves were constructed. The aim is to prepare the chromosome analysis to a biological dosimetry. The aberration findings could be adapted to the linear-quadrativ model y = c+ αD + βD 2 . With increasing LET the quantity lambda increased which is a measure for the share of the linear and quadratical components of the dose effect obtained. In case of electrons the RBE-values increased with increasing doses. In the case of neutrons they had their maximum in the low dose range. The feed back distances which lead to formation of primary lesions are for X-rays and electrons approximately 1 μm, for neutrons 1.7 μm. In a fractionation experiment with X-rays, the time of formation of exchange aberrations in radiation-induced primary breaks was measured. The number of dicentric chromosomes decreased with increasing time, while the intercellular distribution was not changed. The number of primary breaks decreasing per temporal interval is proportional to the number of the existing primary breaks. The average feed back time during which the primary breaks lead to induction of dicentric chromosomes, is 110 min. In order to determine the correspondence of the results of in-vivo and in-vitro experiments 15 patients and their blood were irradiated with 60 C-γ-rays. No significant differences were measured. (AJ) [de

  20. Genome-wide screen of DNA methylation changes induced by low dose X-ray radiation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzi Wang

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in non-targeted effects of radiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate global hypomethylation and promoter hypermethylation of particular genes induced by low dose radiation (LDR. Thirty male BALB/c mice were divided into 3 groups: control, acutely exposed (0.5 Gy X-rays, and chronic exposure for 10 days (0.05Gy/d×10d. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and MeDIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were used to study methylation profiles. DNMT1 and MBD2 expression was determined by qPCR and western blot assays. Methylation and expression of Rad23b and Ddit3 were determined by bisulfate sequencing primers (BSP and qPCR, respectively. The results show that LDR induced genomic hypomethylation in blood 2 h postirraditaion, but was not retained at 1-month. DNMT1 and MBD2 were downregulated in a tissue-specific manner but did not persist. Specific hypermethylation was observed for 811 regions in the group receiving chronic exposure, which covered almost all key biological processes as indicated by GO and KEGG pathway analysis. Eight hypermethylated genes (Rad23b, Tdg, Ccnd1, Ddit3, Llgl1, Rasl11a, Tbx2, Scl6a15 were verified by MeDIP-qPCR. Among them, Rad23b and Ddit3 gene displayed tissue-specific methylation and downregulation, which persisted for 1-month postirradiation. Thus, LDR induced global hypomethylation and tissue-specific promoter hypermethylation of particular genes. Promoter hypermethylation, rather than global hypomethylation, was relatively stable. Dysregulation of methylation might be correlated with down-regulation of DNMT1 and MBD2, but much better understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process will require further study.

  1. Chromosome aberration yields in human lymphocytes induced by fractionated doses of x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purrott, R.J.; Reeder, E.

    1976-01-01

    Unstimulated (G 0 ) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed at 37degC to doses of 200 or 500 rad of X-rays delivered in two equal fractions. The dose fractions were separated by intervals of up to 7 h in the 200 rad study and up to 48 h for 500 rad. In both studies the mean levels of dicentrics and total unstable aberrations began to decline when fractions were delivered with intervals of greater than 2 h. With 200 rad the yield had decreased to an additive baseline (i.e. equal to only twice the yield of a single 100-rad fraction) by an interval of 4 h. Following 500 rad the yield declined until 8 h and then remained 20% above the expected additive baseline even when 48 h separated the fractions. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed. In a second experiment PHA stimulated lymphocyte cultures were exposed to 2 doses of 125 rad of X-rays up to 7 h apart in an attempt to demonstrate the late peak in aberration yield originally reported by Lane. Control cultures received unsplit doses of 250 rad at the time of the corresponding second 125-rad fraction. No evidence of a late peak in dicentric yield was observed. The yield remained approximately the same irrespective of the time interval between fractions but these split dose yields were significantly different from the accompanying unsplit controls

  2. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor

  3. Induced Mitogenic Activity in AML-12 Mouse Hepatocytes Exposed to Low-dose Ultra-Wideband Electromagnetic Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Tchounwou

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra–wideband (UWB technology has increased with the use of various civilian and military applications. In the present study, we hypothesized that low-dose UWB electromagnetic radiation (UWBR could elicit a mitogenic effect in AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, in vitro. To test this hypothesis, we exposed AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, to UWBR in a specially constructed gigahertz transverse electromagnetic mode (GTEM cell. Cells were exposed to UWBR for 2 h at a temperature of 23°C, a pulse width of 10 ns, a repetition rate of 1 kHz, and field strength of 5-20 kV/m. UWB pulses were triggered by an external pulse generator for UWBR exposure but were not triggered for the sham exposure. We performed an MTT Assay to assess cell viability for UWBR-treated and sham-exposed hepatocytes. Data from viability studies indicated a time-related increase in hepatocytes at time intervals from 8-24 h post exposure. UWBR exerted a statistically significant (p < 0.05 dose-dependent response in cell viability in both serum-treated and serum free medium (SFM -treated hepatocytes. Western blot analysis of hepatocyte lysates demonstrated that cyclin A protein was induced in hepatocytes, suggesting that increased MTT activity after UWBR exposure was due to cell proliferation. This study indicates that UWBR has a mitogenic effect on AML-12 mouse hepatocytes and implicates a possible role for UWBR in hepatocarcinoma.

  4. Potential pre-cataractous markers induced by low-dose radiation effects in cultured human lens cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E.; McNamara, M.; Bjornstad, K.; Chang, P.

    The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. Recent evidence indicates that exposure to relatively low doses of space radiation are associated with an increased incidence and early appearance of human cataracts (Cucinotta et al., Radiat. Res. 156:460-466, 2001). Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the early responses of various late-responding tissues into our understanding and estimation of radiation risk for space travel. In addition, these studies may contribute to the development of countermeasures for the early lenticular changes, in order to prevent the late sequelae. Radiation damage to the lens is not life threatening but, if severe, can affect vision unless surgically corrected with synthetic lens replacement. The lens, however, may be a sensitive detector of radiation effects for other cells of ectodermal origin in the body for which there are not currently clear endpoints of low-dose radiation effects. We have investigated the dose-dependent expression of several radiation-responsive endpoints using our in vitro model of differentiating human lens epithelial cells (Blakely et al., Investigative Ophthalmology &Visual Sciences, 41(12):3898-3907, 2000). We have investigated radiation effects on several gene families that include, or relate to, DNA damage, cytokines, cell-cycle regulators, cell adhesion molecules, cell cytoskeletal function and apoptotic cell death. In this paper we will summarize some of our dose-dependent data from several radiation types, and describe the model of molecular and cellular events that we believe may be associated with precataractous events in the human lens after radiation exposure. This work was supported by NASA Grant #T-965W.

  5. Alzheimer ’s Disease: Possible Mechanisms Behind Neurohormesis Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, scientists reported that human exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (CT scans of the brain) might relieve symptoms of both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). The findings were unbelievable for those who were not familiar with neurohormesis. X-ray stimulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against neurodegenerative diseases was the mechanism proposed by those authors. Now, some more recent studies performed in the field of neurobiological research confirm that low levels of stress can produce protective responses against the pathogenic processes. This paper outlines possible protective consequences of LDR in preventing the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms such as restoring the myelin sheath and preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. Focal demyelination is frequently reported in the proximity of beta-amyloid plaques within neocortex. Extracellular accumulation of amyloid is among well-characterized pathological changes in AD. It should be noted that LDR has been shown to contribute to the regeneration and functional recovery after transverse peripheral nerve injury (through inducing increased production of VEGF and GAP-43), which advances both the axonal regeneration and myelination. Another mechanism which is possibly involved is preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. While high doses can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation, substantial evidence now indicates that LDR can mitigate tissue damage through antioxidant defenses. Although adult neurogenesis has been reported to be beneficial for the regeneration of nervous system, some studies demonstrate that neurogenesis increases in AD brains. In spite of these reports, cellular therapy is introduced as a promising strategy for AD, and hence, LDR can affect the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Although such mechanisms are not fully known yet, it is hoped

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors mitigate collagen synthesis induced by a single dose of radiation to the whole thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kma, L.; Gao, F.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.; Jacobs, E.R.; Medhora, M.

    2012-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to use angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to mitigate the increase in lung collagen synthesis that is induced by irradiation to the lung, which could result from accidental exposure or radiological terrorism. Rats (WAG/RijCmcr) were given a single dose of 13 Gy (dose rate of 1.43 Gy/min) of X-irradiation to the thorax. Three structurally-different ACE inhibitors, captopril, enalapril and fosinopril were provided in drinking water beginning 1 week after irradiation. Rats that survived acute pneumonitis (at 6-12 weeks) were evaluated monthly for synthesis of lung collagen. Other endpoints included breathing rate, wet to dry lung weight ratio, and analysis of lung structure. Treatment with captopril (145-207 mg/m 2 /day) or enalapril (19-28 mg/m 2 /day), but not fosinopril (19-28 mg/m 2 /day), decreased morbidity from acute pneumonitis. Lung collagen in the surviving irradiated rats was increased over that of controls by 7 months after irradiation. This increase in collagen synthesis was not observed in rats treated with any of the three ACE inhibitors. Analysis of the lung morphology at 7 months supports the efficacy of ACE inhibitors against radiation-induced fibrosis. The effectiveness of fosinopril against fibrosis, but not against acute pneumonitis, suggests that pulmonary fibrosis may not be a simple consequence of injury during acute pneumonitis. In summary, three structurally-different ACE inhibitors mitigate the increase in collagen synthesis 7 months following irradiation of the whole thorax and do so, even when therapy is started one week after irradiation. (author)

  7. Radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohnen, M.; Kemper, J.; Moedder, U.; Moebes, O.; Pawelzik, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology. (orig.)

  8. Are low radiation doses Dangerous?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Lima, O.; Cornejo, N.

    1996-01-01

    In the last few years the answers to this questions has been affirmative as well as negative from a radiation protection point of view low doses of ionizing radiation potentially constitute an agent causing stochasting effects. A lineal relation without threshold is assumed between dose and probability of occurrence of these effects . Arguments against the danger of probability of occurrence of these effects. Arguments again the danger of low dose radiation are reflected in concepts such as Hormesis and adaptive response, which are phenomena that being studied at present

  9. Quantification of radiation-induced epilation in the pig: a biological indicator of radiation dose to the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieber, V.K.; Wilkinson, J.; Aluri, G.R.; Bywaters, T.

    1993-01-01

    Epilation in the pig has been quantified following single exposures of X-rays in the range 1.0-25.0Gy. Hair loss was dose-dependent for exposures between 1.0 and 15.0 Gy and this response was linearly related to dose. No further increase in hair loss was observed for doses ≥ 15.0 Gy as 20-30% of the hairs remained. It was assumed that these hairs were not actively growing at the time of irradiation and did, therefore, not express damage. The ED 50 for the loss of ≥ 30% of hairs was 3.8 Gy whilst that for the loss of ≥ 50% of hairs was 6.8 Gy and for the loss of ≥ 67% of hairs was 12.5 Gy. There was ± 7% hair loss per Gy exposure for doses between 0.0 and 15.0 Gy. Quantification of hair loss provided a more sensitive assay than the use of visual scoring systems. Hair loss was detectable within 4 weeks of irradiation. The system is simple, non-invasive and appears to have considerable potential for use as a biological dosemeter. (Author)

  10. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Di Trano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author) [es

  11. Recent results on the linearity of the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced mutations in human cells by low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1987-01-01

    Five studies made by various authors in the last years are discussed, which are significant in that the response of human cells to low-dose irradiation is determined directly and not by extrapolation, and which also provide information on the mutagenic effects of low radiation doses. The results of these studies do not indicate any other than a linear response for induction of mutations by low-dose irradiation, nor are there any reasons observable for assuming the existence of a threshold dose. It is very likely therefore that cancer initiation at the low dose level also is characterized by a linear relationship. Although threshold dose levels cannot generally be excluded, and maybe are only too low to be detected by experiment, there is no plausible biophysical argument for assuming the existence of such microdose threshold. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Study on dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced DNA damage using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Jiang Enhai; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan; Zhao Yongcheng; Fan Feiyue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore a new, simple and quick radiation biodosimeter, which can be applied to estimate biological dose in case of radiation accident. Methods: DNA double-strand break were detected using neutral single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), and all the indexes of comet assay including HDNA%, TDNA%, CL, TL, TM, and OTM were analyzed by CASP (Comet Assay Software Project). The curve of dose-effect was fitted using SPSS 12.0 software. Results: Statistically significant dose-effect relationships were observed in all the indexes of comet assay, OTM was superior to other indexes. Conclusions: Application of neutral comet assay combined with CASP analysis could serve as a new radiation biodosimeter. (authors)

  13. Radiation dose during angiographic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie, Ch.; Rasuli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The use of angiographic procedures is becoming more prevalent as new techniques and equipment are developed. There have been concerns in the scientific community about the level of radiation doses received by patients, and indirectly by staff, during some of these radiological procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of radiation dose from angiographic procedures to patient at the Ottawa Hospital, General Campus. Radiation dose measurements, using Thermo-Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), were performed on more than 100 patients on various procedures. The results show that while the patient dose from the great majority of angiographic procedures is less than 2 Gy, a significant number of procedures, especially interventional procedures may have doses greater than 2 Gy and may lead to deterministic effects. (author)

  14. Calculating radiation exposure and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods and procedures used to calculate the radiation exposures and radiation doses to designated employees of the Olympic Dam Project. Each of the three major exposure pathways are examined. These are: gamma irradiation, radon daughter inhalation and radioactive dust inhalation. A further section presents ICRP methodology for combining individual pathway exposures to give a total dose figure. Computer programs used for calculations and data storage are also presented briefly

  15. Radiation. Doses, effect, risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapirev, E.; Todorov, P.

    1994-12-01

    This book outlines in a popular form the topic of ionizing radiation impacts on living organisms. It contains data gathered by ICRP for a period of 35 years. The essential dosimetry terms and units are presented. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are described. Possible biological radiation effects and diseases as a consequence of external and internal irradiation at normal and accidental conditions are considered. An assessment of genetic risk for human populations is presented and the concept of 'acceptable risk' is discussed

  16. Adaptive Response to ionizing Radiation Induced by Low Doses of Gamma Rays in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1994-01-01

    When cells are exposed to low doses of a mutagenic or clastogenic agents, they often become less sensitive to the effects of a higher does administered subsequently. Such adaptive responses were first described in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells to low doses of an alkylating agent. Since most of the studies have been carried out with human lymphocytes, it is urgently necessary to study this effect in different cellular systems. Its relation with inherent cellular radiosensitivity and underlying mechanism also remain to be answered. In this study, adaptive response by 1 cGy of gamma rays was investigated in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines which were derived from ataxia telangiectasia homozygote, ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote, and normal individual. Experiments were carried out by delivering 1 cGy followed by 50 cGy of gamma radiation and chromatid breaks were scored as an endpoint. The results indicate that prior exposure to 1 cGy of gamma rays reduces the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher does (50 cGy). The expression of this adaptive response was similar among three cell lines despite of their different radiosensitivity. When 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added after 50 cGy, adaptive responses were abolished in all the tested cell lines. Therefore it is suggested that the adaptive response can be observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Which was first documented through this study. The expression of adaptive response was similar among the cell lines regardless of their radiosensitivity. The elimination of the adaptive response by 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromosomal repair mechanism

  17. Radiation-induced strand-breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks depend predominantly on the dose, oxygen concentration and repair time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.; Miyagi, Y.; Zhang, H.

    1995-01-01

    It has been known for many years that the DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation depends upon the oxygen concentration around the DNA. For example, the number of DNA strand-breaks (SBs) formed per unit dose decreases at low oxygen concentrations, and the number of DNA-protein crosslinks formed per unit dose increases at low oxygen concentrations. If radiation-induced SBs and DPCs are to be useful for detecting and/or quantifying hypoxic cells in solid tumors, the formation of these lesions must depend predominantly on the oxygen concentration around the DNA. All other physical, biological, and physiological factors must either be controllable or have little influence on the assay used to measure these lesions. This paper is a summary of the authors' recent experiments to determine if the radiation-induced SBs and DPCs measured by alkaline elution may be used to estimate the hypoxic fraction or fractional hypoxic volume of solid tumors

  18. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  19. The problem of induced genomic instability in the child organism under conditions of long-term effect of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suskov, I.I.; Kuz'mina, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenological aspects of the genomic instability induced in the descendants of the multi-divided cells having been exposed to the radiation are examined. It is demonstrated that the regularity of the genomic instability induction do not correspond to the classical conception of the radiation genetics (hit principle and target theory). The mechanisms and the biological significance of this new genetic phenomenon in the child organism under conditions of low-intensive effect of small-dose radiation and its connection with the state of health are discussed [ru

  20. Radiation-induced bystander effects in the Atlantic salmon (salmo salar L.) following mixed exposure to copper and aluminum combined with low-dose gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin B. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Aas (Norway); Smith, Richard W. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Heier, Lene Soerlie; Teien, Hans-Christian; Land, Ole Christian; Oughton, Deborah; Salbu, Brit [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Aas (Norway)

    2014-03-15

    Very little is known about the combined effects of low doses of heavy metals and radiation. However, such ''multiple stressor'' exposure is the reality in the environment. In the work reported in this paper, fish were exposed to cobalt 60 gamma irradiation with or without copper or aluminum in the water. Doses of radiation ranged from 4 to 75 mGy delivered over 48 or 6 h. Copper doses ranged from 10 to 80 μg/L for the same time period. The aluminum dose was 250 μg/L. Gills and skin were removed from the fish after exposure and explanted in tissue culture flasks for investigation of bystander effects of the exposures using a stress signal reporter assay, which has been demonstrated to be a sensitive indicator of homeostatic perturbations in cells. The results show complex synergistic interactions of radiation and copper. Gills on the whole produce more toxic bystander signals than skin, but the additivity scores show highly variable results which depend on dose and time of exposure. The impacts of low doses of copper and low doses of radiation are greater than additive, medium levels of copper alone have a similar level of effect of bystander signal toxicity to the low dose. The addition of radiation stress, however, produces clear protective effects in the reporters treated with skin-derived medium. Gill-derived medium from the same fish did not show protective effects. Radiation exposure in the presence of 80 μg/L led to highly variable results, which due to animal variation were not significantly different from the effect of copper alone. The results are stressor type, stressor concentration and time dependent. Clearly co-exposure to radiation and heavy metals does not always lead to simple additive effects. (orig.)

  1. Carboplatin- and cisplatin-induced potentiation of moderate-dose radiation cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, H. J.; Sleijfer, S.; Meijer, C.; Kampinga, H. H.; Konings, A. W. T.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Mulder, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between moderate-dose radiation and cisplatin or carboplatin was studied in a cisplatin-sensitive (GLC(4)) and -resistant (GLC(4)-CDDP) human small-cell lung cancer cell line. Cellular toxicity was analysed under oxic conditions with the microculture tetrazolium assay. For the

  2. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms

  3. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  4. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR. In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3′ -kinase(PI3K-Akt (PI3K/AKT phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy. In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy.

  5. Radiation absorbed doses in cephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.; Stenstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation absorbed doses to different organs in the head and neck region in lateral (LAT) and postero-anterior (PA) cephalography were investigated. The doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) on a tissue equivalent phantom head. Lanthanide screens in speed group 4 were used at 90 and 85 k Vp. A near-focus aluminium dodger was used and the radiation beam was collimated strictly to the face. The maximum entrance dose from LAT was 0.25 mGy and 0.42 mGy from a PA exposure. The doses to the salivary glands ranged between 0.2 and 0.02 mGy at LAT and between 0.15 and 0.04 mGy at PA exposures. The average thyroid gland dose without any shielding was 0.11 mGy (LAT) and 0.06 mGy (PA). When a dodger was used the dose was reduced to 0.07 mGy (LAT). If the thyroid gland was sheilded off, the dose was further reduced to 0.01 mGy and if the thyroid region was collimated out of the primary radiation field the dose was reduced to only 0.005 mGy. (authors)

  6. Cosmic radiation dose in the aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Varga, M.; Planinic, J.; Vekic, B.

    2006-01-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A 320 and ATR 42 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb - Paris - Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 μSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the total dose of 75 μSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to the Japan (24 hours-flight: Zagreb - Frankfurt - Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 μSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude the neutron component curried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data. (author)

  7. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  8. Radiation dose rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts

  9. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  10. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54–56 Gy given in 9–7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003–2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54–56 Gy in 9–7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16–48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10–55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures

  11. Spiral CT and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Czerny, C.; Hojreh, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Kudler, H.; Noebauer, I.; Nowotny, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies in the USA and Europe state that computed tomography (CT) scans compromise only 3-5% of all radiological exams, but they contribute 35-45% of total radiation dose to the patient population. These studies lead to concern by several public authorities. Basis of CT-dose measurements is the computed tomography dose index (CTDI), which was established 1981. Nowadays there are several modifications of the CTDI values, which may lead to confusion. It is suggested to use the standardized CTDI-100 w. value together with the dose length product in all CT-examinations. These values should be printed on all CT-images and allows an evaluation of the individualized patient dose. Nowadays, radiologist's aim must be to work at the lowest maximal diagnostic acceptable signal to noise ratio. To decrease radiation dose radiologist should use low kV and mA, but high pitches. Newly developed CT-dose-reduction soft-wares and filters should be installed in all CT-machines. We should critically compare the average dose used for a specific examination with the reference dose used in this country and/or Europe. Greater differences should caution the radiologist. Finally, we as radiologists must check very carefully all indications and recommend alternative imaging methods. But we have also to teach our customers--patients and medical doctors who are non-radiologists--that a 'good' image is not that which show all possible information, but that which visualize 'only' the diagnostic necessary information

  12. LET and dose rate effect on radiation-induced copolymerization of maleimide with styrene in 2-propanol solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Seiko, E-mail: Nakagawa.Seiko@iri-tokyo.jp [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aoumi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kimura, Atsushi [Environmental Radiation Processing Group, Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    N{sub 2}-saturated 2-propanol solutions containing styrene and maleimide were irradiated by electron, proton, He and C-ion beams. The styrene-maleimide copolymer was produced by radical polymerization induced during irradiation. The effects of the radical distribution, which depends on the LET or dose rate, on the molecular weight and the polymer yield were discussed. - Highlights: > Maleimide with styrene in N{sub 2}-saturated 2-propanol was irradiated by electron and heavy ions. > LET and dose rate effects of radical polymerization induced by irradiation were studied. > Results have shown the relation between radical distribution and efficiency of polymerization.

  13. Comparative studies of the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by low radiation doses, using Feulgen orcein glacial acetic acid and FPG staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.

    1982-01-01

    Peripheral lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 220 kV X-radiation, with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.5 Gy, their culture and preparation was made under standardized conditions. The slides were stained using two different methods, namely FPG staining (fluorescence plus giemsa), and the conventional Feulgen orcein glacial acetic acid method. Compared to the conventional method, FPG staining achieved absolute yields of acentric fragments three times higher, and of dicentric chromosomes twice as high. A linear dose-response relationship in acentric fragments was found by the two staining methods alike, which agrees with the theory. Both staining methods revealed a linear-square dose-response relationship in dicentric chromosomes. Using FPG staining, preparing only M 1 cells for evaluation, the linear component was found to be dominant over the whole dose range applied. The conventional method, analysing M 1 and M 2 cells, revealed the square component to be the most important one. The dose-response relationships determined after FPG staining can be used for biological dosimetry. Calibration can be improved by increasing the number of cells analysed at doses [de

  14. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  15. Quantification of gene expression modulation at the human genome wide induced by low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosel, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the response to low doses of ionizing radiation by using oligonucleotide micro-arrays. The results presented in this study demonstrate the relevance of this tool in the characterization of changes in gene expression at low doses of g radiation. All experimentations conducted were conducted on T CD4+ human lymphocytes. From this model we tried to characterize in 600 minutes after irradiation the molecular players in response to a dose range of 5 and 500 mGy. In this study, we highlight two types of molecular response. First, a dose-dependent response to irradiation involving groups of genes whose proteins are implicated in the response to DNA damage and in the p53 signaling pathway. The expression of the majority of the genes is modulated from 100 mGy. The second type of response is independent of the irradiation dose and the proteins encoded are involved in the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation. Some of these genes could potentially be regulated by a family of transcription factor with an ETS domain. These ETS factors are known to be potential targets of the MAPKinase pathway. All these genes are modulated from 5 mGy and are therefore potential molecular players involved in the cellular response to ionizing stress with a low intensity. (author)

  16. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  17. Gamma-radiation induced synthesis of silver nanoparticles in gelatin and its application for radiotherapy dose measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Y. S.

    2014-09-01

    A new gel dosimeter based on a radiation-sensitive silver nitrate was formulated and investigated for its potential use in γ-radiation treatment, from 3 to 100 Gy. This gel matrix is analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subjecting the gel to γ-rays produces Ag nanoparticles that exhibit a plasmon resonance absorption band at 450 nm. The intensity of this band increases linearly with the increase of absorbed dose up to 100 Gy. Stability of Ag nanoparticle in the dark at 6 °C is good. The overall uncertainty (2σ) of the gel dosimeter is estimated as ~4.65% in the dose range of 5-100 Gy.

  18. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W; Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue

  19. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue

  20. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Haytham [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Galal, Omima [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Abdelrahim, Eman [Department of Medical Histology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Ono, Yusuke [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Mostafa, Emtethal [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Li, Tao-Sheng, E-mail: litaoshe@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  1. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit + stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit + stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit + stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms

  2. Histogenetic disorders of cerebral cortex induced by in utero exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushiki, Shinji; Kinoshita, Chikako; Hyodo-Taguchi, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yuji; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the short- and long-term effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cell migration in the developing cerebral cortex of mice and rats, we irradiated them at the middle of cortical histogenesis with either γ-rays or X-rays. We have demonstrated an effect of ionizing radiation on neuronal migration at doses as low as 0.15 Gy together with a changing pattern of expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM. Our findings suggest a possible role of N-CAM in neuronal migration and suggest the presence of a threshold in terms of the effects of small radiation doses on the developing cerebral cortex. In addition, the effects of radiation on neuronal migration during the embryonic stage remained even after birth in that aberrantly placed neurons were noted in the cerebral cortex. However, such derangement was less pronounced in mature animals compared to younger ones. These observations suggest that some modification process including apoptosis might have occurred during the postnatal period. In this review, molecular pathogenesis of neuronal migration disorders will also be discussed, based upon recent experimental as well as molecular genetic studies. (author)

  3. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C.

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors)

  4. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P.; Roeser, A.

    2015-01-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  5. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  6. The influence of non-radiation induced ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes for dosimetry in the radiotherapy dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Lettau, C.; Fill, U.; Regulla, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The yield of radicals induced by ionizing radiation in the amino acid alanine and its quantification by ESR spectroscopy has proven excellent reproducibility. Those radicals trapped in the crystal lattice are prevented from recombination providing a thermally very stable system. This allows alanine to be applied as a transfer dosemeter. With paraffin-alanine probes ESR dosimetry can be performed with a standard deviation of ± 0.5% in the dose range from 20 Gy up to 100 kGy. At 1 Gy dose level the error increases to ± 6%. This dose level is three orders of magnitude higher than the calculated detection threshold for alanine with modern X-band ESR spectrometers. It was found that the poor standard deviation at the 1 Gy dose level, is not mainly produced by a bad signal-to-noise ratio but by a variable non-radiation induced ESR background signal from the alanine probes within a batch. In the present study the main sources of error for ESR dosimetry in the dose range below 20 Gy were analyzed. The influences of the production process, UV light and humidity upon the ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes were investigated. Measurements are shown indicating a second stable structure of the alanine radical at room temperature. (author)

  7. Radiation-induced nondisjunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    The methodology and results of epidemiological studies of the effects of preconception diagnostic x-rays of the abdomen on chromosome segregation in humans are described. The vast majority of studies show the same positive, though not significant, trend to increased nondisjunction among the offspring of irradiated women. The results of the various studies, however, cannot be pooled because of differing methodologies used. Abnormal chromosome segregation during mitotic division has been inducted experimentally by the in vitro exposure of human lymphocytes to a low dose of 50 R gamma irradiation. First meiotic nondisjunction has been successfully induced by whole body exposure of female mice to a low dose of radiation. The question of time-related repair of the mechanism involved in chromosome segregation is raised

  8. Radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low range i.e, population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. (author)

  9. Dose limits for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, D.

    1989-01-01

    Dose limits for exposure to ionising radiation are assessed to see if they give sufficient protection both for the occupationally exposed and for the general public. It is concluded that current limits give a level of safety that satisfies the necessary criteria in the light of present knowledge and further reductions would be unlikely to improve standards of safety. (author)

  10. Radiation dose rate affects the radiosensitization of MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines to X-rays induced by dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshgard, Karim; Kiani, Parvaneh; Haghparast, Abbas; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-08-01

    The aim of radiotherapy is to deliver lethal damage to cancerous tissue while preserving adjacent normal tissues. Radiation absorbed dose of the tumoral cells can increase when high atomic nanoparticles are present in them during irradiation. Also, the dose rate is an important aspect in radiation effects that determines the biological results of a given dose. This in vitro study investigated the dose-rate effect on the induced radiosensitivity by dextran-coated iron oxide in cancer cells. HeLa and MCF-7 cells were cultured in vitro and incubated with different concentrations of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. They were then irradiated with 6 MV photons at dose rates of 43, 185 and 370 cGy/min. The MTT test was used to obtain the cells' survival after 48 h of irradiations. Incubating the cells with the nanoparticles at concentrations of 10, 40 and 80 μg/ml showed no significant cytotoxicity effect. Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed more radiosensitivity effect by increasing the dose rate and nanoparticles concentration. Radiosensitization enhancement factors of MCF-7 and HeLa cells at a dose-rate of 370 cGy/min and nanoparticles' concentration of 80 μg/ml were 1.21 ± 0.06 and 1.19 ± 0.04, respectively. Increasing the dose rate of 6 MV photons irradiation in MCF-7 and HeLa cells increases the radiosensitization induced by the dextran-coated iron nanoparticles in these cells.

  11. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  12. Biological evidence of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsch, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Throughout life, every person is constantly exposed to different types of ionising radiation, without even noticing the exposure. The mean radiation exposure for people living in Germany amounts to approximately 4 mSv per year and encompasses the exposure from natural and man-made sources. The risks associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are still the subject of intense and highly controversial discussions, emphasizing the social relevance of studies investigating the effects of low radiation doses. In this thesis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were analyzed within three projects covering different aspects. DSBs are among the most hazardous DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation, because this type of damage can easily lead to the loss of genetic information. Consequently, the DSB presents a high risk for the genetic integrity of the cell. In the first project, extensive results uncovered the track structure of charged particles in a biological model tissue. This provided the first biological data that could be used for comparison with data that were measured or predicted using theoretical physical dosimetry methods and mathematical simulations. Charged particles contribute significantly to the natural radiation exposure and are used increasingly in cancer radiotherapy because they are more efficient in tumor cell killing than X- or γ-rays. The difference in the biological effects of high energy charged particles compared with X- or γ-rays is largely determined by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition and the track structure inducing a three-dimensional damage pattern in living cells. This damage pattern consists of cells directly hit by the particle receiving a high dose and neighboring cells not directly hit by primary particles but exposed to far-reaching secondary electrons (δ-electrons). These cells receive a much lower dose deposition in the order of a few mGy. The radial dose distribution of single particle tracks was

  13. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR. All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM observation, forced swim test (FST, the open field test (OFT, the chromosome aberration (CA, the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA, the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR.

  14. Evaluation of the Comet Assay for Assessing the Dose-Response Relationship of DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Chang; Du, Li Qing; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jian Xiang; Su, Xu; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Fei-Yue; Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Fan, Sai Jun; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Dose- and time-response curves were combined to assess the potential of the comet assay in radiation biodosimetry. The neutral comet assay was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes caused by γ-ray irradiation. A clear dose-response relationship with DNA double-strand breaks using the comet assay was found at different times after irradiation (p < 0.001). A time-response relationship was also found within 72 h after irradiation (p < 0.001). The curves for DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair in vitro of human lymphocytes presented a nice model, and a smooth, three-dimensional plane model was obtained when the two curves were combined. PMID:24240807

  15. Distribution of the various radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements in relation to the dose and sampling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Prod'homme, M.; Sportes, M.

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of the chromosome rearrangements detected in 2128 R-banded metaphases, obtained from γ-irradiated human lymphocytes after 48 to 96 h in culture is reported. Depending on the culture time, and possibly on the dose of radiation (from 1 to 3 Gy), the most frequent type of rearrangement was either dicentrics or reciprocal translocations. In first generation mitoses, the frequency of cells without rearrangement ranged from 0.66 to 0.18, and the mean number of rearranged chromosomes per cell from 0.79 to 3.28. The dose-response curve follows a quadratic function for dicentric aberration yields, but not for other rearrangements. (Auth.)

  16. Evaluation of the Comet Assay for Assessing the Dose-Response Relationship of DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dose- and time-response curves were combined to assess the potential of the comet assay in radiation biodosimetry. The neutral comet assay was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes caused by γ-ray irradiation. A clear dose-response relationship with DNA double-strand breaks using the comet assay was found at different times after irradiation (p < 0.001. A time-response relationship was also found within 72 h after irradiation (p < 0.001. The curves for DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair in vitro of human lymphocytes presented a nice model, and a smooth, three-dimensional plane model was obtained when the two curves were combined.

  17. Cytogenetic Effects of Low Dose Radiation in Mammalian Cells Analysis of the Phenomenon Hypersensitivity and Induced Radioresistence

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Nasonova, E A; Krasavin, E A; Rsjanina, A V

    2001-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic damage after irradiation of chinese hamster cells and human melanoma cells within dose range 1-200 cGy was studied. The anaphase and metaphase analysis of chromosome damage and micronuclei test were applied. The hypersensitivity (HRS) at doses below 20 cGy and the increased radioresistence at higher doses (IR) were shown with all cytogenetic criteria for both cell lines. The phenomenon of HRS/IR was reproduced in synchronic as well as in asynchronic population of chinese hamster cells. This fact shows that HRS was caused by high radiosensitivity of all cells and can not be explained by any differential sensitivity of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. So it was supposed that the increasing radioresistence is determined by the inclusion of the inducible repair processes in all cells. This conclusion agress with the fact that there was no evidence of HRS on dose-effect curves and that some part of pre-existent damage was repaired after preliminary irradiation with low dose...

  18. State-of-the-art cytogenetic techniques to detect radiation damage induced by low doses bin human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekova, V.

    2004-01-01

    Cytogenetic techniques are the most sensitive and reliable tools for bio-monitoring and bio-dosimetry of people professionally or accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation. They are applied in addition to the evaluations of the physical dosimetry and they consider the individual radiosensitivity. The main potential risk for humans from exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations is the enhanced incidence of stochastic effects, i.e. carcinogenesis and heritable genetic effects. This report presents a comparative evaluation of the cytogenetic markers for radiation damage of humans and general conclusions of cytogenetic studies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation in individuals occupationally exposed to action of ionizing radiation. The sensitivity of the methods is compared and their great development and mastering during the last years, as well as the basis of their application - the relation between the frequency of cytogenetic markers observed in lymphocytes in peripheral blood and the risk of malignant disease. The advantages and disadvantages of different cytogenetic techniques are discussed. (author)

  19. Natural radiation dose to Gammarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Eisenbud, M.

    1975-01-01

    The natural radiation dose rate to whole body and components of the Gammarus species (i.e., G. Tigrinus, G. Fasciatus and G. Daiberi) that occurs in the Hudson River is evaluated and the results compared with the upper limits of dose rates from man made sources to the whole body of the organisms. Methods were developed to study the distribution of alpha emitters from 226 Ra plus daughter products in Gammarus using autoradiographic techniques, taking into account the amount of radon that escapes from the organisms. This methodology may be adapted to study the distribution of alpha emitters in contaminated tissues of plants and animals

  20. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low dose radiation, and low dose radiation could not induce adaptive response. But in vivo experience, low dose radiation could enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation and alleviated the injury of hematological system. (authors)

  1. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  2. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  3. Dose-dependent and gender-related radiation-induced transcription alterations of Gadd45a and Ier5 in human lymphocytes exposed to gamma ray emitted by 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, H.; Manoochehri, M.; Mosalla, S. M. M.; Ghafori, M.; Karimi, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest DNA damage-inducible 45a gene (Gadd45a) and immediate early response gene 5 (Ier5) have been emphasised as ideal radiation bio-markers in several reports. However, some aspects of radiation-induced transcriptional alterations of these genes are unknown. In this study, gender-dependency and dose-dependency as two factors that may affect radiation induced transcription of Gadd45a and Ier5 genes were investigated. Human lymphocyte cells from six healthy voluntary blood donors (three women and three men) were irradiated in vitro with doses of 0.5-4.0 Gy from a 60 Co source and RNA isolated 4 h later using the High Pure RNA Isolation Kit. Dose and gender dependency of radiation-induced transcriptional alterations of Gadd45a and Ier5 genes were studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that as a whole, Gadd45a and Ier5 gave responses to gamma rays, while the responses were independent of radiation doses. Therefore, regardless of radiation dose, Gadd45a and Ier5 can be considered potential radiation bio-markers. Besides, although radiation-induced transcriptional alterations of Gadd45a in female and male lymphocyte samples were insignificant at 0.5 Gy, at other doses, their quantities in female samples were at a significantly higher level than in male samples. Radiation induced transcription of Ier5 of females samples had a reduction in comparison with male samples at 1 and 2 Gy, but at doses of 0.5 and 4 Gy, females were significantly more susceptible to radiation-induced transcriptional alteration of Ier5. (authors)

  4. Adaptive response of apoptosis in EL-4 lymphoma cells induced by low dose radiation and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuchun; Gong Pingsheng; Wang Zhicheng; Sun Liguang; Gong Shouliang

    2008-01-01

    EL-4 lymphoma cells were irradiated with the inductive doses (D1: 25-200 mGy, dose rate: 12.5mGy/min) and the challenging dose (D2:0.5-3.0 Gy, dose rate: 287 mGy/min), and the time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The percentage of cell apoptosis and the expressive levels of cell apoptosis-associated gene pro- reins were measured with flow cytometry. The percentages of cell apoptosis in the D1 + D2 group with 25-100 mGy (D1) and 1.5 Gy (D2) or 75 mGy (D1) and 25-200 mGy (D2) were significantly lower than those in the D2 group. As compared with the D2 group, the positive percentage of cell Bcl-2 protein expression increased somewhat, and Bax decreased significantly, meanwhile the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax increased significantly and p53 decreased somewhat in D1 + D2 group with 25-100 mGy (D1) and 1.5 Gy (D2). The adaptive response of EL-4 lymphoma cell apoptosis could be induced by pre-irradiation with 25-100 mGy. Meantime, the expressive levels of cell apoptosis-associated gene Bcl-2, Bax and p53 proteins could change accordingly with cell apoptosis. These gene protein changes may play an important role in the mechanism of the adaptive response. (authors)

  5. Use of three-dimensional lognormal dose-response surfaces in lifetime studies of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional lognormal cumulative probability power function was used to provide a unifying dose-response description of the lifetime cancer risk for chronic exposure of experimental animals and people, for risk evaluation, and for scaling between species. Bone tumor fatilities, primarily from alpha irradiation of the skeleton in lifetime studies of beagles injected with 226 Ra, were shown to be well described by this function. This function described cancer risk in lifetime studies as a curved smooth surface depending on radiation exposure rate and elapsed time, such that the principal risk at low dose rates occurred near the end of the normal life span without significant life shortening. Essentially identical functions with the median value of the power function displaced with respect to appropriate RBE values were shown to describe bone-cancer induction primarily from alpha irradiation of the skeleton in lifetime beagle studies with injected 226 Ra, 228 Th, 239 Pu and 241 Am, and with inhaled 238 Pu. Application of this model to human exposures to 226 Ra yielded a response ratio of 3.6; that is, the time required for development of bone cancer in people was 3.6 times longer than for beagles at the same average skeletal dose rate. It was suggested that similar techniques were appropriate to other carcinogens and other critical organs. 20 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Assessing patient characteristics and radiation-induced non-targeted effects in vivo for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Christine; Timotin, Emilia; Wong, Raimond; Sur, Ranjan K; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    To test whether blood, urine, and tissue based colony-forming assays are a useful clinical detection tool for assessing fractionated treatment responses and non-targeted radiation effects in bystander cells. To assess patients' responses to radiation treatments, blood serum, urine, and an esophagus explant-based in vivo colony-forming assay were used from oesophageal carcinoma patients. These patients underwent three fractions of high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT). Human keratinocyte reporters exposed to blood sera taken after the third fraction of brachytherapy had a significant increase in cloning efficiency compared to baseline samples (p fractions for the blood sera data only. Patient characteristics such as gender had no statistically significant effect (p > 0.05). Large variability was observed among the patients' tissue samples, these colony-forming assays showed no significant changes throughout fractionated brachytherapy (p > 0.05). Large inter-patient variability was found in the urine and tissue based assays, so these techniques were discontinued. However, the simple blood-based assay had much less variability. This technique may have future applications as a biological dosimeter to predict treatment outcome and assess non-targeted radiation effects.

  7. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  8. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  9. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiang Juliann G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wounding following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co γ-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in γ-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in γ-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI included continuously decreased γ-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined

  10. Validation of radiation dose estimations in VRdose: comparing estimated radiation doses with observed radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystad, Espen; Sebok, Angelia; Meyer, Geir

    2004-04-01

    The Halden Virtual Reality Centre has developed work-planning software that predicts the radiation exposure of workers in contaminated areas. To validate the accuracy of the predicted radiation dosages, it is necessary to compare predicted doses to actual dosages. During an experimental study conducted at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) hall, the radiation exposure was measured for all participants throughout the test session, ref. HWR-681 [3]. Data from this experimental study have also been used to model tasks in the work-planning software and gather data for predicted radiation exposure. Two different methods were used to predict radiation dosages; one method used all radiation data from all the floor levels in the HBWR (all-data method). The other used only data from the floor level where the task was conducted (isolated data method). The study showed that the all-data method gave predictions that were on average 2.3 times higher than the actual radiation dosages. The isolated-data method gave predictions on average 0.9 times the actual dosages. (Author)

  11. Thermal annealing of high dose radiation induced damage at room temperature in alkaline. Stored energy, thermoluminescence and coloration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible relation between stored energy, thermoluminescence and colour centre annealing in gamma and electron irradiated alkali halides is studied. Thermoluminescence occurs at temperature higher than the temperature at which the main stored energy peak appears. No stored energy release is detected in additively coloured KC1 samples. Plastic deformation and doping with Ca and Sr induce a stored energy spectrum different from the spectrum observed in pure and as cleaved samples, but the amount of stored energy does not change for a given irradiation dose.Capacity of alkali halides to store energy by irradiation increases as the cation size decreases. (Author) 51 refs

  12. Comparison of the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and intestinal crypt of adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Yang, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, D.; Kim, J. C.; Shin, T.; Kim, S. H.; Moon, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present study compared the dose-response curves for the frequency of apoptosis in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and intestinal crypt using whole-body gamma irradiation. The incidence of gamma-ray-induced apoptosis was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end-labelling (TUNEL) method. TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the DG and intestinal crypt were increased in a dose-dependent pattern (0-2 Gy). The dose-response curves were linear-quadratic, with a significant relationship between the appearance of apoptosis and irradiation dose. The slopes of the dose-response curves in the DG were much steeper (∼5-6-fold) than those in the intestinal crypt within the range of 0-1 Gy exposure. Hippocampal DG might be a more effective and sensitive evaluation structure than the intestinal crypt to estimate the degree of radiation exposure in damaged organs of adult mice exposed to low irradiation dose. copy; The Author 2011. Published by Oxford Univ. Press. All rights reserved. (authors)

  13. Modifications in the optical and thermal properties of a CR-39 polymeric detector induced by high doses of γ-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, A. F.; Ibraheim, Mona H.; Nwara, Aya M.; Kandil, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    Effects of γ-radiation on the optical and thermal properties of a poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC), a form of CR-39, polymer have been investigated. CR-39 detectors were exposed to γ-rays at very high doses ranging from 5.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 106 Gy. The induced changes were analyzed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) in absorbance mode, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The UV-visible spectra of the virgin and γ-irradiated CR-39 polymer detectors displayed a significant decreasing trend in their optical energy band gaps for indirect transitions, whereas for the direct ones showed a little change. This drop in the energy band gap with increasing dose is discussed on the basis of the gamma irradiation induced modifications in the CR-39 polymeric detector. The TGA thermograms show that the weight loss rate increased with increase in dose, which may be due to the disordered system via scission followed by crosslinking in the irradiated polymer detector. The TGA thermograms also indicated that the CR-39 detector decomposed in three/four stages for the virgin and irradiated samples. The activation energy for thermal decomposition was determined using a type of Arrhenius equation based on the TGA experimental results. These experimental results so obtained can be well used in radiation dosimetry.

  14. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, M J; Abreu-Luis, J; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Prada-Martinez, E [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm{sup 2} in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  15. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  16. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events.

  17. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O 2 . In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O 2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account

  18. Analgesia induced by repeated exposure to low dose X-rays in mice, and involvement of the accessory olfactory system in modulation of the radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyachi, Yukihisa; Yamada, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low-dose X-rays on mouse nociceptive behavior were examined using a formalin injected test which rated the amount of time the animals spent licking the injected hind-paw. Male ICR White Swiss mice showed a marked suppression of licking behavior after repeated low-dose X-irradiation (5 cGy/day, 6 consecutive days). The most profound effect was observed on the day 30 after irradiation. The decline of licking behavior, however, was not observed at all following olfactory bulbectomy or vomeronasal tract cut. The analgesic effects could be observed in writhing animals administered acetic-acid intraperitoneally. Moreover, analgesia was totally blocked by the administration of N-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to accessory olfactory bulbs prior to the exposure. The present results indicate that the olfactory system plays an important role in modulation of radiation-induced analgesia, and a possible involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of recognition memory subjected to repeated X-rays. Relatively higher doses (5 cGy x 9 days, 5 cGy x 12 days), however, did not induce such effects, namely, the decline of nociceptive response was limited to the animals irradiated with the smaller dose. (author)

  19. Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of ionizing radiations become refractory to high doses of radiation as well as to chemical mutagens that induce double-strand breaks in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Sheldon; Afzal, Veena; Wiencke, J.K.; Olivieri, G.; Michaeli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The results indicate that prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of X-rays reduces the number of chromosome breaks induced by double-strand breaks, and perhaps even by cross-links, in DNA, but has the opposite effect on breaks induced by the alkylating agent MMS. The results also show that the induced repair mechanism is different from that observed in the adaptive reponse that follows exposure to low doses of alkylating agents. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martignoni, K.

    1986-01-01

    Dose assessments for cataract threshold doses are available based on epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients, survivors of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and of persons with occupational exposure to radiation. According to these, short-term application of low-level LET radiation of a dose ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 Gy may suffice to cause a cataract in the course of a few months or years which results in inpairment of vision (UNSCEAR, 1982). In fractionated irradiation, cataractogenic threshold dose increases to 4 Sv at treatment times between 3 weeks and 3 months, and to more than 5 Sv at more than 3 months (ICRP 41). Densely ionizing radiation must be assumed to have threshold doses between 2 and 20 Sv. An ICRP assessment (ICRP Publ. No. 41, 1984) gives a threshold dose of more than 8 Sv for a vision-impairing cataract if these was protracted irradiation at a low-level dose rate. Concerning radiation protection, a maximum lens dose of 150 mSv per annum was recommended which should not be exceeded. This indicates a maximum of 7.5 Sv of exposure throughout a period of 50 years of working life. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Validating the pivotal role of the immune system in low-dose radiation-induced tumor inhibition in Lewis lung cancer-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoying; Li, Hui; Niu, Chao; Yu, Dehai; Yang, Guozi; Liang, Xinyue; Wen, Xue; Li, Min; Cui, Jiuwei

    2018-04-01

    Although low-dose radiation (LDR) possesses the two distinct functions of inducing hormesis and adaptive responses, which result in immune enhancement and tumor inhibition, its clinical applications have not yet been elucidated. The major obstacle that hinders the application of LDR in the clinical setting is that the mechanisms underlying induction of tumor inhibition are unclear, and the risks associated with LDR are still unknown. Thus, to overcome this obstacle and elucidate the mechanisms mediating the antitumor effects of LDR, in this study, we established an in vivo lung cancer model to investigate the participation of the immune system in LDR-induced tumor inhibition and validated the pivotal role of the immune system by impairing immunity with high-dose radiation (HDR) of 1 Gy. Additionally, the LDR-induced adaptive response of the immune system was also observed by sequential HDR treatment in this mouse model. We found that LDR-activated T cells and natural killer cells and increased the cytotoxicity of splenocytes and the infiltration of T cells in the tumor tissues. In contrast, when immune function was impaired by HDR pretreatment, LDR could not induce tumor inhibition. However, when LDR was administered before HDR, the immunity could be protected from impairment, and tumor growth could be inhibited to some extent, indicating the induction of the immune adaptive response by LDR. Therefore, we demonstrated that immune enhancement played a key role in LDR-induced tumor inhibition. These findings emphasized the importance of the immune response in tumor radiotherapy and may help promote the application of LDR as a novel approach in clinical practice. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cloning of low dose radiation induced gene RIG1 by RACE based on non-cloned cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Ying; Sui Jianli; Tie Yi; Zhang Yuanping; Zhou Pingkun; Sun Zhixian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To obtain full-length cDNA of radiation induced new gene RIG1 based on its EST fragment. Methods: Based on non-cloned cDNA library, enhanced nested RACE PCR and biotin-avidin labelled probe for magnetic bead purification was used to obtain full-length cDNA of RIG1. Results: About 1 kb of 3' end of RIG1 gene was successfully cloned by this set of methods and cloning of RIG1 5' end is proceeding well. Conclusion: The result is consistent with the design of experiment. This set of protocol is useful for cloning of full-length gene based on EST fragment

  3. Methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaf and low doses of gamma radiation alleviated amiodarone-induced lung toxicity in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hesham F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera (MO and/or low doses of gamma radiation (LDR on amiodarone (AMD-induced lung toxicity in rats. AMD administered to female albino rats (100 mg/kg body weight for 10 consecutive days. Rats received methanolic extract of MO (250 mg/kg bwt for 15 successive days and/or were exposed to whole body LDR (0.25Gy on the 1st and 10th days, up to a total dose of 0.5Gy. MO administration induced a significant decrease in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β levels as well as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Also, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA and hydroxyproline (HYP was significantly decreased in lung tissue. Furthermore, MO significantly increased reduced glutathione (GSH content in lung tissue as compared with AMD. The histopathological investigation of lung tissue revealed the appearance of interstitial pneumonia in rats treated with AMD. The oral administration of MO and/or exposure to LDR reversed the biochemical and histopathological alterations induced by AMD. It can be posited that MO and LDR might have a considerable role in the prevention of lung toxicity induced by AMD.

  4. Effect of cell cycle stage, dose rate and repair of sublethal damage of radiation-induced apoptosis in F9 teratocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.E.; Quartuccio, S.G.; Kennealey, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    There are at least two different models of cell death after treatment with ionizing radiation. The first is a failure to undergo sustained cell division despite metabolic survival, and we refer to this end point as open-quotes classical reproductive cell death.close quotes The second is a process that results in loss of cell integrity. This second category includes cellular necrosis as well as apoptosis. Earlier studies in our laboratory showed that the predominant mechanism of cell death for irradiated F9 cell is apoptosis, and there is no indication that these cells die by necrosis. We have therefore used cells of this cell line to reassess basic radiobiological principles with respect to apoptosis. Classical reproductive cell death was determined by staining colonies derived from irradiated cells and scoring colonies of less than 50 cells as reproductively dead and colonies of more than 50 cells as survivors. Cells that failed to produce either type of colony (detached from the plate or disintegrated) were scored as having undergone apoptosis. Using these criteria we found that the fraction of the radiation-killed F9 cells that died by apoptosis did not vary when cells were irradiated at different stages of the cell cycle despite large variations in overall survival. This suggests that the factors that influence radiation sensitivity throughout the cell cycle have an equal impact on apoptosis and classical reproductive cell death. There was no difference in cell survival between split doses and single doses of X rays, suggesting that sublethal damage repair is not a factor in radiation-induced apoptosis of F9 cells. Apoptosis was not affected by changes in dose rate in the range of 0.038-4.96 Gy/min. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2016-04-01

    To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a (137)Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a "1"3"7Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. Results: First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Conclusion: Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast.

  7. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Suhkneung [College of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kwang Hee, E-mail: kwangheey@khnp.co.kr [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a {sup 137}Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. Results: First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Conclusion: Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast.

  8. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  9. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A; Chapman, C; Tsien, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans were performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal vascular

  10. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A; Chapman, C; Tsien, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans were performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal vascular

  11. Multiple low-dose radiation prevents type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage through attenuation of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance and subsequent renal inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Shao

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms.Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured.HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2 expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks.These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.

  12. No adaptive response is induced by chronic low-dose radiation from Ra-226 in the CHSE/F fish embryonic cell line and the HaCaT human epithelial cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaopei, E-mail: shix22@mcmaster.ca; Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether chronic low-dose α-particle radiation from Ra-226 over multiple cell generations can lead to an adaptive response in CHSE/F fish embryonic cells or HaCaT human epithelial cells receiving subsequent acute high-dose γ-ray radiation. Methods: CHSE/F and HaCaT cells were exposed to very low doses of Ra-226 in medium for multiple generations prior to being challenged by a higher dose γ-ray radiation. The clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival of cells with or without being pretreated by radiation from Ra-226. Results: In general, pretreatment with chronic radiation has no significant influence on the reaction of cells to the subsequent challenge radiation. Compared to unprimed cells, the change in clonogenic survival of primed cells after receiving challenge radiation is mainly due to the influence of the chronic exposure, and there's little adaptive response induced. However at several dose points, pretreatment of CHSE/F fish cells with chronic radiation resulted in a radiosensitive response to a challenge dose of γ-ray radiation, and pretreatment of HaCaT cells resulted in no effect except for a slightly radioresistant response to the challenge radiation which was not significant. Conclusion: The results suggest that chronic low-dose radiation is not effective enough to induce adaptive response. There was a difference between human and fish cells and it may be important to consider results from multiple species before making conclusions about effects of chronic or low doses of radiation in the environment. The term “radiosensitive” or “adaptive” make no judgment about whether such responses are ultimately beneficial or harmful. - Highlights: • No obvious adaptive response is induced by chronic low-dose radiation from Ra-226. • Priming radiation from Ra-226 sensitized CHSE/F cells to the challenge radiation. • Linear model is inconsistent with current work using chronic low-dose radiation.

  13. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinji

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1980-06-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population.

  15. Dose-effect of ionizing radiation-induced PIG3 gene expression alteration in human lymphoblastoid AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Zhang, De-Qin; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lu, Xue; Wang, Xin-Ru; Li, Kun-Peng; Chen, De-Qing; Mu, Xiao-Feng; Li, Shuang; Gao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    To identify new ionizing radiation (IR)-sensitive genes and observe the dose-effect of gene expression alteration (GEA) induced by IR. Microarray was used to screen the differentially expressed genes in human lymphoblastoid cells (AHH-1) using three doses of (60)Co γ-rays (0.5-8 Gy at 1 Gy/min). Given that p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) was consistently upregulated, the GEA of PIG3 in AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) induced by γ-rays (1 Gy/min) was measured at messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. The GEA of PIG3 in AHH-1 cells exposed to neutron radiation (californium-252, 0.073 Gy/min) was also quantified. PIG3 was one of the seven differentially expressed genes found in the microarray analysis. The PIG3 mRNA and protein levels in AHH-1 cells were significantly increased from 1-10 Gy of γ-rays 8-72 h or 8-168 h after exposure, respectively. The enhancement was also observed in AHH-1 cells from 0.4-1.6 Gy of neutrons 48 h post-irradiation. The PIG3 mRNA levels (mRNA copy numbers) in HPBL were significantly increased from 1-8 Gy of γ-rays within 4-24 h post-irradiation, but the highest increase in signal-to-noise responsiveness is approximately two-fold, which was less than that of AHH-1 (approximately 20-fold). IR can upregulate the PIG3 gene expression in AHH-1 and HPBL in the early phase after exposure; however, the IR induced expression levels of PIG3 are greater in AHH-1 than HPBL.

  16. Low radiation doses - Book of presentations (slides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the conference on low radiation doses organised by the 'research and health' department of the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Ten presentations are available and deal with he following topics: 1 - Cyto-toxicity, geno-toxicity: comparative approach between ionizing radiations and other geno-toxic agents (F. Nesslany, Institut Pasteur, Lille); Succession of events occurring after a radio-induced DNA damage (D. Averbeck, IRSN/CEA); Importance of stem cells in the response to ionizing radiations (J. Lebeau, CEA); Relation between energy deposition at the sub-cell scale and early biological effects (C. Villagrasa, IRSN); Natural history of breast cancer: predisposition, susceptibility with respect to irradiation (S. Rivera, IGR); Pediatrics scanner study and the EPI-CT project (M.O Bernier, IRSN); What future for an irradiated cell: survival or apoptosis? (E. Sage, Institut Curie); Differential effect of a 137 Cs chronic contamination on the different steps of the atheromatous pathology (T. Ebrahimian, IRSN); Variability of the individual radiosensitivity (S. Chevillard, CEA); What definitions for individual sensitivity? (A. Schmidt, CEA); Low doses: some philosophical remarks (A. Grinbaum, CEA)

  17. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2004. Abstract. This study determined the correlation between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from ...

  18. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the correlation between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from the source. The study included the interventional ...

  19. A comparison of dose-response characteristics of four NTCP models using outcomes of radiation-induced optic neuropathy and retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Song, William Y; Mell, Loren K; Bhandare, Niranjan

    2011-01-01

    Biological models are used to relate the outcome of radiation therapy to dose distribution. As use of biological models in treatment planning expands, uncertainties associated with the use of specific models for predicting outcomes should be understood and quantified. In particular, the question to what extent model predictions are data-driven or dependent on the choice of the model has to be explored. Four dose-response models--logistic, log-logistic, Poisson-based and probit--were tested for their ability and consistency in describing dose-response data for radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) and retinopathy (RIRP). Dose to the optic nerves was specified as the minimum dose, D min , received by any segment of the organ to which the damage was diagnosed by ophthalmologic evaluation. For retinopathy, the dose to the retina was specified as the highest isodose covering at least 1/3 of the retinal surface (D 33% ) that geometrically covered the observed retinal damage. Data on both complications were modeled separately for patients treated once daily and twice daily. Model parameters D 50 and γ and corresponding confidence intervals were obtained using maximum-likelihood method. Model parameters were reasonably consistent for RION data for patients treated once daily, D 50 ranging from 94.2 to 104.7 Gy and γ from 0.88 to 1.41. Similar consistency was seen for RIRP data which span a broad range of complication incidence, with D 50 from 72.2 to 75.0 Gy and γ from 1.51 to 2.16 for patients treated twice daily; 72.2-74.0 Gy and 0.84-1.20 for patients treated once daily. However, large variations were observed for RION in patients treated twice daily, D 50 from 96.3 to 125.2 Gy and γ from 0.80 to 1.56. Complication incidence in this dataset in any dose group did not exceed 20%. For the considered data sets, the log-logistic model tends to lead to larger D 50 and lower γ compared to other models for all datasets. Statements regarding normal tissue

  20. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  1. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  2. Radiation-induced changes in breathing frequency and lung histology of C57BL/6J mice are time- and dose-dependent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldh, T.; Heinzelmann, F.; Velalakan, A. [Univ. Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Budach, W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Belka, C. [Univ. Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Jendrossek, V. [Univ. Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (DE). Inst. of Cell Biology (Cancer Research)

    2012-03-15

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis constitute serious adverse effects of radiotherapy in the thoracic region. In this study, time-course and dose-dependence of clinically relevant parameters of radiation-induced lung injury in C57BL/6J mice were analyzed. A well-characterized disease model is necessary for the analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms using genetically modified mice. C57BL/6J mice received single dose right hemithorax irradiation with 12.5 or 22.5 Gy. Body weight and breathing frequency were recorded as parameters for health impairment. Lung tissue was collected over 24 weeks for histological analysis. Hemithorax irradiation with 12.5 or 22.5 Gy induced biphasic breathing impairment with the first increase between days 7 and 70. Although breathing impairment was more pronounced in the 22.5 Gy group, it was accompanied in both dose groups by pneumonitis-associated histological changes. A second rise in breathing frequency ratios became visible starting on day 70 with a steady increase until day 210. Again, breathing was more strongly affected in the 22.5 Gy group. However, breathing impairment coincided only in the 22.5 Gy group with a significant increase in collagen deposition in the lung tissue by day 210. Tissue inflammation and fibrosis were observed in the irradiated and the shielded lungs, pointing toward involvement of systemic effects. Hemithorax irradiation induces time-dependent pneumonitis and fibrosis in C57BL/6J mice. While hemithorax irradiation with 12.5 Gy is sufficient to induce lung inflammation, it is below the threshold for collagen deposition and fibrosis development by day 210.

  3. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis

  4. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  5. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  6. Radiation-induced instability of human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.N.; Demina, Eh.A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is dedicated to the phenomenon of radiation-induced genomic instability where the increased level of genomic changes in the offspring of irradiated cells is characteristic. Particular attention is paid to the problems of genomic instability induced by the low-dose radiation, role of the bystander effect in formation of radiation-induced instability, and its relationship with individual radiosensitivity. We believe that in accordance with the paradigm of modern radiobiology the increased human individual radiosensitivity can be formed due to the genome instability onset and is a significant risk factor for radiation-induced cancer

  7. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, O [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Health, Safety and Waste Disposal, Vienna (Austria)

    1959-04-15

    To establish the maximum permissible radiation doses for occupational and other kinds of radiation exposure, it is necessary to know those biological effects which can be produced by very small radiation doses. This particular field of radiation biology has not yet been sufficiently explored. This holds true for possible delayed damage after occupational radiation exposure over a period of many years as well as for acute reactions of the organism to single low level exposures. We know that irradiation of less than 25 Roentgen units (r) is unlikely to produce symptoms of radiation sickness. We have, however, found indications that even smaller doses may produce certain instantaneous reactions which must not be neglected

  8. Application of radiation-induced apoptosis in radiation oncology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.; Emery, G.C.; Ozsahin, M.; Menz, R.; Knesplova, L.; Larsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    A rapid assay of the ability of lymphocytes to respond to radiation-induced damage is presented. Age and genetic dependence of radiation response have been quantified. The assay is sensitive to low doses of radiation. Its ability to assess the cytotoxic response of blood capillaries to radiation has been evaluated. (author)

  9. Assessment of pediatrics radiation dose from routine x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Given the fact that children are more sensitive to ionizing radiation than adults,with an increased risk of developing radiation-induced cancer,special care should be taken when they undergo X-ray examinations. The main aim of the current study was to determine Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) to pediatric ...

  10. Global DNA methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.R.; Ormsby, R.J.; Blyth, B.J.; Sykes, P.J.; Bezak, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: High radiation doses cause breaks in the DNA which are considered the critical lesions in initiation of radiation-induced cancer. However, at very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of such breaks will be rare, and other changes to the DNA such as DNA methylation which affects gene expression may playa role in radiation responses. We are studying global DNA methylation after low dose radiation exposure to determine if low dose radiation has short- and/or long-term effects on chromatin structure. We developed a sensitive high resolution melt assay to measure the levels of DNA methylation across the mouse genome by analysing a stretch of DNA sequence within Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements-I (LINE I) that comprise a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Our initial results suggest no significant short-term or longterm) changes in global NA methylation after low dose whole-body X-radiation of 10 J1Gyor 10 mGy, with a significant transient increase in NA methylation observed I day after a high dose of I Gy. If the low radiation doses tested are inducing changes in bal DNA methylation, these would appear to be smaller than the variation observed between the sexes and following the general stress of the sham-irradiation procedure itself. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Biological and Environmental Research, US DOE, Grant DE-FG02-05ER64104 and MN is the recipient of the FMCF/BHP Dose Radiation Research Scholarship.

  11. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  12. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a 'Th2 polarized' immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in

  13. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  14. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  15. Tumour induction by small doses of ionised radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionised radiation on tumour induction in animals is discussed. It is hypothesised that high doses of radiation can strongly advance tumour induction from the combination of a stimulated cell growth, as a reaction to massive cell killing, and damage to DNA in the cell nuclei. This effect has a limit below which the radiation dose causes a non-significant amount of dead cells. However in animals where through other reasons, a chronic growth stimulation already exists, only one effect, the damage of DNA, is necessary to induce tumours. A linear dose effect without a threshold level applies in these cases. Applying this hypothesis to man indicates that calculating low dose effects by linear extrapolation of high dose effects is nothing more than a reasonable approximation. (C.F.)

  16. The limiting dose rate and its importance in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkiam, D.; Sonwani, Swetha; Arul Ananthakumar, A.; Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of defining a low dose of ionizing radiation still remains unclear. Before attempting to define a low dose, it is more important to define a low-dose rate since effects at low dose-rates are different from those observed at higher dose-rates. Hence, it follows that low dose-rates rather than a low dose is an important criteria to determine radio-biological effects and risk factors i.e. stochastic health effects. Chromosomal aberrations induced by ionizing radiations are well fitted by quadratic model Y= áD + âD 2 + C with the linear coefficient of dose predominating for high LET radiations and low doses of low LET. At higher doses and dose rates of sparsely ionizing radiation, break pairs produced by inter-track action leads to the formation of exchange type aberrations and is dependent on dose rate. Whereas at lower doses and dose rates, intra-track action produces break pairs and resulting aberrations are in direct proportion to absorbed dose and independent of dose rate. The dose rate at which inter-track ceases to be observable and where intra-track action effectively becomes the sole contributor of lesion-pair formation is referred to as limiting dose rate (LDR). Once the LDR is reached further reduction in dose rates will not affect the slope of DR since breaks produced by independent charged particle tracks are widely separated in time to interact with each other for aberration yield. This linear dependency is also noticed for acute exposures at very low doses. Existing reports emphasizes the existence of LDR likely to be e6.3cGyh -1 . However no systematic studies have been conducted so far to determine LDR. In the present investigation DR curves were constructed for the dose rates 0.002 and 0.003 Gy/min and to define LDR at which a coefficient approaches zero. Extrapolation of limiting low dose rate data can be used to predict low dose effects regardless of dose rate and its definition ought to serve as a useful index for studies pertaining

  17. A Paradigm Shift in Low Dose Radiation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alatas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When ionizing radiation traverses biological material, some energy depositions occur and ionize directly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA molecules, the critical target. A classical paradigm in radiobiology is that the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA are responsible for the detrimental biological effects of radiation. It is presumed that no radiation effect would be expected in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure through nucleus. The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation. However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose radiation than they do to high dose radiation. Moreover, recent experimental evidences from many laboratories reveal the fact that radiation effects also occur in cells that were not exposed to radiation and in the progeny of irradiated cells at delayed times after radiation exposure where cells do not encounter direct DNA damage. Recently, the classical paradigm in radiobiology has been shifted from the nucleus, specifically the DNA, as the principal target for the biological effects of radiation to cells. The universality of target theory has been challenged by phenomena of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response. The new radiation biology paradigm would cover both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying these responses involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. These results brought in understanding that the biological response to low dose radiation at tissue or organism level is a complex process of integrated response of cellular targets as well as extra-cellular factors. Biological understanding of

  18. Annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huhou

    1988-01-01

    The annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating has been discussed. The autor gives an entirely new concept of the enviromental radiation in the thermoluminescence dating. Methods of annual dose detemination used by author are dating. Methods of annual dose determination used by author are summed up, and the results of different methods are compared. The emanium escapiug of three radioactive decay serieses in nature has been considered, and several determination methods are described. The contribution of cosmic rays for the annual radiation dose has been mentioned

  19. Annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhou, Li [Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Archaeology

    1988-11-01

    The annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating has been discussed. The autor gives an entirely new concept of the enviromental radiation in the thermoluminescence dating. Methods of annual dose detemination used by author are dating. Methods of annual dose determination used by author are summed up, and the results of different methods are compared. The emanium escapiug of three radioactive decay serieses in nature has been considered, and several determination methods are described. The contribution of cosmic rays for the annual radiation dose has been mentioned.

  20. Radiation-induced heart injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the internal between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue. (Evans, G.)

  1. Exploring the Role of Piwi/piRNA Pathway in Epigenetic Dysregulation in Low Dose Radiation Induced Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jejelowo, O. A.; Tariq, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    We will utilize multi-omics to identify robust biomarkers and to understand radiation effects and develop countermeasures. Information obtained will enhance development of capabilities to monitor health in real time and for mitigation of risks.

  2. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site.

  3. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site

  4. Experimentally induced, synergistic late effects of a single dose of radiation and aging: significance in LKS fraction as compared with mature blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Yoko; Tsuboi, Isao; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Inoue, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    The number of murine mature blood cells recovered within 6 weeks after 2-Gy whole-body irradiation at 6 weeks of age, whereas in the case of the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) compartment [cells in the lineage-negative, c-kit-positive and stem-cell-antigen-1-positive (LKS) fraction], the numerical differences between mice with and without irradiation remained more than a year, but conclusively the cells showed numerical recovery. When mice were exposed to radiation at 6 months of age, acute damages of mature blood cells were rather milder probably because of their maturation with age; but again, cells in the LKS fraction were specifically damaged, and their numerical recovery was significantly delayed probably as a result of LKS-specific cellular damages. Interestingly, in contrast to the recovery of the number of cells in the LKS fraction, their quality was not recovered, which was quantitatively assessed on the basis of oxidative-stress-related fluorescence intensity. To investigate why the recovery in the number of cells in the LKS fraction was delayed, expression levels of genes related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis of cells in the bone marrow and LKS fraction were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the case of 21-month-old mice after radiation exposure, Ccnd1, PiK3r1 and Fyn were overexpressed solely in cells in the LKS fraction. Because Ccnd1and PiK3r1 upregulated by aging were further upregulated by radiation, single-dose radiation seemed to induce the acceleration of aging, which is related to the essential biological responses during aging based on a lifetime-dependent relationship between a living creature and xenobiotic materials. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Charpak, Garwin, propose unit for radiation dose

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Becquerels, curries, grays, rads, rems, roentgens, sieverts - even for specialists the units of radiation can get confusing. That's why two eminent physicists, Georges Charpak of France, and Richard Garwin, are proposing the DARI as a unit of radiation dose they hope will help the public evaluate the risks associated with low-level radiation exposure (1 page)

  6. SMART, Radiation Dose Rates on Cask Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SMART calculates radiation dose rate at the center of each cask surface by using characteristic functions for radiation shielding ability and for radiation current back-scattered from cask wall and cask cavity of each cask, once cask-type is specified. 2 - Method of solution: Matrix Calculation

  7. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  8. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, M.; Foster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference

  10. Study of the antioxidant effect of {alpha}-tocopherol on low-density lipoprotein peroxidation induced at low and high {gamma}-radiation dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Abdelouahed [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)]. E-mail: abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca; Milochevitch, Christelle [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    It is well known that vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol, {alpha}-toc) is a very efficient lipid soluble antioxidant and several studies showed its beneficial action in the prevention and reduction of atherosclerosis. However, some in vitro studies suggest a prooxidant role of vitamin E, which could occur under given circumstances. This study was thus designed to investigate the antioxidant vs. prooxidant effect of vitamin E with regards to LDL peroxidation induced under different oxidative stress conditions. LDL was enriched with {alpha}-tocopherol and different {alpha}-toc/LDL ratios were studied (8.0{+-}2.5, 14.3{+-}3.0, 33.3{+-}3.7, 42.7{+-}3.5 and 48.2{+-}4.5 molecules of {alpha}-toc/LDL particle). Enriched and control LDL were oxidized by action of {sup {center_dot}}OH and O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} free radicals produced by {gamma}-radiolysis at different dose rates. Susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was examined by the measure of conjugated diene and TBARS formation as well as LDL endogenous {alpha}-toc disappearance. Increasing LDL {alpha}-toc concentration reduced the LDL susceptibility to oxidation and their oxidizability. {alpha}-toc disappearance rates were comprised between 43 and 8.3x10{sup -10} M s{sup -1} and decreased with the radiation dose rate. Our results support an antioxidant role for {alpha}-tocopherol at high and low oxidative stress conditions.

  11. Study of the antioxidant effect of α-tocopherol on low-density lipoprotein peroxidation induced at low and high γ-radiation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Abdelouahed; Milochevitch, Christelle

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that vitamin E (α-tocopherol, α-toc) is a very efficient lipid soluble antioxidant and several studies showed its beneficial action in the prevention and reduction of atherosclerosis. However, some in vitro studies suggest a prooxidant role of vitamin E, which could occur under given circumstances. This study was thus designed to investigate the antioxidant vs. prooxidant effect of vitamin E with regards to LDL peroxidation induced under different oxidative stress conditions. LDL was enriched with α-tocopherol and different α-toc/LDL ratios were studied (8.0±2.5, 14.3±3.0, 33.3±3.7, 42.7±3.5 and 48.2±4.5 molecules of α-toc/LDL particle). Enriched and control LDL were oxidized by action of · OH and O 2 ·- free radicals produced by γ-radiolysis at different dose rates. Susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was examined by the measure of conjugated diene and TBARS formation as well as LDL endogenous α-toc disappearance. Increasing LDL α-toc concentration reduced the LDL susceptibility to oxidation and their oxidizability. α-toc disappearance rates were comprised between 43 and 8.3x10 -10 M s -1 and decreased with the radiation dose rate. Our results support an antioxidant role for α-tocopherol at high and low oxidative stress conditions

  12. Occupational radiation doses during interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuraeni, N; Hiswara, E; Kartikasari, D; Waris, A; Haryanto, F

    2016-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a type of fluoroscopy technique used in interventional radiology to clearly visualize blood vessels in a bony or dense soft tissue environment. The use of DSA procedures has been increased quite significantly in the Radiology departments in various cities in Indonesia. Various reports showed that both patients and medical staff received a noticeable radiation dose during the course of this procedure. A study had been carried out to measure these doses among interventionalist, nurse and radiographer. The results show that the interventionalist and the nurse, who stood quite close to the X-ray beams compared with the radiographer, received radiation higher than the others. The results also showed that the radiation dose received by medical staff were var depending upon the duration and their position against the X-ray beams. Compared tothe dose limits, however, the radiation dose received by all these three medical staff were still lower than the limits. (paper)

  13. Dose evaluation and protection of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Takagi, Toshiharu

    2004-01-01

    This paper explained the effects of cosmic radiation on aircraft crews and astronauts, as well as related regulations. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the practice of radiation exposure management for the handling/storage of radon and materials containing natural radioactive substances, as well as for boarding jet aircraft and space flight. Common aircraft crew members are not subject to radiation exposure management in the USA and Japan. In the EU, the limit value is 6 mSv per year, and for the crew group exceeding this value, it is recommended to keep records containing appropriate medical examination results. Pregnant female crewmembers are required to keep an abdominal surface dose within 1 mSv. For astronauts, ICRP is in the stage of thinking about exposure management. In the USA, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement has set dose limits for 30 days, 1 year, and lifetime, and recommends lifetime effective dose limits against carcinogenic risk for each gender and age group. This is the setting of the dose limits so that the risk of carcinogenesis, to which space radiation exposure is considered to contribute, will reach 3%. For cosmic radiation environments at spacecraft inside and aircraft altitude, radiation doses can be calculated for astronauts and crew members, using the calculation methods for effective dose and dose equivalent for tissue. (A.O.)

  14. Radiation induced liver disease: A clinical update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.; Madan, R.; Chander, S.; Kilambi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) or radiation hepatitis is a sub-acute form of liver injury due to radiation. It is one of the most dreaded complications of radiation which prevents radiation dose escalation and re irradiation for hepatobiliary or upper gastrointestinal malignancies. This complication should be kept in mind whenever a patient is planned for irradiation of these malignancies. Although, incidence of RILD is decreasing due to better knowledge of liver tolerance, improved investigation modalities and modern radiation delivery techniques, treatment options are still limited. In this review article, we have focussed on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and management of RILD

  15. Dose Assurance in Radiation Processing Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Chadwick, K.H.; Nam, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed...... at the radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing....

  16. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  17. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  18. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek

    2007-07-01

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources

  19. Gamma-radiation-induced chromosal aberration in human lymphocytes: dose-rate effects in stimulated and non-stimulated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liniecki, J.; Bajerska, A.; Wyszynska, K.; Cisowska, B.

    1977-01-01

    Stimulated and non-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated acutely and chronically, over 24 h. Dose-effect relationships for dicentric chromosomes were established and various models were fitted to the data. At prolonged irradiations, the yield decreased in basic agreement with the linear-quadratic model of aberration induction. Dose-protraction experiments on PHA + and PHA - lymphocytes, irradiated under various conditions of oxygenation and suspension (culture medium, whole blood) showed that the rejoining time increased from about 3 h in non-stimulated cells to about 10 h after PHA stimulation, and that this retarded rejoining was most likely due to blastic transformation itself and not to other conditions of irradiation

  20. Gamma radiation induced chromosal aberration in human lymphocytes: dose-rate effects in stimulated and non-stimulated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liniecki, J; Bajerska, A; Wyszynska, K [School of Medicine, Lodz (Poland). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology. Medical Research Center; Cisowska, B [Copernicus Municipal Hospital, Lodz (Poland). Oncology Center. Radiotherapy Dept.

    1977-05-01

    Stimulated and non-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated acutely and chronically, over 24 h. Dose-effect relationships for dicentric chromosomes were established and various models were fitted to the data. At prolonged irradiations, the yield decreased in basic agreement with the linear-quadratic model of aberration induction. Dose-protraction experiments on PHA/sup +/ and PHA/sup -/ lymphocytes, irradiated under various conditions of oxygenation and suspension (culture medium, whole blood) showed that the rejoining time increased from about 3 h in non-stimulated cells to about 10 h after PHA stimulation, and that this retarded rejoining was most likely due to blastic transformation itself and not to other conditions of irradiation.

  1. An integrated model for radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Varma, M.

    1994-01-01

    Risk estimates for radiation induced cancer are based on epidemiological data, principally the Japanese A bomb survivors. These estimates for radiation are better known than for any other environmental pollutant, but they do not relate directly to exposure to low doses and low dose rate. Recent rapid advances in molecular genetics, coupled with steady gains in cellular biology, radiation physics and chemistry led to the notion that the time may not be far off when it may be possible to arrive at human cancer risk estimates entirely from laboratory data. Whether risk estimates based on laboratory data will ever replace estimates based on epidemiological studies is an open question. What is clear is that laboratory data can supplement the present risk estimates by providing information on the relative effectiveness of high LET radiations, the importance of dose rate and dose protraction, and by identifying subpopulations which are unusually sensitive or resistant to radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  2. Health hazards of low doses of ionizing radiations. Vo. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation results in clinical manifestations of several disease entities that may be fatal. The onset and severity of these acute radiation syndromes are deterministic in relation to dose magnitude. Exposure to ionizing radiations at low doses and low dose rates could initiate certain damage in critical molecules of the cell, that may develop in time into serious health effects. The incidence of such delayed effects in low, and is only detectable through sophisticated epidemiological models carried out on large populations. The radiation damage induced in critical molecules of cells may develop by stochastic biochemical mechanisms of repair, residual damage, adaptive response, cellular transformation, promotion and progression into delayed health effects, the most important of which is carcinogenesis. The dose response relationship of probabilistic stochastic delayed effects of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, is very complex indeed. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, the factors involved, and the uncertainties encountered. Contrary to acute deterministic effects, the occurrence of probabilistic delayed effects of radiation remains to be enigmatic. 7 figs

  3. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiations on mankind. Some of them have been well documented (skin cancer and leukaemia for the pioneer scientists who worked on radiations, some other types of cancer for workers who handled luminescent paints, rock miners, nuclear explosion survivors, patients submitted to radiological treatments). He also evokes the issue of hereditary cancers, and discusses the issue of low dose irradiation where some surveys can now be performed on workers. He discusses the biological effects of these low doses. He outlines that many questions remain about these effects, notably the influence of dose level and of dose rate level on the biological reaction

  4. Development of radiation dose assessment system for radiation accident (RADARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shigemori, Yuji; Seki, Akiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The possibility of radiation accident is very rare, but cannot be regarded as zero. Medical treatments are quite essential for a heavily exposed person in an occurrence of a radiation accident. Radiation dose distribution in a human body is useful information to carry out effectively the medical treatments. A radiation transport calculation utilizing the Monte Carlo method has an advantageous in the analysis of radiation dose inside of the body, which cannot be measured. An input file, which describes models for the accident condition and quantities of interest, should be prepared to execute the radiation transport calculation. Since the accident situation, however, cannot be prospected, many complicated procedures are needed to make effectively the input file soon after the occurrence of the accident. In addition, the calculated doses are to be given in output files, which usually include much information concerning the radiation transport calculation. Thus, Radiation Dose Assessment system for Radiation Accident (RADARAC) was developed to derive effectively radiation dose by using the MCNPX or MCNP code. RADARAC mainly consists of two parts. One part is RADARAC - INPUT, which involves three programs. A user can interactively set up necessary resources to make input files for the codes, with graphical user interfaces in a personnel computer. The input file includes information concerning the geometric structure of the radiation source and the exposed person, emission of radiations during the accident, physical quantities of interest and so on. The other part is RADARAC - DOSE, which has one program. The results of radiation doses can be effectively indicated with numerical tables, graphs and color figures visibly depicting dose distribution by using this program. These results are obtained from the outputs of the radiation transport calculations. It is confirmed that the system can effectively make input files with a few thousand lines and indicate more than 20

  5. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  6. Radiation induced sarcomas of bone following therapeutic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Chu, F.C.H.; Woodward, H.Q.; Huvos, A.

    1983-01-01

    Because of new therapeutic trends of multi-modality and the importance of late effects, we have updated our series of radiation induced bone sarcomas seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center over the past four decades. A total of 37 cases of bone sarcoma arising from normal bone in the irradiated field was analyzed. The median for latent period from irradiation to diagnosis of bone sarcoma was 11 years with a minimum latent period of four years. The median radiation dose for the bone sarcoma was 6000 rad in 6 weeks with a minimum total radiation dose of 3000 rad in 3 weeks. We have found nine patients who developed bone sarcomas in the radiation field after successful treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Criteria for radiation induced bone sarcomas and the magnitude of the risk of bone sarcomas are briefly discussed

  7. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  8. Radiation dose to the global flying population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Luis E; Eastham, Sebastian D; Barrett, Steven R H

    2016-01-01

    Civil airliner passengers and crew are exposed to elevated levels of radiation relative to being at sea level. Previous studies have assessed the radiation dose received in particular cases or for cohort studies. Here we present the first estimate of the total radiation dose received by the worldwide civilian flying population. We simulated flights globally from 2000 to 2013 using schedule data, applying a radiation propagation code to estimate the dose associated with each flight. Passengers flying in Europe and North America exceed the International Commission on Radiological Protection annual dose limits at an annual average of 510 or 420 flight hours per year, respectively. However, this falls to 160 or 120 h on specific routes under maximum exposure conditions. (paper)

  9. Radiation Dose Measurement Using Chemical Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Han, Bum Soo

    2010-01-01

    The radiation dose can be estimated in various ways. Dose estimates can be obtained by either experiment or theoretical analysis. In experiments, radiation impact is assessed by measuring any change caused by energy deposition to the exposed matter, in terms of energy state (physical change), chemical production (chemical change) or biological abnormality (biological change). The chemical dosimetry is based on the implication that the energy deposited to the matter can be inferred from the consequential change in chemical production. The chemical dosimetry usually works on the sample that is an aqueous solution, a biological matter, or an organic substance. In this study, we estimated absorbed doses by quantitating chemical changes in matter caused by radiation exposure. Two different chemical dosimeters, Fricke and ECB (Ethanol-Chlorobenzene) dosimeter, were compared in several features including efficacy as dose indicator and effective dose range

  10. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    In any application involving the use of ionizing radiation in humans, risks and benefits must be properly evaluated and balanced. Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Recently, interest has grown in therapeutic agents for a number of applications in nuclear medicine, particularly in the treatment of hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies. This has heightened interest in the need for radiation dose calculations and challenged the scientific community to develop more patient-specific and relevant dose models. Consideration of radiation dose in such studies is central to efforts to maximize dose to tumor while sparing normal tissues. In many applications, a significant absorbed dose may be received by some radiosensitive organs, particularly the active marrow. This talk will review the methods and models used in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, and discuss some current trends and challenges in this field

  11. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  12. Plastic for indicating a radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.; Ohmori, S.

    1975-01-01

    A plastic film suitable for indicating radiation dose contains a chlorine polymer, at least one acid sensitive coloring agent and a plasticizer. The film undergoes a distinct change of color in response to a given radiation dose, the degree of change proportional to the total change. These films may be stored for a long period without loss of sensitivity, and have good color stability after irradiation. (auth)

  13. Emissions and doses from sources of ionising radiation in the Netherlands: radiation policy monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleveld, H.; Pruppers, M.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997 the Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment requested RIVM to develop an information system for policy monitoring. One of the motives was that the European Union requires that the competent authorities of each member state ensure that dose estimates due to practices involving exposure to ionising radiation are made as realistic as possible for the population as a whole and for reference groups in all places where such groups may occur. Emissions of radionuclides and radiation to the environment can be classified as follows: (1) emissions to the atmosphere, (2) emissions to the aquatic system and (3) emission of external radiation from radioactive materials and equipment that produces ionising radiation. Released radioactivity is dispersed via exposure pathways, such as the atmosphere, deposition on the ground and farmland products, drinking water, fish products, etc. This leads to radiation doses due to inhalation, ingestion and exposure to external radiation. To assess the possible radiation doses different kinds of models are applied, varying from simple multiplications with dispersion coefficients, transfer coefficients and dose conversion coefficients to complex dispersion models. In this paper an overview is given of the human-induced radiation doses in the Netherlands. Also, trends in and the effect of policy on the radiation dose of members of the public are investigated. This paper is based on an RIVM report published recently. A geographical distribution of radiation risks due to routine releases for a typical year in the Netherlands was published earlier

  14. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222 Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings

  15. Characteristics of natural background external radiation and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The two sources of natural radiation - cosmic rays and primordial radionuclides - are described. The factors affecting radiation doses received from natural radiation and the calculation of effective dose equivalent due to natural radiation are discussed. 10 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  17. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  18. Evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.A.; Grove, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive new drugs are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. Before a new drug can be marketed it must have an approved New Drug Application (NDA). Clinical investigations of a radioactive new drug are carried out under a Notice of Claimed Investigational Exemption for a New Drug (IND), submitted to the FDA. In the review of the IND, radiation doses are projected on the basis of experimental data from animal models and from calculations based upon radiation characteristics, predicted biodistribution of the drug in humans, and activity to be administered. FDA physicians review anticipated doses and prevent clinical investigations in humans when the potential risk of the use of a radioactive substance outweighs the prospect of achieving beneficial results from the administration of the drug. In the evaluation of an NDA, FDA staff attempt to assure that the intended diagnostic or therapeutic effect is achievable with the lowest practicable radiation dose. Radiation doses from radioactive new drugs are evaluated by physicians within the FDA. Important radioactive new drugs are also evaluated by the Radiopharmaceuticals Advisory Committee. FDA also supports the Center for Internal Radiation Dosimetry at Oak Ridge, to provide information regarding in vivo distribution and dosimetry to critical organs and the whole body from radioactive new drugs. The process for evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive new drugs for protection against use of unnecessary radiation exposure by patients in nuclear medicine procedures, a

  19. Radiation doses - maps and magnitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' Series presents information on the numerous sources and magnitude of exposure of man to radiation. These include the medical use of radiation, radioactive discharges to the environment, cosmic rays, gamma rays from the ground and buildings, radon gas and food and drink. A Pie chart represents the percentage contribution of each of those sources. Finally, the terms becquerel, microsievert and millisievert are explained. (U.K.)

  20. Dyed grafted films for large-dose radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Rehim, F; El-Sawy, N M; Abdel-Fattah, A A [National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Cairo (Egypt)

    1993-07-01

    By radiation-induced polymerization of acrylic acid onto poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) (ET) copolymer film and reacting the resulted grafted film with both Rhodamine B (RB) and Malachite Green (MG), new dosimeter films have been developed for high-dose gamma radiation applications in the range of absorbed doses from 10 to 180 kGy. The radiation-induced color bleaching has been analysed with visible spectrophotometry, either at the maximum of the absorption band peaking at 559 nm (for ETRB) or that peaking at 627 nm (for ETMG). The effects of different conditions of absorbed dose rate, temperature and relative humidity during irradiation and post-irradiation storage on dosimeter performance are discussed. (author).

  1. Progress in high-dose radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Nam, J.W.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a deluge of new high-dose dosimetry techniques and expanded applications of methods developed earlier. Many of the principal systems are calibrated by means of calorimetry, although production of heat is not always the final radiation effect of interest. Reference systems also include a number of chemical dose meters: ferrous sulphate, ferrous-cupric sulphate, and ceric sulphate acidic aqueous solutions. Requirements for stable and reliable transfer dose meters have led to further developments of several important high-dose systems: amino acids and saccharides analysed by ESR or lyoluminescence, thermoluminescent materials, radiochromic dyes and plastics, ceric-cerous solutions analysed by potentiometry, and ethanol-chlorobenzene solutions analysed by high-frequency oscillometry. A number of other prospective dose meters are also treated in this review. In addition, an IAEA programme of high-dose standardization and intercomparison for industrial radiation processing is described. (author)

  2. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  3. Dose estimation for space radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Feng; Xu Zhenhua; Huang Zengxin; Jia Xianghong

    2007-01-01

    For evaluating the effect of space radiation on human health, the dose was estimated using the models of space radiation environment, models of distribution of the spacecraft's or space suit's mass thickness and models of human body. The article describes these models and calculation methods. (authors)

  4. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Ayae

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p ≥ 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy 3 (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy 3 ] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy 3 ) and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were also significant and clinically useful for estimating the risk of rib fracture after hypofractionated PBT

  5. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Ayae [Proton Medical Research Center and Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)], e-mail: ayaek@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp [and others

    2013-04-15

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p {>=} 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy{sub 3} (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy{sub 3}] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy{sub 3}) and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were also significant and clinically useful for estimating

  6. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  7. Radiation induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will focus on delayed genetic effects occurring in the progeny of cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. We have developed a model system for investigating those genetic effects occurring multiple generations after radiation exposure. The presentation will describe some of the delayed effects observed after radiation exposures including delayed chromosomal rearrangements, and recombination events as determined by a plasmid based assay system. We will present new data on how changes in gene expression as measured by differential display and DNA microarray analysis provides a mechanism by which cells display a memory of irradiation, and introduce candidate genes that may play a role in initiating and perpetuation the unstable phenotype. These results will be discussed in terms of the recently described non-targeted Death Inducing Effect (DIE) where by secreted factors from clones of unstable cells can elicit effects in non irradiated cells and may serve to perpetuate the unstable phenotype in cells that themselves were not irradiated

  8. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants

  9. Different effects of dose rate on radiation-induced mutation frequency in various germ-cell stages of the mouse, and their implications for the analysis of tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The following factors affecting mutation induction by radiation in mice are discussed: dose rate, cell stage, and sex. It is suggested that for cancers of presumed mutational origin, the risk from chronic radiation exposure may be only one-third the risk from acute exposure. This is based only on responses of spermatogonia; other cell types behave quite differently. Specific and general applications are discussed

  10. Radiation dose reduction in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.E.; Hill, E.P.; Harpen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between image noise and radiation dose was investigated in computed tomography (CT) images of a pediatric abdomen phantom. A protocol which provided a minimum absorbed dose consistent with acceptable image noise criteria was determined for a fourth generation CT scanner. It was found that pediatric abdominal CT scans could maintain diagnostic quality with at least a 50% reduction in dose from the manufacturers' suggested protocol. (orig.)

  11. Dose mapping for documentation of radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation sterilization standards EN 552 and ISO 11137 require that dose mapping in real or simulated product be carried in connection with the process qualification. This paper reviews the recommendations given in the standards and discusses the difficulties and limitations of practical dose...... mapping. The paper further gives recommendations for effective dose mapping including traceable dosimetry, documented procedures for placement of dosimeters, and evaluation of measurement uncertainties. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Analysis of T101 outage radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Collective radiation dose during outage is about 80% of annual collective radiation dose at nuclear power plants (NPPs). T 101 Outage is the first four-year outage of Unit 1 at Tianwan Nuclear Power Station (TNPS) and thorough overhaul was undergone for the 105-day's duration. Therefore, T 101 Outage has significant reference meaning to reducing collective radiation dose at TNPS. This paper collects the radiation dose statistics during T 101 Outage and analyses the radiation dose distribution according to tasks, work kinds and varying trend of the collective radiation dose etc., comparing with other similar PWRs in the world. Based on the analysis this paper attempts to find out the major factors in collective radiation dose during T 101 Outage. The major positive factor is low radiation level at workplace, which profits from low content of Co in reactor construction materials, optimised high-temperature p H value of the primary circuit coolant within the tight range and reactor operation without trips within the first fuel cycle. One of the most negative factors is long outage duration and many person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone, caused by too many tasks and inefficient work. So besides keeping good performance of reducing radioactive sources, it should be focused on how to improve implementation of work management including work selection, planning and scheduling, work preparation, work implementation, work assessment and feedback, which can lead to reduced numbers of workers needed to perform a task, of person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone. Moreover, this leads to reduce occupational exposures in an ALARA fashion. (author)

  13. Work on optimum medical radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2010-01-01

    Every day the medical world makes use of X-rays and radioisotopes. Radiology allows organs to be visualised, nuclear medicine diagnoses and treats cancer by injecting radioisotopes, and radiotherapy uses ionising radiation for cancer therapy. The medical world is increasingly mindful of the risks of ionising radiation that patients are exposed to during these examinations and treatments. In 2009 SCK-CEN completed two research projects that should help optimise the radiation doses of patients.

  14. Radiation-induced DNA damage in tumors and normal tissues. II. Influence of dose, residual DNA damage and physiological factors in oxygenated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1994-01-01

    Detection and quantification of hypoxic cells in solid tumors is important for many experimental and clinical situations. Several laboratories, including ours, have suggested that assays which measure radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) might be used to detect or quantify hypoxic cells in tumors and normal tissues. Recently, we demonstrated the feasibility of using an alkaline elution assay that measures strand breaks and DPCs to detect and/or quantify hypoxic cells in tissues. For this approach to be valid, DPCs must not be formed to any great extent in irradiated oxygenated cells, and the formation and repair of strand breaks and DPCs in oxygenated cells must not be modified appreciably by physiological factors (e.g., temperature, pH and nutrient depletion) that are often found in solid tumors. To address these issues, two sets of experiments were performed. In one set of experiments, oxygenated 9L cells in tissue culture, subcutaneous 9L tumors and rat cerebella were irradiated with doses of 15 or 50 Gy and allowed to repair until the residual strand break damage was low enough to detect DPCs. In another set of experiments, oxygenated exponentially growing or plateau-phase 9L cells in tissue culture were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy at 37 or 20 degrees C, while the cells were maintained at a pH of either 6.6 or 7.3. DNA-protein crosslinks were formed in oxygenated cells about 100 times less efficiently than in hypoxic cells. In addition, temperature, pH, nutrient depletion and growth phase did not appreciably alter the formation and repair of strand breaks or the formation of DPCs in oxygenated 9L cells. These results support the use of this DNA damage assay for the detection and quantification of hypoxic cells in solid tumors. 27 refs., 5 tabs

  15. Radiation Doses Received by the Irish Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P.A.; Organo, C.; Hone, C.; Fenton, D.

    2008-05-01

    Some chemical elements present in the environment since the Earth was formed are naturally radioactive and exposure to these sources of radiation cannot be avoided. There have also been additions to this natural inventory from artificial sources of radiation that did not exist before the 1940s. Other sources of radiation exposure include cosmic radiation from outer space and the use of radiation in medical diagnosis and treatment. There can be large variability in the dose received by invividual members of the population from any given source. Some sources of radiation expose every member of the population while, in other cases, only selected individuals may be exposed. For example, natural radioactivity is found in all soils and therefore everybody receives some radiation dose from this activity. On the other hand, in the case of medical exposures, only those who undergo a medical procedure using radiation will receive a radiation dose. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has undertaken a comprehensive review of the relevant data on radiation exposure in Ireland. Where no national data have been identified, the RPII has either undertaken its own research or has referred to the international literature to provide a best estimate of what the exposure in Ireland might be. This has allowed the relative contribution of each source to be quantified. This new evaluation is the most up-to-date assessment of radiation exposure and updates the assessment previously reported in 2004. The dose quoted for each source is the annual 'per caput' dose calculated on the basis of the most recently available data. This is an average value calculated by adding the doses received by each individual exposed to a given radiation source and dividing the total by the current population of 4.24 million. All figures have been rounded, consistent with the accuracy of the data. In line with accepted international practice, where exposure takes place both indoors and

  16. Radiation Dose from Reentrant Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Cleghorn, T. E.; Watts, J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating the crew exposures during an EVA, the contribution of reentrant electrons has always been neglected. Although the flux of these electrons is small compared to the flux of trapped electrons, their energy spectrum extends to several GeV compared to about 7 MeV for trapped electrons. This is also true of splash electrons. Using the measured reentrant electron energy spectra, it is shown that the dose contribution of these electrons to the blood forming organs (BFO) is more than 10 times greater than that from the trapped electrons. The calculations also show that the dose-depth response is a very slowly changing function of depth, and thus adding reasonable amounts of additional shielding would not significantly lower the dose to BFO.

  17. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  18. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  19. Analysis gives alterations stable chromosomic induced by the radiation in vitro the sanguine samples to well-known dose. Preliminary results obtained by means of chromosomic painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.J.; Moreno, M.; Gomez-Espi, M.; Olivares, P.; Herranz, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the University General Hospital Gregorio Marannon, once standardized the technique in situ hybridization with fluorescence by means of painting chromosomic the couples 1 and 2 you this carrying out the irradiation gives sanguine samples to well-known dose The objective these irradiations it is the elaboration in vitro a calibration chart dose effect for gamma ray. This new curve will allow to estimate dose in individuals with suspicion overexposure to ionizing radiations, solving some gives the limitations that it presents the technique classic cytogenetics

  20. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Parnell-Parmley, June E.; Charkot, Ellen; BenDavid, Guila; Krajewski, Connie; Haidar, Salwa; Moineddin, Rahim

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  1. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure.

  2. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  3. Advance of study on hormesis of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    There have been growing interests in recent years over the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on human. The paper gives a brief review on the LDR studies, which include LDR-induced hormesis and adaptive response, LDR experiments in vivo or in vitro and epidemiologic investigation, and clinical applications of LDR as well

  4. Dose and temperature criteria for radiation chlorination of ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasil, Z.

    1979-01-01

    General criteria determining the region of dose rates and temperatures at which a radiation-induced chain reaction proceeds are applied to a series of subsequent and competitive chain reactions of the chlorination of ethane and its derivatives. The calculations presume that the reactions proceed in an ideal through-flow chemical reactor with a piston flow. (M.S.)

  5. Plants as warning signal for exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli Ibrahim; Norhafiz Talib

    2012-01-01

    The stamen-hair system of Tradescantia for flower colour has proven to be one of the most suitable materials to study the frequency of mutations induced by low doses of various ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens. The system has also been used successfully for detecting mutagenic synergisms among chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations as well as for studying the variations of spontaneous mutation frequency. In this study of radiobiology, the main objective is to observe somatic mutation (occurrence of pink cells from blue cells) induced on stamen hairs of five Tradescantia sp. available in Malaysia after exposure to low doses of chronic gamma irradiation using Gamma Green House. Pink cells appeared only on Tradescantia Pallida Purpurea stamen hairs after 13 days of exposure to irradiation with different doses of gamma rays. The highest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded from flowers irradiated with the highest dose of 6.37 Gy with 0.07 Gy/ h of dose rate. The lowest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded with an average of 0.57, irradiated with the lowest dose of 0.91 Gy with 0.01 Gy/ h of dose rate. There were no pink cells observed on Tradescantia Spathaceae Discolor after exposure to different doses of gamma rays. Similar negative results were observed for the control experiments. The principal cells in this assay are the mitotic stamen hair cells developing in the young flower buds. After exposure to radiation, the heterozygous dominant blue character of the stamen hair cell is prevented, resulting in the appearance of the recessive pink color. Furthermore, no pink cell appears on all species of Tradescantia spathaceae after irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. The sensitivity of the Tradescantia has been used widely and has demonstrated the relation between radiation dose and frequency of mutation observed at low doses which can contribute to the effects of low doses and their consequences for human health. This system

  6. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  7. Potential gonadal dose from leakage radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author draws attention to the potential dangers of leakage radiation from mobile image intensifier units, and points out that during interventional urological procedures, radiation from below the urologist's knees may irradiate male gonads without being intercepted by protective aprons. Results are presented for a Shimatzu WHA mobile II, phantom doses being measured with an ionization chamber. Dose rates measured in the male gonad position were compared with rates at waist level behind a 0.35 mm lead equivalent shielding and dose rates at collar level outside the lead apron. Results are also presented of a study on the effect on gonad dose of a) adding 0.7 mm lead shielding to the tube housing and b) adding 0.7 mm lead and removing the spacer cone to reduce scatter. Results show that it is possible for gonad doses to be comparable with those assumed for the eyes, rather than the body. (Author)

  8. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  9. Radiation dose to the lens and cataract formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Warrington, A.P.; Bessell, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the radiation tolerance of the lens of the eye and the incidence of radiation-induced lens changes in patients treated by fractionated supervoltage radiation therapy for orbital tumors. Forty patients treated for orbital lymphoma and pseudotumor with tumor doses of 20--40 Gy were studied. The lens was partly shielded using lead cylinders in most cases. The dose to the germinative zone of the lens was estimated by measurements in a tissue equivalent phantom using both film densitometry and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Opthalmological examination was performed at 6 monthly intervals after treatment. The lead shield was found to reduce the dose to the germinative zone of the lens to between 36--50% of the tumor dose for Cobalt beam therapy, and to between 11--18% for 5 MeV x-rays. Consequently, the lens doses were in the range 4.5--30 Gy in 10--20 fractions. Lens opacities first appeared from between 3 and 9 years after irradiation. Impairment of visual acuity ensued in 74% of the patients who developed lens opacities. The incidence of lens changes was strongly dose-related. None was seen after doses of 5 Gy or lower, whereas doses of 16.5 Gy or higher were all followed by lens opacities which impaired visual acuity. The largest number of patients received a maximum lens dose of 15 Gy; in this group the actuarial incidence of lens opacities at 8 years was 57% with visual impairment in 38%. The adult lens can tolerate a total dose of 5 Gy during a fractionated course of supervoltage radiation therapy without showing any changes. Doses of 16.5 Gy or higher will almost invariably lead to visual impairment. The dose which causes a 50% probability of visual impairment is approximately 15 Gy. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Lisjak, I.; Vekic, B.; Poje, M.; Planinic, J.

    2008-01-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10 B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 μSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 μSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 μSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data

  11. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Lisjak, I. [Croatia Airlines, Zagreb (Croatia); Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Poje, M. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia)], E-mail: planinic@ffos.hr

    2008-02-15

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or {sup 10}B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 {mu}Sv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 {mu}Sv or the average dose rate of 2.7 {mu}Sv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 {mu}Sv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  12. Radiation dose from cigarette tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, Constantin

    2008-01-01

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as 226 Ra and 210 Pb of the uranium series and 228 Ra of the thorium series and or man-made produced radionuclides, such as 137 Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226 Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 μSv y -1 (average 79.7 μSv y -1 ), while for 228 Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 μSv y -1 (average 67.1 μSv y -1 ) and for 210 Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 μSv y -1 (average 104.7 μSv y -1 ), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 μSv y -1 (average 251.5 μSv y -1 ). The annual effective dose from 137 Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 μSv y -1 (average 199.3 μSv y -1 ). (author)

  13. Low radiation doses and antinuclear lobby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobnik, J.

    1987-01-01

    The probability of mutations or diseases resulting from other than radiation causes is negatively dependent on radiation. Thus, for instance, the incidence of cancer, is demonstrably lower in areas with a higher radiation background. The hypothesis is expressed that there exist repair mechanisms for DNA damage which will repair the damage, and will give priority to those genes which are currently active. Survival and stochastic processes are not dependent on the overall repair of DNA but on the repair of critical function genes. New discoveries shed a different light on views of the linear dependence of radiation damage on the low level doses. (M.D.)

  14. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Philips fluoroscopy systems DoseWise: perfect image, perfect sense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueve, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Although image quality (IQ) is the ultimate goal for accurate diagnosis and treatment, minimizing radiation dose is equally important. This is especially true when pediatric patients are examined, because their sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer is two to three times greater than that of adults. DoseWise is an ALARA-based philosophy within Philips Medical Systems that is active at every level of product design. It encompasses a set of techniques, programs and practices that ensures optimal IQ while protecting people in the X-ray environments. DoseWise methods include management of the X-ray beam, less radiation-on time and more dose information for the operator. Smart beam management provides automatic customization of the X-ray beam spectrum, shape, and pulse frequency. The Philips-patented grid-controlled fluoroscopy (GCF) provides grid switching of the X-ray beam in the X-ray tube instead of the traditional generator switching method. In the examination of pediatric patients, DoseWise technology has been scientifically documented to reduce radiation dose to <10% of the dose of traditional continuous fluoroscopy systems. The result is improved IQ at a significantly lower effective dose, which contributes to the safety of patients and staff. (orig.)

  15. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin

  16. Dose distribution following selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.A.; Klemp, P.F.; Egan, G.; Mina, L.L.; Burton, M.A.; Gray, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy is the intrahepatic arterial injection of microspheres labelled with 90Y. The microspheres lodge in the precapillary circulation of tumor resulting in internal radiation therapy. The activity of the 90Y injected is managed by successive administrations of labelled microspheres and after each injection probing the liver with a calibrated beta probe to assess the dose to the superficial layers of normal tissue. Predicted doses of 75 Gy have been delivered without subsequent evidence of radiation damage to normal cells. This contrasts with the complications resulting from doses in excess of 30 Gy delivered from external beam radiotherapy. Detailed analysis of microsphere distribution in a cubic centimeter of normal liver and the calculation of dose to a 3-dimensional fine grid has shown that the radiation distribution created by the finite size and distribution of the microspheres results in an highly heterogeneous dose pattern. It has been shown that a third of normal liver will receive less than 33.7% of the dose predicted by assuming an homogeneous distribution of 90Y

  17. Radiation doses to children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmedal, Lise J. [Helse Fonna, Department of Radiology, Stord Hospital, Stord (Norway); Friberg, Eva G.; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde [The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Laegreid, Liv [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Bergen (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology Section, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus are still followed routinely with frequent head CT scans. To estimate the effective dose, brain and lens doses from these examinations during childhood, and to assess dose variation per examination. All children born between 1983 and 1995 and treated for hydrocephalus between 1983 and 2002 were included. We retrospectively registered the number of examinations and the applied scan parameters. The effective dose was calculated using mean conversion factors from the CT dose index measured free in air, while doses to the lens and brain were estimated using tabulated CT dose index values measured in a head phantom. A total of 687 CT examinations were performed in 67 children. The mean effective dose, lens dose and brain dose to children over 6 months of age were 1.2 mSv, 52 mGy and 33 mGy, respectively, and the corresponding doses to younger children were 3.2 mSv, 60 mGy and 48 mGy. The effective dose per CT examination varied by a factor of 64. None of the children was exposed to doses known to cause deterministic effects. However, since the threshold for radiation-induced damage is not known with certainty, alternative modalities such as US and MRI should be used whenever possible. (orig.)

  18. Radiation absorbed dose from medically administered radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.; Kaul, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for medical examinations is increasing. Surveys carried out in West Berlin show a 20% average yearly increase in such examinations. This implies an increased genetic and somatic radiation exposure of the population in general. Determination of radiation exposure of the population as well as of individual patients examined requires a knowledge of the radiation dose absorbed by each organ affected by each examination. An extensive survey of the literature revealed that different authors reported widely different dose values for the same defined examination methods and radiopharmaceuticals. The reason for this can be found in the uncertainty of the available biokinetic data for dose calculations and in the application of various mathematical models to describe the kinetics and calculation of organ doses. Therefore, the authors recalculated some of the dose values published for radiopharmaceuticals used in patients by applying biokinetic data obtained from exponential models of usable metabolism data reported in the literature. The calculation of organ dose values was done according to the concept of absorbed fractions in its extended form. For all radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine the energy dose values for the most important organs (ovaries, testicles, liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys, skeleton, total body or residual body) were recalculated and tabulated for the gonads, skeleton and critical or examined organs respectively. These dose values are compared with those reported in the literature and the reasons for the observed deviations are discussed. On the basis of recalculated dose values for the gonads and bone-marrow as well as on the basis of results of statistical surveys in West Berlin, the genetically significant dose and the somatically (leukemia) significant dose were calculated for 1970 and estimated for 1975. For 1970 the GSD was 0.2 mrad and the LSD was 0.7 mrad. For 1975 the GSD is estimated at < 0.5 mrad and the

  19. A method to adjust radiation dose-response relationships for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical risk factors for radiation induced toxicity have been identified in the literature. Here, we present a method to quantify the effect of clinical risk factors on radiation dose-response curves and apply the method to adjust the dose-response for radiation pneumonitis for patients...

  20. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  1. Internal radiation dose of Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Nagaratnam, A.; Sharma, U.C.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of γ-rays from 40 K by whole-body counting provides a sensitive technique to estimate the body 40 K radioactivity. In India, right from the whole body counter (WBC) of Trombay in the early 1960s to the INMAS WBC of 1970s, some limited information has been available about the internal 40 K of Indians. However, information on 40 K dose with age and sex of Indians is scanty. Therefore, a systematic study was taken up to generate this information

  2. We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose concept was designed to compare the generic risks of exposure to different radiation fields. More commonly these days, it is used to estimate or compare radiation-induced cancer risks. For various reasons, effective dose represents flawed science: for instance, the tissue-specific weighting factors used to calculate effective dose are a subjective mix of different endpoints; and the marked and differing age and gender dependencies for different health detriment endpoints are not taken into account. This paper suggests that effective dose could be replaced with a new quantity, ‘effective risk’, which, like effective dose, is a weighted sum of equivalent doses to different tissues. Unlike effective dose, where the tissue-dependent weighting factors are a set of generic, subjective committee-defined numbers, the weighting factors for effective risk are simply evaluated tissue-specific lifetime cancer risks per unit equivalent dose. Effective risk, which has the potential to be age and gender specific if desired, would perform the same comparative role as effective dose, be just as easy to estimate, be less prone to misuse, be more directly understandable, and would be based on solid science. An added major advantage is that it gives the users some feel for the actual numerical values of the radiation risks they are trying to control.

  3. Radiation doses from phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The activity concentrations determined of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in nCi/kg P 2 O 5 for the five most important kinds of fertilizer as well as their percent share in the economy year 1973/74 in the FRG are compiled in a table. From these values, the consumption of 0.917 million tons P 2 O 5 and from an average annual fertilizer coverage of 68.3 kg/ha, one can calculate a distribution of 32 Ci 226 Ra, 1 Ci 232 Th and 543 Ci 40 K over the total agriculturally used area, in other words, a deposit of 2.4 μCi 226 Ra, 0.07 μCi 232 Th and 40.5 μCi 40 K per ha. Taking a pessimistic view, an external radiation exposure of 0.11 mrad/a was calculated for gonads and bone marrow. If the total accumulation of 226 Ra (38% of the radiation exposure) from phosphate fertilizers from the ground during the last 80 years is assumed, then there is an exposure of 1.7 mrad/a for individual members of the population and 2.0 mrad/a for those occupied in agriculture. (HP/LH) [de

  4. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  5. Metrology of radiation doses in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclet, H.

    2016-01-01

    This article recalls how to calculate effective and equivalent doses in radiology from the measured value of the absorbed dose. The 97/43 EURATOM directive defines irradiation standards for diagnostic radiology (NRD) as the value of the radiation dose received by the patient's skin when the diagnostic exam is performed. NRD values are standard values that can be exceeded only with right medical or technical reasons, they are neither limit values nor optimized values. The purpose of NRD values is to avoid the over-irradiation of patients and to homogenize radiologists' practices. French laws impose how and when radiologists have to calculate the radiation dose received by the patient's skin. The calculated values have to be compared with NRD values and any difference has to be justified. A table gives NRD values for all diagnostic exams. (A.C.)

  6. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  7. Dose specification for radiation therapy: dose to water or dose to medium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C-M; Li Jinsheng

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method enables accurate dose calculation for radiation therapy treatment planning and has been implemented in some commercial treatment planning systems. Unlike conventional dose calculation algorithms that provide patient dose information in terms of dose to water with variable electron density, the Monte Carlo method calculates the energy deposition in different media and expresses dose to a medium. This paper discusses the differences in dose calculated using water with different electron densities and that calculated for different biological media and the clinical issues on dose specification including dose prescription and plan evaluation using dose to water and dose to medium. We will demonstrate that conventional photon dose calculation algorithms compute doses similar to those simulated by Monte Carlo using water with different electron densities, which are close (<4% differences) to doses to media but significantly different (up to 11%) from doses to water converted from doses to media following American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 105 recommendations. Our results suggest that for consistency with previous radiation therapy experience Monte Carlo photon algorithms report dose to medium for radiotherapy dose prescription, treatment plan evaluation and treatment outcome analysis.

  8. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  9. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    radiation, a time after radiation, individual and situational conditions of the irradiated object and the environment. A group of essential radiation toxins with antigenic properties expressed significantly and specifically for different forms of the radiation disease represents the group of compounds: glycoproteins and lipoproteins that accumulate in the lymphatic system of mammals at once in the first hours after radiation. The molecular weight of radiation toxins of S.D.R. group constitutes 200-250 k DA. The essential radiation toxins, preparations of S.D.R. (Specific Radiation Determinant), were isolated from the lymphatic system of laboratory and agricultural animals that were irradiated by doses capable to induce development of cerebral (S.D.R. - 1), toxic (S.D.R.-2), gastrointestinal (S.D.R.-3) and typical (S.D.R.-4) forms of the acute radiation disease. Biological properties and reproduction effects of preparations of essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group depended on a magnitude of radiation doses that animal-donors absorbed being irradiated. The essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group isolated from the lymphatic system of irradiated animals and injected by the different doses to intact animals can provide the effects which induce development of different forms of the acute radiation disease. Different doses of active biological substance of S.D.R. can provide different effects:1. Optimal doses are necessary for an active immune response and radioprotection effects 2. Toxic doses can induce and stimulate the radiation disease. Optimal doses of S.D.R. preparations applied for active immunization are determined very individually and depend on species of laboratory animals, their weight and gender. Toxic doses of S.D.R. preparations can cause, stimulate and imitate the development of different forms of the acute radiation syndromes and any consequences of the acute radiation disorder. Previously researchers allow making assumption what toxic doses of biological

  10. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D.; Jones, J.; Gonda, S.; Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G.; Kirchin, V.; Rachael, C.

    2006-01-01

    radiation, a time after radiation, individual and situational conditions of the irradiated object and the environment. A group of essential radiation toxins with antigenic properties expressed significantly and specifically for different forms of the radiation disease represents the group of compounds: glycoproteins and lipoproteins that accumulate in the lymphatic system of mammals at once in the first hours after radiation. The molecular weight of radiation toxins of S.D.R. group constitutes 200-250 k DA. The essential radiation toxins, preparations of S.D.R. (Specific Radiation Determinant), were isolated from the lymphatic system of laboratory and agricultural animals that were irradiated by doses capable to induce development of cerebral (S.D.R. - 1), toxic (S.D.R.-2), gastrointestinal (S.D.R.-3) and typical (S.D.R.-4) forms of the acute radiation disease. Biological properties and reproduction effects of preparations of essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group depended on a magnitude of radiation doses that animal-donors absorbed being irradiated. The essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group isolated from the lymphatic system of irradiated animals and injected by the different doses to intact animals can provide the effects which induce development of different forms of the acute radiation disease. Different doses of active biological substance of S.D.R. can provide different effects:1. Optimal doses are necessary for an active immune response and radioprotection effects 2. Toxic doses can induce and stimulate the radiation disease. Optimal doses of S.D.R. preparations applied for active immunization are determined very individually and depend on species of laboratory animals, their weight and gender. Toxic doses of S.D.R. preparations can cause, stimulate and imitate the development of different forms of the acute radiation syndromes and any consequences of the acute radiation disorder. Previously researchers allow making assumption what toxic doses of biological

  11. Tumor induction by small doses ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, L.M. van

    1981-01-01

    Tumour induction by low radiation doses is in general a non-linear process. However, two exceptions are well known: myeloid leukemia in Rf mice and mamma tumours in Sprague-Dawley rats. The hypothesis that radiation is highly oncogenic in combination with cell growth stimuli, as reaction to massive cell death after damage of nuclear DNA, is applied to man and the consequences are discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Visual indicator of absorbed radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generalova, V V; Krasovitskii, B M; Vainshtok, B A; Gurskii, M N

    1968-10-15

    A visual indicator of the absorbed doses of ionizing radiation is proposed. The indicator has a polymer base with the addition of a dye. A distinctive feature of the indicator consists of the use of polystyrene as its polymer base with the addition of halogen-containing hydrocarbon and the light-proof dye. Such combination of the radiation-resistant polymer of polystyrene and the light-proof dyestuff makes the proposed indicator highly stable.

  13. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey; Leonov, Sergey; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry; Osipov, Andreyan N

    2017-11-21

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, low-dose irradiation resulted in residual γН2АХ foci still present at 24 h. Notably, these low dose induced residual γН2АХ foci were not co-localized with рАТМ foci and were observed predominantly in the proliferating Кi67 positive (Кi67+) cells. The number of γН2АХ foci and the fraction of nonproliferating (Кi67-) and senescent (SA-β-gal+) cells measured at passage 11 were increased in cultures exposed to an intermediate dose compared to unirradiated controls. These delayed effects were not seen in the progeny of cells that were irradiated with low-dose X-rays, although such exposure resulted in residual γН2АХ foci in directly irradiated cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the low-dose IR induced residual γH2AХ foci do not play a role in delayed irradiation consequences, associated with cellular senescence in cultured MSCs.

  14. Radiation-induced myelomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzick, J.

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that radiation can cause myeloid leukemia. However, no excess of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been observed. Myelomatosis, like chronic lymphocytic leukemia, is a tumor of B lymphocytes. To determine whether this disease has a radiogenic origin, we surveyed all cohorts of persons exposed to radiation for which data on cancer-related mortaility are available. An excess of myeloma was found in most cohorts. However, a striking deficit was found in two groups irradiated intensely for uterine neoplasms (three cases observed, 10.71 expected; P = 0.012). All other groups combined had a highly significant excess (50 observed, 22.21 expected; P = 2 x 10 -7 ). The largest relative risk appeared among persons receiving internal doses of α-particles (14 observed, 3.24 expected; P = 2 x 10 -5 ), but a significant excess (13 observed, 6.33 expected; P = 0.026) was also found in patients receiving only therapeutic or diagnostic γ-rays or x-rays. Most cases occurred 15 to 25 years after exposure

  15. Radiation induced emulsion polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannett, V.T.; Stahel, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    High energy radiation is particularly favored for the initiation of emulsion polymerization. The yield of free radicals, for example, from the radiolysis of the aqueous phase, is high; G(radical) values of 5-7. In addition, the rather special kinetics associated with emulsion polymerization lead, in general, to very large kinetic chain lengths, even with 'non-ideal' monomers such as vinyl acetate. Together, high polymerization rates at low doses become possible. There are some important advantages of radiation polymerization compared with chemical initiators, such as potassium persulfate. Perhaps the most important among them is the temperature independence of the initiation step. This makes low temperature polymerization very accessible. With monomers such as vinyl acetate, where chain termination to monomer is predominant, low temperatures lead to often highly desirable higher molecular weights. With styrene, the classical ideally behaved monomer, there are the advantages such as, for example, the feasibility of using cationic monomers. These and some attendant disadvantages are discussed in detail, including pilot plant studies

  16. Radiation effects on and dose enhancement of electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srour, J.R.; Long, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes radiation effects on and dose enhancement factors for electronic materials. Alteration of the electrical properties of solid-state devices and integrated circuits by impinging radiation is well-known. Such changes may cause an electronic subsystem to fail, thus there is currently great interest in devising methods for avoiding radiation-induced degradation. The development of radiation-hardened devices and circuits is an exciting approach to solving this problem for many applications, since it could minimize the need for shielding or other system hardening techniques. Part 1 describes the basic mechanisms of radiation effects on electronic materials, devices, and integrated circuits. Radiation effects in bulk silicon and in silicon devices are treated. Ionizing radiation effects in silicon dioxide films and silicon MOS devices are discussed. Single event phenomena are considered. Key literature references and a bibliography are provided. Part II provides tabulations of dose enhancement factors for electronic devices in x-ray and gamma-ray environments. The data are applicable to a wide range of semiconductor devices and selected types of capacitors. Radiation environments discussed find application in system design and in radiation test facilities

  17. Pathology of experimental radiation pancarditis, 1. Observation on radiation-induced heart injuries following a single dose of x-ray irradiation to rabbit heart with special reference to its pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, S [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced heart injuries were morphologically studied by using the rabbits irradiated with a single dose of 3,000R (group I) or 300R X-ray (group II) from 1 hour until 6 months. There was no essential difference in the lesions of the hearts from group I and that of group II. Acute epicarditis was found as early as 1 hour after irradiation and it became maximum in severity at 1 - 2 days. In the myocardium, there were degeneration and resolution of the myocardial cell, various architectural changes of mitochondria, and disorganization of the intercalated disc. Polymorphonuclear cell infiltration and endothelial injuries of the capillaries occurred in the interstitial tissue. In addition, endocarditis with or without thrombus formation was often found. Acute inflammation was seen in the myocardium of group II rather later than that of group I, but it disappeared earlier. In the later stage, fibrosis finally occurred in the epicardium and endocardium. Glycoprotein degeneration of the muscle cells and fibrosis appeared in the myocardium. The pathogenesis of radiation pancarditis is thought to be dependent not only on the disturbance of microcirculation caused by endothelial cell damage of the capillaries, but also on alterations of the myocardial mitochondria as a result of direct injury.

  18. Beta induced Bremsstrahlung dose rate in concrete shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetric study of beta-induced Bremsstrahlung in concrete is importance in the field of radiation protection. The efficiency, intensity and dose rate of beta induced Bremsstrahlung by 113 pure beta nuclides in concrete shielding is computed. The Bremsstrahlung dosimetric parameters such as the efficiency (yield), Intensity and dose rate of Bremsstrahlung are low for 199 Au and high for 104 Tc in concrete. The efficiency, Intensity and dose rate of Bremsstrahlung increases with maximum energy of beta nuclide (Emax) and modified atomic number (Zmod) of the target. The estimated Bremsstrahlung efficiency, Intensity and dose rate are useful in the calculations photon track-length distributions. These parameters are useful to determine the quality and quantity of the radiation (known as the source term). Precise estimation of this source term is very important in planning of radiation shielding. (author)

  19. Effects of small doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty remains about the quantitative effects of doses of ionising radiation less than 0.2 Sv. Estimates of hereditary effects, based on the atomic bomb survivors, suggest that the mutation doubling dose is about 2 Sv for acute low LET radiation, but the confidence limits are wide. The idea that paternal gonadal irradiation might explain the Seascale cluster of childhood leukaemia has been disproved. Fetal irradiation may lead to a reduction in IQ and an increase in seizures in childhood proportional to dose. Estimates that doses to a whole population cause a risk of cancer proportional to dose, with 0.1 Sv given acutely causing a risk of 1%, will need to be modified as more information is obtained, but the idea that there is a threshold for risk above this level is not supported by observations on the irradiated fetus or the effect of fallout. The idea, based on ecological observations, that small doses protect against the development of cancer is refuted by the effect of radon in houses. New observations on the atomic bomb survivors have raised afresh the possibility that small doses may also have other somatic effects. (author)

  20. Radiologist and angiographic procedures. Absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tryhus, M.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Kelsey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation dose absorbed by the angiographer during angiographic procedures is of vital importance to the radiologist. Nevertheless, most articles on the subject are incomplete, and few measure gonadal dose. In this study, three TLDs were used for each of the following sites: radiologist's eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding apron, and hands. The average dose during carotid angiograms was 2.6, 4.1, 0.4, 4.7, and 7.1 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without .5 mm of lead shielding, and hands, respectively. Average dose during abdominal and peripheral vascular angiographic procedures was 5.2, 7.5, 1.2, 8.5, and 39.9 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding, and hands, respectively. A literature review demonstrates a significant reduction in radiation dose to the angiographer after the advent of automated injectors. Our measured doses for carotid angiography are compatible with contemporary reported values. There was poor correlation with fluoroscopy time and measured dose to the angiographer

  1. Radiation- induced aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tease, C.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of ionizing radiation to induce aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells has been investigated experimentally in the laboratory mouse using a variety of cytogenetic and genetic methods. These studies have provided unambiguous evidence of induced nondisjunction in both male and female germ cells when the effect of irradiation is screened in meiotic cells or preimplantation embryos. In contrast, however, cytogenetic analyses of post-implantation embryos and genetic assays for induced chromosome gains have not found a significant radiation effect. These apparently contradictory findings may be reconciled if (a) radiation induces tertiary rather than primary trisomy, or (b) induces embryo-lethal genetic damage, such as deletions, in addition to numerical anomalies. Either or both of these explanations may account for the apparent loss during gestation of radiation-induced trisomic embryos. Extrapolating from the information so far available, it seems unlikely that environmental exposure to low doses if low dose rate radiation will result in a detectable increase in the rate of aneuploidy in the human population. (author)

  2. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  3. Brachytherapy radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Biase, Steven J.; Wallner, Kent; Tralins, Kevin; Sutlief, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB) in brachytherapy-related impotence. Methods and Materials: Fourteen Pd-103 or I-125 implant patients were studied. For patients treated with implant alone, the prostate and margin (clinical target volume [CTV]) received a prescription dose of 144 Gy for I-125 or 115 Gy for Pd-103. Two patients received Pd-103 (90 Gy) with 46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Axial CT images were acquired 2 to 4 hours postoperatively for postimplant dosimetry. Because the NVBs cannot be visualized on CT, NVB calculation points were determined according to previously published anatomic descriptions. Bilateral NVB points were considered to lie posterior-laterally, approximately 2 mm from the prostatic capsule. NVB doses were recorded bilaterally, at 0.5-cm intervals from the prostatic base. Results: For Pd-103, the average NVB doses ranged from 150 Gy to 260 Gy, or 130% to 226% of the prescription dose. For I-125, the average NVB dose ranged from 200 Gy to 325 Gy, or 140% to 225% of the prescription dose. These was no consistent relationship between the NVB dose and the distance from the prostatic base. To examine the possible effect of minor deviations of our calculation points from the true NVB location, we performed NVB calculations at points 2 mm medial or lateral from the NVB calculation point in 8 patients. Doses at these alternate calculation points were comparable, although there was greater variability with small changes in the calculation point if sources were located outside the capsule, near the NVB calculation point. Three patients who developed early postimplant impotence had maximal NVB doses that far exceeded the average values. Conclusions: In the next few years, we hope to clarify the role of high NVB radiation doses on potency, by correlating NVB dose calculations with a large number of patients enrolled in an ongoing I-125 versus Pd-103 trial for early-stage patients

  4. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  5. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  6. Microbiological aspects relating to the choice of radiation sterilization dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitby, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is widely used for sterilization of single-use medical devices, and it is employed for its lethal effect on microbial life. Microbes are capable of regenerating from a single surviving cell, and individual cells of some microbial species are highly resistant to the lethal effects of radiation. It is necessary to employ radiation doses far in excess of those lethal to man or animals to ensure that no viable microbe remains to repopulate the device or the patient at the time that the device is used. Ionizations induce the production of short-lived free radicals that also induce lethal changes in cells. The sensitivity of microbial species to these changes varies markedly but since the changes are induced within the cell, each cell has to sustain the necessary amount of lethal damage before death will occur. Therefore the death of cells will occur in the exponential mode the surviving fraction decreasing with increasing dose. Using a semi-logarithmic plot, curves of three types may be generated, a simple exponential curve with a constant slope over the whole dose range, one where an initial shoulder is followed by a constant slope, and curves which are concave, and only seen in mixed bacterial populations of differing radiation resistance. (author)

  7. Bio-indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1990-12-01

    In nuclear facilities, such as Chalk River Laboratories, dose to the atomic radiation workers (ARWs) is assessed routinely by using physical dosimeters and bioassay procedures in accordance with regulatory recommendations. However, these procedures may be insufficient in some circumstances, e.g., in cases where the reading of the physical dosimeters is questioned, in cases of radiation accidents where the person(s) in question was not wearing a dosimeter, or in the event of a radiation emergency when an exposure above the dose limits is possible. The desirability of being able to assess radiation dose on the basis of radio-biological effects has prompted the Dosimetric Research Branch to investigate the suitability of biological devices and techniques that could be used for this purpose. Current biological dosimetry concepts suggest that there does not appear to be any bio-indicator that could reliably measure the very low doses that are routinely measured by the physical devices presently in use. Nonetheless, bio-indicators may be useful in providing valuable supplementary information in cases of unusual radiation exposures, such as when the estimated body doses are doubtful because of lack of proper physical measurements, or in cases where available results need to be confirmed for medical treatment plannings. This report evaluates the present state of biological dosimetry and, in particular, assesses the efficiency and limits of individual indicators. This has led to the recommendation of a few promising research areas that may result in the development of appropriate biological dosimeters for operational and emergency needs at Chalk River

  8. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, John; Day, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  9. Scatter Dose in Patients in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W. F. O.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy are often treated with high energy radiation (bremsstrahlung) which causes scatter doses in the patients from various sources as photon scatter coming from collimator, gantry, patient, patient table or room (walls, floor, air) or particle doses resulting from gamma-particle reactions in the atomic nucleus if the photon energies are above 8 MeV. In the last years new treatment techniques like IMRT (esp the step-and-shoot- or the MIMIC-techniques) have increased interest in these topics again. In the lecture an overview about recent measurements on scatter doses resulting from gantry, table and room shall be given. Scatter doses resulting from the volume treated in the patient to other critical parts of the body like eyes, ovarii etc. have been measured in two diploma works in our institute and are compared with a program (PERIDOSE; van der Giessen, Netherlands) to estimate them. In some cases these scatter doses have led to changes of treatment modalities. Also an overview and estimation of doses resulting from photon-particle interactions is given according to a publication from Gudowska et al.(Gudowska I, Brahme A, Andreo P, Gudowski W, Kierkegaard J. Calculation of absorbed dose and biological effectiveness from photonuclear reactions in a bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV. Phys Med Biol 1999; 44(9):2099-2125.). Energy dose has been calculated with Monte Carlo-methods and is compared with analytical methods for 50 MV bremsstrahlung. From these data biologically effective doses from particles in different depths of the body can be estimated also for energies used in normal radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Radiation doses from radioactivity in incandescent mantles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Thorium nitrate is used in the production of incandescent mantles for gas lanterns. In this report dose estimates are given for internal and external exposure that result from the use of the incandescent mantles for gas lanterns. The collective, effective dose equivalent for all users of gas mantles is estimated to be about 100 Sv per annum in the Netherlands. For the population involved (ca. 700,000 persons) this is roughly equivalent to 5% to 10% of the collective dose equivalent associated with exposure to radiation from natural sources. The major contribution to dose estimates comes from inhalation of radium during burning of the mantles. A pessimistic approach results in individual dose estimates for inhalation of up to 0.2 mSv. Consideration of dose consequences in case of a fire in a storage department learns that it is necessary for emergency personnel to wear respirators. It is concluded that the uncontrolled removal of used gas mantles to the environment (soil) does not result in a significant contribution to environmental radiation exposure. (Auth.)

  11. Radiation therapy tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    To adequately plan acceptable dose distributions for radiation therapy treatments it is necessary to ensure that normal structures do not receive unacceptable doses. Acceptable doses are generally those that are below a stated tolerance dose for development of some level of complication. To support the work sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to low-LET radiation has been compiled from a number of sources. These tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represent doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same end point. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Radiation dose measurement in gastrointestinal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Elzaki, M.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Barium studies investigations (barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema) are the basic routine radiological examination, where barium sulphate suspension is introduced to enhance image contrast of gastrointestinal tracts. The aim of this study was to quantify the patients' radiation doses during barium studies and to estimate the organ equivalent dose and effective dose with those procedures. A total of 33 investigations of barium studies were measured by using thermoluminescence dosemeters. The result showed that the patient entrance surface doses were 12.6±10, 44.5±49 and 35.7±50 mGy for barium swallow, barium meal, follow through and enema, respectively. Effective doses were 0.2, 0.35 and 1.4 mSv per procedure for barium swallow, meal and enema respectively. Radiation doses were comparable with the previous studies. A written protocol for each procedure will reduce the inter-operator variations and will help to reduce unnecessary exposure. (authors)

  13. Medical effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ionising radiation is genotoxic and causes biological effects via a chain of events involving DNA strand breaks and 'multiply damaged sites' as critical lesions that lead to cell death. The acute health effects of radiation after doses of a few gray, are due to such cell death and consequent disturbance of cell population kinetics. Because of cellular repair and repopulation there is generally a threshold dose of about 1-2 Gy below which such severe effects are not inducible. However, more subtle, sub-lethal mutational DNA damage in somatic cells of the body and the germ cells of the ovary and testis cause the two major low dose health risks -cancer induction and genetic (heritable) effects. This paper discusses some of the epidemiological and experimental evidence regarding radiation genetic effects, carcinogenesis and CNS teratogenesis. It concludes that current risk estimates imply that about 3% of all cancers; 1% of genetic disorders and between 0% and 0.3% of severe mental subnormality in the UK is attributable to the ubiquitous background radiation. The health risks associated with the medical uses of radiation are smaller, whilst the nuclear industry causes perhaps 1% of the health detriment attributable to background doses. (author)

  14. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The report contains information on the natural (background) radiation exposure (chapter II), the natural radiation exposure as influenced by anthropogenic effects (chapter III), the anthropogenic radiation exposure (chapter IV), and the radiation doses to the environment and the population emanating from the Chernobyl fallout (chapter V). The natural radiation exposure is specified referring to the contributions from cosmic and terrestrial background radiation and intake of natural radioactive substances. Changes of the natural environment resulting from anthropogenic effects (technology applications) inducing an increase in concentration of natural radioactive substances accordingly increase the anthropogenic radiation exposure. Indoor air radon concentration in buildings for instance is one typical example of anthropogenic increase of concentration of natural radioactivity, primarily caused by the mining industry or by various materials processing activities, which may cause an increase in the average radiation dose to the population. Measurements so far show that indoor air concentration of radon exceeds a level of 200 Bq/m 3 in less than 2% of the residential buildings; the EUropean Commission therefore recommends to use this concentration value as a maximum value for new residential buildings. Higher concentrations are primarily measured in areas with relevant geological conditions and abundance of radon, or eg. in mining areas. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Radiation-induced cataracts: the Health Protection Agency's response to the ICRP statement on tissue reactions and recommendation on the dose limit for the eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffler, Simon; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Gilvin, Phil; Harrison, John

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the response of the Health Protection Agency (HPA) to the 2011 statement from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on tissue reactions and recommendation of a reduced dose limit for the lens of the eye. The response takes the form of a brief review of the most recent epidemiological and mechanistic evidence. This is presented together with a discussion of dose limits in the context of the related risk and the current status of eye dosimetry, which is relevant for implementation of the limits. It is concluded that although further work is desirable to quantify better the risk at low doses and following protracted exposures, along with research into the mechanistic basis for radiation cataractogenesis to inform selection of risk projection models, the HPA endorses the conclusion reached by the ICRP in their 2011 statement that the equivalent dose limit for the lens of the eye should be reduced from 150 to 20 mSv per year, averaged over a five year period, with no year's dose exceeding 50 mSv.

  16. Radiation-induced linking reactions in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoepfl, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three types of measurements are reported relating to chemical reactions in polyethylene induced by ionizing radiation: 1) viscometric and low-angle laser light scattering measurements to determine the effect of a radical scavenger on the yield of links; 2) calorimetric measurements to determine the effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene; and 3) high-resolution solution carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry measurements to determine the nature of the links and the method of their formation. The NMR results present the first direct detection of radiation-induced long-chain branching (Y links) in polyethylene, and place an apparent upper limit on the yield of H-shaped crosslinks that are formed when polyethylene is irradiated to low absorbed doses. The effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that radiation-induced links do not change the heat of fusion of polythylene crystals, but decrease the melt entropy and increase the fold surface free energy per unit area of the crystals. The carbon 13 NMR results demonstrate that long-chain branches (Y links) are formed much more frequently than H-shaped crosslinks at low absorbed doses. The Y links are produced by reactions of alkyl free radicals with terminal vinyl groups in polyethylene

  17. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  19. Estimated radiation dose from timepieces containing tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Luminescent timepieces containing radioactive tritium, either in elemental form or incorporated into paint, are available to the general public. The purpose of this study was to estimate potential radiation dose commitments received by the public annually as a result of exposure to tritium which may escape from the timepieces during their distribution, use, repair, and disposal. Much uncertainty is associated with final dose estimates due to limitations of empirical data from which exposure parameters were derived. Maximum individual dose estimates were generally less than 3 μSv/yr, but ranged up to 2 mSv under worst-case conditions postulated. Estimated annual collective (population) doses were less than 5 person/Sv per million timepieces distributed

  20. Internal radiation dose in diagnostic nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedler, H D; Kaul, A; Hine, G J

    1978-01-01

    Absorbed dose values per unit administered activity for the most frequently used radipharmaceuticals and methods were calculated according to the MIRD concept or compiled from literature and were tabulated in conventional as well as in the SI-units recently introduced. The data are given for critical or investigated organs, ovaries, testes and red bone marrow. Where available, dose values for newborns, infants and children are included. Additionally, mean values of administered activity are listed. The manner in which to estimate the radiation dose to the patient is to multiply the tabulated dose values per unit administered activity with the corresponding mean or the actually administered activity. The methods are arranged in correlation with the following nuclear medical subspecialities: 1. Endocrinology 2. Neurology, 3. Osteomyology, 4. Gastroenterology, 5. Nephrology, 6. Pulmonology, 7. Hematology, 8. Cardiology/Angiology.

  1. Radiation dose measurements in intravenous pyelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeblad, M.; Gottlieb, E.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) and micturition cystourethrography (MCU) are the standard procedures in the radiological examination of children with urinary tract infections and in the control of these children. Gonad protection against radiation is not possible in MCU, but concerning the girls partly possible in IVP. It is of major importance to know the radiation dose in these procedures, especially since the examination is often repeated in the same patients. All IVP were done by means of the usual technique including possible gonad protection. The thermoluminescence dosimeter was placed rectally in the girls and fixed on the scrota in the boys. A total of 50 children was studied. Gonad dose ranged from 140 to 200mR in the girls and from 20 to 70mR in the boys (mean values). The radiation dose in IVP is very low compared to that of MCU, and from this point of view IVP is a dose saving examination in the control of children with urinary tract infections [fr

  2. Radiation doses in endoscopic interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Paraskeva, K.; Mathou, N.; Aggelogiannopoulou, P.; Triantopoulou, C.; Karagianis, J.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Paspatis, G.; Voudoukis, E.; Athanasopoulos, N.; Lydakis, I.; Scotiniotis, H.; Georgopoulos, P.; Finou, P.; Kadiloru, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Extensive literature exists on patient radiation doses in various interventional procedures. This does not stand for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) where the literature is very limited. This study compares patient dose during ERCP procedures performed with different types of X-ray systems. Methods and Materials: Four hospitals participated in the study with the following X-ray systems: A) X-ray conventional system (X-ray tube over table), 137 pts, B) X-ray conventional system (X-ray tube under table), 114 pts, C) C-arm system, 79 pts, and D) angiography system, 57 pts. A single experienced endoscopist performed the ERCP in each hospital. Kerma Area Product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (T) and total number of X-ray films (F) were collected. Results: Median patient dose was 6.2 Gy.cm 2 (0.02-130.2 Gy.cm 2 ). Medium linear correlation between KAP and T (0.6) and F (0.4) were observed. Patient doses were 33 % higher than the reference value in UK (4.15 Gy.cm 2 with a sample of 6089 patients). Median KAP for each hospital was: A) 3.1, B) 9.2, C) 3.9 and D) 6.2 Gy.cm 2 . Median T was: A) 2.6, B) 4.1, C) 2.8 and D) 3.4 min. Median F was: A) 2, B) 7, C) 2 and D) 2 films. Conclusion: Patient radiation dose during ERCP depends on: a) fluoroscopy time and films taken, b) the type of the X-ray system used, with the C arm and the conventional over the couch systems carrying the lower patient radiation dose and the angiography system the higher. (authors)

  3. Internal 40K radiation dose to Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Someswara Rao, M.; Nagaratnam, A.; Mishra, U.C.

    2002-01-01

    A group of 350 Indians from both sexes (7-65 years) representing different regions of India was studied for internal 40 K radiation dose from the naturally occurring body 40 K, which was measured in the National Institute of Nutrition (NIN) whole-body counter. Although the 40 K radioactivity reached a peak value by 18 years in female (2,412 Bq) and by 20 years in male (3,058 Bq) and then varied inversely with age in both sexes, the radiation dose did not show such a trend. Boys and girls of 11 years had annual effective dose of nearly 185 mSv, which decreased during adolescence (165 mSv), increased to 175 mSv by 18-20 years in adults and decreased progressively on further ageing to 99 mSv in males and 69 mSv in females at 65 years. The observed annual effective dose (175 mSv) of the young adults was close to that of the ICRP Reference Man (176 mSv) and Indian Reference Man (175 mSv). With a mean specific activity of 55 Bq/kg for the subjects and a conversion coefficient close to 3 mSv per annum per Bq/kg, the average annual effective dose from the internal 40 K turned out to be 165 mSv for Indians. (author)

  4. Patient radiation dose during mammography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Swsan Awd Elkriem

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the patient dose in term of mean glandular dose and assist in optimization of radiation protection in mammographic procedures in Sudan. A total number of 107 patients were included. Four mammographic units were participated. Only one center was using automatic exposure control (AEC). The mean doses in (mGy) for the CC projection were 3.13, 1.24, 2.45 and 0.98 and for the MLO projection was 2.13, 1.26, 1.99 and 1.02 for centers A, B, C, and D, respectively. The total mean dose per breast from both projections was 5.26, 2.50, 4.44 and 1.99 mGy for centers A, B, C and D, respectively. The minimum mean glandular dose was found between the digital system which was operated under AEC and one of the manual selected exposure factors systems, this highlight possible optimization of radiation protection in the other manual selected systems. The kilo volt and the tube current time products should be selected correctly according to the breast thickness in both centers A and C. (author)

  5. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs

  6. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  7. Radiation doses to patients at dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulusson-Odenhagen, M

    1975-11-01

    An investigation about the technique and the equipment at x-ray investigations and the distribution of the radiation doses to the thyroid and the gonads has been made in the dental policlinics belonging to the county council of the province of Stockholm. This investigation, which was suggested by the National Institute of Radiation Protection and the faculty of odontology in Stockholm, consisted of on one hand a distributed questionnaire and on the other visits. The questionnaire was distributed to all dentists (altogether 343) belonging to the dental policlinics of the county council of the province of Stockholm. 22 dentists of these were visited.

  8. Radiation-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a new technique for obtaining information non-invasively on the composition and structures of a material or body by detecting radiation-induced thermoacoustic image features. This is accomplished by utilizing the acoustic wave generated by sudden thermal stress. The sudden thermal stress is induced by a pulse of radiation which deposits energy causing a rapid, but very small, rise of temperature (typically, ΔT approximately 10sup(-6) - 10sup(-5) deg C). The radiation may be ionizing radiation, such as high energy electrons, photons (x-rays), neutrons, or other charged particles or it may be non-ionizing radiation, such as R.F. and microwave electromagnetic radiation and ultrasonic radiation. The choice of radiation depends on the nature of the body to be imaged and the type of information desired

  9. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure

  10. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  11. Radiation-induced neurobehavioral dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manda, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    There is a lacuna between sparsely reported immediate effects and the well documented delayed effects on cognitive functions seen after ionizing radiation exposure. We reported the radiation-dose dependent incongruity in the early cognitive changes and its correlation with the structural aberration as reported by imaging study. The delayed effect of radiation was investigated to understand the role of hippocampal neurogenesis in the functional recovery of cognition. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to different doses of γ-radiation and 24 hrs after exposure, the stress and anxiety levels were examined in the Open Field Exploratory Paradigms (OFT). 48hrs after irradiation, the hippocampal dependent recognition memory was observed by the Novel Object Recognition Test (NORT) and the cognitive function related to memory processing and recall was tested using the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM). Visualization of damage to the brain was done by diffusion tensor imaging at 48 hours post-irradiation. Results indicate a complex dose independent effect on the cognitive functions immediately after exposure to gamma rays. Radiation exposure caused short term memory dysfunctions at lower doses which were seen to be abrogated at higher doses, but the long term memory processing was disrupted at higher doses. The Hippocampus emerged as one of the sensitive regions to be affected by whole body exposure to gamma rays, which led to profound immediate alterations in cognitive functions. Furthermore, the results indicate a cognitive recovery process, which might be dependent on the extent of damage to the hippocampal region. While evaluating the delayed effect of radiation on the hippocampal neurogenesis, we observed that higher doses groups showed comparatively more adaptive regenerative neurogenic potential which they could not sustain at later stages. Our studies reported an important hitherto uncovered phenomenon of neurobehavioral dysfunctions in relation to radiation dose. Nevertheless, a

  12. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  13. Radiation Dose from Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG) Examination in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwiladluk, T.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to determine entrance skin dose (ESD) from fluoroscopy and radiography procedures in voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) studies of pediatric patients by dose-area product (DAP) recording. Methods: Radiation doses received by 70 patients underwent VCUG procedures were determined by the DAP Meter, Wellh?fer Dosimetrie GmbH, Germany) directly coupled to the x-ray tube window (Philips Omni Diagnost Eleva) and an electrometer connected to a computer for data collection. The study revealed the radiation dose for VCUG and the baseline data on the entrance skin dose, ESD, dose area-product (DAP) and the effective dose, E, to establish local reference dose levels for VCUG in pediatric patients. Results: The mean(minimum-maximum) ESD, DAP and the effective dose of pediatric patients in 4 age ranges were 3.41(1-9) mGy, 46.58 (21.90-158.90) cGycm 2 and 0.10(0.05-0.33) mSv for 0- 1 years, 6.80(2-16) mGy, 115.55 (20.70-258.70)cGycm 2 and 0.24(0.04-0.54) mSv for >1-5 years, 11.76 (3-23) mGy, 292.28 (88.90-593.50)cGycm 2 and 0.61(0.19-1.25) mSv for >5-10 years, and 20.50(10-42) mGy, 575.98(255.60-1247.80) cGycm 2 and 1.12(0.54-2.62) mSv for >10-15 years respectively. Discussion: The dose levels for VCUG as recommended by the national reference doses (NRDs) of UK are classified at patient age of 0-1 years, 90 cGy.cm 2 , >1-5 years, 110 cGy.cm 2 , >5-10 years, 210 cGy.cm 2 and >10-15 years, 470 cGy.cm 2 respectively. Conclusions: The mean DAP of pediatric patients were higher than the dose level as recommended by NRD at the age range >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 years. The limitation in this study was the non uniform in the number of patients at the higher age. Attempts could be made to lower the radiation dose to avoid the higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer in children. (author)

  14. Lowering the Radiation Dose in Dental Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radan, Elham

    2017-04-01

    While the use of dental imaging continues to evolve into more advanced modalities such as 3-D cone beam computed tomography, in addition to conventional 2-D imaging (intraoral, panoramic and cephalometric), the public concern for radiation safety is also increasing. This article is a guide for how to reduce patients’ exposure to the minimum with proper selection criteria (as needed only if it benefits the patient) and knowledge of effective doses, exposure parameters and proper collimation.

  15. Ion exchange resins as high-dose radiation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; Dessouki, A.; El-Assay, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports on the possibility of using various types of ion exchange resins as high-dose radiation dosimeters, by analysis of the decrease in exchange capacity with absorbed dose. The resins studied are Sojuzchim-export-Moscow Cation Exchanger KU-2 and Anion Exchanger AV-17 and Merck Cation Exchanger I, and Merck Anion Exchangers II and III. Over the dose range 1 to 100 kGy, the systems show linearity between log absorbed dose and decrease in resin ion exchange capacity. The slope of this response function differs for the different resins, depending on their ionic form and degree of cross-linking. The radiation sensitivity increases in the order KU-2; Exchanger I; AV-17; Exchanger II; Exchanger III. Merck resins with moisture content of 21% showed considerably higher radiation sensitivity than those with 2 to 3% moisture content. The mechanism of radiation-induced denaturing of the ion exchanger resins involves cleavage and decomposition of functional substituents, with crosslinking playing a stabilizing role, with water and its radiolytic products serving to inhibit radical recombination and interfering with the protection cage effect of crosslinking. (author)

  16. New technologies to reduce pediatric radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, Philipp; Lendl, Markus; Deinzer, Frank

    2006-01-01

    X-ray dose reduction in pediatrics is particularly important because babies and children are very sensitive to radiation exposure. We present new developments to further decrease pediatric patient dose. With the help of an advanced exposure control, a constant image quality can be maintained for all patient sizes, leading to dose savings for babies and children of up to 30%. Because objects of interest are quite small and the speed of motion is high in pediatric patients, short pulse widths down to 4 ms are important to reduce motion blurring artifacts. Further, a new noise-reduction algorithm is presented that detects and processes signal and noise in different frequency bands, generating smooth images without contrast loss. Finally, we introduce a super-resolution technique: two or more medical images, which are shifted against each other in a subpixel region, are combined to resolve structures smaller than the size of a single pixel. Advanced exposure control, short exposure times, noise reduction and super-resolution provide improved image quality, which can also be invested to save radiation exposure. All in all, the tools presented here offer a large potential to minimize the deterministic and stochastic risks of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  17. Radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Yukihide; Abiko, Seisho; Kurokawa, Yasushi; Okamura, Tomomi; Watanabe, Kohsaku; Inoue, Shinichi; Fujii, Yasuhiro.

    1993-01-01

    We reported a patient who suffered from cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation therapy for astrocytoma located at the left temporal lobe. An eleven year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting received partial removal of a tumor. Histological diagnosis of the tumor was astrocytoma (grade II). His preoperative cerebral angiograms showed mass sign solely, without stenosis or occlusion of the cerebral vessel. Postoperatively, he was treated with irradiation therapy involving the whole brain with a total of 30 Gy, and gamma knife therapy. Six months after irradiation, he started suffering from frequent cerebral ischemic attacks, but there was no regrowth of the tumor visible on CT scans. Cerebral angiograms were made again, and revealed multifocal stenoses in the bilateral internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries, and the anterior cerebral artery. His symptoms did not improve after conservative treatment with steroids, calcium antagonist, or low molecular weight dextran. Although he received a superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomoses bilaterally, multiple cerebral infarctions appeared. Although irradiation therapy is acceptable in patients with brain tumor, cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation should be considered as one of the most important complications, and the risk incurred by irradiation therapy should lead to more careful consideration and caution when treating intracranial brain tumors, especially in children. From our experience, the usefulness of bypass surgery for radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy is still controversial. (author)

  18. Radiation Dose to Post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation dose calculation for post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers in Ukraine - both external radiation exposure due to fallout and internal doses due to inhalation (I131 intake) or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs.

  19. Audit of radiation dose to patients during coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Chandy, Sunil; Peace, Timothy B.S.; George, Paul V.; John, Bobby; Pati, Purendra

    2007-01-01

    There is a widespread concern about radiation doses imparted to patients during cardiology procedures in the medical community. The current study intends to audit and optimize radiation dose to patients undergoing coronary angiography performed using two dedicated cardiovascular machines

  20. Natural radiation dose estimates from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, M.A.G.R.; Moreira, H.; Medina, N.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil has been studied. Soil samples from Interlagos, Sao Paulo; parks and Billings dam, in Sao Bernardo do Campo city; Santos, Sao Vicente and Sao Sebastiao beaches, Sao Paulo and sands from Ilha Grande beaches, Rio de Janeiro, were analyzed. The results show that the main contribution to the effective dose is due to elements of the 232 Th decay chain, with a smaller contribution from the radionuclide 40 K and the elements of the series of 238 U. The obtained values found in the studied regions, are around the average international dose due to external exposure to gamma rays (0.48 mSv/yr), except in Praia Preta, Ilha Grande, where the effective dose exceeds the average value. (author)

  1. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  2. Annual individual doses for personnel dealing with ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    Data on annual individual doses for personnel of national economy enterprises, research institutes, high schools, medical establishments dealing with ionizing radiation sources are presented. It is shown that radiation dose for the personnel constitutes only shares of standards established by sanitary legislation. Numeral values of individual doses of the personnel are determined by the type, character and scope of using ionizing radiation sources

  3. Radiation induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A brain weight deficit of about 70 mg was induced at doses of approximately 75-mGy and a deficit of 60 mg was induced at 100 mGy. This confirms the effects projected and observed by Wanner and Edwards. Although the data do not demonstrate a clear dose-response relationship between the 75-mGy and 100-mGy groups, the data are statistically consistent with a dose-response effect because of the overlapping confidence intervals. The lack of a statistically significant observation is most likely related to the small difference in doses and the limited numbers of animals examined. There are several factors that can influence the brain weight of guinea pig pups, such as caging and housing conditions, the sex of the animal, and litter size. These should be taken into account for accurate analysis. Dam weight did not appear to have a significant effect. The confirmation of a micrencephalic effect induced x rays at doses of 75-mGy during this late embryonic stage of development is consistent with the findings of small head size induced in those exposed prior to the eight week of conception at Hiroshima. This implies a mechanism for micrencephaly different from those previously suggested and lends credence to a causal relation between radiation and small head size in humans at low doses as reported by Miller and Mulvihill. 16 refs., 13 tabs

  4. Cancer and low dose responses in vivo: implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection practices assume that cancer risk is linearly proportional to total dose, without a threshold, both for people with normal cancer risk and for people who may be genetically cancer prone. Mice heterozygous for the Tp 53 gene are cancer prone, and their increased risk from high doses was not different from Tp 53 normal mice. However, in either Tp 53 normal or heterozygous mice, a single low dose of low LET radiation given at low dose rate protected against both spontaneous and radiation-induced cancer by increasing tumor latency. Increased tumor latency without a cancer frequency change implies that low doses in vivo primarily slow the process of genomic instability, consistent with the elevated capacity for correct DSB rejoining seen in low dose exposed cells. The in vivo animal data indicates that, for low doses and low dose rates in both normal and cancer prone adult mice, risk does not increase linearly with dose, and dose thresholds for increased risk exist. Below those dose thresholds (which are influenced by Tp 53 function) overall risk is reduced below that of unexposed control mice, indicating that Dose Rate Effectiveness Factors (DREF) may approach infinity, rather than the current assumption of 2. However, as dose decreases, different tissues appear to have different thresholds at which detriment turns to protection, indicating that individual tissue weighting factors (Wt) are also not constant, but vary from positive values to zero with decreasing dose. Measurements of Relative Biological Effect between high and low LET radiations are used to establish radiation weighting factors (Wr) used in radiation protection, and these are also assumed to be constant with dose. However, since the risk from an exposure to low LET radiation is not constant with dose, it would seem unlikely that radiation-weighting factors for high LET radiation are actually constant at low dose and dose rate

  5. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  6. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed

  8. Radiation dose to the eye lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; D. Nielsen, Kamilla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Dose to the Eye Lens: Does Positioning Really Matter? C. Baun1, K. Falch1, K.D. Nielsen2, S. Shanmuganathan1, O. Gerke1, P.F. Høilund-Carlsen1 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. 2University College Lillebaelt, Odense, Denmark. Aim: The scan...... field in oncology patients undergoing eyes-to-thighs PET/CT must always include the base of the scull according to department guidelines. The eye lens is sensitive to radiation exposure and if possible it should be avoided to scan the eye. If the patient’s head is kipped backwards during the scan one...... might avoid including the eye in the CT scan without losing sufficient visualization of the scull base. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose to the eye lens, simply by changing the head position, when doing the PET/CT scan from the base of the scull...

  9. Radiation induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Otsuhata, Kazushige; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1995-01-01

    The Irradiation temperature effect on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) from room temperature to 380degC was investigated by tensile test and thermal analysis. The behavior of tensile properties and changes of crystallinity on irradiation indicated the formation of a network structure in PTFE by radiation induced crosslinking in inert gas in the molten state just above the melting temperature of PTFE (327degC). The crosslinked PTFE showed a much improved radiation resistance in an atmospheric radiation field. (author)

  10. Estimates of radiation doses from various sources of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of radiation doses to individuals and to the collective US population from various sources of ionizing radiation. Summary tables present doses from various sources of ionizing radiation. Summary tables present doses from occupational exposures and annual per capita doses from natural background, the healing arts, nuclear weapons, nuclear energy and consumer products. Although doses from non-ionizing radiation are not as yet readily available in a concise form, the major sources of non-ionizing radiation are listed

  11. Radiation-induced enteropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, M.E.; Bauer, J. (Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The incidence of chronic radiation enteritis appears to have risen in recent years due to the increasing utilization of radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. The etiology, pathogenesis, and management of radiation enteritis are discussed. Two case reports exemplify the progressive nature of the disease. Case 1 demonstrates the classical picture of multiple exacerbations and remissions of partial small bowel obstruction and the eventual need for surgical management ten years after radiation therapy. Case 2 presents the more severe sequelae of an acute perforation with a 14-yr latency period. Predisposing factors in the progression of radiation injury include excessive radiation, underlying cardiovascular disease, fixation of the bowel, and an asthenic habitus. In both cases, radiation injury was localized to a discrete segment of bowel; therefore, resection with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. In addition, diseased bowel was eliminated and, therefore, would not cause further complications such as intractable bleeding or fistula formation. The review focuses on current knowledge which may be applied to the treatment and prevention of radiation enteritis.

  12. Assessment of Organ Radiation Dose Associated with Uterine Artery Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glomset, O.; Hellesnes, J.; Heimland, N.; Hafsahl, G.; Smith, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    using system A were 81 mGy (range 30-247) and 85 mGy (range 24-207), respectively; when using system B, the respective doses were 101 mGy (range 45-182) and 105 mGy (range 31-246). The measured vaginal doses had a mean value of 52.5 mGy (range 12-124). Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between the estimated uterine doses and the measured vaginal doses. Conclusion: A significant difference was found between the estimated uterine doses and the corresponding measured vaginal doses. This has to be kept in mind when using vaginal doses as a substitute for the uterine dose. There was also a significant difference between the DAP values from systems A and B. System B, with pulsed fluoroscopy and greater filtration, gave the lower exposure. The maximum skin dose indicates that skin injuries are unlikely to occur. The ovarian doses are also below the threshold for temporary or permanent sterility. The stochastic risk for radiation-induced cancer and genetic injury to the patient's future children is not considered as substantial

  13. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.; Dellagrammaticas, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered. (author)

  14. Radiation doses from mammography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Young, B.F.; Young, J.G.; Tingey, D.R.C.

    1991-05-01

    During 1989-90 the Australian Radiation Laboratory conducted a postal survey of at least 90% of the mammographic facilities in Australia. The primary aim of the survey was to measure the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the X-ray beam half value layer (HVL) for a typical mammograph. The MGD and HVL were measured with a specially designed tissue equivalent monitor. In all, 258 mammographic centres were surveyed. It was found that for centres using film-screen imaging, the average mean glandular dose was 1.83 mGy for centres using grids and 0.84 mGy for centres not using grids. In addition to the MGD and HVL, comprehensive statistical information was collected and data is presented on the types of equipment and techniques used, the number and age of patients and demographic distribution of centres. Results indicate that the use of a grid is the major factor determining dose and several other factors appear to have minor effects. In view of the distribution of MGD, it is recommended that the mean glandular dose per image, for a 5 cm compressed breast thickness, should not exceed 2.0 mGy when a grid is used and 1.0 mGy without a grid. 63 refs., 11 tabs., 15 figs

  15. Radiation risk factors and dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The contents of the ICRP publications 9 (1965) and 26 (1977) are outlined and the research conducted during these years considered. Expressions are derived for the frequency for induction of cancer from the most common irradiations - X rays, gamma rays and electrons. The dose limits advised by the ICRP are discussed and the first two fundamental principles are presented - that no one should be subjected to radiation without useful cause and that in those cases where irradiation is thought necessary, the medical, scientific, social and economic advantages need to be carefully considered with respect to the possible disadvantages. (C.F.)

  16. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  17. Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Isamu; Suzuki, Gen; Imai, Yasufumi; Kawase, Yoshiko; Nose, Masako; Hirashima, Kunitake; Bessho, Masami

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to determine the clonal origin of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice with cellular mosaicism for phosphoglycerate kinase; (2) to determine the incidence and latent period of myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma induced by whole-body exposure to median doses (3.0 Gy or less) in RFM/MsNrs-2 mice; and (3) to examine the influence of human recombinant interleukin-2 (hrIL-2). Thymic lymphoma was of a single cell origin. The incidence of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma in RFM mice increased in a dose dependent fashion. Mean latent periods of both myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma after irradiation became shorter in proportion to radiation doses. When hrIL-2 was injected to RFM mice receiving 3.0 Gy, mean survivals were shorter in thymoma-bearing mice than the control mice. This suggested that hrIL-2 shortens the promotion step of thymoma. Administration of hrIL-2 failed to alter the incidence of myeloid leukemia or the mean survival of mice having myeloid leukemia, indicating that the protocol of hrIL-2 administration was not so sufficient as to alter the myeloid leukemogenesis. (Namekawa, K)

  18. Cancer Control Related to Stimulation of Immunity by Low-Dose Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shu-Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies showed that low dose radiation (LDR) could stimulate the immune system in both animal and human populations. This paper reviews the present status of relevant research as support to the use of LDR in clinical practice for cancer prevention and treatment. It has been demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in immune activity follows an inverse J-shaped curve, i.e., low dose stimulation and high dose suppression. The stimulation of immunity by LDR concerns most anticancer p...

  19. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far

  20. Transatlantic Comparison of CT Radiation Doses in the Era of Radiation Dose-Tracking Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Anushri; Euler, Andre; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare diagnostic reference levels from a local European CT dose registry, using radiation-tracking software from a large patient sample, with preexisting European and North American diagnostic reference levels. Data (n = 43,761 CT scans obtained over the course of 2 years) for the European local CT dose registry were obtained from eight CT scanners at six institutions. Means, medians, and interquartile ranges of volumetric CT dose index (CTDI vol ), dose-length product (DLP), size-specific dose estimate, and effective dose values for CT examinations of the head, paranasal sinuses, thorax, pulmonary angiogram, abdomen-pelvis, renal-colic, thorax-abdomen-pelvis, and thoracoabdominal angiogram were obtained using radiation-tracking software. Metrics from this registry were compared with diagnostic reference levels from Canada and California (published in 2015), the American College of Radiology (ACR) dose index registry (2015), and national diagnostic reference levels from local CT dose registries in Switzerland (2010), the United Kingdom (2011), and Portugal (2015). Our local registry had a lower 75th percentile CTDI vol for all protocols than did the individual internationally sourced data. Compared with our study, the ACR dose index registry had higher 75th percentile CTDI vol values by 55% for head, 240% for thorax, 28% for abdomen-pelvis, 42% for thorax-abdomen-pelvis, 128% for pulmonary angiogram, 138% for renal-colic, and 58% for paranasal sinus studies. Our local registry had lower diagnostic reference level values than did existing European and North American diagnostic reference levels. Automated radiation-tracking software could be used to establish and update existing diagnostic reference levels because they are capable of analyzing large datasets meaningfully.

  1. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard; Li, X. Allen; El Naqa, Issam; Hahn, Carol A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-01-01

    We have reviewed the published data regarding radiotherapy (RT)-induced brain injury. Radiation necrosis appears a median of 1-2 years after RT; however, cognitive decline develops over many years. The incidence and severity is dose and volume dependent and can also be increased by chemotherapy, age, diabetes, and spatial factors. For fractionated RT with a fraction size of 80 Gy. For large fraction sizes (≥2.5 Gy), the incidence and severity of toxicity is unpredictable. For single fraction radiosurgery, a clear correlation has been demonstrated between the target size and the risk of adverse events. Substantial variation among different centers' reported outcomes have prevented us from making toxicity-risk predictions. Cognitive dysfunction in children is largely seen for whole brain doses of ≥18 Gy. No substantial evidence has shown that RT induces irreversible cognitive decline in adults within 4 years of RT.

  2. Basic reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the basic reactions resulting from exposure to high energy radiation. In the initial stages energy is absorbed, but not necessarily at random, giving radical and ion species which may then react to promote the final chemical change. However, it is possible to intervene at intermediate stages to modify or reduce the radiation effect. Under certain conditions enhanced reactions are also possible. Several expressions are given to calculate radiation yield in terms of energy absorbed. Some analogies between radiation-induced reactions in polymers, and those studied in radiobiology are outlined. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced liver damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, V.A.; Santiago-Delpin, E.A.; Lanaro, A.E.; Castro-Vita, H.; Arroyo, G.; Moscol, J.A.; Gomez, C.; Velazquez, J.; Prado, K.

    1977-01-01

    Due to the recent increase in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer with or without chemotherapy, the risk of liver radiation damage has become a significant concern for the radiotherapist when the treated tumour is located in the upper abdomen or lower thorax. Clinically evident radiation liver damage may result in significant mortality, but at times patients recover without sequelae. The dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks to the entire liver with 5 fractions per week of 200 rads each, seems to be tolerated well clinically by adult humans. Lower doses may lead to damage when used in children, when chemotherapy is added, as in recent hepatectomy cases, and in the presence of pre-existent liver damage. Reduced fractionation may lead to increased damage. Increased fractionation, limitation of the dose delivered to the entire liver, and restriction of the high dose irradiation volume may afford protection. With the aim of studying the problems of hepatic radiation injury in humans, a project of liver irradiation in the dog is being conducted. Mongrel dogs are being conditioned, submitted to pre-irradiation studies (haemogram, blood chemistry, liver scan and biopsy), irradiated under conditions resembling human cancer therapy, and submitted to post-irradiation evaluation of the liver. Twenty-two dogs have been entered in the study but only four qualify for the evaluation of all the study parameters. It has been found that dogs are susceptible to liver irradiation damage similar to humans. The initial mortality has been high mainly due to non-radiation factors which are being kept under control at the present phase of the study. After the initial experiences, the study will involve variations in total dose and fractionation, and the addition of anticoagulant therapy for possible prevention of radiation liver injury. (author)

  4. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Wheeler, Kenneth T. [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Radiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mrobbins@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-07-19

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  5. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  6. The development of wireless radiation dose monitoring using smart phone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Jeong, Gyo Seong; Lee, Yun Jong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Yeal [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chai Wan [REMTECH, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Radiation workers at a nuclear facility or radiation working area should hold personal dosimeters. some types of dosimeters have functions to generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions to communicate with other equipment or the responsible personnel. our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system that can be utilized to monitor the radiation dose for radiation workers and to notify the radiation protection manager of the dose information in real time. We use a commercial survey meter for personal radiation measurement and a smart phone for a mobile wireless communication tool and a Beacon for position detection of radiation workers using Blue tooth communication. In this report, the developed wireless dose monitoring of cellular phone is introduced.

  7. Oxidative stress as a significant factor for development of an adaptive response in irradiated and nonirradiated human lymphocytes after inducing the bystander effect by low-dose X-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Science, ul. Moskvorechye, 1, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Egolina, Natalya A.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Science, ul. Moskvorechye, 1, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-02

    X-radiation (10 cGy) was shown to induce in human lymphocytes transposition of homologous chromosomes loci from the membrane towards the centre of the nucleus and activation of the chromosomal nucleolus-forming regions (NFRs). These effects are transmitted by means of extracellular DNA (ecDNA) fragments to nonirradiated cells (the so-called bystander effect, BE). We demonstrated that in the development of the BE an important role is played by oxidative stress (which is brought about by low radiation doses and ecDNA fragments of the culture medium of the irradiated cells), by an enzyme of apoptosis called caspase-3, and by DNA-binding receptors of the bystander cells, presumably TLR9. Proposed herein is a scheme of the development of an adaptive response and the BE on exposure to radiation. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis of the radiosensitive fraction of cells due to the development of the 'primary' oxidative stress (OS). DNA fragments of apoptotic cells are released into the intercellular space and interact with the DNA-binding receptors of the bystander cells. This interaction activates in lymphocytes signalling pathways associated with synthesis of the reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species, i.e., induces secondary oxidative stress accompanied by apoptosis of part of the cells, etc. Hence, single exposure to radiation may be followed by relatively long-lasting in the cellular population oxidative stress contributing to the development of an adaptive response. We thus believe that ecDNA of irradiated apoptotic lymphocytes is a significant factor of stress-signalling.

  8. Determination of the radiation dose to the body due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1985-01-01

    Section 63 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance defines the basic requirement, determination of radiation dose to the body. The determination of dose equivalents for the body is the basic step in practical monitoring of dose equivalents or dose limits with regard to individuals or population groups, both for constant or varying conditions of exposure. The main field of monitoring activities is the protection of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Conversion factors between body doses and radiation quantities are explained. (DG) [de

  9. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard-Stroel, Claudia; Hachenburger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Peter, Josef

    2013-07-01

    The annual report 2011 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following issues: Part A: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. Part B; Current data and their evaluation: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. The Appendix includes Explanations of terms, radiation doses and related units, external and internal radiation exposure, stochastic and deterministic radiation effects, genetic radiation effects, induction of malignant neoplasm, risk assessment, physical units and glossary, laws, ordinances, guidelines, recommendations and other regulations concerning radiation protection, list of selected radionuclides.

  10. Yield of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks in Escherichia coli and superinfecting phage lambda at different dose rates. Repair of strand breaks in different buffers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boye, E.; Johansen, I.; Brustad, T.

    1976-01-01

    Cells of E. coli K-12 strain AB 1886 were irradiated in oxygenated phosphate buffered saline at 2 0 C with electrons from a 4-MeV linear accelerator. The yield of DNA single-strand breaks was determined as a function of the dose rate between 2.5 and 21,000 krad/min. For dose rates over 100 krad/min the yield was found to be constant. Below 10 krad/min the yield of breaks decreases drastically. This is explained by rejoining of breaks during irradiation. Twenty percent of the breaks induced by acute exposure are repaired within 3 min at 2 0 C. Superinfecting phage lambda DNA is repaired at the same rate as chromosomal DNA. In contrast to the results obtained with phosphate-buffered saline, an increase in the number of breaks after irradiation is observed when the bacteria are suspended in tris buffer. It is suggested that buffers of low ionic strength facilitate the leakage through the membrane of a small-molecular-weight component(s) necessary for DNA strand rejoining

  11. Analysis of CT radiation dose based on radiation-dose-structured reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weipeng; Zhang Yi; Zhang Menglong; Zhang Dapeng; Song Shaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the CT radiation dose statistically using the standardized radiation-dose-structured report (RDSR) of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). Methods: Using the self-designed software, 1230 RDSR files about CT examination were obtained searching on the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The patient dose database was established by combination of the extracted relevant information with the scanned sites. The patients were divided into adult group (over 10 years) and child groups (0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years) according to the age. The average volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) of all scans were recorded respectively, and then the effective dose (E) was estimated. The DLP value at 75% quantile was calculated and compared with the diagnostic reference level (DRL). Results: In adult group, CTDI vol and DLP values were moderately and positively correlated (r = 0.41), the highest E was observed in upper abdominal enhanced scan, and the DLP value at 75% quantile was 60% higher than DRL. In child group, their CTDI vol in group of 5-10 years was greater than that in groups of 0-1 and 1-5 years (t = 2.42, 2.04, P < 0.05); the DLP value was slightly and positively correlated with the age (r = 0.16), while E was moderately and negatively correlated with the age (r = -0.48). Conclusions: It is a simple and efficient method to use RDSR to obtain the radiation doses of patients. With the popularization of the new equipment and the application of regionalized medical platform, RDSR would become the main tool for the dosimetric level surveying and individual dose recording. (authors)

  12. Gamma-irradiated onions as a biological indicator of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaijapurkar, S.G.; Agarwal, Deepshikha; Chaudhuri, S.K.; Ram Senwar, Kana; Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Post-irradiation identification and dose estimation are required to assess the radiation-induced effects on living things in any nuclear emergency. In this study, radiation-induced morphological/cytological changes i.e., number of root formation and its length, shooting length, reduction in mitotic index, micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberrations in the root tip cells of gamma-irradiated onions at lower doses (50-2000 cGy) are reported. The capabilities of this biological species to store the radiation-induced information are also studied

  13. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Hwang, T.; Hsieh, C.; Thames, H.

    1985-01-01

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  14. Cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhikang; Sun Jianzhong; Zhao Zudan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization and to analyze the dose influence factors. Methods: The DLP for CT and DR were retrospectively collected from the patients during June, 2009 and April, 2011 at a university affiliated hospital. The cumulative radiation doses were calculated by summing typical effective doses of the anatomic regions scanned. Results: The cumulative radiation doses of 113 patients were collected. The maximum,minimum and the mean values of cumulative effective doses were 153.3, 16.48 mSv and (52.3 ± 26.6) mSv. Conclusions: Multiple trauma patients have high cumulative radiation exposure. Therefore, the management of cumulative radiation doses should be enhanced. To establish the individualized radiation exposure archives will be helpful for the clinicians and technicians to make decision whether to image again and how to select the imaging parameters. (authors)

  15. Radiation dose-reduction strategies in thoracic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, J B; Sheard, S L; Edyvean, S; Vlahos, I

    2017-05-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) machines have the capability to perform thoracic CT for a range of clinical indications at increasingly low radiation doses. This article reviews several factors, both technical and patient-related, that can affect radiation dose and discusses current dose-reduction methods relevant to thoracic imaging through a review of current techniques in CT acquisition and image reconstruction. The fine balance between low radiation dose and high image quality is considered throughout, with an emphasis on obtaining diagnostic quality imaging at the lowest achievable radiation dose. The risks of excessive radiation dose reduction are also considered. Inappropriately low dose may result in suboptimal or non-diagnostic imaging that may reduce diagnostic confidence, impair diagnosis, or result in repeat examinations incurring incremental ionising radiation exposure. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dose effect relationships in cervical and thoracic radiation myelopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdorff, B.

    1980-01-01

    The course and prognosis of radiation myelopathies are determined by 3 factors: the segmental (vertical) location of the lesion, the extent of the transverse syndrome (complete or incomplete) and the radiation dose. The median spinal dose in cervical radiation myelopathies with fatal outcome was higher than in survivals with an incomplete transverse syndrome. In thoracic radiation myelopathies a dose difference between complete and incomplete transverse syndromes could be found as well. Incomplete transverse syndromes as submaximum radiation injuries are more suitable for the determination of the spinal tolerance dose than complete transverse syndromes. The lowest threshold could be stated for cases following high-volume irradiation of the lymphatic system. (Auth.)

  17. Relationship to carcinogenesis of repetitive low-dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose. (author)

  18. High-dose radiotherapy or concurrent chemo-radiation in lung cancer patients only induces a temporary, reversible decline in QoL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Houben, Ruud; Boersma, Liesbeth; Grutters, Janneke; Seghers, Katarina; Lambin, Philippe; Wanders, Rinus; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Aggressive radiotherapy or concurrent chemo-radiation therapy for lung cancer leads to a high incidence of severe, mostly esophageal, toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the evolution of quality of life (QoL) in patients with lung cancer, selected for curative radiotherapy (RT) or chemo-RT. Methods: Seventy-five lung cancer patients completed a longitudinal the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC13. Linear mixed regression models were fitted to investigate the impact of different factors on overall QoL. Results: Overall QoL decreased shortly after the end of RT (4 points, p = 0.19), but increased back to baseline within 3 months. Mean scores of role functioning (p = 0.018), cognitive functioning (p = 0.002), dyspnoea (EORTC QLQ-LC13; p = 0.043), dysphagia (p = 0.005) and hoarseness (p = 0.029), showed a significant worsening over time. Emotional functioning (p = 0.033) improved significantly over time. Severe esophagitis (≥grade 2) was reported in only 12% of the patients. Next to maximal esophageal toxicity ≥grade 2 (p = .0.010), also tumor stage IIIA (p < 0.001), tumor stage IIIB (p = 0.003), gender (p = 0.042) and fatigue (p < 0.001) appeared to be significant predictors of QoL. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy or concurrent chemo-radiation in the treatment of lung cancer seems to be a well-tolerated treatment option with preservation of QoL.

  19. Hazards and maximum permissible doses of radiation for man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walinder, G.

    1977-11-01

    Maximum permissible dose levels are primarely based on risks for genetic damage and cancer. The reason for this is the observation that such late effects of radiation seem to arise even after doses that are to low to give rise to acute effects. In contrast to the tumour incidence found in irradiated human populations no genetic effects of radiation have been observed in man. This does not mean that genetic effects have not been induced but that it has been impossible to find an increase or to discern them among all the congenital defects, that can not be ascribed to the irradiation. As a consequence, the radiological risk estimation has been concentrated on the hazard of malignant diseases. Tumour risks are generally expressed as excess rates of incidence and mortality per million persons per rem. These figures are, however, not obtained from direct epidemiological observations but have been calculated from such data under the assumption of a linear relationship between effect and radiation dose. This formal extrapolation of observed data involves an uncertainty which, of course, is proportionately greater for the calculated effects in the millirem range. However, although the calculated tumour risks can not be said to be founded on direct scientific evidence, there are scientific reasons to believe that the figures derived from the formal extrapolations constitute an upper limit of possible ri02050

  20. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  1. Low dose radiation and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Gong Shouliang; Cai Lu

    2006-01-01

    Induction of hormesis and adaptive response by low-dose radiatio (LDR) has been extensively indicated. It's mechanism may be related with the protective protein and antioxidants that LDR induced, which take effects on the diabetes mellitus (DM) and other diseases. This review will summarize available dat with emphasis on three points: the preventive effect of LDR on the development of diabetes, the therapeutic effect of LDR on diabetic complications and possible mechanisms by which LDR prevents the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Finally, the perspectives of LDR clinical, diabetes-related implication are discussed. (authors)

  2. Radiation-induced cancers in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Fumio

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced cancers in man were divided into three groups, a group in which cancers occurred after atomic bomb exposure, a group in which cancers occurred in radiologists and other medical specialists, and a group in which cancers occurred after exposure to diagnostic radiation, and they were summarized. In atomic bomb survivors leukemia, thyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer occurred so frequently. In addition to them, mortality ratios by malignant lymphoma, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, and by cancer of urinary tract were increased. The incidence of leukemia was decreased in those who treated radiation owing to the development of the protection of occupational exposure, and the incidence of radiation-induced cancers was decreased in patients owing to the improvement of therapy. However, a new problem has arisen as to the occurrence of cancers after medical exposure, such as various histological types of cancers after the treatment of skin diseases on the head, and breast cancer after the treatment of pneumothorax. Dose-to-effect relation, hereditary factors, effect of age, immunological influences and endocrine actions were also studied in each radiation-induced cancer. (Ichikawa, K.)

  3. Radiation-induced heart injury. Radiopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y; Niibe, H [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-11-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the interval between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue.

  4. Radiation-induced cancers in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, F [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1978-07-01

    Radiation-induced cancers in man were divided into three groups, a group in which cancers occurred after atomic bomb exposure, a group in which cancers occurred in radiologists and other medical specialists, and a group in which cancers occurred after exposure to diagnostic radiation, and they were summarized. In atomic bomb survivors leukemia, thyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer occurred so frequently. In addition to them, mortality ratios by malignant lymphoma, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, and by cancer of urinary tract were increased. The incidence of leukemia was decreased in those who treated radiation owing to the development of the protection of occupational exposure, and the incidence of radiation-induced cancers was decreased in patients owing to the improvement of therapy. However, a new problem has arisen as to the occurrence of cancers after medical exposure, such as various histological types of cancers after the treatment of skin diseases on the head, and breast cancer after the treatment of pneumothorax. Dose-to-effect relation, hereditary factors, effect of age, immunological influences and endocrine actions were also studied in each radiation-induced cancer.

  5. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  6. Radiation induced genetic damage in Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces genetic damage in haploid and diploid conidia of Aspergillus nidulans was investigated. Although the linear dose-response curves obtained following low LET irradiation implied a 'single-hit' action of radiation, high LET radiations were much more efficient than low LET radiations, which suggests the involvement of a multiple target system. It was found that the RBE values for non-disjunction and mitotic crossing-over were very different. Unlike mitotic crossing-over, the RBE values for non-disjunction were much greater than for cell killing. This suggests that non-disjunction is a particularly sensitive genetical endpoint that is brought about by damage to a small, probably non-DNA target. Radiosensitisers were used to study whether radiation acts at the level of the DNA or some other cellular component. The sensitisation to electrons and/or X-rays by oxygen, and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole and misonidazole) was examined for radiation induced non-disjunction, mitotic crossing-over, gene conversion, point mutation and cell killing. It was found that these compounds sensitised the cells considerably more to genetic damage than to cell killing. (author)

  7. Low dose diagnostic radiation does not increase cancer risk in cancer prone mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D., E-mail: dboreham@nosm.ca [Northern Ontario School of Medicine, ON (Canada); Phan, N., E-mail: nghiphan13@yahoo.com [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lemon, J., E-mail: lemonja@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The increased exposure of patients to low dose diagnostic ionizing radiation has created concern that these procedures will result in greater risk of carcinogenesis. However, there is substantial evidence that shows in many cases that low dose exposure has the opposite effect. We have investigated whether CT scans can modify mechanisms associated with carcinogenesis in cancer-prone mice. Cancer was induced in Trp53+/- mice with an acute high dose whole-body 4 Gy γ-radiation exposure. Four weeks following the cancer-inducing dose, weekly whole-body CT scans (10 mGy/scan, 75 kVp X-rays) were given for ten consecutive weeks adding an additional radiation burden of 0.1 Gy. Short-term biological responses and subsequent lifetime cancer risk were investigated. Five days following the last CT scan, there were no detectable differences in the spontaneous levels of DNA damage in blood cells (reticulocytes). In fact, CT scanned mice had significantly lower constitutive levels of oxidative DNA damage and cell death (apoptosis), compared to non-CT scanned mice. This shows that multiple low dose radiation exposures modified the radio response and indicates protective processes were induced in mice. In mice treated with the multiple CT scans following the high cancer-inducing 4 Gy dose, tumour latency was increased, significantly prolonging lifespan. We conclude that repeated CT scans can reduce the cancer risk of a prior high-dose radiation exposure, and delay the progression of specific types of radiation-induced cancers in Trp53+/-mice. This research shows for the first time that low dose exposure long after cancer initiation events alter risk and reduce cancer morbidity. Cancer induction following low doses does not follow a linear non-threshold model of risk and this model should not be used to extrapolate risk to humans following low dose exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  8. Radiation dose and risk in gastrointestinal roentgendiagnostic of the child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H; Loehr, H; Wallbaum, F [Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1978-11-01

    In gastrointestinal roentgendiagnostic of the child the exposure of the skin and the testis depends on body height and body weight. The dose grows with the age. The squaredose product (Rcm/sup 2/) and the energy absorbed by the body(integraldose, rdkg)increases comparably. On the other hand the quotient integraldosis/body weight is similar for the different age-groups. The radiation risk (the probability to die as consequence of a roentgenray induced disease) is approximately 1:100,000 to 1:10,000,000.

  9. Peculiarities of radiation induced craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sataev, N.M. (Uzbekskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Tashkent (USSR))

    1982-03-01

    Due to intracranial implantation of a radiosource in rabbit brain craniopharyngioma appeared. Its specific feature is grandular differentiation of embryonal epithelium of residuals of hypophysical (craniopharyngial) passage and the presence of focuses of blood vessel tumor degeneration of hemangioma type in its stroma. It is suggested that radiation craniopharyngioma is developed along the way of epigenetic changes of cellular elements of embryonal epithelium induced by radiation.

  10. Peculiarities of radiation induced craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sataev, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    Due to intracranial implantation of a radiosource in rabbit brain craniopharyngioma appeared. Its specific feature is grandular differentiation of embryonal epithelium of residuals of hypophysical (craniopharyngial) passage and the presence of focuses of blood vessel tumor degeneration of hemangioma type in its stroma. It is suggested that radiation craniopharyngioma is developed along the way of epigenetic changes of cellular elements of embryonal epithelium induced by radiation

  11. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  12. Patient radiation dose audits for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, Stephen; Rosenstein, Marvin; Miller, Donald L.; Schueler, Beth; Spelic, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quality management for any use of medical x-ray imaging should include monitoring of radiation dose. Fluoroscopically guided interventional (FGI) procedures are inherently clinically variable and have the potential for inducing deterministic injuries in patients. The use of a conventional diagnostic reference level is not appropriate for FGI procedures. A similar but more detailed quality process for management of radiation dose in FGI procedures is described. Methods: A method that takes into account both the inherent variability of FGI procedures and the risk of deterministic injuries from these procedures is suggested. The substantial radiation dose level (SRDL) is an absolute action level (with regard to patient follow-up) below which skin injury is highly unlikely and above which skin injury is possible. The quality process for FGI procedures collects data from all instances of a given procedure from a number of facilities into an advisory data set (ADS). An individual facility collects a facility data set (FDS) comprised of all instances of the same procedure at that facility. The individual FDS is then compared to the multifacility ADS with regard to the overall shape of the dose distributions and the percent of instances in both the ADS and the FDS that exceed the SRDL. Results: Samples of an ADS and FDS for percutaneous coronary intervention, using the dose metric of reference air kerma (K a,r ) (i.e., the cumulative air kerma at the reference point), are used to illustrate the proposed quality process for FGI procedures. Investigation is warranted whenever the FDS is noticeably different from the ADS for the specific FGI procedure and particularly in two circumstances: (1) When the facility's local median K a,r exceeds the 75th percentile of the ADS and (2) when the percent of instances where K a,r exceeds the facility-selected SRDL is greater for the FDS than for the ADS. Conclusions: Analysis of the two data sets (ADS and FDS) and of the

  13. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, O.

    1959-01-01

    According to its Statute the IAEA has to fulfil a dual function - to help individual countries in solving their specific problems and to undertake tasks in the common interest of all its Member States. With this latter aim in mind the Agency has placed a number of research contracts with national research institutes. The purpose and scope of two of them is described below by the scientists responsible for their execution. The Agency has contributed to this work by putting at the institutes' disposal scientists from its own staff apparatus and financial aid.IAEA placed a research contract concerning the effects of small radiation doses on cells, in particular on nervous cells, with the Pharmacological Institute of the University of Vienna. This Institute appeared well suited to deal with the problem owing to the type of its previous research work. The Director, Prof. Franz Bruecke, and his collaborator Dr. Otto Kraupp, have long been interested in the functioning of the nervous system and in the influence of different drugs upon it. It was particularly fortunate that the electrical properties and functions of cells had been measured by a method specially developed at this Institute. From the above mentioned observations one could expect that instantaneous reactions of cells to radiation would also lead to changes of the electrical status. Consequently, this method is now being applied to the research undertaken for IAEA. Different cells of plants and animals, ranging from algae to muscle fibres of mammals, were chosen as objects. So far changes of potentials-had been observed only during irradiation with very high doses. During these investigations another useful test for small radiation doses was developed, namely the measurement of the through-flow of an artificial blood solution through the blood vessels of an intestinal loop. It was observed that a few seconds after irradiation the flow rate diminishes, and returns to its normal level only when irradiation ends

  14. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, O

    1959-01-15

    According to its Statute the IAEA has to fulfil a dual function - to help individual countries in solving their specific problems and to undertake tasks in the common interest of all its Member States. With this latter aim in mind the Agency has placed a number of research contracts with national research institutes. The purpose and scope of two of them is described below by the scientists responsible for their execution. The Agency has contributed to this work by putting at the institutes' disposal scientists from its own staff apparatus and financial aid.IAEA placed a research contract concerning the effects of small radiation doses on cells, in particular on nervous cells, with the Pharmacological Institute of the University of Vienna. This Institute appeared well suited to deal with the problem owing to the type of its previous research work. The Director, Prof. Franz Bruecke, and his collaborator Dr. Otto Kraupp, have long been interested in the functioning of the nervous system and in the influence of different drugs upon it. It was particularly fortunate that the electrical properties and functions of cells had been measured by a method specially developed at this Institute. From the above mentioned observations one could expect that instantaneous reactions of cells to radiation would also lead to changes of the electrical status. Consequently, this method is now being applied to the research undertaken for IAEA. Different cells of plants and animals, ranging from algae to muscle fibres of mammals, were chosen as objects. So far changes of potentials-had been observed only during irradiation with very high doses. During these investigations another useful test for small radiation doses was developed, namely the measurement of the through-flow of an artificial blood solution through the blood vessels of an intestinal loop. It was observed that a few seconds after irradiation the flow rate diminishes, and returns to its normal level only when irradiation ends

  15. Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology. Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In other words, there are accumulated findings which cannot be explained by the classical ''target theory'' of radiation biology. The radioadaptive response, radiation-induced bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and the mechanisms underlying these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, correlations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. The present review focuses on the latter two phenomena by summarizing observations supporting their existence, and discussing the linkage between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (author)

  16. Bayesian approach in MN low dose of radiation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna Berna, A.; Alcaraz, M.; Acevedo, C.; Navarro, J. L.; Alcanzar, M. D.; Canteras, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Micronucleus assay in lymphocytes is a well established technique for the assessment of genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. Due to the presence of a natural background of MN the net MN is obtained by subtracting this value to the gross value. When very low doses of radiation are given the induced MN is close even lower than the predetermined background value. Furthermore, the damage distribution induced by the radiation follows a Poisson probability distribution. These two facts pose a difficult task to obtain the net counting rate in the exposed situations. It is possible to overcome this problem using a bayesian approach, in which the selection of a priori distributions for the background and net counting rate plays an important role. In the present work we make a detailed analysed using bayesian theory to infer the net counting rate in two different situations: a) when the background is known for an individual sample, using exact value value for the background and Jeffreys prior for the net counting rate, and b) when the background is not known and we make use of a population background distribution as background prior function and constant prior for the net counting rate. (Author)

  17. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.

    1980-01-01

    The author puts low dose irradiation risks in perspective using average background radiation doses for standards. He assailed irresponsible media coverage during the height of public interest in the Three-Mile Island Reactor incident

  18. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities