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Sample records for dose measurement system

  1. Real-time personal dose measurement and management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiyong; Cheng Chang; Liu Zhengshan; Yang Huating; Deng Changming; Zhang Xiu; Guo Zhanjie

    2001-01-01

    The composition and design of a real-time personal dose measurement and management system are described. Accordingly, some pertinent hardware circuits and software codes including their operation modes are presented

  2. Dose measurements in space by the Hungarian Pille TLD system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apathy, I.; Deme, S.; Feher, I.; Akatov, Y.A.; Reitz, G.; Arkhanguelski, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of crew, equipment, and experiments to the ambient space radiation environment in low Earth orbit poses one of the most significant problems to long-term space habitation. Accurate dose measurement has become increasingly important during the assembly (extravehicular activity (EVA)) and operation of space stations such as on Space Station Mir. Passive integrating detector systems such as thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are commonly used for dosimetry mapping and personal dosimetry on space vehicles. The well-known advantages of passive detector systems are their independence of power supply, small dimensions, high sensitivity, good stability, wide measuring range, resistance to environmental effects, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, they have the general disadvantage that for evaluation purposes they need a laboratory or large--in mass and power consumption--terrestrial equipment, and consequently they cannot provide time-resolved dose data during long-term space flights. KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (KFKI AEKI) has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescent dosemeter systems for measuring cosmic radiation doses in the 10 μGy to 10 Gy range, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a compact, self-contained, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system, highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A detailed description of the system is given and the comprehensive results of these measurements are summarised

  3. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bronner, J.; Hartet, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, Freiburg (Germany); Franz, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO{sub 2} will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  4. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuz, M.; Bronner, J.; Hartet, J.; Franz, S.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO 2 will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10 9 n/cm 2 for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10 12 n/cm 2 for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  5. Measurement system for depth dose distribution in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hirotsugu; Tsutaka, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Ikuo

    1999-01-01

    An accurate estimation of an absorbed dose distribution in human tissue is indispensable to efficiently perform radiotherapy in humans. Previously, various methods for such estimation have been developed, however, there is some problem in those methods, it takes too long times (3-4 hours) to determine the absorbed dose distribution through scanning by ionization chamber in water phantom. So, a determination system of depth dose was developed with an aim to determine the absorbed dose of X-ray or electron beam in materials similar to human body. This system was composed of a detector including scintillation fibers which allows emission due to radio-interaction, CCD camera for determination of light distribution of the emission and personal computer for data processing. Though the accuracy of this system was ±2% similar to that of the conventional measuring method, measuring time was reduced to almost 5 min, markedly shorter than that of the conventional water phantom (3-4 hours). The efficacy of works including the adjustment of irradiation system, planning, etc. would be improved by application of this system. (M.N.)

  6. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  7. Radiation dosemeters and ambient dose rate measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maushart, R.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturers have got the feeling that the PTB only reluctantly accepts complex dosimetric systems or systems with modern digital and microprocessor technology. Especially the fact that the PTB demands a restriction to a defined system configuration which must not be changed after design approval is felt to be a severe handicap. The rigid frame of design qualification forces manufacturers to adopt a two-tier development line, at least for ambient dose rate measuring systems, and frequently it is not necessarily the 'nature' system, i.e. equipment with modern technology, that is sent in to the PTB for testing. The way of solving the problem could be that PTB more readily accepts less familiar technologies, for instance by more frequently approving equipment at least preliminarily or for a restricted period of time, in order to collect experience. Another way could be to grant licence for system components, especially detectors. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  9. Comparison of 3-dimensional dose reconstruction system between fluence-based system and dose measurement-guided system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaguchi, Yuji, E-mail: nkgc2003@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kumamoto University Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan); Ono, Takeshi [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Onitsuka, Ryota [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Maruyama, Masato; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kai, Yudai [Department of Radiological Technology, Kumamoto University Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    COMPASS system (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) and ArcCHECK with 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) are commercial quasi-3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry arrays. Cross-validation to compare them under the same conditions, such as a treatment plan, allows for clear evaluation of such measurement devices. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of reconstructed dose distributions from the COMPASS system and ArcCHECK with 3DVH software using Monte Carlo simulation (MC) for multi-leaf collimator (MLC) test patterns and clinical VMAT plans. In a phantom study, ArcCHECK 3DVH showed clear differences from COMPASS, measurement and MC due to the detector resolution and the dose reconstruction method. Especially, ArcCHECK 3DVH showed 7% difference from MC for the heterogeneous phantom. ArcCHECK 3DVH only corrects the 3D dose distribution of treatment planning system (TPS) using ArcCHECK measurement, and therefore the accuracy of ArcCHECK 3DVH depends on TPS. In contrast, COMPASS showed good agreement with MC for all cases. However, the COMPASS system requires many complicated installation procedures such as beam modeling, and appropriate commissioning is needed. In terms of clinical cases, there were no large differences for each QA device. The accuracy of the compass and ArcCHECK 3DVH systems for phantoms and clinical cases was compared. Both systems have advantages and disadvantages for clinical use, and consideration of the operating environment is important. The QA system selection is depending on the purpose and workflow in each hospital.

  10. Alanine-EPR dosimetry system for high industrial as well radiotherapeutic dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovodsky, J.; Bukovjan, J.

    2005-01-01

    Slovak Institute of Metrology is developing new metrology standard for high doses, based on the alanine-EPR as a reference dosimetry system. A Bruker e-scan EPR analyser developed specifically for alanine dosimetry has improved stability of EPR measurement, especially at lower dose range. The standard e-scan system provides sensitivity below 1 Gray. After further improvement of the system and lowering of dose determination expanded uncertainty down below 1 %, its utilisation for radiotherapy field is expected (authors)

  11. Basic evaluation of signal transmission in a real-time internal radiation dose measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohe, K.; Takura, T.; Sato, F.; Matsuki, H.; Yamada, S.; Sato, T.

    2009-01-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive exposure to radiation occurs because the dose actually delivered to the tumor is not known. As a result, a patient suffers from side effects. To solve this problem, a system is needed in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body and the dose data are transmitted from inside to outside of the body during radiation therapy. If such a system is realized, it will be possible to treat cancer safely and effectively. The proposed real-time internal radiation dose measurement system consists of an implantable dosimeter, a wireless communication system, and a wireless feeding system. In this study, a wireless communication system that uses magnetic fields was investigated. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. It was confirmed that radiation dose data could be transmitted outside the body when the communication distance is the required 200 mm. (author)

  12. In-vivo (entrance) dose measurements in external beam radiotherapy with aqueous FBX dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, M.K.; Thakur, P.K.; Bansal, A.K.; Vidyasagar, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    FBX aqueous chemical dosimetry system has been found useful in radiotherapy owing to its low dose measuring capability. In the present work, entrance dose measurements in external beam radiotherapy on a telecobalt machine were carried out with the system on 100 patients. Treatments involving simple beam arrangement of open parallel-opposed beams in cranial and pelvic irradiations were selected for this study. In place of a spectrophotometer, a simple and inexpensive colorimeter was used for absorbance measurements. The purpose was to assess the efficacy of the FBX system for in-vivo dose measurements. The results obtained show that the average discrepancy between the measured and expected dose for both categories of patients was 0.2% (standard deviation 3.2%) with a maximum of +1 0.3%. There were 5.5% cases showing more than ± 5% discrepancy. Comparison of the results obtained with published work on entrance dose measurements, with diode detectors, shows that the inexpensive FBX system can be used for in-vivo (entrance) dose measurements for simple beam arrangements in radiotherapy and can thus serve as a useful QA tool. (author)

  13. Description of the local dose rate measuring system for the Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Lilian Rose Sobral da; Souza Mendes, Jorge Eduardo de

    1995-01-01

    The equipment used and the measured value processing involved in the Local Dose Rate Measuring System is described including the installation points for the measuring equipment in the reactor building, the auxiliary building and at the main gate of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant. Under normal operating conditions protecting of the personnel is ensured by measuring the local dose rate at those points which are generally accessible. In some cases , fixed sensors are not suitable so that mobile equipment is used. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig

  14. Implementation of Ray Safe i2 System for staff dose measuring in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershan, Vesna; Atsovska, Violeta

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiology procedures usually delivered the highest radiation dose to the patients as well as to medical personal. Beside another factors like patient size, fluoroscopy time, machine calibration etc., a good clinical practice has strong effects to staff and patient’s radiation dose. Materials and methods: In August 2012, a Ray Safe i2 system was installed in a private hospital in Skopje. The main purpose of this dosimetry system is to provide real time indication for the current exposure level of the medical personal. Knowing that, the staff has prerequisites to adjust their behavior to minimize unnecessary exposure like changing distance from exposed volume, C-ram angulations, field of view etc. and on this way to develop a good clinical practice. The Ray Safe i2 system is consisted by ten digital dosimeters, two dock stations, real time display, dose viewer and dose manager software. During interventional procedures, each involved staff wears dosimeter which measures and records X-Ray exposure every second and transfer the data wirelessly to the real time display. Color indication bars (green, yellow, red) represents the intensity of the currently received exposure, whereas green zone indicates < 0.2 mSv/h, yellow zone from 0.2 to 2 mSv/h and red zone indications from 2 to 20 mSv/h. Additionally, accumulated dose per individual is displayed next to the color indication bars. By using the software, information about personal dose history, such as annual dose, dose per particular session, hour, day or week, can be viewed and analyzed. Results: In this work it was found that staff accumulated doses were constantly increased over time, but reported number of procedures does not correspond to this tendency. Our assumption is that there is a misleading between reported number and actual performed procedures. Doctor1 received 55 times more dose than Doctor2 and Nurse1 received 11 to 3 times more dose than another Nurses. It was found a correlation of R2

  15. Dose measurements in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Kallinger, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dose measurements at the mamma during mammography were carried out in the form of direct measurement with thermoluminescent dosimetry. Measurement was done for the in- and outcoming doses at the mamma, the dose exposure of the sternal region and the scattered rays above the symphysis, the latter as parameter for the genetic radiation exposure. As expected, the dose of the smooth radiation used for mammography showed a strong decrease at the outcome point in comparison with the income point. Surprisingly high was the scattered radiation in the sternal region. A corresponding protection by lead plates could be taken into consideration. Extremely low is the scattered radiation above the symphysis. Even measurements with the very sensitive calcium fluoride dosimeters did not reveal any practically important dose in the symphysis region. Most measurement values remained below the determinable dose of 0.3mR. Some maximal values varied in the range of 3-1 mR. (orig.) [de

  16. Development of an ICCD-scintillator system for measurement of spatial dose distributions around 'hot particles'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydarous, A. Sh; Darley, P. J.; Charles, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD)-scintillator system has been investigated for potential use in measuring the spatially non-uniform dose distribution around 'hot particles'. This imaging system is capable of producing real-time measurements considerably quicker than other presently available radiation dosimetry techniques and exhibits good linearity and reproducibility and relatively high spatial resolution (∼17.5 μm). The time required for a dose evaluation is less than a hundredth that required for radiochromic dye film measurements. The non-uniformity of the system has been eliminated by applying pixel-to-pixel correction factors. The measurable dose rate range using a 110 μm thick scintillator extends from ∼2000 down to ∼6 Gy h -1 . The prototype ICCD-scintillator system has been used in evaluation of the skin dose from some high-activity nuclear fuel fragments. The results agree within a few percentage with radiochromic dye film measurements for 1 cm 2 averaging areas. (authors)

  17. Global real-time dose measurements using the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, D.; Smart, D.; Shea, M.; Bailey, J.; Didkovsky, L.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Jones, B.; Hong, S.; Yoon, K.

    2016-11-01

    The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) program has successfully deployed a fleet of six instruments measuring the ambient radiation environment at commercial aircraft altitudes. ARMAS transmits real-time data to the ground and provides quality, tissue-relevant ambient dose equivalent rates with 5 min latency for dose rates on 213 flights up to 17.3 km (56,700 ft). We show five cases from different aircraft; the source particles are dominated by galactic cosmic rays but include particle fluxes for minor radiation periods and geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The measurements from 2013 to 2016 do not cover a period of time to quantify galactic cosmic rays' dependence on solar cycle variation and their effect on aviation radiation. However, we report on small radiation "clouds" in specific magnetic latitude regions and note that active geomagnetic, variable space weather conditions may sufficiently modify the magnetospheric magnetic field that can enhance the radiation environment, particularly at high altitudes and middle to high latitudes. When there is no significant space weather, high-latitude flights produce a dose rate analogous to a chest X-ray every 12.5 h, every 25 h for midlatitudes, and every 100 h for equatorial latitudes at typical commercial flight altitudes of 37,000 ft ( 11 km). The dose rate doubles every 2 km altitude increase, suggesting a radiation event management strategy for pilots or air traffic control; i.e., where event-driven radiation regions can be identified, they can be treated like volcanic ash clouds to achieve radiation safety goals with slightly lower flight altitudes or more equatorial flight paths.

  18. Intercomparison On Depth Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, N; Akhadi, M

    1996-01-01

    Intercomparation on personal dose evaluation system has been carried out between CSRSR-NAEA of Indonesia toward Standard Laboratory of JAERI (Japan) and ARL (Australia). The intercomparison was in 10 amm depth dose measurement , Hp (10), from the intercomparison result could be stated that personal depth dose measurement conducted by CSRSR was sufficiently good. Deviation of dose measurement result using personal dosemeter of TLD BG-1 type which were used by CSRSR in the intercomparison and routine photon personal dose monitoring was still in internationally agreed limit. Maximum deviation of reported doses by CSRSR compared to delivered doses for dosemeter irradiation by JAERI was -10.0 percent and by ARL was +29 percent. Maximum deviation permitted in personal dose monitoring is ± 50 percent

  19. Development of wireless communication system in real-time internal radiation dose measurement system using magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Fumihiro; Shinohe, Kohta; Takura, Tetsuya; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Syogo; Sato, Tadakuni

    2009-01-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive radiation occurs because the actual delivered dose to the tumor is unknown. To overcome this problem, we need a system in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body, and the dose data are transmitted from the inside to the outside of the body. In this study, a wireless communication system, using magnetic fields was studied, and an internal circuit for obtaining radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was examined. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. An internal circuit was developed, and a signal transmission experiment was performed using the wireless communication system. As a result, the radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was transmitted over a communication distance of 200 mm, and the delivered dose was determined from the received signal

  20. Measures associated with the dose limitation system at the TVO Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruuskanen, A.T.; Sundell, R.O.

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses radiation protection practices at the TVO Power Company, which owns and operates two BWR units of Asea-Atom design at Olkiluoto, Finland. The installed electric power of each unit is 660MW. The full power operation of TVO I and TVO II began in 1979 and 1980, respectively. The dose limitation system calls for an organization which is responsible for radiation protection. This organization at the plant site is described. To limit doses a good knowledge of the work activities which cause doses is needed. There is a very up-to-date microprocessor-based work dosimetry system at the TVO power plant. The system provides a practicable means of measuring personal doses from various work activities. It also makes the allocation of radiation protection measures possible. The system and experience in applying it are discussed. The dose limitation system presupposes the realization of the optimization principle. The practice applied at TVO in order to limit internal contamination is presented. Owing to this practice, workers' internal doses have remained at a considerably low level. The paper discusses the ALARA values of different kinds of respiratory equipment. These values, which vary from 2x10 4 to 1x10 6 FIM/man.Sv (1 FIM=approx. US$ 0.22), can be used in the evaluation of different measures in avoiding internal doses. The operating policy of movable lead shields is presented. The ALARA value of this activity is evaluated to be about 5x10 4 FIM/man.Sv and on that basis it can be concluded that the use of movable lead shields is very efficient. The dose statistics for TVO's plant are presented. The doses have been less than 0.001 man.Sv/MW.a. Although the dose statistics for TVO are very good it is not realistic to consider solely the optimization aspect of radiation protection. The costs must also be kept in mind; these are presented in the paper. Problems in assessing the level of radiation protection practices on an annual basis are briefly discussed

  1. The system for automatic dose rate measurements by mobile groups in field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Filgas, R.; Cespirova, I.; Ejemova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of characteristics between a pressurized ionization chamber, plastic scintillator and proportional counter is given. Based on requirements and comparison of properties of various probes, the system for automatic dose rate measurement and integration of geographic co-ordinates in field was designed and tested.The system consists of proportional counter. This is so-called intelligent probe can be easily connected to a personal computer. The probe measures in the energy range 30 keV - 1.3 MeV with reasonable energy and angular response, it can measure the dose rate in the range 50 nSv/h - 1 Sv/h with the typical efficiency 9.5 imp/s/μSv/h. The probe is fixed in the holder placed on the front mask of a car. For the simultaneous determination of geographical co-ordinates the personal GPS navigator Garmin 95 is used. Both devices are controlled by a notebook via two serial ports. The second serial port that is not quite common in notebook can be easily realised by a PCMCIA card. The notebook is used in the field by a mobile group can be transmitted to the assessment centre by the cellular GSM phone. The system Nokia 2110 connected to notebook by PCMCIA card is used. The whole system is powered up from the car battery. The system is controlled by specially developed software. The software was developed in the FoxPro 2.5 environment and works under MS-DOS 6.22. It has no problems to work in Windows 95 DOS window. The results of dose rate measurements obtained during route monitoring are stored in files. They can be displayed on a graphic screen, presenting the geographical distribution of the dose rate values colour coded on a map and the time sequence of the measured data. (authors)

  2. Absorbed dose measurement by the MIRD system in the 131-I treated Thyroid Cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Woon; Lim, Sang Mu; Kim, Chang Hui; Kim, Ki Sub; Cho, Jong Sio; Jeong, Jin Sung; Park, Heung Kyu; Kwon, Oh Jin [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Medical Internal Radiation Dose(MIRD) schema was developed for calculating the absorbed dose from the administrated radiopharmaceuticals. With the biological distribution data and physical properties of the radionuclide, we can estimated the absorbed dose by the MIRD schema. For the thyroid cancer patients received high dose 131-I therapy, the absorbed dose to the bone marrow is limiting factor to the administered dose and the duration of admission is determined by the retained activity in the whole body. To the monitoring of whole body radioactivity, we used Eberline Smart 200 system using ionization chamber as a detector. With the time activity (Author).

  3. Radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    About 200 scientists from 28 countries and 5 international organizations met at a symposium on radiation dosimetry held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in June 1960. The aim of the symposium was not so much the description of a large number of measuring instruments as a discussion of the methods used, with special emphasis on those problems which had become important in the context of recent developments, such as the measurement of mixed or very large doses

  4. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  5. Intercomparison of radiotherapy treatment planning systems using calculated and measured dose distributions for external photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.; Jaervinen, H.; Vatnitskij, S.; Ermakov, I.; Chervjakov, A.; Kulmala, J.; Pitkaenen, M.; Vaeyrynen, T.; Vaeaenaenen, A.

    1991-02-01

    The requirement of 5 % overall accuracy for the target absorbed dose in radiotherapy implies that the accuracy of the relative dose calculation should be within only a few per cent. According to the recommendation by the International Commission on radiation units and measurements (ICRU), a computer-produced dose distribution can be considered to be accurate enough if it differs from the results of relative dose measurements by less than 2 %, or 2 mm in the position of isodose curves involving very steep dose gradients. In this study five treatment planning systems, currently used by the hospitals in Finland or in the USSR, were intercompared with respect to the above requirement. Five typical cases of irradiation were selected: regular fields, oblique incidence, irregular field, wedge field and inhomogeneity in a water equivalent phantom. Complete dose distributions were used for the intercomparison, and the beam data for each TPS was that pertaining to the beam where the comparative relative measurements were performed. The results indicate that the dose distributions produced by different TPS:s can differ from each other as well as from the measured dose distributions up to a level which is not acceptable in terms of the above requirement. Greatest differences seem to be related to the omission or undue consideration of the scatter components of the beam. A suitable quality assurance program for the systematic testing of the performance of the treatment planning systems could be based on a selection of tests as used in this study.(orig.)

  6. Doses Due to the South Atlantic Anomaly During the Euromir'95 Mission Measured by an On-Board TLD System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.; Reitz, G.

    1999-01-01

    During the Euromir'95 mission, a specially designed microprocessor-controlled thermoluminescent detector (TLD) system, called the 'Pille'95', was used by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter to measure the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir space station. One of the experiment's objectives was to determine the dose fraction on Mir due to the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) on an orbit inclined at 51.6 deg. and at an altitude of about 400 km. Using an hourly measuring period for 170 h in automatic mode, dose components both of galactic (independent of SAA) and SAA origin were determined. It was found that the maximum dose due to crossing the SAA was equal to 55 μGy. Averaging all the measurements it was calculated that the mean dose rate inside the Mir was 12-14 μGy.h -1 , and that half of this value was caused by the SAA. (author)

  7. The impact of ambient dose rate measuring network and precipitation radar system for detection of environmental radioactivity released by accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleher, M; Stoehlker, U.

    2003-01-01

    For the surveillance of environmental radioactivity, the German measuring network of BfS consists of more than 2000 stations where the ambient gamma dose rate is continuously measured. This network is a helpful tool to detect and localise enhanced environmental contamination from artificial radionuclides. The threshold for early warning is so low, that already an additional dose rate contribution of 0,07 μGy/h is detectable. However, this threshold is frequently exceeded due to precipitation events caused by washout of natural activity in air. Therefore, the precipitation radar system of the German Weather Service provides valuable information on the problem, whether the increase of the ambient dose rate is due to natural or man-made events. In case of an accidental release, the data of this radar system show small area precipitation events and potential local hot spots not detected by the measuring network. For the phase of cloud passage, the ambient dose rate measuring network provides a reliable database for the evaluation of the current situation and its further development. It is possible to compare measured data for dose rate with derived intervention levels for countermeasures like ''sheltering''. Thus, critical regions can be identified and it is possible to verify implemented countermeasures. During and after this phase of cloud passage the measured data of the monitoring network help to adapt the results of the national decision support systems PARK and RODOS. Therefore, it is necessary to derive the actual additional contribution to the ambient dose rate. Map representations of measured dose rate are rapidly available and helpful to optimise measurement strategies of mobile systems and collection strategies for samples of agricultural products. (orig.)

  8. Development of a high precision dosimetry system for the measurement of surface dose rate distribution for eye applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichmann, Marion; Fluehs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard [Fakultaet Physik, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, D 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Klinische Strahlenphysik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D 45122 Essen (Germany); Fakultaet Physik, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, D 44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The therapeutic outcome of the therapy with ophthalmic applicators is highly dependent on the application of a sufficient dose to the tumor, whereas the dose applied to the surrounding tissue needs to be minimized. The goal for the newly developed apparatus described in this work is the determination of the individual applicator surface dose rate distribution with a high spatial resolution and a high precision in dose rate with respect to time and budget constraints especially important for clinical procedures. Inhomogeneities of the dose rate distribution can be detected and taken into consideration for the treatment planning. Methods: In order to achieve this, a dose rate profile as well as a surface profile of the applicator are measured and correlated with each other. An instrumental setup has been developed consisting of a plastic scintillator detector system and a newly designed apparatus for guiding the detector across the applicator surface at a constant small distance. It performs an angular movement of detector and applicator with high precision. Results: The measurements of surface dose rate distributions discussed in this work demonstrate the successful operation of the measuring setup. Measuring the surface dose rate distribution with a small distance between applicator and detector and with a high density of measuring points results in a complete and gapless coverage of the applicator surface, being capable of distinguishing small sized spots with high activities. The dosimetrical accuracy of the measurements and its analysis is sufficient (uncertainty in the dose rate in terms of absorbed dose to water is <7%), especially when taking the surgical techniques in positioning of the applicator on the eyeball into account. Conclusions: The method developed so far allows a fully automated quality assurance of eye applicators even under clinical conditions. These measurements provide the basis for future calculation of a full 3D dose rate

  9. Development of a high precision dosimetry system for the measurement of surface dose rate distribution for eye applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Marion; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard

    2009-10-01

    The therapeutic outcome of the therapy with ophthalmic applicators is highly dependent on the application of a sufficient dose to the tumor, whereas the dose applied to the surrounding tissue needs to be minimized. The goal for the newly developed apparatus described in this work is the determination of the individual applicator surface dose rate distribution with a high spatial resolution and a high precision in dose rate with respect to time and budget constraints especially important for clinical procedures. Inhomogeneities of the dose rate distribution can be detected and taken into consideration for the treatment planning. In order to achieve this, a dose rate profile as well as a surface profile of the applicator are measured and correlated with each other. An instrumental setup has been developed consisting of a plastic scintillator detector system and a newly designed apparatus for guiding the detector across the applicator surface at a constant small distance. It performs an angular movement of detector and applicator with high precision. The measurements of surface dose rate distributions discussed in this work demonstrate the successful operation of the measuring setup. Measuring the surface dose rate distribution with a small distance between applicator and detector and with a high density of measuring points results in a complete and gapless coverage of the applicator surface, being capable of distinguishing small sized spots with high activities. The dosimetrical accuracy of the measurements and its analysis is sufficient (uncertainty in the dose rate in terms of absorbed dose to water is <7%), especially when taking the surgical techniques in positioning of the applicator on the eyeball into account. The method developed so far allows a fully automated quality assurance of eye applicators even under clinical conditions. These measurements provide the basis for future calculation of a full 3D dose rate distribution, which then can be used as input for

  10. Chemical Processing effects on the radiation doses measured by Film Dosimeter System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihai, F.

    2009-01-01

    Halide film dosimetry is a quantitative method of measurement of the radiation doses. The fog density and chemical processing of the dosimeter film affect the radiation dose measurement accuracy. This work presents the effect of the developer solution concentration on the response of the dosimetric film which different fog densities. Thus, three batches of film, dosimeters with following fog density 0.312 ± 1.31 %, 0.71 ± 0.59% and 0.77 ± 0.81 %, were irradiated to 137 Cs standard source to dose value of 1mSv. The halide films have been chemical processed at different concentrations of the developer solution: 20 %; 14.29 %; 11.11%; all other physics-chemical conditions in baths of development have been kept constants. Concentration of 20% is considered to be chemical processed standard conditions of the films. In case of the films exposed to 1 mSv dose, optical density recorded on the low fog films processed at 20% developer solution is rather closed of high fog film optical densities processed at 11.11% developer solution concentration. Also, the chemical processing effect on the image contrast was taken into consideration

  11. Extra Dose Due to Extravehicular Activity During the NASA4 Mission, Measured by an On-Board TLD System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I. [Budapest (Hungary)

    1999-07-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO{sub 4}:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO{sub 4}:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 {mu}Gy.h{sup -1} at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET. (author)

  12. Measured Neutron Spectra and Dose Equivalents From a Mevion Single-Room, Passively Scattered Proton System Used for Craniospinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Rebecca M., E-mail: rhowell@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Burgett, Eric A.; Isaacs, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States); Price Hedrick, Samantha G.; Reilly, Michael P.; Rankine, Leith J.; Grantham, Kevin K.; Perkins, Stephanie; Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To measure, in the setting of typical passively scattered proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) treatment, the secondary neutron spectra, and use these spectra to calculate dose equivalents for both internal and external neutrons delivered via a Mevion single-room compact proton system. Methods and Materials: Secondary neutron spectra were measured using extended-range Bonner spheres for whole brain, upper spine, and lower spine proton fields. The detector used can discriminate neutrons over the entire range of the energy spectrum encountered in proton therapy. To separately assess internally and externally generated neutrons, each of the fields was delivered with and without a phantom. Average neutron energy, total neutron fluence, and ambient dose equivalent [H* (10)] were calculated for each spectrum. Neutron dose equivalents as a function of depth were estimated by applying published neutron depth–dose data to in-air H* (10) values. Results: For CSI fields, neutron spectra were similar, with a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate continuum between the evaporation and thermal peaks. Neutrons in the evaporation peak made the largest contribution to dose equivalent. Internal neutrons had a very low to negligible contribution to dose equivalent compared with external neutrons, largely attributed to the measurement location being far outside the primary proton beam. Average energies ranged from 8.6 to 14.5 MeV, whereas fluences ranged from 6.91 × 10{sup 6} to 1.04 × 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/Gy, and H* (10) ranged from 2.27 to 3.92 mSv/Gy. Conclusions: For CSI treatments delivered with a Mevion single-gantry proton therapy system, we found measured neutron dose was consistent with dose equivalents reported for CSI with other proton beamlines.

  13. Analysis and radiation dose rate measurement of the Al-1050 capsule on the rabbit system facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani; Sutrisno; H, Saleh; Rohidi; M, Kawkab

    2000-01-01

    Aluminium is a kind of light metal with density of 2.7 gram /cm exp 3,regarding to the aluminium is characteristic such as easy to fabricated,has a good corrosion resistant and radiation heat resistant, therefore aluminum is selected to be used as a material for sample irradiation capsule with high neutron fluency. Analysis using neutron activation method and capsule irradiation by using high neutron fluency and dose radiation rate measurement was done. The analysis result show that impurities in the Al-1050 capsule are Fe, Cu, Mg, Sb, Zn, and Mn. The capsule irradiated at 15 MW during 6 Hours with neutron fluency of 2,8 x 10 exp 17 n/cm exp 2. The radiation doses rate after 24 hours decay is 220 mrad/h at 0-meter distance and 60 mrad/h at 1-meter distance. Respectively. From the analysis results and measurement show that the Al-1050 capsule has no high neutron absorption element and available to get continuing irradiation at 15 MW as far as 6 hours. Due to the personal safety, therefore the capsule handling could be carried out in the hot cell

  14. Occupational dose assessment and national dose registry system in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari-Zadeh, M.; Nazeri, F.; Hosseini-Pooya, S. M.; Taheri, M.; Gheshlaghi, F.; Kardan, M. R.; Babakhani, A.; Rastkhah, N.; Yousefi-Nejad, F.; Darabi, M.; Oruji, T.; Gholamali-Zadeh, Z.; Karimi-Diba, J.; Kazemi-Movahed, A. A.; Dashti-Pour, M. R.; Enferadi, A.; Jahanbakhshian, M. H.; Sadegh-Khani, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents status of external and internal dose assessment of workers and introducing the structure of National Dose Registry System of Iran (NDRSI). As well as types of individual dosemeters in use, techniques for internal dose assessment are presented. Results obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison programme on measurement of personal dose equivalent H p (10) and consistency of the measured doses with the delivered doses are shown. Also, implementation of dosimetry standards, establishment of quality management system, authorisation and approval procedure of dosimetry service providers are discussed. (authors)

  15. Skin dose measurement with MICROSPEC-2 trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    For many years, the Eberline HP-260 trademark beta detectors were used for skin dose measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This detector does not measure the beta spectrum and the skin dose can only be determined if the contaminating radioactive isotope is known. A new product MICROSPEC-2 trademark, has been developed which consists of a small portable computer with a multichannel analyzer and a beta probe consisting of a phoswich detector. The system measures the beta spectrum and automatically folds in the beta fluence-to-dose conversion function to yield the skin dose

  16. Dose discrepancy between planning system estimation and measurement in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Vial Philip; Berry Megan; Ochoa, Cesar; Beeksma, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat spinal metastases has shown excellent clinical outcomes for local control. High dose gradients wrapping around spinal cord make this treatment technically challenging. In this work, we present a spine SBRT case where a dosimetric error was identified during pre-treatment dosimetric quality assurance (QA). A patient with metastasis in T7 vertebral body consented to undergo SBRT. A dual arc volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) with a 6 MV Elekta machine using gantry control point spacing of 4°. Standard pre-treatment QA measurements were performed, including ArcCHECK, ion chamber in CTV and spinal cord (SC) region and film measurements in multiple planes. While the dose measured at CTV region showed good agreement with TPS, the dose measured to the SC was significantly higher than reported by TPS in the original and repeat plans. Acceptable agreement was only achieved when the gantry control point spacing was reduced to 3°. A potentially harmful dose error was identified by pre-treatment QA. TPS parameter settings used safely in conventional treatments should be re-assessed for complex treatments.

  17. Measurement of stray neutron doses inside the treatment room from a proton pencil beam scanning system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mojzeszek, N.; Farah, J.; Klodowska, M.; Ploc, Ondřej; Stolarczyk, L.; Waligorski, M. P. R.; Olko, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2017), s. 80-84 ISSN 1120-1797 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : secondary neutrons * proton therapy * pencil beam scanning systtems * out-of-field doses * stray neutron doses * TEPC Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging Impact factor: 1.990, year: 2016

  18. Bio-physical effects of scanned proton beams: measurements and models for discrete high dose rates scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Marzi, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop and optimize algorithms for intensity modulated proton therapy, taking into account the physical and biological pencil beam properties. A model based on the summation and fluence weighted division of the pencil beams has been used. A new parameterization of the lateral dose distribution has been developed using a combination of three Gaussian functions. The algorithms have been implemented into a treatment planning system, then experimentally validated and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Some approximations have been made and validated in order to achieve reasonable calculation times for clinical purposes. In a second phase, a collaboration with Institut Curie radiobiological teams has been started in order to implement radiobiological parameters and results into the optimization loop of the treatment planning process. Indeed, scanned pencil beams are pulsed and delivered at high dose rates (from 10 to 100 Gy/s), and the relative biological efficiency of protons is still relatively unknown given the wide diversity of use of these beams: the different models available and their dependence with linear energy transfers have been studied. A good agreement between dose calculations and measurements (deviations lower than 3 % and 2 mm) has been obtained. An experimental protocol has been set in order to qualify pulsed high dose rate effects and preliminary results obtained on one cell line suggested variations of the biological efficiency up to 10 %, though with large uncertainties. (author) [fr

  19. A luminescence imaging system for the routine measurement of single-grain OSL dose distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, Myung Ho; Lapp, Torben; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    the potential of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD), providing extremely low level light detection. We characterize the performance of the device by discussing reproducibility and evaluating uncertainties in OSL signals. Finally we derive a typical single grain natural dose distribution...

  20. Traceability and standardization of large dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    The reliability of dose control for radiation sterilization and food irradiation depends on the relative errors in measurements made by different dosimeters and the level of process control techniques as well as traceability. International efforts have been made for standardization of dose measurement procedures and process control techniques. A system for traceability of large dose measurement has already been established in the U.S. and Britain, and it has become urgent in Japan to establish a traceability system. For process control for radiation sterilization of medical tools, dose measurement is replacing the use of a biological indicator to play a more important role in relation to sterilization assurance. AAMI is making efforts to establish implementation standards for process control for industrial sterilization with electron beam. In Japan, the Radiation Irradiation Promotion Association has developed a manual 'Measurement of Dose of Electron Beam for Irradiation' to be used by users of electron beam for irradiation. Further efforts are required to establish a proper traceability system and standardization of dose measurement. (N.K.)

  1. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  2. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  3. Problems in continuous dose rate measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Mitsuo

    1983-01-01

    The system of continuous dose rate measurement in Fukui Prefecture is described. A telemeter system was constructed in October, 1976, and it has been operated since 1977. Observation has been made at 11 observation stations in the Prefecture. In addition to the continuous measurement of dose rate by using NaI(T1)-DBM systems, the ionization chambers for high dose rate were installed, and also meteorological data have been collected. The detectors are covered with 1 mm thick aluminum designed so that the absorption of external radiation is kept as small as possible. To keep the environmental temperature of the detectors constant, constant temperature wind blow is made. With these consideration, the measurement of Xe-133 is possible, and the standard deviation of yearly dose is around 0.4 mR/Y. By measuring DBM transmission rate, the contribution of Xe-133, which comes from the exhaust pumps in power plants, can be detected. The problems of this system are as follows. First of all, the characteristics of the system must meet the purpose of dose monitoring. The system must detect the dose less than the target value to be achieved. The second is the selection of measuring systems to be set. The system is still not unified, and it is difficult to exchange data between different stations. Finally, the method of data analysis is not yet unified. Manuals or guide-books for this purpose are necessary for the mutual comparison of the data from the stations in different districts. (Kato, T.)

  4. Assessment of offsite, real-time dose measurement systems for emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeck, W.J.; Hoffman, L.G.; Staples, B.A.; Keller, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation is made of the effectiveness of fixed, real-time monitoring systems around nuclear power stations in determining the magnitude of unmonitored releases. The effects of meteorological conditions on the accuracy with which the magnitude of unmonitored releases is determined and the uncertainties inherent in defining these meteorological conditions are discussed. The number and placement of fixed field detectors in a system is discussed, and the data processing equipment required to convert field detector output data into release rate information is described. Cost data relative to the purchase and installation of specific systems are given, as well as the characteristics and information return for a system purchased at an arbitrary cost

  5. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2005-01-01

    Industrial gamma irradiators facilities are designed for processing large amounts of products, which are exposed to large doses of gamma radiation. The irradiation, in industrial scale, is usually carried out in a dynamic form, where the products go through a 60 Co gamma source with activity of TBq to P Bq (k Ci to MCi). The dose is estimated as being directly proportional to the time that the products spend to go through the source. However, in some situations, mainly for research purposes or for validation of customer process following the ISO 11137 requirements, it is required to irradiate small samples in a static position with fractional deliver doses. The samples are put inside the irradiation room at a fixed distance from the source and the dose is usually determined using dosimeters. The dose is only known after the irradiation, by reading the dosimeter. Nevertheless, in the industrial irradiators, usually different kinds of products with different densities go through between the source and the static position samples. So, the dose rate varies in function of the product density. A suitable methodology would be to monitor the samples dose in real time, measuring the dose on line with a radiation detector, which would improve the dose accuracy and avoid the overdose. A cylindrical ionization chamber of 0.9 cm 3 has been developed for high-doses real-time monitoring, during the sample irradiation at a static position in a 60 Co gamma industrial plant. Nitrogen and argon gas at pressure of 10 exp 5 Pa (1 bar) was utilized to fill the ionization chamber, for which an appropriate configuration was determined to be used as a detector for high-dose measurements. To transmit the signal generated in the ionization chamber to the associated electronic and processing unit, a 20 m mineral insulated cable was welded to the ionization chamber. The signal to noise ratio produced by the detector was about 100. The dosimeter system was tested at a category I gamma

  6. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  7. Mixed field dose equivalent measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; McDonald, J.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Quam, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, separate instruments have been used to monitor dose equivalent from neutrons and gamma rays. It has been demonstrated that it is now possible to measure simultaneously neutron and gamma dose with a single instrument, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). With appropriate algorithms dose equivalent can also be determined from the TEPC. A simple ''pocket rem meter'' for measuring neutron dose equivalent has already been developed. Improved algorithms for determining dose equivalent for mixed fields are presented. (author)

  8. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2004. Abstract. This study determined the correlation between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from ...

  9. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the correlation between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from the source. The study included the interventional ...

  10. Dose distribution around Ir192 brachytherapy source in non-full scattering conditions: comparison of in-phantom measurements and Nucletron-Oldelft plato system calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jastrzembski, Michal; Kabacinska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Comparing the values of doses measured in vivo during gynaecological brachytherapy with those computed with the use of Nucletron-Oldelft brachytherapy treatment planning system a high level of uncertainty appears. In case of points located close to the media border this is also due to the lack of scattering in this region. The influence of the lack of scattering on dose distribution has been investigated. Measured data has been compared to those given by Nucletron-Oldelft BPS. Materials and methods: Profiles in a large water phantom (PTW MP3 system) has been measured in directions perpendicular to the long axis of the fixed source at varied water level and at varied source-to-detector distances. Normalization values for the curves has been acquired by absolute dose measurements. Obtained data has been compared to profiles calculated in the same axes by Nucletron-Oldelft BPS. Results: The lack of scattering in the region close to water surface (up to 8cm) results in significant drop in measured dose. The decrease depends both on the distance from the medium border and on the distance from the source. For source-to-detector distance of 6.5cm the difference between calculated and measured dose is 8% for 3cm and 21% for 1cm of water above the source. Profiles in this region become flattened and asymmetric according to the drop in dose level. Conclusions: The lack of scattering in the region close to the patient skin results in significant drop in dose which is not taken into account by Nucletron-Oldelft BPS. This means that dose distribution calculated in this region by the System is not correct

  11. Patient dose measurement and dose reduction in East Anglia (UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, J.P.; Goldstone, K.E.; Dendy, P.P.

    1995-01-01

    At the end of 1990 a programme of patient dose measurements was introduced as part of the quality assurance service already provided for X ray departments throughout the East Anglian Health Region (UK). Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were used to measure over 1200 skin entrance surface doses for four common radiographic views in 33 hospitals in both the NHS and private sector. The four views were chosen to cover a wide range of equipment and techniques. The data collected have enabled Regional reference doses to be set which, for all views considered, fall below the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) Reference levels. In departments which exceeded reference levels, techniques were reviewed, improvements suggested and doses re-measured, in accordance with the recommended procedure for patient dose audit. A significant finding was that, given appropriate controls, X ray departments in the private sector could achieve the same acceptably low doses as NHS departments. (Author)

  12. A dosimetry system for fast measurement of 3D depth-dose profiles in charged-particle tumor therapy with scanning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusasco, C.; Voss, B.; Schardt, D.; Kraemer, M.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    The high complexity and high instantaneous dose rates of the intensity modulated treatment plans performed using carbon beams at GSI require a good granularity of the dose verification procedures. As a consequence, a new detector system was developed in order to obtain a 3D reconstruction of the relative depth-dose distributions in a short time, with high granularity and over large volumes. The system takes advantage of the active beam delivery system operative in the therapy facility of GSI and consists of one position sensitive detector with a stack of ionization chambers and a range-shifter. After a technical description of the apparatus, the procedure to reconstruct the 3D measurements is explained and the possible sources of errors in the measurements are analyzed. Finally, the results of the measurement of some treatment plans are shown

  13. Measurement of radiocesium concentration in trees using cumulative gamma radiation dose rate detection systems - A simple presumption for radiocesium concentration in living woods using glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, T.; Hashida, S.N. [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Kawachi, N.; Suzui, N.; Yin, Y.G.; Fujimaki, S. [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagao, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium from the severe accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on 11 March 2011 contaminates large areas. After this, a doubt for forest products, especially of mushroom, is indelible at the areas. Pruned woody parts and litters are containing a considerable amount of radiocesium, and generates a problem at incineration and composting. These mean that more attentive survey for each subject is expected; however, the present survey system is highly laborious/expensive and/or non-effective for this purpose. On the other hand, we can see a glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system. This system always utilized to detect a personal cumulative radiation dose, and thus, it is not suitable to separate a radiation from a specific object. However, if we can separate a radiation from a specific object and relate it with the own radiocesium concentration, it would enable us to presume the specific concentration with just an easy monitoring but without a destruction of the target nature and a complicated process including sampling, pre-treatment, and detection. Here, we present the concept of the measurement and results of the trials. First, we set glass-badges (type FS, Chiyoda Technol Corp., Japan) on a part of bough (approximately 10 cm in diameter) of Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) with four different settings: A, a direct setting without any shield; B, a setting with an aluminum shield between bough and the glass-badge; C, a setting with a lead shield between bough and the glass-badge; D, a setting with a lead shield covering the glass-badge to shut the radiation from the surrounding but from bough. The deduction between the amount of each setting should separate a specific radiation of the bough from unlimited radiation from the surrounding. Even if the hourly dose rate is not enough to count the difference, a moderate cumulative dose would clear the difference. In fact, results demonstrated a

  14. Entrance and peripheral dose measurements during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Kappas, K.; Theodorou, K.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry of entrance dose was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in order to evaluate the clinical application of the build up caps in patient dose measurements and for different treatment techniques. Peripheral dose (thyroid and skin) was measured for patients during breast radiotherapy to evaluate the probability of secondary cancer induction. TLD-100 chips were used with different Copper build up caps (for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams from two linear accelerators. Entrance doses were measured for patients during radiotherapy course for breast, head and neck, abdomen and pelvis malignancies. The measured entrance dose for the different patients for 6 MV beams is found to be within the ±2.6% compared to the dose derived from theoretical estimation (normalized dose at D max ). The same measurements for 15 MV beams are found to be ±3 %. The perturbation value can reach up to 20% of the D max , which acts as a limitation for entrance dose measurements. An average thyroid skin dose of 3.7% of the prescribed dose was measured per treatment session while the mean skin dose breast treatment session is estimated to be 42% of D max , for both internal and external fields. These results are comparable in those of the in vivo of reported in literature. The risk of fatality due to thyroid cancer per treatment course is 3x10 -3

  15. Calculation of midplane dose for total body irradiation from entrance and exit dose MOSFET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, P R

    2012-03-01

    This work is the development of a MOSFET based surface in vivo dosimetry system for total body irradiation patients treated with bilateral extended SSD beams using PMMA missing tissue compensators adjacent to the patient. An empirical formula to calculate midplane dose from MOSFET measured entrance and exit doses has been derived. The dependency of surface dose on the air-gap between the spoiler and the surface was investigated by suspending a spoiler above a water phantom, and taking percentage depth dose measurements (PDD). Exit and entrances doses were measured with MOSFETs in conjunction with midplane doses measured with an ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were combined using an exponential attenuation formula to give an estimate of midplane dose and were compared to the midplane ion chamber measurement for a range of phantom thicknesses. Having a maximum PDD at the surface simplifies the prediction of midplane dose, which is achieved by ensuring that the air gap between the compensator and the surface is less than 10 cm. The comparison of estimated midplane dose and measured midplane dose showed no dependence on phantom thickness and an average correction factor of 0.88 was found. If the missing tissue compensators are kept within 10 cm of the patient then MOSFET measurements of entrance and exit dose can predict the midplane dose for the patient.

  16. In vivo measurement of urethral dose profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toye, W.C.; Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology,; Duchesne, G.M.; Das, K.R.; Cee, A.; Mameghan, H.; Johnston, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Quality assurance becomes a critical requirement when radiographs are routinely used in planning of treatments. In HDR prostate brachytherapy, the surrounding organs at risk of complications are the bladder and the rectum. However, of particular concern is the urethra that runs centrally through the prostate gland, as an unavoidably high dose can occur in the central region in order to achieve a minimum peripheral dose to a small target volume. Although high urethral doses have previously been related to increased urinary symptoms, some recent studies have not found such a correlation. The aim of this study was firstly, to identify dosimetric indicators of urethral morbidity following HDR prostate brachytherapy (4F x of 5.0 Gy), and secondly, to test the validity of calculated dose values. The in vivo measurements utilised a TLD (LiF:Mg,Ti) train formed by loading eight TLD rods alternating with 1,0 cm brass spacers into a fine plastic flexible tube. The length and diameter of plastic tubing was approximately 45cm and 0.15cm respectively, while the train length was 11.8 cm from the tip of the tube. The TLD train was placed into the central lumen of an 18 F three-way urethral catheter prior to its insertion. Significant urinary morbidity was defined prospectively as a score of a total of 3 or more points for severity from 5 symptoms categories. The five symptoms evaluated were hesitancy, frequency/nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. The introduction of in vivo measurements to enhance the existing dosimetric analysis may be required to fully test the quantitative relationships (e.g. dose-volume ratios). Placement of TLDs within the urethra results in measurements whose accuracy is unaffected by internal organ motion as the hollow urethra must move with the prostate. The dose recorded by the TLDs is determined independently of the predictive algorithm used by the treatment planning system, and prostate location errors (e.g. due to image

  17. Personnel external dose monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hengyuan

    1989-01-01

    The status and trend of personnel external dose monitoring system are introduced briefly. Their characteristics, functions and TLD bedges of some commercially available automatic TLD system, including UD-710A (Matsushita, Japan), Harshaw-2271, 2276 (Harshaw, USA), Harshaw-8000 (Harshaw/Filtrol), Studsvik-1313 (Sweden) and Pitman-800 (UK) were depicted in detail. Finally, personnel dose management and record keeping system were presented and two examples were given

  18. Mobile System for the Measurement of Dose Rates with locations determined by means of satellite positioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, A.; Rio, L.M. del; Macias, J.A.; Vasco, J.

    1998-01-01

    Our laboratory has been developing and implementing a Real Time Radiological Warning Network around the Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant since 1990. It consists of six gamma dosimetry stations, two devices for the detection of radio-iodines and alpha, beta, and gamma emissions in air, a monitor for the continuous measurement of gamma radiation in water, and two basic meteorological stations. In this context, we have developed a mobile station endowed with a device for the measurement of dose rates which uses satellite positioning technology (GPS) so that it can be located remotely. The information gathered is sent back to our central laboratory in real/or deferred time through the digital mobile telephone network. A twofold utility is foreseen for this station: (a) action in the case of a radiological alert situation detected by our network, and (b) the performance of radiological-dosimetric studies of distant geographical zones. (Author)

  19. Characterization of a cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors for "in vivo" entrance skin dose measurements in interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Maria Daniela; D'Andrea, Marco; Strigari, Lidia; D'Alessio, Daniela; Quagliani, Francesco; Santoni, Riccardo; Bosco, Alessia Lo

    2012-08-01

    During radiological interventional procedures (RIP) the skin of a patient under examination may undergo a prolonged x-ray exposure, receiving a dose as high as 5 Gy in a single session. This paper describes the use of the OneDose(TM) cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors to determine the entrance skin dose (ESD) at selected points during RIP. At first, some dosimetric characteristics of the detector, such as reproducibility, linearity, and fading, have been investigated using a C-arc as a source of radiation. The reference setting (RS) was: 80 kV energy, 40 cm × 40 cm field of view (FOV), current-time product of 50 mAs and source to skin distance (SSD) of 50 cm. A calibrated PMX III solid state detector was used as the reference detector and Gafchromic(®) films have been used as an independent dosimetric system to test the entire procedure. A calibration factor for the RS and correction factors as functions of tube voltage and FOV size have been determined. Reproducibility ranged from 4% at low doses (around 10 cGy as measured by the reference detector) to about 1% for high doses (around 2 Gy). The system response was found to be linear with respect to both dose measured with the PMX III and tube voltage. The fading test has shown that the maximum deviation from the optimal reading conditions (3 min after a single irradiation) was 9.1% corresponding to four irradiations in one hour read 3 min after the last exposure. The calibration factor in the RS has shown that the system response at the kV energy range is about four times larger than in the MV energy range. A fifth order and fourth order polynomial functions were found to provide correction factors for tube voltage and FOV size, respectively, in measurement settings different than the RS. ESDs measured with the system after applying the proper correction factors agreed within one standard deviation (SD) with the corresponding ESDs measured with the reference detector. The ESDs measured with

  20. Patient dose measurement and dose reduction in chest radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milatović Aleksandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations presented in this paper represent the first estimation of patient doses in chest radiography in Montenegro. In the initial stage of our study, we measured the entrance surface air kerma and kerma area product for chest radiography in five major health institutions in the country. A total of 214 patients were observed. We reported the mean value, minimum and third quartile values, as well as maximum values of surface air kerma and kerma area product of patient doses. In the second stage, the possibilities for dose reduction were investigated. Mean kerma area product values were 0.8 ± 0.5 Gycm2 for the posterior-anterior projection and 1.6 ± 0.9 Gycm2 for the lateral projection. The max/min ratio for the entrance surface air kerma was found to be 53 for the posterior-anterior projection and 88 for the lateral projection. Comparing the results obtained in Montenegro with results from other countries, we concluded that patient doses in our medical centres are significantly higher. Changes in exposure parameters and increased filtration contributed to a dose reduction of up to 36% for posterior-anterior chest examinations. The variability of the estimated dose values points to a significant space for dose reduction throughout the process of radiological practice optimisation.

  1. Need for quality dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Work procedures based upon dependable measurements have unquestionably reduced past exposures to a level that will produce few injuries in later years. Of the many legal issues that might be discussed with regard to instrument calibration, the two of present concern are the determination of cause, and the evidence (including expert testimony) submitted to that end. Although they are termed here legal issues, they are in fact highly technical problems which have recently become political footballs. Some background is discussed in order to understand how such legal/technical/political considerations are related to instrument calibration, the subject of this workshop

  2. Experience of using MOSFET detectors for dose verification measurements in an end-to-end 192Ir brachytherapy quality assurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Nilsson, Josef; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa

    Establishment of an end-to-end system for the brachytherapy (BT) dosimetric chain could be valuable in clinical quality assurance. Here, the development of such a system using MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) detectors and experience gained during 2 years of use are reported with focus on the performance of the MOSFET detectors. A bolus phantom was constructed with two implants, mimicking prostate and head & neck treatments, using steel needles and plastic catheters to guide the 192 Ir source and house the MOSFET detectors. The phantom was taken through the BT treatment chain from image acquisition to dose evaluation. During the 2-year evaluation-period, delivered doses were verified a total of 56 times using MOSFET detectors which had been calibrated in an external 60 Co beam. An initial experimental investigation on beam quality differences between 192 Ir and 60 Co is reported. The standard deviation in repeated MOSFET measurements was below 3% in the six measurement points with dose levels above 2 Gy. MOSFET measurements overestimated treatment planning system doses by 2-7%. Distance-dependent experimental beam quality correction factors derived in a phantom of similar size as that used for end-to-end tests applied on a time-resolved measurement improved the agreement. MOSFET detectors provide values stable over time and function well for use as detectors for end-to-end quality assurance purposes in 192 Ir BT. Beam quality correction factors should address not only distance from source but also phantom dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Wireless monitoring system for personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hironobu; Kawamura, Takeshi; Inoue, Takayuki

    2000-01-01

    Fuji Electric has developed a system for the higher radiation controlled area in nuclear power plants, in which exposure dose data measured on the wearer's chest, hands, and legs are transferred by wireless to the data control equipment so that the exposure dose can be controlled in real time. The system using a specified low-power radio wave causes no interference to the other types of dosimeters. The data control equipment automatically saves data received from the dosimeters and also has functions of calibration of dosimeters and maintenance of the wireless system. This paper describes the wireless monitoring system that consists of chest and parts dosimeters and data control equipment. (author)

  4. Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.; Carlsson, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality control and it is important to have a well-defined and easy to use method for dose measurements. In dental radiology, the most commonly used dose parameters for the setting of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for intraoral examinations and dose width product (DWP) for panoramic examinations. DWP is the air kerma at the front side of the secondary collimator integrated over the collimator width and an exposure cycle. ESAK or DWP is usually measured in the absence of the patient but with the same settings of tube voltage (kV), tube current (mA) and exposure time as with the patient present. Neither of these methods is easy to use, and, in addition, DWP is not a risk related quantity. A better method of monitoring patient dose would be to use a dose area product (DAP) meter for all types of dental examinations. In this study, measurements with a DAP meter are reported for intraoral and panoramic examinations. The DWP is also measured with a pencil ionisation chamber and the product of DWP and the height H (DWP x H) of the secondary collimator (measured using film) was compared to DAP. The results show that it is feasible to measure DAP using a DAP meter for both intraoral and panoramic examinations. The DAP is therefore recommended for the setting of DRLs. (authors)

  5. SU-E-T-87: Comparison Study of Dose Reconstruction From Cylindrical Diode Array Measurements, with TLD Measurements and Treatment Planning System Calculations in Anthropomorphic Head and Neck and Lung Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Huang, M; Brezovich, I; Popple, R [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Faught, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess dose calculated by the 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL) against TLD measurements and treatment planning system calculations in anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The IROC Houston (RPC) head and neck (HN) and lung phantoms were scanned and plans were generated using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA) following IROC Houston procedures. For the H and N phantom, 6 MV VMAT and 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. For the lung phantom 6 MV VMAT and 15 MV 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. The plans were delivered to the phantoms and to an ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL). The head and neck phantom contained 8 TLDs located at PTV1 (4), PTV2 (2), and OAR Cord (2). The lung phantom contained 4 TLDs, 2 in the PTV, 1 in the cord, and 1 in the heart. Daily outputs were recorded before each measurement for correction. 3DVH dose reconstruction software was used to project the calculated dose to patient anatomy. Results: For the HN phantom, the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was -3.4% and between 3DVH and Eclipse was 1.2%. For the lung plan the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was 4.3%, except for the spinal cord for which 3DVH overestimated the TLD dose by 12%. The maximum difference between 3DVH and Eclipse was 0.3%. 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse because the dose reconstruction algorithm uses the diode measurements to perturb the dose calculated by the treatment planning system; therefore, if there is a problem in the modeling or heterogeneity correction, it will be carried through to 3DVH. Conclusion: 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse and TLD measurements. Comparison of 3DVH with film measurements is ongoing. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA81647 (NCI, DHHS)

  6. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H.; Rubo, R.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  7. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  8. Radiation Dose Measurement Using Chemical Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Han, Bum Soo

    2010-01-01

    The radiation dose can be estimated in various ways. Dose estimates can be obtained by either experiment or theoretical analysis. In experiments, radiation impact is assessed by measuring any change caused by energy deposition to the exposed matter, in terms of energy state (physical change), chemical production (chemical change) or biological abnormality (biological change). The chemical dosimetry is based on the implication that the energy deposited to the matter can be inferred from the consequential change in chemical production. The chemical dosimetry usually works on the sample that is an aqueous solution, a biological matter, or an organic substance. In this study, we estimated absorbed doses by quantitating chemical changes in matter caused by radiation exposure. Two different chemical dosimeters, Fricke and ECB (Ethanol-Chlorobenzene) dosimeter, were compared in several features including efficacy as dose indicator and effective dose range

  9. Dose estimation and evaluation of protector measures for a power plant's accidents scenario, using geographical information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.M.; Biagio, R.M.S.; Alves, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    Since the initial phase of a project of a nuclear plant several environmental studies are carried out, and a considerable amount of relevant information is generated. Therefore, there is an increasing need of an integrated analysis of this information in order to better evaluate the potential impact associated to hypothetical accident scenarios of such plants. This paper presents a case-study, in which a hypothetical accident scenario is analysed taking into account the environmental and populational information of the Brazilian nuclear power plants region by using a geographical information system. Important areas for planning of protective measures are identified to provide a basis for further analysis. (author)

  10. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  11. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A wide variety of portable survey instruments employing GM, ionization chamber and scintillation detectors exist for the measurement of gamma exposure rates. Often these same survey instruments are used for monitoring beta fields. This is done by making measurements with and without a removable shield which is intended to shield out the non-penetrating component (beta) of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. In many instances correction factors have been derived, that if properly applied, can reduce these errors substantially. However, this requires some knowledge of the beta spectra, calibration techniques and source geometry. This paper discusses some aspects of the proper use of instruments for beta measurements including the application of appropriate correction factors. Ionization type instruments are commonly used to measure beta dose rates. Through design and calibration these instruments will give an accurate reading only for uniform irradiation of the detection volume. Often in the field it is not feasible to meet these conditions. Large area uniform distributions of activity are not generally encountered and it is not possible to use large source-to-detector distances due to beta particle absorption in air. An example of correction factors required for various point sources is presented when a cutie pie ionization chamber is employed. The instrument reading is multiplied by the appropriate correction factor to obtain the dose rate at the window. When a different detector is used or for other geometries, a different set of correction factors must be used

  12. Thermoluminescent dose measurements on board Salyut type orbital stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatov, Yu.A.; Arkhangelskij, V.V.; Aleksandrov, A.P.

    1984-06-01

    A small, vibration- and shock-resistant thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) system - named PILLE - was developed for orbital stations at the Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary, to measure the cosmic radiation dose on-board. The first on-board measurements with this system were performed by B. Farkas, the Hungarian astronaut, on the Salyut-6 space station in 1980. The same instrument was used by other crews in the following years. Doses measured at different sites in Salyut-6 are presented. The dose rates varied from 0.7 to 0.11 mGy.day -1 . After the first cosmic measurements, the system was further developed. The minimum detectable dose of the new TLD system is 1 μGy, i.e. less by one order of magnitude than that of the former system. The self-irradiation dose rate of the TLD bulbs is also reduced by more than an order of magnitude to 10 nGy.h -1 , by use of potassium-free glass for the bulb envelope. This new type of PILLE TLD system is currently on-board Salyut-7. The dose rates (0.12-0.23 mGy.day -1 ) measured in 1983 are presented in detail. (author)

  13. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A large number of portable survey instruments employing G.M., ionization chamber, and scintillation detectors used for gamma measurements are also used for monitoring in beta fields by using removable shields to separate the beta and gamma components of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. Appropriate calibrations and correction factors can be used to reduce the errors in beta measurements to a tolerable level

  14. Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Currie, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size. (note)

  15. Measurements of the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the results of measurements related to the personal dose equivalent in the rooms adjacent to NILPRP 7 MeV linear accelerator, by means of the secondary standard chamber T34035 Hp(10). The chamber was calibrated by PTB at S- 137 Cs (E av = 661.6 keV, T 1/2 11050 days) and has N H = 3.17x10 6 Sv/C calibration factor for the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), at a depth of 10 mm in climatic reference conditions. The measurements were made for the two operation mode of the 7 MeV linac: electrons and bremsstrahlung

  16. Comparison and analysis of BNCT radiation dose between gold wire and JCDS measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Mizobuchi, Y.; Nagahiro, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    We compared and evaluated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) radiation dose between gold wire measurement and JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS). Gold wire analysis demonstrates the actual BNCT dose though it dose not reflect the real the maximum and minimum dose in tumor tissue. We can conclude that JCDS is precise and high-reliable dose planning system for BNCT. (author)

  17. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  18. Radiation dose measurement in gastrointestinal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Elzaki, M.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Barium studies investigations (barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema) are the basic routine radiological examination, where barium sulphate suspension is introduced to enhance image contrast of gastrointestinal tracts. The aim of this study was to quantify the patients' radiation doses during barium studies and to estimate the organ equivalent dose and effective dose with those procedures. A total of 33 investigations of barium studies were measured by using thermoluminescence dosemeters. The result showed that the patient entrance surface doses were 12.6±10, 44.5±49 and 35.7±50 mGy for barium swallow, barium meal, follow through and enema, respectively. Effective doses were 0.2, 0.35 and 1.4 mSv per procedure for barium swallow, meal and enema respectively. Radiation doses were comparable with the previous studies. A written protocol for each procedure will reduce the inter-operator variations and will help to reduce unnecessary exposure. (authors)

  19. INTERCOMPARISON ON THE MEASUREMENT OF THE QUANTITY PERSONAL DOSE EQUIVALENT HP(10) IN PHOTON FIELDS. LINEARITY DEPENDENCE, LOWER LIMIT OF DETECTION AND UNCERTAINTY IN MEASUREMENT OF DOSIMETRY SYSTEMS OF INDIVIDUAL MONITORING SERVICES IN GABON AND GHANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondo Meye, P; Schandorf, C; Amoako, J K; Manteaw, P O; Amoatey, E A; Adjei, D N

    2017-12-01

    An inter-comparison study was conducted to assess the capability of dosimetry systems of individual monitoring services (IMSs) in Gabon and Ghana to measure personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields. The performance indicators assessed were the lower limit of detection, linearity and uncertainty in measurement. Monthly and quarterly recording levels were proposed with corresponding values of 0.08 and 0.025 mSv, and 0.05 and 0.15 mSv for the TLD and OSL systems, respectively. The linearity dependence of the dosimetry systems was performed following the requirement given in the Standard IEC 62387 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The results obtained for the two systems were satisfactory. The procedure followed for the uncertainty assessment is the one given in the IEC technical report TR62461. The maximum relative overall uncertainties, in absolute value, expressed in terms of Hp(10), for the TL dosimetry system Harshaw 6600, are 44. 35% for true doses below 0.40 mSv and 36.33% for true doses ≥0.40 mSv. For the OSL dosimetry system microStar, the maximum relative overall uncertainties, in absolute value, are 52.17% for true doses below 0.40 mSv and 37.43% for true doses ≥0.40 mSv. These results are in good agreement with the requirements for accuracy of the International Commission on Radiological protection. When expressing the uncertainties in terms of response, comparison with the IAEA requirements for overall accuracy showed that the uncertainty results were also acceptable. The values of Hp(10) directly measured by the two dosimetry systems showed a significant underestimation for the Harshaw 6600 system, and a slight overestimation for the microStar system. After correction for linearity of the measured doses, the two dosimetry systems gave better and comparable results. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Measurement and evaluation of internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, J. I.; Song, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiation monitoring programme, measurement of uranium present in lung by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of the KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity

  1. Polystyrene calorimeter for electron beam dose measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    Calorimeters from polystrene have been constructed for dose measurement at 4-10 MeV electron accelerators. These calorimeters have been used successfully for a few years, and polystyrene calorimeters for use at energies down to 1 MeV and being tested. Advantage of polystyrene as the absorbing...

  2. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Sol Fernández, S.; García-Salcedo, R.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G.; Gaona, E.; León-Alfaro, M.A. de; Rivera-Montalvo, T.

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO_4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm"2 at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO_4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO_4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy - Highlights: • Low dose X-ray doses for personal dosimetry were measured. • Radiation dose (µGy ) for environmental dosimetry were determined. • Scattering radiation dose were measured by TLDs. • Linearity of pair TLD system was successful in the range of microgray. • Pair TLDs composed by CaSO_4:Dy and by LiF:Mg,Cu,P. is suggested for clinical dosimetry.

  3. Measurements of dose with individual FAMOS transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheick, L.Z.; McNulty, P.J.; Roth, D.R.; Davis, M.G.; Mason, B.E.

    1999-12-01

    A new method is described for measuring the doses absorbed by microstructures from an exposure to ionizing radiation. The decrease in the duration of UltraViolet light (UV) exposure required to erase each cell of a commercial UltraViolet erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (UVPROM) correlates with the dose absorbed by the floating gate of that transistor. This technique facilitates analysis of the microdose distribution across the array and the occurrence of Single Event Upset (SEU) like anomalous shifts due to rare large energy-deposition events.

  4. Measurements of dose with individual FAMOS transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheick, L.Z.; McNulty, P.J.; Roth, D.R.; Davis, M.G.; Mason, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    A new method is described for measuring the doses absorbed by microstructures from an exposure to ionizing radiation. The decrease in the duration of UltraViolet light (UV) exposure required to erase each cell of a commercial UltraViolet erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (UVPROM) correlates with the dose absorbed by the floating gate of that transistor. This technique facilitates analysis of the microdose distribution across the array and the occurrence of Single Event Upset (SEU) like anomalous shifts due to rare large energy-deposition events

  5. Multilayer detector for skin absorbed dose measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method for skin dosimetry based on utilization of multilayer detectors and permitting to estimate distribution of absorbed dose by skin depth is described. The detector represents a set of thin sensitive elements separated by tissue-equivalent absorbers. Quantitative evaluation and forecasting the degree of radiation injury of skin are determined by the formula based on determination of the probability of the fact that cells are not destroyed and they can divide further on. The given method ensures a possibility of quantitative evaluation of radiobiological effect and forecasting clinical consequences of skin irradiation by results of corresponding measurements of dose by means of the miultilayer detector

  6. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  7. Phantoms for IMRT dose distribution measurement and treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Gerber, Russell L.; Mutic, Sasa; Purdy, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient treatment dose distributions is currently based on custom-built or modified dose measurement phantoms. The only commercially available IMRT treatment planning and delivery system (Peacock, NOMOS Corp.) is supplied with a film phantom that allows accurate spatial localization of the dose distribution using radiographic film. However, measurements using other dosimeters are necessary for the thorough verification of IMRT. Methods: We have developed a phantom to enable dose measurements using a cylindrical ionization chamber and the localization of prescription isodose curves using a matrix of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chips. The external phantom cross-section is identical to that of the commercial phantom, to allow direct comparisons of measurements. A supplementary phantom has been fabricated to verify the IMRT dose distributions for pelvis treatments. Results: To date, this phantom has been used for the verification of IMRT dose distributions for head and neck and prostate cancer treatments. Designs are also presented for a phantom insert to be used with polymerizing gels (e.g., BANG-2) to obtain volumetric dose distribution measurements. Conclusion: The phantoms have proven useful in the quantitative evaluation of IMRT treatments

  8. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  9. Measurement of glanduler tissue dose and image quality on mammography investigation at different exposure parameters and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyol, O.

    2004-01-01

    There are many protocols suggested different international organization regarding to routine quality control and acceptance test methods of mammography systems. Users may select the most appropriate method for their routine practices according to infrastructure they have. However if there is a need for national authority to establish protocol for licesing of invidual users or in case of a screening studies for a large populations. Use of standard protocol became is important. Currently, there are more than 550 mamography system use in Turkey. However users implementing neither quality controlnor acceptance on the other hand even the national authorities. The purpose this thesis is to establishment a standard protocol than can be used for quality control and routine tests on mammography systems. This procedures were implented for 18 different mammography systems instoled at different places in Ankara

  10. Physical requirements for measurement of radiation dose and their relationship to personnel dose meter design and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, G.E. Jr.; Jimenez, M.A.; Skrable, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper stems from the concerns of the authors with both the design of current personnel dose meters and the interpretation of dose information from them in light of the actual physical requirements to measure dose. These concerns have been reinforced and extended following a comparative study of the responses of particular TLD and film systems and as the result of a recent national survey on personnel dosimetry conducted by the authors. Among the major points discussed are the systems available for penetrating and shallow dose assessment, dose meter calibration, the measurement and interpretation of skin dose, and the deficiencies of neutron albedo dose meters for routine personnel use. Calibration considerations address the questions of whether or not a phantom should be used and the difference in interpretation of responses with and without a phantom; the relationship between calculated and measured doses; and electronic equilibrium considerations in the measurement of photon doses. Matters of importance in relation to skin dose measurement include techniques in use to interpret skin dose from dose meter response; the appropriateness of evaluation of the surface dose to the live skin layer versus the average dose to the live skin layer and the limitations and requirements on dose meter design with respect to the dose being evaluated; and the significance of dose meter response in relationship to currently used beta calibration standards. Regarding the use of TLD albedo type neutron dose meters currently available, considerations are extended to the strong energy spectral dependence of the dose meter response and the possibility of making significant over or underestimations of neutron dose equivalent, depending on the calibration techniques used and the spectral quality encountered. (author)

  11. Skin Dose Equivalent Measurement from Neutron-Deficient Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Costigan, Steve A.; Romero, Leonard L.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    1997-12-01

    Neutron-deficient-isotopes decay via positron emission and/or electron capture often followed by x-ray, gamma-ray, and 0.511 MeV photons from positron annihilation. For cases of significant area and/or personnel contamination with these isotopes, determination of skin dose equivalent (SDE) is required by 10CFR835. For assessment of SDE, we evaluated the MICROSPEC-2(TM) system manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries of Canada which uses three different probes for dose measurement. We used two probes: (1) the X-probe which measures lower energy (4 - 120 keV) photon energy distributions and determines deep dose equivalent, SDE and dose equivalent to eyes, and (2) the B-probe which measures electron (positron) energy distributions, and determines skin dose equivalent. Also, the measured photon and beta spectra can be used to identify radioactive isotopes in the contaminated area. Measurements with several neutron-deficient sources showed that this system provided reasonably accurate SDE rate measurements when compared with calculated benchmark SDE rates with an average percent difference of 40%. Variations were expected because of differences between the assumed geometries used by MlCROSPEC-2 and the calculations when compared to the measurement conditions

  12. Assessment of dose measurement uncertainty using RisoScan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Miller, Arne

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement uncertainty of the dosimeter system RisoScan, office scanner and Riso B3 dosimeters has been assessed by comparison with spectrophotometer measurements of the same dosimeters. The reproducibility and the combined uncertainty were found to be approximately 2% and 4%, respectively, at one standard deviation. The subroutine in RisoScan for electron energy measurement is shown to give results that are equivalent to the measurements with a scanning spectrophotometer

  13. Assessment of dose measurement uncertainty using RisøScan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement uncertainty of the dosimeter system RisoScan, office scanner and Riso B3 dosimeters has been assessed by comparison with spectrophotometer measurements of the same dosimeters. The reproducibility and the combined uncertainty were found to be approximately 2% and 4%, respectiv......%, respectively, at one standard deviation. The subroutine in RisoScan for electron energy measurement is shown to give results that are equivalent to the measurements with a scanning spectrophotometer. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Verification of eye lens dose in IMRT by MOSFET measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuetao; Li, Guangjun; Zhao, Jianling; Song, Ying; Xiao, Jianghong; Bai, Sen

    2018-04-17

    The eye lens is recognized as one of the most radiosensitive structures in the human body. The widespread use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) complicates dose verification and necessitates high standards of dose computation. The purpose of this work was to assess the computed dose accuracy of eye lens through measurements using a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system. Sixteen clinical IMRT plans of head and neck patients were copied to an anthropomorphic head phantom. Measurements were performed using the MOSFET dosimetry system based on the head phantom. Two MOSFET detectors were imbedded in the eyes of the head phantom as the left and the right lens, covered by approximately 5-mm-thick paraffin wax. The measurement results were compared with the calculated values with a dose grid size of 1 mm. Sixteen IMRT plans were delivered, and 32 measured lens doses were obtained for analysis. The MOSFET dosimetry system can be used to verify the lens dose, and our measurements showed that the treatment planning system used in our clinic can provide adequate dose assessment in eye lenses. The average discrepancy between measurement and calculation was 6.7 ± 3.4%, and the largest discrepancy was 14.3%, which met the acceptability criterion set by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 53 for external beam calculation for multileaf collimator-shaped fields in buildup regions. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Remote control and data processing for measurement of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu; Luo Yisheng; Guo Yong; Ji Gang; Wang Xinggong; Zhang Hong; Zhang Wenzhong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To protect the workers from the reactor radiation and to improve the accuracy and efficiency of neutron dose measurement. Methods: With the application of remote control technology, a remote control and automatic measurement system for radiation dose measurement(especially for neutron dose) was set up. A Model 6517A electrometer was operated all automatically over RS-232 serial interface using SCPI commands with a computer. Results: The workers could stay far from the reactor and be able to control the portable computer in site though internet or LAN and then to control the 6517A electrometer to implement the dose measurement. After the measurement, the data were transferred to the remote computer near the workers and shared by many experts at the first time through the net. Conclusion: This is the first time that the remote control technology is applied in radiation dose measurement, which has so far been considered can only be performed at a near place. This new system can meet the need of neutron radiobiology researches as well as of the safety and health of the workers. (author)

  16. Patient and personnel dose measurements at selective coronarangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maripuu, E.

    1977-01-01

    During 1975 dose measurements were performed on patients and doctors at the thoraxradiologic department of the Caroline Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The doses were measured during angiography. Skin doses are listed in tables. Also the doses to the bone marrow was estimated. LiF-dosemeters were used for the measurements. Calibration of the dosemeters and errors in the measurements are discussed

  17. Dose measurement of ion implanted silicon by RBS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamawanna, Teerasak; Intarasiri, Saweat; Prapunsri, Chowunchun; Thongleurm, Chome; Maleepatra, Saenee; Singkarat, Somsorn

    2003-10-01

    Surface modification can be achieved by ion implantation. This study used a 1 mm thick silicon wafer as a target which was implanted with Ar+ at 80 keV. The degree of the modification depends on both the ion energy and the implanted dose. The distribution of argon in the silicon substrate and the absolute implanted dose can be measured by using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These investigations utilized a 1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator system at Chiang Mai University. The dose determination by a direct calculation is in agreement with the simulation by the SIMNRA code

  18. Measuring physiological and pathological femoral anteversion using a biplanar low-dose X-ray system: validity, reliability, and discriminative ability in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thepaut, Matthias [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de chirurgie pediatrique, Brest (France); Brochard, Sylvain [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, Brest (France); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Leboucher, Julien [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Lempereur, Mathieu [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, Brest (France); Stindel, Eric [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, La Cavale Blanche, Service d' Orthopedie-Traumatologie, Brest (France); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Tissot, Valentin [CHRU de Brest, Service de radiologie, Brest (France); Borotikar, Bhushan S. [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Institut Mines-Telecom, Telecom Bretagne, Brest (France)

    2016-02-15

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the concurrent validity and reliability of a low-dose biplanar X-ray system (Ld-BPR) for the measurement of femoral anteversion (FA) by comparing Ld-BPR-based three-dimensional measures with CT-scan-based measures and to assess the discriminative ability of this method in children with cerebral palsy. Fifty dry femora were scanned using both a CT scan and the Ld-BPR system. Ten femora were artificially modified to mimic a range of anteversion from -30 to +60 and scanned by both modalities. FA was quantified using the images from both modalities and statistically compared for concurrent validity. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of the Ld-BPR system was also determined. Further, Ld-BPR data from 16 hemiplegic and 22 diplegic children were analyzed for its discriminative ability. The concurrent validity between the Ld-BPR and CT-scan measures was excellent (R {sup 2} = 0.83-0.84) and no significant differences were found. The intra- and inter-trial reliability were excellent (ICCs = 0.98 and 0.97) with limits of agreement of (-2.28 ; +2.65 ) and (-2.76 ; +3.38 ) respectively. Further, no significant effects of angle or method were found in the sample of modified femora. Ld-BPR measures for FA were significantly different between healthy and impaired femora. The excellent concurrent validity with the CT scan modality, the excellent reliability, and the ability to discriminate pathological conditions evaluated by this study make this radiological method suitable for a validated use across hospitals and research institutes. (orig.)

  19. ''Nonisolated-sensor'' solid polystyrene absorbed dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitz, L.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A ''nonisolated-sensor'' solid polystyrene calorimeter was constructed to test the role of thermal diffusion in limiting the length of irradiation time during which temperature measurements with nonisolated sensors could be made sufficiently free of drift for determining dose with radiation fields such as gamma rays, x rays, and high-energy electrons. From measured ratios of dose at 5.0 and 0.5 cm in polystyrene and comparisons to dose measurements with a polystyrene parallel-plate (pancake) ion chamber, it was shown that thermal diffusion is sufficiently small in polystyrene to permit accurate measurements for irradiation periods of less than 20 min. Comparison of the absorbed dose measurements and depth dose ratios with pancake ion chambers and calorimeter showed, that within the precision and accuracy of the two measuring systems, there is close agreement. The nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter has the interesting features of (i) simplicity of construction, (ii) simplicity of operation without vacuum or feedback for temperature control, (iii) capability of simultaneous measurements at several depths and off-axis positions, (iv) the very small thermal defect correction with polystyrene, and (v) operation with the calorimeter in any orientation

  20. Nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene absorbed dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitz, L.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter was constructed to test the role of thermal diffusion in limiting the length of irradiation time during which temperature measurements with nonisolated sensors could be made sufficiently free of drift for determining dose with radiation fields such as gamma rays, x rays, and high-energy electrons. From measured ratios of dose at 5.0 and 0.5 cm in polystyrene and comparisons to dose measurements with a polystyrene parallel-plate (pancake) ion chamber, it was shown that thermal diffusion is sufficiently small in polystyrene to permit accurate measurements for irradiation periods of less than 20 min. Comparison of the absorbed dose measurements and depth dose ratios with pancake ion chambers and calorimeter showed, that within the precision and accuracy of the two measuring systems, there is close agreement. The nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter has the interesting features of (i) simplicity of construction, (ii) simplicity of operation without vacuum or feedback for temperature control, (iii) capability of simultaneous measurements at several depths and off-axis positions, (iv) the very small thermal defect correction with polystyrene, and (v) operation with the calorimeter in any orientation

  1. Breast internal dose measurements in a physical thoracic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, S.D.; Oliveira, M.A.; Castro, A.L.S.; Dias, H.G.; Nogueira, L.B.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: sadonatosilva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Hospital das Clinicas de Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Oncologia; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Anatomia e Departamento de Imagem

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a cancer treatment intended to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously into a target volume in order to eliminate the tumor and to spare the surrounding healthy tissues. This paper aimed to provide a dosimetric comparison between the treatment planning system (TPS) ECLIPSE from Varian Medical Systems and the internal dosimetric measurements in a breast phantom. The methodology consisted in performing a 3D conformal radiotherapy planning with two tangential opposite parallel fields applied to the synthetic breast in a thoracic phantom. The irradiation was reproduced in the Varian Linear accelerator, model SL - 20 Precise, 6 MV energy. EBT2 Radiochromic films, placed into the glandular equivalent tissue of the breast, were used to measure the spatial dose distribution. The absorbed dose was compared to those values predicted by the treatment planning system; besides, the dosimetric uncertainties were analyzed. The modal absorbed dose was in agreement with the prescribed value of 180 cGy, although few high dose points between 180 and 220 cGy were detected. The findings suggested a non-uniform dose distribution in the glandular tissue of the synthetic breast, similar to those found in the TPS, associated with the irregular anatomic breast shape and presence of inhomogeneities next to the thoracic wall generated by the low lung density. (author)

  2. Measurement of radiation dose with a PC-based instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangland, L.; Neubeck, R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in what way the introduction of Digital Subtraction Angiography has influenced absorbed doses to the patient and personnel. Calculation of the energy imparted to the patient, ε, was based on measurements of the dose-area product, tube potential and tube current which were registered with a PC-based instrument. The absorbed doses to the personnel were measured with TLD. The measurements on the personnel were made only at the digital system. The results indicate large variations in ε between different types of angiographic examinations of the same type. The total ε were similar on both systems, although the relative contribution from image acquisition and fluoroscopy were different. At the conventional system fluoroscopy and image acquisition contributed almost equally to the total ε. At the digital system 25% of the total ε was due to fluoroscopy and 75% to image acquisition. The differences were due to longer fluoroscopic times on the conventional system, mainly due to lack of image memory and road mapping, and lower ε/image, due to lower dose settings to the film changer compared to the image intensifier on the digital system. 11 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Clinical application of a OneDose(TM) MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-01-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose(TM) in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs. (note)

  4. Clinical application of a OneDose MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-07-21

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  5. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chena; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Woo Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Symkhampha, Khanthaly [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic); Lee, Woo Jin [Dept. of Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Sciences Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Heon Young [School of Computer Science Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose.

  6. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chena; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Woo Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo Jin; Yeom, Heon Young

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose

  7. Experimental measurements of spatial dose distributions in radiosurgery treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Perez-Pastenes, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions requires an integrating, high-resolution dosimeter capable of providing a spatial map of absorbed dose. This paper describes the use of a commercial radiochromic dye film (GafChromic MD-55-2) to measure radiosurgery dose distributions with 6 MV X-rays in a head phantom. The response of the MD-55-2 was evaluated by digitizing and analyzing the films with conventional computer systems. Radiosurgery dose distributions were measured using the radiochromic film in a spherical acrylic phantom of 16 cm diameter undergoing a typical SRS treatment as a patient, and were compared with dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system. The comparison lead to mean radial differences of ±0.6 mm, ±0.9 mm, ±1.3 mm, ±1.9 mm, and ±2.8 mm, for the 80, 60, 50, 40, and 30% isodose curves, respectively. It is concluded that the radiochromic film is a convenient and useful tool for radiosurgery treatment planning validation

  8. Dose rate measuring device and dose rate measuring method using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Sadao; Konno, Takahiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Yumitate, Tadahiro

    1998-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a scintillation fiber scope having a shape elongated in the direction of the height of a pressure vessel and emitting light by incident of radiation to detect radiation, a radioactivity measuring device for measuring a dose rate based on the detection of the fiber scope and a reel means for dispensing and taking up the fiber scope, and it constituted such that the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of a shroud are determined independently. Then, when the taken out shroud is contained in an container, excessive shielding is not necessary, in addition, this device can reliably be inserted to or withdrawn from complicated places between the pressure vessel and the shroud, and further, the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of the shroud can be measured approximately accurately even when the thickness of them is different greatly. (N.H.)

  9. Dose rate measuring device and dose rate measuring method using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Sadao; Konno, Takahiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Yumitate, Tadahiro

    1998-11-13

    The device of the present invention comprises a scintillation fiber scope having a shape elongated in the direction of the height of a pressure vessel and emitting light by incident of radiation to detect radiation, a radioactivity measuring device for measuring a dose rate based on the detection of the fiber scope and a reel means for dispensing and taking up the fiber scope, and it constituted such that the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of a shroud are determined independently. Then, when the taken out shroud is contained in an container, excessive shielding is not necessary, in addition, this device can reliably be inserted to or withdrawn from complicated places between the pressure vessel and the shroud, and further, the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of the shroud can be measured approximately accurately even when the thickness of them is different greatly. (N.H.)

  10. Radiation dose during mammography using various recording systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heep, H.; Buelow-Johansen, T.; Klemencic, J.; Wegwitz, J.; Stadtkrankenhaus Offenbach

    1978-01-01

    Patient dose during mammography for various recording systems, such as film, film-screen combination and xeromammography was measured by thermoluminescent densitometers. In the first set of experiments we measured dose per exposure, in a second set total surface dose at five points on the breast, using the following combintions: a) Two industrial film exposures and one xeromammographic exposure. b) two film-screen exposures and one xeromammographic exposure. c) One industrial film and two xeromammographic exposures. (orig.) [de

  11. Prediction of midline dose from entrance ad exit dose using OSLD measurements for total irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Park, Jong Min; Park, So Yeon; Chun, Min Soo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study aims to predict the midline dose based on the entrance and exit doses from optically stimulated luminescence detector (OSLD) measurements for total body irradiation (TBI). For TBI treatment, beam data sets were measured for 6 MV and 15 MV beams. To evaluate the tissue lateral effect of various thicknesses, the midline dose and peak dose were measured using a solid water phantom (SWP) and ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were measured using OSLDs. OSLDs were attached onto the central beam axis at the entrance and exit surfaces of the phantom. The predicted midline dose was evaluated as the sum of the entrance and exit doses by OSLD measurement. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was evaluated at various thicknesses. The ratio of the peak dose to the midline dose was 1.12 for a 30 cm thick SWP at both energies. When the patient thickness is greater than 30 cm, the 15 MV should be used to ensure dose homogeneity. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was less than 1.0 for thicknesses of less than 30 cm and 40 cm at 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. Therefore, the predicted midline dose can be underestimated for thinner body. At 15 MV, the ratios were approximately 1.06 for a thickness of 50 cm. In cases where adult patients are treated with the 15 MV photon beam, it is possible for the predicted midline dose to be overestimated for parts of the body with a thickness of 50 cm or greater. The predicted midline dose and OSLD-measured midline dose depend on the phantom thickness. For in-vivo dosimetry of TBI, the measurement dose should be corrected in order to accurately predict the midline dose.

  12. Routine measurement of dose to the bladder: still an utopy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeken, B.; Goor, C.; Weyngaert, D. van den; Middelheim, A.Z.

    1996-01-01

    Dosimetry with alanine is based on the relative and non destructive measurement of stable free radicals produced by radiation. The flexibility of the method (linear dose response, no energy dependence, no dose rate dependence) as well as in detector design makes this method very suited as in vivo dosimetry system for brachytherapy. Absorbed dose to the detector is measured as the signal intensity of the central line of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) powder spectrum of alanine. The dose at the bladder reference point (ICRU 38) can be measured with no additional inconvenience to the patient using a liquid alanine detector (natural oil with alanine crystals of size less than 200 mm) as follows: the balloon of the Foley catheter is filled with ± 7 cc of liquid detector instead of a radio-opaque fluid. By sedimentation the alanine crystals are collected at the posterior surface of the balloon in the vicinity of the bladder reference point. After the treatment the detector is recuperated from the Foley catheter and read out using a small quartz tube. In vitro measurements revealed 1) a perfect linear dose response in the range between 2 Gy and 5 Gy; 2) highly reproducible measurements: 3% (1s) at 1 Gy, 0.3% (1s) at 50 Gy; 3) a minor quantity of oil is leaking through the balloon wall which we expect is of no harm to the patient; 4) retrieving the irradiated alanine crystals from the Foley catheter reduces the EPR signal with a factor 0.927 ± 0.003 (1s); 5) subsequent mixing followed by centrifuge of the detector fluid will result in an EPR signal stable within ± 1% (1s); 6) the detector fluid shows an excellent EPR stability in a period of months after irradiation. We only recently obtained permission of the ethical committee to use this technique in vivo; the results of at least one patient will be discussed

  13. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K

    2003-01-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose b...

  14. Dose calculation system for remotely supporting radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kunieda, E.; Narita, Y.; Kimura, H.; Hirai, M.; Deloar, H. M.; Kaneko, K.; Ozaki, M.; Fujisaki, T.; Myojoyama, A.; Saitoh, H.

    2005-01-01

    The dose calculation system IMAGINE is being developed keeping in mind remotely supporting external radiation therapy using photon beams. The system is expected to provide an accurate picture of the dose distribution in a patient body, using a Monte Carlo calculation that employs precise models of the patient body and irradiation head. The dose calculation will be performed utilising super-parallel computing at the dose calculation centre, which is equipped with the ITBL computer, and the calculated results will be transferred through a network. The system is intended to support the quality assurance of current, widely carried out radiotherapy and, further, to promote the prevalence of advanced radiotherapy. Prototypes of the modules constituting the system have already been constructed and used to obtain basic data that are necessary in order to decide on the concrete design of the system. The final system will be completed in 2007. (authors)

  15. measurement of high dose radiation using yellow perspex dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamrin, M Thoyib; Sofyan, Hasnel

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of high dose radiation using yellow perspex dosemeter has been carried out. Dose range used was between 0.1 to 3.0 kGy. Measurement of dose rate against Fricke dosemeter as a standard dose meter From the irradiation of Fricke dosemeter with time variation of 3,6,9,12,15 and 18 minute, it was obtained average dose rate of 955.57 Gy/hour, linear equation of dose was Y= 2.333+15.776 X with its correlation factor r = 0.9999. Measurement result using yellow perspex show that correlation between net optical density and radiation dose was not linear with its equation was ODc exp. [Bo + In(dose).Bi] Value of Bo = -0.215 and Bi=0.5020. From the experiment it was suggested that routine dosimeter (yellow perspex) should be calibrated formerly against standard dosemeters

  16. A paired wedge filter system for compensation in dose differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Kondo, S.; Abe, S.; Hayakawa, N.; Aoyama, Y.; Obata, Y.; Ishigaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: In radiotherapy, it is important to conform the high dose volume to the planned target volume. A variable thickness paired wedge filter system was developed to compensate for dose inhomogeneity arising from field width segment variation in conformal irradiation. Materials and methods: The present study used a 6 MV linear accelerator equipped with multileaf collimator leaves and a paired wedge compensating filter system. The dose variation due to field width was measured in each field segment width. The variation in attenuation of the compensators was measured as a function of filter position. As the field width increases, the relative absorbed dose also increases; this is the point of requiring compensation, so it can be in reverse proportion. Results: As the field width increases, the relative absorbed dose also increases; this is why compensation is required and thus it must be in reverse proportion. Attenuation of the absorbed dose by the paired filters was in proportion to the filter position. The filter position to compensate for the difference of absorbed doses was defined by the square root of the field width. For a field varying in width from 4 to 16 cm, the variation in the absorbed dose across the field was reduced from 12% to 2.7%. Conclusion: This paired wedge filter system reduced absorbed dose variations across multileaf collimator shaped fields and can facilitate treatment planning in conformal therapy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Phantom's construction for dose measurement in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Harjanto; Hidayat Joko Puspito; Joko Triyanto

    2009-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, dose rate validation is the key for a successful process in therapy and diagnose of any deases. Therefore, the brachytherapy equipment being designed and constructed is to be validated its dose rate received by the radiated object. A phantom for such validation purpose is designed and constructed as a correct as if on site geometrical position of sources. The design of phantom consists of seven layers of flexi glass plates: 10 mm thick, 105 mm wide, and 280 mm length. All the plates are to be holed according to the size of the applicator to be used. Every surface of the flexi glass layers is grooved 1 mm wide, 1 mm depth, and 10 mm distance between the groove. The applicator inside the phantom is positioned at a certain reference for measurement. Every TLD installed has a fix position toward the reference coordinate and has an index number. By this system of phantom, the isodose system can be plotted. (author)

  18. Entrance surface dose measurements in mammography using thermoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.; Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E; Azorin, J.; Gonzalez, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Of the various techniques that can be used for personnel dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has emerged as a superior technique due to its manifold advantages over other methods of dose estimation. Various phosphors have been therefore investigated regarding their suitability for dosimetry. In this paper, a dosimetry system based on thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) from zirconium oxide phosphors embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (ZrO 2 +PTFE) was developed for entrance surface doses (ES) measurements in mammography. Small ZrO 2 pellets of 5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were used. The reproducibility of measurements and linearity of ZrO 2 were also studied. The results were compared with those obtained from LiF:Mg,Cu,P usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. Measurements both per unit air kerma and In vivo were performed using a mammography unit model DMR (General Electric). The results showed that ZrO 2 TLDs can be used for the same X-ray dosimetry applications as LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with each type having the disadvantage of a response dependent on energy, particularly at low energies. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and In vivo ES measurements in mammography. (Author)

  19. Estimation of Electron Dose Delivered by a 0.4 MeV Accelerator from Bremsstrahlung Dose Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadjov, A. G.; Hansen, Jørgen-Walther

    1980-01-01

    Determination of a 0.4 MeV electron dose from a bremsstrahlung dose measurement using a converter-detector system is considered. The detector used is a Frickle dosimeter, and the converters are aluminum, copper and lead foils. Optimal converter thickness is ascertained experimentally for each mat...... materials within a Z-range of 13–82. A linear relation is found between bremsstrahlung dose and electron dose ranging from 2 to 20 Mrad. Finally the effect of converter area on detector response is studied....

  20. Radiation dose measurements in intravenous pyelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeblad, M.; Gottlieb, E.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) and micturition cystourethrography (MCU) are the standard procedures in the radiological examination of children with urinary tract infections and in the control of these children. Gonad protection against radiation is not possible in MCU, but concerning the girls partly possible in IVP. It is of major importance to know the radiation dose in these procedures, especially since the examination is often repeated in the same patients. All IVP were done by means of the usual technique including possible gonad protection. The thermoluminescence dosimeter was placed rectally in the girls and fixed on the scrota in the boys. A total of 50 children was studied. Gonad dose ranged from 140 to 200mR in the girls and from 20 to 70mR in the boys (mean values). The radiation dose in IVP is very low compared to that of MCU, and from this point of view IVP is a dose saving examination in the control of children with urinary tract infections [fr

  1. The NRPB automated thermoluminescent dosemeter and dose record keeping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.; Marshall, T.O.; Shaw, K.B.

    1975-03-01

    This report describes the thermoluminescent personal radiation dosemeter and its associated automated processing equipment, which are being developed by the National Radiological Protection Board, together with the operation of a computerised dosemeter issue and record keeping system. The main justifications for introducing these systems are improvements in the organizational efficiency of the maintenance of individual dose records, a more flexible and accurate dosimetry system, and economics in operational costs. The dosemeter is based on a numbered aluminium plate containing two lithium fluoride in polytetrafluorethylene disks for the measurement of surface and body dose. This dosemeter is wrapped in thin plastic and labelled with the wearer's name and address. On return, the dosemeter is checked automatically for radioactive contamination; it is unwrapped and evaluated; the dose readings are included in the wearer's stored dose record; the dosemeter is annealed and is then available for re-issue to another wearer. Dose reports and warnings are automatically issued to the wearer or his employer. (author)

  2. Technology Development for Radiation Dose Measurement and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Hwan; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, T. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The correction factors essential for the operation of In-Vivo counting system were produced and implemented into a field operation for the improvement of accuracy in measurement of the radioactivity inside a human body. The BiDAS2007 code which calculate an internal dose was developed by upgrading the former code prepared in the previous stage of this project. The method of using the multibioassy data, the maximum likelihood function and the Bayesian statistics were established to an internal dose based on the measurement data of radioactivity, intakes and retention of radioactivity in a human body and it can improve the accuracy in estimation of the intakes of radioactivity and the committed effective dose equivalent. In order to solve the problem of low detection efficiency of the conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) to a high energy neutron, the extended BS's were manufactured and the technique for neutron field spectrometry was established. The fast neutron and gamma spectrometry system with a BC501A scintillation detector was also prepared. Several neutron fluence spectra at several nuclear facilities were measured and collected by using the extended BS. The spectrum weighted responses of some neutron monitoring instruments were also derived by using these spectra and the detector response functions. A high efficient TL material for the neutron personal dosimeter was developed. It solved the main problem of low thermal stability and high residual dose of the commercial TLDs and has the sensitivity to neutron and to gamma radiation with 40 and 10 times higher respectively than them.

  3. Comparison of two techniques for natural dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdal, E.; Ege, A.; Goekce, M.; Karali, T.; Derin, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In the study of luminescence dating, age of an archaeological sample is calculated by the ratio of total exposed dose to annual dose resulted from the environmental radioactivity. Determination of the annual dose level of an archaeological area is one of the most important parameter in calculating the archaeological age of the sample using luminescence techniques. Therefore, the knowledge of the concentrations of the natural radionuclides is important since naturally occurring radioactivity provides major contribution to the annual dose. The natural radioactivity is originated from natural radionuclides consisting mainly of 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K isotopes together with their daughters in soils. In this study, annual dose level of the archaeological site was determined with two different methods: an indirect method that is determining the concentrations of the naturally occurring radioactive elements using gamma spectroscopy and a direct method that uses thermoluminescence dosimeters. Soil samples were collected from the Yesilova Hoeyuek archaeological site located in Izmir City at the Aegean Region of Turkey. The concentrations of the natural radioactivity ( 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K) in soil samples were determined using 3 x 3 N aI (Tl) γ-ray spectrometry system. In direct method, Al 2 O 3 :C thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) were used. These dosimeters were chosen because of their sensitivity and usability in dating studies. They were buried in same archaeological site, 30 cm depth from the soil surface for 30 days period. The luminescence intensity of Al 2 O 3 :C dosimeters was measured by a TLD reader and the dose level was calculated by the luminescence signals emitted by the dosimeters. The results obtained from natural radionuclides and Al 2 O 3 :C thermoluminescence dosimeters were compared and the source of the differences between two methods were discussed

  4. Application of combined TLD and CR-39 PNTD method for measurement of total dose and dose equivalent on ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, E.R.; Deme, S.; Apathy, I.

    2006-01-01

    To date, no single passive detector has been found that measures dose equivalent from ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit. We have developed the I.S.S. Passive Dosimetry System (P.D.S.), utilizing a combination of TLD in the form of the self-contained Pille TLD system and stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (P.N.T.D.) oriented in three mutually orthogonal directions, to measure total dose and dose equivalent aboard the International Space Station (I.S.S.). The Pille TLD system, consisting on an on board reader and a large number of Ca 2 SO 4 :Dy TLD cells, is used to measure absorbed dose. The Pille TLD cells are read out and annealed by the I.S.S. crew on orbit, such that dose information for any time period or condition, e.g. for E.V.A. or following a solar particle event, is immediately available. Near-tissue equivalent CR-39 P.N.T.D. provides Let spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent from charged particles of LET ∞ H 2 O ≥ 10 keV/μm, including the secondaries produced in interactions with high-energy neutrons. Dose information from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is used to correct the absorbed dose component ≥ 10 keV/μm measured in TLD to obtain total dose. Dose equivalent from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is combined with the dose component <10 keV/μm measured in TLD to obtain total dose equivalent. Dose rates ranging from 165 to 250 μGy/day and dose equivalent rates ranging from 340 to 450 μSv/day were measured aboard I.S.S. during the Expedition 2 mission in 2001. Results from the P.D.S. are consistent with those from other passive detectors tested as part of the ground-based I.C.C.H.I.B.A.N. intercomparison of space radiation dosimeters. (authors)

  5. The Validity of a New Low-Dose Stereoradiography System to Perform 2D and 3D Knee Prosthetic Alignment Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Velleman, Ton; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Otten, Egbert; Stevens, Martin; Reininga, Inge H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The EOS stereoradiography system has shown to provide reliable varus/valgus (VV) measurements of the lower limb in 2D (VV2D) and 3D (VV3D) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Validity of these measurements has not been investigated yet, therefore the purpose of this study was to

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDoseTM MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  7. Measurement of gamma radiation doses in nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochvar, I.A.; Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Sergeeva, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the problems of measuring gamma radiation dose values and the dose distribution in the nuclear power plant area with the aim of estimating the extent of their effect on the population. Presented are the dosimeters applied, their distribution throughout the controlled area, time of measurement. The distribution of gamma radiation doses over the controlled area and the dose alteration with the increase of the distance from the release source are shown. The results of measurements are investigated. The conclusion is made that operating nuclear power plants do not cause any increase in the gamma radiation dose over the area. Recommendations for clarifying the techniques for using dose-meters and decreasing measurement errors are given [ru

  8. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. Measurements of absorbed dose in graphite irradiated by a beam of cobalt-60 gamma rays from an Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) E1 Dorado 6 teletherapy unit are reported. The measurements were performed using a graphite calorimeter, which is the primary standard for absorbed dose. The measurements are used to calibrate a working standard ion chamber in terms of absorbed dose in graphite. Details of the methods, results and correction factors applied are given in Appendices. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  9. Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with commercially available measuring components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Sabrina; Hupe, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with dosemeters using the counting technique are known to be inappropriate. Therefore, there is a demand for a portable device able to measure the dose in pulsed radiation fields. As a detector, ionisation chambers seem to be a good alternative. In particular, using a secondary standard ionisation chamber in combination with a reliable charge-measuring system would be a good solution. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) uses secondary standard ionisation chambers in combination with PTB-made measuring electronics for dose measurements at its reference fields. However, for general use, this equipment is too complex. For measurements on-site, a mobile special electronic system [Hupe, O. and Ankerhold, U. Determination of ambient and personal dose equivalent for personnel and cargo security screening. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 121(4), 429-437 (2006)] has been used successfully. Still, for general use, there is a need for a much simpler but a just as good solution. A measuring instrument with very good energy dependence for H*(10) is the secondary standard ionisation chamber HS01. An easy-to-use and commercially available electrometer for measuring the generated charges is the UNIDOS by PTW Freiburg. Depending on the expected dose values, the ionisation chamber used can be selected. In addition, measurements have been performed by using commercially available area dosemeters, e.g. the Mini SmartION 2120S by Thermo Scientific, using an ionisation chamber and the Szintomat 6134 A/H by Automess, using a scintillation detector. (authors)

  10. Ionizing radiation population doses at Sao Paulo city, Brazil: open-pit gamma dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Raimundo Enoch Rodrigues

    2001-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation to the human beings are well known for high and intermediate doses. As far as low level) radiation doses are concerned, there is no consensus. In order to get a better understanding of such effects it is necessary to assess the low doses with better accuracy. In this work, it was made an estimate of the annual ambient dose equivalent (H * (10)) to which the people are exposed in the city of Sao Paulo. Until now there are no data about it available in the literature. For the purpose of this evaluation, a map with various routes covering the largest and more representative area of the city was designed. The choice of points for data collection was made taking into account mainly the occupancy of the region. A portable gamma spectrometry system was used. It furnishes the rate of H * (10) and the measured gamma spectrum (in the range from 50 to 1670 keV) in the place of interest. The measurements were performed in a short time interval, since the gamma radiation arrives from a great extent of soil. Each measurement was done 1 m above the soil during 300 s. The rates of H * (10) varied from 33.1 to 152.3 nSv.h -1 , net values, obtained after subtraction of the cosmic rays contribution. The standard deviation was 22 n Sv.h -1 for an average for the city of Sao Paulo of 96.1(24) nSv.h -1 . In addition, average values of H * (10) rates for the city Health Divisions were calculated. Those values are not statistically equivalent and the whole set of data could not be treated as one, as the statistical Student test indicated a non homogeneity of the group of data. Hence it is necessary the accomplishment of a more detailed survey in order to verify the origin of the discrepancy. The mean value of H * (10) rate obtained for the city of Sao Paulo as converted to effective dose. in order to be compared with other places results It could be noticed that the annual average of effective dose for the city of Sao Paulo, 0.522(13) mSv, is superior to

  11. Real-time personal dose monitoring and management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiyong; Cheng Chang; Yang Huating; Liu Zhengshan; Deng Changming; Li Mei

    2000-01-01

    This paper mainly describes a real-time personal dose monitoring and management system. The system is composed of three parts that include SDM-98 semiconductor detector personal dosimeters, Data Readers and a Management System Software. It can be used for personal dose monitoring and management and other controlling actions in a radioactive controlled area. Adopting semiconductor detector and microcontroller, SDM-98 Personal Dosimeter is used to measure personal accumulated dose equivalent and dose rate caused by X-ray and Gamma ray. The results can be read directly on LCD. All the data stored in dosimeter can be transmitted into a data reader by infrared optical link. The alarm threshold can be adjusted successively in whole range of dose or dose rate. The Data Reader is an intelligent interface between the dosimeter and master computer. The data received from dosimeter will be sent to a master computer through RS-232 serial interface. According to the master computer's order, the Data Reader can turn on the dosimeter's power at entrance and shutdown it at exit. The Management System Software which written by Visual BASIC 5.0 runs on MS Win95. All the measuring data from dosimeters can be analyzed and treated according to requirements and stored in database. Therefore, some figures and tables relative to dose or rate can be shown on screen or printed out. (author)

  12. Radiation leakage dose from Elekta electron collimation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Garrett M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L

    2016-09-08

    This study provided baseline data required for a greater project, whose objective was to design a new Elekta electron collimation system having significantly lighter electron applicators with equally low out-of field leakage dose. Specifically, off-axis dose profiles for the electron collimation system of our uniquely configured Elekta Infinity accelerator with the MLCi2 treatment head were measured and calculated for two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate and document the out-of-field leakage dose in the patient plane and 2) to validate the dose distributions calculated using a BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) model for out-of-field dose profiles. Off-axis dose profiles were measured in a water phantom at 100 cm SSD for 1 and 2 cm depths along the in-plane, cross-plane, and both diagonal axes using a cylindrical ionization chamber with the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators and 7, 13, and 20 MeV beams. Dose distributions were calculated using a previously developed BEAMnrc MC model of the Elekta Infinity accelerator for the same beam energies and applicator sizes and compared with measurements. Measured results showed that the in-field beam flatness met our acceptance criteria (± 3% on major and ±4% on diagonal axes) and that out-of-field mean and maximum percent leakage doses in the patient plane met acceptance criteria as specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Cross-plane out-of-field dose profiles showed greater leakage dose than in-plane profiles, attributed to the curved edges of the upper X-ray jaws and multileaf collimator. Mean leakage doses increased with beam energy, being 0.93% and 0.85% of maximum central axis dose for the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators, respectively, at 20 MeV. MC calculations predicted the measured dose to within 0.1% in most profiles outside the radiation field; however, excluding model-ing of nontrimmer applicator components led to calculations exceeding measured data by as much as 0.2% for some regions

  13. Neutron Dose Measurement Using a Cubic Moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinfeld, M.; Mazor, T.; Cohen, Y.; Kadmon, Y.; Orion, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), introduced In July 1960 by a research group from Rice University, Texas, is a major approach to neutron spectrum estimation. The BSS, also known as multi-sphere spectrometer, consists of a set of a different diameters polyethylene spheres, carrying a small LiI(Eu) scintillator in their center. What makes this spectrometry method such widely used, is its almost isotropic response, covering an extraordinary wide range of energies, from thermal up to even hundreds of MeVs. One of the most interesting and useful consequences of the above study is the 12'' sphere characteristics, as it turned out that the response curve of its energy dependence, have a similar shape compared with the neutron's dose equivalent as a function of energy. This inexplicable and happy circumstance makes it virtually the only monitoring device capable providing realistic neutron dose estimates over such a wide energy range. However, since the detection mechanism is not strictly related to radiation dose, one can expect substantial errors when applied to widely different source conditions. Although the original design of the BSS included a small 4mmx4mmO 6LiI(Eu) scintillator, other thermal neutron detectors has been used over the years: track detectors, activation foils, BF3 filled proportional counters, etc. In this study we chose a Boron loaded scintillator, EJ-254, as the thermal neutron detector. The neutron capture reaction on the boron has a Q value of 2.78 MeV of which 2.34 MeV is shared by the alpha and lithium particles. The high manufacturing costs, the encasement issue, the installation efficiency and the fabrication complexity, led us to the idea of replacing the sphere with a cubic moderator. This article describes the considerations, as well as the Monte-Carlo simulations done in order to examine the applicability of this idea

  14. SU-G-BRB-14: Uncertainty of Radiochromic Film Based Relative Dose Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devic, S; Tomic, N; DeBlois, F; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lewis, D [RCF Consulting, LLC, Monroe, CT (United States); Aldelaijan, S [King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Due to inherently non-linear dose response, measurement of relative dose distribution with radiochromic film requires measurement of absolute dose using a calibration curve following previously established reference dosimetry protocol. On the other hand, a functional form that converts the inherently non-linear dose response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system into linear one has been proposed recently [Devic et al, Med. Phys. 39 4850–4857 (2012)]. However, there is a question what would be the uncertainty of such measured relative dose. Methods: If the relative dose distribution is determined going through the reference dosimetry system (conversion of the response by using calibration curve into absolute dose) the total uncertainty of such determined relative dose will be calculated by summing in quadrature total uncertainties of doses measured at a given and at the reference point. On the other hand, if the relative dose is determined using linearization method, the new response variable is calculated as ζ=a(netOD)n/ln(netOD). In this case, the total uncertainty in relative dose will be calculated by summing in quadrature uncertainties for a new response function (σζ) for a given and the reference point. Results: Except at very low doses, where the measurement uncertainty dominates, the total relative dose uncertainty is less than 1% for the linear response method as compared to almost 2% uncertainty level for the reference dosimetry method. The result is not surprising having in mind that the total uncertainty of the reference dose method is dominated by the fitting uncertainty, which is mitigated in the case of linearization method. Conclusion: Linearization of the radiochromic film dose response provides a convenient and a more precise method for relative dose measurements as it does not require reference dosimetry and creation of calibration curve. However, the linearity of the newly introduced function must be verified. Dave Lewis

  15. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutrakon, G; Wang, N; Miller, D W; Yang, Y

    2010-01-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 x 10 x 8 cm 3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  16. Computerized assessment of the measurement of individual doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiibus, A.

    1981-06-01

    The department for the measurements of individual doses makes regular dose controls by means of film badges for approximately 14000 individuals. The operation is facilitated by a Honeywell Bull Mini 6 Mod 43 computer. The computer language is COBOL applied to registering of in-data such as delivery of badges, film development, calibration, invoices, recording of individual doses and customers. The print-out consists of customers, badge codes, dosimeter lists, development specifications, dose statements, addresses, bills, dose statistics and the register of individuals. As a consequence of charges the activity is financially self-supporting. (G.B.)

  17. In situ measurements of dose rates from terrestrial gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, M.C.; Jiang, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was employed for the performance of in situ measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations in the ground in Taiwan, at altitudes ranging from sea level to 3900 m. The absolute peak efficiency of the HPGe detector for a gamma-ray source uniformly distributed in the semi-infinite ground was determined using a semi-empirical method. The gamma-ray dose rates from terrestrial radionuclides were calculated from the measured activity levels using recently published dose rate conversion factors. The absorbed dose rate in air due to cosmic rays was derived by subtracting the terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate from the overall absorbed dose rate in air measured using a high-pressure ionization chamber. The cosmic-ray dose rate calculated as a function of altitude, was found to be in good agreement with the data reported by UNSCEAR. (orig.)

  18. Measuring dose from radiotherapy treatments in the vicinity of a cardiac pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Samuel C; Wilks, Rachael; Kairn, Tanya; Crowe, Scott B

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the dose absorbed by tissues surrounding artificial cardiac pacemakers during external beam radiotherapy procedures. The usefulness of out-of-field reference data, treatment planning systems, and skin dose measurements to estimate the dose in the vicinity of a pacemaker was also examined. Measurements were performed by installing a pacemaker onto an anthropomorphic phantom, and using radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters to measure the dose in the vicinity of the device during the delivery of square fields and clinical treatment plans. It was found that the dose delivered in the vicinity of the cardiac device was unevenly distributed both laterally and anteroposteriorly. As the device was moved distally from the square field, the dose dropped exponentially, in line with out-of-field reference data in the literature. Treatment planning systems were found to substantially underestimate the dose for volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical tomotherapy, and 3D conformal treatments. The skin dose was observed to be either greater or lesser than the dose received at the depth of the device, depending on the treatment site, and so care should be if skin dose measurements are to be used to estimate the dose to a pacemaker. Square field reference data may be used as an upper estimate of absorbed dose per monitor unit in the vicinity of a cardiac device for complex treatments involving multiple gantry angles. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Networked National Occupational Dose Registry System (NODRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Recording of occupational doses received by radiation workers during their working life is a mandatory aspect of radiation protection. Maintaining of life-time dose data of these radiation workers is also necessary for (i) ensuring and reviewing radiation safety of workers, (ii) certification and other legal purposes, and (iii) for statistical analysis and epidemiological studies. Centralized dose records are being maintained by BARC since the inception of Directorate of Radiation Protection in late sixties. The dose records were computerized since 1975 and the systems were upgraded from time to time. The requirement of personnel data information was made a pre-requisite for allotment of personnel number to new persons for TLD Badge services since 1992

  20. Oblique incidence of electron beams - comparisons between calculated and measured dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karcher, J.; Paulsen, F.; Christ, G.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical applications of high-energy electron beams, for example for the irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes, can lead to oblique incidence of the beams. It is well known that oblique incidence of electron beams can alter the depth dose distribution as well as the specific dose per monitor unit. The dose per monitor unit is the absorbed dose in a point of interest of a beam, which is reached with a specific dose monitor value (DIN 6814-8[5]). Dose distribution and dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence were measured with a small-volume thimble chamber in a water phantom, and compared to both normal incidence and calculations of the Helax TMS 6.1 treatment planning system. At 4 MeV and 60 degrees, the maximum measured dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence was decreased up to 11%, whereas at 18MeV and 60 degrees this was increased up to 15% compared to normal incidence. Comparisons of measured and calculated dose distributions showed that the predicted dose at shallow depths is usually higher than the measured one, whereas it is smaller at depths beyond the depth of maximum dose. On the basis of the results of these comparisons, normalization depths and correction factors for the dose monitor value were suggested to correct the calculations of the dose per monitor unit. (orig.)

  1. Studying and measuring the gamma radiation doses in Homs city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofaan, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    The gamma radiation dose was measured in Homs city by using many portable dosimeters (electronic dosimeter and Geiger-Muller). The measurements were carried out in the indoor and outdoor buildings, for different time period, through one year (1999-2000). High purity germanium detector with low back ground radiation (HpGe) was used to determine radiation element contained in some building and the surrounding soil. The statistical analysis laws were applied to make sure that the measured dose distribution around average value is normal distribution. The measurement indicates that the gamma indoor dose varies from 312μSv/y to 511μSv/y, with the average annual dose of 385μSv/y. However the gamma outdoor dose rate varies from 307μSv/y to 366μSv/y with an average annual dose 385μSv/y. The annual outdoor gamma radiation dose is about %16 lower than the outdoor dose in Homs City. These measurements have indicated that environmental gamma doses in Homs City are relatively low. This is because that most of the soils and rocks in the area are limestone. (author)

  2. Real-time measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, Sergey; Korenev, Ivan; Rumega, Stanislav; Grossman, Leon

    2004-09-01

    The real-time method and system for measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for industrial and research electron accelerators is considered in the report. The system was created on the basis of beam parameters method. The main concept of this method consists in the measurement of dissipated kinetic energy of electrons in the irradiated product, determination of number of electrons and mass of irradiated product in the same cell by following calculation of absorbed dose in the cell. The manual and automation systems for dose measurements are described. The systems are acceptable for all types of electron accelerators.

  3. Real-time measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, Sergey E-mail: sergey_korenev@steris.com; Korenev, Ivan; Rumega, Stanislav; Grossman, Leon

    2004-10-01

    The real-time method and system for measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for industrial and research electron accelerators is considered in the report. The system was created on the basis of beam parameters method. The main concept of this method consists in the measurement of dissipated kinetic energy of electrons in the irradiated product, determination of number of electrons and mass of irradiated product in the same cell by following calculation of absorbed dose in the cell. The manual and automation systems for dose measurements are described. The systems are acceptable for all types of electron accelerators.

  4. Real-time measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey; Korenev, Ivan; Rumega, Stanislav; Grossman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    The real-time method and system for measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for industrial and research electron accelerators is considered in the report. The system was created on the basis of beam parameters method. The main concept of this method consists in the measurement of dissipated kinetic energy of electrons in the irradiated product, determination of number of electrons and mass of irradiated product in the same cell by following calculation of absorbed dose in the cell. The manual and automation systems for dose measurements are described. The systems are acceptable for all types of electron accelerators

  5. The measurement of patient doses from diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.; Solomon, S.B.

    1980-06-01

    As part of the National Health and Medical Research Council survey to determine the genetic and mean bone-marrow doses to the Australian population from the medical, dental and chiropractic uses of radiation sources, doses to patients undergoing X-ray diagnostic procedures were evaluated. The doses were measured using capsules of LiF or CaF 2 :Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). The evaluation of the TLD measurements is described and the mean values of the skin doses for patients undergoing various radiographic examinations in Australia in 1970 are presented

  6. Fast skin dose estimation system for interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Takeshi; Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Maejima, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Shinobu; Arai, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Takenori; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Furui, Shigeru

    2018-03-01

    To minimise the radiation dermatitis related to interventional radiology (IR), rapid and accurate dose estimation has been sought for all procedures. We propose a technique for estimating the patient skin dose rapidly and accurately using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with a graphical processing unit (GPU, GTX 1080; Nvidia Corp.). The skin dose distribution is simulated based on an individual patient's computed tomography (CT) dataset for fluoroscopic conditions after the CT dataset has been segmented into air, water and bone based on pixel values. The skin is assumed to be one layer at the outer surface of the body. Fluoroscopic conditions are obtained from a log file of a fluoroscopic examination. Estimating the absorbed skin dose distribution requires calibration of the dose simulated by our system. For this purpose, a linear function was used to approximate the relation between the simulated dose and the measured dose using radiophotoluminescence (RPL) glass dosimeters in a water-equivalent phantom. Differences of maximum skin dose between our system and the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) were as high as 6.1%. The relative statistical error (2 σ) for the simulated dose obtained using our system was ≤3.5%. Using a GPU, the simulation on the chest CT dataset aiming at the heart was within 3.49 s on average: the GPU is 122 times faster than a CPU (Core i7-7700K; Intel Corp.). Our system (using the GPU, the log file, and the CT dataset) estimated the skin dose more rapidly and more accurately than conventional methods.

  7. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR 192 Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single 192 Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the 192 Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for 192 Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  8. Measured dose to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields and determination of genetically significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Cumberlin, R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the genetically significant dose from therapeutic radiation exposure with Hodgkin's fields by estimating the doses to ovaries and testes. Phantom measurements were performed to verify estimated doses to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields. Thermoluminescent LiF dosimeters (TLD-100) of 1 x 3 x 3 mm 3 dimensions were embedded in phantoms and exposed to standard mantle and paraaortic fields using Co-60, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. The results show that measured doses to ovaries and testes are about two to five times higher than the corresponding graphically estimated doses for Co-60 and 4 MVX photon beams as depicted in ICRP publication 44. In addition, the measured doses to ovaries and testes are about 30% to 65% lower for 10 MV photon beams than for their corresponding Co-60 photon beams. The genetically significant dose from Hodgkin's treatment (less than 0.01 mSv) adds about 4% to the genetically significant dose contribution to medical procedures and adds less than 1% to the genetically significant dose from all sources. Therefore, the consequence to society is considered to be very small. The consequences for the individual patient are, likewise, small. 28 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Lisjak, I.; Vekic, B.; Poje, M.; Planinic, J.

    2008-01-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10 B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 μSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 μSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 μSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data

  10. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Lisjak, I. [Croatia Airlines, Zagreb (Croatia); Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Poje, M. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia)], E-mail: planinic@ffos.hr

    2008-02-15

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or {sup 10}B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 {mu}Sv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 {mu}Sv or the average dose rate of 2.7 {mu}Sv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 {mu}Sv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  11. The Validity of a New Low-Dose Stereoradiography System to Perform 2D and 3D Knee Prosthetic Alignment Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Velleman, Ton; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Otten, Egbert; Stevens, Martin; Reininga, Inge H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The EOS stereoradiography system has shown to provide reliable varus/valgus (VV) measurements of the lower limb in 2D (VV2D) and 3D (VV3D) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Validity of these measurements has not been investigated yet, therefore the purpose of this study was to determine validity of EOS VV2D and VV3D. Methods EOS images were made of a lower limb phantom containing a knee prosthesis, while varying VV angle from 15 degrees varus to 15 degrees valgus and flexion a...

  12. Fiber optical dose rate measurement based on the luminescence of beryllium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fiber optical dose rate measurement system based on the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. The system consists of a small, radiation sensitive probe which is coupled to a light detection unit with a long and flexible light guide. Exposing the beryllium oxide probe to ionizing radiation results in the emission of light with an intensity which is proportional to the dose rate. Additionally, optically stimulated luminescence can be used to obtain dose and dose rate information during irradiation or retrospectively. The system is capable of real time dose rate measurements in fields of high dose rates and dose rate gradients and in complex, narrow geometries. This enables the application for radiation protection measurements as well as for quality control in radiotherapy. One inherent drawback of fiber optical dosimetry systems is the generation of Cherenkov radiation and luminescence in the light guide itself when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. This so called “stem” effect leads to an additional signal which introduces a deviation in the dose rate measurement and reduces the spatial resolution of the system, hence it has to be removed. The current system uses temporal discrimination of the effect for radioluminescence measurements in pulsed radiation fields and modulated optically stimulated luminescence for continuous irradiation conditions. This work gives an overview of the major results and discusses new-found obstacles of the applied methods of stem discrimination.

  13. An international intercomparison of absorbed dose measurements for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiman Kadni; Noriah Mod Ali

    2002-01-01

    Dose intercomparison on an international basis has become an important component of quality assurance measurement i.e. to check the performance of absorbed dose measurements in radiation therapy. The absorbed dose to water measurements for radiation therapy at the SSDL, MINT have been regularly compared through international intercomparison programmes organised by the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory, Seibersdorf, Austria such as IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose quality audits and the Intercomparison of therapy level ionisation chamber calibration factors in terms of air kerma and absorbed dose to water calibration factors. The results of these intercomparison in terms of percentage deviations for Cobalt 60 gamma radiation and megavoltage x-ray from medical linear accelerators participated by the SSDL-MINT during the year 1985-2001 are within the acceptance limit. (Author)

  14. Measurement of dose enhancement close to high atomic number media using optical fibre thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alalawi, Amani I.; Hugtenburg, R.P.; Abdul Rahman, A.T.; Barry, M.A.; Nisbet, A.; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Bradley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Present interest concerns development of a system to measure photoelectron-enhanced dose close to a tissue interface using analogue gold-coated doped silica-fibre thermoluminescence detectors and an X-ray set operating at 250 kVp. Study is made of the dose enhancement factor for various thicknesses of gold; measurements at a total gold thickness of 160 nm (accounting for incident and exiting photons) produces a mean measured dose enhancement factor of 1.33±0.01 To verify results, simulations of the experimental setup have been performed. - Highlights: • Dose enhancement • Thermoluminescence dosimeter • Monte Carlo simulation

  15. Exact comparison of dose rate measurements and calculation of TN12/2 packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniuchi, H.; Matsuda, F.

    1998-01-01

    Both of dose rate measurements of TN 12/2 package and calculations by Monte Carlo code MORSE in SCALE code system and MCNP were performed to evaluate the difference between the measurement and the calculation and finding out the cause of the difference. The calculated gamma-ray dose rates agreed well with measured ones, but calculated neutron dose rates overestimated more than a factor of 1.7. When considering the cause of the difference and applying the modification into the neutron calculation, the calculated neutron dose rates become to agree well, and the factor decreased to around 1.3. (authors)

  16. The minimum measurable dose of the sensitive Harshaw TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shachar, B.; German, U.; Naim, E.

    1991-01-01

    The TL-dose response was measured for the sensitive Harshaw manufactured phosphors (CaF 2 :Dy and CaF 2 :Tm), taking chips from the same batch and from different batches. The relative standard deviations were fitted to a semiempirical expression, from which the minimum measurable doses were derived and compared to the minimum measurable dose calculated by taking 3 times the standard deviation of unirradiated chips. The contribution of the individual calibration of each TLD chip was checked, as well

  17. Measurement of annual dose on porcelain using surface TLD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Junding; Wang Weida; Leung, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve accuracy of TL authentication test for porcelain, a method of measurement of annual dose using ultrathin (CaSO 4 :Tm) dosage layer on porcelain was studied. The TLD was placed on the part of porcelain without glaze. A comparison of measurement of annual dose for surface TLD, inside TLD and alpha counting on porcelain was made. The results show that this technique is suitable for measuring annual dose and improving accuracy of TL authentication test for both porcelain and pottery

  18. Measurement of dosimetric parameters and dose verification in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduan Abdullah; Nik Ruzman Nik Idris; Ahmad Lutfi Yusof; Mazurawati Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The purpose of this study was to measure the dosimetric parameters for small photon beams to be used as input data treatment planning computer system (TPS) and to verify dose calculated by TPS in Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) procedure. The beam data required were Percentage Depth Dose (PDD), Off-axis Ratio (OAR), and Scatter Factor of Relative Output Factor. Small beams of 5 mm to 45 mm diameter circular cone collimators used in SRS were utilized for beam data measurements measured using pinpoint 3D ionization chamber (0.016 cc). For second part of this study, we reported the important quality assurance (QA) procedures before SRS treatment that influenced the dose delivery. These QA procedures consist of measurements on the accuracy in target localization and room laser alignment. The dose calculated to be delivered for treatment was verified using pinpoint 3D ionization chamber and TLD 100H. The mean deviation of measured dose using TLD 100H compared to calculated dose was 3.37 %. Beside that, pinpoint ionization 3D chamber give more accurate results of dose compared to TLD 100H. The measured dose using pinpoint 3D ionization chamber are good agreement with calculated dose by TPS with deviation of 2.17 %. The results are acceptable such as recommended by International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report No. 50 (1993) that dose delivered to the target volume must be within ±5 % error. (author)

  19. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  20. Performance of dichromate dosimetry systems in calibration and dose intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bof, E.S.; Smolko, E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the High Dose Dosimetry Laboratory of Argentina during ten years of international intercomparisons for high dose with the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) of the IAEA, using the standard high dose dichromate dosimetry system, and the results of a high dose intercomparison regional exercise in which our Laboratory acted as a reference laboratory, using the standard high dose and low dose dichromate dosimetry system. (author)

  1. Assessment of the potential implementation of the Fricke dosimetric system to measure the gamma dose rate in a mixed field at the Central Irradiation Facility of the Thermal Column at RA-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curotto, P.; Pozzi, E.C.C.; Thorp, S.I.; Casal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The characterization of the mixed field, i.e. neutron and gamma radiation, at the Central Irradiation Facility of the Thermal Column (FCCT) at RA-3 is pivotal to the radiobiology experiments carried out there. One of the greatest difficulties of gamma dosimetry in a mixed field such as the FCCT field is to discriminate the perturbation induced by the high neutron flux. Given that the neutron spectrum of the source is very well characterized, it is of interest to have an alternative way of measuring gamma dose rate to be able to compare the results with those currently derived from an ionization chamber (IC). The Fricke dosimetric system is widely used as an absolute dosimeter in pure, very high dose radiation fields. The experimental set-up of these dosimeters exhibits advantages compared to instrumentation with IC. The aim of the present study was to adapt the system to use it as a measuring method at FCCT and perform a comparative analysis. Materials and Methods: Once the technique to prepare the dosimeters was adapted at our laboratory the following irradiations were carried out: one in a pure, known, gamma field, and four in the mixed FCCT field in the same position, employing 3 different configurations to obtain different relations between the radiation components in the field. The following configurations were employed: a) with closed neutron shielding, b) with open neutron shielding and c) no shielding. The results were compared with those derived from measurements with the IC. Results: In pure gamma field experience the following results were obtained: the dose measured by the IC was (44.6 ± 0.5) Gy (in air) and Fricke dose was (48.2 ± 1.1) Gy. Comparing the configurations with closed and open neutron shielding, the IC signal rose by 4% (considered not significant) whereas the Fricke dose rate increased by 15%. Comparing the configurations with closed shielding and no shielding, the gamma dose rate measured with the Fricke system rose by 153

  2. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    of dose rate (1–1014 rad s−1). Upon irradiation of the film, the profile of the radiation field is registered as a permanent colored image of the dose distribution. Unlike most other types of dyed plastic dose meters, the optical density produced by irradiation is in most cases stable for periods...... of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron...

  3. SU-E-T-481: In Vivo and Post Mortem Animal Irradiation: Measured Vs. Calculated Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, P [Univ New Mexico Radiology Dept., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heintz, B [Texas Oncology, PA, Southlake, TX (United States); Sandoval, D [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W; Melo, D; Guilmette, R [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Computerized radiation therapy treatment planning is performed on almost all patients today. However it is seldom used for laboratory irradiations. The first objective is to assess whether modern radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems accurately predict the subject dose by comparing in vivo and decedent dose measurements to calculated doses. The other objective is determine the importance of using a RTP system for laboratory irradiations. Methods: 5 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the absorbed dose at 5 levels (carina, lung, heart, liver and rectum) during whole body irradiation. The subjects were treated with large opposed lateral fields and extended distances to cover the entire subject using a Varian 600C linac. CT simulation was performed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM). To compare AM and PM doses, calculation points were placed at the location of each dosimeter in the treatment plan. The measured results were compared to the results using Varian Eclipse and Prowess Panther RTP systems. Results: The Varian and Prowess treatment planning system agreed to within in +1.5% for both subjects. However there were significant differences between the measured and calculated doses. For both animals the calculated central axis dose was higher than prescribed by 3–5%. This was caused in part by inaccurate measurement of animal thickness at the time of irradiation. For one subject the doses ranged from 4% to 7% high and the other subject the doses ranged 7% to 14% high when compared to the RTP doses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that using proper CT RTP system can more accurately deliver the prescribed dose to laboratory subjects. It also shows that there is significant dose variation in such subjects when inhomogeneities are not considered in the planning process.

  4. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  5. Student's music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washnik, Nilesh Jeevandas; Phillips, Susan L; Teglas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49%) student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19%) exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing.

  6. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  7. Trend of collective dose and dose reduction measures of Mitsubishi Electric Corporation workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamato, I.; Nakayama, T.; Shimokawa, F.; Yamamoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    MELCO has supplied the reactor instrumentation control system, reactor coolant pump motors, turbine generator and central control system for the pressurized water type nuclear power plant. For the legal periodical inspection and repair work, MELCO has also received orders for the periodical inspection for 23 power plants (including 4 plants under construction) of 5 electric power companies, and executed the inspection work from the view point of preventive maintenance. The annual dose for MELCO's workers is liable to be decreased in spite of increased number of plants. The dose for new plant in particular is 50, or less as compared with that for conventional plant. This is because the measures taken for the conventional plant against the dose reduction is reflected upon the new plant. The dose reduction measures are taken for each system for which order was received. Such measures are mainly intended to improve the work procedures and equipment for reduction of work time in the radioactive area and to arrange the working process, so as to perform the work in such period when the dose level at the working environment is low. To enhance the workers' consciousness for reduction of dose, MELCO provided the workers with dose predictive training, and let them aware of such items known at the tool box briefing (TBX), which could realize the dose reduction for workers. MELCO has been positively promoting the activity to arrange the desirable work environment for extermination of 3Ks (giken, gitsui, titanai) or 3Ds (dangerous, difficult, dirty) including protection against radiation in corporation with electric power companies. (author)

  8. Measurement of the equivalent dose in quartz using a regenerative-dose single-aliquot protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, A.S.; Roberts, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The principles behind a regenerative-dose single-aliquot protocol are outlined. It is shown for three laboratory-bleached Australian sedimentary quartz samples that the relative change in sensitivity of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) during a repeated measurement cycle (consisting of a dose followed by a 10 s preheat at a given temperature and then a 100 s exposure to blue/green light at 125 deg. C) is very similar to that of the 110 deg. C thermoluminescence (TL) peak measured during the preheat cycle. The absolute change in the TL sensitivity with preheat temperature is different for samples containing a natural or a regenerative dose. Furthermore, the absolute change in sensitivity in both the OSL and TL signals is non-linear with regeneration cycle, but the relative change in the OSL signal compared to the following 110 deg. C TL measurement is well approximated by a straight line. Both signals are thought to use the same luminescence centres, and so some common behaviour is not unexpected. A new regenerative-dose protocol is presented which makes use of this linear relationship to correct for sensitivity changes with regeneration cycle, and requires only one aliquot for the estimation of the equivalent dose (D e ). The protocol has been applied to quartz from nine Australian sites. To illustrate the value of the regenerative-dose single-aliquot approach, the apparent values of D e for 13 samples, containing doses of between 0.01 and 100 Gy, have been measured at various preheat temperatures of between 160 and 300 deg. C, using a single aliquot for each D e measurement. Excellent agreement is found between these single-aliquot estimates of D e and those obtained from additive-dose multiple-aliquot and single-aliquot protocols, over the entire dose range

  9. Installation and commissioning of instantaneous dose rate monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Iaydjiev, Plamen

    2018-01-01

    INRNE-Sofia was working on the installation and commissioning of new instantaneous dose rate monitoring system for the GIF++ facility at CERN. The final device, containing an 8-channels readout board was designed and tested at the CERN facility during November 2017, in an irradiation campaign supported by the AIDA-2020 TA program. The system is designed to be fully integrated in the GIF++ control system and the data measured are available to the users.

  10. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment.

  11. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment

  12. Characteristics of dosemeter types for skin dose measurements in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van, D. J.; Bosmans, H.; Marchal, G.; Wambersie, A.

    2005-01-01

    A growing number of papers report deterministic effects in the skin of patients who have undergone interventional radiological procedures. Dose measurements, and especially skin dose measurements, are therefore increasingly important. Methods and acceptable dosemeters are, however, not clearly defined. This paper is the result of a literature overview with regard to assessing the entrance skin dose during radiological examinations by putting a dosemeter on the patient's skin. The relevant intrinsic characteristics, as well as some examples of clinical use of the different detector types, are presented. In this respect, thermoluminescence, scintillation, semiconductor and film dosemeters are discussed and compared with respect to their practical use. (authors)

  13. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 μSv per hour (20 μrem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNPtrademark are reported for materials typical of those being shipped

  14. Out-of-field dose measurements in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaderka, Robert

    2011-07-13

    This thesis describes the results from measurements of the out-of-field dose in radiotherapy. The dose outside the treatment volume has been determined in a water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Measurements were performed with linac photons, passively delivered protons, scanned protons, passively delivered carbon ions as well as scanned carbon ions. It was found that the use of charged particles for radiotherapy reduces the out-of-field dose by up to three orders of magnitude compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons.

  15. Dose measurement method suitable for management of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1990-01-01

    The report describes major features of dose measurement performed for the management of food irradiation processes, and dose measuring methods suitable for this purpose, and outlines some activities for establishing international standards for dose measurement. Traceability studies made recently are also reviewed. Compared with the sterilization of medical materials, food irradiation is different in some major points from a viewpoint of dose measurement: foods can undergo significant changes in bulk density, depending on its properties, during irradiation, and the variation in the uniformity of bulk density can be large within an irradiation unit and among different units. An accurate dosimeter and well-established traceability are essential for food irradiation control, and basically a dosimeter should be high in reproducibility and stable in dose response, and should be easy to readjust for eliminating systematic errors. A new type of dosimeter was developed recently, in which ESR is used to measure the free radicals generated by radiations in crystals of alanine, an amino acid. Standardization of large dose measurement procedures has been carried out by committee E10 set up under ASTM. (N.K.)

  16. Development of a real-time radiological dose assessment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil

    1997-07-01

    A radiological dose assessment system named FADAS has been developed. This system is necessary to estimated the radiological consequences against a nuclear accident. Mass-consistent wind field module was adopted for the generation of wind field over the whole domain using the several measured wind data. Random-walk dispersion module is used for the calculation of the distribution of radionuclides in the atmosphere. And volume-equivalent numerical integration method has been developed for the assessment of external gamma exposure given from a randomly distributed radioactive materials and a dose data library has been made for rapid calculation. Field tracer experiments have been carried out for the purpose of analyzing the site-specific meteorological characteristics and increasing the accuracy of wind field generation and atmospheric dispersion module of FADAS. At first, field tracer experiment was carried out over flat terrain covered with rice fields using the gas samplers which were designed and manufactured by the staffs of KAERI. The sampled gas was analyzed using gas chromatograph. SODAR and airsonde were used to measure the upper wind. Korean emergency preparedness system CARE was integrated at Kori 4 nuclear power plants in 1995. One of the main functions of CARE is to estimate the radiological dose. The developed real-time dose assessment system FADAS was adopted in CARE as a tool for the radiological dose assessment. (author). 79 refs., 52 tabs., 94 figs.

  17. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k......Rad. The precision limits of the measurement of dose were found to be ±4%. The procedure was simple and the holographic equipment stable and compact, thus allowing experimentation under routine laboratory conditions and limited space....

  18. The Validity of a New Low-Dose Stereoradiography System to Perform 2D and 3D Knee Prosthetic Alignment Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrigje F Meijer

    Full Text Available The EOS stereoradiography system has shown to provide reliable varus/valgus (VV measurements of the lower limb in 2D (VV2D and 3D (VV3D after total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Validity of these measurements has not been investigated yet, therefore the purpose of this study was to determine validity of EOS VV2D and VV3D.EOS images were made of a lower limb phantom containing a knee prosthesis, while varying VV angle from 15° varus to 15° valgus and flexion angle from 0° to 20°, and changing rotation from 20° internal to 20° external rotation. Differences between the actual VV position of the lower limb phantom and its position as measured on EOS 2D and 3D images were investigated.Rotation, flexion or VV angle alone had no major impact on VV2D or VV3D. Combination of VV angle and rotation with full extension did not show major differences in VV2D measurements either. Combination of flexion and rotation with a neutral VV angle showed variation of up to 7.4° for VV2D; maximum variation for VV3D was only 1.5°. A combination of the three variables showed an even greater distortion of VV2D, while VV3D stayed relatively constant. Maximum measurement difference between preset VV angle and VV2D was 9.8°, while the difference with VV3D was only 1.9°. The largest differences between the preset VV angle and VV2D were found when installing the leg in extreme angles, for example 15° valgus, 20° flexion and 20° internal rotation.After TKA, EOS VV3D were more valid than VV2D, indicating that 3D measurements compensate for malpositioning during acquisition. Caution is warranted when measuring VV angle on a conventional radiograph of a knee with a flexion contracture, varus or valgus angle and/or rotation of the knee joint during acquisition.

  19. The Validity of a New Low-Dose Stereoradiography System to Perform 2D and 3D Knee Prosthetic Alignment Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marrigje F; Velleman, Ton; Boerboom, Alexander L; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Otten, Egbert; Stevens, Martin; Reininga, Inge H F

    2016-01-01

    The EOS stereoradiography system has shown to provide reliable varus/valgus (VV) measurements of the lower limb in 2D (VV2D) and 3D (VV3D) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Validity of these measurements has not been investigated yet, therefore the purpose of this study was to determine validity of EOS VV2D and VV3D. EOS images were made of a lower limb phantom containing a knee prosthesis, while varying VV angle from 15° varus to 15° valgus and flexion angle from 0° to 20°, and changing rotation from 20° internal to 20° external rotation. Differences between the actual VV position of the lower limb phantom and its position as measured on EOS 2D and 3D images were investigated. Rotation, flexion or VV angle alone had no major impact on VV2D or VV3D. Combination of VV angle and rotation with full extension did not show major differences in VV2D measurements either. Combination of flexion and rotation with a neutral VV angle showed variation of up to 7.4° for VV2D; maximum variation for VV3D was only 1.5°. A combination of the three variables showed an even greater distortion of VV2D, while VV3D stayed relatively constant. Maximum measurement difference between preset VV angle and VV2D was 9.8°, while the difference with VV3D was only 1.9°. The largest differences between the preset VV angle and VV2D were found when installing the leg in extreme angles, for example 15° valgus, 20° flexion and 20° internal rotation. After TKA, EOS VV3D were more valid than VV2D, indicating that 3D measurements compensate for malpositioning during acquisition. Caution is warranted when measuring VV angle on a conventional radiograph of a knee with a flexion contracture, varus or valgus angle and/or rotation of the knee joint during acquisition.

  20. Measurement of absorbed doses near interfaces, and dose mapping using gas chromic dosimetry media. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rehim, F; Said, F I.A.; Abdel-Fattah, A A [National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Athority, P.O.Box 29 Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Gas chromic dosimetry media is a thin-coated film which has advantages for high-dose radiation dosimetry, and produces high-resolution radiation image for gamma radiation. Therefore, these films were calibrated for the dose range 0.1-50 kGy in terms of increase in absorbance at 600 nm, 400 nm; increase in the area of the absorption spectra in the ranges 395-405 nm and 320-450 nm wave length as a function of absorbed dose in water. The calibrated films were used for measurement of absorbed doses close to metal interface, and dose mapping of the radiation field inside product box during a run for sterilizing surgical gloves at the mega-gamma irradiation facility.7 figs.

  1. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  2. TLD array for precise dose measurements in stereotactic radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl, A.; Kitz, K.; Griffitt, W.; Hartl, R.F.E.; Zehetmayer, M.

    1996-01-01

    We developed a new TLD array for precise dose measurement and verification of the spatial dose distribution in small radiation targets. It consists of a hemicylindrical, tissue-equivalent rod made of polystyrene with 17 parallel moulds for an exact positioning of each TLD. The spatial resolution of the TLD array was evaluated using the Leskell spherical phantom. Dose planning was performed with KULA 4.4 under stereotactic conditions on axial CT images. In the Leksell gamma unit the TLD array was irradiated with a maximal dose of 10 Gy with an unplugged 14 mm collimator. The doses delivered to the TLDs were rechecked by diode detector and film dosimetry and compared to the computer-generated dose profile. We found excellent agreement of our measured values, even at the critical penumbra decline. For the 14 mm and 18 mm collimator and for the 11 mm collimator combination we compared the measured and calculated data at full width at half maximum. This TLD array may be useful for phantom or tissue model studies on the spatial dose distribution in confined radiation targets as used in stereotactic radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Andres, U.; Mendez, G.

    2003-01-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137 Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  4. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Su Chul; Hong, Dong Hee

    2016-01-01

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures

  5. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  6. Measurements of the dose due to cosmic rays in aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Lisjak, I.; Radolic, V.; Vekic, B.; Planinic, J.

    2006-01-01

    When the primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR 42 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; radon concentration in the atmosphere was measured with the Alpha Guard radon detector. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed by the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the TLD dosimeter registered the total dose of 75 μSv and the average dose rate was 2.7 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24 h flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h

  7. Measurements of the dose due to cosmic rays in aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, B. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Lisjak, I. [Croatia Airlines, Zagreb (Croatia); Radolic, V. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia)]. E-mail: planinic@ffos.hr

    2006-06-15

    When the primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR 42 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; radon concentration in the atmosphere was measured with the Alpha Guard radon detector. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed by the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the TLD dosimeter registered the total dose of 75 {mu}Sv and the average dose rate was 2.7 {mu}Sv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24 h flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h.

  8. Full system decontamination (FSD) for sustainable dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, Christoph; Sempere-Belda, Luis; Topf, Christian; Basu, Ashim

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear power plants experience an increase in dose rates during operation due to the build-up of the activity inventory. The activity build-up is influenced by the construction materials, past and present water chemistries, and the individual operating history of the plant. Depending on these factors the dose levels in an operating plant may reach a point in which concrete actions to reduce the overall radiation exposure become necessary. In the past dose reduction plans were performed, based on - Modification in coolant water chemistry - Substitution of Cobalt containing materials - Outage optimization program - Installation of permanent shielding - Decontamination The dose rate reduction took several years and today a stagnation of further dose rate reduction can be seen. Therefore AREVA has developed the Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs. This is a program of joint corrective measures to minimize dose levels rapidly and keep them low for continued operation. It can be applied in plants from all constructors and designs. The concept is based fully on the application of proven technologies, including: - Full System Decontamination with AREVA's decontamination process HP/CORD UV to minimize the activity inventory - The formation of new, very stable protective oxides on the system surfaces including injection of depleted zinc - Introduction of advanced water chemistry for maintaining the low dose levels achieved during ongoing operation The implementation of this program is particularly interesting for plants with a long operation history, especially when considering life extension. The latest application was performed successfully at the German PWR Grafenrheinfeld in 2010. In this paper the concept for sustainable dose reduction will be outlined and the site application detailed and the achieved results at PWR Grafenrheinfeld will be described. The recontamination after one cycle will be outlined in a second paper. (authors)

  9. Measurement of Skin Dose from Using the Treatment Immobilization Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Je, Jae Yong; Park, Chul Woo; Noh, Kyung Suk

    2009-01-01

    The research was about the relation between the dorsal side dose measured by using the phantom body (Alderson Rando Phantom) and factors like contacted material of the patients, the size of the field, angle of incidence. Compared with mylar (tennis racket), the dose on 10 x 10 cm 2 field size of cotton was increased by 2% and by 8% in the case of breast board. In the case of 15 x 15 cm 2 field size, the dose was increased by 6% compared with 10 x 10 cm 2 size. The field size of 20 x 20 cm 2 resulted in 10% increase of dose, while 5 x 5 cm 2 produced 13% decrease. Compared with incident angle 0 degree, the cases for the incident angle 5 degrees had 0.4% less dose for breast board, 0.5% for tennis racket, 1.1% for cotton. The cases for the incident angle 10 degrees had 1.5% less dose for breast board, 1.9% for tennis racket, 2.6% for cotton. For the incident angle 15 degrees, breast board, tennis racket, cotton caused decrease of dose by 3.9%, 2.6%, 3.86% respectively. Resultantly carbon material can cause more skin dose in treatment field. By the results of this study, we recommend that one should avoid the contact between the carbon material and skin.

  10. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers, 3 He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs

  11. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  12. Direct measurement of annual β dose using TLD on porcelain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.L.; Stokes, M.J.; Xia Junding; Wang Weida; Zhou Zhixin

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve accuracy of TL authentication test for porcelain, a method of direct measurement of annual β dose using ultrathin TLD (CaSO 4 :Tm) on porcelain was studied. Since the TLD was placed into a hole left after sampling for the TL measurement, the method will not cause any new damage to the studied object. The results show that the technique is suitable for measuring annual β dose and improving accuracy of TL authentication test for both porcelain and pottery

  13. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takemi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The authors participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the authors derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose by the evaluation formula to the measured value by the alanine dosimeter was 0.94 and the formula agreed within 6%. From examination of this TRACY, we can conclude that the value reported to OECD/NEA has equivalent accuracy. (author)

  14. Image quality control of mammography equipment -Mammography System MX-300- of the Teachers Hospital of UNSA and dose measurement in breasts with radiographic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quispe F, L. K.; Vega R, J.

    2015-10-01

    This work is part of medical imaging for the evaluation of quality. Will have an accredited breast phantom Rmi-156 that allows evaluating the image quality of mammography equipment and through a series of techniques and processes that will submit to mammography films we obtain characteristic curves, which allows to evaluate different parameters that will serve for our study. Images were acquired with different k Vp and m As of the equipment, also with different thicknesses of the breast phantom. Also we want to use the lowest possible dose for obtaining our images. In this paper we develop a simple protocol that aims to unify the conditions under which are acquired the images for later evaluation. By obtaining these characteristic curves demonstrate that the Kodak film is the most suitable for our study because it requires lower dose for obtaining our images. (Author)

  15. Measurements and applications of dose indices in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.R.; Tyan, Y.S.; Yang, J.J.; Shao, C.H.; Lin, J.Y.; Tung, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Assessments of radiation dose and image quality are required in diagnostic radiography for quality assurance and optimization studies. In work currently being undertaken, dose indices were measured and image quality evaluated for a chest PA procedure. Thermoluminescent dosimeters of the GR-200 type were attached to the entrance and exit surfaces and placed at various depths of the PMMA phantom to measure the entrance surface dose, the exit surface dose, and the organ dose index. The effective dose was estimated from the entrance surface dose using PCXMC software. Two contrast-detail image plates, one with air holes for the low contrast objects and the other with gypsum holes for the high contrast objects, were used to obtain radiographic images. This image plate was placed at different depths from the entrance surface of the phantom to simulate objects at different positions in the body. Each image was evaluated by three independent radiologists to determine image quality. Analyses of radiation dose versus image quality were performed to determine the optimal technical factors such as, filtration and tube potential. It was found that an 11-cm thick PMMA phantom best simulated the patients. The fractional dose backscattered from this phantom was between 22% and 27% for kVp’s between 66 and 133. Optimization analyses showed that no extra filter was required. For low contrast objects, an optimal choice of tube potential was 120 kVp. For high contrast objects, a kVp as low as 77 kVp could be used, depending on the image quality requirement.

  16. Dose management as a measurable criteria into the quality control programme of an imaging diagnostic clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Georgiev, E.; Zasheva, C.; Georgiev, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the Radiology Department of Tokuda Hospital Sofia, a strong control over the radiation dose for all patients was accepted with the implementation of the Dose Watch software. The system allows bad practices to be discovered and improves the efficiency and quality of the CT procedures performed in the department. The article will briefly demonstrate the main steps, which have been done, and the results, which have been achieved. The purpose is to identify the challenges, the available tools, and the opportunities for improving the patients' dose in the CT sector of a general Radiology Department. Collected data was based on the information concerning the radiation dose absorbed by individual patients undergoing MDCT examinations in a general radiology department with an overall annual rate of around 7000 MDCT examinations. All of them were carried out using a single 64row MDCT system. The hospital logbook was used to identify the number of CT examinations and dose levels associated with some typical diagnostic procedures in order to make an analysis. The information was taken form the PACS and Dose Watch software and was analyzed. The article draws some measures towards improving the organization and reducing the dose, keeping the quality of the performed exams. Thanks to the supportive software for dose tracking, analyzing and reporting, some problems have been solved and some reasonable measures have been implemented into the daily practice. (authors) Key words: RADIATION DOSE. MDCT. DOSE REDUCTION. REFERRAL GUIDELINES.CTDI. DLP

  17. Secondary standard dosimetry system with automatic dose/rate calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.; Bernhart, J.; Stehno, G.; Klosch, W.

    1980-01-01

    A versatile and automated secondary standard instrument has been designed for quick and accurate dose/rate measurement in a wide range of radiation intensity and quality (between 1 μR and 100 kR; 0.2 nC/kg - 20C/kg) for protection and therapy level dosimetry. The system is based on a series of secondary standard ionization chambers connected to a precision digital current integrator with microprocessor circuitry for data evaluation and control. Input of measurement parameters and calibration factors stored in an exchangeable memory chip provide computation of dose/rate values in the desired units. The ionization chambers provide excellent long-term stability and energy response and can be used with internal check sources to test validity of calibration. The system is a useful tool particularly for daily measurements in a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory or radiation therapy center. (H.K.)

  18. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  19. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  20. Biophysical dose measurement using electron paramagnetic resonance in rodent teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.F.H.; Rink, W.J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of human tooth enamel has been widely used in measuring radiation doses in various scenarios. However, there are situations that do not involve a human victim (e.g. tests for suspected environmental overexposures, measurements of doses to experimental animals in radiation biology research, or chronology of archaeological deposits). For such cases we have developed an EPR dosimetry technique making use of enamel of teeth extracted from mice. Tooth enamel from both previously irradiated and unirradiated mice was extracted and cleaned by processing in supersaturated KOH aqueous solution. Teeth from mice with no previous irradiation history exhibited a linear EPR response to the dose in the range from 0.8 to 5.5 Gy. The EPR dose reconstruction for a preliminarily irradiated batch resulted in the radiation dose of (1.4±0.2) Gy, which was in a good agreement with the estimated exposure of the teeth. The sensitivity of the EPR response of mouse enamel to gamma radiation was found to be half of that of human tooth enamel. The dosimetric EPR signal of mouse enamel is stable up at least to 42 days after exposure to radiation. Dose reconstruction was only possible with the enamel extracted from molars and premolars and could not be performed with incisors. Electron micrographs showed structural variations in the incisor enamel, possibly explaining the large interfering signal in the non-molar teeth

  1. Indoor gamma dose measurements in Gudalore (India) using TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Mugunthamanikandan, N.; Raghunath, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    Indoor gamma radiation dose rates were measured inside residential buildings in Gudalore using a CaSO 4 : Dy thermoluminescent dosimeter for 1 year . Significant seasonal variations are observed. The highest dose rate is observed during summer and the lowest in winter. The dose rates observed are between 77.9 and 229.3 nGy h -1 and may be attributed to the type of building materials used in the dwellings monitored. The calculated mean annual effective dose equivalent rates range between 477.6 μSv y -1 , for the inhabitants of mud houses to 1406.3 μSv y -1 , for those living in terrace houses made of cement and brick

  2. Indoor gamma dose measurements in Gudalore (India) using TLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R.; Selvasekarapandian, S. E-mail: spandian@bharathi.ernet.in; Mugunthamanikandan, N.; Raghunath, V.M

    2002-06-01

    Indoor gamma radiation dose rates were measured inside residential buildings in Gudalore using a CaSO{sub 4} : Dy thermoluminescent dosimeter for 1 year . Significant seasonal variations are observed. The highest dose rate is observed during summer and the lowest in winter. The dose rates observed are between 77.9 and 229.3 nGy h{sup -1} and may be attributed to the type of building materials used in the dwellings monitored. The calculated mean annual effective dose equivalent rates range between 477.6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, for the inhabitants of mud houses to 1406.3 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, for those living in terrace houses made of cement and brick.

  3. Accredited dose measurements for validation of radiation sterilized products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    for control of radiation sterilization. The accredited services include: 1. 1. Irradiation of dosimeters and test samples with cobalt-60 gamma rays. 2. 2. Irradiation of dosimeters and test samples with 10 MeV electrons. 3. 3. Issue of and measurement with calibrated dosimeters. 4. 4. Measurement...... of the dosimetric parameters of an irradiation facility. 5. 5. Measurement of absorbed dose distribution in irradiated products. The paper describes these services and the procedures necessary for their execution....

  4. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...... into response. A good agreement was observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although a slight underestimation of the calculated values in the Bragg peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use...... of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields....

  5. Comparison of measured and calculated doses for narrow MLC defined fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydon, J.; Rozenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) has led to the use of narrow fields in the delivery of radiation doses to patients. Such fields are not well characterized by calculation methods commonly used in radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm must therefore be investigated prior to clinical use. This study looked at symmetrical and asymmetrical 0.1 to 3cm wide fields delivered with a Varian CL2100C 6MV photon beam. Measured doses were compared to doses calculated using Pinnacle, the ADAC radiotherapy treatment planning system. Two high resolution methods of measuring dose were used. A MOSFET detector in a water phantom and radiographic film in a solid water phantom with spatial resolutions of 10 and 89μm respectively. Dose calculations were performed using the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle with a 0.1cm dose calculation grid in the MLC direction. The effect of Pinnacle not taking into account the rounded leaf ends was simulated by offsetting the leaves by 0.1cm in the dose calculation. Agreement between measurement and calculation is good for fields of 1cm and wider. However, fields of less than 1cm width can show a significant difference between measurement and calculation

  6. Health System Measurement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health System Measurement Project tracks government data on critical U.S. health system indicators. The website presents national trend data as well as detailed...

  7. The application of computer and automatic technology in dose measurement of neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu; Li Chenglin; Luo Yisheng; Guo Yong; Chen Di; Xiaojiang

    1999-01-01

    Generally the dose measurement of neutron radiation requires three electrometers, two bias, three workers in the same time. To improve the accuracy and efficiency of measurement, a Model 6517A electrometer that accommodate Model 6521 scanner cards and a portable computer are used to make up of a automatic measurement system. Corresponding software is developed and used to control it. Because of the application of computer and automatic technology, this system can not only measure dose rate automatically, but also make data's calculating, saving, querying, printing and comparing ease

  8. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M.; Dhote, Dipak S.; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate.

  9. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M; Dhote, Dipak S; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate.

  10. Ambient dose measurement in some CT departments in Khartoum State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, S. A. H.

    2012-09-01

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is now one of the most important radiological examinations world wide.The frequency of CT examinations is increasing rapidly from 2% of all radiological examinations in some countries a decade age to 10-15% now. During the imaging procedure, staff may expose to a significant dose. Therefore, ambient dose measurement is important in the shortage of regular personal monitoring in sudan. This study intended to evaluate the ambient dose at some CT departments (Medical Military hospital, Alamal National Hospital, Elnelin Diagnostic Center and Modern Medical Centre). These departments were equipped with daul, 16 and 64 multi detector CT machines. A survey meter (Radios) was used to measure ambient doses in three locations: Doors, Control Rooms and Adjacent Rooms. The ambient dose equivalent (scatter dose) was measured at various distances from the isocenter of the CT unit at various angles to establish isodose cartography. The mean and range of radiation at control room is 10.00-0.20 and mean (7.05μSv/hr,) reception 1.0-0 (0.40) and doors 4.00-100.00 (73.5) for height 1 meter above the ground. For height 2 meters at control room 0-10.00 (6,75), reception 0-90.00 (30) at door 9.00-90.00 (49.50). This study confirms that low levels of radiation dose are received by staff during CT imaging and these levels are within safe limits as prescribed by the national and international regulations. (Author)

  11. Dose area product measurement for diagnostic reference levels and analysis of patient dose in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.; Lee, B.; Shin, G.; Choi, J.; Kim, J.; Park, C.; Park, H.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were suggested and patient doses were analysed through the dose-area product value in dental radiography. In intraoral radiography, at three sites, i.e. molar, premolar and incisor on the maxilla and acquired third quartile values: 55.5, 46 and 36.5 mGy cm 2 , respectively, were measured. In panoramic, cephalo-metric and cone beam computed tomography, the values were 120.3, 146 and 3203 mGy cm 2 (16 x 18 cm), respectively. It has been shown that, in intraoral radiography, the patient dose changes proportionally to the value of mA s, but the change in extra-oral radiography in response to mA s could not be confirmed. The authors could confirm, however, the difference in dose according to the manufacturer in all dental radiography examinations, except for panoramic radiography. Depending on the size of hospital, there were some differences in patient dose in intraoral radiography, but no difference in patient dose in extra-oral radiography. (authors)

  12. Comparative study on skin dose measurement using MOSFET and TLD for pediatric patients with acute lymphatic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohammed, Huda I; Mahyoub, Fareed H; Moftah, Belal A

    2010-07-01

    The object of this study was to compare the difference of skin dose measured in patients with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (mobile MOSFET dose verification system (TN-RD-70-W) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 chips, Harshaw/ Bicron, OH, USA). Because TLD has been the most-commonly used technique in the skin dose measurement of TBI, the aim of the present study is to prove the benefit of using the mobile MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) dosimeter, for entrance dose measurements during the total body irradiation (TBI) over thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measurements involved 10 pediatric patients ages between 3 and 14 years. Thermoluminescent dosimeters and MOSFET dosimetry were performed at 9 different anatomic sites on each patient. The present results show there is a variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD in all patients, and for every anatomic site selected, there is no significant difference in the dose delivered using MOSFET as compared to the prescribed dose. However, there is a significant difference for every anatomic site using TLD compared with either the prescribed dose or MOSFET. The results indicate that the dosimeter measurements using the MOSFET gave precise measurements of prescribed dose. However, TLD measurement showed significant increased skin dose of cGy as compared to either prescribed dose or MOSFET group. MOSFET dosimeters provide superior dose accuracy for skin dose measurement in TBI as compared with TLD.

  13. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Agia Paraskevi, Attiki, 60092 (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a {sup 137}Cs source for density measurements and an {sup 241}Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  14. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a 137 Cs source for density measurements and an 241 Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  15. Technical Note: Out-of-field dose measurement at near surface with plastic scintillator detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgouin, Alexandra; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Archambault, Louis

    2016-09-08

    Out-of-field dose depends on multiple factors, making peripheral dosimetry com-plex. Only a few dosimeters have the required features for measuring peripheral dose. Plastic scintillator dosimeters (PSDs) offer numerous dosimetric advantages as required for out-of-field dosimetry. The purpose of this study is to determine the potential of using PSD as a surface peripheral dosimeter. Measurements were performed with a parallel-plate ion chamber, a small volume ion chamber, and with a PSD. Lateral-dose measurements (LDM) at 0.5 cm depth and depth-dose curve (PDD) were made and compared to the dose calculation provided by a treatment planning system (TPS). This study shows that a PSD can measure a dose as low as 0.51 ± 0.17 cGy for photon beam and 0.58 ± 0.20 cGy for electron beam with a difference of 0.2 and 0.1 cGy compared to a parallel-plate ion chamber. This study demonstrates the potential of using PSD as an out-of-field dosimeter since measure-ments with PSD avoid averaging over a too-large depth, at 1 mm diameter, and can make precise measurement at very low dose. Also, electronic equilibrium is easier to reach with PSD due to its small sensitive volume and its water equivalence. © 2016 The Authors.

  16. Measurement of patient radiation doses in certain urography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Zailae, A.; Abuderman, A.; Theodorou, K.

    2015-01-01

    Patients are exposed to significant radiation doses during diagnostic and interventional urological procedures. This study aimed to measure patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and to estimate the effective dose during intravenous urography (IVU), extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and ascending urethrogram (ASU) procedures. ESAK was measured in patients using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 179 procedures were investigated. 27.9 % of the patients underwent IVU procedures, 27.9 % underwent ESWL procedures and 44.2 % underwent ASU procedures. The mean ESAK was 2.1, 4.18 and 4.9 mGy for IVU, ESWL, and ASU procedures, respectively. Differences in patient ESAK for the same procedure were observed. The mean ESAK values were comparable with those in previous studies. (authors)

  17. Measurements of cosmic-ray doses in commercial airline cabins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, M.; Fujitaka, K.; Izumo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Cosmic radiation doses which aircrew and air passengers receive in airplanes have been calling attention in many countries especially in the last decade. In this relation, various types of information had been reported on cosmic radiation intensity. In Japan, the cosmic radiation intensity had been measured in commercial airline cabins as well as chartered flights. While the intensity depends on altitude, geomagnetic latitude (or cutoff rigidity), and temporal variation of the solar activity, their doses are often speculated based on paper records on airflights combined with the intensity-altitude relationship. In this study, however, efforts were made to estimate more realistic integrated doses in airline cabins based on actual on-board measurements which had been conducted several dozens of times in each year (e.g., 45 times in 1994 and 27 times in 1995). (author)

  18. Unit of measurement used and parent medication dosing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P; Ugboaja, Donna C; Sanchez, Dayana C; Paul, Ian M; Moreira, Hannah A; Rodriguez, Luis; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    Adopting the milliliter as the preferred unit of measurement has been suggested as a strategy to improve the clarity of medication instructions; teaspoon and tablespoon units may inadvertently endorse nonstandard kitchen spoon use. We examined the association between unit used and parent medication errors and whether nonstandard instruments mediate this relationship. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a larger study of provider communication and medication errors. English- or Spanish-speaking parents (n = 287) whose children were prescribed liquid medications in 2 emergency departments were enrolled. Medication error defined as: error in knowledge of prescribed dose, error in observed dose measurement (compared to intended or prescribed dose); >20% deviation threshold for error. Multiple logistic regression performed adjusting for parent age, language, country, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education, health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults); child age, chronic disease; site. Medication errors were common: 39.4% of parents made an error in measurement of the intended dose, 41.1% made an error in the prescribed dose. Furthermore, 16.7% used a nonstandard instrument. Compared with parents who used milliliter-only, parents who used teaspoon or tablespoon units had twice the odds of making an error with the intended (42.5% vs 27.6%, P = .02; adjusted odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.4) and prescribed (45.1% vs 31.4%, P = .04; adjusted odds ratio=1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.5) dose; associations greater for parents with low health literacy and non-English speakers. Nonstandard instrument use partially mediated teaspoon and tablespoon-associated measurement errors. Findings support a milliliter-only standard to reduce medication errors. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Measurement of radiation dose in paediatric micturating cystourethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N. E. A.

    2013-06-01

    Paediatrics and children have been recognized that they have a higher risk of developing cancer from the radiation than adults. Therefor, increased attention has been directed towards the dose to the patients. Micturating Cystourethrography (MCU) is a commonly use ed fluoroscopic procedure in children and commonly used to detect the vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and show urethral and bladder and abnormalities. This study aims to measure the pediatric patients undergoing MCU. The study was carried out in two hospitals in Khartoum. The entrance surface dose (ESD) was determined determined by indirect method for 45 children. Furthermore, the mean ESD, sd and range resulting from MCU procedures has been estimated to be 0.7±.5 (0.2-2.5) mGy for the total patient population. The radiation dose to the patients is well within established safety limits, in the light of the current practice. The radiation dose results of this study are appropriate for adoption as the local initial dose reference level (DRL) value for this technique. The data presented in this study showed our doses to be approximately 50% lower than the lower mean values presented in the literature.(Author)

  20. Radioisotope measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva Ruibal, Jose

    2007-01-01

    A radioisotope measurement system installed at L.M.R. (Ezeiza Atomic Center of CNEA) allows the measurement of nuclear activity from a wide range of radioisotopes. It permits to characterize a broad range of radioisotopes at several activity levels. The measurement hardware as well as the driving software have been developed and constructed at the Dept. of Instrumentation and Control. The work outlines the system's conformation and its operating concept, describes design characteristics, construction and the error treatment, comments assay results and supplies use advices. Measuring tests carried out employing different radionuclides confirmed the system performing satisfactorily and with friendly operation. (author) [es

  1. Development of radiation dose assessment system for radiation accident (RADARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shigemori, Yuji; Seki, Akiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The possibility of radiation accident is very rare, but cannot be regarded as zero. Medical treatments are quite essential for a heavily exposed person in an occurrence of a radiation accident. Radiation dose distribution in a human body is useful information to carry out effectively the medical treatments. A radiation transport calculation utilizing the Monte Carlo method has an advantageous in the analysis of radiation dose inside of the body, which cannot be measured. An input file, which describes models for the accident condition and quantities of interest, should be prepared to execute the radiation transport calculation. Since the accident situation, however, cannot be prospected, many complicated procedures are needed to make effectively the input file soon after the occurrence of the accident. In addition, the calculated doses are to be given in output files, which usually include much information concerning the radiation transport calculation. Thus, Radiation Dose Assessment system for Radiation Accident (RADARAC) was developed to derive effectively radiation dose by using the MCNPX or MCNP code. RADARAC mainly consists of two parts. One part is RADARAC - INPUT, which involves three programs. A user can interactively set up necessary resources to make input files for the codes, with graphical user interfaces in a personnel computer. The input file includes information concerning the geometric structure of the radiation source and the exposed person, emission of radiations during the accident, physical quantities of interest and so on. The other part is RADARAC - DOSE, which has one program. The results of radiation doses can be effectively indicated with numerical tables, graphs and color figures visibly depicting dose distribution by using this program. These results are obtained from the outputs of the radiation transport calculations. It is confirmed that the system can effectively make input files with a few thousand lines and indicate more than 20

  2. Precedents For Authorization Of Contents Using Dose Rate Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-01-01

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  3. Dose-area product measurement for patients in diagnostic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhawad, Safaa Ibrahim Awad Elkarim

    2001-09-01

    There is a wide spread of the utilization of medical diagnostic x-ray in Sudan upon the last years, in private clinics as well as in public hospitals. The aim of this study was to measure the doses to patients from x-ray in radiography departments in Khartoum State. Use was made of ionization chamber that measures the product of dose times the exposed area of the patient in units of Gy cm 2 . The work was performed in 7 hospitals over 250 patients. 71.2% of the patients were males and 28.8% females. From this work, it appears that the chest radiography represent 42% of the total exposure of human body organs to radiography, there was also a clear variation in doses resulting from this exposure for different x-ray machines. The results of this study were compared with similar from Germany, Finland, New Zealand and Norway; which are recently available studies. The comparison showed those investigation of abdomen, spine and pelvis result in higher radiation doses. No data for limb exposure were obtained from these countries, in Sudan exposure of the limb carry radiation doses compared to the rest of the human body.(Author)

  4. Measuring Systemic Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Viral V.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse; Philippon, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We present an economic model of systemic risk in which undercapitalization of the financial sector as a whole is assumed to harm the real economy, leading to a systemic risk externality. Each financial institution’s contribution to systemic risk can be measured as its systemic expected shortfall...... of components of SES to predict emerging systemic risk during the financial crisis of 2007–2009....

  5. Improvements to the Hunter Dose tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteside, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-01

    Since 1965, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted deer hunts which are open to the general public. SRS performs field monitoring for cesium-137 (Cs-137) of each harvested animal to determine whether the animal may be released to the hunter. A new field system for measuring Cs-137 in the harvested animals has been developed. The system incorporates numerous enhancements compared to the original system. The original system was composed of two Ludlum Measurements scalar-driven 2 inch x 2 inch sodium iodide counters, while the new system is based on a single Ametek Ortec Digibase-driven 2 inch x 4 inch x 16 inch sodium iodide gamma spectrometer. The new system includes a series of easy-to-assemble stainless steel encapsulated lead shields. The combination of the larger detector size and lead shielding improved the detection limit of the new system by a factor of approximately three compared to the original system. This lower detection limit allows for a larger number of measurements to be directly compared to the laboratory results, in cases where animal portions have been sampled. The results from developing and using this system are presented as well as recommendations on improvements to the overall field monitoring of the SRS hunts.

  6. Is the dose equivalent index a quantity to be measured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    ICRP introduced the concept of Effective Dose Equivalent H(sub)E and fixed the basic limits of radiation exposure in terms of H(sub)I. As H(sub)E cannot be measured, ICRP stated that with external exposure to penetrating radiation the limitation of the Dose Equivalent Index H(sub)I would afford at least as good a level of protection. However, difficulties arise in measuring H(sub)I and in calibrating instruments in terms of H(sub)I, since the height and location of the dose equivalent maximum in the sphere which is the phantom used in the definition of H(sub)I, depend on the energy and the angular distribution of the incident radiation. That is, H(sub)I is not an additive quantity relative to the partial H(sub)I(sub)i-values of the different energy and angular components. Hence, 1) the distribution of dose equivalent in the sphere must be measured in full for a determination of H(sub)I, and 2) it is not possible to calibrate an instrument which does not exhibit the scattering and absorption properties of the sphere, consistently for arbitrary radiation fields in terms of H(sub)I. Thus the calibration in an unidirectional beam would infer an uncertainty which may amount to a factor of up to 4. This would hardly be tolerable as a base for radiation protection provisions. An alternative is to introduce operational quantities which are additive, e.g. 1) the sum of maxima of the dose equivalent distributions in the sphere produced by different radiation components, and 2) the mean dose equivalent in the sphere. Their relation to H(sub)E for different types of radiation and consequences on secondary limits are discussed. (H.K.)

  7. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated 252 Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D 2 O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%

  8. Analysis of workers' dose records from the Greek Dose Registry Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Dimitriou, P.; Proukakis, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this work is the study of the individual film badge annual dose information of classified workers in Greece, monitored and assessed by the central dosimetry service of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission. Dose summaries were recorded and processed by the Dose Registry Information System. The statistical analysis refers to the years 1989-93 and deals with the distribution of individuals in the occupational groups, the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distribution of the dose over the different specialties and the number of workers that have exceeded any of the established dose limits. Results concerning the annual dose summaries, demonstrate a year-by-year reduction in the mean individual dose to workers in the health sector. Conversely, exposures in the industrial sector did not show any decreasing tendency during the period under consideration. (Author)

  9. Effective dose measurement at workplaces within an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagrasa, C.; Darreon, J.; Martin-Burtat, N.; Clairand, I.; Colin, J.; Fontbonne, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the IRSN (France) is developing an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose for photon fields at workplaces. This anthropomorphic phantom will be equipped with small active detectors located inside at chosen positions. The aim of this paper is to present the development of these new detectors showing the results of the characterisation of the prototype under metrological conditions. New evaluations of the effective dose for standard and non-homogenous irradiation configurations taking into account the real constraints of the project have been done validating the feasibility and utility of the instrument. (authors)

  10. On the accuracy of self-made dose planning system based on the static field measurements of cobalt unit Theratron 780C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treer, T.; Polgar, I.

    1995-01-01

    In connection with the installation of the new Theratron 780C cobalt unit the authors demonstrate that the planning program developed in Pecs 8 years ago can be used even for the new cobalt unit. The computed results are in good agreement with the measurements made by the PTW MP3 water phantom using the Mephysto program. (N.T.) 3 refs., 4 figs

  11. 128 slice computed tomography dose profile measurement using thermoluminescent dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehhon, N; Hashim, S; Karim, M K A; Ang, W C; Musa, Y; Bahruddin, N A

    2017-01-01

    The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice marks the needs to understand the dose descriptor and dose profile. The purposes of the current study were to determine the CT dose index free-in-air (CTDI air ) in 128 slice CT scanner and to evaluate the single scan dose profile (SSDP). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were used to measure the dose profile of the scanner. There were three sets of CT protocols where the tube potential (kV) setting was manipulated for each protocol while the rest of parameters were kept constant. These protocols were based from routine CT abdominal examinations for male adult abdomen. It was found that the increase of kV settings made the values of CTDI air increased as well. When the kV setting was changed from 80 kV to 120 kV and from 120 kV to 140 kV, the CTDI air values were increased as much as 147.9% and 53.9% respectively. The highest kV setting (140 kV) led to the highest CTDI air value (13.585 mGy). The p -value of less than 0.05 indicated that the results were statistically different. The SSDP showed that when the kV settings were varied, the peak sharpness and height of Gaussian function profiles were affected. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose profiles for all protocols were coincided with the nominal beam width set for the measurements. The findings of the study revealed much information on the characterization and performance of 128 slice CT scanner. (paper)

  12. Minimizing and measuring lens dose when giving cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, S.Y.; Donaldson, S.S.; Heck, R.J.; Nielson, K.L.; Shostak, C.

    1989-01-01

    Three different techniques of administering cranial irradiation were used to determine the dose to the lens as measured in the Rando phantom. The techniques employed were as follows: (1) the central axis of the radiation beam was placed at the thickest portion of the cranium; (2) the central axis of the radiation beam was placed at the lateral orbital rim (bon canthus); (3) the central axis of the radiation beam was placed at the thickest portion of the cranium but with the beam angled 5deg posteriorly away from the eye. Thermal luminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed in a phantom, at a point determined from a life-sized anatomical section of the plane through the midsection of the eye, to be at the location of the posterior capsule of the lens. In addition, TLDs were placed on the outer surface of the phantom head, directly lateral to the location determined to be where the lens would lie. With equally weighted lateral opposed beams, delivering a midplane dose of 200cGy, the TLDs at the point of the lens measured 21, 9.9 and 10.6% of the midplane doses from the three techniques respectively. TLDs placed directly lateral to the lens on the surface of the phantom head gave an approximation of the lens dose, particularly when techniques 2 and 3 were used. Isodose curve generated by a General Electric treatment planning computer gave lens doses similar to those of the phantom data for each of the three different radiotherapy techniques. Cranial irradiation should be carried out by either technique 2 or technique 3 to minimize radiation dose to the lens. (author). 11 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. A unique experiment. Measurement of radiation doses at Vinca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-07-15

    For the first time in the history of the peaceful applications of atomic energy, an experiment was conducted to determine the exact levels of radiation exposure resulting from a reactor incident. The experiment was made at Vinca, Yugoslavia, wherein October 1958 six persons had been subjected to high doses of neutron and gamma radiation during a brief uncontrolled run of a zero-power reactor. One of them died but the other five were successfully treated at the Curie Hospital in Paris. In the case of four of them, the treatment involved the grafting of healthy bone marrow to counteract the effects of radiation on blood-forming tissues. It was recognized that if the effects produced on the irradiated persons could be related to the exact doses of radiation they had received, it would be possible to gain immensely valuable knowledge about the biological consequences of acute and high level radiation exposure on a quantitative basis. It was suggested to the Yugoslav authorities that a dosimetry experiment be conducted at Vinca. The most accurate modern techniques of dosimetry developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory were employed during the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the neutron and gamma doses were made at points where the people had been located. At these points the effects of the radiation on the salt solution in the phantoms were studied. In particular, the energy distribution of the radiation was investigated.It was the ratio between the various components of the radiation that was of special interest in these measurements because this ratio itself would help in determining the exact doses. The dose of one of the components, viz. slow neutrons, had already been determined during the treatment of the patients. If the ratio of the components could be ascertained, the doses of the fast neutrons and gamma rays could also be established because the ratio would not be affected by the power level at which the reactor was operated

  14. Estimating average glandular dose by measuring glandular rate in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Sachiko; Azuma, Yoshiharu; Sumimoto, Tetsuhiro; Eiho, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    The glandular rate of the breast was objectively measured in order to calculate individual patient exposure dose (average glandular dose) in mammography. By employing image processing techniques and breast-equivalent phantoms with various glandular rate values, a conversion curve for pixel value to glandular rate can be determined by a neural network. Accordingly, the pixel values in clinical mammograms can be converted to the glandular rate value for each pixel. The individual average glandular dose can therefore be calculated using the individual glandular rates on the basis of the dosimetry method employed for quality control in mammography. In the present study, a data set of 100 craniocaudal mammograms from 50 patients was used to evaluate our method. The average glandular rate and average glandular dose of the data set were 41.2% and 1.79 mGy, respectively. The error in calculating the individual glandular rate can be estimated to be less than ±3%. When the calculation error of the glandular rate is taken into consideration, the error in the individual average glandular dose can be estimated to be 13% or less. We feel that our method for determining the glandular rate from mammograms is useful for minimizing subjectivity in the evaluation of patient breast composition. (author)

  15. Pressure Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  16. Analysis and modeling of electronic portal imaging exit dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistorius, S.; Yeboah, C.

    1995-01-01

    In spite of the technical advances in treatment planning and delivery in recent years, it is still unclear whether the recommended accuracy in dose delivery is being achieved. Electronic portal imaging devices, now in routine use in many centres, have the potential for quantitative dosimetry. As part of a project which aims to develop an expert-system based On-line Dosimetric Verification (ODV) system we have investigated and modelled the dose deposited in the detector of a video based portal imaging system. Monte Carlo techniques were used to simulate gamma and x-ray beams in homogeneous slab phantom geometries. Exit doses and energy spectra were scored as a function of (i) slab thickness, (ii) field size and (iii) the air gap between the exit surface and the detector. The results confirm that in order to accurately calculate the dose in the high atomic number Gd 2 O 2 S detector for a range of air gaps, field sizes and slab thicknesses both the magnitude of the primary and scattered components and their effective energy need to be considered. An analytic, convolution based model which attempts to do this is proposed. The results of the simulation and the ability of the model to represent these data will be presented and discussed. This model is used to show that, after training, a back-propagation feed-forward cascade correlation neural network has the ability to identify and recognise the cause of, significant dosimetric errors

  17. Bioelectric Signal Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Santana, A.; Pólo-Parada, L.; García-Valenzuela, A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low noise measuring system based on interdigitated electrodes for sensing bioelectrical signals. The system registers differential voltage measurements in order of microvolts. The base noise during measurements was in nanovolts and thus, the sensing signals presented a very good signal to noise ratio. An excitation voltage of 1Vrms with 10 KHz frequency was applied to an interdigitated capacitive sensor without a material under test and to a mirror device simultaneously. The output signals of both devices was then subtracted in order to obtain an initial reference value near cero volts and reduce parasitic capacitances due to the electronics, wiring and system hardware as well. The response of the measuring system was characterized by monitoring temporal bioelectrical signals in real time of biological materials such as embryo chicken heart cells and bovine suprarenal gland cells.

  18. Electron beam dose measurements with alanine/ESR dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, O. Jr.; Galante, O.L.; Campos, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    When the aminoacid alanine, CH 3 -CH(NH 2 )-COOH, is exposed to radiation field, stable free radicals are produced. The predominant paramagnetic specie found at room temperature is the CH 3 -CH-COOH. Electron Spin Resonance - ESR is a technique used for quantification and analysis of radicals in solid and liquid samples. The evaluation of the amount of produced radicals can be associated with the absorbed dose . The alanine/ESR is an established dosimetry method employed for high doses evaluation, it presents good performance for X-rays, gamma, electrons, and protons radiation detection. The High Doses Dosimetry Laboratory of Ipen developed a dosimetric system based on alanina/ESR that presents good characteristics for use in gamma fields such as: wide dose range from 10 to 10 5 Gy, low fading, low uncertainty (<5%), no dose rate dependence and non-destructive ESR single readout. The detector is encapsulated in a special polyethylene tube that reduces the humidity problems and improves the mechanical resistance. The IPEN dosimeter was investigated for application in electron beam fields dosimetry

  19. Dose measurements in laboratory of Physics department, University of Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, Maria Mohammed

    1999-05-01

    Personal monitoring in University of Khartoum is being conducted using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The purpose of the study is to measure the dose of radiation in laboratory of Physics in physics department. TL phosphors LiF: Mg, Ti (card) and LiF Mg, Cu, P (GR-200) and mini-rad dosimeter are used to measure the dose in laboratory. The total dose for students form the laboratory bu using card, GR-200 and mini-rad dosimeter was found to be 2.2μ sv/year. 2.5 μ sv/year and 2.6 μ sv respectively, and for the teacher about 4.0 μ sv/year, 5.8 μ sv/year and 13.6 μ sv/year respectively, and for the dose near junk room about 3.9 μ sv/year, 2.9 μ sv/year and 2.8 μ sv/year by using card, GR-200 and mini-rad dosimeter respectively. There is just a background radiation in the main library and the applied nuclear.(Author)

  20. Experimental evaluation of a MOSFET dosimeter for proton dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishio, Teiji; Miyagishi, Tomoko; Hirano, Eriko; Hotta, Kenji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for patient dose verification. The major advantage of this detector is its size, which acts as a point dosimeter, and also its ease of use. The commercially available TN502RD MOSFET dosimeter manufactured by Thomson and Nielsen has never been used for proton dosimetry. Therefore we used the MOSFET dosimeter for the first time in proton dose measurements. In this study, the MOSFET dosimeter was irradiated with 190 MeV therapeutic proton beams. We experimentally evaluated dose reproducibility, linearity, fading effect, beam intensity dependence and angular dependence for the proton beam. Furthermore, the Bragg curve and spread-out Bragg peak were also measured and the linear-energy transfer (LET) dependence of the MOSFET response was investigated. Many characteristics of the MOSFET response for proton beams were the same as those for photon beams reported in previous papers. However, the angular MOSFET responses at 45, 90, 135, 225, 270 and 315 degrees for proton beams were over-responses of about 15%, and moreover the MOSFET response depended strongly on the LET of the proton beam. This study showed that the angular dependence and LET dependence of the MOSFET response must be considered very carefully for quantitative proton dose evaluations

  1. Measurement of doses to aviator pilots using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Cruz C, D.; Rivera M, T.

    2004-01-01

    During the development of their work, the aviator pilots are exposed at high levels of natural radiation of bottom caused mainly by the cosmic radiation of galactic origin and lot. For such reason, the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) and the Union Association of Aviator Pilots (ASPA), subscribed an agreement with the purpose of to measure the doses of ionizing radiation received by the aviator pilots of diverse air companies that man different types of airships and to determine if these doses surpass the one limit of 0.11 mSv/h settled down by the IAEA for the public in general; and if therefore, these workers should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. In this work the obtained results when measuring the absorbed dose received by Mexican civil aviator pilots during the development of their work, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P + Ptfe of national production are presented. The obtained results during the years of 2001 and 2002 show that the monthly doses received by the pilots surpass the one it limits established for the public in general, for what they should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. (Author)

  2. In vivo dose measurement using TLDs and MOSFET dosimeters for cardiac radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Edward A; Sumanaweera, Thilaka S; Blanck, Oliver; Iwamura, Alyson K; Steel, James P; Dieterich, Sonja; Maguire, Patrick

    2012-05-10

    In vivo measurements were made of the dose delivered to animal models in an effort to develop a method for treating cardiac arrhythmia using radiation. This treatment would replace RF energy (currently used to create cardiac scar) with ionizing radiation. In the current study, the pulmonary vein ostia of animal models were irradiated with 6 MV X-rays in order to produce a scar that would block aberrant signals characteristic of atrial fibrillation. The CyberKnife radiosurgery system was used to deliver planned treatments of 20-35 Gy in a single fraction to four animals. The Synchrony system was used to track respiratory motion of the heart, while the contractile motion of the heart was untracked. The dose was measured on the epicardial surface near the right pulmonary vein and on the esophagus using surgically implanted TLD dosimeters, or in the coronary sinus using a MOSFET dosimeter placed using a catheter. The doses measured on the epicardium with TLDs averaged 5% less than predicted for those locations, while doses measured in the coronary sinus with the MOSFET sensor nearest the target averaged 6% less than the predicted dose. The measurements on the esophagus averaged 25% less than predicted. These results provide an indication of the accuracy with which the treatment planning methods accounted for the motion of the target, with its respiratory and cardiac components. This is the first report on the accuracy of CyberKnife dose delivery to cardiac targets.

  3. Dermatologic radiotherapy and thyroid cancer. Dose measurements and risk quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid doses for various dermatologic radiation techniques were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization rate meters in an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom. The effects of changes in radiation quality and of the use or nonuse of treatment cones and thyroid shields were evaluated in detail. The results indicate that the potential risk of radiogenic thyroid cancer is very small when proper radiation protection measures are used. The probability of radiogenic thyroid cancer developing and the potential mortality risk were assessed quantitatively for each measurement. The quantification of radiation risks allows comparisons with risks of other therapeutic modalities and the common hazards of daily life

  4. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynier, Yvan [Meylan, FR; Yazami, Rachid [Los Angeles, CA; Fultz, Brent T [Pasadena, CA

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  5. A remotely operated drug delivery system with dose control

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2017-01-01

    include an effective actuation stimulus and a controllable dose release mechanism. This work focuses on remotely powering an implantable drug delivery system and providing a high degree of control over the released dose. This is accomplished by integration

  6. TH-CD-201-10: Highly Efficient Synchronized High-Speed Scintillation Camera System for Measuring Proton Range, SOBP and Dose Distributions in a 2D-Plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddu, S; Sun, B; Grantham, K; Zhao, T; Zhang, T; Bradley, J; Mutic, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy (PT) delivery is complex and extremely dynamic. Therefore, quality assurance testing is vital, but highly time-consuming. We have developed a High-Speed Scintillation-Camera-System (HS-SCS) for simultaneously measuring multiple beam characteristics. Methods: High-speed camera was placed in a light-tight housing and dual-layer neutron shield. HS-SCS is synchronized with a synchrocyclotron to capture individual proton-beam-pulses (PBPs) at ∼504 frames/sec. The PBPs from synchrocyclotron trigger the HS-SCS to open its shutter for programmed exposure-time. Light emissions within 30×30×5cm3 plastic-scintillator (BC-408) were captured by a CCD-camera as individual images revealing dose-deposition in a 2D-plane with a resolution of 0.7mm for range and SOBP measurements and 1.67mm for profiles. The CCD response as well as signal to noise ratio (SNR) was characterized for varying exposure times, gains for different light intensities using a TV-Optoliner system. Software tools were developed to analyze ∼5000 images to extract different beam parameters. Quenching correction-factors were established by comparing scintillation Bragg-Peaks with water scanned ionization-chamber measurements. Quenching corrected Bragg-peaks were integrated to ascertain proton-beam range (PBR), width of Spared-Out-Bragg-Peak (MOD) and distal

  7. TH-CD-201-10: Highly Efficient Synchronized High-Speed Scintillation Camera System for Measuring Proton Range, SOBP and Dose Distributions in a 2D-Plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddu, S; Sun, B; Grantham, K; Zhao, T; Zhang, T; Bradley, J; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy (PT) delivery is complex and extremely dynamic. Therefore, quality assurance testing is vital, but highly time-consuming. We have developed a High-Speed Scintillation-Camera-System (HS-SCS) for simultaneously measuring multiple beam characteristics. Methods: High-speed camera was placed in a light-tight housing and dual-layer neutron shield. HS-SCS is synchronized with a synchrocyclotron to capture individual proton-beam-pulses (PBPs) at ∼504 frames/sec. The PBPs from synchrocyclotron trigger the HS-SCS to open its shutter for programmed exposure-time. Light emissions within 30×30×5cm3 plastic-scintillator (BC-408) were captured by a CCD-camera as individual images revealing dose-deposition in a 2D-plane with a resolution of 0.7mm for range and SOBP measurements and 1.67mm for profiles. The CCD response as well as signal to noise ratio (SNR) was characterized for varying exposure times, gains for different light intensities using a TV-Optoliner system. Software tools were developed to analyze ∼5000 images to extract different beam parameters. Quenching correction-factors were established by comparing scintillation Bragg-Peaks with water scanned ionization-chamber measurements. Quenching corrected Bragg-peaks were integrated to ascertain proton-beam range (PBR), width of Spared-Out-Bragg-Peak (MOD) and distal.

  8. Dialogue scanning measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodyuk, V.P.; Shkundenkov, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    The main developments of scanning measuring systems intended for mass precision processsing of films in nuclear physics problems and in related fields are reviewed. A special attention is paid to the problem of creation of dialogue systems which permit to simlify the development of control computer software

  9. Dose measurement of fast electrons with a modified Fricke solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, H.W.; Roth, J.; Luethy, H.

    1975-01-01

    A combination of two different modifications indicated in the literature about the ferrosulfate dosimetry is given. This permits a dose measurement which shows compared to the usual Fricke dosimetry above all following advantages: dose specification related to water; displacement of the absorption maximum in the perceptible spectral sphere; increase of the sensibility and lower influence of pollutions. The molar coefficient of extinction of the modified solution has been determined from 60 Co gamma irradiation and is epsilonsub(m) = 1.46 x 10 4 l x Mol -1 x cm -1 . The increase of extinction which has been measured with this method after the irradiation with 18 MeV electrons occurs linearly within the studied region to 1,200 rd at least, the G-value is 15.5. The indicated method renders possible a relative simple calibration of the ionization chambers used in the practice. (orig.) [de

  10. Dose Measurements in a 20-J Repetitive Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, S.; Babaee, H.; Esmaeli, A.; Nasiri, A.; Mazandarani, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this article, the results of X-ray dose measurements executed using thermoluminescent dosimeters in experiments with a very small (20 J) repetitive plasma focus device named SORENA-1 are presented and analyzed. The working gas in these experiments was Argon. Also, pinch formation in experiments with this device has been observed. This device has been designed and constructed in Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research School of Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute of Iran. From these results, it is concluded that we can do experiments with this device using Ar as working gas all over the working days of year, and a good symmetry for measured dose around the device has been seen.

  11. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will causes damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 , displacement damage in silicon in terms of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence and fluence of thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper design of the system, results of measurements and comparison of measured integrated doses and fluences with predictions from FLUKA simulation will be shown.

  12. Whole-body dose meters. Measurements of total activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, P.; Klinikum Steglitz, Berlin

    1990-01-01

    By means of measurements using a whole-body dose meter, the course of the incorporation of radionuclides was established between April 1986 and May 1989 for unchanged conditions of alimentation, activity-conscious alimentation, and uniquely increased incorporation. Monitoring covered persons from the most different spheres of life. The incorporation is compared with the one resulting from nuclear weapons explosions in the atmosphere. (DG) [de

  13. Radiation dose measurement for patients and staff during cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joda, H. H. M.

    2009-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the patient and staff dose during cardiac catheterization procedures in Ahmed Gasim Hospital, Khartoum Bahry. A survey of patient and staff exposure was performed covered 2 Cath Lab units from 2 manufacturers. The measurements involved 50 operations. The medical staff was monitored using TLD chips (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). The main operator who was closer to the patient and the x-ray tube, was monitored at six positions (forehead, neck chest - over the lead apron, waist - under the lead apron, leg, and hand), while the exposure to the assistant was measured at two positions (chest - over the lead apron, and hand), where the technologist and the circulator were monitored at one position (chest - over the lead apron). patient exposure was measured using the DAP meter. The main operator and the rest of the staff received 0.14, 0.01 mSv/y respectively. The estimated patient dose rate was found to be 125 mGy/min which considered higher than the recommended DRL for the continuous high mode fluoroscopy used in interventional radiology (100 mGy/min). The study concluded to the fact that the main operator received relatively high dose which is a direct result to the poor radiation protection in the department. (Author)

  14. SU-E-T-196: Comparative Analysis of Surface Dose Measurements Using MOSFET Detector and Dose Predicted by Eclipse - AAA with Varying Dose Calculation Grid Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Nejaiman, S; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Kumar, P [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dose can be the limiting factor and fairly common reason to interrupt the treatment, especially for treating head-and-neck with Intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy(IMRT) or Volumetrically-modulated - arc-therapy (VMAT) and breast with tangentially-directed-beams. Aim of this study was to investigate accuracy of near-surface dose predicted by Eclipse treatment-planning-system (TPS) using Anisotropic-Analytic Algorithm (AAA)with varying calculation grid-size and comparing with metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors(MOSFETs)measurements for a range of clinical-conditions (open-field,dynamic-wedge, physical-wedge, IMRT,VMAT). Methods: QUASAR™-Body-Phantom was used in this study with oval curved-surfaces to mimic breast, chest wall and head-and-neck sites.A CT-scan was obtained with five radio-opaque markers(ROM) placed on the surface of phantom to mimic the range of incident angles for measurements and dose prediction using 2mm slice thickness.At each ROM, small structure(1mmx2mm) were contoured to obtain mean-doses from TPS.Calculations were performed for open-field,dynamic-wedge,physical-wedge,IMRT and VMAT using Varian-21EX,6&15MV photons using twogrid-sizes:2.5mm and 1mm.Calibration checks were performed to ensure that MOSFETs response were within ±5%.Surface-doses were measured at five locations and compared with TPS calculations. Results: For 6MV: 2.5mm grid-size,mean calculated doses(MCD)were higher by 10%(±7.6),10%(±7.6),20%(±8.5),40%(±7.5),30%(±6.9) and for 1mm grid-size MCD were higher by 0%(±5.7),0%(±4.2),0%(±5.5),1.2%(±5.0),1.1% (±7.8) for open-field,dynamic-wedge,physical-wedge,IMRT,VMAT respectively.For 15MV: 2.5mm grid-size,MCD were higher by 30%(±14.6),30%(±14.6),30%(±14.0),40%(±11.0),30%(±3.5)and for 1mm grid-size MCD were higher by 10% (±10.6), 10%(±9.8),10%(±8.0),30%(±7.8),10%(±3.8) for open-field, dynamic-wedge, physical-wedge, IMRT, VMAT respectively.For 6MV, 86% and 56% of all measured values

  15. Calorimetric measuring systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritchie, Andrew Ewen; Pedersen, John Kim; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2004-01-01

    in the system. If the switching speed can be increased, improvements may be possible (e.g., current ripple in an electrical machine or physical size of passive components may be reduced). On the other hand, increased switching speed may cause additional losses in a power electronic system and increase...... the system cooling requirement. A common problem is that high-frequency phenomena like proximity effect, skin effect, hysteresis losses, and eddy current losses appear in the systems. These losses are very difficult to treat both theoretically and in practice. It is often difficult to measure the effect...

  16. BeO-OSL detectors for dose measurements in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeff, M.; Freudenberg, R.; Kotzerke, J.; Sommer, D.; Reichelt, U.; Henniger, J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The absorbed dose is an important parameter in experiments involving irradiation of cells in vitro with unsealed radionuclides. Typically, this is estimated with a model calculation, although the results thus obtained cannot be verified. Generally used real-time measurement methods are not applicable in this setting. A new detector material with in vitro suitability is the subject of this work. Methods: Optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters based on beryllium oxide (BeO) were used for dose measurement in cell cultures exposed to unsealed radionuclides. Their qualitative properties (e. g. energy-dependent count rate sensitivity, fading, contamination by radioactive liquids) were determined and compared to the results of a Monte Carlo simulation (using AMOS software). OSL dosimeters were tested in common cell culture setups with a known geometry. Results: Dose reproducibility of the OSL dosimeters was ± 1.5%. Fading at room temperature was 0.07% per day. Dose loss (optically-stimulated deletion) under ambient lighting conditions was 0.5% per minute. The Monte Carlo simulation for the relative sensitivity at different beta energies provided corresponding results to those obtained with the OSL dosimeters. Dose profile measurements using a 6 well plate and 14 ml PP tube showed that the geometry of the cell culture vessel has a marked influence on dose distribution with 188 Re. Conclusion: A new dosimeter system was calibrated with β-emitters of different energy. It turned out as suitable for measuring dose in liquids. The dose profile measurements obtained are suitably precise to be used as a check against theoretical dose calculations. (orig.)

  17. The National Dose Registration and Information System: Dose distributions in the Netherlands over the period 1989-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, J.W.E. van; Julius, H.W.; Bogaerde, M.A. van de

    1994-01-01

    In 1988 the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment commissioned TNO Radiological Service to set up a National Dose REgistration and Information System (NDRIS). The government had three reasons in view to build NDRIS: To improve radiation protection by supervising the occupational doses of radiation workers by using one central database system; To improve the reliability of long term storage of dose data; To improve the possibilities for statistical analysis of occupational doses to guide policy making. Each approved dosimetry service (ADS) in the country sends its dose information to NDRIS on a monthly basis. IN its turn NDRIS sends back for each worker monitored by that ADS, the integrated dose as measured by any ADS. This creates the possibility for each ADS to report to the workers their total annual dose irrespectively whether they work for more than one employer or are monitored by more than one ADS, either simultaneously or successively in the course of the year. European legislation requires that the occupational dose should be controlled in this way. The availability of the centralized database replaces the need of a radiation passbook for national use. The passbook that is needed by radiation workers during interstate travelling can be produced using data from NDRIS

  18. Measurement of radiotherapy CBCT dose in a phantom using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Naonori; McLean, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used widely for the precise and accurate patient set up needed during radiation therapy, notably for hypo fractionated treatments, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation therapy. Reported doses associated with CBCT indicate the potential to approach radiation tolerance levels for some critical organs. However while some manufacturers state the CBCT dose for each standard protocol, currently there are no standard or recognised protocols for CBCT dosimetry. This study has applied wide beam computed tomography dosimetry approaches as reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine to investigate dosimetry for the Varian Trilogy linear accelerator with on-board imager v1.5. Three detection methods were used including (i) the use of both 100 mm and 300 mm pencil ionisation chambers, (ii) a 0.6 cm 3 ionisation chamber and (iii) gafchromic film. Measurements were performed using custom built 45 cm long PMMA phantoms as well as standard 15 cm long phantoms for both head and body simulation. The results showed good agreement between each other detector system (within 3 %). The measured CBCT dose for the above methods showed a large difference to the dose stated by Varian, with the measured dose being 40 % over the stated dose for the standard head protocol. This shows the importance of independently verifying the stated dose given by the vendor for standard procedures.

  19. Environmental dose measurement with microprocessor based portable TLD reader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Feher, I.

    1996-01-01

    Application of TL method for environmental gamma-radiation dosimetry involves uncertainty caused by the dose collected during the transport from the point of annealing to the place of exposure and back to the place of evaluation. Should an accident occur read out is delayed due to the need to transport to a laboratory equipped with a TLD reader. A portable reader capable of reading out the TL dosemeter at the place of exposure ('in situ TLD reader') eliminates the above mentioned disadvantages. We have developed a microprocessor based portable TLD reader for monitoring environmental gamma-radiation doses and for on board reading out of doses on space stations. The first version of our portable, battery operated reader (named Pille - 'butterfly') was made at the beginning of the 80s. These devices used CaSO 4 bulb dosemeters and the evaluation technique was based on analogue timing circuits and analogue to digital conversion of the photomultiplier current with a read out precision of 1 μGy and a measuring range up to 10 Gy. The measured values were displayed and manually recorded. The version with an external power supply was used for space dosimetry as an onboard TLD reader

  20. Technical specification of the NRPB thermoluminescent dosemeter used for the measurement of body dose and skin dose

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, K B

    1977-01-01

    This report specifies the NRPB thermoluminescent dosemeter used for the measurement of radiation dose in tissue at a depth of 700 mg cm sup - sup 2 (body dose) and at a depth of 5-10 mg cm sup - sup 2 (skin dose).

  1. Entrance surface dose measurements in pediatric radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, L.A.; Yoshimura, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of pediatric radiological examinations was carried out in a reference pediatric hospital of the city of Sao Paulo, in order to investigate the doses to children undergoing conventional X-ray examinations. The results showed that the majority of pediatric patients are below 4 years, and that about 80% of the examinations correspond to chest projections. Doses to typical radiological examinations were measured in vivo with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti and LiF: Mg, Cu, P) attached to the skin of the children to determine entrance surface dose (ESD). Also homogeneous phantoms were used to obtain ESD to younger children, because the technique uses a so small kVp that the dosimeters would produce an artifact image in the patient radiograph. Four kinds of pediatric examinations were investigated: three conventional examinations (chest, skull and abdomen) and a fluoroscopic procedure (barium swallow). Relevant information about kVp and mAs values used in the examinations was collected, and we discuss how these parameters can affect the ESD. The ESD values measured in this work are compared to reference levels published by the European Commission for pediatric patients. The results obtained (third-quartile of the ESD distribution) for chest AP examinations in three age groups were: 0.056 mGy (2-4 years old); 0.068 mGy (5-9 years old); 0.069 mGy (10-15 years old). All of them are below the European reference level (0.100 mGy). ESD values measured to the older age group in skull and abdomen AP radiographs (mean values 3.44 and 1.20 mGy, respectively) are above the European reference levels (1.5 mGy to skull and 1.0 mGy to abdomen). ESD values measured in the barium swallow examination reached 10 mGy in skin regions corresponding to thyroid and esophagus. It was noticed during this survey that some technicians use, improperly, X-ray fluoroscopy in conventional examinations to help them in positioning the patient. The results presented here are a

  2. Issues with using radiological exposures as a company performance measure in a low dose environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, Richard I.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Collective and maximum individual doses are two measures commonly used as an indicator for measuring Company performance. There is often an expectation for year on year improvements by optimisation of exposures through improved working methods and modernisation of facilities. Eventually a level of exposure can be reached that is no longer easy to measure which makes meaningful trend analysis difficult. The paper discusses the issues that arose at AWE where the majority of exposures are close the limit of detection for the TLD system used. It details the investigation that was carried out when recorded doses where observed to unexpectedly increase significantly. The paper shows the significant effect of a small change in the background radiation levels that are subtracted for each individual dose measurement. Also discussed is the effect of using TLD dosimeter readers that have undergone recent maintenance and are therefore assessing slightly increased exposures. Compounding the apparent increase in gamma dose a slight change in the manufacturing process for the plastic neutron film in the neutron dosimeters also gave an increased neutron exposure measurement which is detailed. The paper concludes with describing the changes that have been made to better ensure reproducibility of the exposure measurements so that any improvements in Company performance can be shown. It also questions the use of Collective Dose as a performance measure which is commonly misused across the industry. (author)

  3. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  4. Characterization of a team intraoperative Radiation therapy and measurement of dose in skin with film radiochromic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onses Segarra, A.; Sancho Kolster, I.; Eraso Urien, A.; Pla Farnos, M. J.; Picon Olmos, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the initial reference state of intraoperative radiotherapy equipment lntraBeam, for performing breast treatments are analyzed. To the initial reference team was established for the following dosimetric and geometric beam parameters: percentage depth dose, beam quality, isotropy, linearity and mechanical and geometric integrity for both the source RX as for different spherical applicators of the team. Based on these checks, a program of periodic quality control was established. One of the exclusion criteria for this treatment is that the tumor is less than l cm of the skin, yaque give doses received in this organ can be high. For this reason it is important to know exactly the absorbed dose in skin during these treatments. In this regard we have implemented a system for measuring the skin dose during treatment with Radiochromic film, placing 4 film segments in fixed positions of the skin around the surgical incision. It .ha obtained calibration curve of sterilized films and compared the results with a calibration beam megavoltage. The results of the skin dose measurements are compared with theoretical estimates given by the planning system equipment. The results indicate the need to measure individually the skin dose for these treatments. (Author)

  5. SU-F-P-47: Estimation of Skin Dose by Performing the Measurements On Cylindrical Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosma, S; Sanders, M; Aryal, P [University Kentucky - Chandler Medical Ctr, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the skin dose by performing the measurements on cylindrical phantom with 6X beam. Methods: A cylindrical phantom was used to best model a patient surface. The source to surface distance (SSD) was 100 cm at phantom surface along central axis (CAX). The EBT2 films were cut into 2×2 cm2 pieces. Each piece of film was placed at CAX on phantom surface for each measurement at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90° gantry angles for field sizes of 5×5, 10×10, 15×15, and 20×20 cm{sup 2} respectively. One hundred monitor units (MU) with 6X beam were delivered for each set up. Similarly, the measurements were repeated using lithium fluoride (LiF) thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips (1X1X1 mm{sup 3}). Two TLD chips were placed for each gantry angle and field size. The calibration curves were produced for both film and TLD. The computed tomography (CT) was also performed on the same cylindrical phantom and dose was evaluated at the phantom surface using Eclipse treatment planning system ( AAA algorithm) for skin dose comparison. Results: Data showed small differences at smaller angles among EBT2, TLD and Eclipse treatment planning system. But Eclipse treatment planning system under estimated the skin dose between 20% and 50% at larger gantry angles (between 40° and 80°) at all field sizes before dose differences began to converge. Conclusion: Given this data, we can conclude that Eclipse treatment planning system under estimated the dose especially between 40 and 80 degrees of obliquity compared to the measurements results. Ideally, this study can be applied largely to head and neck patients where contours differ drastically and where skin dose is paramount.

  6. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Zorko, B.; Gregori, B.; Knezevic, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron + gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Boskovic Inst. (RBI), Croatia, Jozef Stefan Inst. (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7 LiF (TLD-700), CaF 2 :Mn and Al2 O3 :Mg,Y - all from RBI; CaF 2 :Mn from JSI and 7 LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. (authors)

  7. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  8. Performance test of a portable TLD system for accidental doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihelic, M.; Stuhec, M.; Mitic, D.; Vekic, B.; Miljanic, S.; Ban, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A portable TLD measuring system was constructed at the J. Stefan Institute many years ago, motivated by the thread of a catastrophic nuclear event. It was designed for fast measurements in accidental dosimetry mainly for military and civil protection use. The system consists of a robust portable measuring unit built for measurements in field conditions, sized about 40 cm in diameter and weighting 5 kg. Dosimeters are based on CaF 2 :Mn ceramic tablets closed in water resistant plastic housings. In original design producer assured measuring range from cGy to kGy. Specially designed energy compensating filters are used to satisfy requirements for energy response from 0,1 to 3 MeV. Stability of readings is maintained with the temperature stabilized light source. Measuring time for manually driven heating-reading cycle of one dosimeter is about 30 sec. Many systems of the type with sets of dosimeters were stored unused for some years in depositories of different institutions. Modernization of equipment in last years raised questions of applicability of such measurement systems for contemporary needs. The system was thus tested in a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory for compliance with up to date requirements for accidental individual monitoring. Dosimeter characteristics as repeatability, linearity and directional response were of particular interest. As a result of the tests, technical improvements are suggested to extent systems measuring capabilities in order to meet new standards. Possibilities of its use in different fields of dosimetry are discussed, where quick in field measurements of high doses is required as for example in medicine or in civil protection motivated by the new threads of terrorist attacks. (author)

  9. Measurement and comparison of skin dose using OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Essam H; Hammad, Lina F; Al-Mohammed, Huda I

    2011-07-01

    Total body irradiation is a protocol used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients prior to bone marrow transplant. It is involved in the treatment of the whole body using a large radiation field with extended source-skin distance. Therefore measuring and monitoring the skin dose during the treatment is important. Two kinds of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (OneDose MOSFET and mobile MOSEFT) dosimeter are used during the treatment delivery to measure the skin dose to specific points and compare it with the target prescribed dose. The objective of this study was to compare the variation of skin dose in patients with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) using OneDose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET, and then compare both results with the target prescribed dose. The measurements involved 32 patient's (16 males, 16 females), aged between 14-30 years, with an average age of 22.41 years. One-Dose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET dosimetry were performed at 10 different anatomical sites on every patient. The results showed there was no variation between skin dose measured with OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET in all patients. Furthermore, the results showed for every anatomical site selected there was no significant difference in the dose delivered using either OneDose MOSFET detector or Mobile MOSFET as compared to the prescribed dose. The study concludes that One-Dose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET both give a direct read-out immediately after the treatment; therefore both detectors are suitable options when measuring skin dose for total body irradiation treatment.

  10. Eye lens dosimetry in interventional cardiology: Results of staff dose measurements and link to patient dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, V.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rehani, M.; Aleksandric, S.; Arandjic, D.; Ostojic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens dose if protection is not used. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine use for the measurement of eye dose. Since most angiography machines are equipped with suitable patient dosemeters, deriving factors linking staff eye doses to the patient doses can be helpful. In this study the patient kerma-area product, cumulative dose at an interventional reference point and eye dose in terms of Hp(3) of the cardiologists, nurses and radiographers for interventional cardiology procedures have been measured. Correlations between the patient dose and the staff eye dose were obtained. The mean eye dose was 121 mSv for the first operator, 33 mSv for the second operator/nurse and 12 mSv for radiographer. Normalised eye lens doses per unit kerma-area product were 0.94 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the first operator, 0.33 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the second operator/nurse and 0.16 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for radiographers. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a weak but significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product for all three staff categories. These values are based on a local practice and may provide useful reference for other studies for validation and for wider utilisation in assessing the eye dose using patient dose values. (authors)

  11. Measuring Systemic Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Viral V.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse; Philippon, Thomas

    We present a simple model of systemic risk and we show that each financial institution's contribution to systemic risk can be measured as its systemic expected shortfall (SES), i.e., its propensity to be undercapitalized when the system as a whole is undercapitalized. SES increases...... with the institution's leverage and with its expected loss in the tail of the system's loss distribution. Institutions internalize their externality if they are ‘taxed’ based on their SES. We demonstrate empirically the ability of SES to predict emerging risks during the financial crisis of 2007-2009, in particular......, (i) the outcome of stress tests performed by regulators; (ii) the decline in equity valuations of large financial firms in the crisis; and, (iii) the widening of their credit default swap spreads....

  12. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  13. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapp, J V; Warrington, A P; Partridge, M; Philps, A; Leach, M O; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry

  14. Design and construction of a calorimeter for the measurement of radiation doses in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo R, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The amount of energy deposited by the radiation in an absorber system, in radiation dose units was established, the Reactor Triga Mark III core of the Mexican Nuclear Center was used as radiation source. The calorimetric method was used, which gives us a direct measurement in energy units. The total dose was measured, that is, no difference was made between the different forms of radiation that operate with the system. A calorimeter was made with the following materials: stainless steel jacket, aluminium absorber material and thermometers of iron alloy. The calibration system was made for the heating and cooling technique, obtaining with the experimental data the value of the pseudo period constant. With that value and using the fit derived equation, the dose values were established for the G-21 position of the reactor core. It was established that the obtained dose is a function of the operation reactor time before the measurement, at the same a lot of propositions are presented in order to improve this technique, as for the used materials as to the obtaining the most fit equations. A comparison was made between the theoretical calculated dose and the experimentally obtained data with the calorimetric technique. (author)

  15. Evaluation of glandular dose in conventional and digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, Celia Maria Campos

    2009-01-01

    A survey was conducted to estimate the average glandular dose (D g ) for patients undergoing mammography and to report the distribution of incident air kerma (K i ), patient age, compressed breast thickness and glandular tissue content. From 1183 cranio caudal mammograms clinical data were collected and doses were measured. The survey data included mammograms from six mammography equipment: two screen/film units (SFM), two computed radiography units (CR) and two full-field digital (DR). Mean value for patient age and compressed breast thickness were 57 +-12 y and 5.4 +-1.4 cm, respectively. To investigate the importance of technical characteristics of three different mammography systems and breast glandularity, K i and D g were measured for individual breast of 392 patients from the original sample with compressed breast thickness in the range of 5.5 cm to 6.5 cm using tissue-equivalent phantoms of different glandularities manufactured in this study to mimic both the attenuation and the density of breast tissues. Mean K i value was 10.0 +-3.6 mGy for SFM systems, 12.0 +-3.6 mGy for CR systems and 4.9 +-1.3 mGy for DR systems. Mean D g value was 1.4 +-0.5 mGy for S/F systems, 1.7 +-0.5 mGy for CR systems and 0.9 +-0.2 mGy for D R systems. Statistical analysis for differences in mean values of K i and D g between mammography systems showed significant effect of their technical characteristics (p i and D g , it was observed statistically significant differences between the group of patients with 0 to 50% glandularity and the group of patients with 50 to 100% glandularity. (author)

  16. Measuring Systemic Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a simple model of systemic risk and we show that each financial institution’s contribution to systemic risk can be measured as its systemic expected shortfall (SES), i.e., its propensity to be undercapitalized when the system as a whole is undercapitalized. SES increases...... with the institution’s leverage and with its expected loss in the tail of the system’s loss distribution. Institutions internalize their externality if they are “taxed” based on their SES. We demonstrate empirically the ability of SES to predict emerging risks during the financial crisis of 2007-2009, in particular......, (i) the outcome of stress tests performed by regulators; (ii) the decline in equity valuations of large financial firms in the crisis; and, (iii) the widening of their credit default swap spreads....

  17. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-01-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio® treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  18. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  19. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorín, C; Rivera, T; Azorín, J; Aguirre, F

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations

  20. [The use of polymer gel dosimetry to measure dose distribution around metallic implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahata, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Monzen, Hajime; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-10-01

    A semi-solid polymer dosimetry system using agar was developed to measure the dose distribution close to metallic implants. Dosimetry of heterogeneous fields where electron density markedly varies is often problematic. This prompted us to develop a polymer gel dosimetry technique using agar to measure the dose distribution near substance boundaries. Varying the concentration of an oxygen scavenger (tetra-hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride) showed the absorbed dose and transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance signal to be linear between 3 and 12 Gy. Although a change in the dosimeter due to oxidization was observed in room air after 24 hours, no such effects were observed in the first 4 hours. The dose distribution around the metal implants was measured using agar dosimetry. The metals tested were a lead rod, a titanium hip joint, and a metallic stent. A maximum 30% dose increase was observed near the lead rod, but only a 3% increase in the absorbed dose was noted near the surface of the titanium hip joint and metallic stent. Semi-solid polymer dosimetry using agar thus appears to be a useful method for dosimetry around metallic substances.

  1. The use of polymer gel dosimetry to measure dose distribution around metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahata, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Monzen, Hajime; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    A semi-solid polymer dosimetry system using agar was developed to measure the dose distribution close to metallic implants. Dosimetry of heterogeneous fields where electron density markedly varies is often problematic. This prompted us to develop a polymer gel dosimetry technique using agar to measure the dose distribution near substance boundaries. Varying the concentration of an oxygen scavenger (tetra-hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride) showed the absorbed dose and transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance signal to be linear between 3 and 12 Gy. Although a change in the dosimeter due to oxidization was observed in room air after 24 hours, no such effects were observed in the first 4 hours. The dose distribution around the metal implants was measured using agar dosimetry. The metals tested were a lead rod, a titanium hip joint, and a metallic stent. A maximum 30% dose increase was observed near the lead rod, but only a 3% increase in the absorbed dose was noted near the surface of the titanium hip joint and metallic stent. Semi-solid polymer dosimetry using agar thus appears to be a useful method for dosimetry around metallic substances. (author)

  2. Measurement of beta emitting radionuclides in dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tastan, S.; Soylu, A.; Kucuk, O.; Ibis, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Radionuclides for diagnostics purposes like Tc-99m, Tl-201, Ga-67 and In-111 are measured by using ionization type of dose calibrators. Therapeutic radionuclides, which emit both beta and gamma rays are detected by the same type of dose calibrators. Other therapeutic products like Y-90, P-32 and Sr-89 are pure beta emitters and they are gaining wider utility because various new therapy radiopharmaceuticals are being developed. The type of container material, like glass or plastic, may seriously affect radioactivity measurement due to attenuation, Since it is crucial to give the exact amount of radioactivity to the patient for therapy purposes, dedicated dose calibrators are specially manufactured for the measurement of these radionuclides. But these measuring systems are not widely available in nuclear medicine centers where therapy is applied to the patient. It is a known fact that dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments can be calibrated for vials and syringes using standard sources of the same radioisotope. The method of calibration of Y-90 measurement for two ionization chamber dose calibrators available in the institute will be summarized in this presentation

  3. Measurement of beta emitting radionuclides in dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tastan, S.; Soylu, A.; Kucuk, O.; Ibis, E.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides for diagnostics purposes like Tc-99m, Tl-201, Ga-67 and In-111 are measured by using ionization type of dose calibrators. Therapeutic radionuclides, which emit both beta and gamma rays are detected by the same type of dose calibrators. Other therapeutic products like Y-90, P-32 and Sr-89 are pure beta emitters and they are gaining wider utility because various new therapy radiopharmaceuticals are being developed. The type of container material, like glass or plastic, may seriously affect radioactivity measurement due to attenuation, Since it is crucial to give the exact amount of radioactivity to the patient for therapy purposes, dedicated dose calibrators are specially manufactured for the measurement of these radionuclides. But these measuring systems are not widely available in nuclear medicine centers where therapy is applied to the patient. It is a known fact that dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments can be calibrated for vials and syringes using standard sources of the same radioisotope. The method of calibration of Y-90 measurement for two ionization chamber dose calibrators available in the institute will be summarized in this presentation. (author)

  4. A novel method for measuring patients' adherence to insulin dosing guidelines: introducing indicators of adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahané Michel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic type 1 patients are often advised to use dose adjustment guidelines to calculate their doses of insulin. Conventional methods of measuring patients' adherence are not applicable to these cases, because insulin doses are not determined in advance. We propose a method and a number of indicators to measure patients' conformance to these insulin dosing guidelines. Methods We used a database of logbooks of type 1 diabetic patients who participated in a summer camp. Patients used a guideline to calculate the doses of insulin lispro and glargine four times a day, and registered their injected doses in the database. We implemented the guideline in a computer system to calculate recommended doses. We then compared injected and recommended doses by using five indicators that we designed for this purpose: absolute agreement (AA: the two doses are the same; relative agreement (RA: there is a slight difference between them; extreme disagreement (ED: the administered and recommended doses are merely opposite; Under-treatment (UT and over-treatment (OT: the injected dose is not enough or too high, respectively. We used weighted linear regression model to study the evolution of these indicators over time. Results We analyzed 1656 insulin doses injected by 28 patients during a three weeks camp. Overall indicator rates were AA = 45%, RA = 30%, ED = 2%, UT = 26% and OT = 30%. The highest rate of absolute agreement is obtained for insulin glargine (AA = 70%. One patient with alarming behavior (AA = 29%, RA = 24% and ED = 8% was detected. The monitoring of these indicators over time revealed a crescendo curve of adherence rate which fitted well in a weighted linear model (slope = 0.85, significance = 0.002. This shows an improvement in the quality of therapeutic decision-making of patients during the camp. Conclusion Our method allowed the measurement of patients' adherence to their insulin adjustment guidelines. The indicators that we

  5. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  6. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-10-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  7. Enterprise performance measurement systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milija Bogavac

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement systems are an extremely important part of the control and management actions, because in this way a company can determine its business potential, its market power, potential and current level of business efficiency. The significance of measurement consists in influencing the relationship between the results of reproduction (total volume of production, value of production, total revenue and profit and investments to achieve these results (factors of production spending and hiring capital in order to achieve the highest possible quality of the economy. (The relationship between the results of reproduction and investment to achieve them quantitatively determines economic success as the quality of the economy. Measuring performance allows the identification of the economic resources the company has, so looking at the key factors that affect its performance can help to determine the appropriate course of action.

  8. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-07

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  9. Radiotherapy high energy surface dose measurements: effects of chamber polarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The effects of chamber polarity have been investigated for the measurement of 6MV and 18MV x-ray surface dose using a parallel plate ionization chamber. Results have shown that a significant difference in measured ionization is recorded between to polarities at 6MV and 18MV at the phantom surface. A polarity ratio ranging from 1 062 to 1 005 is seen for 6MV x-rays at the phantom surface for field sizes 5cm x 5cm to 40cm x 40cm when comparing positive to negative polarity. These ratios range from 1.024 to 1.004 for 18MV x-rays with the same field sizes. When these charge reading are compared to the D max readings of the same polarity it is found that these polarity effects are minimal for the calculation of percentage dose results with variations being less than 1% of maximum. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  10. Radon integral measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Radon Integral Measurement System (SMIR) is a device designed specially to detect, to count and to store the data of the acquisition of alpha particles emitted by Radon-222 coming from the underground. The system includes a detection chamber, a radiation detector, a digital system with bateries backup and an auxiliary photovoltaic cell. A personal computer fixes the mode in which the system works, transmitting the commands to the system by the serial port. The heart of the system is a microprocesor working with interrupts by hardware. Every external device to the microprocessor sends his own interrupt request and the microprocessor handles the interrupts with a defined priority. The system uses a real time clock, compatible with the microprocessor, to take care of the real timing and date of the acquisition. A non volatile RAM is used to store data of two bytes every 15 minutes along 41 days as a maximum. After the setting up to the system by the computer, it can operate in stand alone way for up 41 days in the working place without the lose of any data. If the memory is full the next data will be written in the first locations of the memory. The memory is divided in pages corresponding every one of this to a different day of the acquisition. The counting time for every acquisition can be programmed by the user from 15 minutes to 65535 minutes but it is recommended to use a small time not to reach the limit of 65535 counts in every acquisition period. We can take information of the system without affecting the acquisition process in the field by using a lap top computer, then the information can be stored in a file. There is a program in the computer that can show the information in a table of values or in a bar graph. (Author)

  11. Tissue doses in X-ray examinations of osteoarticular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Stavitskij, R.V.; Blinov, N.N.; Vasil'ev, Yu.D.

    1985-01-01

    The X-ray method in diagnosis of the osteoarticular system disease is described. Problems on tissue dose distribution in X-ray examinations of a skeleton, a skull, humeral articulation, cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, hip joint, hipbones are considered. The values of specific tissue doses in roentgenography of the osteoarticular system are given

  12. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, W L; Ung, N M; Wong, J H D; Ng, K H

    2016-01-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved. (paper)

  13. Air contamination measurements for the evaluation of internal dose to workers in nuclear medicine departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Massimi, B.; Bianchini, D.; Sarnelli, A.; D'Errico, V.; Marcocci, F.; Mezzenga, E.; Mostacci, D.

    2017-11-01

    Radionuclides handled in nuclear medicine departments are often characterized by high volatility and short half-life. It is generally difficult to monitor directly the intake of these short-lived radionuclides in hospital staff: this makes measuring air contamination of utmost interest. The aim of the present work is to provide a method for the evaluation of internal doses to workers in nuclear medicine, by means of an air activity sampling detector, to ensure that the limits prescribed by the relevant legislation are respected. A continuous air sampling system measures isotope concentration with a Nal(TI) detector. Energy efficiency of the system was assessed with GEANT4 and with known activities of 18F. Air is sampled in a number of areas of the nuclear medicine department of the IRST-IRCCS hospital (Meldola- Italy). To evaluate committed doses to hospital staff involved (doctors, technicians, nurses) different exposure situations (rooms, times, radionuclides etc) were considered. After estimating the intake, the committed effective dose has been evaluated, for the different radionuclides, using the dose coefficients mandated by the Italian legislation. Error propagation for the estimated intake and personal dose has been evaluated, starting from measurement statistics.

  14. Method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baath, M.; Haakansson, M.; Tingberg, A.; Maansson, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    The optimisation of image quality vs. radiation dose is an important task in medical imaging. To obtain maximum validity of the optimisation, it must be based on clinical images. Images at different dose levels can then either be obtained by collecting patient images at the different dose levels sought to investigate - including additional exposures and permission from an ethical committee - or by manipulating images to simulate different dose levels. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems. The method uses information about the detective quantum efficiency and noise power spectrum at the original and simulated dose levels to create an image containing filtered noise. When added to the original image this results in an image with noise which, in terms of frequency content, agrees with the noise present in an image collected at the simulated dose level. To increase the validity, the method takes local dose variations in the original image into account. The method was tested on a computed radiography system and was shown to produce images with noise behaviour similar to that of images actually collected at the simulated dose levels. The method can, therefore, be used to modify an image collected at one dose level so that it simulates an image of the same object collected at any lower dose level. (authors)

  15. VMAT QA: Measurement-guided 4D dose reconstruction on a patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Robinson, Joshua; Wolf, Theresa K.; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Live Oak Technologies LLC, Kirkwood, Missouri 63122 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) tool that takes as input a time-resolved, low-density ({approx}10 mm) cylindrical surface dose map from a commercial helical diode array, and outputs a high density, volumetric, time-resolved dose matrix on an arbitrary patient dataset. This first validation study is limited to a homogeneous 'patient.'Methods: A VMAT treatment is delivered to a diode array phantom (ARCCHECK, Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear) derives the high-density volumetric dose using measurement-guided dose reconstruction (MGDR). MGDR cylindrical phantom results are then used to perturb the three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning dose on the patient dataset, producing a semiempirical volumetric dose grid. Four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction on the patient is also possible by morphing individual sub-beam doses instead of the composite. For conventional (3D) dose comparison two methods were developed, using the four plans (Multi-Target, C-shape, Mock Prostate, and Head and Neck), including their structures and objectives, from the AAPM TG-119 report. First, 3DVH and treatment planning system (TPS) cumulative point doses were compared to ion chamber in a cube water-equivalent phantom ('patient'). The shape of the phantom is different from the ARCCHECK and furthermore the targets were placed asymmetrically. Second, coronal and sagittal absolute film dose distributions in the cube were compared with 3DVH and TPS. For time-resolved (4D) comparisons, three tests were performed. First, volumetric dose differences were calculated between the 3D MGDR and cumulative time-resolved patient (4D MGDR) dose at the end of delivery, where they ideally should be identical. Second, time-resolved (10 Hz sampling rate) ion chamber doses were compared to cumulative point dose vs time curves from 4D MGDR. Finally, accelerator output was varied to assess the linearity of

  16. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Philips fluoroscopy systems DoseWise: perfect image, perfect sense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueve, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Although image quality (IQ) is the ultimate goal for accurate diagnosis and treatment, minimizing radiation dose is equally important. This is especially true when pediatric patients are examined, because their sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer is two to three times greater than that of adults. DoseWise is an ALARA-based philosophy within Philips Medical Systems that is active at every level of product design. It encompasses a set of techniques, programs and practices that ensures optimal IQ while protecting people in the X-ray environments. DoseWise methods include management of the X-ray beam, less radiation-on time and more dose information for the operator. Smart beam management provides automatic customization of the X-ray beam spectrum, shape, and pulse frequency. The Philips-patented grid-controlled fluoroscopy (GCF) provides grid switching of the X-ray beam in the X-ray tube instead of the traditional generator switching method. In the examination of pediatric patients, DoseWise technology has been scientifically documented to reduce radiation dose to <10% of the dose of traditional continuous fluoroscopy systems. The result is improved IQ at a significantly lower effective dose, which contributes to the safety of patients and staff. (orig.)

  17. Modern systems for environmental radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimpean, A.; Borodeanu, C.

    1995-01-01

    The system for environmental radioactivity measurements with automatic data transmission represents a better solution for nuclear safety assurance. The 'intelligent probe' will be of real use for surveying the environmental radioactivity. The probes work independently. They measure the dose rate and store the data in their internal memory. Many such probes can be spread all over a large area. They are able to measure dose rate from the background level up to high catastrophic levels. A central computer 'asks' periodically the probes to send their stored data. This computer stores the data from many probes over a long time. It can show in 'windows' manner the dose rate from any probe (either in a numerical or graphical way), the position on a map of every probe and the corresponding results of the measurements. In can alert, if an alarm threshold is crossed or it can print on a printer the data for any single probe. (author)

  18. Measurements and calculations of doses from radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, J.B.; Herbaut, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) and Tchernobyl reactor accidents have revealed the importance of the skin exposure to beta radiation produced by small high activity sources, named 'hot particles'. In nuclear power reactors, they may arise as small fragments of irradiated fuel or material which have been neutron activated by passing through the reactor co. In recent years, skin exposure to hot particles has been subject to different limitation criteria, formulated by AIEA, ICRP, NCRP working groups. The present work is the contribution of CEA Grenoble to a contract of the Commission of the European communities in cooperation with several laboratories: University of Birmingham, University of Toulouse and University of Montpellier with the main goal to check experiments and calculations of tissue dose from 60 Co radioactive particles. This report is split up into two parts: hot particle dosimetry close to a 60 Co spherical sample with an approximately 200 μm diameter, using a PTW extrapolation chamber model 233991; dose calculations from two codes: the Varskin Mod 2 computer code and the Hot 25 S2 Monte Carlo algorithm. The two codes lead to similar results; nevertheless there is a large discrepancy (of about 2) between calculations and PTW measurements which are higher by a factor of 1.9. At a 70 μm skin depth and for 1 cm 2 irradiated area, the total (β + γ) tissue dose rate delivered by a spherical ( φ = 200 μm) 60 Co source, in contact with skin, is of the order of 6.1 10 -2 nGy s -1 Bq -1 . (author)

  19. Passive Rn dose meters - measuring methods appropriate for large measurement series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, M.; Kiefer, H.

    1985-01-01

    Passive integrating measuring methods can be classified in several groups by their functioning principle, e.g. spray chambers or open chambers with nuclear trace detectors or TL detectors, open detectors, activated carbon dose meters with or without TL detectors. According to the functioning principle, only radon or radon and fission products can be detected. The lecture gives a survey of the present state of development of passive Rn dose meters. By the example of the Ra dose meter developed at Karlsruhe which was used in inquiry measurements carried out in Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria, etching technology, estimation of measuring uncertainties, reproducibility and fading behaviour shall be discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  20. SU-E-T-602: Patient-Specific Online Dose Verification Based On Transmission Detector Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoelking, J; Yuvaraj, S; Jens, F; Lohr, F; Wenz, F; Wertz, H; Wertz, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy requires a comprehensive quality assurance program in general and ideally independent verification of dose delivery. Since conventional 2D detector arrays allow only pre-treatment verification, there is a debate concerning the need of online dose verification. This study presents the clinical performance, including dosimetric plan verification in 2D as well as in 3D and the error detection abilities of a new transmission detector (TD) for online dose verification of 6MV photon beam. Methods: To validate the dosimetric performance of the new device, dose reconstruction based on TD measurements were compared to a conventional pre-treatment verification method (reference) and treatment planning system (TPS) for 18 IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. Furthermore, dose reconstruction inside the patient based on TD read-out was evaluated by comparing various dose volume indices and 3D gamma evaluations against independent dose computation and TPS. To investigate the sensitivity of the new device, different types of systematic and random errors for leaf positions and linac output were introduced in IMRT treatment sequences. Results: The 2D gamma index evaluation of transmission detector based dose reconstruction showed an excellent agreement for all IMRT and VMAT plans compared to reference measurements (99.3±1.2)% and TPS (99.1±0.7)%. Good agreement was also obtained for 3D dose reconstruction based on TD read-out compared to dose computation (mean gamma value of PTV = 0.27±0.04). Only a minimal dose underestimation within the target volume was observed when analyzing DVH indices (<1%). Positional errors in leaf banks larger than 1mm and errors in linac output larger than 2% could clearly identified with the TD. Conclusion: Since 2D and 3D evaluations for all IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were in excellent agreement with reference measurements and dose computation, the new TD is suitable to qualify for routine treatment plan

  1. SU-E-T-602: Patient-Specific Online Dose Verification Based On Transmission Detector Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoelking, J; Yuvaraj, S; Jens, F; Lohr, F; Wenz, F; Wertz, H; Wertz, H [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy requires a comprehensive quality assurance program in general and ideally independent verification of dose delivery. Since conventional 2D detector arrays allow only pre-treatment verification, there is a debate concerning the need of online dose verification. This study presents the clinical performance, including dosimetric plan verification in 2D as well as in 3D and the error detection abilities of a new transmission detector (TD) for online dose verification of 6MV photon beam. Methods: To validate the dosimetric performance of the new device, dose reconstruction based on TD measurements were compared to a conventional pre-treatment verification method (reference) and treatment planning system (TPS) for 18 IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. Furthermore, dose reconstruction inside the patient based on TD read-out was evaluated by comparing various dose volume indices and 3D gamma evaluations against independent dose computation and TPS. To investigate the sensitivity of the new device, different types of systematic and random errors for leaf positions and linac output were introduced in IMRT treatment sequences. Results: The 2D gamma index evaluation of transmission detector based dose reconstruction showed an excellent agreement for all IMRT and VMAT plans compared to reference measurements (99.3±1.2)% and TPS (99.1±0.7)%. Good agreement was also obtained for 3D dose reconstruction based on TD read-out compared to dose computation (mean gamma value of PTV = 0.27±0.04). Only a minimal dose underestimation within the target volume was observed when analyzing DVH indices (<1%). Positional errors in leaf banks larger than 1mm and errors in linac output larger than 2% could clearly identified with the TD. Conclusion: Since 2D and 3D evaluations for all IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were in excellent agreement with reference measurements and dose computation, the new TD is suitable to qualify for routine treatment plan

  2. New values of some physical interaction coefficients for dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenlohr, H.H.; Zsdanszky, K.

    1986-01-01

    At its 8th meeting in 1985 Section I of the ''Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements lonisants'' (CCEMRI) to the ''Comite International des Poids et Mesures'' (CIPM) has put forward a recommendation on new values of some physical constants to be used for exposure and absorbed dose determinations (see Annex I). Implementation of this recommendation has some impact on the measurement of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose, and may result in changes in calibration factors of dosimeters. This subject will be discussed in detail at the IAEA Workshop on Calibration Procedures in Dosimetry, to be held in Quito in October 1986. The following information may assist SSDLs in preparing themselves for the expected changes of calibration factors. The recommendation has been caused by new numerical values of some physical constants which have become available recently. The two most important changes concern: a) S m,a , the ratio of the mean restricted collision mass stopping powers of the chamber material to that of air for electrons crossing the cavity, and b) W air /e, the mean energy required to produce an ion pair in air per electron charge, for electrons emitted by radioactive sources or produced by photon absorption

  3. Thyroid Uptake Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Duc Tuan; Nguyen Thi Bao My; Nguyen Van Sy

    2007-01-01

    The NED-UP.M7 is a complete thyroid uptake and analysis system specifically designed for nuclear medicine. Capable of performing a full range of studies this system provides fast, accurate results for Uptake Studies. The heart of the NED-UP.M7 is a microprocessor-controlled 2048 channel Compact Multi-Channel Analyzer, coupled to a 2 inch x 2 inch NaI(Tl) detector with a USB personal computer interface. The system offers simple, straight-forward operation using pre-programmed isotopes, and menudriven prompts to guide the user step by step through each procedure. The pre-programmed radionuclides include I-123, I-125, I-131, Tc-99m and Cs-137. The user-defined radionuclides also allow for isotope identification while the printer provides hard copy printouts for patient and department record keeping. The included software program running on PC (Windows XP-based) is a user friendly program with menudriven and graphic interface for easy controlling the system and managing measurement results of patient on Excel standard form. (author)

  4. Dose measurements for characterization of a semi-industrial cobalt-60 gamma-irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, K.; Jerbi, T.; Kuntz, F.; Kovacs, A.

    2006-01-01

    Cobalt-60 irradiation facility has been put into operation at the National Centre of Nuclear Sciences and Technology, Sidi-thabet, Tunisia. Its technical specifications were controlled by dosimetry commissioning experiments and compared to the data specified by the plant manufacturer. Installation qualification has been carried out to measure absorbed dose distribution in the irradiation cell and products. Two dosimeter systems were used for measurements: Red and Amber Perspex and Cellulose Triacetate (CTA). The regions of minimum and maximum absorbed dose within a homogeneous dummy product (sawdust) with a bulk density of 114kg/m 3 and the dose uniformity ratio were determined. The isodose curves and the three-dimensional views were built using an automatic geostatistical gridding method, the kriging method

  5. Dose measurement during defectoscopic work using electronic personal dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoldasova, J.

    2008-01-01

    Personal monitoring of the external radiation of radiation, personnel exposed to sources of ionizing radiation at a workplace is an important task of the radiological protection. Information based on the measured quantities characterizing the level of the exposure of radiation personnel enable to assess the optimum radiological protection at the relevant workplace and ascertain any deviation from the normal operation in time. Different types of personal dosimeters are used to monitor the external radiation of radiation personnel. Basically, there are two types of dosimeters, passive and active (electronic). Passive dosimeters provide information on the dose of exposure after its evaluation, while electronic dosimeters provide this information instantly. The goal of the work is to compare data acquired during different working activities using the DMC 2000 XB electronic dosimeters and the passive film dosimeters currently used at the defectoscopic workplace. (authors)

  6. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry.

  7. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Gutermuth, F.; Radon, T.; Kozlova, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At high energy particle accelerators the production of neutron radiation dominates radiation protection. For the radiation survey at accelerators there is a need for reliable detection systems (passive radiation monitors), which can measure the dose for a wide range of neutron energies independently on the beam pulse structure of the produced radiation. In this work a passive neutron dosemeter for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent is presented. The dosemeter is suitable for measurements of the emerging neutron radiation at accelerators for the whole energy range up to about 10 GeV. The dosemeter consists of a polyethylene sphere, TL elements (pairs of TLD600/700) and an additional lead layer (PE/Pb) in neutron fields at high energy accelerators is investigated in this work. Results of dose measurements which were performed in realistic neutron fields at the high energy accelerator SPS at CERN (CERF facility) and in Cave A at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS at GSI are presented. The results of these measurements are compared with the expected dose values from the neutron spectra determined for the measurement positions at CERF and in Cave A (FLUKA) and with the dosemeter response derived by the calculated response functions (FLUKA) folded with the neutron spectra. The comparisons show that the additional lead layer in the PE/Pb-sphere improves significantly the response of the dosemeter. The response of the PE/Pb-sphere is 40 to 50 % higher at CERF and Cave A in comparison to the bare PE-sphere. At CERF the dose values of the PE/Pb-sphere is about 25 % lower than the expected dose value, whilst for Cave A, a rather good agreement was found (2 % deviation). (author)

  8. Radiation dose measurements during kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography imaging in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Radiation dose to the eye, breast, and the surface of the pelvis have been arrived at during CBCT. The doses measured on patients agreed closely with those measured on humanoid phantom and with published values.

  9. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  10. System for estimation of mean active bone marrow dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.E.; Healy, M.J.R.; Shleien, B.; Tucker, T.

    1975-09-01

    The exposure measurements, model and computer program for estimation of mean active bone marrow doses formerly employed in the 1962 British Survey of x-ray doses and proposed for application to x-ray exposure information obtained in the U.S. Public Health Service's X-Ray Exposure Studies (1966 and 1973) are described and evaluated. The method described is feasible for use to determine the mean active bone marrow doses to adults for examinations having a skin to source distance of 80 cm or less. For a greater SSD, as for example in chest x rays, a small correction in the calculation dose can be made

  11. Development of personnel dose control system and whole body counter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooki, Yasushi; Harato, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We delivered Personnel Dose Control System to Higashidohri nuclear plant of Tohoku Electric Power Company, in November 2004. In this system development, we automated the registration of radiation worker with close link between this system and Whole Body Counter System. In addition, this system enables the user to reduce workload for accumulation and notification of personal exposure data, because we adopted the system to extract the data effectively operating the terminal PC which the associate company gets ready in their office. We also delivered Whole body Counter System in December 2004, which was developed to measure internal exposure without feeling of oppression in chair-style device for the first time in Japan. This system enables non-operator system for measurement allowing workers to operate by themselves. (author)

  12. Fiber optic based OSL set up for online and offline measurements of dose due to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, N.S.; Kulkarni, M.S.; Upadhyay, B.N.; Srikanth, G.; Bindra, K.S.; Oak, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    An optic-fiber dosimetry system based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radio-luminescence (RL) from Al_2O_3 : C single-crystal (detector) was designed and developed. The set up is intended to measure dose and dose rates at various radiological installations. The Al_2O_3:C single crystal (from Landaeur Inc. USA) was coupled to a fiber optic delivery system and OSL from the detector is stimulated via the optical fiber cable using light from a Nd:YAG laser. OSL and RL signals are later used to predict cumulative dose and dose rates using "6"0Co gamma source. (author)

  13. Entrance surface dose distribution and organ dose assessment for cone-beam computed tomography using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations with voxel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Vieira, S.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) enables high-resolution volumetric scanning of the bone and soft tissue anatomy under investigation at the treatment accelerator. This technique is extensively used in Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for pre-treatment verification of patient position and target volume localization. When employed daily and several times per patient, CBCT imaging may lead to high cumulative imaging doses to the healthy tissues surrounding the exposed organs. This work aims at (1) evaluating the dose distribution during a CBCT scan and (2) calculating the organ doses involved in this image guiding procedure for clinically available scanning protocols. Both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements were performed. To model and simulate the kV imaging system mounted on a linear accelerator (Edge™, Varian Medical Systems) the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport program MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. In order to validate the simulation results, measurements of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) were performed, using standard PMMA head and body phantoms, with 150 mm length and a standard pencil ionizing chamber (IC) 100 mm long. Measurements for head and pelvis scanning protocols, usually adopted in clinical environment were acquired, using two acquisition modes (full-fan and half fan). To calculate the organ doses, the implemented MC model of the CBCT scanner together with a male voxel phantom ("Golem") was used. The good agreement between the MCNPX simulations and the CTDIw measurements (differences up to 17%) presented in this work reveals that the CBCT MC model was successfully validated, taking into account the several uncertainties. The adequacy of the computational model to map dose distributions during a CBCT scan is discussed in order to identify ways to reduce the total CBCT imaging dose. The organ dose assessment highlights the need to evaluate the therapeutic and the CBCT imaging doses, in a more balanced approach, and the

  14. Establishment of a dosimetric system for high doses using glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Quezada, Valeria de la Asuncion

    1997-01-01

    A routine dosimetric system was developed using commercial glass samples. The dosimetric characteristics of national and imported samples were studied: batch uniformity, response repeatability, reutilization, absorbed dose response, detection range, response stability as a function of absorbed dose, storage temperature and thermal treatments pre- and post-irradiation, using the optical absorption technique. As an application, the dosimetric system was tested in a flower irradiation process at IPEN. All the obtained results show the usefulness of the proposed system for high dose dosimetry. (author)

  15. Measurement and modeling of out-of-field doses from various advanced post-mastectomy radiotherapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Heins, David; Zhao, Xiaodong; Sanders, Mary; Zhang, Rui

    2017-12-01

    More and more advanced radiotherapy techniques have been adopted for post-mastectomy radiotherapies (PMRT). Patient dose reconstruction is challenging for these advanced techniques because they increase the low out-of-field dose area while the accuracy of out-of-field dose calculations by current commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) is poor. We aim to measure and model the out-of-field radiation doses from various advanced PMRT techniques. PMRT treatment plans for an anthropomorphic phantom were generated, including volumetric modulated arc therapy with standard and flattening-filter-free photon beams, mixed beam therapy, 4-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and tomotherapy. We measured doses in the phantom where the TPS calculated doses were lower than 5% of the prescription dose using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The TLD measurements were corrected by two additional energy correction factors, namely out-of-beam out-of-field (OBOF) correction factor K OBOF and in-beam out-of-field (IBOF) correction factor K IBOF, which were determined by separate measurements using an ion chamber and TLD. A simple analytical model was developed to predict out-of-field dose as a function of distance from the field edge for each PMRT technique. The root mean square discrepancies between measured and calculated out-of-field doses were within 0.66 cGy Gy-1 for all techniques. The IBOF doses were highly scattered and should be evaluated case by case. One can easily combine the measured out-of-field dose here with the in-field dose calculated by the local TPS to reconstruct organ doses for a specific PMRT patient if the same treatment apparatus and technique were used.

  16. Device for measuring the dose rate of pulsed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, A.

    2009-01-01

    The author presents a new apparatus, developed in collaboration by Berthold Technologies and the German company DESY, allowing neutron pulsed fields to be measured. It is based on the activation by high energy neutrons of carbon 12 present in the sensor materials, and on the decay of short life radionuclides produced by this activation. The detection principle and system are briefly presented

  17. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige [Kinki Univ., Atomic Energy Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Tatsumi, Kusuo [Kinki Univ., Life Science Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu [Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan); Yuan Yongling [Labor Hygiene Institute of Hunan Prov. (China); Wei Luxin [Laboratory of Industorial Hygiene, Ministry of Health (China)

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. (2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  18. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. 2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  19. Eye dose measurements using conventional and rare-earth screens during tomography of the para-nasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddleston, B.; Moores, B.M.; Walker, A.

    1977-01-01

    Eye dose measurements have been performed when using medium speed conventional and rare-earth screen-film combinations during tomography of the para-nasal sinuses. The measurements showed that using conventional intensifying screens with the A.P. view a total eye dose of about 20 rad may be given during an examination. This eye dose can be reduced by 98% using the P.A. position. If rare-earth screen/film combinations were employed the eye dose measured in the A.P. view was reduced by 75% of that obtained with conventional screens without detectable loss of image quality. A total eye dose reduction of about 99.5% was measured in the P.A. view with the rare-earth systems. (author)

  20. Eye lens dose correlations with personal dose equivalent and patient exposure in paediatric interventional cardiology performed with a fluoroscopic biplane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, L; Koren, C; Corredoira, E; Sánchez, F; Bayón, J; Serrada, A; Guibelalde, E

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the correlations between the eye lens dose estimates performed with dosimeters placed next to the eyes of paediatric interventional cardiologists working with a biplane system, the personal dose equivalent measured on the thorax and the patient dose. The eye lens dose was estimated in terms of H p (0.07) on a monthly basis, placing optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) on goggles. The H p (0.07) personal dose equivalent was measured over aprons with whole-body OSLDs. Data on patient dose as recorded by the kerma-area product (P KA ) were collected using an automatic dose management system. The 2 paediatric cardiologists working in the facility were involved in the study, and 222 interventions in a 1-year period were evaluated. The ceiling-suspended screen was often disregarded during interventions. The annual eye lens doses estimated on goggles were 4.13±0.93 and 4.98±1.28mSv. Over the aprons, the doses obtained were 10.83±0.99 and 11.97±1.44mSv. The correlation between the goggles and the apron dose was R 2 =0.89, with a ratio of 0.38. The correlation with the patient dose was R 2 =0.40, with a ratio of 1.79μSvGy -1 cm -2 . The dose per procedure obtained over the aprons was 102±16μSv, and on goggles 40±9μSv. The eye lens dose normalized to P KA was 2.21±0.58μSvGy -1 cm -2 . Measurements of personal dose equivalent over the paediatric cardiologist's apron are useful to estimate eye lens dose levels if no radiation protection devices are typically used. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison between dose calculation in XiO® and dosimetric measurements in virtual wedge photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Laila G.; Amaral, Leonardo L.; Oliveira, Harley F.; Maia, Ana F.

    2012-01-01

    The virtual wedge is useful tool in the radiation treatment planning since it has series of advantages over the hard wedge. Quality control tests ensure correct performance of the planning done in treatment planning systems (TPS). This study aimed to compare doses calculated by TPS and doses measured by ionization chamber (CI) and an ionization chambers array in virtual wedge photon beams of 6 MV. Measures carried out in Primus linear accelerator with a solid water phantom and dosimeter positioned at 10 cm depth with gantry at 0° in many fields sizes and angles in the virtual wedge. Measurements on the central axis used as dosimeter an IC and on off-axis used an IC array. The simulation in CMS-XiO used the CT images of the phantom in the same configuration of the irradiation. Maximum and minimum values of the percentage differences between the doses provided by TPS and measurements with ionization chamber on the central axis were 1.43 and -0.10%, respectively, with average percentage difference of 0.08% and confidence limit of Δ=1.72%. In the region off-axis, the average percentage difference was 0.04%, with a maximum of 1.9%, minimum of 0% and confidence limit of Δ=1.91%. All values for dose percentage differences were below 2% and lower confidence limit of 3% are thus, according to the recommendations of the Technical Report Series - TRS-430. (author)

  2. Film dosimetry using a smart device camera: a feasibility study for point dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Trent; Jhala, Ekta; Kairn, Tanya; Trapp, Jamie

    2017-10-03

    In this work, a methodology for using a smartphone camera, in conjunction with a light-tight box operating in reflective transmission mode, is investigated as a proof of concept for use as a film dosimetry system. An imaging system was designed to allow the camera of a smartphone to be used as a pseudo densitometer. Ten pieces of Gafchromic EBT3 film were irradiated to doses up to 16.89 Gy and used to evaluate the effects of reproducibility and orientation, as well as the ability to create an accurate dose response curve for the smartphone based dosimetry system, using all three colour channels. Results were compared to a flatbed scanner system. Overall uncertainty was found to be best for the red channel with an uncertainty of 2.4% identified for film irradiated to 2.5 Gy and digitised using the smartphone system. This proof of concept exercise showed that although uncertainties still exceed a flatbed scanner system, the smartphone system may be useful for providing point dose measurements in situations where conventional flatbed scanners (or other dosimetry systems) are unavailable or unaffordable.

  3. Film dosimetry using a smart device camera: a feasibility study for point dose measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Trent; Jhala, Ekta; Kairn, Tanya; Trapp, Jamie

    2017-10-01

    In this work, a methodology for using a smartphone camera, in conjunction with a light-tight box operating in reflective transmission mode, is investigated as a proof of concept for use as a film dosimetry system. An imaging system was designed to allow the camera of a smartphone to be used as a pseudo densitometer. Ten pieces of Gafchromic EBT3 film were irradiated to doses up to 16.89 Gy and used to evaluate the effects of reproducibility and orientation, as well as the ability to create an accurate dose response curve for the smartphone based dosimetry system, using all three colour channels. Results were compared to a flatbed scanner system. Overall uncertainty was found to be best for the red channel with an uncertainty of 2.4% identified for film irradiated to 2.5 Gy and digitised using the smartphone system. This proof of concept exercise showed that although uncertainties still exceed a flatbed scanner system, the smartphone system may be useful for providing point dose measurements in situations where conventional flatbed scanners (or other dosimetry systems) are unavailable or unaffordable.

  4. Verification of IMRT dose distributions using a water beam imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.S.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Ma, C.-M.

    2001-01-01

    A water beam imaging system (WBIS) has been developed and used to verify dose distributions for intensity modulated radiotherapy using dynamic multileaf collimator. This system consisted of a water container, a scintillator screen, a charge-coupled device camera, and a portable personal computer. The scintillation image was captured by the camera. The pixel value in this image indicated the dose value in the scintillation screen. Images of radiation fields of known spatial distributions were used to calibrate the device. The verification was performed by comparing the image acquired from the measurement with a dose distribution from the IMRT plan. Because of light scattering in the scintillator screen, the image was blurred. A correction for this was developed by recognizing that the blur function could be fitted to a multiple Gaussian. The blur function was computed using the measured image of a 10 cmx10 cm x-ray beam and the result of the dose distribution calculated using the Monte Carlo method. Based on the blur function derived using this method, an iterative reconstruction algorithm was applied to recover the dose distribution for an IMRT plan from the measured WBIS image. The reconstructed dose distribution was compared with Monte Carlo simulation result. Reasonable agreement was obtained from the comparison. The proposed approach makes it possible to carry out a real-time comparison of the dose distribution in a transverse plane between the measurement and the reference when we do an IMRT dose verification

  5. SPEEDI: system for prediction of environmental emergency dose information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Hirohiko; Kai, Michiaki

    1984-03-01

    In this report a computer code system for prediction of environmental emergency dose information , i.e., SPEEDI for short, is presented. In case of an accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear plant, it is very important for an emergency planning to predict the concentration and dose caused by the materials. The SPEEDI code system has been developed for this purpose and it has features to predict by calculation the released nuclides, wind fields, concentrations and dose based on release information, actual weather and topographical data. (author)

  6. Systems automated reporting of patient dose in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collado Chamorro, P.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Martinez Mirallas, O.; Tejada San Juan, S.; Lopez de Gammarra, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    It has developed a procedure automated reporting of doses to patients in Radiology. This procedure allows to save the time required of the data used to calculate the dose to patients by yields. Also saves the time spent in the transcription of these data for the realization of the necessary calculations. This system has been developed using open source software. The characteristics of the systems of digital radiography for the automation of procedures, in particular the registration of dose should benefit from patient. This procedure is validated and currently in use at our institution. (Author)

  7. New technology development for radiation dose measurement and evaluation based on the operational quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Lyul; Kim, B. H.; Lee, J. I.; Lim, K. S.; Song, M. Y.; Joo, G. S.; Kim, S. I.; Chang, I. S.

    2012-04-01

    · Development of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for multi-purpose radiation dosimetry - Development of a semi-automatic type OSL measurement system · Number of sample holders: 10 ea · Development of a built-in type reference radiation irradiation system using 50 kV-1 mA X-rays of the maximum dose rate of 230 mGy/s - Development of an automatic diameter control system and crystal growth system for making a new OSL material: LiMgF 3 : X, LiAlO 2 : C - Development of a procedure of retrospective accident dosimetry · Establishment of Practical Technology for Internal Dose Assessment - Development of the technology to the internal dose assessment for an injection of radionuclides and intercomparison on the evaluation results of the committed effective dose between the estimators of Korea · Construction of workplace monitoring technique by quantification of neutron fields - Preparation of the neutron spectra DB of various neutron fields and production of those dosimetric data: 29 kinds of neutron fields using a thermal neutron irradiator, a proton accelerator and a neutron generator - Neutron monitoring procedure at workplace using neutron fluence spectra

  8. Default Drug Doses in Anesthesia Information Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Luis I; Smaka, Todd J; Mahla, Michael; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-07-01

    In the United States, anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) are well established, especially within academic practices. Many hospitals are replacing their stand-alone AIMS during migration to an enterprise-wide electronic health record. This presents an opportunity to review choices made during the original implementation, based on actual usage. One area amenable to this informatics approach is the configuration in the AIMS of quick buttons for typical drug doses. The use of such short cuts, as opposed to manual typing of doses, simplifies and may improve the accuracy of drug documentation within the AIMS. We analyzed administration data from 3 different institutions, 2 of which had empirically configured default doses, and one in which defaults had not been set up. Our first hypothesis was that most (ie, >50%) of drugs would need at least one change to the existing defaults. Our second hypothesis was that for most (>50%) drugs, the 4 most common doses at the site lacking defaults would be included among the most common doses at the 2 sites with defaults. If true, this would suggest that having default doses did not affect the typical administration behavior of providers. The frequency distribution of doses for all drugs was determined, and the 4 most common doses representing at least 5% of total administrations for each drug were identified. The appropriateness of the current defaults was determined by the number of changes (0-4) required to match actual usage at the 2 hospitals with defaults. At the institution without defaults, the most frequent doses for the 20 most commonly administered drugs were compared with the default doses at the other institutions. At the 2 institutions with defaults, 84.7% and 77.5% of drugs required at least 1 change in the default drug doses (P default drug doses, 100% of the 20 most commonly administered doses (representing ≥5% of use for that drug) were included in the most commonly administered doses at the other 2

  9. A reference dosimetric system for dose interval of radiotherapy based on alanine/RPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Galante, Ocimar L.; Campos, Leticia L.

    2001-01-01

    This work describes the development of a reference dosimetric system based on alanine/EPR for radiotherapy dose levels. Currently the IPEN is concluding a similar system for the dose range used for irradiation of products, 10-10 5 Gy. The objective of this work is to present the efforts towards to improve the measure accuracy for doses in the range between 1-10 Gy. This system could be used as reference by radiotherapy services, as much in the quality control of the equipment, as for routine accompaniment of more complex handling where the total doses can reach some grays. The system uses alanine as detector and electronic paramagnetic resonance - EPR as measure technique. To reach accuracy better than 5% mathematical studies on the best optimization of the EPR spectrometer parameters and methods for the handling of the EPR sign are discussed. (author)

  10. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlerman, D.A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  11. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlerman, D A.E. [Institute of Process Engineering, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  12. Optimization of paediatric radiation doses with CR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatelli, Giovanna; Mazzocchi, S.; Ciccarone, A.; Fonda, C.; De Otto, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection of paediatric patients is a primary objective in paediatric radiology due the higher life expectance of the little patients undergoing radiology examinations and due to the higher radiosensitivity of tissues. Aim of this work is the study of the optimization process in paediatric doses needed after the recent installation of a new Computed Radiography System in the Radiology of the Meyer paediatric Hospital, in Florence, Italy. This process involves both the use of new dedicated digitizer (Agfa DX-S) and elaboration software (Agfa NX2.0). The choice of the DX-S systems has been performed in consideration of high resolution (Scanhead technology - DirectriX detector), image sharpness and portability of the cassettes that make DX-S ideal in paediatric applications as neonatal intensive care. The NX software for image processing has been installed with the 'Paediatric' licence that optimizes paediatric images especially for exposures of premature newborns. Paediatric NX automatically selects the paediatric age group, depending on the patient's birth date. Each age group contains enhanced algorithms and settings adapted to age group, for optimized visibility of fine details. All the CR system has been accepted by mean of quality control acceptance tool AGFA AutoQC2, and all the automatic exposure control devices installed on radiographic devices were previously calibrated in accordance to literature with signal to noise vs dose considerations [S. Mazzocchi et al. 'AEC set-up optimization with computed radiography imaging' Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 117, 169-173 2005]. Paediatric patients were then divided into age-weight categories and the Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) were calculated by output x-rays measurements. ESD for thorax examinations were correlated to the image evaluations performed by experienced radiologists following European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images in paediatrics (EUR 16261, European

  13. Dose measurements in dental radiology using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiara, Ana Claudia M. de; Costa, Alessandro M.; Pardini, Luiz Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was the implementation of a code of practice for dosimetry in dental radiology using the technique of thermoluminescent dosimetry. General principles for the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters were followed. The irradiations were performed using ten X-ray equipment for intra-oral radiography and an X-ray equipment for panoramic radiography. The incident air kerma was evaluated for five different exposure times used in clinical practice for intra-oral radiographs. Using a backscatter factor of 1.2, it was observed that approximately 40% of the entrance skin dose values found for intra-oral radiographs are above the diagnostic reference level recommended in national regulation. Different configurations of voltage and current were used representing the exposure as a child, woman and man for panoramic radiographs. The results obtained for the air kerma area product were respectively 53.3 +- 5.2 mGy.cm 2 , 101.5 +- 9.5 mGy.cm 2 and 116.8 +- 10.4 mGy.cm 2 . The use of thermoluminescent dosimetry requires several procedures before a result is recorded. The use of dosimeters with ionization chambers or semiconductors provides a simple and robust method for routine measurements. However, the use of thermoluminescent dosimetry can be of great value to large-scale surveys to establish diagnostic reference levels. (author)

  14. Dose reconstruction in radioactively contaminated areas based on radiation transport calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, Mauritius Michael

    2015-01-01

    The external radiation exposure at the former village of Metlino, Russia, was reconstructed. The Techa river in Metlino was contaminated by water from the Majak plant. The village was evacuated in 1956 and a reservoir lake created. Absorbed doses in bricks were measured and a model of the present-day and the historic Metlino was created for Monte Carlo calculations. By combining both, the air kerma at shoreline could be reconstructed to evaluate the Techa River Dosimetry System.

  15. Computer Based Dose Control System on Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxwim; Djoko-SP; Widi-Setiawan; Agus-Budi Wiyatna

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator technology has been used for radio therapy. DokterKaryadi Hospital in Semarang use electron or X-ray linear accelerator (Linac)for cancer therapy. One of the control parameter of linear accelerator isdose rate. It is particle current or amount of photon rate to the target. Thecontrol of dose rate in linac have been done by adjusting repetition rate ofanode pulse train of electron source. Presently the control is stillproportional control. To enhance the quality of the control result (minimalstationer error, velocity and stability), the dose control system has beendesigned by using the PID (Proportional Integral Differential) controlalgorithm and the derivation of transfer function of control object.Implementation of PID algorithm control system is done by giving an input ofdose error (the different between output dose and dose rate set point). Theoutput of control system is used for correction of repetition rate set pointfrom pulse train of electron source anode. (author)

  16. Dose rate measurement of a cobalt source 'Issledovatel' by means of Fricke dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The results of measurements leading to the elaboration of a reliable and accurate dose rate determination for a cobalt irradiator 'Issledovatel' were presented. The dose measurements were done by means of classic Fricke dosimeter. The conclusions from measurements can be useful also for the dosimetry of other kinds of cobalt irradiators. The measurements were performed by a newly employed Laboratory for Measurements of Technological Doses staff and were a practical test of their proficiency in gamma ray dosimetry.

  17. MO-AB-BRA-03: Calorimetry-Based Absorbed Dose to Water Measurements Using Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Martinez, E; Malin, M; DeWerd, L [University of WI-Madison/ADCL, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interferometry-based calorimetry is a novel technique to measure radiation-induced temperature changes allowing the measurement of absorbed dose to water (ADW). There are no mechanical components in the field. This technique also has the possibility of obtaining 2D dose distributions. The goal of this investigation is to calorimetrically-measure doses between 2.5 and 5 Gy over a single projection in a photon beam using interferometry and compare the results with doses calculated using the TG-51 linac calibration. Methods: ADW was determined by measuring radiation-induced phase shifts (PSs) of light passing through water irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam. A 9×9×9 cm{sup 3} glass phantom filled with water and placed in an arm of a Michelson interferometer was irradiated with 300, 400, 500 and 600 monitor units. The whole system was thermally insulated to achieve sufficient passive temperature control. The depth of measurement was 4.5 cm with a field size of 7×7 cm{sup 2}. The intensity of the fringe pattern was monitored with a photodiode and used to calculate the time-dependent PS curve. Data was acquired 60 s before and after the irradiation. The radiation-induced PS was calculated by taking the difference in the pre- and post-irradiation drifts extrapolated to the midpoint of the irradiation. Results were compared to computed doses. Results: Average comparison of calculated ADW values with interferometry-measured values showed an agreement to within 9.5%. k=1 uncertainties were 4.3% for calculations and 14.7% for measurements. The dominant source of uncertainty for the measurements was a temperature drift of about 30 µK/s caused by heat conduction from the interferometer’s surroundings. Conclusion: This work presented the first absolute ADW measurements using interferometry in the dose range of linac-based radiotherapy. Future work to improve measurements’ reproducibility includes the implementation of active thermal control techniques.

  18. Dose measurements with a HPGe detector - a technical manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidstroem, K.; Nordenfors, C.; Aagren, G

    2000-06-01

    This paper is a technical manual for estimations of dose based on a gamma spectrum. The method used is based on the Monte Carlo code EGS4. Since dose estimations from spectra are specific for each detector, this work is performed on two mobile HPGe detectors at FOA NBC Defence in Umeaa. This technical manual describes the method used in three steps: Part 1 explains how to construct a model of the detector geometry and the specific material for a new detector. Part 2 describes the underlying work of Monte Carlo simulations of a detector given geometry and material. Part 3 describes dose estimations from a gamma spectrum.

  19. Estimation of computed tomography dose index in cone beam computed tomography: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry; Toncheva, Greta; Yoo, Sua; Yin, Fang-Fang; Frush, Donald

    2010-05-01

    To address the lack of accurate dose estimation method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), we performed point dose metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) was employed to measure point doses in the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) CT phantoms with MOSFETs for standard and low dose modes. A MC model of the OBI x-ray tube was developed using BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system and validated by the half value layer, x-ray spectrum and lateral and depth dose profiles. We compared the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) between MOSFET measurements and MC simulations. The CTDIw was found to be 8.39 cGy for the head scan and 4.58 cGy for the body scan from the MOSFET measurements in standard dose mode, and 1.89 cGy for the head and 1.11 cGy for the body in low dose mode, respectively. The CTDIw from MC compared well to the MOSFET measurements within 5% differences. In conclusion, a MC model for Varian CBCT has been established and this approach may be easily extended from the CBCT geometry to multi-detector CT geometry.

  20. Measurement of multi-slice computed tomography dose profile with the Dose Magnifying Glass and the MOSkin radiation dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, C.P.L.; Wong, J.H.D.; Young, A.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M.L.F.; Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the application of two in-house developed dosimeters, the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG) and the MOSkin dosimeter at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Australia, for the measurement of CT dose profiles for a clinical diagnostic 16-slice MSCT scanner. Two scanner modes were used; axial mode and helical mode, and the effect of varying beam collimation and pitch was studied. With an increase in beam collimation in axial mode and an increase of CT pitch in helical mode, cumulative point dose at scanner isocentre decreased while FWHM increased. There was generally good agreement to within 3% between the acquired dose profiles obtained by the DMG and the film except at dose profile tails, where film over-responded by up to 30% due to its intrinsic depth dose dependence at low doses. -- Highlights: ► This study shows the CT beam profiles acquired with our institution's detectors. ► The DMG is a relative dosimeter calibrated to absolute MOSkin readings. ► There was good agreement between dose profiles acquired by the DMG and the film

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in teeth from citizens of Ozyorsk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, A.; Semiochkina, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Vasilenko, E.; Aladova, E.; Smetanin, M. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Fattibene, P. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    In 1945, within the frame of the Uranium Project for the production of nuclear weapons, the Mayak nuclear facilities were constructed at the Lake Irtyash in the Southern Urals, Russia. The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), who lived in the city of Ozyorsk, are the focus of epidemiological studies for the assessment of health risks due to protracted exposure to ionising radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in tooth enamel have already been used in the past, in an effort to validate occupational external doses that were evaluated in the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. In the present study, 229 teeth of Ozyorsk citizens not employed at MPA were investigated for the assessment of external background exposure in Ozyorsk. The annually absorbed dose in tooth enamel from natural background radiation was estimated to be (0.7 ± 0.3) mGy. For citizens living in Ozyorsk during the time of routine noble gas releases of the MPA, which peaked in 1953, the average excess absorbed dose in enamel above natural background was (36 ± 29) mGy, which is consistent with the gamma dose obtained by model calculations. In addition, there were indications of possible accidental gaseous MPA releases that affected the population of Ozyorsk, during the early and late MPA operation periods, before 1951 and after 1960. (orig.)

  2. Optimized probes for dose rate measurements at local government sites and in emergency planning zones and their integration into measurement networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuca, Petr; Helebrant, Jan; Cespirova, Irena; Judas, Libor; Skala, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The results of a security project aimed at the development of a radiation situation monitoring system using optimized probes for dose rate measurements are described. The system is suitable for use at local government sites as well as at other sites. The system includes dose rate measurement probes with the variable configuration functionality (detection part), equipment for data transfer to a central workplace (communication part) and application for collection, storage and administration of the results and their presentation at a website (presentation part). The dosimetric and other operational properties of the probes were tested and the feasibility of their integration into measurement networks using the IMS central application was examined. (orig.)

  3. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P S; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will cause damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 and fluences of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutrons and thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper measurements collected during two years of ATLAS data taking are presented and compared to predictions from radiation background simulations.

  4. Eye lens dosimetry for interventional procedures – Relation between the absorbed dose to the lens and dose at measurement positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber, Therese; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Mattsson, Sören

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the absorbed dose to the lens of the eye and the absorbed dose at different measurement positions near the eye of interventional radiologists. It also visualised the dose distribution inside the head, both when protective eyewear were used and without such protection. The best position for an eye lens dosimeter was found to be at the side of the head nearest to the radiation source, close to the eye. Positioning the dosimeter at the eyebrow could lead to an underestimation of the lens dose of as much as 45%. The measured dose distribution showed that the absorbed dose to the eye lenses was high compared to the other parts of the head, which stresses the importance of wearing protective eyewear. However, many models of eyewear were found to be deficient as the radiation could slip through at several places, e.g. at the cheek. The relationship between the absorbed dose to the lens and the kerma-area-product (P KA ) delivered to the patient was also studied.

  5. A phantom based method for deriving typical patient doses from measurements of dose-area product on populations of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapple, C.-L.; Broadhead, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    One of the chief sources of uncertainty in the comparison of patient dosimetry data is the influence of patient size on dose. Dose has been shown to relate closely to the equivalent diameter of the patient. This concept has been used to derive a prospective, phantom based method for determining size correction factors for measurements of dose-area product. The derivation of the size correction factor has been demonstrated mathematically, and the appropriate factor determined for a number of different X-ray sets. The use of phantom measurements enables the effect of patient size to be isolated from other factors influencing patient dose. The derived factors agree well with those determined retrospectively from patient dose survey data. Size correction factors have been applied to the results of a large scale patient dose survey, and this approach has been compared with the method of selecting patients according to their weight. For large samples of data, mean dose-area product values are independent of the analysis method used. The chief advantage of using size correction factors is that it allows all patient data to be included in a survey, whereas patient selection has been shown to exclude approximately half of all patients. (author)

  6. Occupational dose measurement in interventional cardiology, dosimetry comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.M.A.

    2008-05-01

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart disease. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Therefore workers in interventional cardiology are expected to receive high doses. This study overviews the status of occupational exposure at the three cardiology centers at three different hospitals in Khartoum compared with that received by workers at other medical practices (radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology) in the Institute of Nuclear and Technology (INMO) at El Gezira. The TLD Harshaw 6600 reader was used in the assessment of effective dose for Hp (10). Two TLDs were used by each worker at the three cardiology centres, one worn under a protective apron and the other worn outside and above the apron as specified by the ICRP. Each worker at the other sections was facilitated with one dosimeter to be worn on the chest. The annual doses received by 14 cardiologists, 13 nurses and 9 technologists at the three cardiology centres were in the range: (0.84-4.77), (0.15-2.08), (0.32-1.10) mSv respectively. In the INMO the annual doses received by 7 doctors, 5 nurses and 14 technologists were in the range: (0.12-0.51), (0.11-0.65), (0.03-1.39) mSv respectively. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. The study also indicated that doses received by workers in interventional cardiology, in particular the cardiologists are high compared to that received at the other medical sections.(Author)

  7. Sequential measurements of spectrum and dose for cosmic-ray neutrons on the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Suzuki, H.; Nakamura, T.

    2002-01-01

    The earth is continually bathed in high-energy particles that come from outside the solar system, known as galactic cosmic rays. When these particles penetrate the magnetic fields of the solar system and the Earth and reach the Earth's atmosphere, they collide with atomic nuclei in air and secondary cosmic rays of every kind. On the other hand, levels of accumulation of the semiconductor increase recently, and the soft error that the cosmic-ray neutrons cause has been regarded as questionable. There have been long-term measurements of cosmic-ray neutron fluence at several places in the world, but no systematic study on cosmic-ray neutron spectrum measurements. This study aimed to measure the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum and dose on the ground during the solar maximum period of 2000 to 2002. Measurements have been continuing in a cabin of Tohoku University Kawauchi campus, by using five multi-moderator spectrometers (Bonner sphere), 12.7 cm diam by 12.7 cm long NE213 scintillator, and rem counter. The Bonner sphere uses a 5.08 cm diam spherical 3 He gas proportional counter and the rem counter uses a 12.7 cm diam 3 He gas counter. The neutron spectra were obtained by unfolding from the count rates measured with the Bonner sphere using the SAND code and the pulse height spectra measured with the NE213 scintillator using the FORIST code . The cosmic- ray neutron spectrum and ambient dose rates have been measured sequentially from April 2001. Furthermore, the correlation between ambient dose rate and the atmospheric pressure was investigated with a barometer. We are also very much interested in the variation of neutron spectrum following big solar flares. From the sequential measurements, we found that the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum has two peaks at around 1 MeV and at around 100 MeV, and the higher energy peak increases with a big solar flare

  8. Measuring radiation exposure during percutaneous drainages: can shoulder dosemeters be used to estimate finger doses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehmas, Tapio; Tikkanen, Heikki

    1992-01-01

    To assess the need for extra finger dosemeters, radiologists' and assistants' radiation exposure at both shoulders and at the third fingers of both hands were recorded using thermoluminescent dosemeters during 27 interventional drainage procedures. Under couch screening was used. Mean dose rates were calculated by dividing dose by screening time. The radiologists' bilateral finger dose rates did not correlate with each other; nor did dose rates between the left shoulder and the right hand. The radiologists' dose rates at both shoulders, correlated with each other, as did shoulder dose rates with dose rates at the ispilateral hand. The right shoulder dose rates correlated with the left hand dose rates. The assistants' dose rates at places of measurement showed significant correlations with each other. (Author)

  9. Detection and optimization of image quality and dose in digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semturs, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: During the last few years, mammography institutes have replaced their conventional mammography systems (FSM) with digital mammography systems (FFDM). This happened mainly in direction to digital computed radiography systems (FFDM-CR), where the mammography device could be kept in operation. Consequently also the AEC-parameters have not been changed and therefore the same dose as for FFM was used. Following the main theme of the thesis "Optimization of image quality and dose", also measurements with such CR-Systems have been performed in relation to image quality and dose behavior. Optimization in this context means - in following the ALARA principle - the reduction of dose while ensuring required clinical image quality. With other words - image quality is of higher value compared to dose. Considering this, it has been found out through measurements during this thesis, that FFDM-CR Systems need considerable more dose for achieving image quality comparable with FFM. On the other hand, it has been shown with measurements during this thesis, that the newest FFDM-CR technology (needle structure) supports dose reduction (optimization) to a certain degree without compromising image quality. Dose increase, as recommended in this thesis, could also increase the danger of more radiation induced carcinoma. There are several studies (which are also discussed in this thesis), which show that the benefit of not missing cancers because of higher dose dramatically overrides any health concerns. Such an optimization of image quality and dose is now described in more detail by comparing the new CR needle technology with the older power based CR technology. Material and Methods: The image quality and dose behavior for multiple breast thicknesses (simulated with PMMA slabs) of a CR needle crystal detector system is optimized by considering also different beam qualities. Technical image quality is determined with a low contrast phantom (CDMAM phantom) and from

  10. Measurement of radiation dose to the eye-lens with bilateral whole brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Charn Il; Kang, Wee Saing; Choo, Dong Woon

    1985-01-01

    In 40 patients with metastatic brain tumor and acute lymphoblastic leukemia received whole brain irradiation, the dose delivered to the eye lens was measured using T.L.D. chips applied on the eyes as usual shield. The dose to the eye lens was expressed the relative dose to the mid brain dose. Radiotherapy was administrated using Co-60 teletherapy with bilateral whole brain irradiation. The results are as follows: 1. The dose to the right eye from its incipient field is 16.6% of tumor dose while the dose to the same eye from the opposite field is 41.2%. On left eye, 19.2% from incipient field while 39.2% from the opposite field. 2. Total received dose to right and left eyes is 28.9%, 29.8% of tumor dose respectively. 3. Comparing lens shield group with orbit shield group dose is 22.5%, 15.8% of tumor dose, respectively. 4. The dose delivered to the eye lens in ipsilateral side depends upon internal scattering, location of lead shield and penetrating dose of lead in itself. The dose in contralateral side depends upon divergency of radiation beam and patient's malposition. 5. The dose to the eye lens should be less than 10% of tumor dose with adequate shield, also not missing the chance of leptomeningeal recurrence because of overshielding.

  11. System composition and operation of exposure dose registration and control system (Final report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Since November, 1976, the committee concerning the investigation of exposure dose registration and control system for employees in nuclear industries has discussed on the exposure dose registration and control system, issued the interim report (outline) in April, 1977, and continued to investigate the details organizing the working group. Here, the final report is presented. It describes first on the definition of the terms used and the basic concept of the exposure dose registration and control system, in which the name of that organization is decided as ''Central Registration Office for Radiation Works'', Radiation Influence Association, the foundational juridical person. Next, the works to be performed in the Center and nuclear energy enterprises are explained. The items concerning the business management at the time of practical execution are the major part of the report, and are over 22 items. These include the registration business, the official reporting business, inquiry and answer business about career, change and revision, and computer processing system. As the temporary measures for transfer ring to the new system, 10 items are also provided. Supplementary explanation of 9 important items is given in the appendix. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. A Web-Based System for Bayesian Benchmark Dose Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kan; Shapiro, Andrew J

    2018-01-11

    Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling is an important step in human health risk assessment and is used as the default approach to identify the point of departure for risk assessment. A probabilistic framework for dose-response assessment has been proposed and advocated by various institutions and organizations; therefore, a reliable tool is needed to provide distributional estimates for BMD and other important quantities in dose-response assessment. We developed an online system for Bayesian BMD (BBMD) estimation and compared results from this software with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS). The system is built on a Bayesian framework featuring the application of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling for model parameter estimation and BMD calculation, which makes the BBMD system fundamentally different from the currently prevailing BMD software packages. In addition to estimating the traditional BMDs for dichotomous and continuous data, the developed system is also capable of computing model-averaged BMD estimates. A total of 518 dichotomous and 108 continuous data sets extracted from the U.S. EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database (and similar databases) were used as testing data to compare the estimates from the BBMD and BMDS programs. The results suggest that the BBMD system may outperform the BMDS program in a number of aspects, including fewer failed BMD and BMDL calculations and estimates. The BBMD system is a useful alternative tool for estimating BMD with additional functionalities for BMD analysis based on most recent research. Most importantly, the BBMD has the potential to incorporate prior information to make dose-response modeling more reliable and can provide distributional estimates for important quantities in dose-response assessment, which greatly facilitates the current trend for probabilistic risk assessment. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1289.

  13. Validation of SEACAB Methodology with Frascati (FNG) Photon Dose Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tore, C.; Ortego, P.; Rodriguez Rivada, A.

    2014-07-01

    In the operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) the correct estimation of the gamma dose rate produced from the structural materials after shut down is one of the important safety parameter for hands-on maintenance. SEACAB, a rigorous 2-step (R2S) computational method has been developed for the calculation of residual dose in 3-D geometry with the use of the MCNP5 and of the ACAB (ACtivation ABacus) inventory code. The method is very efficient in hardware requirements being essentially modular. Starting from a single MCNP5 run permits a progressive improvement in the spatial detail of the material layers for the activation calculation and obtains separated source distributions for the isotopes contributing to the photon dose. (Author)

  14. The estimation of effective doses using measurement of several relevant physical parameters from radon exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridzikova, A; Fronka, A.; Maly, B.; Moucka, L.

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation, we will be study the dose relevant factors from continual monitoring in real homes into account getting more accurate estimation of 222 Rn the effective dose. The dose relevant parameters include the radon concentration, the equilibrium factor (f), the fraction (fp) of unattached radon decay products and real time occupancy people in home. The result of the measurement are the time courses of radon concentration that are based on estimation effective doses together with assessment of the real time occupancy people indoor. We found out by analysis that year effective dose is lower than effective dose estimated by ICRP recommendation from the integral measurement that included only average radon concentration. Our analysis of estimation effective doses using measurement of several physical parameters was made only in one case and for the better specification is important to measure in different real occupancy houses. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of a low-dose neonatal chest radiographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, E.M.; Kirks, D.R.; Strife, J.L.; Henry, G.C.; Kereiakes, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    A new low-dose chest radiographic system for use in the neonatal nursery was evaluated. This test system, composed of a Du Pont Kevlar fiber-front cassette, Quanta fast-detail screen, Cronex 4L film (wide latitude), and additional yttrium filtration (0.1 mm), reduced the radiation dose in neonatal chest radiography by 69% (0.9 vs 2.9 mrad [0.009 vs 0.029 mGy]) as compared with a conventional system without added yttrium filtration; the thyroid dose was reduced by 76% (0.9 vs 3.7 mrad [0.009 vs 0.037 mGy]). The cumulative dose reduction was achieved through a combination of factors, including (1) beam hardening by the added yttrium filter, (2) increased X-ray transmission through the Kevlar cassette, and (3) a fast film-screen combination. Scatter radiation at distances of 1 and 6 ft. (0.3 and 1.8 m) was negligible for both systems. Image sharpness was compared for the conventional system with and without added yttrium filtration and for the Kevlar system with yttrium. Although sharpness of bony detail was unchanged by adding yttrium filtration to the conventional system, a decrease in sharpness was noted with the Kevlar system. Because image sharpness was affected in the test system, we are not using the Kevlar-Cronex 4L system for mobile chest radiography in the neonatal intensive care unit, despite dose reductions. However, further study is recommended to determine if there is a slower film-screen combination with yttrium filtration that will not degrade image sharpness

  16. Hormesis of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Immune System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, M.H.; Abbas, M.O.; El-Asady, R.S.; Amer, H.A.; El-Khouly, W.A.; Shabon, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the immune system has been a controversial subject. To evaluate the effect of low-doses γ-irradiation exposure on immune system. An animal model, using Rattus Rattus rats was used. The rats were divided into groups exposed to either continuous or fractionated 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mSv of radiation and compared to control rats that did not receive radiation. All groups were exposed to a total white blood count (Wcs), lymphocyte count and serum IgG level measurement, as indicators of the function of the cell-mediated (T lymphocytes) and the humoral (B lymphocytes) immune system. The results of the current study revealed that the counts of total leukocytes (WBCs) and lymphocytes, as well as the serum level of IgG were increased significantly in rats receiving low dose radiation, indicating enhancement of immune system. The data suggests that low-dose gamma-radiation improved hematological parameters and significantly enhances immune response indices of the exposed rats. These findings are similar to the radiation adaptive responses in which a small dose of pre irradiation would induce certain radiation resistance and enhances the cell response after exposure to further irradiation doses The applied low doses used in the present study may appear effective inducing the radio adaptive response. Farooqi and Kesavan (1993) and Bravard et al. (1999) reported that the adaptive response to ionizing radiation refers to the phenomenon by which cells irradiated with low (cGy) or sublethal doses (conditioning doses) become less susceptible to genotoxic effects of a subsequent high dose (challenge dose, several Gy).

  17. Systems Measures of Water Distribution System Resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klise, Katherine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murray, Regan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, La Tonya Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that is being used increasingly to refer to the capacity of infrastructure systems to be prepared for and able to respond effectively and rapidly to hazardous events. In Section 2 of this report, drinking water hazards, resilience literature, and available resilience tools are presented. Broader definitions, attributes and methods for measuring resilience are presented in Section 3. In Section 4, quantitative systems performance measures for water distribution systems are presented. Finally, in Section 5, the performance measures and their relevance to measuring the resilience of water systems to hazards is discussed along with needed improvements to water distribution system modeling tools.

  18. Measuring name system health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casalicchio, Emiliano; Caselli, Marco; Coletta, Alessio; Di Blasi, Salvatore; Fovino, Igor Nai; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    2012-01-01

    Modern critical infrastructure assets are exposed to security threats arising from their use of IP networks and the Domain Name System (DNS). This paper focuses on the health of DNS. Indeed, due to the increased reliance on the Internet, the degradation of DNS could have significant consequences for

  19. Environmental radiation monitoring: mobile gamma dose rate measurements along Mumbai-Hyderabad rail route and Hyderabad city roads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divkar, J.K.; Padmanabhan, N.; Chaudhury, Probal; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Pujari, R.N.; Dogra, Santosh; Sharma, D.N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental Radiation monitoring based on gamma dose rate logging on a mobile platform integrated with real time position from a Global Positioning System is an effective tool to acquire dose rate profile and generate radiological map of any geographical region. The microcontroller based dose rate data acquisition system capable of storing the acquired data and transferring to an attached laptop/PC and providing a graphical illustration of relative variations in gamma background can also be used for quick assessment of environmental radiological impact assessment. This paper describes the methodology and results of the environmental gamma dose rate monitoring surveys carried out: (i) on Mumbai-Hyderabad rail route with the systems installed in the trains guard's room and (ii) Hyderabad city roads with systems installed in a monitoring van. The results indicate significant difference in the gamma background measured along the rail route between Mumbai-Hyderabad and in the radiological map generated after the Hyderabad city survey. (author)

  20. Optical absorption measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draggoo, V.G.; Morton, R.G.; Sawicki, R.H.; Bissinger, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature

  1. Extracranial doses during stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy measured with thermoluminescent dosimeter in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.H.; Lim, D.H.; Kim, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, B.K.; Kang, W-S.; Wu, H.G.; Ha, S.W.; Park, C.I. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology (Korea)

    2000-05-01

    Recently the usage of 3-dimensional non-coplanar radiotherapy technique is increasing. We measured the extracranial dose and its distribution g the above medical procedures to estimate effect of exit doses of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of the intracranial target lesions using a linac system developed in our hospital. Among over hundred patients who were treated with SRS or FSRT from 1995 to 1998, radiation dosimetry data of 15 cases with SRS and 20 cases with FSRT were analyzed. All patients were adults. Of SRS cases, 11 were male and 4 were female. Vascular malformation cases were 9, benign tumors were 3, and malignant tumors were 3. Of FSRT cases, males were 12 and females were 8. Primary malignant brain tumors were 5, benign tumors were 6, and metastatic brain tumors were 10. Doses were measured with lithium fluoride TLD chips (7.5% Li-6 and 92.5% Li-7; TLD-100, Harshaw/Filtrol, USA). The chips were attached patient's skin at the various extracranial locations during SRS or FSRT. For SRS, 14-25 Gy were delivered with 1-2 isocenters using 12-38 mm circular tertiary collimators with reference to 50-80% isodose line conforming at the periphery of the target lesions. For FSRT, 5-28 fractions were used to deliver 9-56 Gy to periphery with dose maximum of 10-66 Gy. Both procedures used 6 MV X-ray generated from Clinac-18 (Varian, USA). For SRS procedures, extracranial surface doses (relative doses) were 8.07{+-}4.27 Gy (0.31{+-}0.16% Mean{+-}S.D.) at the upper eyelids, 6.13{+-}4.32 Gy (0.24{+-}0.16%) at the submental jaw, 7.80{+-}5.44 Gy (0.33{+-}0.26%) at thyroid, 1.78{+-}0.64 Gy (0.07{+-}0.02%) at breast, 0.75{+-}0.38 Gy (0.03{+-}0.02%) at umbilicus, 0.40{+-}0.07 Gy (0.02{+-}0.01%) at perineum, and 0.46{+-}0.39 Gy (0.02{+-}0.01%) at scrotum. Thus the farther the distance from the brain, the less the dose to the location. In overall the doses were less than 0.3% and thus less detrimental. For FSRT procedures

  2. Is the dose equivalent index a quantity to be measured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    The following modifying factors are briefly considered in relation to the ambiguities and limitations of the Dose Equivalent Index: 1) Variations with time or of the movement of the exposed person 2) Irradiation geometry 3) Effect of radiation energy 4) Instrument performance and calibration, and other operational quantities. (U.K.)

  3. Conversion of ionization measurements to radiation absorbed dose in non-water density material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khatib, E.; Connors, S.

    1992-01-01

    In bone-equivalent materials two different calculations of absorbed dose are possible: the absorbed dose to soft tissue plastic (polystyrene) within bone-equivalent material and the dose to the bone-equivalent material itself. Both can be calculated from ionization measurements in phantoms. These two calculations result in significantly different doses in a heterogeneous phantom composed of polystyrene and aluminium (a bone substitute). The dose to a thin slab of polystyrene in aluminium is much higher than the dose to the aluminium itself at the same depth in the aluminium. Monte Carlo calculations confirm that the calculation of dose to polystyrene in aluminium can be accurately carried out using existing dosimetry protocols. However, the conversion of ionization measurements to absorbed dose to high atomic number materials cannot be accurately carried out with existing protocols and appropriate conversion factors need to be determined. (author)

  4. Characterisation of a MOSFET-based detector for dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, W. L.; Ung, N. M.; Tiong, A. H. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Wong, J. H. D.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of the MOSkin detector for megavoltage electron beam dosimetry. The reproducibility, linearity, energy dependence, dose rate dependence, depth dose measurement, output factor measurement, and surface dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam were tested. The MOSkin detector showed excellent reproducibility (>98%) and linearity (R2= 1.00) up to 2000 cGy for 4-20 MeV electron beams. The MOSkin detector also showed minimal dose rate dependence (within ±3%) and energy dependence (within ±2%) over the clinical range of electron beams, except for an energy dependence at 4 MeV electron beam. An energy dependence correction factor of 1.075 is needed when the MOSkin detector is used for 4 MeV electron beam. The output factors measured by the MOSkin detector were within ±2% compared to those measured with the EBT3 film and CC13 chamber. The measured depth doses using the MOSkin detector agreed with those measured using the CC13 chamber, except at the build-up region due to the dose volume averaging effect of the CC13 chamber. For surface dose measurements, MOSkin measurements were in agreement within ±3% to those measured using EBT3 film. Measurements using the MOSkin detector were also compared to electron dose calculation algorithms namely the GGPB and eMC algorithms. Both algorithms were in agreement with measurements to within ±2% and ±4% for output factor (except for the 4 × 4 cm2 field size) and surface dose, respectively. With the uncertainties taken into account, the MOSkin detector was found to be a suitable detector for dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam. This has been demonstrated in the in vivo skin dose measurement on patients during electron boost to the breast tumour bed.

  5. In vivo measurement of radiation dose during radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using MOSFET dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lili; Tu Yu; Zhou Juying; Lu Ye; Xu Xiaoting; Li Li; Qin Songbing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to observe and analysis the actual dosage of patients with breast cancer using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector. Methods: First, Phantom measurements were performed to investigate dose distribution in the area of the junction in a half-field matching method and the influence of factors related to the accelerator. In vivo dose measurements were performed for patients with breast cancer to investigate the skin dose and the junction of supraclavicular-axillary field and tangential field in 6 MV X-ray beams. Results: Phantom measurements showed that the relative deviation in the junction were within ±3%, and the dose distributions in the junction area depended on the matching field direction (x or y). In vivo measurement of tangential region for patients showed that, the maximum dose deviation between measurement and calculation was -30.39%,the minimum deviation was -18.85%, the average dose deviation was -24.76%. The dose deviation of tangential fields for patients with breast-conserving surgery was larger than that patients with radical surgery (t =2.40, P<0.05), while dose deviation of supraclavicular-axillary fields was not significantly different. The average values of 15 fraction in the junction area showed more stable than one individual measurement. Conclusions: It is important to real-time, in vivo measurement of radiation dose during radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer, and change treatment plan in time, to ensure the accuracy of target dose. (authors)

  6. Study on dose distribution of therapeutic proton beams with prompt gamma measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. W. [National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, C. H.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, D. K.; Yoon, M. Y. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The proton beam has an advantage of the sharp dose falloff in dose distribution called Bragg peak while conventional radiation therapy modalities such as photons exhibit considerable amount of exit dose. To take advantage of this property it is important to know the exact location of the distal dose falloff. An error can cause overdose to the normal tissue or underdose to the tumor volume. The only way of finding out the dose distribution in-situ in particle therapy is to measure the gammas produced by nuclear reactions with tissue materials. Two kinds of gammas can be used: one is prompt gamma and the other is coincident gamma from the positron-emission isotopes. We chose to detect prompt gammas, and developed a prompt gamma scanning system (PGS). The proton beams of the proton therapy facility at National Cancer Center were used. The gamma distribution was compared to the dose distribution measured by an ionization chamber at three different energies of 100, 150, 200 MeV's. The two distributions were well correlated within 1-2 mm. The effect of high-energy neutron appeared as blurred distribution near the distal dose falloff at the energy of 200 MeV. We then tested the PGS shielding design by adding additional layer of paraffin plates outside of the PGS, and found that fast neutrons significantly affect the background level. But the location of the dose fall-off was nearly coincident. The analysis of gamma energy spectrum showed that cut-off energy in gamma counting can be adjusted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. Further the ATOM phantom, which has similar tissue structure to human, was used to investigate the gamma distribution for the case of inhomogeneous matter. The location of dose falloff region was found to be well defined as for water phantom. Next an actual therapy beam, which was produced by the double scattering method, was used, for which the dose falloff by the gamma distribution was completely wiped out by background neutrons. It is not

  7. Measurement of ambient dose equivalent H*(10) and directional dose equivalent H'(0.07) with pocket sized survey meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatschenko, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In many parts of the world, predominantly in Europe, small sized survey meters based on Geiger-Mueller or proportional counters are widely used for dose rate and dose equivalent rate measurements, while in other regions, especially in the U.S., ionisation chambers are preferred for this task. This paper tries to shed some light on the likely reasons for these two diverging instrumental inclinations. Their respective strengths and weaknesses is analyzed in respect to energy response, dose rate measuring range, size, weight and susceptibility to environmental influences. Furthermore the response and limitations regarding the measurement of pulsed radiation (medical X-ray and CT-devices, accelerators, non-destructive testing) is discussed. A newly developed pocket size instrument based on a pan-cake Geiger-Mueller tube is used as an example to explain the capability and flexibility of modern survey meters. The RadEye B20 is a compact multi-purpose dose rate meter and contamination meter for alpha, beta, gamma and X-ray radiation. By virtue of carefully designed multi-layer gamma energy filters, H*(10) (deep dose) or H'(0,07) (shallow dose) measurements from 17 - 1300 keV can be performed. The instrument can even be worn in a belt holster, so that the impact to the mobility of the user is minimized. For emergency response purposes alpha and beta contamination can be discriminated using another optional filter; a simple sample changer adapter can extend the scope of application. Immediate and reproducible counter measurements, e.g. of smear tests can be performed locally. (author)

  8. Microbial ecology measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The sensitivity and potential rapidity of the PIA test that was demonstrated during the feasibility study warranted continuing the effort to examine the possibility of adapting this test to an automated procedure that could be used during manned missions. The effort during this program has optimized the test conditions for two important respiratory pathogens, influenza virus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, developed a laboratory model automated detection system, and investigated a group antigen concept for virus detection. Preliminary tests on the handling of oropharygeal clinical samples for PIA testing were performed using the adenovirus system. The results obtained indicated that the PIA signal is reduced in positive samples and is increased in negative samples. Treatment with cysteine appeared to reduce nonspecific agglutination in negative samples but did not maintain the signal in positive samples.

  9. The Measuring of the Gamma Dose Rate in the Air at Location of the Sar-Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrovic, F.; Ninkovic, M.; Adrovic, S.

    1999-01-01

    The results of the measured values of gamma dose rate in the air at the location of Sar-mountain (Balkan Peninsula) using autonomous ADL-probe Gamma Tracer system. The difference between levels of the natural background radiation and natural environment has been pointed out at the different chosen measuring overall research of natural radioactivity at the location of Sar-mountain

  10. Measurement of the relationship of 24 Na activity and the received neutron dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossio, S.; Carrelli, J.; Villella, A.; Soppe, E.

    2013-01-01

    In cases of criticality accidents it is required a fast dosimetric system that allows to evaluate the doses of the personnel involved. The reaction (n,y) with sodium presented in the body ( 23 Na), generates 24 Na, that emits two gamma of 1369KeV and 2754 KeV that can be measured using a whole body counter. The experienced were carried out with the irradiation of 252 Cf of a phantom with a solution of NaCl in water. After the irradiation it was measured the 24 Na activity in the whole body counter, which has a HPGe detector previously calibrated in energy and efficiency. Considering the correction by decay, the quantity of 23 Na presented in the body of an adult and elimination curve of 24 Na, it was established a coefficient of neutronic doses by unity of activity of 24 Na measured in the whole body counter. This method is useful for the retrospective estimation of the doses, as well as to carry out a radiological sorting in case of criticality

  11. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional cardiology using OSL and electronic dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Ginjaume, M.; Duch, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the appropriateness of OSL and electronic dosemeters to estimate eye lens doses at interventional cardiology environment. Using TLD as reference detectors, personal dose equivalent was measured in phantoms and during clinical procedures. For phantom measurements, OSL dose values resulted in an average difference of 215 % vs. TLD. Tests carried out with other electronic dosemeters revealed differences up to ±20 % versus TLD. With dosemeters positioned outside the goggles and when TLD doses were >20 μSv, the average difference OSL vs. TLD was 29 %. Eye lens doses of almost 700 μSv per procedure were measured in two cases out of a sample of 33 measurements in individual clinical procedures, thus showing the risk of high exposure to the lenses of the eye when protection rules are not followed. The differences found between OSL and TLD are acceptable for the purpose and range of doses measured in the survey (authors)

  12. Validation of OMI erythemal doses with multi-sensor ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempila, Melina Maria; Fountoulakis, Ilias; Taylor, Michael; Kazadzis, Stelios; Arola, Antti; Koukouli, Maria Elissavet; Bais, Alkiviadis; Meleti, Chariklia; Balis, Dimitrios

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) erythemal dose rates using ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece. In the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, a Yankee Environmental System UVB-1 radiometer measures the erythemal dose rates every minute, and a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU) multi-filter radiometer provides multi-filter based irradiances that were used to derive erythemal dose rates for the period 2005-2014. Both these datasets were independently validated against collocated UV irradiance spectra from a Brewer MkIII spectrophotometer. Cloud detection was performed based on measurements of the global horizontal radiation from a Kipp & Zonen pyranometer and from NILU measurements in the visible range. The satellite versus ground observation validation was performed taking into account the effect of temporal averaging, limitations related to OMI quality control criteria, cloud conditions, the solar zenith angle and atmospheric aerosol loading. Aerosol optical depth was also retrieved using a collocated CIMEL sunphotometer in order to assess its impact on the comparisons. The effect of total ozone columns satellite versus ground-based differences on the erythemal dose comparisons was also investigated. Since most of the public awareness alerts are based on UV Index (UVI) classifications, an analysis and assessment of OMI capability for retrieving UVIs was also performed. An overestimation of the OMI erythemal product by 3-6% and 4-8% with respect to ground measurements is observed when examining overpass and noontime estimates respectively. The comparisons revealed a relatively small solar zenith angle dependence, with the OMI data showing a slight dependence on aerosol load, especially at high aerosol optical depth values. A mean underestimation of 2% in OMI total ozone columns under cloud-free conditions was found to lead to an overestimation in OMI erythemal

  13. A polymeric dosimeter film based on optically-stimulated luminescence for dose measurements below 1 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.; Baranyai, M.; Wojnarovits, L.; Slezsak, I.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, S.D.; Miller, A.; Fuochi, P.G.; Lavalle, M.

    1999-01-01

    A new potential dosimetry system 'Sunna' containing a microcrystalline dispersion of an optically-stimulated fluor in a plastic matrix has been recently developed to measure and image high doses. Our previous investigations have revealed that the new dosimeter system is capable of measuring absorbed doses in the dose range of 1-100 kGy. The optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) analysis is based on the blue light stimulation of the colour center states produced upon irradiation, and the intensity of the resulting red-light emission is used to measure absorbed dose. This analysis is carried out with a simple table-top fluorimeter developed for this purpose having also the ability to calculate the mathematical formula of the calibration function. The Sunna dosimeter was recently investigated for potential use in lower dose range below 1 kGy. These investigations have shown that the film is suitable for measuring doses in the range of 1-1000 Gy for both electron and gamma radiation. To test the applicability of the film, its reproducibility, stability, sensitivity to ambient and UV light and irradiation temperature were measured. The stability of the dosimeter was investigated by monitoring the change of the OSL signal with storage time after irradiation. Further experiments proved the homogeneity of the film with respect to thickness variation, and limited differences in its response were found between batches. (author)

  14. SU-F-T-426: Measurement of Dose Enhancement Due to Backscatter From Modern Dental Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, M; Margalit, D; Williams, C; Tso, T; Lee, S; Rosen, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-density materials used in dental restoration can cause significant localized dose enhancement due to electron backscatter in head-and-neck radiotherapy, increasing the risk of mucositis. The materials used in prosthetic dentistry have evolved in the last decades from metal alloys to ceramics. We aim to determine the dose enhancement caused by backscatter from currently-used dental materials. Methods: Measurements were performed for three different dental materials: lithium disilicate (Li 2 Si 2 O 5 ), zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ), and gold alloy. Small thin squares (2×2×0.15 cm 3 ) of the material were fabricated, and placed into a phantom composed of tissue-equivalent material. The phantom was irradiated with a single 6 MV photon field. A thin-window parallel-plate ion chamber was used to measure the dose at varying distances from the proximal interface between the material and the plastic. Results: The dose enhancement at the interface between the high-density and tissue-equivalent materials, relative to a homogeneous phantom, was 54% for the gold alloy, 31% for ZrO 2 , and 9% for Li 2 Si 2 O 5 . This enhancement decreased rapidly with distance from the interface, falling to 11%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively, 2 mm from the interface. Comparisons with the modeling of this effect in treatment planning systems are performed. Conclusion: While dose enhancement due to dental restoration is smaller with ceramic materials than with metal alloys, it can still be significant. A spacer of about 2–3 mm would be effective in reducing this enhancement, even for metal alloys.

  15. SU-F-T-426: Measurement of Dose Enhancement Due to Backscatter From Modern Dental Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurwitz, M; Margalit, D; Williams, C [Brigham and Women’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tso, T; Lee, S; Rosen, E [Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High-density materials used in dental restoration can cause significant localized dose enhancement due to electron backscatter in head-and-neck radiotherapy, increasing the risk of mucositis. The materials used in prosthetic dentistry have evolved in the last decades from metal alloys to ceramics. We aim to determine the dose enhancement caused by backscatter from currently-used dental materials. Methods: Measurements were performed for three different dental materials: lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), zirconium dioxide (ZrO{sub 2}), and gold alloy. Small thin squares (2×2×0.15 cm{sup 3}) of the material were fabricated, and placed into a phantom composed of tissue-equivalent material. The phantom was irradiated with a single 6 MV photon field. A thin-window parallel-plate ion chamber was used to measure the dose at varying distances from the proximal interface between the material and the plastic. Results: The dose enhancement at the interface between the high-density and tissue-equivalent materials, relative to a homogeneous phantom, was 54% for the gold alloy, 31% for ZrO{sub 2}, and 9% for Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}. This enhancement decreased rapidly with distance from the interface, falling to 11%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively, 2 mm from the interface. Comparisons with the modeling of this effect in treatment planning systems are performed. Conclusion: While dose enhancement due to dental restoration is smaller with ceramic materials than with metal alloys, it can still be significant. A spacer of about 2–3 mm would be effective in reducing this enhancement, even for metal alloys.

  16. Design and development of a silicon-segmented detector for 2D dose measurements in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichelli, David [Department of Clinical Phisiopathology, University of Florence, v.le Morgagni, 85-50134 Florence (Italy); INFN, Florence division, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)], E-mail: david.menichelli@cern.ch; Bruzzi, Mara [Department of Energetics, University of Florence, via S. Marta, 3-50139 Florence (Italy); INFN, Florence division, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bucciolini, Marta; Talamonti, Cinzia; Casati, Marta; Marrazzo, Livia [Department of Clinical Phisiopathology, University of Florence, v.le Morgagni, 85-50134 Florence (Italy); INFN, Florence division, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Tesi, Mauro [Department of Energetics, University of Florence, via S. Marta, 3-50139 Florence (Italy); Piemonte, Claudio; Pozza, Alberto; Zorzi, Nicola [ITC-irst, via Sommarive, 18-38050 Trento (Italy); Brianzi, Mirko [INFN, Florence division, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); De Sio, Antonio [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Florence, L.go E. Fermi, 2-50125 Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and protontherapy, require detectors with specific features, usually not available in conventional dosimeters. IMRT dose measurements, for instance, must face non-uniform beam fluences as well as a time-varying dose rate. Two-dimensional detectors present a great interest for dosimetry in beams with steep dose gradients, but they must satisfy a number of requirements and, in particular, they must exhibit high spatial resolution. With the aim of developing a dosimetric system adequate for 2D pre-treatment dose verifications, we designed a modular dosimetric device based on a monolithic silicon-segmented module. State and results of this work in progress are described in this article. The first 441 pixels, 6.29x6.29 cm{sup 2} silicon module has been produced by ion implantation on a 50 {mu}m thick p-type epitaxial layer. This sensor has been connected to a discrete readout electronics performing current integration, and has been tested with satisfactory results. In the final configuration, nine silicon modules will be assembled together to cover an area close to 20x20 cm{sup 2} with 3969 channels. In this case, the readout electronics will be based on an ASIC capable to read 64 channels by performing current-to-frequency conversion.

  17. Radiation Dose Measurements in Routine X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H.; Sulieman, A.; Suliman, I.I.; Sam, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of current study was to evaluate patients radiation dose in routine X-ray examinations in Omdurman teaching hospital Sudan.110 patients was examined (134) radiographs in two X-ray rooms. Entrance surface doses (ESDs) were calculated from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. The mean ESD for the chest, AP abdomen, AP pelvis, thoracic spine AP, lateral lumber spine, anteroposterior lumber spine, lower limb and for the upper limb were; 231±44 Gy,453± 29 Gy, 567±22 Gy, 311±33 Gy,716±39 Gy, 611±55 Gy,311±23 Gy, and 158±57 Gy, respectively. Data shows asymmetry in distribution. The results of were comparable with previous study in Sudan.

  18. Radiation dose to procedural personnel and patients from an X-ray volume imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Mbalisike, Emmanuel C.; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the radiation dose received by procedural personnel and patients from an X-ray volume imaging (XVI) system during interventional procedures. Forty patients were examined using catheter angiography (group A), digital subtraction angiography (group B) and cone-beam CT (CBCT, group C). Doses to procedural personnel (using thermo-luminescent dosimeters, TLDs) and patients were estimated. Image quality and lesion delineation were assessed using objective and subjective methods. Shapiro-Wilk, two-sided Student's t and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests were used to test statistical significance. Doses (milligrays) measured in the hands and left knee of the interventionist were higher than those in an assistant physician (P < 0.05). Doses (dose-area product and skin entry dose) were lower in group A and higher in C compared with other groups; moreover, comparison among the groups were significant (all P = 0.0001). Subjective and objective lesion delineation showed significant results (all P < 0.05) among the tumour types considered. Image quality estimation showed the opposite results for objective and subjective analysis. More doses were obtained for hands of the procedural personnel compared to other anatomical regions measured. Catheter angiography showed lower dose compared with other imaging groups examined. Lesion delineation was clearly possible using CBCT. Objective and subjective analysis showed the opposite results regarding image quality because of higher noise levels and artefacts. (orig.)

  19. Multilayer detector for measuring absorbed dose in skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method of skin dosimetry using multilayer dosimeters is described that allows the skin-depth distribution of absorbed dose to be estimated. A method of quantitative estimation and prediction of the degree of skin radiation damage using a three-layer dosimeter is demonstrated. Dosimeters are holders of tissue-equivalent material that contain photographic film, a scintillator, thermoluminophor, or any other radiation-sensitive element

  20. Absorbed Dose Measurement in Gonads Menduring Abdominal and Pelvicradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sadegh Masoudi; Ali Asghar Yousefi; Somayeh Nourollahi; Fatemeh Noughani

    2013-01-01

    Two different testicular tissues have to be distinguished in regard to radiation damage: first the seminiferous tubules, corresponding to the sites of spermatogenesis, which are extremely radiosensitive. Second the testosterone secreting Leydig cells, which are considered to be less radiosensitive. This study aims to estimate testicular dose and the associated risks for infertility and hereditary effects from Abdominal and pelvic irradiation. Radiotherapy was simulated on a humanoid phantom u...

  1. [Evaluation of an Experimental Production Wireless Dose Monitoring System for Radiation Exposure Management of Medical Staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Murazaki, Hiroo; Kuramoto, Taku; Umedzu, Yoshiyuki; Ishigaki, Yung

    2015-08-01

    Because of the more advanced and more complex procedures in interventional radiology, longer treatment times have become necessary. Therefore, it is important to determine the exposure doses received by operators and patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate an experimental production wireless dose monitoring system for pulse radiation in diagnostic X-ray. The energy, dose rate, and pulse fluoroscopy dependence were evaluated as the basic characteristics of this system for diagnostic X-ray using a fully digital fluoroscopy system. The error of 1 cm dose equivalent rate was less than 15% from 35.1 keV to 43.2 keV with energy correction using metal filter. It was possible to accurately measure the dose rate dependence of this system, which was highly linear until 100 μSv/h. This system showed a constant response to the pulse fluoroscopy. This system will become useful wireless dosimeter for the individual exposure management by improving the high dose rate and the energy characteristics.

  2. Comparison of predicted versus measured dose rates for low-level radioactive waste cask shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macher, Martin S.

    1992-01-01

    Shippers of low-level radioactive waste must select casks which will provide sufficient shielding to keep dose rates below the federal limit of 10 mr/hr at 2 meters from the vehicle. Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. uses a cask selection methodology which is based on shielding analysis code predictions with an additional factor of safety applied to compensate for inhomogeneities in the waste, uncertainties in waste characterization, and inaccuracy in the calculational methods. This proven cask selection methodology is explained and suggested factors of safety are presented based on comparisons of predicted and measured dose rates. A safety factor of 2 is shown to be generally appropriate for relatively homogeneous waste and a safety factor of between 3 and 4 is shown to be generally appropriate for relatively inhomogeneous wastes. (author)

  3. A simplified approach for exit dose in vivo measurements in radiotherapy and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banjade, D.P.; Shukri, A.; Tajuddin, A.A.; Shrestha, S.L.; Bhat, M.

    2002-01-01

    This is a study using LiF:Mg;Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) rods in phantoms to investigate the effect of lack of backscatter on exit dose. Comparing the measured dose with anticipated dose calculated using tissue maximum ratio (TMR) or percentage depth dose (PDD) gives rise to a correction factor. This correction factor may be applied to in-vivo dosimetry results to derive true dose to a point within the patient. Measurements in a specially designed humanoid breast phantom as well as patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment were also been done. TLDs with reproducibility of within ±3% (1 SD) are irradiated in a series of measurements for 6 and 10 MV photon beams from a medical linear accelerator. The measured exit doses for the different phantom thickness for 6 MV beams are found to be lowered by 10.9 to 14.0% compared to the dose derived from theoretical estimation (normalized dose at d max ). The same measurements for 10 MV beams are lowered by 9.0 to 13.5%. The variations of measured exit dose for different field sizes are found to be within 2.5%. The exit doses with added backscatter material from 2 mm up to 15 cm, shows gradual increase and the saturated values agreed within 1.5% with the expected results for both beams. The measured exit doses in humanoid breast phantom as well as in the clinical trial on patients undergoing radiotherapy also agreed with the predicted results based on phantom measurements. The authors' viewpoint is that this technique provides sufficient information to design exit surface bolus to restore build down effect in cases where part of the exit surface is being considered as a target volume. It indicates that the technique could be translated for in vivo dose measurements, which may be a conspicuous step of quality assurance in clinical practice. Copyright (2002) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Development of dose monitoring system applicable to various radiations with wide energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-01-01

    A new inventive radiation dose monitor, designated as DARWIN (Dose monitoring system Applicable to various Radiations with WIde energy raNges), has been developed for monitoring doses in workspaces and surrounding environments of high energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN is composed of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, which consists of liquid organic scintillator BC501A coupled with ZnS(Ag) scintillation sheets doped with 6 Li, and a data acquisition system based on a Digital-Storage-Oscilloscope. Scintillations from the detector induced by thermal and fast neutrons, photons and muons were discriminated by analyzing their waveforms, and their light outputs were directly converted into the corresponding doses by applying the G-function method. Characteristics of DARWIN were studied by both calculation and experiment. The calculated results indicate that DARWIN gives reasonable estimations of doses in most radiation fields. It was found from the experiment that DARWIN has an excellent property of measuring doses from all particles that significantly contribute to the doses in surrounding environments of accelerator facilities - neutron, photon and muon with wide energy ranges. The experimental results also suggested that DARWIN enables us to monitor small fluctuation of neutron dose rates near the background-level owing to its high sensitivity. (author)

  5. Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.; Wauben, D. J. L.; de Groot, M.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; van t Veld, Aart A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e.,

  6. SU-E-J-11: Measurement of Eye Lens Dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with Different CBCT Acquisition Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S; Dhote, D; Kumar, R; Thakur, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens doses were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT

  7. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional radiology and cardiology: Final results of the ORAMED project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Carinou, E.; Domienik, J.; Donadille, L.; Ginjaume, M.; Gualdrini, G.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Nikodemova, D.; Ruiz-Lopez, N.; Sans-Merce, M.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Within the ORAMED project (Optimization of Radiation Protection of Medical Staff) a coordinated measurement program for occupationally exposed medical staff was performed in different hospitals in Europe ( (www.oramed-fp7.eu)). The main objective was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff involved in interventional radiology and cardiology and to optimize radiation protection. Special attention was given to the measurement of the doses to the eye lenses. In this paper an overview will be given of the measured eye lens doses and the main influence factors for these doses. The measured eye lens doses are extrapolated to annual doses. The extrapolations showed that monitoring of the eye lens should be performed on routine basis.

  8. An automated dose tracking system for adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Kim, Jinkoo; Kumarasiri, Akila; Mayyas, Essa; Brown, Stephen L; Wen, Ning; Siddiqui, Farzan; Chetty, Indrin J

    2018-02-01

    The implementation of adaptive radiation therapy (ART) into routine clinical practice is technically challenging and requires significant resources to perform and validate each process step. The objective of this report is to identify the key components of ART, to illustrate how a specific automated procedure improves efficiency, and to facilitate the routine clinical application of ART. Data was used from patient images, exported from a clinical database and converted to an intermediate format for point-wise dose tracking and accumulation. The process was automated using in-house developed software containing three modularized components: an ART engine, user interactive tools, and integration tools. The ART engine conducts computing tasks using the following modules: data importing, image pre-processing, dose mapping, dose accumulation, and reporting. In addition, custom graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to allow user interaction with select processes such as deformable image registration (DIR). A commercial scripting application programming interface was used to incorporate automated dose calculation for application in routine treatment planning. Each module was considered an independent program, written in C++or C#, running in a distributed Windows environment, scheduled and monitored by integration tools. The automated tracking system was retrospectively evaluated for 20 patients with prostate cancer and 96 patients with head and neck cancer, under institutional review board (IRB) approval. In addition, the system was evaluated prospectively using 4 patients with head and neck cancer. Altogether 780 prostate dose fractions and 2586 head and neck cancer dose fractions went processed, including DIR and dose mapping. On average, daily cumulative dose was computed in 3 h and the manual work was limited to 13 min per case with approximately 10% of cases requiring an additional 10 min for image registration refinement. An efficient and convenient

  9. Beam intensity scanner system for three dimensional dose verification of IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahc, Young W.; Kwon, Ohyun; Park, Kwangyl; Park, Kyung R.; Yi, Byung Y.; Kim, Keun M.

    2003-01-01

    Patient dose verification is clinically one of the most important parts in the treatment delivery of radiation therapy. The three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of dose distribution delivered to target volume helps to verify patient dose and determine the physical characteristics of beams used in IMRT. Here we present beam intensity scanner (BInS) system for the pre-treatment dosimetric verification of two dimensional photon intensity. The BInS is a radiation detector with a custom-made software for dose conversion of fluorescence signals from scintillator. The scintillator is used to produce fluorescence from the irradiation of 6 MV photons on a Varian Clinac 21EX. The digitized fluoroscopic signals obtained by digital video camera-based scintillator (DVCS) will be processed by our custom made software to reproduce 3D- relative dose distribution. For the intensity modulated beam (IMB), the BInS calculates absorbed dose in absolute beam fluence which is used for the patient dose distribution. Using BInS, we performed various measurements related to IMRT and found the following: (1) The 3D-dose profiles of the IMBs measured by the BInS demonstrate good agreement with radiographic film, pin type ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. (2) The delivered beam intensity is altered by the mechanical and dosimetric properties of the collimation of dynamic and/or step MLC system. This is mostly due to leaf transmission, leaf penumbra scattered photons from the round edges of leaves, and geometry of leaf. (3) The delivered dose depends on the operational detail of how to make multi leaf opening. These phenomena result in a fluence distribution that can be substantially different from the initial and calculated intensity modulation and therefore, should be taken into account by the treatment planning for accurate dose calculations delivered to the target volume in IMRT. (author)

  10. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  11. Prototype development or multi-cavity ion chamber for depth dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, M.K.; Sahu, T.K.; Haridas, G.; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Tripathi, R.M.; Nandedkar, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    In high energy electron accelerators, when the electrons interact with vacuum chamber or surrounding structural material, Bremsstrahlung x-rays are produced. It is having a broad spectrum extending up to the electron energies. Dose measured as a function of depth due to electromagnetic cascade will give rise to depth dose curve. To measure the online depth dose profile in an absorber medium, when high energy electron or Bremsstrahlung is incident, a prototype Multi-Cavity Ion Chamber (MCIC) detector is developed. The paper describes the design and development of the MCIC for measurement of depth dose profile

  12. Dose determination with nitro blue tetrazolium containing radiochromic dye films by measuring absorbed and reflected light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, A.; Baranyai, M.; Wojnárovits, L.

    2000-01-01

    determination in a wide dose range both by absorbance and reflectance measurements. The concept of measuring reflected light from dose labels has been discussed earlier and emerged recently due to the requirement of introducing semiquantitative label dose indicators for quarantine control. The usefulness...... of the method was studied using the newly developed radiochromic dye films as well as already existing ones. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Absolute dose measurement Gafchromic R EBT2 movies. Case Study of Kaposis sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.; Moral, F. del; Meilan, E.; Azevedo Gomes, J. C. de; Tejeiro Garcia, A. G.; Andrade Alvarez, B.; Vazquez, J.; Nieto, I.; Medal, D.; Lopez Medina, A.; Francisco, S.; Salgado, M.; Munoz, V.

    2011-01-01

    Because of its high spatial resolution, low energy dependence and good response over a wide energy range, EBT2 Gafchromic films are widely used in many applications in radiotherapy for measuring relative dose. Despite being the most common use can be used to measure absolute dose. This text is an example of using films as EBT2 for in vivo absolute dose in a Kaposis sarcoma.

  14. Computerized x-ray dose-monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, R.H.; Wesenberg, R.L.; Amundson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An x-ray dose-monitoring system using a small digital computer is described. Initially, and for every 6 months afterward, the system is calibrated using an exposure meter. For each exposure, the computer receives values of x-ray technique and beam geometry from the x-ray generator through a specially designed electronic interface. Then, by means of calibration data, entrance exposure, area exposure product, and integral dose are obtained and printed for each patient examined. The overall accuracy of the system is better than +/-20%. Operation is semiautomatic, requiring minimum operator intervention. Over 2000 patients have been monitored with the device. Because the system is computer-based, it offers the opportunity for statistical analysis of the data base created, as the results for each patient are stored on computer disk

  15. Development of dose rate estimation system for FBR maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga Head Office, International Cooperation and Technology Development Center, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan); Takeuchi, Jun; Yoshikawa, Satoru [Hitachi Engineering Company, Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Urushihara, Hiroshi [Ibaraki Hitachi Information Service Co., Ltd., Omika, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    During maintenance activities on the primary sodium cooling system by an FBR Personnel radiation exposure arises mainly from the presence of radioactive corrosion products (CP). A CP behavior analysis code, PSYCHE, and a radiation shielding calculation code, QAD-CG, have been developed and applied to investigate the possible reduction of radiation exposure of workers. In order to make these evaluation methods more accessible to plant engineers, the user interface of the codes has been improved and an integrated system, including visualization of the calculated gamma-ray radiation dose-rate map, has been developed. The system has been verified by evaluating the distribution of the radiation dose-rate within the Monju primary heat transport system cells from the estimated saturated CP deposition and distribution which would be present following about 20 cycles of full power operation. (author)

  16. Development of dose rate estimation system for FBR maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Takeuchi, Jun; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Urushihara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    During maintenance activities on the primary sodium cooling system by an FBR Personnel radiation exposure arises mainly from the presence of radioactive corrosion products (CP). A CP behavior analysis code, PSYCHE, and a radiation shielding calculation code, QAD-CG, have been developed and applied to investigate the possible reduction of radiation exposure of workers. In order to make these evaluation methods more accessible to plant engineers, the user interface of the codes has been improved and an integrated system, including visualization of the calculated gamma-ray radiation dose-rate map, has been developed. The system has been verified by evaluating the distribution of the radiation dose-rate within the Monju primary heat transport system cells from the estimated saturated CP deposition and distribution which would be present following about 20 cycles of full power operation. (author)

  17. The EOS imaging system: Workflow and radiation dose in scoliosis examinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Bo; Torfing, Trine; Jespersen, Stig

    Introduction The EOS imaging system is a biplane slot beam scanner capable of full body scans at low radiation dose and without geometrical distortion. It was implemented in our department primo 2012 and all scoliosis examinations are now performed in EOS. The system offers improved possibility...... to measure rotation of individual vertebrae and vertebral curves can be assessed in 3D. Leg length Discrepancy measurements are performed in one exposure without geometrical distortion and no stitching. Full body scans for sagittal balance are also performed with the equipment after spine surgery. Purpose...... The purpose of the study was to evaluate workflow defined as scheduled time pr. examination and radiation dose in scoliosis examinations in EOS compared to conventional x-ray evaluation. Materials and Methods: The Dose Area Product (DAP) was measured with a dosimeter and a comparison between conventional X...

  18. A remotely operated drug delivery system with dose control

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2017-05-08

    “On demand” implantable drug delivery systems can provide optimized treatments, due to their ability to provide targeted, flexible and precise dose release. However, two important issues that need to be carefully considered in a mature device include an effective actuation stimulus and a controllable dose release mechanism. This work focuses on remotely powering an implantable drug delivery system and providing a high degree of control over the released dose. This is accomplished by integration of a resonance-based wireless power transfer system, a constant voltage control circuit and an electrolytic pump. Upon the activation of the wireless power transfer system, the electrolytic actuator is remotely powered by a constant voltage regardless of movements of the device within an effective range of translation and rotation. This in turn contributes to a predictable dose release rate and greater flexibility in the positioning of external powering source. We have conducted proof-of-concept drug delivery studies using the liquid drug in reservoir approach and the solid drug in reservoir approach, respectively. Our experimental results demonstrate that the range of flow rate is mainly determined by the voltage controlled with a Zener diode and the resistance of the implantable device. The latter can be adjusted by connecting different resistors, providing control over the flow rate to meet different clinical needs. The flow rate can be maintained at a constant level within the effective movement range. When using a solid drug substitute with a low solubility, solvent blue 38, the dose release can be kept at 2.36μg/cycle within the effective movement range by using an input voltage of 10Vpp and a load of 1.5 kΩ, which indicates the feasibility and controllability of our system without any complicated closed-loop sensor.

  19. Decision Support System for Optimized Herbicide Dose in Spring Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Mette; Kudsk, Per; Mathiassen, Solvejg K

    2014-01-01

    Crop Protection Online (CPO) is a decision support system, which integrates decision algorithms quantifying the requirement for weed control and a herbicide dose model. CPO was designed to be used by advisors and farmers to optimize the choice of herbicide and dose. The recommendations from CPO...... as the Treatment Frequency Index (TFI)) compared to a high level of required weed control. The observations indicated that the current level of weed control required is robust for a range of weed scenarios. Weed plant numbers 3 wk after spraying indicated that the growth of the weed species were inhibited...

  20. Rethinking basic concepts in ICRP's system of dose limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.; Mossman, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The present criterion for radiation protection appears to be exposure reduction rather than adequate protection of health. The 1990 ICRP draft recommendations for a system of dose limitation would further implement this more restrictive criterion by implementing certain academic concepts and assumptions. These concepts and assumptions are discussed and the suggestion is made that the radiation protection community needs to carefully examine the need for the complex system proposed

  1. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  2. On the conversion of dose to bone to dose to water in radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Reynaert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Conversion factors between dose to medium (Dm,m and dose to water (Dw,w provided by treatment planning systems that model the patient as water with variable electron density are currently based on stopping power ratios. In the current paper it will be illustrated that this conversion method is not correct. Materials and methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed in a phantom consisting of a 2 cm bone layer surrounded by water. Dw,w was obtained by modelling the bone layer as water with the electron density of bone. Conversion factors between Dw,w and Dm,m were obtained and compared to stopping power ratios and ratios of mass-energy absorption coefficients in regions of electronic equilibrium and interfaces. Calculations were performed for 6 MV and 20 MV photon beams. Results: In the region of electronic equilibrium the stopping power ratio of water to bone (1.11 largely overestimates the conversion obtained using the Monte Carlo calculations (1.06. In that region the MC dose conversion corresponds to the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients. Near the water to bone interface, the MC ratio cannot be determined from stopping powers or mass energy absorption coefficients. Conclusion: Stopping power ratios cannot be used for conversion from Dm,m to Dw,w provided by treatment planning systems that model the patient as water with variable electron density, either in regions of electronic equilibrium or near interfaces. In regions of electronic equilibrium mass energy absorption coefficient ratios should be used. Conversions at interfaces require detailed MC calculations. Keywords: Dose to water, Monte Carlo, Dosimetry, TPS comparison

  3. Commissioning of a MOSFET in-vivo patient dose verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenetsky, G.O.; Brown, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: TLD dosimetry has long been used for in-vivo measurements in estimating absorbed dose to critical structures on patients. Preparing TLDs for measurement, and then obtaining the results is a time consuming process taking many hours. The Thomson-Neilson 'MOSFET 20' (Metal Oxide Semiconducting Field Effect Transistor) dose assessment system, allows for in-vivo measurements (preparation and results) within minutes. Before being used clinically for dose verification, the MOSFETs were tested against the manufacturer's technical specifications, and compared with results from TLDs measured under controlled experiments and patient measurements. Standard sensitivity MOSFETs (TN-502RD) were used with the bias supply set to High sensitivity range. MOSFETs were tested for linearity (5-100cGy) and their calibration factors obtained for all energies (6MV, 18MV, 6MeV, 12MeV, 16MeV, 20MeV) using the method described by Ramani. MOSFETs and TLDs were exposed to a 6MV beam for 50MU at various depths (RW3 solid water phantom) and field sizes and compared to results taken with an ion chamber. Measurements using both systems were also taken at beam edge and 5mm and 10mm out of the field. Eleven patients, who had lens dose assessment requests were measured with both TLDs and MOSFETs and a paired t-test was performed on the results. On two patients, multiple (nine and four) MOSFET measurements were taken and the range of results compared to the range obtained from the TLDs. MOSFET linearity obtained co-efficients of R 2 ≥ 0.996 for all energies, this compared to R 2 ≥ 0.996 recorded by both Ramani and Chaung. The y-intercept values varied from 0 to -2.0mV. Greatest variation between calibration factors, measured for each energy, was 7.5%, this is substantially greater than 3.8% quoted by the manufacturer. For the measurements taken at varying depths and field sizes both TLDs and MOSFETs agreed with the ion chamber results ±IcGy. Measurements taken at beam edge varied ±6c

  4. Review of techniques and detectors used in instruments for field measurement of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, field measurements are required to assess the hazard from #betta#-rays before personnel are allowed to occupy a working space or perform a task. Occasionally, the measurements are required for an assessment after a #betta#-ray exposure is suspected to have occurred. Until recently the dose or dose rate have been the quantities of interest but there is now felt to be a need to characterize the energies and directions of the #betta#-rays as well. The purpose of #betta#-dosimetry is the assessment of hazard to superficial tissues (within approx. 10 mm of the surface) and that these tissues may also be exposed simultaneously to other ionizing radiations. The #betta#-dosimetry technique must take account of this. With these uses of field instruments in mind the following detectors, and associated techniques will be discussed in terms of the measurement principles, advantages and limitations: thin-walled ion chambers (sometimes in combination with thick-walled ones or with covers thick enough to prevent penetration of #betta#-particles); thin scintillators, nearly tissue equivalent, to provide a detector analogous to skin; scintillators, thick enough to absorb all the energy of the #betta#-particles (circuitry is required to count pulses according to size to permit calculation of dose or dose rate); silicon diodes with thin detection layers operated as photocurrent generators; silicon diodes, reversed biassed, with pulses counted according to size; and simple pulse counters (e.g., GM counters or silicon diodes with thin windows)

  5. Improvement of the following accident dose assessment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Enn Han; Han, Moon Hee; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    The FADAS has been updates for calculating the real-time wind fields continuously at the nuclear sites in Korea. The system has been constructed to compute the wind fields using its own process for the dummy meteorological data, and dose not effect on the overall wind field module. If the radioactive materials are released into the atmosphere in real situation, the calculations of wind fields and exposure dose in the previous FADAS are performed in the case of the recognition of the above situation in the source term evaluation module. The current version of FADAS includes the program for evaluating the effect of the predicted accident and the assumed scenario together. The dose assessment module is separated into the real-time and the supposed accident respectively.

  6. Measurement of Patient Dose from Computed Tomography Using Physical Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ki Won; Lee, Jae Ki; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2005-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) provides a high quality in images of human body but contributes relatively high patient dose compared with the conventional X-ray examination. Furthermore, the frequency of CT examination has been increasing in Korea for the last decade owing to the national health insurance benefits. Increasing concerns about high patient dose from CT have stimulated a great deal of researches on dose assessment, which many of these are based on the Monte Carlo simulation. But in this study, absorbed doses and effective dose of patient undergoing CT examination were determined experimentally using anthropomorphic physical phantom and the measured results are compared with those from Monte Carlo calculation

  7. The Use Of Optical Properties Of Cr-39 In Alpha Particle Equivalent Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnishin, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, optical properties of alpha irradiated Cr-39 were measured as a function of optical photon wavelength from 200-1100 nm. Optical energy gap and optical absorption at finite wavelength was also calculated and correlated to alpha fluence and dose equivalent. Alpha doses were calculated from the corresponding irradiation fluence and specific energy loss using TRIM computer program. It was found that, the optical absorption of unattached Cr-39 was varied with alpha fluence and corresponding equivalent doses. Also the optical energy gab was varied with fluence and dose equivalent of alpha particles. This work introduces a reasonably simple method for the Rn dose equivalent calculation by Cr-39 track

  8. Comparison of dose measurements in water versus in air for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of dose measurements in water versus in air for therapy. Dose measurements in water and in the air had been done by teletherapy unit Co-60 Picker Model V 4m/60 with Farmer dosimeter. The result of inverse square law, TAR, PDD, and PSF compared to BJR No. 17 produced a difference of more than 4,65% with SSD 80 cm. Doses in water calculated from the result of dose measurement in air using BJR tables given, was compared with direct dose measurement in water. Values of 0,9850 to 1,0302 were obtained if using inverse square law, PDD and PSF formula. Using inverse square law and TAR, values of 0,9474 to 1,0197 were obtained for 4 depths and 5 field sizes. Measurements done in 5 cm depth and 10 cm x 10 cm field size using both methods, were still good. (author). 7 figs, 8 refs

  9. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  10. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klüter, Sebastian; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  11. Real time dose rate measurements with fiber optic probes based on the RL and OSL of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichmann, T.; Sponner, J.; Jakobi, Ch.; Henniger, J.

    2016-01-01

    This work covers the examination of fiber optical probes based on the radioluminescence and real time optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. Experiments are carried out to determine the fundamental dosimetric and temporal properties of the system and evaluate its suitability for dose rate measurements in brachytherapy and other applications using non-pulsed radiation fields. For this purpose the responses of the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence signal have been investigated in the dose rate range of 20 mGy/h to 3.6 Gy/h and for doses of 1 mGy up to 6 Gy. Furthermore, a new, efficient analysis procedure, the double phase reference summing, is introduced, leading to a real time optically stimulated luminescence signal. This method allows a complete compensation of the stem effect during the measurement. In contrast to previous works, the stimulation of the 1 mm cylindrical beryllium oxide detectors is performed with a symmetric function during irradiation. The investigated dose rates range from 0.3 to 3.6 Gy/h. The real time optically stimulated luminescence signal of beryllium oxide shows a dependency on both the dose rate and the applied dose. To overcome the problem of dose dependency, further experiments using higher stimulation intensities have to follow. - Highlights: • RL and OSL measurements with BeO extended to low dose (rate) range. • A new method to obtain the real time OSL: Dual Phase Reference Summing. • Real time OSL signal shows both dose and dose rate dependency. • Real time OSL enables a complete discrimination of the stem effect.

  12. Peripheral dose measurement in high-energy photon radiotherapy with the implementation of MOSFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulou, Vassiliki; Malatara, Georgia; Delis, Harry; Theodorou, Kiki; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Panayiotakis, George

    2010-11-28

    To study the peripheral dose (PD) from high-energy photon beams in radiotherapy using the metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dose verification system. The radiation dose absorbed by the MOSFET detector was calculated taking into account the manufacturer's Correction Factor, the Calibration Factor and the threshold voltage shift. PD measurements were carried out for three different field sizes (5 cm × 5 cm, 10 cm × 10 cm and 15 cm × 15 cm) and for various depths with the source to surface distance set at 100 cm. Dose measurements were realized on the central axis and then at distances (1 to 18 cm) parallel to the edge of the field, and were expressed as the percentage PD (% PD) with respect to the maximum dose (d(max)). The accuracy of the results was evaluated with respect to a calibrated 0.3 cm(3) ionization chamber. The reproducibility was expressed in terms of standard deviation (s) and coefficient of variation. % PD is higher near the phantom surface and drops to a minimum at the depth of d(max), and then tends to become constant with depth. Internal scatter radiation is the predominant source of PD and the depth dependence is determined by the attenuation of the primary photons. Closer to the field edge, where internal scatter from the phantom dominates, the % PD increases with depth because the ratio of the scatter to primary increases with depth. A few centimeters away from the field, where collimator scatter and leakage dominate, the % PD decreases with depth, due to attenuation by the water. The % PD decreases almost exponentially with the increase of distance from the field edge. The decrease of the % PD is more than 60% and can reach up to 90% as the measurement point departs from the edge of the field. For a given distance, the % PD is significantly higher for larger field sizes, due to the increase of the scattering volume. Finally, the measured PD obtained with MOSFET is higher than that obtained with an ionization chamber

  13. Microdose acquisition in adolescent leg length discrepancy using a low-dose biplane imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Janni; Mussmann, Bo R; Hjarbæk, John; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid; Pedersen, Niels W; Gerke, Oke; Torfing, Trine

    2017-09-01

    Background Children with leg length discrepancy often undergo repeat imaging. Therefore, every effort to reduce radiation dose is important. Using low dose preview images and noise reduction software rather than diagnostic images for length measurements might contribute to reducing dose. Purpose To compare leg length measurements performed on diagnostic images and low dose preview images both acquired using a low-dose bi-planar imaging system. Material and Methods Preview and diagnostic images from 22 patients were retrospectively collected (14 girls, 8 boys; mean age, 12.8 years; age range, 10-15 years). All images were anonymized and measured independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Three sets of measurements were performed on all images; the mechanical axis lines of the femur and the tibia as well as the anatomical line of the entire extremity. Statistical significance was tested with a paired t-test. Results No statistically significant difference was found between measurements performed on the preview and on the diagnostic image. The mean tibial length difference between the observers was -0.06 cm (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.12 to 0.01) and -0.08 cm (95% CI, -0.21 to 0.05), respectively; 0.10 cm (95% CI, 0.02-0.17) and 0.06 cm (95% CI, -0.02 to 0.14) for the femoral measurements and 0.12 cm (95% CI, -0.05 to 0.26) and 0.08 cm (95% CI, -0.02 to 0.19) for total leg length discrepancy. ICCs were >0.99 indicating excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability. Conclusion The data strongly imply that leg length measurements performed on preview images from a low-dose bi-planar imaging system are comparable to measurements performed on diagnostic images.

  14. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kevin M [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-05-20

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  15. Proton gyromagnetic precision measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Deming; Deming Zhu

    1991-01-01

    A computerized control and measurement system used in the proton gyromagnetic precision meausrement is descirbed. It adopts the CAMAC data acquisition equipment, using on-line control and analysis with the HP85 and PDP-11/60 computer systems. It also adopts the RSX11M computer operation system, and the control software is written in FORTRAN language

  16. Estimation of the fetal dose by dose measurement during an irradiation of a parotid tumor; Estimation de la dose foetale par mesure de dose lors d'une irradiation d'une tumeur de la parotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, V.; Graff-Cailleaud, P.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Noel, A. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, CRAN CNRS UMR-7039, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2006-11-15

    The irradiation of a five months pregnant patient has been made for a right parotid attack. In conformation with the legislative texts relative to radiation protection ( publication 84 of the ICRP) an estimation of the dose received for the fetus has been led by dose measurement on phantom. With the dose limit ( 100 mGy) recommended in the publication 84 of the ICRP neither modification of the treatment nor abortion was necessary. (N.C.)

  17. Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm on a distributed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvie, Stephane; Dominoni, Matteo; Marini, Piergiorgio; Stasi, Michele; Pia, Maria Grazia; Scielzo, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of modern radiotherapy, such as 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is to deliver a high dose to the target volume sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The accuracy of dose calculation in a treatment planning system is therefore a critical issue. Among many algorithms developed over the last years, those based on Monte Carlo proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy. The most severe obstacle in application to clinical practice is the high time necessary for calculations. We have studied a high performance network of Personal Computer as a realistic alternative to a high-costs dedicated parallel hardware to be used routinely as instruments of evaluation of treatment plans. We set-up a Beowulf Cluster, configured with 4 nodes connected with low-cost network and installed MC code Geant4 to describe our irradiation facility. The MC, once parallelised, was run on the Beowulf Cluster. The first run of the full simulation showed that the time required for calculation decreased linearly increasing the number of distributed processes. The good scalability trend allows both statistically significant accuracy and good time performances. The scalability of the Beowulf Cluster system offers a new instrument for dose calculation that could be applied in clinical practice. These would be a good support particularly in high challenging prescription that needs good calculation accuracy in zones of high dose gradient and great dishomogeneities

  18. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kojima, Noboru; Hayashi, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  19. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kojima, Noboru; Hayashi, Naomi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  20. Measurement of depth-dose distributions by means of the LiF-fluoroplastic thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaks, A.I.; Uryaev, I.A.; Trifonov, V.A.; Reshetnikova, L.V.

    1977-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions have been studied by means of thin-layer thermoluminescent detectors LiF-fluoroplast (8 mg/cm 2 ). Dosimetric characteristics of the detectors are described. They are: tissue-equivalence, dependence of sensitivity on the dose, dose rate and angle of incidence of radiation, and time-dependent storage, of the total light absorbed. Comparison of the results obtained with the measurements taken with an extrapolation chamber has demonstrated the possibility of measuring the depth-dose distributions by means of LiF-fluoroplast detectors

  1. Guideline values for skin decontamination measures based on nuclidspecific dose equivalent rate factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfob, H.; Heinemann, G.

    1992-01-01

    Corresponding dose equivalent rate factors for various radionuclides are now available for determining the skin dose caused by skin contamination. These dose equivalent rate factors take into account all contributions from the types of radiation emitted. Any limits for skin decontamination measures are nowhere contained or determined yet. However, radiological protection does in practice require at least guideline values in order to prevent unsuitable or detrimental measures that can be noticed quite often. New calculations of dose equivalent rate factors for the skin now make the recommendation of guideline values possible. (author)

  2. An overview of measuring and modelling dose and risk from ionising radiation for medical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tootell, Andrew; Szczepura, Katy; Hogg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper gives an overview of the methods that are used to calculate dose and risk from exposure to ionizing radiation as a support to other papers in this special issue. Background: The optimization of radiation dose is a legal requirement in medical exposures. This review paper aims to provide the reader with knowledge of dose by providing definitions and concepts of absorbed, effective and equivalent dose. Criticisms of the use of effective dose to infer the risk of an exposure to an individual will be discussed and an alternative approach considering the lifetime risks of cancer incidence will be considered. Prior to any dose or risk calculation, data concerning the dose absorbed by the patient needs to be collected. This paper will describe and discuss the main concepts and methods that can be utilised by a researcher in dose assessments. Concepts behind figures generated by imaging equipment such as dose-area-product, computed tomography dose index, dose length product and their use in effective dose calculations will be discussed. Processes, advantages and disadvantages in the simulation of exposures using the Monte Carlo method and direct measurement using digital dosimeters or thermoluminescent dosimeters will be considered. Beyond this special issue, it is proposed that this paper could serve as a teaching or CPD tool for personnel working or studying medical imaging

  3. FBX dosimetry for point dose measurements in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balraj, A.; Thakur, P.K.; Bhatnagar, S.; Vidyasagar, P.B.; Nirhali, Amit; Semwal, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    FBX dosimeter is mainly based on the determination of the radiation dose from the chemical changes produced in an irradiated medium, which can be measured by Spectrophotometry or Colorimetry, for which adequate FBX solution of 2 ml required for measuring the optical density (OD). To measure the point dose using 2 ml solution may lead to error in the measured dose since the solution may occupy 2 cc volume of the point measured. In head and neck carcinoma patients, the treatment area involves curvatures. Fixing 2 ml vial at the body surface is difficult and leads to give wrong readings. In this study we have measured the entrance and exit dose by filling 0.5 ml solution in a flexible catheter and placed at a point in the patient body surface during the radiation treatment. The solution was diluted adding 1.5 ml distilled water to measure the OD in the colorimeter

  4. Thermoluminescence and phosphate glass dosimeter systems in the low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1978-06-01

    This report describes a standard test program for TLD and RPL systems worked out by the Working Party on 'Dose Measurement of External Radiation' by the Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz e.V. to demonstrate the performance of dosimeter systems to be employed in environmental monitoring and in personnel dosimetry. The results of an intercomparison study are outlined in which 17 laboratories from the German speaking countries participated with 43 dosimeter systems. (orig.) [de

  5. [A novel serial port auto trigger system for MOSFET dose acquisition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guangwen; Qi, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    To synchronize the radiation of microSelectron-HDR (Nucletron afterloading machine) and measurement of MOSFET dose system, a trigger system based on interface circuit was designed and corresponding monitor and trigger program were developed on Qt platform. This interface and control system was tested and showed stable operate and reliable work. This adopted serial port detect technique may expand to trigger application of other medical devices.

  6. Study of sources, dose contribution and control measures of Argon-41 at Kaiga Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Ramana, K.; Shrikrishna, U.V.; Manojkumar, M.; Ramesh, R.; Madhan, V.; Varadhan, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    Air is used as a medium for cooling calandria vault and thermal shield systems in the earlier Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (Rajasthan Atomic Power Station and Madras Atomic Power Station) in India. This leads to production of significant quantity of 41 Ar in calandria vault and thermal shield cooling systems due to neutron activation of 40 Ar present in air (∼1% v/v). The presence of 41 Ar in reactor building contributes significant external doses to plant personnel during reactor operation and the release of this radionuclide to the environment result in dose to the public in the vicinity of the plants. An attempt is made to eliminate Argon-41 production in Indian standard Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (Narora Atomic Power Station, Kakrapar Atomic Power Station, Kaiga Generating Station -1 and 2 and Rajasthan Atomic Power Station-3 and 4), by filling the calandria vault with demineralized water and providing a separate Annulus Gas Monitoring System (AGMS) for detecting leaks from calandria tube or pressure tube using Carbon dioxide as a medium. However, 41 Ar is produced in the Annulus Gas Monitoring System, Primary Heat Transport cover gas system and moderator cover gas system due to ingress of air into the systems during operational transients or due to trace quantity of air present as an impurity in the gases used for the above systems. A study was conducted to identify and quantify the sources of 41 Ar in the work areas. This report brings out the sources of 41 Ar, reasons for 41 Ar production and the results of the measures incorporated to reduce the presence of 41 Ar in the above systems. (author)

  7. Dose linearity and monitor unit stability of a G4 type cyberknife robotic stereotactic radiosurgery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudahar, H.; Kurup, P.G.G.; Murali, V.; Velmurugan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Dose linearity studies on conventional linear accelerators show a linearity error at low monitor units (MUs). The purpose of this study was to establish the dose linearity and MU stability characteristics of a cyberknife (Accuracy Inc., USA) stereotactic radiosurgery system. Measurements were done at a depth of 5 cm in a stereotactic dose verification phantom with a source to surface distance of 75 cm in a Generation 4 (G4) type cyberknife system. All the 12 fixed-type collimators starting from 5 to 60 mm were used for the dose linearity study. The dose linearity was examined in small (1-10), medium (15-100) and large (125-1000) MU ranges. The MU stability test was performed with 60 mm collimator for 10 MU and 20 MU with different combinations. The maximum dose linearity error of -38.8% was observed for 1 MU with 5 mm collimator. Dose linearity error in the small MU range was considerably higher than in the medium and large MU ranges. The maximum error in the medium range was -2.4%. In the large MU range, the linearity error varied between -0.7% and 1.2%. The maximum deviation in the MU stability was -3.03%. (author)

  8. Determining clinical photon beam spectra from measured depth dose with the Cimmino algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, P.; Altschuler, M.D.; Bjaerngard, B.E.; Kassaee, A.; McDonough, J.

    2000-01-01

    A method to determine the spectrum of a clinical photon beam from measured depth-dose data is described. At shallow depths, where the range of Compton-generated electrons increases rapidly with photon energy, the depth dose provides the information to discriminate the spectral contributions. To minimize the influence of contaminating electrons, small (6x6cm2 ) fields were used. The measured depth dose is represented as a linear combination of basis functions, namely the depth doses of monoenergetic photon beams derived by Monte Carlo simulations. The weights of the basis functions were obtained with the Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which examines in each iteration the discrepancy between predicted and measured depth dose. For 6 and 15 MV photon beams of a clinical accelerator, the depth dose obtained from the derived spectral weights was within about 1% of the measured depth dose at all depths. Because the problem is ill conditioned, solutions for the spectrum can fluctuate with energy. Physically realistic smooth spectra for these photon beams appeared when a small margin (about ±1%) was attributed to the measured depth dose. The maximum energy of both derived spectra agreed with the measured energy of the electrons striking the target to within 1 MeV. The use of a feasibility method on minimally relaxed constraints provides realistic spectra quickly and interactively. (author)

  9. Composite depth dose measurement for total skin electron (TSE) treatments using radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, Lisa M; Farrell, Thomas J; Jones, Glenn W; Hayward, Joseph E

    2003-01-01

    Total skin electron (TSE) radiotherapy is routinely used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and can be implemented using a modified Stanford technique. In our centre, the composite depth dose for this technique is achieved by a combination of two patient positions per day over a three-day cycle, and two gantry angles per patient position. Due to patient morphology, underdosed regions typically occur and have historically been measured using multiple thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We show that radiochromic film can be used as a two-dimensional relative dosimeter to measure the percent depth dose in TSE radiotherapy. Composite depth dose curves were measured in a cylindrical, polystyrene phantom and compared with TLD data. Both multiple films (1 film per day) and a single film were used in order to reproduce a realistic clinical scenario. First, three individual films were used to measure the depth dose, one per treatment day, and then compared with TLD data; this comparison showed a reasonable agreement. Secondly, a single film was used to measure the dose delivered over three daily treatments and then compared with TLD data; this comparison showed good agreement throughout the depth dose, which includes doses well below 1 Gy. It will be shown that one piece of radiochromic film is sufficient to measure the composite percent depth dose for a TSE beam, hence making radiochromic film a suitable candidate for monitoring underdosed patient regions

  10. Improving ingestion dose modelling for the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems: A Nordic Initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Thørring, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    A Nordic work group under the NKS-B activity PARDNOR has revised the input parameters in the ECOSYS model that is incorporated for ingestion dose modelling in the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems. The new parameterisation takes into account recent measurement data, and targets the model f...

  11. Measurement of radiation dose to ovaries from CT of the head and trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Habdhan, M.A.M.; Kinsara, A.R. [King Abdul Aziz Univ., Nuclear Engineering Dept., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2001-07-01

    With the rise in concern about doses received by patients over recent years, there has been a growing requirement for information on typical doses and the range of dose received during Computerized Tomography (CT). This study was performed for the assessment of radiation dose to the ovaries from various CT protocols for head and trunk imaging. Thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for the dosimetry measurement in an anthropomorphic Rando Alderson phantom. The wanted (obligatory) and unwanted (non-useful) radiation doses delivered to the ovaries during CT examinations of head, facial bone, orbits, abdomen, chest, pelvis, neck, nasopharynx, cervical spine, lumber spine and sacroiliac joint were assessed. The results are compared with the corresponding values published in the literature. A comparison of the received dose from CT examinations and general radiography examinations by the ovaries was made. It is found that relatively high doses of unwanted radiation are delivered with computerized tomography. (author)

  12. Using an electronic portal imaging device for exit dose measurements in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganowicz, M.; Wozniak, B.; Bekman, A.; Maniakowski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    To present a method of determining the exit dose with the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The device used was the Portal Vision LC250 (Varian). The EPID signals on the central beam axis have been related to the exit dose. The exit dose measurements were performed with the ionisation chamber in the slab phantom at the distance of dose maximum from the exit surface of the phantom. EPID reading was investigated as a function of field size, phantom thickness and source-detector distance. The relation between dose rate and the EPID reading is described with empirical functions applicable to the obtained data. The exit dose is calculated from the EPID reading as a product of the calibration factor and appropriate correction factors. The determination of the exit dose rate from the EPID signal requires the knowledge of many parameters and earlier determination of essential characteristics. (author)

  13. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  14. The system of radiological protection revisited. Are dose limits for the population really necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-01-01

    The distinction between practices and interventions in the System of Radiation Protection has created a lot of confusion in the population and amongst decision-makers, especially with regards to the concepts of dose limits and intervention levels. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicated that many actions taken led to an unnecessarily large expenditure of national resources, and many instances occurred of contradictory national responses. A major reason was the mixture of dose limits for the population, which apply only to exposures from practices, and intervention levels, which apply only to protective measures in de-facto exposure situations. The existing System of Radiation Protection is revisited and it is suggested that the System can be revised with no dose limits for the public without causing a lower degree of protection of the population. With the widespread use of source-related dose constraints and practical restrictions on the sources of public exposure from practices, generally applicable dose limits are rarely limiting in any practical situation, even if dose constraints might, at least in principle, fail to take adequate account of the exposures from other practices. Constraints can be expressed as operational protection quantities, e.g. nuclide-specific release rates, dose rate at the fence of a facility or nuclide-specific surface contamination density in the environment. A revised System of Radiation Protection without public dose limits would not cause any reduced protection of the public compared to the existing System, and it has a potential for removing much of the confusion with regards to application of intervention/action levels. It would also have the potential for improving public perception of radiation protection and radiation risks as well as for saving vast resources in intervention situations for better application in general health care of the public. (au)

  15. Development and characterization of an interferometer for calorimeter-based absorbed dose to water measurements in a medical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Martinez, Everardo; Malin, Martha J; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-11-01

    The quantity of relevance for external beam radiotherapy is absorbed dose to water (ADW). An interferometer was built, characterized, and tested to measure ADW within the dose range of interest for external beam radiotherapy using the temperature dependence of the refractive index of water. The interferometer was used to measure radiation-induced phase shifts of a laser beam passing through a (10 × 10 × 10) cm 3 water-filled glass phantom, irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator. The field size was (7 × 7) cm 2 and the dose was measured at a depth of 5 cm in the water phantom. The intensity of the interference pattern was measured with a photodiode and was used to calculate the time-dependent phase shift curve. The system was thermally insulated to achieve temperature drifts of less than 1.5 mK/min. Data were acquired 60 s before and after the irradiation. The radiation-induced phase shifts were calculated by taking the difference in the pre- and post-irradiation drifts extrapolated to the midpoint of the irradiation. For 200, 300, and 400 monitor units, the measured doses were 1.6 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.3, and 3.1 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. Measurements agreed within the uncertainty with dose calculations performed with a treatment planning system. The estimated type-A, k = 1 uncertainty in the measured doses was 0.3 Gy which is an order of magnitude lower than previously published interferometer-based ADW measurements.

  16. Surface dose measurements in and out of field. Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 18 MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams.

  17. Individual Dose Calculations with Use of the Revised Techa River Dosimetry System TRDS-2009D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    An updated deterministic version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS-2009D) has been developed to estimate individual doses from external exposure and intake of radionuclides for residents living on the Techa River contaminated as a result of radioactive releases from the Mayak plutonium facility in 1949–1956. The TRDS-2009D is designed as a flexible system that uses, depending on the input data for an individual, various elements of system databases to provide the dosimetric variables requested by the user. Several phases are included in the computation schedule. The first phase includes calculations with use of a common protocol for all cohort members based on village-average-intake functions and external dose rates; individual data on age, gender and history of residence are included in the first phase. This phase results in dose estimates similar to those obtained with system TRDS-2000 used previously to derive risks of health effects in the Techa River Cohort. The second phase includes refinement of individual internal doses for those persons who have had body-burden measurements or exposure parameters specific to the household where he/she lived on the Techa River. The third phase includes summation of individual doses from environmental exposure and from radiological examinations. The results of TRDS-2009D dose calculations have demonstrated for the ETRC members on average a moderate increase in RBM dose estimates (34%) and a minor increase (5%) in estimates of stomach dose. The calculations for the members of the ETROC indicated similar small changes for stomach, but significant increase in RBM doses (400%). Individual-dose assessments performed with use of TRDS-2009D have been provided to epidemiologists for exploratory risk analysis in the ETRC and ETROC. These data provide an opportunity to evaluate the possible impact on radiogenic risk of such factors as confounding exposure (environmental and medical), changes in the Techa River source

  18. Measurement and monitoring of entrance exposure dose rate in X-ray image intensifier television with dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J [Bezirkskrankenhaus Brandenburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1981-03-01

    For X-ray image intensifier television operation very low entrance dose rates (about 5.2 nA/kg) are stated and demanded, respectively. These required values are often manifold exceeded in practice so that a check seems to be necessary. It is shown and proved how these measurements can be performed with simple, generally available means of measurement in the radiological practice. For ZnCdS-image intensifiers should be considered that about 13 nA/kg for the large entrance size are not to be exceeded; for the CsI type lower values (factor 1.5) are practicable because of the twofold quantum absorption efficiency. Furthermore, some tests for a semiquantitative function check of the automatic dose rate control are proposed.

  19. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE® radiochromic plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A. L.; Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE ® with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO 2 fibers with 6 μm active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 μm active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE ® , 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE ® , and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental conditions used in this study, the useful range from an isolated

  20. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE® radiochromic plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A L; Di Pietro, P; Alobaidli, S; Issa, F; Doran, S; Bradley, D; Nisbet, A

    2013-06-01

    Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE(®) with optical-CT readout. Ge-doped SiO2 fibers with 6 μm active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 μm active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE(®), 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE(®), and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental conditions used in this study, the useful range from an isolated HDR source was 5-40 mm for

  1. Measurements of surgeons' exposure to ionizing radiation dose during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Boram; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-06-15

    Measurement of radiation dose from C-arm fluoroscopy during a simulated intraoperative use in spine surgery. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate scatter radiation doses to specific organs of surgeons during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy in spine surgery and to provide practical intraoperative guidelines. There have been studies that reported the radiation dose of C-arm fluoroscopy in various procedures. However, radiation doses to surgeons' specific organs during spine surgery have not been sufficiently examined, and the practical intraoperative radioprotective guidelines have not been suggested. Scatter radiation dose (air kerma rate) was measured during the use of a C-arm on an anthropomorphic chest phantom on an operating table. Then, a whole body anthropomorphic phantom was located besides the chest phantom to simulate a surgeon, and scatter radiation doses to specific organs (eye, thyroid, breast, and gonads) and direct radiation dose to the surgeon's hand were measured using 4 C-arm configurations (standard, inverted, translateral, and tube translateral). The effects of rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient and of a thyroid shield were also evaluated. Scatter radiation doses decreased as distance from the patient increased during C-arm fluoroscopy use. The standard and translateral C-arm configurations caused lower scatter doses to sensitive organs than inverted and tube translateral configurations. Scatter doses were highest for breast and lowest for gonads. The use of a thyroid shield and rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient reduced scatter radiation dose to the surgeon's thyroid and eyes. The direct radiation dose was at least 20 times greater than scatter doses to sensitive organs. The following factors could reduce radiation exposure during intraoperative use of C-arm; (1) distance from the patient, (2) C-arm configuration, (3) radioprotective equipments, (4) rotating the surgeons' eyes away from the patient, and (5) avoiding

  2. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin-woo; Jeong, Kyu-hwan; Kim, Jong-il; Im, Chae-wan

    2015-01-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  3. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-woo [KAERI - Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup-si (Korea, Republic of); Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyu-hwan [KINS - Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon-Si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-il [Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Im, Chae-wan [REMTECH, Seoul-Si (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  4. Manufacturing of different gel detectors and their calibration for spatial radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.

    2008-05-01

    Three types of gel dosemeter have been made and their most important properties for radiation dosimetry were studied. The comparison between the three categories helps to widen knowledge in each of these detectors and to establish a method for the preparation as well as testing of this radiation sensitive materials. Experiments show the technical application possibility for using these gel detectors to measure the spatial radiation dose distribution in the range of doses given for cancer treatment. The experimental results give some important characteristic for the three gel dosemeter used in comparison to that of the traditional dosimetry systems. It also shows the simplicity of manufacturing the dosemeter from low cost materials and its radiation response to ionizing. The relationships between the dosemeter response and the dose rate as well as the radiation energy were also investigated. Important subjects that have been also taken into consideration are the effects of ambient conditions and storage likelihood of the studied materials. Recommendation was made for the use of these materials in practical applications and for handling as well as their long term storage possibility. (author)

  5. Statistical approaches to forecast gamma dose rates by using measurements from the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.J.; Hwang, W. T.; Kim, E.H.; Han, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the results obtained by inter-comparing several statistical techniques for estimating gamma dose rates, such as an exponential moving average model, a seasonal exponential smoothing model and an artificial neural networks model, are reported. Seven years of gamma dose rates data measured in Daejeon City, Korea, were divided into two parts to develop the models and validate the effectiveness of the generated predictions by the techniques mentioned above. Artificial neural networks model shows the best forecasting capability among the three statistical models. The reason why the artificial neural networks model provides a superior prediction to the other models would be its ability for a non-linear approximation. To replace the gamma dose rates when missing data for an environmental monitoring system occurs, the moving average model and the seasonal exponential smoothing model can be better because they are faster and easier for applicability than the artificial neural networks model. These kinds of statistical approaches will be helpful for a real-time control of radio emissions or for an environmental quality assessment. (authors)

  6. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1989-08-01

    As an agent for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is responsible for maintenance of the Australian Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose. This standard of measurement has application in radiation therapy dosimetry, which is required for the treatment of cancer patients. This report is the first in a series of reports documenting the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. The Urquhart graphite micro-calorimeters, which is used for the determination of absorbed dose under high energy photon beams, has been now placed under computer control. Accordingly, a complete upgrade of the calorimeter systems was performed to allow operation in the hospital. In this report, control and monitoring techniques have been described, with an assessment of the performance achieved being given for 6 and 18 MeV bremsstrahlung beams. Random errors have been reduced to near negligible proportions, while systematic errors have been minimized by achieving true quasi-adiabatic operation. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs

  7. The dose distribution of low dose rate Cs-137 in intracavitary brachytherapy: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation, treatment planning calculation and polymer gel measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, M; Love, P A; Verhaegen, F; Nalder, C; Bidmead, A M; Leach, M; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the dose distribution delivered by low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques and polymer gel dosimetry. The results obtained were compared with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The 20 mm and the 30 mm diameter Selectron vaginal applicator set (Nucletron) were used for this study. A homogeneous and a heterogeneous-with an air cavity-polymer gel phantom was used to measure the dose distribution from these sources. The same geometrical set-up was used for the MC calculations. Beyond the applicator tip, differences in dose as large as 20% were found between the MC and TPS. This is attributed to the presence of stainless steel in the applicator and source set, which are not considered by the TPS calculations. Beyond the air cavity, differences in dose of around 5% were noted, due to the TPS assuming a homogeneous water medium. The polymer gel results were in good agreement with the MC calculations for all the cases investigated

  8. Computed tomography dose and variability of airway dimension measurements: how low can we go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Pim A. de; Long, Frederick R.; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative CT shows promise as an outcome measure for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease in infancy, but must be accomplished at a dose as low as reasonably achievable. To determine the feasibility of ultra-low-dose CT for quantitative measurements of airway dimensions. Two juvenile pigs were anesthetized and their lungs scanned at 25 cm H 2 O face-mask pressure in apnoea using beam currents of 5, 10, 20, 40 and 100 mAs. The lumen diameters and wall thicknesses of matched airways (n=22) at each dose were measured by two observers using validated software. Measurement variability at each dose was compared to that at 100 mAs (reference dose) for large and small airways (lumen diameter <2.5 mm). Lowering CT dose (mAs) affected measurement variability for lumen diameter of small and large airways (P<0.001) and for wall thickness of small (P<0.001), but not large (P=0.63), airways. To obtain the same measurement variability at 5 mAs as at 100 mAs, four to six small airways or one to three large airways have to be measured and averaged. Quantitative airway measurements are feasible on images obtained at as low as 5 mAs, but more airways need to be measured to compensate for greater measurement variability. (orig.)

  9. Developing a single-aliquot protocol for measuring equivalent dose in biogenic carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, R.J.; Duller, G.A.T.; Roberts, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Exploiting biogenic carbonates as thermoluminescence dosimeters requires an understanding of trap kinetics and an appropriate sequence with which to measure equivalent dose. The trap kinetics of two high temperature peaks (peaks II and III) from calcitic snail opercula have been investigated resulting in the calculation of lifetimes of 7.4 × 10 7 and 1.4 × 10 11 years for the two peaks respectively. Two measurement sequences, based upon changes in the application and measurement of a test dose, have been applied to peaks II and III, and though both methods were equally successful in dose recovery and production of a dose response curve some differences were observed. Primarily, the use of method 1 lead to dose dependant sensitivity change implying competition effects occurring during irradiation; method 2 did not experience this phenomenon. As a consequence method 2 was chosen as the most appropriate protocol for single-aliquot dating of this material. When assessing the TL behaviour of the two peaks, peak II performed poorly in dose recovery experiments recovering a dose 60–100% larger than that applied. Disproportionate growth of peak II in response to a beta dose applied prior to measurement, compared to growth following regeneration doses indicated that peak II was not suitable for use in single-aliquot protocols. However, dose recovery results for peak III were all within errors of unity of the given dose, and peak III was therefore chosen as the most appropriate peak for TL dosimetry in these single-aliquot procedures. The lifetime of charge in peak III is sufficient to date over many millions of years, and furthermore using the chosen method 2 the dose response curve has a D 0 of 3,250 ± 163 Gy allowing dating to over 3 million years.

  10. A technique to measure the absorbed dose in human tooth enamel using EPR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanjanian, H.; Ziaie, F.; Modarresi, M.; Nikzad, M.; Shahvar, A.; Durrani, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    The EPR spectrum of irradiated tooth enamel contains a multitude of signals that are divided into two categories of radiation-induced and radiation insensitive (native) signals. At lower doses the broad native signal obscures the radiation-induced signal. In this work attempt has been made to find a method to measure the radiation-induced signal other than peak-to-peak signal amplitude measurement. For this reason software was programmed to extract the data from EPR system. The average amplitude of the radiation-induced EPR signal which is defined between the known g-values can also be calculated using the software. The result of this calculations were considered as the EPR response for the tooth enamel samples irradiated from 100 to 500 mGy and was drawn as the calibration curve. The resulted data as compared to the peak-to-peak amplitude measurement method seems to be more reproducible and shows a better variation against the dose values

  11. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  12. The Norwegian system for implementing the IAEA code of practice based on absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerke, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) SSDL recommended in 2000 the use of absorbed dose to water as the quality for calibration and code of practice in radiotherapy. The absorbed dose to water standard traceable to BIPM was established in Norway in 1995. The international code of practice, IAEA TRS 398 was under preparation. As a part of the implementation of the new dosimetry system the SSDL went to radiotherapy departments in Norway in 2001. The aim of the visit was to: Prepare and support the users in the implementation of TRS 398 by teaching, discussions and measurements on-site; Gain experience for NRPA in the practical implementation of TRS 398 and perform comparisons between TRS 277 and TRS 398 for different beam qualities; Report experience from implementation of TRS 398 to IAEA. The NRPA 30x30x30 cm 3 water phantom is equal to the BIPM calibration phantom. This was used for the photon measurements in 16 different beams. NRPA used three chambers: NE 2571, NE 2611 and PR06C for the photon measurements. As a quality control the set-up was compared with the Finnish site-visit equipment at University Hospital of Helsinki, and the measured absorbed dose to water agreed within 0.6%. The Finnish SSDL calibrated the Norwegian chambers and the absorbed dose to water calibration factors given by the two SSDLs for the three chambers agreed within 0.3%. The local clinical dosimetry in Norway was based on TRS 277. For the site-visit the absorbed dose to water was determined by NRPA using own equipment including the three chambers and the hospitals reference chamber. The hospital determined the dose the same evening using their local equipment. For the 16 photon beams the deviations between the two absorbed dose to water determinations for TRS 277 were in the range -1,7% to +4.0%. The uncertainty in the measurements was 1% (k=1). The deviation was explained in local implementation of TRS 277, the use of plastic phantoms, no resent calibration of

  13. Experiment for dose measurement during beam killing at Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, M.K.; Dev, Vipin; Haridas, G.; Thakkar, K.K.; Sarkar, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental measurement of radiation dose likely to be received by an occupational worker in the experimental hall of Indus-1 during accidental beam killing was carried out. Various accidental beam-killing scenarios were experimentally simulated for the measurement. The measurement was carried out using direct reading dosimeters. Result shows that in the event of accidental beam killing, dose likely to be received by an occupational worker outside the shield is negligible. (author)

  14. Measurement of exposure dose rate by TLD in 60Co garden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Chengfang; Li Pinfang; Wu Maoliang; Zhao Quan

    1987-01-01

    The use of TLD method to measure exposure dose rate in 60 Co garden is described. As compared with chemical dosimetry, the relative deviation of measurement would not exceed 10%. The good repeatability has been proved by comparing the measurements of different times and distances with correction of decay law and 1/1 2 law. Besides, the distribution of exposure dose rate was influenced by scattering of the living plants

  15. System for prediction of environmental emergency dose information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    According to the national research program revised by the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission after the TMI-2 reactor accident JAERI started the development of a computer code system for the real-time prediction of environmental consequences following a nuclear reactor accident, and in 1985 the basic development of the System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information SPEEDI was completed. The system consists of three-dimensional models of wind field calculation (WIND04), dispersion calculation (PRWDA) and internal and external dose calculation (CIDE), and is designed to speedily predict radioactive concentration in the air, the ground deposition and radiation doses of upto 100 km range by simulation calculation when the radioactive materials are accidentally released from a reactor. At Chernobyl accident the calculational domain of SPEEDI were extended tentatively upto 2000 km, and simulation calculations of the movement of radioactive cloud were executed, and the estimation of the amounts of released radioactivities were made using calculated results and observed data. The calculated distribution and the movement of plume well agreed with the distribution patterns evaluated from observation data, and the estimated source term agreed approximately with data reported from USSR and other countries. (author)

  16. Automated measuring systems. Automatisierte Messsysteme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessors have become a regular component of automated measuring systems. Experts offer their experience and basic information in 24 lectures and 10 poster presentations. The focus is on the following: Automated measuring, computer and microprocessor use, sensor technique, actuator technique, communication, interfaces, man-system interaction, distrubance tolerance and availability as well as uses. A discussion meeting is dedicated to the theme complex sensor digital signal, sensor interface and sensor bus.

  17. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boas, J.F.; Hargrave, N.J.; Huntley, R.B.; Kotler, L.H.; Webb, D.V.; Wise, K.N. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate know