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Sample records for dominant wrist compared

  1. The dominance of haptics over audition in controlling wrist velocity during striking movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yinan; Giordano, Bruno L; Avanzini, Federico; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Skilled interactions with sounding objects, such as drumming, rely on resolving the uncertainty in the acoustical and tactual feedback signals generated by vibrating objects. Uncertainty may arise from mis-estimation of the objects' geometry-independent mechanical properties, such as surface stiffness. How multisensory information feeds back into the fine-tuning of sound-generating actions remains unexplored. Participants (percussionists, non-percussion musicians, or non-musicians) held a stylus and learned to control their wrist velocity while repeatedly striking a virtual sounding object whose surface stiffness was under computer control. Sensory feedback was manipulated by perturbing the surface stiffness specified by audition and haptics in a congruent or incongruent manner. The compensatory changes in striking velocity were measured as the motor effects of the sensory perturbations, and sensory dominance was quantified by the asymmetry of congruency effects across audition and haptics. A pronounced dominance of haptics over audition suggested a superior utility of somatosensation developed through long-term experience with object exploration. Large interindividual differences in the motor effects of haptic perturbation potentially arose from a differential reliance on the type of tactual prediction error for which participants tend to compensate: vibrotactile force versus object deformation. Musical experience did not have much of an effect beyond a slightly greater reliance on object deformation in mallet percussionists. The bias toward haptics in the presence of crossmodal perturbations was greater when participants appeared to rely on object deformation feedback, suggesting a weaker association between haptically sensed object deformation and the acoustical structure of concomitant sound during everyday experience of actions upon objects.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of wrist posture and typing performance: A comparative study of 4 computer keyboards

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    Burastero, S.

    1994-05-01

    The present study focuses on an ergonomic evaluation of 4 computer keyboards, based on subjective analyses of operator comfort and on a quantitative analysis of typing performance and wrist posture during typing. The objectives of this study are (1) to quantify differences in the wrist posture and in typing performance when the four different keyboards are used, and (2) to analyze the subjective preferences of the subjects for alternative keyboards compared to the standard flat keyboard with respect to the quantitative measurements.

  3. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  4. Cross-education of wrist extensor strength is not influenced by non-dominant training in right-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Timothy A; Frazer, Ashlyn K; Horvath, Deanna M; Pearce, Alan J; Howatson, Glyn; Kidgell, Dawson J

    2016-09-01

    Cross-education of strength has been proposed to be greater when completed by the dominant limb in right handed humans. We investigated whether the direction of cross-education of strength and corticospinal plasticity are different following right or left limb strength training in right-handed participants. Changes in strength, muscle thickness and indices of corticospinal plasticity were analyzed in 23 adults who were exposed to 3-weeks of either right-hand strength training (RHT) or left-hand strength training (LHT). Maximum voluntary wrist extensor strength in both the trained and untrained limb increased, irrespective of which limb was trained, with TMS revealing reduced corticospinal inhibition. Cross-education of strength was not limited by which limb was trained and reduced corticospinal inhibition was not just confined to the trained limb. Critically, from a behavioral perspective, the magnitude of cross-education was not limited by which limb was trained.

  5. Comparative evaluation between cervical vertebral morphology and hand-wrist morphology for skeletal maturation assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippaudo, C; Garcovich, D; Volpe, G; Lajolo, C

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the study was to find a correlation between the evaluation of skeletal maturation performed by the study of cervical vertebrae maturation indicators and the evaluation obtained by the hand and wrist maturation indicators. Left hand wrist radiographs and the corresponding lateral cephalograms of 90 patients (48 males and 42 females; aged 6 to 14 years) were paired and a study group of 128 pair of radiographs was obtained, having some patients 2 or more radiographs at different times. Hand and wrist radiographs were evaluated according to the protocol proposed by Grave (scores 0 to 9); corresponding lateral cephalograms were evaluated according to the method reported by Baccetti (scores 1 to 5). Values obtained with the 2 methods were analyzed by Spearman's correlation test. When the values were compared globally in the 2 genders a good correlation was obtained (r=0.795; Pmaturation evaluation by the analysis of cervical vertebrae in laterolateral cephalograms which can substitute the hand and wrist radiograph for the skeletal maturation evaluation in orthodontic diagnosis.

  6. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  7. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. The wrist is made up of eight ...

  8. Comparative Study of the Diagnostic Value of Panoramic and Conventional Radiography of the Wrist in Scaphoid Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoddini Ardakani, Fatemeh; Zangoie Booshehri, Maryam; Banadaki, Seyed Hossein Saeed; Nafisi-Moghadam, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Scaphoid fractures are the most common type of carpal fractures. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value of panoramic and conventional radiographs of the wrist in scaphoid fractures. Patients and Methods The panoramic and conventional radiographs of 122 patients with acute and chronic wrist trauma were studied. The radiographs were analyzed and examined by two independent radiologist observers; one physician radiologist and one maxillofacial radiologist. The final diagnosis was made by an orthopedic specialist. Kappa test was used for statistical calculations, inter- and intra-observer agreement and correlation between the two techniques. Results Wrist panoramic radiography was more accurate than conventional radiography for ruling out scaphoid fractures. There was an agreement in 85% or more of the cases. Agreement values were higher with better inter and intra observer agreement for panoramic examinations than conventional radiographic examinations. Conclusion The panoramic examination of the wrist is a useful technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of scaphoid fractures. Its use is recommended as a complement to conventional radiography in cases with inconclusive findings. PMID:23599708

  9. Comparing two methods to record maximal voluntary contractions and different electrode positions in recordings of forearm extensor muscle activity: Refining risk assessments for work-related wrist disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Camilla; Nordander, Catarina; Granqvist, Lothy; Forsman, Mikael; Hansson, Gert-Åke

    2018-01-18

    Wrist disorders are common in force demanding industrial repetitive work. Visual assessment of force demands have a low reliability, instead surface electromyography (EMG) may be used as part of a risk assessment for work-related wrist disorders. For normalization of EMG recordings, a power grip (hand grip) is often used as maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the forearm extensor muscles. However, the test-retest reproducibility is poor and EMG amplitudes exceeding 100% have occasionally been recorded during work. An alternative MVC is resisted wrist extension, which may be more reliable. To compare hand grip and resisted wrist extension MVCs, in terms of amplitude and reproducibility, and to examine the effect of electrode positioning. Twelve subjects participated. EMG from right forearm extensors, from four electrode pairs, was recorded during MVCs, on three separate occasions. The group mean EMG amplitudes for resisted wrist extension were 1.2-1.7 times greater than those for hand grip. Resisted wrist extension showed better reproducibility than hand grip. The results indicate that the use of resisted wrist extension is a more accurate measurement of maximal effort of wrist extensor contractions than using hand grip and should increase the precision in EMG recordings from forearm extensor muscles, which in turn will increase the quality of risk assessments that are based on these.

  10. Comparative evaluation of efficiency of serum IGF-1, hand-wrist radiographs, and cervical vertebrae as skeletal maturity indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Phogat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accurate determination of skeletal maturity and remaining growth is crucial to identify optimal timing for the treatment of a series of dentoskeletal disharmonies in all three planes of space. Currently, cervical vertebral stages and hand-wrist radiographs are used to identify peak mandibular bone growth. Objectives: The main objective of this study was to compare and correlate insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 levels to skeletal maturation stages obtained by the cervical vertebral maturation method and skeletal maturational indicators obtained by the hand-wrist maturation method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, serum IGF-1 level was measured for 53 healthy, North Indian subjects (26 female, 27 male, who were either about to begin orthodontic treatment, were undergoing treatment, or were in posttreatment follow-up between the ages of 9 and 20 years. For each subject, hand-wrist radiographs and lateral cephalograms were also obtained and staged. Results: The mean serum IGF-1 levels were the highest at the skeletal stages that were previously associated with the greatest amount of mandibular growth. Serum IGF-1 levels were low in the prepubertal skeletal stages, rise sharply to their peak in late puberty, and decline to approach prepubertal levels after puberty. Conclusion: Serum IGF-1 could be used as a skeletal maturity indicator and might be useful in detecting residual mandibular growth in young adults.

  11. The outcome of conservative treatment of adult distal radius fractures compared with the other wrist: radiological and functional evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Uslu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to evaluate anatomical and functional results of closed reduction-long arm cast treatment for distal radius fractures and compared other healthy wrist in the adults. Methods: 77 patients with distal radius fracture were treated conservatively between January 2010 and December 2010. The fractures were classified according to AO and Frykman classification system and investigated prospectively. The radiological and anatomical results were assessed by the Stewart score criteria. The functional results were assessed by Quick-Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (Q-DASH and the Stewart II score criteria. The mean follow-up of patients was 12 months. Results: The forty patients had right wrist fractured, 37 patients had left wrist fractured. According to Frykman classification 46 patients were type I-II fractured, according to AO classification 59 patients were type 23,A2,1 and 23,A2,2 fractured. According to Stewart the radiological and anatomical, the result were excellent in 57, good in 17, fair in 3. According to Stewart II functional criteria, the results were assessed excellent in 57, good in 8, fair in 12 The mean Q-DASH score was 6,37. The overall complication rate was 12.98%. Mild Carpal tunnel syndrome was observed in the two patients, ulna styloid nonunion in the four patients, pain of distal radioulnar joint in the one patient, mild carpal tunnel syndrome and tenderness of distal radioulnar joint in the three patients. Conclusion: Closed reduction and cast immobilization is still an effective and inexpensive treatment method in distal radial fractures. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 403-409

  12. Wrist Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at a keyboard, take regular breaks. When you type, keep your wrist in a relaxed, neutral position. An ergonomic ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  13. Botulinum toxin injection into the forearm muscles for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in adults with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial comparing three injection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Lobba, Davide; Midiri, Alessandro; Prandi, Paolo; Melotti, Camilla; Baldessarelli, Silvia; Smania, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    To compare the outcome of manual needle placement, electrical stimulation and ultrasonography-guided techniques for botulinum toxin injection into the forearm muscles of adults with arm spasticity. Randomized controlled trial. University hospital. Sixty chronic stroke patients with wrist and fingers spasticity. After randomization into three groups, each patient received botulinum toxin type A in at least two of these muscles: flexor carpi radialis and ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus (no fascicles selection). The manual needle placement group underwent injections using palpation; the electrical stimulation group received injections with electrical stimulation guidance; the ultrasonography group was injected under sonographic guidance. A sole injector was used. All patients were evaluated at baseline and four weeks after injection. Modified Ashworth Scale; Tardieu Scale; wrist and fingers passive range of motion. One month after injection, Modified Ashworth Scale scores improved more in the electrical stimulation group than the manual needle placement group (wrist: P = 0.014; fingers: P = 0.011), as well as the Tardieu angle (wrist: P = 0.008; fingers: P = 0.015) and passive range of motion (wrist: P = 0.004). Furthermore, Modified Ashworth Scale scores improved more in the ultrasonography group than in the manual needle placement group (wrist: P = 0.001; fingers: P = 0.003), as well as the Tardieu angle (wrist: P = 0.010; fingers: P = 0.001) and passive range of motion (wrist: P < 0.001; proximal interphalangeal joints: P = 0.009). No difference was found between the ultrasonography and electrical stimulation groups. Instrumental guidance may improve the outcome of botulinum toxin injections into the spastic forearm muscles of stroke patients.

  14. Comparative study between the hand-wrist method and cervical vertebral maturation method for evaluation skeletal maturity in cleft patients.

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    Manosudprasit, Montian; Wangsrimongkol, Tasanee; Pisek, Poonsak; Chantaramungkorn, Melissa

    2013-09-01

    To test the measure of agreement between use of the Skeletal Maturation Index (SMI) method of Fishman using hand-wrist radiographs and the Cervical Vertebral Maturation Index (CVMI) method for assessing skeletal maturity of the cleft patients. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 60 cleft subjects (35 females and 25 males, age range: 7-16 years) were used. Skeletal age was assessed using an adjustment to the SMI method of Fishman to compare with the CVMI method of Hassel and Farman. Agreement between skeletal age assessed by both methods and the intra- and inter-examiner reliability of both methods were tested by weighted kappa analysis. There was good agreement between the two methods with a kappa value of 0.80 (95% CI = 0.66-0.88, p-value <0.001). Reliability of intra- and inter-examiner of both methods was very good with kappa value ranging from 0.91 to 0.99. The CVMI method can be used as an alternative to the SMI method in skeletal age assessment in cleft patients with the benefit of no need of an additional radiograph and avoiding extra-radiation exposure. Comparing the two methods, the present study found better agreement from peak of adolescence onwards.

  15. Force transmission through the wrist during performance of push-ups on a hyperextended and a neutral wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovinets, Olga; Wolf, Alon; Wollstein, Ronit

    2017-07-03

    Cross-sectional cohort. Push-ups are used ubiquitously to evaluate and strengthen the upper body. They are usually performed in 1 of 2 main ways: with the wrist in hyperextension and with the wrist in a neutral position. The purpose of our study was to compare the dynamic forces in the wrist during the 2 push-up styles. Fourteen volunteers performed push-ups in 2 different patterns: on a hyperextended wrist and a neutral wrist (NW). Two force plates and a motion capture system were used to measure the ground reaction forces (GRFs) and the kinematics of the upper extremity during push-ups. Kinematic and kinetic analyses were performed using Matlab software (Mathworks, Natick, MA). The GRF vector was distributed differently during the different types of push-ups. For both methods, the total GRF carried by the upper dominant extremity was larger than those of the nondominant extremity. In the NW configuration, the GRF vector was more uniform throughout the push-up in the vertical direction. The horizontal distance between the capitate bone location and the GRF origin was smaller in hyperextension. The forces traveled more dorsally over a wider area and more ulnarly in the hyperextended wrist. Forces are transmitted differently through the wrist in the 2 methods. Push-ups on an NW are likely safer because ligaments may be preferentially loaded in hyperextension. Further study may delineate the differences in the anatomic location of force transmission and the long-term clinical effect on the wrist. This study supports the performance of push-ups on a wrist in neutral flexion extension; both to enable patients after surgery or injury to strengthen the upper body and prevent injury and long-term wear in the wrist. The knowledge gained from this study may assist in outlining guidelines for push-up performance. Diagnostic level 2a. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Wrist blood pressure-measuring devices: a comparative study of accuracy with a standard auscultatory method using a mercury manometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunkan, Sekip; Yildiz, Sevil; Azer, Sabir

    2002-10-01

    In this study, we compared two wrist blood pressure-measuring devices, the Omron RX and the Nissei WS-310, against a mercury manometer. A total of 152 subjects attending an out-patient hypertensive clinic were recruited from a randomized blood pressure survey, 87 patients (mean 44.4 +/- 14.5 years of age) being selected according to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation/British Hypertension Society standards. Device validation was assessed through the use of sequential same-arm readings compared with readings taken using a mercury sphygmomanometer by the two trained observers. There were no differences between the observers and the monitors for diastolic readings (2.8 +/- 4.8 mmHg for the Omron and 4.2 +/- 6.4 mmHg for the Nissei) according to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation standards. The largest standard deviations -- 8.3 mmHg for the Omron and 8.8 mmHg for the Nissei, respectively -- were seen for systolic readings recorded by the observers and the monitors. According to the British Hypertension Society standards, the Omron achieved an A grade for diastolic readings and a B grade for systolic readings within 5 and 10 mmHg. The Nissei monitor achieved an A grade for diastolic readings and a B grade for systolic readings within 5 and 10 mmHg. Patients found the wrist oscillometric devices that we tested to be comfortable and easy to use. These devices are appropriate for measuring diastolic blood pressure according to the standards, but the reliability of both devices decreased when measuring systolic blood pressure.

  17. Constrained Registration of the Wrist Joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Giessen, M.; Streekstra, G.J.; Strackee, S.D.; Maas, M.; Grimbergen, K.A.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Vos, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparing wrist shapes of different individuals requires alignment of these wrists into the same pose. Unconstrained registration of the carpal bones results in anatomically nonfeasible wrists. In this paper, we propose to constrain the registration using the shapes of adjacent bones, by keeping the

  18. Constrained registration of the wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, M.; Streekstra, G.J.; Strackee, S.D.; Maas, M.; Grimbergen, K.A.; van Vliet, L.J.; Vos, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparing wrist shapes of different individuals requires alignment of these wrists into the same pose. Unconstrained registration of the carpal bones results in anatomically nonfeasible wrists. In this paper, we propose to constrain the registration using the shapes of adjacent bones, by keeping the

  19. Computational Biomechanics of the Wrist Joint

    CERN Document Server

    Nazri Bajuri, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    This book presents an analysis of the stress distribution and contact stresses in severe rheumatoid wrist after total wrist arthroplasty. It assesses and compares the load transfer throughout the joint and contact pressure at the articulations. The data obtained from this study is of importance as this provide greater evidence to the benefits of total wrist arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  20. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  1. Arthroscopic Wrist Anatomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    .... Arthroscopy of the wrist is now a primary method of evaluating and treating many intra-articular wrist conditions including triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, chondral injuries, distal radius...

  2. Ultra-high resolution C-Arm CT arthrography of the wrist: Radiation dose and image quality compared to conventional multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werncke, Thomas, E-mail: Werncke.Thomas@mh-hannover.de [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Sonnow, Lena; Meyer, Bernhard C. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Lüpke, Matthias [University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Institute for General Radiology and Medical Physics, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover (Germany); Hinrichs, Jan; Wacker, Frank K.; Falck, Christian von [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Objective of this phantom and cadaveric study was to compare the effective radiation dose (ED) and image quality (IQ) between C-arm computed tomography (CACT) using an ultra-high resolution 1 × 1 binning with a standard 16-slice CT (MDCT) arthrography of the wrist. Methods: ED was determined with thermoluminescence dosimetry using an anthropomorphic phantom and different patient positions. Imaging was conducted in 10 human cadaveric wrists after tri-compartmental injection of diluted iodinated contrast material and a wire phantom. IQ of MDCT was compared with CACT reconstructed with a soft (CACT1) and sharp (CACT2) kernel. High and low contrast resolution was determined. Three radiologists assessed IQ of wrist structures and occurrence of image artifacts using a 5-point Likert scale. Results: ED of MDCT was comparable to standard CACT (4.3 μSv/3.7 μSv). High contrast resolution was best for CACT2, decreased to CACT1 and MDCT. Low contrast resolution increased between CACT2 and MDCT (P < 0.001). IQ was best for CACT2 (1.3 ± 0.5), decreased to CACT1 (1.9 ± 0.6) and MDCT (3.5 ± 0.6). Non-compromising artifacts were only reported for CACT. Conclusions: The results of this phantom and cadaveric study indicate that ultra-high resolution C-Arm CT arthrography of the wrist bears the potential to outperform MDCT arthrography in terms of image quality and workflow at the cost of mildly increasing image artifacts while radiation dose to the patient is comparably low for both, MDCT and C-Arm CT.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Hand-Wrist and Cervical Vertebrae Radiography for the Determination of Skeletal Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Mohammadhashem; Zamaheni, Sara; Bashizadeh Fakhar, Hourieh; Akbari, Forough; Chalipa, Javad; Rahmati, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prediction of skeletal growth is necessary for growth modification and surgical orthodontic treatments and is usually done by assessing skeletal maturity indicators in hand-wrist radiographs. The use of growth stages of cervical vertebrae in lateral cephalograms has been suggested to avoid overexposure. Objectives This study seeks to assess the degree of agreement between hand-wrist and cervical vertebrae maturation stages for skeletal age determination and prediction of the peak growth spurt (PGS). Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with 67 boys and 66 girls between 8 and 18 years of age, divided into 11 age groups; 266 hand-wrist radiographs and lateral cephalograms were obtained and analyzed. Hand-wrist maturation stages were evaluated according to the Grave and Brown, Bjork system (stages 1 - 9). The cervical vertebral maturation stage (CVMS) was determined on lateral cephalograms based on a system described by Baccetti et al. (CVMS 1-5). To apply the Cohen’s kappa index, the stages of growth were reduced to 5 intervals (A - E) to relate the 5 CVMS to the 9 stages of Bjork hand-wrist analysis. Results In all age groups, the skeletal maturity stages of the hand and wrist bones and the cervical vertebrae of the girls were ahead of the boys. Cohen’s kappa test revealed a low level of agreement between the two methods [Kappa (95% CI) = 0.312 (0.290 - 0.377)]; concordance was slightly higher in males (K = 0.33 for males versus 0.27 for females). Evaluation of concordance coefficients between the stages determined by the two methods indicated the highest concordance in 8- and 9-year-olds and the lowest in 12- and 14-year-olds. The level of agreement between the two methods was only acceptable in 8- and 9-year-olds of both genders and 10-year-old boys. The level of agreement between the two methods in other age groups was not acceptable. Conclusion The level of agreement between the two methods was low; thus, they cannot be

  4. Machine learning for activity recognition: hip versus wrist data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trost, Stewart G; Zheng, Yonglei; Wong, Weng-Keen

    2014-01-01

    Problem addressed: Wrist-worn accelerometers are associated with greater compliance. However, validated algorithms for predicting activity type from wrist-worn accelerometer data are lacking. This study compared the activity recognition rates of an activity classifier trained on acceleration signal collected on the wrist and hip. Methodology: 52 children and adolescents (mean age 13.7  ±  3.1 year) completed 12 activity trials that were categorized into 7 activity classes: lying down, sitting, standing, walking, running, basketball, and dancing. During each trial, participants wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ tri-axial accelerometer on the right hip and the non-dominant wrist. Features were extracted from 10-s windows and inputted into a regularized logistic regression model using R (Glmnet + L1). Results: Classification accuracy for the hip and wrist was 91.0% ± 3.1% and 88.4% ± 3.0%, respectively. The hip model exhibited excellent classification accuracy for sitting (91.3%), standing (95.8%), walking (95.8%), and running (96.8%); acceptable classification accuracy for lying down (88.3%) and basketball (81.9%); and modest accuracy for dance (64.1%). The wrist model exhibited excellent classification accuracy for sitting (93.0%), standing (91.7%), and walking (95.8%); acceptable classification accuracy for basketball (86.0%); and modest accuracy for running (78.8%), lying down (74.6%) and dance (69.4%). Potential Impact: Both the hip and wrist algorithms achieved acceptable classification accuracy, allowing researchers to use either placement for activity recognition. (paper)

  5. The effect of forearm posture on wrist flexion in computer workers with chronic upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson R Terry

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational computer use has been associated with upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs, but the etiology and pathophysiology of some of these disorders are poorly understood. Various theories attribute the symptoms to biomechanical and/or psychosocial stressors. The results of several clinical studies suggest that elevated antagonist muscle tension may be a biomechanical stress factor. Affected computer users often exhibit limited wrist range of motion, particularly wrist flexion, which has been attributed to increased extensor muscle tension, rather than to pain symptoms. Recreational or domestic activities requiring extremes of wrist flexion may produce injurious stress on the wrist joint and muscles, the symptoms of which are then exacerbated by computer use. As these activities may involve a variety of forearm postures, we examined whether changes in forearm posture have an effect on pain reports during wrist flexion, or whether pain would have a limiting effect on flexion angle. Methods We measured maximum active wrist flexion using a goniometer with the forearm supported in the prone, neutral, and supine postures. Data was obtained from 5 subjects with UEMSDs attributed to computer use and from 13 control subjects. Results The UEMSD group exhibited significantly restricted wrist flexion compared to the control group in both wrists at all forearm postures with the exception of the non-dominant wrist with the forearm prone. In both groups, maximum active wrist flexion decreased at the supine forearm posture compared to the prone posture. No UEMSD subjects reported an increase in pain symptoms during testing. Conclusion The UEMSD group exhibited reduced wrist flexion compared to controls that did not appear to be pain related. A supine forearm posture reduced wrist flexion in both groups, but the reduction was approximately 100% greater in the UEMSD group. The effect of a supine forearm posture on wrist

  6. Wrist Injuries in Elderly Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Erik Kristian Maurice; Brix, Lau

    Keywords Extremities, Musculoskeletal bone, Trauma, Conventional radiography, MR, Outcomes analysis, Acute, Osteoporosis Aims and objectives The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic X-rays and MRI of the injured wrist in female patients aged 50 years or more. Methods and materials Fift...

  7. Smartphone photography utilized to measure wrist range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Conti Mica, Megan; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to determine if smartphone photography is a reliable tool in measuring wrist movement. Smartphones were used to take digital photos of both wrists in 32 normal participants (64 wrists) at extremes of wrist motion. The smartphone measurements were compared with clinical goniometry measurements. There was a very high correlation between the clinical goniometry and smartphone measurements, as the concordance coefficients were high for radial deviation, ulnar deviation, wrist extension and wrist flexion. The Pearson coefficients also demonstrated the high precision of the smartphone measurements. The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated 29-31 of 32 smartphone measurements were within the 95% confidence interval of the clinical measurements for all positions of the wrists. There was high reliability between the photography taken by the volunteer and researcher, as well as high inter-observer reliability. Smartphone digital photography is a reliable and accurate tool for measuring wrist range of motion. II.

  8. Comparative study of the detection of joint injury in early-stage rheumatoid arthritis by magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist and finger joints and physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Mami; Kawakami, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Kita, Junko; Okada, Akitomo; Koga, Tomohiro; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kamachi, Makoto; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Hideki; Ida, Hiroaki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Takao, Shoichiro; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Uetani, Masataka; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2011-03-01

    To verify whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven joint injury is sensitive as compared with joint injury determined by physical examination. MRI of the wrist and finger joints of both hands was examined in 51 early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by both plain and gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced MRI. Synovitis, bone edema, and bone erosion (the latter two included as bone lesions at the wrist joints); metacarpophalangeal joints; and proximal interphalangeal joints were considered as MRI-proven joint injury. Japan College of Rheumatology-certified rheumatologists had given a physical examination just before the MRI study. The presence of tender and/or swollen joints in the same fields as MRI was considered as joint injury on physical examination. The association of MRI-proven joint injury with physical examination-proven joint injury was examined. A total of 1,110 sites were available to be examined. MRI-proven joint injury was found in 521 sites, whereas the other 589 sites were normal. Physical examination-proven joint injury was found in 305 sites, which was significantly low as compared with MRI-proven joint injury (P = 1.1 × 10(-12) versus MRI). Joint injury on physical examination was not found in 81.5% of the sites where MRI findings were normal. Furthermore, an association of the severity of MRI-proven joint injury with that of joint injury on physical examination was clearly demonstrated (P = 1.6 × 10(-15), r(s) = 0.469). Our present data suggest that MRI is not only sensitive but accurately reflects the joint injury in patients with early-stage RA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Design and characterization of the OpenWrist: A robotic wrist exoskeleton for coordinated hand-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezent, Evan; Rose, Chad G; Deshpande, Ashish D; O'Malley, Marcia K

    2017-07-01

    Robotic devices have been clinically verified for use in long duration and high intensity rehabilitation needed for motor recovery after neurological injury. Targeted and coordinated hand and wrist therapy, often overlooked in rehabilitation robotics, is required to regain the ability to perform activities of daily living. To this end, a new coupled hand-wrist exoskeleton has been designed. This paper details the design of the wrist module and several human-related considerations made to maximize its potential as a coordinated hand-wrist device. The serial wrist mechanism has been engineered to facilitate donning and doffing for impaired subjects and to insure compatibility with the hand module in virtual and assisted grasping tasks. Several other practical requirements have also been addressed, including device ergonomics, clinician-friendliness, and ambidextrous reconfigurability. The wrist module's capabilities as a rehabilitation device are quantified experimentally in terms of functional workspace and dynamic properties. Specifically, the device possesses favorable performance in terms of range of motion, torque output, friction, and closed-loop position bandwidth when compared with existing devices. The presented wrist module's performance and operational considerations support its use in a wide range of future clinical investigations.

  10. Scapholunate kinematics of asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists using four-dimensional CT examinations: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demehri, Shadpour; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Morelli, John N.; Thakur, Uma; Eng, John [Johns Hopkins University, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lifchez, Scott D.; Shores, Jaimie T. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Means, Kenneth R. [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, The Curtis National Hand Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Using four-dimensional CT scan (4DCT), we aimed at showing the kinematics of scapholunate (SL) interval in asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists with inconclusive radiographic findings. This is an IRB approved, HIPPA compliant, retrospective study. Patients suspected of SL interosseous ligament (SLIL) injuries were referred for further evaluation of chronic wrist pain (>3 months). Twelve wrists (11 subjects) with chronic symptoms and inconclusive plain radiographs and 10 asymptomatic wrists (in 10 different subjects) were scanned using 4DCT. The minimum SL interval was measured during three wrist motions: relaxed-to-clenched fist, flexion-to-extension, and radial-to-ulnar-deviation. Changes were recorded using double-oblique multiplanar reformation technique. We extracted the normal limits of the SL interval as measured by dynamic CT scanning during active motion in asymptomatic wrists. In asymptomatic wrists, the average SL interval was observed to be smaller than 1 mm during all motions. In symptomatic wrists, during exams performed with clenched fist (SL interval (mean ± SD) = 2.53 ± 1.19 mm), extension (2.54 ± 1.48 mm) or ulnar deviation (2.06 ± 1.12 mm), the average SL interval was more than 2 mm. In contrast to symptomatic wrists, no significant change in SL interval measurements was detected during wrist motions in asymptomatic wrists. There was a mild to moderate correlation between SL interval change and presence/absence of symptoms (point-biserial correlation coefficients: 0.29-0.55). In patients with wrist pain suspicious for SLIL injury and inconclusive radiographs, SL interval increase can be detected with 4DCT in the symptomatic wrist compared to the asymptomatic wrist. (orig.)

  11. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... movement: Warm up your wrist by using a heating pad or warm washcloth for about 10 minutes. ... MD, Thompson SR. eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  12. Endowrist versus wrist: a case-controlled study comparing robotic versus hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Frederick H X; Tan, Ker-Kan; Lieske, Bettina; Tsang, Marianne L; Tsang, Charles B; Koh, Dean C

    2014-10-01

    Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) remains a technically challenging procedure. This study aims to compare the surgical outcomes of the robotic-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) versus hand-assisted laparoscopic (HAL) techniques in performing TME for patients with rectal cancers. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent RAL TME for rectal cancers was performed. These cases were matched for age, sex, and stage of malignancy with patients who underwent HAL TME. Data collected included age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, comorbid conditions, types of surgical resections and operative times, perioperative complications, length of hospital stays, and histopathologic outcomes were analyzed. From August 2008 to August 2011, 19 patients, with a median age of 62 (range, 47 to 92) years underwent RAL TME. Eight (42.1%) patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The median docking and operative times were 10 (range, 3 to 34) and 390 (range, 289 to 771) minutes, respectively. There was 1 (5.3%) conversion to open surgery. The grade of mesorectal excision was histopathologically reported as complete in all 19 cases. Positive circumferential margin was reported in 1 (5.3%) patient.Comparing the 2 groups, more patients in the RAL group received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (8 vs. 3; P=0.048). The operative times were longer in the RAL group (390 vs. 225 min; P<0.001). A higher proportion of patients in the HAL group required conversion to open surgery (5 vs. 1; P=0.180) and developed perioperative morbidities (3 vs. 7; P=0.269). The median length of hospitalization was comparable between both groups (RAL: 7 vs. HAL: 6 d; P=0.476).The procedural cost was significantly higher in the RAL group (US$12,460 vs. US$8560; P<0.001), whereas the nonprocedural cost remained comparable between the 2 groups (RAL: US$4470 vs. HAL: US$4500; P=0.729). RAL TME is associated with lower conversion and morbidity rates compared with HAL TME. The longer

  13. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Martins Roberto S.; Siqueira Mario G.; Simplício Hougelli

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist imobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuosly for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment...

  14. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    survival was 0.9 at 5–9 years. Interpretation The clinical results in terms of pain, motion, strength, and function were similar to those in previous reports. The implant survival was 0.9 at 9 years, both in rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid cases, which is an important improvement compared to the earlier......Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non......-rheumatoid cases) and short follow-up times. Here we report a multicenter series using a third-generation implant with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Methods In 2012, data were retrieved from a registry of consecutive wrist operations at 7 centers with units specialized in hand surgery, between 2003 and 2007...

  15. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  16. Meta-Analysis: Association Between Wrist Posture and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doohee You

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: We found evidence that prolonged exposure to non-neutral wrist postures is associated with a twofold increased risk for CTS compared with low hours of exposure to non-neutral wrist postures. Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  17. The hand and wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.B.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Trauma is the most common etiologic factor leading to disability in the hand and wrist. Judicious radiographic evaluation is required for accurate assessment in practically all but the most minor of such injuries. Frequently serial radiographic evaluation is essential for directing the course of treatment and for following the healing process. A meaningful radiographic evaluation requires a comprehensive knowledge of the normal radiographic anatomy, an overview of the spectrum of pathology, and an awareness of the usual mechanisms of injury, appropriate treatment options, and relevant array of complications

  18. Tubercular monoarthritis of wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB has been a major health concern since decades, and millions continue to be afflicted with this disease. Extrapulmonary sites of TB must not be neglected as there is paucity of systemic manifestations and absence of distinct clinical features which delay its diagnosis and can lead to functional disability and severe infirmities. Osteoarticular TB is an infrequent form of the disease and monoarthritis of the wrist accounts for 1% of all cases of skeletal involvement. Hereby, we report a 45-year-old female patient with history of progressive pain and swelling of right wrist joint which is refractory to analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. She was diagnosed to have tubercular monoarthritis after synovial fluid analysis and radiographic findings. Standard antitubercular treatment for 6 months was given. The joint was salvaged after 9 months from the start of the treatment. Pain and swelling of joint were subsided and joint was rehabilitated with full range of motion and weight bearing.

  19. Comparative study of different sexis mutability: recessive sex-linked and dominant lethals in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatti, K.V.; Dzhaparidze, L.A.; Mamon, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) and those realizing in embryogenesis of dominant lethals, which form in oo- and spermatogenesis of Drosophila and fly productivity under the effect of X-rays and N-nitroso-N methylourea (NMU), is studied. In the case of effect of both mutagens RSLLM form in spermatocytes with higher frequency as compared with oocytes. Dominant lethal mutations (DLM) during irradiation are also often registered in spermatocytes. NMU induces DLM in mitotic male cells with a very high frequency but is not effective during the effect on oocytes. When both mutagens affect males and X-rays affect females, the decrease of productivity is mainly conditioned by DLM. As NMU does not induce DLM in females realizing in embryogenesis but reduces productivity, a later lethal realization connected with their different nature is supposed. Differences in mole and female mutability found in the course of X-ray and NMU effect are discussed in connection with peculiarities of their mitotic cells and the nature of effect of mutagens applied [ru

  20. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...

  1. Comparative Study between Two Market Clearing Schemes in Wind Dominant Electricity Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farashbashi-Astaneh, Seyed-Mostafa; Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    High price volatility and excessive price reduction are introduced as two emerging problems in wind dominant electricity markets. In this study, an agent-based simulation methodology is employed to investigate the impact of two pricing mechanisms, uniform and pay-as-bid, on the mentioned problems...... policy maker's concerns regarding mentioned emerging problems in power systems with extremely high percentage of wind power penetration. It is also shown that market efficiency is lower under pay-as-bid scheme. The validity of the proposed methodology is investigated using IEEE 24-bus test system with 33....... According to the proposed agent-based approach, electricity market agents (here generation units) learn from their previous bidding experience to obtain maximum financial. A comparative study is then conducted to investigate the impact of mentioned pricing schemes on price volatility and average price level...

  2. Wrist Septic Arthritis: An 11 Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Robert Tze Jin; Tay, Shian Chao

    2015-10-01

    This report utilizes 11 years (2003-2013) of clinical records of patients for a retrospective evaluation of the effectiveness of various combinations of diagnostic methods, treatment options and surgical procedures to try to determine the optimal combinations to improve the rate of success for the treatment of septic wrist arthritis. Analysis of records of 40 patients treated for septic wrist arthritis in our hospital involving records of physical examination, full blood analysis, biochemical, microbial profiles, type of surgical intervention, length of stay, number of surgical interventions to resolution and the rate of morbidity and mortality. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups, consisting of 6 (mortality) in one group and 34 (non-mortality) in the other. The various parameters as listed above were compared for differences. The patient records included those from immunocompromised elderly patients, with other existing medical complications such as gout, pseudogout, cellulitis and arthritic flare that made accurate diagnosis of septic wrist arthritis challenging. There is a trend showing better success in the treatment of septic wrist arthritis among patients without co-morbid medical problems. Due to the unavoidable delays in microbial identification, it was noted that escalation of antibiotics should be adopted especially for the immunocompromised patients. Staphylococcus aureus, the most common microbial pathogen in our findings, point to the need to adopt a lower threshold for escalation of antibiotics for immunocompromised patients with slow reversal of infection in order to reduce morbidity, mortality, number of surgeries and length of post-operative stay.

  3. Wrist proprioception: amplitude or position coding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Marini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work examines physiological mechanisms underlying the position sense of the wrist, namely the codification of proprioceptive information related to pointing movements of the wrist towards kinesthetic targets. Twenty-four healthy subjects participated to a robot-aided assessment of their wrist proprioceptive acuity to investigate if the sensorimotor transformation involved in matching targets located by proprioceptive receptors relies on amplitude or positional cues. A joint position matching test was performed in order to explore such dichotomy. In this test, the wrist of a blindfolded participant is passively moved by a robotic device to a preset target position and, after a removal movement from this position, the participant has to actively replicate and match it as accurately as possible. The test involved two separate conditions: in the first the matching movements started from the same initial location; in the second one the initial location was randomly assigned. Target matching accuracy, precision and bias in the two conditions were then compared. Overall results showed a consistent higher performance in the former condition than in the latter, thus supporting the hypothesis that the joint position sense is based on vectorial or amplitude coding rather than positional.

  4. The kinetics of normal and prosthetic wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, J R; Blair, W F; Andrews, J G; Crowninshield, R D

    1985-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to describe normal wrist kinetics, and (2) to investigate the in-vitro kinetics of four currently available wrist prostheses (Swanson, Meuli, Volz, Hamas). The effective tendon moment arms of the six major wrist muscles were determined through the use of load cells and applied weights. Testing was conducted in a neutral wrist configuration with hand pronation-supination both constrained and unconstrained. The results indicate that each of the muscles studied has a unique set of effective tendon moment arms about the normal wrist as well as about wrists with the implanted prostheses, and that none of the prosthetic wrists studied duplicated normal wrist kinetics.

  5. Decoupling the Wrist: A Cadaveric Experiment Examining Wrist Kinematics Following Midcarpal Fusion and Scaphoid Excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A.; Bednar, Michael S.; Havey, Robert M.; Murray, Wendy M.

    2016-01-01

    At the wrist, kinematic coupling (the relationship between flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) facilitates function. Although the midcarpal joint is critical for kinematic coupling, many surgeries, such as four-corner fusion (4CF) and scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion (SE4CF), modify the midcarpal joint. This study examines how 4CF and SE4CF influence kinematic coupling by quantifying wrist axes of rotation. Wrist axes of rotation were quantified in eight cadaveric specimens using an optimization algorithm, which fit a two-revolute joint model to experimental data. In each specimen, data measuring the motion of the third metacarpal relative to the radius was collected for three conditions (nonimpaired, 4CF, SE4CF). The calculated axes of rotation were compared using spherical statistics. The angle between the axes of rotation was used to assess coupling, as the nonimpaired wrist has skew axes (i.e., angle between axes approximately 60°). Following 4CF and SE4CF, the axes are closer to orthogonal than those of the nonimpaired wrist. The mean angle (±95 percent confidence interval) between the axes was 92.6° ± 25.2° and 99.8° ± 22.0° for 4CF and SE4CF, respectively. The axes of rotation defined in this study can be used to define joint models, which will facilitate more accurate computational and experimental studies of these procedures. PMID:27705062

  6. Chondrocalcinosis of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffar, P

    2004-10-01

    Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition (CPDD) disease has characteristic radiographic features including soft tissue calcification, joint space narrowing, bone sclerosis, subchondral cyst formation without osteophyte formation, and large intraosseous geodes. Triangular fibrocartilage calcification is frequently found and isolated scapho-trapezio-trapezoid (STT) arthritis is specific for CPDD. Distal radio-ulnar (DRUJ), isolated midcarpal joint and piso-triquetral joint involvement also occur. 127 patients were reviewed. Seventy-eight had symptomatic STT joint arthritis, for which 36 underwent surgery. Twenty-two patients had a SLAC wrist deformity for which ten underwent surgery. Eight patients had isolated midcarpal arthritis for which three midcarpal arthrodeses, two four-bone arthrodeses and two carpal tunnel releases were performed. Nineteen patients had a generalized arthritis and seven of the patients underwent surgery: four-corner arthrodesis+scaphoidectomy (one case), carpal tunnel release (two cases) extensor synovectomy (two cases) and trigger finger release (two cases).

  7. Determination of the relationship between the wrist isokinetic muscle strenght and the grip strength in tennis players aged between 12-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akınoğlu, Bihter; Kocahan, Tuğba; Yıldırım, Necmiye Ün; Soylu, Çağlar; Hasanoğlu, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between isokinetic wrist muscle strenght and grip strength in tennis players aged between 12-14. Methods: This study was carried out with the participation of 9 (3 female and 6 male) tennis players aged between 12-14 (means 13,22±0,83). Weight, height, body mass index and dominant extremity of the players were recorded. İsokinetic measurement was performed with Isomed 2000® device. İsokinetic testing protocol; before the test all players performed the wrist flexion and extension isokinetic test with the 5 repeating at 90 º/sec as a warm-up and for comprehenting the test. Then, wrist flexion and extension concentric-concentric strength measurements were performed with the 5 repeating at 60 º/sec and with the 15 repeating at 240 º/sec with the angle between 50 degrees of wrist flexion and 60 degrees of wrist extension and peak torque values were recorded. Standard Jamar® Dynamometer was used for grip strength measurements. Grip strenght was performed firstly in sitting position, which is the position of standard measurement. Secondly, in standing position, the elbow was in full ekstansion and the forearm was in neutral position. Thirdly, in standing position the wrist was positioned approximately 30° extension and 10° ulnar deviation. This test was repeated 3 times in all test position and the mean of three scores were recorded. Firstly, the dominant hand, then the non-dominant hand was evoluated. They were allowed to rest for 30 seconds between each grip measurement. Correlation between peak tork of isokinetic muscle strenght and grip strength was done having been used Spearman correlation test. Findings: It was determined that there was a significant positive relation between wrist flexion-extension isokinetic muscle strength and grip strenght in tennis players aged between 12-14. Clinically, grip strength measured in the standard sitting position was found more as compared to the other

  8. Comparing the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in the assessment of wrist flexor spasticity in patients with stroke: protocol for a neurophysiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Hamid; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mansouri, Korosh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Hasson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reliable and valid tools must be used to assess spasticity in clinical practise and research settings. There is a paucity of literature regarding the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). No study, to date, has been performed to compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS. This neurophysiological study protocol will compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS in the assessment of poststroke wrist flexor spasticity. Methods and analysis Thirty-two patients with stroke from the University Rehabilitation clinics will be recruited to participate in this cross-sectional, non-interventional study. All measurements will be taken in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Shafa University Hospital in Tehran, Iran. First, wrist flexor spasticity will be assessed clinically using the MMAS and MTS. The tests will be applied randomly. For the MTS, the components of R1, R2, R2−R1 and quality of muscle reaction will be measured. Second, neurophysiological measures of H-reflex latency, Hmax/Mmax ratio, Hslp and Hslp/Mslp ratio will be collected from the affected side. The results will be analysed using Spearman's ρ test or Pearson's correlation test to determine the validity of the MMAS and the MTS as well as to compare the validity between the MMAS and the MTS. Ethics and dissemination The Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) approved the study protocol.  The study results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at international congresses. PMID:23166123

  9. Comparing the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in the assessment of wrist flexor spasticity in patients with stroke: protocol for a neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Hamid; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mansouri, Korosh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Hasson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and valid tools must be used to assess spasticity in clinical practise and research settings. There is a paucity of literature regarding the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). No study, to date, has been performed to compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS. This neurophysiological study protocol will compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS in the assessment of poststroke wrist flexor spasticity. Thirty-two patients with stroke from the University Rehabilitation clinics will be recruited to participate in this cross-sectional, non-interventional study. All measurements will be taken in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Shafa University Hospital in Tehran, Iran. First, wrist flexor spasticity will be assessed clinically using the MMAS and MTS. The tests will be applied randomly. For the MTS, the components of R1, R2, R2-R1 and quality of muscle reaction will be measured. Second, neurophysiological measures of H-reflex latency, H(max)/M(max) ratio, H(slp) and H(slp)/M(slp) ratio will be collected from the affected side. The results will be analysed using Spearman's ρ test or Pearson's correlation test to determine the validity of the MMAS and the MTS as well as to compare the validity between the MMAS and the MTS. The Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) approved the study protocol.  The study results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at international congresses.

  10. Physical activity derived from questionnaires and wrist-worn accelerometers: comparability and the role of demographic, lifestyle, and health factors among a population-based sample of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koolhaas CM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chantal M Koolhaas,1 Frank JA van Rooij,1 Magda Cepeda,1 Henning Tiemeier,1–3 Oscar H Franco,1 Josje D Schoufour1 1Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Background: Agreement between questionnaires and accelerometers to measure physical activity (PA differs between studies and might be related to demographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics, including disability and depressive symptoms.Methods: We included 1,410 individuals aged 51–94 years from the population-based Rotterdam Study. Participants completed the LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire and wore a wrist-worn accelerometer on the nondominant wrist for 1 week thereafter. We compared the Spearman correlation and disagreement (level and direction for total PA across levels of demographic, lifestyle, and health variables. The level of disagreement was defined as the absolute difference between questionnaire- and accelerometer-derived PA, whereas the direction of disagreement was defined as questionnaire PA minus accelerometer PA. We used linear regression analyses with the level and direction of disagreement as outcome, including all demographic, lifestyle, and health variables in the model.Results: We observed a Spearman correlation of 0.30 between questionnaire- and accelerometer-derived PA in the total population. The level of disagreement (ie, absolute difference was 941.9 (standard deviation [SD] 747.0 minutes/week, and the PA reported by questionnaire was on average 529.4 (SD 1,079.5 minutes/week lower than PA obtained by the accelerometer. The level of disagreement decreased with higher educational levels. Additionally, participants with obesity, higher disability scores, and more depressive symptoms underestimated their self-reported PA more than their

  11. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  12. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  13. Radiologic evaluation of wrist arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Hee; Seong, Hyeun Lim; Yang, Jae Beom; Park, Chan Sup; Lee, Sang Seun

    1991-01-01

    Wrist arthrography allows direct visualization of the cartilage and synovial structure not seen in plain film. Arthrography of the wrist is valuable in evaluating patients with persistent wrist pain and limitation of motion after trauma. Wrist arthrography was performed in the evaluation of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (2 cases), ganglions (12 cases), and wrist trauma (16 cases), and contrast media was injected in radiocarpal joint. The arthrographic findings were analyzed, and the results were as follows: In 16 patients with wrist trauma, 12 cases (75%) of compartment communication was seen including communication with distal radioulnar joint (44%), midcarpal joint (69%), and common carpometacarpal joint (63%). Of the total 30 patients, the pisiform-triquetral joint communicated with the radio carpal joint in 9 cases (30%). In 16 patients with trauma, the findings of post-traumatic arthritis included tendon communication (50%), irregular synovium (31%), and rupture of the joint capsule (25%). There was no lymphatic filling. Of 3 scaphoid fracture patients without bony callus formation, fibrous union was verified in one patient and nouncion in 2. O 12 patients with ganglion, communication between the ganglion and radiocarpal joint was seen in 2 cases and no communication in 10 cases

  14. Robot-assisted assessment of wrist proprioception: does wrist proprioceptive acuity follow Weber's law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contu, Sara; Marini, Francesca; Cappello, Leonardo; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Proprioception is essential for planning and controlling limb posture and movement. In our recent work, we introduced a standardized robot-aided method for measuring proprioceptive discrimination thresholds at the wrist to obtain reliable and accurate measures of proprioceptive acuity. Weber's law defines discrimination thresholds as a constant ratio between the just noticeable difference and the reference or standard stimulus. Reporting Weber's fractions thus provides the possibility of comparing results with the reports of others collected worldwide. This work aims to determine that Weber's Law holds for proprioceptive discrimination thresholds and to provide Weber's fraction for wrist joint proprioception. To this end, eight healthy subjects experienced two passive wrist movements of different amplitude and verbally indicated which was larger. An adaptive psychophysical procedure established the amplitude of the largest stimulus according to participants' responses. This comparison stimulus was then compared to a standard stimulus amplitude of 10°, 20°, 30° or 40°. The discrimination thresholds for each standard stimulus were established at the 75% correct response level. The obtained thresholds followed Weber's Law indicating that larger amplitudes were associated with higher discrimination thresholds. Based on a linear regression function the overall Weber's fraction, defined as the slope of the line, was computed to be 0.09. This result expands the present limited knowledge on wrist proprioception showing that its proprioceptive acuity follows Weber's law.

  15. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist clinical evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheurecker, G

    2001-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG...

  16. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Carloni, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures [it

  17. Viability of Hand and Wrist Photogoniometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton G; Saunders, Rebecca J; Desale, Sameer; Means, Kenneth R

    2017-04-01

    No goniometric technique is both maximally convenient and completely accurate, although photogoniometry (ie, picture taking to facilitate digital angle measurement) shows promise in this regard. Our purpose was to test the feasibility and reliability of a photogoniometric protocol designed to measure wrist and digit range of motion in general. Two independent observers examined a sample of joints in both normal and abnormal hands according to a photogoniometric protocol. Interrater and intrarater correlation were calculated, and these measurements were compared with measurements made by a third independent examiner with a manual goniometer. The photo-based measurements were reliable within and between observers; however, only a minority of these measurements were in agreement with manually collected values. At present, photogoniometry is not an acceptable alternative to manual goniometry for determining wrist and digit range of motion in general. Joint-specific photogoniometry should be the subject of future study, as should relevant imaging and software technology.

  18. Wrist CT and three-dimensional reconstruction: Direct coronal versus transaxial scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondetti, P.R.; Vannier, M.W.; Gilula, L.A.; Knapp, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Because of its three-dimensional complexity, the wrist cannot be completely examined radiographically without CT. Complex carpal fractures, intercarpal and distal radioulnar dislocations or subluxations, late sequelae of trauma (nonunion, osteonecrosis, degenerative changes, infections), and the painful wrist with normal plain film and abnormal bone scan appearance have been evaluated with CT. In the majority of cases reported in the literature, the wrist was scanned by CT in the transaxial plane. The author compared direct transaxial and coronal CT scanning in 23 patients with wrist disorders. Axial sections were superior for distal radioulnar subluxation, hamate hook fractures, and for the ventral trapezial tubercle not shown on routine radiographs. Coronal scanning, performed using a specially designed wrist fixture, was preferable for most other wrist CT examinations. Coronal wrist CT offers perpendicular orientation for the majority of the carpal joints, anatomic display similar to that of plain film radiography, and fewer scans per wrist CT examination. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction wrist images were better when coronal rather than transaxial scans were used as input. Direct coronal CT should be the method of choice for most patients with wrist problems

  19. The Diagnostic Utility of Midcarpal Anesthetic Injection in the Evaluation of Chronic Wrist Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, S. Josh; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Moran, Steven L.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of chronic wrist pain can be a diagnostic dilemma. Lidocaine injections combined with corticosteroids are often used for both diagnosis and therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine if a midcarpal injection of lidocaine could serve as a diagnostic tool in patients with chronic wrist pain. Specifically, the relationship of pain relief from the injection and improvement of grip strength were compared to the presence of intracarpal pathology as confirmed by wrist arthros...

  20. Comparative community gene expression analysis of Aquificales-dominated geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Meneghin, Jennifer; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2013-04-01

    Members of Sulfurihydrogenibium are often observed as visible filamentous biomass in circumneutral hot springs and play roles in sulfur-cycling, hydrogen oxidation and iron mineralization. To gain insight into the ecophysiology of Sulfurihydrogenibium populations, we conducted preliminary metatranscriptomic analysis of three distinct thermal springs; Calcite Springs (YNP-CS) and Mammoth Springs (YNP-MHS) in Yellowstone National Park, USA, and Furnas Springs (AZ) in Azores, Portugal. Genes to which transcripts were assigned revealed commonly expressed functions among the sites, while several differences were also observed. All three sites, Sulfurihydrogenibium spp. dominate and are obtaining energy via metabolism of sulfur compounds under microaerophilic conditions. Cell motility was one of the expressed functions in two sites (YNP-CS and AZ) with slower stream flow rates and thicker well-formed biofilms. The transcripts from YNP-CS and -MHS exhibited varying levels of sequence divergence from the reference genomes and corresponding metagenomes, suggesting the presence of microdiversity among Sulfurihydrogenibium populations in situ. Conversely, the majority of the AZ transcripts were identical to the S. azorense genome. Our initial results show that the metatranscriptomes in these similar Aquificales-dominated communities can reveal community-level gene function in geochemically distinct thermal environments. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Proximal Row Carpectomy Combined with Wrist Hemiarthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Culp, Randall W.; Bachoura, Abdo; Gelman, Scott E.; Jacoby, Sidney M.

    2012-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a relatively novel procedure that rivals total wrist arthrodesis and offers a new surgical treatment option for select patients with painful, end-stage wrist disease. We present our early experience with this procedure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for nonrheumatoid patients diagnosed with wrist arthritis and subsequently treated with wrist hemiarthroplasty combined with PRC. The minimum follow-up dura...

  2. Identifying dominant controls on hydrologic parameter transfer from gauged to ungauged catchments: a comparative hydrology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Archfield, S.A.; Wagener, T.

    2014-01-01

    Daily streamflow information is critical for solving various hydrologic problems, though observations of continuous streamflow for model calibration are available at only a small fraction of the world’s rivers. One approach to estimate daily streamflow at an ungauged location is to transfer rainfall–runoff model parameters calibrated at a gauged (donor) catchment to an ungauged (receiver) catchment of interest. Central to this approach is the selection of a hydrologically similar donor. No single metric or set of metrics of hydrologic similarity have been demonstrated to consistently select a suitable donor catchment. We design an experiment to diagnose the dominant controls on successful hydrologic model parameter transfer. We calibrate a lumped rainfall–runoff model to 83 stream gauges across the United States. All locations are USGS reference gauges with minimal human influence. Parameter sets from the calibrated models are then transferred to each of the other catchments and the performance of the transferred parameters is assessed. This transfer experiment is carried out both at the scale of the entire US and then for six geographic regions. We use classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to determine the relationship between catchment similarity and performance of transferred parameters. Similarity is defined using physical/climatic catchment characteristics, as well as streamflow response characteristics (signatures such as baseflow index and runoff ratio). Across the entire US, successful parameter transfer is governed by similarity in elevation and climate, and high similarity in streamflow signatures. Controls vary for different geographic regions though. Geology followed by drainage, topography and climate constitute the dominant similarity metrics in forested eastern mountains and plateaus, whereas agricultural land use relates most strongly with successful parameter transfer in the humid plains.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: demonstration of progression between 1 and 6 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Neal R.; Crabbe, Jeffrey P.; McQueen, Fiona M.

    2004-01-01

    To describe the changes seen in the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging obtained at 1 year and 6 years. A cohort of patients with RA has been studied prospectively from symptom onset. MR scans of the dominant wrist in 31 patients obtained at 1 year and 6 years were compared for bone erosions, marrow signal change (oedema), synovial thickness and tenosynovitis. Twenty-two patients had an increase in erosion score in the interval and three patients showed a decrease in erosion score suggesting erosion healing. Fourteen patients had an increase in oedema score in the interval and eight patients had a decrease in oedema score. Synovial thickness increased in 13 patients and decreased in eight. Tenosynovitis increased in 15 patients and decreased in five. Bone erosions developed immediately adjacent to the tenosynovitis in two patients. MR imaging is useful in following the progress of bone erosions, marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis in RA. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: demonstration of progression between 1 and 6 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Neal R. [Auckland Hospital, Department of Radiology, Private Bag 92024, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland Radiology Group, Auckland (New Zealand); Crabbe, Jeffrey P. [Auckland Radiology Group, Auckland (New Zealand); McQueen, Fiona M. [Auckland Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2004-12-01

    To describe the changes seen in the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging obtained at 1 year and 6 years. A cohort of patients with RA has been studied prospectively from symptom onset. MR scans of the dominant wrist in 31 patients obtained at 1 year and 6 years were compared for bone erosions, marrow signal change (oedema), synovial thickness and tenosynovitis. Twenty-two patients had an increase in erosion score in the interval and three patients showed a decrease in erosion score suggesting erosion healing. Fourteen patients had an increase in oedema score in the interval and eight patients had a decrease in oedema score. Synovial thickness increased in 13 patients and decreased in eight. Tenosynovitis increased in 15 patients and decreased in five. Bone erosions developed immediately adjacent to the tenosynovitis in two patients. MR imaging is useful in following the progress of bone erosions, marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis in RA. (orig.)

  5. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  6. Clinical value of MRI on wrists with arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qiang; Ma Daqing; He Wen; Le Erhu; Ma Xinfa; Wang Jun; Zuo Zhaoyong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearances of various kinds of arthritis on MRI, and to assess and evaluate the role of MRI on diagnosing various kinds of arthritis. Methods: One hundred and fifty-one patients with medical history of wrist pain entered the study. T 1 -weighted spin echo, STIR (short time inversion recovery) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were examined in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical data including swollen joint and patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory, examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score (HAQ). According to 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, in 151 patients, 80 patients were diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis, 29 patients as undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, 20 patients as seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and 22 as other kinds of connective tissue diseases. Results: All 80 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis had bilateral pannus. Among 29 patients diagnosed with undifferentiated spondyloanthropathy, 3 cases had bilateral pannus, 24 had lateral pannus. Among 20 patients diagnosed with seronegative spondyloanthropathy, 4 cases had bilateral pannus, 15 had lateral pannus. Among 22 patients diagnosed with other kinds of connective tissue disease, 21 had lateral pannus. Bilateral pannus on bilateral wrists occured in 87 patients. There were not significant difference in the unilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =6.157; P>0.05). But there were significant difference in the bilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =126.882, P 2 =94.192, P 2 =70.354, P 2 =96.174, P<0.001). Conclusion: MRI can show the pathologic changes of wrists with various kinds of arthritis. MRI plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of various kinds of arthritis

  7. [Wound repair and functional reconstruction of high-voltage electrical burns in wrists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y M; Ma, C X; Qin, F J; Zhang, C; Wang, C; Hu, X H

    2017-12-20

    total active motion (TAM) method, while median nerve function of 21 wrist wounds which had median nerve repair was evaluated with integrate estimation method. Results: (1) After forearm amputation, the incisions of 20 wrists with necrosis in the distal end were healed. (2) Among the 98 tissue flaps, 90 had good blood flow, while 8 had distal necrosis, of which 6 were healed after necrotic tissue removal and skin grafting, and two were sutured directly after debridement. Infection occurred under 7 flaps, of which 3 were healed by dressing change, and 4 were healed after second debridement. Twenty wrist wounds which had radial artery or ulnar artery repair had good blood supply of hand and amputation was avoided. During follow-up of 1 to 3 years, the incisions and flaps of patients who had tissue flap repair surgery healed well. (3) The excellent and good rate of TAM in each finger of the corresponding affected limbs of 53 wrist wounds which had tendon and nerve repair surgery was 51%. (4) Twenty wrists which had simple tendon and nerve release surgery were followed up for 1 to 2 years. The strength of muscle dominated by the median nerve was restored to grade Ⅴ in 1 wrist, grade Ⅳ in 3 wrists, and grade Ⅲ in 2 wrists. The strength of muscle dominated by the ulnar nerve was restored to grade Ⅳ in 3 wrists, with no recovery in other wrists. Sensory function examination showed grade S0 in 4 wrists, grade S1 in 2 wrists, grade S2 in 3 wrists, grade S3 in 8 wrists, and grade S4 in 3 wrists. Twenty-one wrists which had median nerve repair were followed up for 1 to 2 years. There was no recovery in muscle strength dominated by the median nerve. Sensory function examination showed grade S0 in 3 wrists, grade S1 in 5 wrists, grade S2 in 8 wrists, and grade S3 in 5 wrists. Conclusions: It is a good method to sequentially conduct early fasciotomy for decompression, early debridement, vascular reconstruction, transplant of tissue flap with abundant blood supply, tendon and

  8. Evaluation of skeletal maturity in North Indian subjects using an objective method based on cervical vertebral bone age and assessment of its reliability as compared to hand wrist radiographic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the skeletal maturity objectively and assess the reliability and validity of this method in North Indian subjects. Materials and Methods: Sixty subjects (8-16 years were taken and divided into two groups of 30 males and 30 females. For each subject, cervical vertebral bone age (VA was evaluated by the objective method described by Mito et al., and bone age (BA was estimated by Grave and Brown method of hand wrist radiograph. Correlations and average differences between various ages were determined. An analysis of variance and Tukey′s post-hoc tests were used to compare various ages at 5% significance level. Results: The correlations between cervical VAs and BAs were higher than other ages and also more in females than males. The analysis of female data showed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05 whereas analysis of male data showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05 between various ages. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that this method of objectively evaluating skeletal maturation is reliable and can be applied to North Indian females only. The development of a new method to objectively evaluate cervical VA in males is needed.

  9. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability.Non-pregnant (N = 73 and pregnant (N = 35 Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable.There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10 and 9(7-10, respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001.A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  10. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, Massimo [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.defilippo@unipr.it; Pogliacomi, Francesco [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Bertellini, Annalisa [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Araoz, Philip A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [Department of Radiological and Histopathological Sciences, Policlinic S.Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  11. AGE-RELATED DECLINES IN THE DETECTION OF PASSIVE WRIST MOVEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Melissa L.; Adamo, Diane E.; Brown, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related changes in proprioceptive ability and their contributions to postural instability have been well documented. In contrast, and despite the known importance of proprioceptive feedback in the control of coordinated arm and hand movement, studies focusing on upper limb proprioception in older populations are few and equivocal in their findings. This study focused on kinesthetic awareness about the wrist joint in healthy young and older adults. Passive movement detection thresholds (PMDT) were twice as high in older compared to young participants. In contrast to previous findings demonstrating asymmetries in static position sense, PMDT did not differ between the dominant and non-dominant wrist joints nor did direction of joint displacement affect PMDT as has been reported for the lower limb. Preliminary analysis indicated that PMDT was significantly higher in older adults categorized as sedentary while active older adults were able to detect passive movement as well as young adults. These findings demonstrate that upper limb kinesthesia is impaired in older adults although the degree of impairment may be influenced by one’s level of physical activity. PMID:21704124

  12. Exploring Symmetric and Asymmetric Bimanual Eating Detection with Inertial Sensors on the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Edison; Bedri, Abdelkareem; Prioleau, Temiloluwa; Essa, Irfan; Abowd, Gregory D

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by health applications, eating detection with off-the-shelf devices has been an active area of research. A common approach has been to recognize and model individual intake gestures with wrist-mounted inertial sensors. Despite promising results, this approach is limiting as it requires the sensing device to be worn on the hand performing the intake gesture, which cannot be guaranteed in practice. Through a study with 14 participants comparing eating detection performance when gestural data is recorded with a wrist-mounted device on (1) both hands, (2) only the dominant hand, and (3) only the non-dominant hand, we provide evidence that a larger set of arm and hand movement patterns beyond food intake gestures are predictive of eating activities when L1 or L2 normalization is applied to the data. Our results are supported by the theory of asymmetric bimanual action and contribute to the field of automated dietary monitoring. In particular, it shines light on a new direction for eating activity recognition with consumer wearables in realistic settings.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Kunze, V.; Koch, W.; Bruening, R.; Seelos, K.; Stroehmann, I.; Woell, B.; Reiser, M.

    1993-01-01

    21 patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist diagnosed according to the criteria of the American Rheumatism Association were examined by dynamic MRT before and after the i.v. injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). The results were correlated with the clinical and radiological findings. The increased signal intensity of the pannus was 1.17±0.45%/sec and this differed significantly (p [de

  14. [Biomechanic considerations in wrist prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapandji, A I

    1992-01-01

    At the present time, in disorders of the wrist, avulsion of the first carpal row is the most commonly used technique as a last resort. However, there are many wrist prostheses, which are reviewed here. Roughly, they belong to two families: the three axis prostheses (spherical) that cannot transmit to the hand the pronation supination torque, because of their geometrical characteristics, and the two axis prostheses (universal joint) that are able to transmit this movement. The characteristics of future prostheses must include: based on the "universal joint" principle, occupy minimum space, isometric, maintain tendon tension, an axis identical to the true axis of the wrist, to maintain the hand in line with the forearm, fixed without cement but, not shortened with time, possibilities of mechanical flexibility immediately and lastingly stable, to be easily replaced modularly. This ideal prosthesis will certainly exist one day and will take the place of the first carpal row avulsion. In the meantime, this technique will still have a long use.

  15. Food sources of dominant macrozoobenthos between native and non-native mangrove forests: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhen; Yan, Ting; Xiong, Yiyi; Zhang, Yihui; Lin, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    The macrozoobenthos is an important link of the food web in coastal wetlands. Diet-habitat relationships may significantly depend on qualitative differences and seasonal availability of food sources. Increasing interest has been shown in food web structure altered by non-native plants. In particular, however, a non-native mangrove species from Bangladesh, Sonneratia apetala, has been widely planted in China, but little is known about its possible impact on food sources of macrozoobenthos living in these non-native mangrove forests. Therefore, in this study, we used fatty acid analysis to compare the food sources of one littorinid snail and two grapsid crab species between two native mangrove forests and one non-native S. apetala plantation in the Zhanjiang Mangrove National Nature Reserve of China. We found that the sediment of all three forests had high diatom and bacteria signals, but low mangrove leaf signals, while the opposite patterns were detected in the three macrozoobenthos. Specifically, the gastropod Littoraria melanostoma relied mainly on mangrove leaves and brown algae as food sources, with significant differences among the three mangrove forests, and showed significant seasonal variation in its diet. The grapsidae species (Perisesarma bidens and Parasesarma plicatum) mainly grazed on mangrove litter, brown and green algae, and occasionally consumed diatoms and bacteria, also showing significant seasonal variation in their diet. Overall, Principle Components Analysis (PCA) of the fatty acid profiles showed a significant overlapping in food sources among the macrozoobenthos living in the non-native and native mangrove forests, but significant seasonal variations in their food sources. This suggests that the planting of non-native S. apetala near original mangrove forests has had little effect on the feeding behavior of macrozoobenthos some 10 years after planting.

  16. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Roberto S; Siqueira, Mario G; Simplício, Hougelli

    2006-09-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist immobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuously for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment was done pre-operatively and at 2 weeks follow-up and included the two-point discrimination test at the second finger and two questionnaires as an outcome measurement of symptoms severity and intensity. All the patients presented improvement in the postoperative evaluations in the three analyzed parameters. There was no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcome measurements at the final follow-up. We conclude that wrist immobilization in the immediate post-operative period have no advantages when compared with no immobilization in the end result of carpal tunnel release.

  18. Different evolutionary pathways underlie the morphology of wrist bones in hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L; Barros, Anna P; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2013-10-23

    The hominoid wrist has been a focus of numerous morphological analyses that aim to better understand long-standing questions about the evolution of human and hominoid hand use. However, these same analyses also suggest various scenarios of complex and mosaic patterns of morphological evolution within the wrist and potentially multiple instances of homoplasy that would benefit from require formal analysis within a phylogenetic context.We identify morphological features that principally characterize primate - and, in particular, hominoid (apes, including humans) - wrist evolution and reveal the rate, process and evolutionary timing of patterns of morphological change on individual branches of the primate tree of life. Linear morphological variables of five wrist bones - the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, capitate and hamate - are analyzed in a diverse sample of extant hominoids (12 species, 332 specimens), Old World (8 species, 43 specimens) and New World (4 species, 26 specimens) monkeys, fossil Miocene apes (8 species, 20 specimens) and Plio-Pleistocene hominins (8 species, 18 specimens). Results reveal a combination of parallel and synapomorphic morphology within haplorrhines, and especially within hominoids, across individual wrist bones. Similar morphology of some wrist bones reflects locomotor behaviour shared between clades (scaphoid, triquetrum and capitate) while others (lunate and hamate) indicate clade-specific synapomorphic morphology. Overall, hominoids show increased variation in wrist bone morphology compared with other primate clades, supporting previous analyses, and demonstrate several occurrences of parallel evolution, particularly between orangutans and hylobatids, and among hominines (extant African apes, humans and fossil hominins). Our analyses indicate that different evolutionary processes can underlie the evolution of a single anatomical unit (the wrist) to produce diversity in functional and morphological adaptations across individual wrist

  19. Effects of Temperature on Wrist Flexor Muscles Endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsun Nodehi-Moghadam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely recognized that neuromuscular function is temperature sensitive. Changes in muscle temperature may affect muscle force development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on wrist flexor muscles endurance. Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects (mean age 21.13±1.30 years participated in the present study. The wrist flexor muscles endurance was measured before and after applying ice and hot packs over the forearm for 15 minutes. Paired t tests were used to compare differences between pre and post intervention endurance. Results: The results showed a significant increase in wrist flexor muscles endurance after heating. (P=0.04. We also found that, cooling the forearm muscles leaded to significant decrease of wrist flexor muscles endurance (P=0.01. Conclusion: These results suggest that hand function is temperature sensitive. Therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of cold on muscular function in people working in workplaces with extreme temperature.

  20. Comparison of measurement accuracy between two types of wrist goniometer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, P; Johnson, P W

    2001-12-01

    Studies have shown that wrist goniometers are prone to measurement errors, particularly due to crosstalk. This study compared two wrist goniometer systems: a commonly used biaxial, single transducer (System A) and a biaxial, two-transducer (System B). Wrist angles, range of movement and crosstalk results were compared. With the wrist in 90 degrees of pronation, eight subjects were placed in 20 different wrist postures between -40 degrees and 40 degrees of flexion/extension and between -10 degrees and 20 degrees of deviation. Relative to System B, System A had larger measurement errors and was more prone to crosstalk. There may be two sources of crosstalk: (1) intrinsic crosstalk associated with the design, application and twisting of the goniometer transducer when on the wrist, and (2) extrinsic crosstalk associated with the anatomy and complex movement of the wrist joint. It appears that the majority of the radial/ulnar crosstalk measured with System A was intrinsic crosstalk due to the twisting of the goniometer transducer.

  1. Robot-aided developmental assessment of wrist proprioception in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Campus, Claudio; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2017-01-09

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders and brain injuries in children have been associated with proprioceptive dysfunction that will negatively affect their movement. Unfortunately, there is lack of reliable and objective clinical examination protocols and our current knowledge of how proprioception evolves in typically developing children is still sparse. Using a robotic exoskeleton, we investigated proprioceptive acuity of the wrist in a group of 49 typically developing healthy children (8-15 years), and a group of 40 young adults. Without vision participants performed an ipsilateral wrist joint position matching task that required them to reproduce (match) a previously experienced target position. All three joint degrees-of-freedom of the wrist/hand complex were assessed. Accuracy and precision were evaluated as a measure of proprioceptive acuity. The cross-sectional data indicating the time course of development of acuity were then fitted by four models in order to determine which function best describes developmental changes in proprioception across age. First, the robot-aided assessment proved to be an easy to administer method for objectively measuring proprioceptive acuity in both children and adult populations. Second, proprioceptive acuity continued to develop throughout middle childhood and early adolescence, improving by more than 50% with respect to the youngest group. Adult levels of performance were reached approximately by the age of 12 years. An inverse-root function best described the development of proprioceptive acuity across the age groups. Third, wrist/forearm proprioception is anisotropic across the three DoFs with the Abduction/Adduction exhibiting a higher level of acuity than those of Flexion/extension and Pronation/Supination. This anisotropy did not change across development. Proprioceptive development for the wrist continues well into early adolescence. Our normative data obtained trough this novel robot-aided assessment method provide a

  2. High-resolution computed tomography of the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merhar, G.L.; Clark, R.A.; Schneider, H.J.; Stern, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    High resolution computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the wrists of 19 patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Thirteen normal volunteers were used as controls. Measurements obtained from the CT images included the cross-sectional area of the carpal tunnel, the relative amount of synovium within the carpal tunnel, the attenuation coefficient of the carpal tunnel, and the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament. No significant difference in any of these measurements was found when comparing the wrists of symptomatic patients with controls. High resolution CT of the wrist does not appear to be of value in the preoperative evaluation of patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

  3. Comparison of Sedentary Estimates between activPAL and Hip- and Wrist-Worn ActiGraph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, Annemarie; Shiroma, Eric J; Caserotti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    , and nondominant wrist for 7 d in a free-living environment. Using the activPAL as the reference criteria, we compared classification of sedentary time to hip-worn and wrist-worn ActiGraph accelerometers over a range of cutoff points for both 60-s and 15-s epochs. Results The optimal cutoff point for the hip...

  4. Risk factors for hand-wrist disorders in repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. F.; Mikkelsen, S.; Andersen, JH

    2007-01-01

    (wrist pain and palpation tenderness) were determined in 3123 employees in 19 industrial settings. With the use of questionnaires and video recordings of homogenous work tasks number of wrist movements, hand force requirements and wrist position were analysed as risk factors for hand-wrist disorders......OBJECTIVES: To identify the risk of hand-wrist disorders related to repetitive movements, use of hand force and wrist position in repetitive monotonous work. METHODS: Using questionnaires and physical examinations, the prevalence and incidence of hand-wrist pain and possible extensor tendonitis...... were less consistent. Working with the hand in a non-neutral position could not be identified as a risk factor...

  5. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  6. Proximal Row Carpectomy Combined with Wrist Hemiarthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Randall W.; Bachoura, Abdo; Gelman, Scott E.; Jacoby, Sidney M.

    2012-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a relatively novel procedure that rivals total wrist arthrodesis and offers a new surgical treatment option for select patients with painful, end-stage wrist disease. We present our early experience with this procedure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for nonrheumatoid patients diagnosed with wrist arthritis and subsequently treated with wrist hemiarthroplasty combined with PRC. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months. Preoperative and postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were recorded. Postoperative radiographic findings were assessed. The Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire was administered to gauge postoperative pain and function. The records of 10 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 64 years and the mean postoperative follow-up duration was 19 months. Postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were all found to be less than the preoperative levels. The mean postoperative PRWE score for pain and function were 26 and 23, respectively. The complications were diverse and occurred at a relatively high rate. PRC combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a novel procedure that offers a potential surgical option for the treatment of wrist arthritis in select patients. Our early experience has lead us to modify our technique with regard to the implant material, and at this stage, the surgical technique and the most appropriate implant may require further optimization. The level of evidence for this study is IV (therapeutic). PMID:23904978

  7. Ulnar impaction syndrome: Managed by wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiajie; Xu, Zhijie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The development of handicraft industry and increase of various such works that need a large amount of repeated wrist ulnar deviation strength, the incidence of ulnar impaction syndrome (UIS) is increasing, but the traditional simple ulnar shortening osteotomy has more complications. This study aimed to explore the early diagnostic criteria of UIS and its wrist arthroscopic treatment experience. 9 UIS patients were enrolled in this study. According to magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and endoscopic features, the diagnostic criteria of UIS were summarized and the individualized treatment schedule was made. If the ulnar positive variance was less than 4 mm, the arthroscopic wafer resection was performed. If the ulnar positive variance was more than 4 mm, the arthroscopic resection of injury and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar osteotomy were conducted. In all patients, the wound healed without any complications. All patients returned to normal life and work, with no ulnar wrist pain again. One patient had wrist weakness. There was a significant difference of the wrist activity between the last followup and before operation (P < 0.05). According to the modified wrist function scoring system of Green and O'Brien, there were 6 cases of excellent, 2 cases of good and 1 case of appropriate and the overall excellent and good rate was 92.3%. In the treatment of UIS, the arthroscopy can improve the diagnosis rate, optimize the treatment plan, shorten the treatment cycle, with good treatment results.

  8. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  9. Hip and Wrist Accelerometer Algorithms for Free-Living Behavior Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Staudenmayer, John; Lanckriet, Gert

    2016-05-01

    Accelerometers are a valuable tool for objective measurement of physical activity (PA). Wrist-worn devices may improve compliance over standard hip placement, but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for measuring PA in free-living settings. Traditional cut-point methods for accelerometers can be inaccurate and need testing in free living with wrist-worn devices. In this study, we developed and tested the performance of machine learning (ML) algorithms for classifying PA types from both hip and wrist accelerometer data. Forty overweight or obese women (mean age = 55.2 ± 15.3 yr; BMI = 32.0 ± 3.7) wore two ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (right hip, nondominant wrist; ActiGraph, Pensacola, FL) for seven free-living days. Wearable cameras captured ground truth activity labels. A classifier consisting of a random forest and hidden Markov model classified the accelerometer data into four activities (sitting, standing, walking/running, and riding in a vehicle). Free-living wrist and hip ML classifiers were compared with each other, with traditional accelerometer cut points, and with an algorithm developed in a laboratory setting. The ML classifier obtained average values of 89.4% and 84.6% balanced accuracy over the four activities using the hip and wrist accelerometer, respectively. In our data set with average values of 28.4 min of walking or running per day, the ML classifier predicted average values of 28.5 and 24.5 min of walking or running using the hip and wrist accelerometer, respectively. Intensity-based cut points and the laboratory algorithm significantly underestimated walking minutes. Our results demonstrate the superior performance of our PA-type classification algorithm, particularly in comparison with traditional cut points. Although the hip algorithm performed better, additional compliance achieved with wrist devices might justify using a slightly lower performing algorithm.

  10. Monitoring anti-TNF{alpha} treatment in RA: Responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography of the dominant wrist compared to conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, Hilde Berner

    2008-01-01

    months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means (SRM). Accepted thresholds were applied to classify responsiveness as trivial, low, moderate or good. RESULTS: MRI synovitis (SRM between -0.79 and -0.92) and the MRI total inflammation score comprising synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone...... marrow edema (SRM between -1.05 and -1.24) were highly responsive. Moderate to high responsiveness was found for MRI tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, all the composite indices (DAS28, SDAI and CDAI) and the 28-swollen joint count. US displayed low to moderate responsiveness. The MRI erosion score...... was a composite measure comprising MRI synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, and this may be a promising outcome measure in clinical studies....

  11. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  12. Use of wrist albedo neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    We are developing a wrist dosimeter that can be used to measure the exposure at the wrist to x-rays, gamma rays, beta-particles, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons. It consists of a modified Hankins Type albedo neutron dosimeter and also contains three pieces of CR-39 plastic. ABS plastic in the form of an elongated hemisphere provides the beta and low energy x-ray shielding necessary to meet the requirement of depth dose measurements at 1 cm. The dosimeter has a beta window located in the side of the hemisphere oriented towards an object being held in the hands. A TLD 600 is positioned under the 1 cm thick ABS plastic and is used to measure the thermal neutron dose. At present we are using Velcro straps to hold the dosimeter on the inside of the wrist. 9 figures

  13. Preference dominance reasoning for conversational recommender systems: a comparison between a comparative preferences and a sum of weights approach

    OpenAIRE

    Trabelsi, Walid; Wilson, Nic; Bridge, Derek G.; Ricci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    A conversational recommender system iteratively shows a small set of options for its user to choose between. In order to select these options, the system may analyze the queries tried by the user to derive whether one option is dominated by others with respect to the user's preferences. The system can then suggest that the user try one of the undominated options, as they represent the best options in the light of the user preferences elicited so far. This paper describes a framework for prefe...

  14. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  15. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb

  16. Sensor-enabled Activity Class Recognition in Preschoolers: Hip versus Wrist Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Stewart G; Cliff, Dylan P; Ahmadi, Matthew N; Tuc, Nguyen VAN; Hagenbuchner, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Pattern recognition approaches to accelerometer data processing have emerged as viable alternatives to cut-point methods. However, few studies have explored the validity of pattern recognition approaches in preschoolers, and none have compared supervised learning algorithms trained on hip and wrist data. Purpose of this study was to develop, test, and compare activity class recognition algorithms trained on hip, wrist, and combined hip and wrist accelerometer data in preschoolers. Eleven children 3-6 yr of age (mean age, 4.8 ± 0.9 yr) completed 12 developmentally appropriate physical activity (PA) trials while wearing an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on the right hip and nondominant wrist. PA trials were categorized as sedentary, light activity games, moderate-to-vigorous games, walking, and running. Random forest (RF) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers were trained using time and frequency domain features from the vector magnitude of the raw signal. Features were extracted from 15-s nonoverlapping windows. Classifier performance was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Cross-validation accuracy for the hip, wrist, and combined hip and wrist RF models was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-0.82), 0.78 (95% CI, 0.77-0.80), and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.80-0.83), respectively. Accuracy for hip, wrist, and combined hip and wrist SVM models was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.80-0.83), 0.80 (95% CI, 0.79-0.80), and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.84-0.86), respectively. Recognition accuracy was consistently excellent for sedentary (>90%); moderate for light activity games, moderate-to-vigorous games, and running (69%-79%); and modest for walking (61%-71%). Machine learning algorithms such as RF and SVM are useful for predicting PA class from accelerometer data collected in preschool children. Although classifiers trained on hip or wrist data provided acceptable recognition accuracy, the combination of hip and wrist accelerometer delivered better performance.

  17. The role of plain radiography in paediatric wrist trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaar, Annelie; Bentohami, Abdelali; Kessels, Jasper; Bijlsma, Taco S.; van Dijkman, Bart A.; Maas, Mario; Wilde, Jim C. H.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2012-01-01

    Acute wrist trauma in children is one of the most frequent reasons for visiting the emergency department (ED). Radiographic imaging in children with wrist trauma is mostly performed routinely to confirm or rule out a fracture. The aim of this study was to determine how many radiographs of the wrist

  18. Utility of the iPhone 4 Gyroscope Application in the Measurement of Wrist Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendner, Nuphar; Wells, Erik; Lavi, Idit; Kwok, Yan Yan; Ho, Pak-Cheong; Wollstein, Ronit

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of wrist range of motion (ROM) is important to all aspects of treatment and rehabilitation of upper extremity conditions. Recently, gyroscopes have been used to measure ROM and may be more precise than manual evaluations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of the iPhone gyroscope application and compare it with use of a goniometer, specifically evaluating its accuracy and ease of use. A cross-sectional study evaluated adult Caucasian participants, with no evidence of wrist pathology. Wrist ROM measurements in 306 wrists using the 2 methods were compared. Demographic information was collected including age, sex, and occupation. Analysis included mixed models and Bland-Altman plots. Wrist motion was similar between the 2 methods. Technical difficulties were encountered with gyroscope use. Age was an independent predictor of ROM. Correct measurement of ROM is critical to guide, compare, and evaluate treatment and rehabilitation of the upper extremity. Inaccurate measurements could mislead the surgeon and harm patient adherence with therapy or surgeon instruction. An application used by the patient could improve adherence but needs to be reliable and easy to use. Evaluation is necessary before utilization of such an application. This study supports revision of the application on the iPhone to improve ease of use.

  19. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wrist joints can all be replaced (Figure 1). Artificial joints in the hand may help: Reduce joint pain Restore or maintain joint motion Improve the look and alignment of the joint(s) Improve overall hand function Causes In a normal joint, bones have a smooth surface made of a substance ...

  20. PERIMENOPAUSAL WRIST FRACTURE - AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MANAGEMENT OF OSTEOPOROSIS. Alan D Rothberg, Patrick K Matshidze. Objective. Review of Medscheme's administrative databases to study the relationship between hip fracture and previous wrist fracture in peri- and postmenopausal women. Design. Retrospective analysis of 1995 - 1998 data for women aged 50 ...

  1. Ultrasound guided synovial biopsy of the wrist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; van Dalen, A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Seven patients (4 female and 3 male, mean age 46) with arthritis of the wrist (n = 7) without known etiology were evaluated. High-definition ultrasound equipment was used for localization of synovial hypertrophy, suitable for ultrasound guided biopsy without risk. A 18-gauge diameter Tru-cut biopsy

  2. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group.

  3. Development of an anatomical wrist joint coordinate system to quantify motion during functional tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillstrom, Howard J; Garg, Rohit; Kraszewski, Andrew; Lenhoff, Mark; Carter, Timothy; Backus, Sherry I; Wolff, Aviva; Syrkin, Grigory; Cheng, Richard; Wolfe, Scott W

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis based anatomical wrist joint coordinate system for measurement of in-vivo wrist kinematics. The convergent validity and reliability of the 3D motion analysis implementation was quantified and compared with manual and electrogoniometry techniques on 10 cadaveric specimens. Fluoroscopic measurements were used as the reference. The 3D motion analysis measurements (mean absolute difference [MAD] = 3.6°) were significantly less different (P goniometry (MAD = 5.7°) but not (P = .066, power = 0.45) electrogoniometry (MAD = 5.0°) compared with fluoroscopy. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1]) was highest for 3D motion analysis compared with manual and electrogoniometry, suggesting better reliability for this technique. To demonstrate the utility of this new wrist joint coordinate system, normative data from 10 healthy subjects was obtained while throwing a dart.

  4. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 2: Ventral wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian Olchowy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is an important element of the diagnostic and therapeutic protocol. Clinical decisions, including those regarding surgical procedures, are often based solely on ultrasound imaging. However, detailed knowledge on the anatomy and a correct scanning technique are crucial for an accurate diagnosis. Modern ultrasonographic equipment allows obtaining detailed anatomical images of muscle tendons, ligaments, nerves and vessels of the carpal area. Ventral wrist ultrasound is one of the most common diagnostic procedures in patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome. Ventral wrist evaluation is also often performed in patients with wrist pain of unclear etiology, rheumatic diseases, wrist injuries or symptoms of ulnar neuropathy. The aim of this paper is to present ultrasound images with corresponding anatomical schemes. The technique of ultrasound examination of the ventral wrist along with practical guidance to help obtain highly diagnostic images is also discussed. The present paper is the second part of an article devoted to ultrasound anatomy and wrist ultrasound technique – the part discussing the dorsal side of the wrist was published in the Journal of Ultrasonography, Vol. 15, No 61. The following anatomical structures should be visualized during an ultrasound examination of the ventral wrist, both in the carpal tunnel as well as proximally and distally to it: four flexor digitorum superficialis tendons, four flexor digitorum profundus tendons, flexor pollicis longus, flexor carpi radialis tendon, median nerve and flexor retinaculum; in the carpal tunnel as well as proximally and distally to it: the ulnar nerve, ulnar artery and veins; the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle; carpal joints.

  5. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickenig Georg

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wrist blood pressure (BP devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP measurement methods: 1 office BP, 2 home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor, 3 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hunconventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have to be used cautious and with defined limitations, the use of validated devices with position sensor according to recently recommended measurement schedules might have the potential to be used for therapy monitoring.

  6. Accuracy and reliability of three different techniques for manual goniometry for wrist motion: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Timothy I; Pansy, Brian; Wolff, Aviva L; Hillstrom, Howard J; Backus, Sherry I; Lenhoff, Mark; Wolfe, Scott W

    2009-10-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of manual goniometry in measuring objective outcomes of hand surgery and therapy, there are limited data concerning its accuracy or repeatability for wrist motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability (both inter- and intra-rater) in measuring wrist flexion and extension using 3 manual goniometric alignment techniques (ulnar, radial, and dorsal-volar) in cadaveric upper extremities, using fluoroscopic verification of posture as a gold standard. In addition, we sought to assess the accuracy and reliability of the dorsal-volar technique for measurement of radioulnar deviation. External fixators were applied to 10 cadaveric wrists with intramedullary cannulated rods in the radius and third metacarpal for gold-standard fluoroscopic verification of posture. Manual goniometric measurements with each technique were captured by 2 raters (a hand surgeon and a hand therapist) for reliability measurements and by a single rater for accuracy. Wrists were positioned at angles of maximum flexion, extension, and radial and ulnar deviation for reliability testing and at preselected angles across the range of motion for accuracy testing. At each position, wrist angle was measured with a 1 degrees increment goniometer, and fluoroscopic angles were measured digitally. Intraclass correlation coefficients and root mean square values were calculated for all combinations, and analysis of variance was used to test differences between techniques. No technique was statistically less accurate than any other (6 degrees to 7 degrees ). Each method was found to have high intra-rater reliability. For measurement of wrist flexion and extension, the dorsal-volar technique demonstrated the greatest inter-rater reliability, as compared to ulnar and radial, respectively. Although each measurement technique demonstrated a similar degree of accuracy and intra-rater reliability, the dorsal-volar technique demonstrates the greatest level of

  7. MRI findings of the wrist in patients with multiple osteonecrosis in large joints of the extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinobu; Ebata, Tatsuki; Abe, Kazuhiro [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Imai, Katsumi; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated MRI findings of the wrist in patients who had multiple osteonecrosis in the large joints of their extremities (hips, knees, shoulders, and ankles) and compared these with the clinical symptoms and radiographical findings. Sixty wrists of 30 patients (3 males and 27 females) with multiple osteonecrosis were studied. Subjects ranged in age from 16 to 59 years. Their primary diseases were SLE in 24 patients, alcoholic osteonecrosis in two, Sjoegren`s syndrome in one, dermatomyositis in one, leukemia in one, and MCTD in one patient. Using MRI, we found osteonecrosis in seven wrists of four patients. Lesions were seen in six scaphoids of three patients, in two lunates of two patients, and in one capitate. We noted a reduced range of motion in three of the seven wrists with osteonecrosis. Two of the seven complained at wrist pain at motion, although three wrists were symptom free. Radiographically, an abnormality was recognized in two of the seven wrists. Generally, osteonecrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck`s disease) is more frequent than that of the scaphoid (Preiser`s disease). However in the present series, we found a higher osteonecrosis rate of the scaphoid than the lunate, using MRI. The discrepancy can be explained by the vascularity. In 1986, Gelberman reported that the scaphoid, the capitate, and 8% of the lunate had either vessels entering only one surface or large areas of bone that were dependent on a single vessel. The present study is consistent with these anatomical features. In other words, the present results demonstrated that Kienboeck`s disease can be induced not only by a deficient blood supply but also by some additional factors. (author)

  8. Sexual coercion in intimate relationships: a comparative analysis of the effects of women's infidelity and men's dominance and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Aaron T; Shackelford, Todd K

    2009-04-01

    Researchers studying the proximate (or immediate) causes of sexual coercion have proposed that partner rape is motivated by a man's attempt to dominate and control his partner and that this expression of power is the product of men's social roles. Researchers studying the ultimate (or evolutionary) causes, in contrast, have proposed that partner rape may function as an anti-cuckoldry tactic, with its occurrence related to a man's suspicions of his partner's sexual infidelity. In two studies, we collected data relevant to both perspectives to explore how these variables interact with men's sexual coercion in an intimate relationship. Regression analyses from Study 1 (self-reports from 256 men) and Study 2 (partner-reports from 290 women) indicated that men's sexual coercion of their partners was consistently predicted by female infidelity and men's controlling behavior, suggesting that both variables are necessary to explain men's sexual coercion. Discussion addressed limitations of the current research and highlighted the importance of integrating multiple levels of analysis when studying men's sexual coercion of their intimate partners.

  9. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  10. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an asymmetrical parallel robotic wrist, which can generate a decoupled unlimited-torsion motion and achieve high positioning accuracy. The kinematics, dexterity, and singularities of the manipulator are investigated to visualize the performance contours of the manipulator. Using the method of Lagrange multipliers and considering all the mobile components, the equations of motion of the manipulator are derived to investigate the dynamic characteristics efficiently. The developed dynamic model is numerically illustrated and compared with its simplified formulation to show its computation accuracy.

  11. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2016.

  12. New radiographic bone erosions in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are detectable with magnetic resonance imaging a median of two years earlier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, Michael; Stoltenberg, Michael

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a 5-year followup study, we investigated the temporal relationship between development of wrist joint erosions as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus conventional radiography (CR), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We also evaluated the risk of erosive...... progression on CR associated with the presence of MRI erosions. METHODS: In 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, MRI and CR of the dominant wrist were performed annually for 5 years. In each image set, each wrist bone (metacarpal bases, carpal bones, radius, and ulna) was assessed for the absence...

  13. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system's stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training.

  14. A comparison of hand wrist bone analysis with two different cervical vertebral analysis in measuring skeletal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichai, Saravanan; Rajesh, M; Reddy, Naveen; Adusumilli, Gopinath; Reddy, Jayaprakash; Joshi, Bhavana

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal maturation is an integral part of individual pattern of growth and development and is a continuous process. Peak growth velocity in standing height is the most valid representation of the rate of overall skeletal growth. Ossification changes of hand wrist and cervical vertebrae are the reliable indicators of growth status of individual. The objective of this study was to compare skeletal maturation as measured by hand wrist bone analysis and cervical vertebral analysis. Hand wrist radiographs and lateral cephalograms of 72 subjects aged between 7 and 16 years both male and female from the patients visiting Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, R.V. Dental College and Hospital. The 9 stages were reduced to 5 stages to compare with cervical vertebral maturation stage by Baccetti et al. The Bjork, Grave and Brown stages were reduced to six intervals to compare with cervical vertebral maturational index (CVMI) staging by Hassel and Farman. These measurements were then compared with the hand wrist bone analysis, and the results were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. There was no significant difference between the hand wrist analysis and the two different cervical vertebral analyses for assessing skeletal maturation. There was no significant difference between the two cervical vertebral analyses, but the CVMI method, which is visual method is less time consuming. Vertebral analysis on a lateral cephalogram is as valid as the hand wrist bone analysis with the advantage of reducing the radiation exposure of growing subjects.

  15. A Comparison of Hand Wrist Bone Analysis with Two Different Cervical Vertebral Analysis in Measuring Skeletal Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichai, Saravanan; Rajesh, M; Reddy, Naveen; Adusumilli, Gopinath; Reddy, Jayaprakash; Joshi, Bhavana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Skeletal maturation is an integral part of individual pattern of growth and development and is a continuous process. Peak growth velocity in standing height is the most valid representation of the rate of overall skeletal growth. Ossification changes of hand wrist and cervical vertebrae are the reliable indicators of growth status of individual. The objective of this study was to compare skeletal maturation as measured by hand wrist bone analysis and cervical vertebral analysis. Materials and Methods: Hand wrist radiographs and lateral cephalograms of 72 subjects aged between 7 and 16 years both male and female from the patients visiting Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, R.V. Dental College and Hospital. The 9 stages were reduced to 5 stages to compare with cervical vertebral maturation stage by Baccetti et al. The Bjork, Grave and Brown stages were reduced to six intervals to compare with cervical vertebral maturational index (CVMI) staging by Hassel and Farman. These measurements were then compared with the hand wrist bone analysis, and the results were statistically analyzed using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: There was no significant difference between the hand wrist analysis and the two different cervical vertebral analyses for assessing skeletal maturation. There was no significant difference between the two cervical vertebral analyses, but the CVMI method, which is visual method is less time consuming. Conclusion: Vertebral analysis on a lateral cephalogram is as valid as the hand wrist bone analysis with the advantage of reducing the radiation exposure of growing subjects. PMID:25395791

  16. Architectures for wrist-worn energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, R.; Halim, M. A.; Xue, T.; Zhang, Q.; Gu, L.; Yang, K.; Roundy, S.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the simulation-based analysis of six dynamical structures with respect to their wrist-worn vibration energy harvesting capability. This work approaches the problem of maximizing energy harvesting potential at the wrist by considering multiple mechanical substructures; rotational and linear motion-based architectures are examined. Mathematical models are developed and experimentally corroborated. An optimization routine is applied to the proposed architectures to maximize average power output and allow for comparison. The addition of a linear spring element to the structures has the potential to improve power output; for example, in the case of rotational structures, a 211% improvement in power output was estimated under real walking excitation. The analysis concludes that a sprung rotational harvester architecture outperforms a sprung linear architecture by 66% when real walking data is used as input to the simulations.

  17. A Comparison of Hand Wrist Bone Analysis with Two Different Cervical Vertebral Analysis in Measuring Skeletal Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Pichai, Saravanan; Rajesh, M; Reddy, Naveen; Adusumilli, Gopinath; Reddy, Jayaprakash; Joshi, Bhavana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Skeletal maturation is an integral part of individual pattern of growth and development and is a continuous process. Peak growth velocity in standing height is the most valid representation of the rate of overall skeletal growth. Ossification changes of hand wrist and cervical vertebrae are the reliable indicators of growth status of individual. The objective of this study was to compare skeletal maturation as measured by hand wrist bone analysis and cervical vertebral analysis. M...

  18. Does wrist immobilization following open carpal tunnel release improve functional outcome? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, S M; Okoro, T; Danial, I; Wildin, C

    2010-07-11

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a compressive neuropathy of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. The surgical management includes dividing the flexor retinaculum to decompress the median nerve. Post-operative mobilization of the wrist is controversial. Some surgeons splint the wrist for 2-4 weeks whilst others encourage early mobilization. The literature has been inconclusive as to which method is most beneficial. The purpose of this study is to review the literature regarding the effectiveness of wrist immobilization following open carpal tunnel decompression. We reviewed all published clinical trials claiming to evaluate the mobility status following open carpal tunnel release. Studies not in the English language as well as those with small number of patients (n immobilization after open carpal tunnel decompression when compared to early mobilization.

  19. Effect of Bee venom-Acupuncture Therapy on Patients with Sprain of the Wrist Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Jun, An

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was to evaluate the effect of Bee venom-Acupuncture therapy on patients with sprain of the wrist. Methods : We investigated 31 cases of patients with sprain of the wrist. We flip a coin and divide patients into two groups. Bee venom-Acupuncture was performed at on group, and the other group we didn't do it. We evaluated the treatment effect of each group by using the visual analog scale(VAS. Results : 1. As a result of evaluation by using the VAS, the score after treatment was marked lower than that before treatment within each group. 2. After treatment, Bee venom-Acupuncture therapy group showed significant difference on visual analog scale(VAS compared with acupuncture therapy group. Conclusion : These results suggested that Bee venom-Acupuncture treatment should be more effective in the patient with sprain of the Wrist joint.

  20. The effects of wrist motion and hand orientation on muscle forces: A physiologic wrist simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshan S; Middleton, Claire; Gurdezi, Sabahat; Horwitz, Maxim D; Kedgley, Angela E

    2017-07-26

    Although the orientations of the hand and forearm vary for different wrist rehabilitation protocols, their effect on muscle forces has not been quantified. Physiologic simulators enable a biomechanical evaluation of the joint by recreating functional motions in cadaveric specimens. Control strategies used to actuate joints in physiologic simulators usually employ position or force feedback alone to achieve optimum load distribution across the muscles. After successful tests on a phantom limb, unique combinations of position and force feedback - hybrid control and cascade control - were used to simulate multiple cyclic wrist motions of flexion-extension, radioulnar deviation, dart thrower's motion, and circumduction using six muscles in ten cadaveric specimens. Low kinematic errors and coefficients of variation of muscle forces were observed for planar and complex wrist motions using both novel control strategies. The effect of gravity was most pronounced when the hand was in the horizontal orientation, resulting in higher extensor forces (pforces were also affected by the direction of rotation during circumduction. The peak force of flexor carpi radialis was higher in clockwise circumduction (p=0.017), while that of flexor carpi ulnaris was higher in anticlockwise circumduction (p=0.013). Thus, the physiologic wrist simulator accurately replicated cyclic planar and complex motions in cadaveric specimens. Moreover, the dependence of muscle forces on the hand orientation and the direction of circumduction could be vital in the specification of such parameters during wrist rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Compressed sensing approach for wrist vein biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantsov, Aleksey; Ryabko, Maxim; Shchekin, Aleksey

    2017-10-13

    The work describes features of the compressed sensing (CS) approach utilized for development of a wearable system for wrist vein recognition with single-pixel detection; we consider this system useful for biometrics authentication purposes. The CS approach implies use of a spatial light modulation (SLM) which, in our case, can be performed differently-with a liquid crystal display or diffusely scattering medium. We show that compressed sensing combined with above-mentioned means of SLM allows us to avoid using an optical system-a limiting factor for wearable devices. The trade-off between the 2 different SLM approaches regarding issues of practical implementation of CS approach for wrist vein recognition purposes is discussed. A possible solution of a misalignment problem-a typical issue for imaging systems based upon 2D arrays of photodiodes-is also proposed. Proposed design of the wearable device for wrist vein recognition is based upon single-pixel detection. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. External validation of clinical decision rules for children with wrist trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Marjolein A M; Walenkamp, Monique M J; Dubois, Bente F H; Slaar, Annelie; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2017-05-01

    Clinical decision rules help to avoid potentially unnecessary radiographs of the wrist, reduce waiting times and save costs. The primary aim of this study was to provide an overview of all existing non-validated clinical decision rules for wrist trauma in children and to externally validate these rules in a different cohort of patients. Secondarily, we aimed to compare the performance of these rules with the validated Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules. We included all studies that proposed a clinical prediction or decision rule in children presenting at the emergency department with acute wrist trauma. We performed external validation within a cohort of 379 children. We also calculated the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of each decision rule. We included three clinical decision rules. The sensitivity and specificity of all clinical decision rules after external validation were between 94% and 99%, and 11% and 26%, respectively. After external validation 7% to 17% less radiographs would be ordered and 1.4% to 5.7% of all fractures would be missed. Compared to the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules only one of the three other rules had a higher sensitivity; however both the specificity and the reduction in requested radiographs were lower in the other three rules. The sensitivity of the three non-validated clinical decision rules is high. However the specificity and the reduction in number of requested radiographs are low. In contrast, the validated Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules has an acceptable sensitivity and the greatest reduction in radiographs, at 22%, without missing any clinically relevant fractures.

  3. Growth indicators in orthodontic patients. Part 1: comparison of cervical vertebral maturation and hand-wrist skeletal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G; Ari-Demirkaya, A

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the skeletal maturation status based on the assessment of cervical vertebrae from lateral cephalometric radiographs and to compare these findings with the skeletal maturity of the same individuals judged from the hand-wrist radiographs. Lateral cephalometric and left hand-wrist radiographs of 393 Caucasian children from 8 to 18 years old were evaluated. On the hand-wrist radiographs the classification of Bjork [1972] and Grave and Brown [1976] was used to assess skeletal maturity (HWSS). Cervical vertebral maturation was also evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs using the improved CVMS method described by Baccetti, Franchi, and McNamara [2002]. These methods were correlated using the chi-square test. The chi-square test showed that skeletal maturational values obtained by the CVMS method were significantly correlated with the skeletal values obtained from the hand-wrist analysis for both genders (pmaturity.

  4. WRIST: A WRist Image Segmentation Toolkit for carpal bone delineation from MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brent; Joshi, Anand A; Borgese, Marissa; Abdelhafez, Yasser; Boutin, Robert D; Chaudhari, Abhijit J

    2018-01-01

    Segmentation of the carpal bones from 3D imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is commonly performed for in vivo analysis of wrist morphology, kinematics, and biomechanics. This crucial task is typically carried out manually and is labor intensive, time consuming, subject to high inter- and intra-observer variability, and may result in topologically incorrect surfaces. We present a method, WRist Image Segmentation Toolkit (WRIST), for 3D semi-automated, rapid segmentation of the carpal bones of the wrist from MRI. In our method, the boundary of the bones were iteratively found using prior known anatomical constraints and a shape-detection level set. The parameters of the method were optimized using a training dataset of 48 manually segmented carpal bones and evaluated on 112 carpal bones which included both healthy participants without known wrist conditions and participants with thumb basilar osteoarthritis (OA). Manual segmentation by two expert human observers was considered as a reference. On the healthy subject dataset we obtained a Dice overlap of 93.0 ± 3.8, Jaccard Index of 87.3 ± 6.2, and a Hausdorff distance of 2.7 ± 3.4 mm, while on the OA dataset we obtained a Dice overlap of 90.7 ± 8.6, Jaccard Index of 83.0 ± 10.6, and a Hausdorff distance of 4.0 ± 4.4 mm. The short computational time of 20.8 s per bone (or 5.1 s per bone in the parallelized version) and the high agreement with the expert observers gives WRIST the potential to be utilized in musculoskeletal research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Wrist Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Diagnosing Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears; Experience at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem A. Al-Hiari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of the study were to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA of the wrist in detecting full-thickness tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and to compare the results of the magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA with the gold standard arthroscopic findings. Methods:The study was performed at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan, between January 2008 and December 2011. A total of 42 patients (35 males and 7 females who had ulnar-sided wrist pain and clinical suspicions of TFCC tears were included in the study. All patients underwent wrist magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA and then a wrist arthroscopy. The results of MRA were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results: After comparison with the arthroscopic findings, the MRA had three false-negative results (sensitivity = 93% and no false-positive results. A total of 39 patients were able to return to work. Satisfaction was high in 38 of the patients and 33 had satisfactorypain relief. The sensitivity of the wrist MRA in detecting TFCC full-thickness tears was 93% (39, and specificity was 80% (16/20. The overall accuracy of wrist arthroscopy in detecting a full-thickness tear of the TFCC in our study was 85% (29/34. Conclusion: These results illustrate the role of wrist MRA in assessing the TFCC pathology and suggest its use as the first imaging technique, following a plain X-ray, in evaluating patients with chronic ulnar side wrist pain with suspected TFCC injuries.

  6. A quantitative approach to total wrist arthroplasty: development of a "precentered" total wrist prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamas, R S

    1979-05-01

    The major problem with total wrist arthroplasty has been "imbalance" resulting from a lack of information on where to position the axes of motion of the prosthesis. This paper presents a precise method for determining the optimal location for the axes of motion of the prosthesis in any patient's wrist. It is based on a study of the normal biomechanics and was tested clinically in ten patients. The resultant "balance" and range of motion were excellent. A new prosthesis design evolved from this work which should simplify the operative procedure and make the results more reliable. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: erosions or normal variants? A prospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ording Muller, Lil-Sofie; Boavida, Peter; Avenarius, Derk; Eldevik, Odd Petter; Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Lambot-Juhan, Karen; Tanturri, Laura; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Bony depressions at the wrist resembling erosions are frequently seen on MRI in healthy children. The accuracy of MRI in detecting early bony destruction is therefore questionable. We compared findings on MRI of the wrist in healthy children and those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to investigate markers for true disease. We compared the number and localisation of bony depressions at the wrist in 85 healthy children and 68 children with JIA, ages 5-15 years. The size of the wrist was assessed from a radiograph of the wrist performed on the same day as the MRI. No significant difference in the number of bony depressions in the carpal bones was seen between healthy children and children with JIA at any age. Depressions are found in similar locations in the two groups, except for a few sites, where bony depressions were seen exclusively in the JIA group, particularly at the CMC joints. The wrist was significantly smaller in children with JIA (P < 0.001). Using adult scoring systems and standard MR sequences in the assessment of bone destruction in children may lead to overstaging or understaging of disease. At present, standard MRI sequences cannot easily be used for assessment of early signs of erosions in children. (orig.)

  8. Rehabilitation of the wrist and hand following sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Carrie A; Krause, Michelle; Brown, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In sports, wrist and hand injuries are commonplace. Too often, injuries to these areas can be under-treated and left for further complications to arise. While some injuries to the wrist and hand can be treated conservatively with immediate return to play, others require a more in-depth assessment prior to return to play. This article describes the most common wrist and hand injuries in sport, and provides information related to current treatment approaches.

  9. Kinesthetic illusion of wrist movement activates motor-related areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, E; Ehrsson, H H

    2001-12-04

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) to test the hypothesis that illusory movement of the right wrist activates the motor-related areas that are activated by real wrist movements. We vibrated the tendons of the relaxed right wrist extensor muscles which elicits a vivid illusory palmar flexion. In a control condition, we vibrated the skin surface over the processes styloideus ulnae, which does not elicit the illusion, using the identical frequency (83 Hz). We provide evidence that kinesthetic illusory wrist movement activates the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor area (SMA) and cingulate motor area (CMA). These areas are also active when executing the limb movement.

  10. Wrist-worn pervasive gaze interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Lund, Haakon; Biermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses gaze interaction for smart home control, conducted from a wrist-worn unit. First we asked ten people to enact the gaze movements they would propose for e.g. opening a door or adjusting the room temperature. On basis of their suggestions we built and tested different versions...... selection. Their subjective evaluations were positive with regard to the speed of the interaction. We conclude that gaze gesture input seems feasible for fast and brief remote control of smart home technology provided that robustness of tracking is improved....

  11. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-02-25

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated.

  12. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-01-01

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  13. Comparison of surface and intramuscular EMG pattern recognition for simultaneous wrist/hand motion classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren H; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-01-01

    The simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs) is important for the intuitive, life-like control of artificial limbs. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of intramuscular electromyogram (EMG) improved pattern classification of simultaneous wrist/hand movements compared to surface EMG. Two pattern classification methods were used in this analysis, and were trained to predict 1-DOF and 2-DOF movements involving wrist rotation, wrist flexion/extension, and hand open/close. The classification methods used were (1) a single pattern classifier discriminating between 1-DOF and 2-DOF motion classes, and (2) a parallel set of three classifiers to predict the activity of each of the 3 DOFs. We demonstrate that in this combined wrist/hand classification task, the use of intramuscular EMG significantly decreases classification error compared to surface EMG for the parallel configuration (p<0.01), but not for the single classifier. We also show that the use of intramuscular EMG mitigates the increase in errors produced when the parallel classifier method is trained without 2-DOF motion class data.

  14. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C.

    1992-01-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.) [de

  15. Arachidonic acid has a dominant effect to regulate lipogenic genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared to omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Vaidya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of long-chain n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA on the regulation of adipocytes metabolism are well known. These fatty acids are generally consumed together in our diets; however, the metabolic regulation of adipocytes in the presence of these fatty acids when given together is not known. Objective: To investigate the effects of n-3 PUFA and arachidonic acid (AA, an n-6 PUFA, on the regulation of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods: 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated in the presence or absence of 100 µM of eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA; docosahexaenoic acid, DHA; docosapentaenoic acid, DPA and AA, either alone or AA+n-3 PUFA; control cells received bovine serum albumin alone. The mRNA expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes was measured. The fatty acid composition of adipocytes was analyzed using gas chromatography. Results: Individual n-3 PUFA or AA had no effect on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ; however, AA+EPA and AA+DPA significantly increased (P<0.05 the expression compared to control cells (38 and 42%, respectively. AA and AA+EPA increased the mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (P<0.05. AA treatment decreased the mRNA expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD1 (P<0.01, while n-3 PUFA, except EPA, had no effect compared to control cells. AA+DHA and AA+DPA inhibited SCD1 gene expression (P<0.05 suggesting a dominant effect of AA. Fatty acids analysis of adipocytes revealed a higher accretion of AA compared to n-3 PUFA. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that AA has a dominant effect on the regulation of lipogenic genes in adipocytes.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3780 Section 888.3780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  17. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  18. Osteoarthritis of the Wrist STT Joint and Radiocarpal Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit Wollstein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of wrist osteoarthritis (OA lags behind that of other joints, possibly due to the complexity of wrist biomechanics and the importance of ligamentous forces in the function of the wrist. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT OA is common, but its role in wrist clinical pathology and biomechanics is unclear. We identified the prevalence of radiographic STT joint OA in our hand clinic population and defined the relationship between STT and radiocarpal OA in wrist radiographs. One hundred consecutive wrist clinical and radiographic exams were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographs were evaluated for the presence and stage of OA. The mean age was 61.3 (±14.5 years. The radiographic occurrence of STT joint OA was 59% and of radiocarpal (RC OA was 29%. Radiographic STT and RC joint OA were inversely related. Tenderness over the STT joint in physical exam was not associated with OA in the STT or other joints. STT OA in our series was not related to wrist pain. These findings support the discrepancy between radiographic and cadaver findings and clinically significant OA in this joint. The inverse relationship between STT and RC OA, as seen in scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC wrist, requires further biomechanical study.

  19. Wrist inflammation: a retrospective comparison between septic and non-septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gavrielle; Leow, Mabel Q H; Tay, Shian-Chao

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify differences in demographics, clinical and laboratory data between wrist septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis in patients admitted for wrist inflammation. A retrospective review of inpatients from May 2012 to April 2015 was conducted. Seventy-seven patients were included. Non-septic arthritis patients were more likely to have chronic kidney disease, pre-existing gout, or both. All septic arthritis patients had normal serum uric acid levels, and two or more raised inflammatory markers (white cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate). In patients with isolated wrist inflammation, the mean C-reactive protein in the septic arthritis group was significantly higher compared with the non-septic arthritis group (mean difference 132 mg/L, 95% CI 30.9-234). In this study, polyarticular involvement did not exclude a septic cause; nor did it imply a non-septic aetiology. Diabetic or immunosuppressed patients were not more likely to develop septic arthritis. The presence of chondrocalcinosis on wrist radiographs was virtually diagnostic of non-septic arthritis. IV.

  20. Effects of circumferential rigid wrist orthoses in rehabilitation of patients with radius fracture at typical site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of orthoses is a questionable rehabilitation method for patients with the distal radius fracture at typical site. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the rehabilitation on patients with radius fracture at the typical site, who wore circumferential static wrist orthoses, with those who did not wear them. Methods. Thirty patients were divided into 3 equal groups, 2 experimental groups, and 1 control group. The patients in the experimental groups were given the rehabilitation program of wearing serially manufactured (off-the-shelf, as well as custom-fit orthoses. Those in the control group did not wear wrist orthoses. Evaluation parameters were pain, edema, the range of the wrist motion, the quality of cylindrical, spherical, and pinch-spherical grasp, the strength of pinch and hand grasp, and patient's assessment of the effects of rehabilitation. Results. No significant difference in the effects of rehabilitation on the patients in experimental groups as opposed to control group was found. Patients in the first experimental group, and in control group were more satisfied with the effects of rehabilitation, as opposed to the patients in the second experimental group (p<0,05. Conclusion. The effects of circumferential static wrist orthoses in the rehabilitation of patients with distal radius fracture at the typical site were not clinically significant. There was no significant difference between the custom and off-the-shelf orthoses.

  1. Anatomy and injuries of the pediatric wrist: beyond the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ezekiel; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M; Nguyen, Jie; Luo, Yu; Thapa, Mahesh M

    2018-03-20

    Ligamentous injuries of the pediatric wrist, once thought to be relatively uncommon, are increasingly recognized in the context of acute high-energy mechanism trauma and chronic axial loading, including those encountered in both recreational and high-performance competitive sports. Recent advances in MR-based techniques for imaging the pediatric wrist allow for sensitive identification of these often radiographically occult injuries. Detailed knowledge of the intrinsic and supportive extrinsic ligamentous complexes, as well as normal developmental anatomy and congenital variation, are essential to accurately diagnose injuries to these structures. Early identification of ligamentous injury of the pediatric wrist is essential within the conservative treatment culture of modern pediatric orthopedics because treatment of these lesions often necessitates surgery, and outcomes often depend on early and sometimes aggressive intervention. In this article, we review MR arthrogram technique and pediatric wrist anatomy, and correlate appearances on MR and selected ligamentous pathologies of the pediatric wrist.

  2. Wrist-ankle Acupuncture Increases Pain Thresholds in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hai-Jin; Wu, Guo-Cheng; He, Yu-Yu; Chen, Hong-Yun; Zhou, Shuang; Zhou, Qing-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Context • Wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA) has been used to relieve both chronic and acute pain in China. Some research has shown that WAA can increase the pain thresholds in pain patients, but the ability of WAA to affect the pain thresholds in healthy adults is unknown. Objective • The study intended to assess the influence of WAA on the pain thresholds of healthy adults. Design • This is an observational study. Setting • This study was conducted in the School of Traditional Chinese Medicine at the Second Military Medical University (Shanghai, China). Participants • Participants were 50 healthy university students aged 19-23 y. Intervention • In the theory of WAA, each side of the body and each limb are longitudinally divided into 6 regions, with 1 needling point defined for each region at the wrist or ankle. The theory indicates that needling a point should relieve pain in a point's corresponding region. For the study, a needle was inserted and retained for 30 min in the Upper 2 point of the left wrist of each participant. Outcome Measures • The pressure pain threshold was measured by a handheld algometer at a position in the left Upper 2 region corresponding to the site of the needling and at positions in the right Upper 2 region as well as the left and right Upper 3 regions not corresponding to the site of the needling. The measurements were taken at 40 min before needling, 5 min after needling, 30 min after needling when the needles were removed, and 70 min after needling. Results • The immediate influence of the WAA on the pain threshold was not significant at 5 min after needling (P > .05). However, at 30 min after needling when the needles were removed, the increases in the pain thresholds were statistically significant when compared to those at 40 min before needling, which were the measurements at baseline (P ≤ .01). At 70 min after needling, the pain thresholds remained higher than those at 40 min before needling (P pain thresholds in the

  3. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (Psoreness compared with before exercise (Psoreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of hand-wrist bone and cervical vertebral analyses in measuring skeletal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Mancini, Marta; Andreani, Federico

    2006-11-01

    To compare skeletal maturation as measured by hand-wrist bone analysis and by cervical vertebral analysis. A radiographic hand-wrist bone analysis and cephalometric cervical vertebral analysis of 30 patients (14 males and 16 females; 7-18 years of age) were examined. The hand-wrist bone analysis was evaluated by the Bjork index, whereas the cervical vertebral analysis was assessed by the cervical vertebral maturation stage (CVMS) method. To define vertebral stages, the analysis consisted of both cephalometric (13 points) and morphologic evaluation of three cervical vertebrae (concavity of second, third, and fourth vertebrae and shape of third and fourth vertebrae). These measurements were then compared with the hand-wrist bone analysis, and the results were statistically analyzed by the Cohen kappa concordance index. The same procedure was repeated after 6 months and showed identical results. The Cohen kappa index obtained (mean +/- SD) was 0.783 +/- 0.098, which is in the significant range. The results show a concordance of 83.3%, considering that the estimated percentage for each case is 23.3%. The results also show a correlation of CVMS I with Bjork stages 1-3 (interval A), CVMS II with Bjork stage 4 (interval B), CVMS III with Bjork stage 5 (interval C), CVMS IV with Bjork stages 6 and 7 (interval D), and CVMS V with Bjork stages 8 and 9 (interval E). Vertebral analysis on a lateral cephalogram is as valid as the hand-wrist bone analysis with the advantage of reducing the radiation exposure of growing subjects.

  5. Accuracy of a new wrist cuff oscillometric blood pressure device: comparisons with intraarterial and mercury manometer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S; Wenzel, R R; di Matteo, C; Meier, B; Lüscher, T F

    1998-12-01

    Accurate measurement of arterial blood pressure is of great importance for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. Because of the chronic nature of antihypertensive drug therapy, the involvement of the patient in blood pressure control is desirable. Such an involvement, however, is only feasible if simple, user-friendly, and precise blood pressure measurement devices are available. In this study we tested a new wrist cuff oscillometric blood pressure measurement device in 100 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Blood pressures were simultaneously taken intraarterially (axillary artery) and with a mercury manometer and stethoscope or noninvasive measurement device (OMRON R3). Intraarterial measurements were directly compared with two measurements taken in random order with either an arm cuff mercury manometer or the wrist cuff device. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure as assessed with the mercury manometer was higher, especially when compared with the intraarterial and the wrist cuff values, which were comparable. Correlations of blood pressure values with intraarterial measurement were 0.86 systolic and 0.75 diastolic (P manometer measurements. Reproducibility of both measurements was good for the wrist cuff device ([systolic/diastolic]: r = 0.94/0.92; P manometer (r = 0.97/0.88; P manometer were higher than intraarterial values and those of the wrist cuff. Both noninvasive devices overestimated high diastolic values.

  6. The Influence of External Forces on Wrist Proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Marini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Proprioception combines information from cutaneous, joint, tendon, and muscle receptors for maintaining a reliable internal body image. However, it is still a matter of debate, in both neurophysiology and psychology, to what extent such body image is modified or distorted by a changing haptic environment. In particular, what is worth investigating is the contribution of external forces on our perception of body and joint configuration. The proprioceptive acuity of fifteen young participants was tested with a Joint Position Matching (JPM task, performed with the dominant wrist under five different external forces, in order to understand to what extent they affect proprioceptive acuity. Results show that accuracy and precision in target matching do not change in a significant manner as a function of the loading condition, suggesting that the multi-sensory integration process is indeed capable of discriminating different sub-modalities of proprioception, namely the joint position sense and the sense of force. Furthermore, results indicate a preference for target undershooting when movements are performed in a viscous or high resistive force field, rather than passive or null fields in which subjects did not show any predominance for under/over estimation of their position.

  7. The Influence of External Forces on Wrist Proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Contu, Sara; Antuvan, Chris W; Morasso, Pietro; Masia, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Proprioception combines information from cutaneous, joint, tendon, and muscle receptors for maintaining a reliable internal body image. However, it is still a matter of debate, in both neurophysiology and psychology, to what extent such body image is modified or distorted by a changing haptic environment. In particular, what is worth investigating is the contribution of external forces on our perception of body and joint configuration. The proprioceptive acuity of fifteen young participants was tested with a Joint Position Matching (JPM) task, performed with the dominant wrist under five different external forces, in order to understand to what extent they affect proprioceptive acuity. Results show that accuracy and precision in target matching do not change in a significant manner as a function of the loading condition, suggesting that the multi-sensory integration process is indeed capable of discriminating different sub-modalities of proprioception, namely the joint position sense and the sense of force. Furthermore, results indicate a preference for target undershooting when movements are performed in a viscous or high resistive force field, rather than passive or null fields in which subjects did not show any predominance for under/over estimation of their position.

  8. Unusual Wrist Tremor: Unilateral Isometric Tremor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa A. Zesiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tremors may be difficult to classify.Case Report: An 83‐year‐old male presented with an unusual left wrist tremor. The tremor could be reproducibly elicited by making a fist or carrying a weighted object (e.g., a shopping bag, bottle of water of approximately 1 lb or more, and it intensified with heavier weights. The tremor was difficult to classify, although it shared features with isometric tremor.Discussion: This specific presentation of tremor has not been reported previously. We hope that the detailed description we provide will aid other neurologists who encounter this or similar tremors in their clinics.

  9. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta [University of Pisa, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa (Italy); D' aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide [Radiology Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-10-24

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  10. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uen, Sakir; Fimmers, Rolf; Brieger, Miriam; Nickenig, Georg; Mengden, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Wrist blood pressure (BP) devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP) measurement methods: 1) office BP, 2) home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor), 3) 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM) (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hun)conventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH)- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p ABPM (p ABPM was not significantly different (p = 0.80 systolic BP, p = 0.1 diastolic BP). The correlation coefficient of 24-h ABMP (r = 0.52) with left ventricular mass index was significantly higher than with office BP (r = 0.31). The difference between 24-h ABPM and home BP (r = 0.46) was not significant. Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have

  11. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Roentgeninstitut/Nuklearmedizin, Luzern (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Huellner, Martin W.; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Tornquist, Katharina [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Silva, Angela J. da [Advanced Molecular Imaging, Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Bodmer, Elvira; Wartburg, Urs von; Hug, Urs [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Division of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  12. IMU-Based Wrist Rotation Control of a Transradial Myoelectric Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Daniel A; Goldfarb, Michael

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes a control method intended to facilitate improved control of a myoelectric prosthesis containing a wrist rotator. Rather than exclusively utilizing electromyogram (EMG) for the control of all myoelectric components (e.g., a hand and a wrist), the proposed controller utilizes inertial measurement (from six-axis inertial measurement unit (IMU)) to sense upper arm abduction/adduction, and uses this input to command a wrist rotation velocity. As such, the controller essentially substitutes shoulder abduction/adduction in place of agonist/antagonist EMG to control wrist angular velocity, which preserves EMG for control of the hand (or other arm components). As a preliminary assessment of efficacy, the control method was implemented on a transradial prosthesis prototype with a powered wrist rotator and hand, and experimentally assessed on five able-bodied subjects who wore the prototype using an able-bodied adaptor and one transradial amputee subject while performing assessments representative of activities of daily living. The assessments compared the (timed) performance of the combined EMG/ IMU-based control method with a (conventional) sequential EMG control approach. Results of the assessment indicate that the able-bodied subjects were able to perform the tasks 33% faster on average with the EMG/IMU-based method, relative to a conventional sequential EMG method. The same assessment was subsequently conducted using a single transradial amputee subject, which resulted in similar performance trends, although with a somewhat lessened effect size-specifically, the amputee subject was on average 22% faster in performing tasks with the IMU-based controller.

  13. Predicting energy expenditure of physical activity using hip- and wrist-worn accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kong Y; Acra, Sari A; Majchrzak, Karen; Donahue, Candice L; Baker, Lemont; Clemens, Linda; Sun, Ming; Buchowski, Maciej S

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the association between physical activity and health, we need accurate and detailed free-living physical activity measurements. The determination of energy expenditure of activity (EEACT) may also be useful in the treatment and maintenance of nutritional diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Minute-to-minute energy expenditure during a 24-h period was measured in 60 sedentary normal female volunteers (35.4 +/- 9.0 years, body mass index 30.0 +/- 5.9 kg/m2), using a state-of-the-art whole-room indirect calorimeter. The activities ranged from sedentary deskwork to walking and stepping at different intensities. Body movements were simultaneously measured using a hip-worn triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, Hemokentics, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin) and a wrist-worn uniaxial accelerometer (ActiWatch AW64, MiniMitter Co., Sunriver, Oregon) on the dominant arm. Movement data from the accelerometers were used to develop nonlinear prediction models (separately and combined) to estimate EEACT and compared for accuracy. In a subgroup (n=12), a second 24-h study period was repeated for cross-validation of the combined model. The combined model, using Tritrac-R3D and ActiWatch, accurately estimated total EEACT (97.7 +/- 3.2% of the measured values, p=0.781), as compared with using ActiWatch (86.0 +/- 4.7%, ptypes and intensity of activities. This concept can be extended to develop valid models for the accurate measurement of free-living energy metabolism in clinical populations.

  14. Treatment of wrist deformities in children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya A Kochenova

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Patients with segmental lesions of the spinal cord at the С6-С7 and С5-С8 level were associated with restoration of active wrist extension up to the neutral position or more and were expected to achieve significant improvement of hand function. Patients with spinal cord lesions at the C5-Th1 level exhibited significant lesions of the muscles, along with bone deformities. Consequently, surgical treatment could only achieve functional wrist position with minimal improvement of hand function. Using differential approaches in the treatment of wrist contracture that are selected by determining the level of spinal cord lesion will enable physicians to predict the outcome and improve the function and appearance of the wrist.

  15. Herpes,zoster with Wrist Drop and Aberrant Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Dutta

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient having herpes zoster involving C6, 7, 8, Dl and 2 segments, developed ipsilateral wrist drop and aberrant lesions. Paralytic deformity preceded the skin eruption by one day.

  16. MRI features in de Quervain's tenosynovitis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glajchen, N.; Schweitzer, M.

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain's synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain's disease. De Quervain's tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  17. Wrist Resistance Training Improves Motor Control and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Edward; Kim, You-Sin; Hill, Genevieve; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Chang Kook; Shim, Jae Kun

    2018-04-01

    Chu, E, Kim, Y-S, Hill, G, Kim, YH, Kim, CK, and Shim, JK. Wrist resistance training improves motor control and strength. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 962-969, 2018-The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-week direction-specific resistance training program on isometric torque control and isokinetic torque strength of the wrist joint. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to either the wrist training group (n = 9) or the control group (n = 10). The training group performed wrist exercises in 6 directions (flexion, extension, pronation, supination, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation), whereas the control group did not. Data were collected on the isometric torque control, 1-repetition maximum (1RM) strength, and isokinetic maximum torque (angular velocity of 60° per second wrist movements) before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and at 2-week intervals during training. The training group showed significant decreases in isometric torque control error in all 6 directions after 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the control group did not show significant increase or decrease. After 4 weeks of training, the training group showed significant increases in maximum strength in all 6 directions as assessed by 1RM strength and isokinetic strength tests, whereas the control group did not show any statistically significant changes. This study shows that motor control significantly improves within the first 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the wrist strength significantly improves within the first 4 weeks of resistance training. Based on the findings of this study, coaches and trainers should consider wrist resistance training to improve athletes' muscular strength and control of the wrist muscles.

  18. Kinematic Analysis of a Partially Decoupled 3-DOF Parallel Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique spherical parallel wrist with three partially decoupled rotational degrees of freedom (DOFs is introduced in this paper. The mechanism has the significant advantages of few singularities and simple partially decoupled kinematics. A modified parallel wrist is optimized to have the least link interference workspace. Finally, the decoupled motion is studied in detail to exhibit the kinematic performance of the mechanism.

  19. Social humanoid robot SARA: development of the wrist mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penčić, M.; Rackov, M.; Čavić, M.; Kiss, I.; Cioată, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wrist mechanism for humanoid robots. The research was conducted within the project which develops social humanoid robot Sara - a mobile anthropomorphic platform for researching the social behaviour of robots. There are two basic ways for the realization of humanoid wrist. The first one is based on biologically inspired structures that have variable stiffness, and the second one on low backlash mechanisms that have high stiffness. Our solution is low backlash differential mechanism that requires small actuators. Based on the kinematic-dynamic requirements, a dynamic model of the robot wrist is formed. A dynamic simulation for several hand positions was performed and the driving torques of the wrist mechanism were determined. The realized wrist has 2 DOFs and enables movements in the direction of flexion/extension 115°, ulnar/radial deviation ±45° and the combination of these two movements. It consists of a differential mechanism with three spur bevel gears, two of which are driving and identical, while the last one is the driven gear to which the robot hand is attached. Power transmission and motion from the actuator to the input links of the differential mechanism is realized with two parallel placed identical gear mechanisms. The wrist mechanism has high carrying capacity and reliability, high efficiency, a compact design and low backlash that provides high positioning accuracy and repeatability of movements, which is essential for motion control.

  20. A digital database of wrist bone anatomy and carpal kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Douglas C; Crisco, Joseph J; Trafton, Theodore G; Leventhal, Evan L

    2007-01-01

    The skeletal wrist consists of eight small, intricately shaped carpal bones. The motion of these bones is complex, occurs in three dimensions, and remains incompletely defined. Our previous efforts have been focused on determining the in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) kinematics of the normal and abnormal carpus. In so doing we have developed an extensive database of carpal bone anatomy and kinematics from a large number of healthy subjects. The purpose of this paper is to describe that database and to make it available to other researchers. CT volume images of both wrists from 30 healthy volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were acquired in multiple wrist positions throughout the normal range of wrist motion. The outer cortical surfaces of the carpal bones, radius and ulna, and proximal metacarpals were segmented and the 3-D motion of each bone was calculated for each wrist position. The database was constructed to include high-resolution surface models, measures of bone volume and shape, and the 3-D kinematics of each segmented bone. The database does not include soft tissues of the wrist. While there are numerous digital anatomical databases, this one is unique in that it includes a large number of subjects and it contains in vivo kinematic data as well as the bony anatomy.

  1. Separating bedtime rest from activity using waist or wrist-worn accelerometers in youth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin J Tracy

    Full Text Available Recent interest in sedentary behavior and technological advances expanded use of watch-size accelerometers for continuous monitoring of physical activity (PA over extended periods (e.g., 24 h/day for 1 week in studies conducted in natural living environment. This approach necessitates the development of new methods separating bedtime rest and activity periods from the accelerometer recordings. The goal of this study was to develop a decision tree with acceptable accuracy for separating bedtime rest from activity in youth using accelerometer placed on waist or wrist. Minute-by-minute accelerometry data were collected from 81 youth (10-18 years old, 47 females during a monitored 24-h stay in a whole-room indirect calorimeter equipped with a force platform covering the floor to detect movement. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to determine the accelerometer cut points for rest and activity. To examine the classification differences, the accelerometer bedtime rest and activity classified by the algorithm in the development group (n = 41 were compared with actual bedtime rest and activity classification obtained from the room calorimeter-measured metabolic rate and movement data. The selected optimal bedtime rest cut points were 20 and 250 counts/min for the waist- and the wrist-worn accelerometer, respectively. The selected optimal activity cut points were 500 and 3,000 counts/min for waist and wrist-worn accelerometers, respectively. Bedtime rest and activity were correctly classified by the algorithm in the validation group (n = 40 by both waist- (sensitivity: 0.983, specificity: 0.946, area under ROC curve: 0. 872 and wrist-worn (0.999, 0.980 and 0.943 accelerometers. The decision tree classified bedtime rest correctly with higher accuracy than commonly used automated algorithm for both waist- and wrist-warn accelerometer (all p<0.001. We concluded that cut points developed and validated for waist- and wrist

  2. At Home Photography-Based Method for Measuring Wrist Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Rancy, Schneider K; Johnsen, Parker H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  To determine the reliability of wrist range of motion (WROM) measurements based on digital photographs taken by patients at home compared with traditional measurements done in the office with a goniometer. Methods  Sixty-nine postoperative patients were enrolled in this study at least 3 months postoperatively. Active and passive wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation were recorded by one of the two attending surgeons with a 1-degree resolution goniometer at the last postoperative office visit. Patients were provided an illustrated instruction sheet detailing how to take digital photographic images at home in six wrist positions (active and passive flexion/extension, and radial/ulnar deviation). Wrist position was measured from digital images by both the attending surgeons in a randomized, blinded fashion on two separate occasions greater than 2 weeks apart using the same goniometer. Reliability analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient to assess agreement between clinical and photography-based goniometry, as well as intra- and interobserver agreement. Results  Out of 69 enrolled patients, 30 (43%) patients sent digital images. Of the 180 digital photographs, only 9 (5%) were missing or deemed inadequate for WROM measurements. Agreement between clinical and photography-based measurements was "almost perfect" for passive wrist flexion/extension and "substantial" for active wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for the attending surgeons was "almost perfect" for all measurements. Discussion  This study validates a photography-based goniometry protocol allowing accurate and reliable WROM measurements without direct physician contact. Passive WROM was more accurately measured from photographs than active WROM. This study builds on previous photography-based goniometry literature by validating a protocol in which patients or their families take and submit their own

  3. Clinical significance of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of wrist joint in Rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yong Woon; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo; Cho, Jae Hyun

    1996-01-01

    To assess the role of contrast-enhanced dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in evaluation disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Forty-seven wrist joints with rheumatoid arthritis were examined prospectively. Coronal images of the wrist were obtained using fat-suppression Fast multi-planar spoiled gradient recalled (FMPSPGR) acquisition in the steady state ; TR/TE 102/6.4 msec, flip angle = 60, 4 slices per sequence, FOV = 8 cm, matrix 256 X 192 at 1.5 Tesla. Scans were carried out once before and five to eight times after an intravenous Gd-DPTA injection, at 30-second-intervals. The enhancement of synovium were measured, the enhancement ratio was calculated(postcontrast SNR/precontrast SNR) and time-enhancement ratio curves were plotted. Patients were divided into three groups according to the ratio of initial to peak enhancement : less than 30% ; 30-80% more than 80%. Differences among the three groups were statistically tested using clinical indices and laboratory data as variable. Comparing one group with another, there were no significant differences in clinical indices and laboratory data except for the parameter of grip strength. Enhancement pattern measured in a single wrist joint was not comparable to a clinical index in predicting disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

  4. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  5. Big Comsats for big jobs at low user cost. [considering wrist telephony, electronic mail transmission and educational television applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekey, I.

    1979-01-01

    Three examples are used to illustrate what is possible with large space systems: (1) personal communications using wrist telephones, (2) electronic transmission of mail, and (3) wide dissemination of educational TV. Design concepts and costs are explored and compared to alternative ground-based concepts.

  6. Sensory impairments and wrist fractures: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergthora Baldursdottir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate vestibular function, foot sensation, postural control and functional abilities, and to evaluate whether these variables are associated with fall-related wrist fracture. Methods: A case-control study was conducted with 98 subjects, age range 50–75 years, who had sustained a fall-related wrist fracture. Forty-eight sex-, age- and physical activity-matched individuals, with no previous history of wrist fracture, served as controls. Measurements included: head-shake test (HST, tuning fork, biothesiometer, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (MF, Sensory Organization Test (SOT, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSTS, 10-m walk test (10MWT, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI scales. Logistic regression models were used to determine associations of variables with a fall-related wrist fracture. Results: Vestibular asymmetry was apparent in 82% of wrist fracture subjects and 63% of controls (p = 0.012. Plantar pressure sensation (p <0.001, SOT composite scores (p < 0.001, 10MWT (p <0.001, FTSTS (p <0.001, ABC (p <0.001 and DHI (p <0.005 were significantly poorer among cases than controls. A positive HST (odds ratio (OR 5.424; p = 0.008 and monofilament sensation (OR 3.886; p = 0.014 showed the strongest associations with having a fall-related wrist fracture. Conclusion: Asymmetrical vestibular function and reduced plantar pressure sensation are associated with fall-related wrist fractures among the ageing population. These factors are potential targets for future interventions.

  7. Education in wrist arthroscopy: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Bavinck, N; Mathoulin, C; van der Horst, C M A M; Schijven, M P; Tuijthof, G J M

    2015-05-01

    Arthroscopy has assumed an important place in wrist surgery. It requires specific operative skills that are now mainly acquired in the operating room. In other fields of endoscopic surgery, e-learning and virtual reality (VR) have introduced new perspectives in teaching skills. This leads to the following research question: Could the current way of teaching wrist arthroscopy skills be supported using new educational media, such as e-learning and simulator training? The literature was searched for available methods of teaching endoscopic skills. Articles were assessed on the evidence of validity. In addition, a survey was sent to all members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) to find out whether hand surgeons express a need to embrace modern educational tools such as e-learning or simulators for training of wrist arthroscopy skills. This study shows that the current way of teaching wrist arthroscopy skills can be supported using new educational media, such as e-learning and simulator training. Literature indicates that e-learning can be a valuable tool for teaching basic knowledge of arthroscopy and supports the hypothesis that the use of virtual reality and simulators in training enhances operative skills in surgical trainees. This survey indicates that 55 out of 65 respondents feel that an e-learning program would be a valuable asset and 62 out of the 65 respondents are positive on the additional value of wrist arthroscopy simulator in training. Study results support the need and relevance to strengthen current training of wrist arthroscopy using e-learning and simulator training. V.

  8. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  9. New radiographic bone erosions in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are detectable with magnetic resonance imaging a median of two years earlier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, Michael; Stoltenberg, Michael

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a 5-year followup study, we investigated the temporal relationship between development of wrist joint erosions as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus conventional radiography (CR), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We also evaluated the risk of erosive...... progression on CR associated with the presence of MRI erosions. METHODS: In 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, MRI and CR of the dominant wrist were performed annually for 5 years. In each image set, each wrist bone (metacarpal bases, carpal bones, radius, and ulna) was assessed for the absence...... or presence of bone erosions. RESULTS: Nine bones showed radiographic erosions at baseline. Twenty-seven new radiographic erosions developed during the 5-year followup period. Of these 27 new erosions, 21 were detected 1-5 years earlier by MRI than by CR, 3 were simultaneously detected by both methods, 2 were...

  10. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the fertile and sterile flower buds of a dominant genic male sterile line in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyan; Tan, Mingpu; Yu, Haijuan; Li, Liang; Zhou, Fang; Yang, Minmin; Zhou, Ting; Zhao, Yingzhong

    2016-11-10

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is a globally important oilseed crop with highly-valued oil. Strong hybrid vigor is frequently observed within this crop, which can be exploited by the means of genic male sterility (GMS). We have previously developed a dominant GMS (DGMS) line W1098A that has great potential for the breeding of F 1 hybrids. Although it has been genetically and anatomically characterized, the underlying molecular mechanism for male sterility remains unclear and therefore limits the full utilization of such GMS line. In this study, RNA-seq based transcriptome profiling was carried out in two near-isogenic DGMS lines (W1098A and its fertile counterpart, W1098B) to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to male sterility. A total of 1,502 significant DEGs were detected, among which 751 were up-regulated and 751 were down-regulated in sterile flower buds. A number of DEGs were implicated in both ethylene and JA synthesis & signaling pathway; the expression of which were either up- or down-regulated in the sterile buds, respectively. Moreover, the majority of NAC and WRKY transcription factors implicated from the DEGs were up-regulated in sterile buds. By querying the Plant Male Reproduction Database, 49 sesame homologous genes were obtained; several of these encode transcription factors (bHLH089, MYB99, and AMS) that showed reduced expression in sterile buds, thus implying the possible role in specifying or determining tapetal fate and development. The predicted effect of allelic variants on the function of their corresponding DEGs highlighted several Insertions/Deletions (InDels), which might be responsible for the phenotype of sterility/fertility in DGMS lines. The present comparative transcriptome study suggested that both hormone signaling pathway and transcription factors control the male sterility of DGMS in sesame. The results also revealed that several InDels located in DEGs prone to cause loss of function, which might contribute to

  11. [Automated Assessment for Bone Age of Left Wrist Joint in Uyghur Teenagers by Deep Learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T H; Huo, Z; Liu, T A; Wang, F; Wan, L; Wang, M W; Chen, T; Wang, Y H

    2018-02-01

    To realize the automated bone age assessment by applying deep learning to digital radiography (DR) image recognition of left wrist joint in Uyghur teenagers, and explore its practical application value in forensic medicine bone age assessment. The X-ray films of left wrist joint after pretreatment, which were taken from 245 male and 227 female Uyghur nationality teenagers in Uygur Autonomous Region aged from 13.0 to 19.0 years old, were chosen as subjects. And AlexNet was as a regression model of image recognition. From the total samples above, 60% of male and female DR images of left wrist joint were selected as net train set, and 10% of samples were selected as validation set. As test set, the rest 30% were used to obtain the image recognition accuracy with an error range in ±1.0 and ±0.7 age respectively, compared to the real age. The modelling results of deep learning algorithm showed that when the error range was in ±1.0 and ±0.7 age respectively, the accuracy of the net train set was 81.4% and 75.6% in male, and 80.5% and 74.8% in female, respectively. When the error range was in ±1.0 and ±0.7 age respectively, the accuracy of the test set was 79.5% and 71.2% in male, and 79.4% and 66.2% in female, respectively. The combination of bone age research on teenagers' left wrist joint and deep learning, which has high accuracy and good feasibility, can be the research basis of bone age automatic assessment system for the rest joints of body. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  12. Validation of Capturing Sleep Diary Data via a Wrist-Worn Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla R. Jungquist

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper sleep diaries are the gold standard for assessment of sleep continuity variables in clinical practice as well as research. Unfortunately, paper diaries can be filled out weekly instead of daily, lost, illegible or destroyed; and are considered out of date according to the newer technology savvy generations. In this study, we assessed the reliability and validity of using a wrist-worn electronic sleep diary. Design. A prospective design was used to compare capturing 14 days of sleep continuity data via paper to a wrist-worn electronic device that also captured actigraphy data. Results. Thirty-five healthy community dwelling adults with mean (sd age of 36 (15, 80% Caucasians, and 74% females were enrolled. All sleep continuity variables via electronic and paper diary capture methods were significantly correlated with moderate, positive relationships. Assessment of validity revealed that electronic data capture had a significant relationship with objective measure of sleep continuity variables as measured by actigraphy. Paper diary variables were not significantly associated with objective measures. Conclusions. The use of a wrist-worn device to capture daily sleep diary data is as accurate as and for some variables more accurate than using paper diaries.

  13. Influence of dominant- as compared with nondominant-side symptoms on Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand and Western Ontario Rotator Cuff scores in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Michener, Lori; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2018-02-13

    The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index are 2 widely used patient-reported questionnaires in individuals with rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. In contrast to the WORC index, for which the items are specific to the affected shoulder, the items of the DASH questionnaire assess the ability to perform activities regardless of the arm used. The objective of this study is to determine whether scores on the DASH questionnaire and WORC index are affected if the symptoms are on the dominant or nondominant side in individuals with RC tendinopathy. Given the number of items that can be influenced by dominance, the hypothesis is that DASH scores will be impacted by the side of the symptoms. Individuals with RC tendinopathy (N = 149) completed questions on symptomatology and hand dominance, the DASH questionnaire, and the WORC index. Differences in total scores (independent t test) and single items (Wilcoxon rank sum test) were compared between groups of participants with dominant-side symptoms and those without dominant-side symptoms. No significant differences were observed for WORC or DASH total scores when comparing participants with and without symptoms on their dominant side. Single-item comparison revealed more items being affected by symptom side on the DASH questionnaire (6 of 30 items) than on the WORC index (2 of 21 items). The side of the symptoms does not influence the DASH and WORC total scores, as there are no systematic differences between individuals with and without symptoms in their dominant shoulder. However, the presence of dominant symptoms does influence item scores more on the DASH questionnaire than on the WORC index. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Age-Related Decline of Wrist Position Sense and its Relationship to Specific Physical Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Van de Winckel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Perception of limb and body positions is known as proprioception. Sensory feedback, especially from proprioceptive receptors, is essential for motor control. Aging is associated with a decline in position sense at proximal joints, but there is inconclusive evidence of distal joints being equally affected by aging. In addition, there is initial evidence that physical activity attenuates age-related decline in proprioception. Our objectives were, first, to establish wrist proprioceptive acuity in a large group of seniors and compare their perception to young adults, and second, to determine if specific types of training or regular physical activity are associated with preserved wrist proprioception. We recruited community-dwelling seniors (n = 107, mean age, 70 ± 5 years, range, 65–84 years without cognitive decline (Mini Mental State Examination-brief version ≥13/16 and young adult students (n = 51, mean age, 20 ± 1 years, range, 19–26 years. Participants performed contralateral and ipsilateral wrist position sense matching tasks with a bimanual wrist manipulandum to a 15° flexion reference position. Systematic error or proprioceptive bias was computed as the mean difference between matched and reference position. The respective standard deviation over five trials constituted a measure of random error or proprioceptive precision. Current levels of physical activity and previous sport, musical, or dance training were obtained through a questionnaire. We employed longitudinal mixed effects linear models to calculate the effects of trial number, sex, type of matching task and age on wrist proprioceptive bias and precision. The main results were that relative proprioceptive bias was greater in older when compared to young adults (mean difference: 36% ipsilateral, 88% contralateral, p < 0.01. Proprioceptive precision for contralateral but not for ipsilateral matching was smaller in older than in young adults (mean difference: 38

  15. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  16. Hand and Wrist Injuries in Boxing and the Martial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Benjamin Todd; Lehman, Thomas P; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-02-01

    Hand and wrist injuries in martial arts are typically a reflection of the combat nature of this discipline. In striking sports, the axial load mechanism of injury is common and causes fractures and dislocations; in grappling sports, sprain injuries and degenerative changes predominate. There is clear evidence to support that hand protection reduces the risk of hand injury. Traditional training in martial arts on proper technique and target selection in striking sports reduces the risk of hand injury, and is an important component of hand and wrist injury prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Validation of the IOF quality of life questionnaire for patients with wrist fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, P.T.A.M.; Jameson, K.; Bianchi, M.L.; Goemaere, S.; Boonen, S.; Reeve, J.; Stepan, J.; Johnell, O.; van Schoor, N.M.; Dennison, E.; Kanis, J.A.; Cooper, C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Wrist fracture causes pain and decreased physical, social and emotional function. The International Osteoporosis Foundation has developed a specific questionnaire to assess quality of life in patients with wrist fracture. This questionnaire, including 12 questions, was validated in a

  19. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Number: 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration...- NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER...

  20. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: value of fat suppression pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, N.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kawahara, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Oda, J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To determine the usefulness of fat-suppressed gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design and patients. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) images were obtained and compared with other standard techniques in 38 wrists of 27 patients (22-77 years) with RA. Scoring based on the degree of synovial enhancement of each joint was developed and the total scores (J-score) were correlated with radiographic stage, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and symptomatic change in the follow-up study. Results. Synovial proliferations showed marked enhancement in all the wrists. In addition, contrast enhancement in the bone marrow and tenosynovium was seen in 36 and eight wrists respectively. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated these abnormalities better than other techniques. The J-scores correlated well with values of CRP (P=0.0034), but not with radiographic stages and ESR. Conclusion. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted SE images can clearly demonstrate most of the essential lesions in RA including the proliferative synovium, bone erosion, bone marrow inflammatory change, and tenosynovitis. Scoring based on the extent of Gd-enhancement of synovium can be useful in the assessment of the inflammatory status. (orig.). With 8 figs

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: value of fat suppression pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, N. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kawahara, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Matsumoto, T. [Department of Orthopedics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan); Oda, J. [Department of Orthopedics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. To determine the usefulness of fat-suppressed gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design and patients. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) images were obtained and compared with other standard techniques in 38 wrists of 27 patients (22-77 years) with RA. Scoring based on the degree of synovial enhancement of each joint was developed and the total scores (J-score) were correlated with radiographic stage, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and symptomatic change in the follow-up study. Results. Synovial proliferations showed marked enhancement in all the wrists. In addition, contrast enhancement in the bone marrow and tenosynovium was seen in 36 and eight wrists respectively. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated these abnormalities better than other techniques. The J-scores correlated well with values of CRP (P=0.0034), but not with radiographic stages and ESR. Conclusion. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted SE images can clearly demonstrate most of the essential lesions in RA including the proliferative synovium, bone erosion, bone marrow inflammatory change, and tenosynovitis. Scoring based on the extent of Gd-enhancement of synovium can be useful in the assessment of the inflammatory status. (orig.). With 8 figs.

  2. Relationship between the degree of inhibited stretch reflex activities of the wrist flexor and reaction time during quick extension movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, T; Asami, T; Tanii, K

    1997-08-01

    It has been reported that stretch reflex responses, including the long latency component, are modulated by motor preparation for the direction and type of movement. In the present study, human subjects were required to make a reaction movement in the direction of the wrist extension following a muscle stretch to the wrist flexor, and we investigated the relationship between the modulation of reflex activities of the wrist flexor and the length of reaction time (premotor time) of the wrist extensor. Twenty-five healthy males, ranging in age from 20 to 28, participated in the experiments. A DC torque motor was used to evoke the reflex EMG responses on the flexor. Averaging the rectified EMG, recorded with the surface electrodes over the flexor, showed short and long latency reflexes (M1 and M2 components) in response to the muscle stretch. For all subjects, the amplitudes of the reflex components during the extension reaction movement decreased, compared to those amplitudes in the non-reaction tasks. The decrease in the M2 component, which is considered a transcortical reflex, was significantly larger than the decrease in the M1 component, which is a spinal reflex. Moreover, there were correlations between reaction time to muscle stretch and the degree of decrease in reflex activities with the extension reaction (r = 0.652 for M1, r = 0.813 for M2, P motor control required to perform quick movements.

  3. Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs | Henning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dominating set in a graph G is a set S of vertices of G such that every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex of S. The domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G. For a positive integer b, a set S of vertices in a graph G is a b-disjunctive dominating set in G if every vertex v not in S is adjacent ...

  4. Active commuting reduces the risk of wrist fractures in middle-aged women-the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Bergström, U; Pettersson-Kymmer, U

    2013-02-01

    Middle-aged women with active commuting had significantly lower risk for wrist fracture than women commuting by car/bus. Our purpose was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle in middle-aged women was associated with a reduced risk of later sustaining a low-trauma wrist fracture. The Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study is a population-based nested case-control study investigating associations between lifestyle and fragility fractures. From a cohort of ~35,000 subjects, we identified 376 female wrist fracture cases who had reported data regarding their commuting habits, occupational, and leisure physical activity, before they sustained their fracture. Each fracture case was compared with at least one control drawn from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total of 778 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 54.3 ± 5.8 years, and mean age at fracture was 60.3 ± 5.8 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, body mass index, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects with active commuting (especially walking) were at significantly lower risk of sustaining a wrist fracture (OR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.27-0.88) compared with those who commuted by car or bus. Leisure time activities such as dancing and snow shoveling were also associated with a lower fracture risk, whereas occupational activity, training, and leisure walking or cycling were unrelated to fracture risk. This study suggests that active commuting is associated with a lower wrist fracture risk, in middle-aged women.

  5. Digital radiographic evaluation of hand-wrist bone maturation and prediction of age in South Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Reddy, M Asha Lata; Jain, Megha; Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Sanghvi, Praveen; Thetay, Anshuj Ajay Rao

    2014-09-01

    In the growing years, indicators of the level of maturational development of the individual provide the best means for evaluating biologic age and the associated timing of skeletal growth. The relative stage of maturity of a child may be determined by comparing the child's hand-wrist radiograph to the known standards of skeletal development. In this study, we assessed various levels of skeletal maturation and also identified the relationship between chronological age (CA) and maturation stage using the hand-wrist radiographs in adolescents of Indian origin. Three hundred and thirty hand-wrist digital radiographs of individuals aged 8 to 18 years were evaluated for skeletal maturity levels using Fishman's method. The data was analysed using the SPSS software package (version 12, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Regression analysis was performed for calculating bone age of both males and females. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients were estimated separately for males and females to assess the relation between CA and maturation level. An association between skeletal maturation indicator stages and CA (r = 0.82) was significant. Interestingly, female subjects were observed to be advanced in skeletal maturity compared to males. Regression equations were derived to calculate bone age in males, females and the whole sample. The results of this study showed significant association between hand-wrist skeletal maturation levels and CA. Digital radiographic assessment of hand-wrist skeletal maturation can be used as a better choice for predicting average bone age of an individual because of its simplicity, reliability and lesser radiation exposure.

  6. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa A. Zukowski, MA; Jaimie A. Roper, MS; Orit Shechtman, PhD, OTR/L; Dana M. Otzel, PhD; Patty W. Hovis, MSESS; Mark D. Tillman, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury part...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3800 Section 888.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist joint...

  8. Flexor carpi ulnaris tenotomy alone does not eliminate its contribution to wrist torque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J. C.; Kreulen, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle tenotomy and transfer to the extensor side of the wrist are common procedures used to improve wrist position and dexterity in patients with cerebral palsy. Our aim was to determine whether this muscle still influences wrist torque even after tenotomy of its distal tendon.

  9. Universal haptic drive: a robot for arm and wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblak, Jakob; Cikajlo, Imre; Matjacić, Zlatko

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a universal haptic drive (UHD), a device that enables rehabilitation of either arm ("ARM" mode) or wrist ("WRIST" mode) movement in two degrees-of-freedom. The mode of training depends on the selected mechanical configuration, which depends on locking/unlocking of a passive universal joint. Actuation of the device is accomplished by utilizing a series elastic actuation principle, which enables use of off-the-shelf mechanical and actuation components. A proportional force control scheme, needed for implementation of impedance control based movement training, was implemented. The device performance in terms of achievable lower and upper bound of viable impedance range was evaluated through adequately chosen sinusoidal movement in eight directions of a planar movement for the "ARM" mode and in eight directions of a combined wrist flexion/extension and forearm pronation/supination movement for the "WRIST" mode. Additionally, suitability of the universal haptic drive for movement training was tested in a series of training sessions conducted with a chronic stroke subject. The results have shown that reliable and repeatable performance can be achieved in both modes of operation for all tested directions.

  10. Wrist disarticulation associated with Monteggia fracture | El Abdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 50-year-old man, right-handed farmer, was admitted to the emergency department after undergoing an agriculture accident. Physical examination on admission revealed a left wrist disarticulation with a deformity of the ipsilateral elbow and forearm (A and B). Plain radiography showed a fracture of the ulna shaft as well as ...

  11. Synovial Chondrosarcoma in the Hand and Wrist: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Jee Young; Kang, Seok Jin; Kang, Yong Koo; Baik, Jun Hyun [Catholic University St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Synovial chondrosarcoma is extremely rare and arises de novo or from malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis. It commonly involves large joints, such as the knee or hip. Here, we present an unusual case of synovial chondrosarcoma from synovial chondromatosis in the hand and wrist, clearly demonstrating the characteristic findings on plain radiograph and MR imaging.

  12. Synovial Chondrosarcoma in the Hand and Wrist: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Jee Young; Kang, Seok Jin; Kang, Yong Koo; Baik, Jun Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondrosarcoma is extremely rare and arises de novo or from malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis. It commonly involves large joints, such as the knee or hip. Here, we present an unusual case of synovial chondrosarcoma from synovial chondromatosis in the hand and wrist, clearly demonstrating the characteristic findings on plain radiograph and MR imaging

  13. Education in wrist arthroscopy: past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M. C.; Bavinck, N.; Mathoulin, C.; van der Horst, C. M. A. M.; Schijven, M. P.; Tuijthof, G. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopy has assumed an important place in wrist surgery. It requires specific operative skills that are now mainly acquired in the operating room. In other fields of endoscopic surgery, e-learning and virtual reality (VR) have introduced new perspectives in teaching skills. This leads to the

  14. Anatomical parameters for musculoskeletal modeling of the hand and wrist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirakhorlo, M. (Mojtaba); Visser, Judith M A; Goislard de Monsabert, B. A A X; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Maas, H.; Veeger, H. E J

    2016-01-01

    A musculoskeletal model of the hand and wrist can provide valuable biomechanical and neurophysiological insights, relevant for clinicians and ergonomists. Currently, no consistent data-set exists comprising the full anatomy of these upper extremity parts. The aim of this study was to collect a

  15. Statistical Modeling of Shape and Motion of the Wrist Bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Giessen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability occurs when the wrist bones assume a pathological posture, e.g. due to ligament rupture as a result of trauma. Ligament rupture cannot be diagnosed reliably directly, as current medical imaging modalities do not provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast (X-ray, CT) or lack a

  16. [Tuberculosis of the wrist. Symptoms and outcome in eleven cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchakroun, M; El Bardouni, A; Zaddoug, O; Kharmaz, M; El Yaacoubi, M; Ouadghiri, M; El Manouar, M

    2004-06-01

    We present our experience with a rare localization of tuberculosis, the wrist, focusing on symptoms and outcome after treatment. Our series included eleven patients, eight men and three women, mean age 42 Years, who presented tuberculosis of the wrist. Tuberculosis was known in four patients who were being treated and a context of tuberculosis was recognized in three others. One patient on long-term corticosteroid therapy was immunodepressed. Mean time from symptom onset to consultation was fifteen months indicating a slow and progressive disease process. An inflammatory syndrome was noted in nine patients. Based on the standard x-rays, the David-Chausse classification was: stage I n=1; stage II n=1; stage III n=3; stage IV n=4. The AP view of the wrist was normal in two patients. Diagnosis of tuberculosis was confirmed on the surgical biopsy specimen which revealed epithelio-gigantocellulary granuloma with caseous necrosis. In only five patients Koch bacilli developed in culture on Lowenstein-Jensen. Patients were given anti-tuberculous antibiotics and the wrist was immobilized in a plaster splint. Mean follow-up was two years. The disease course was blunted by the antituberculosis treatment. Surgical drainage was only required to clear abscesses. Wrist stiffness was frequent and had a significant functional impact. These eleven cases of a rare localization of tuberculosis illustrate the slow progressive course of clinical symptoms and radiological signs of tuberculosis, emphasizing the difficulties encountered in establishing early diagnosis of such isolated non-abscessed localizations. Anti-tuberculous treatment is effective but the functional outcome depends on early diagnosis before the development of radiological evidence of joint destruction.

  17. SPECT/CT versus MRI in patients with nonspecific pain of the hand and wrist - a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Buerkert, Alexander; Schleich, Florian S.; Strobel, Klaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Lucerne (Switzerland); Schuerch, Maja; Hug, Urs; Wartburg, Urs von [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Hand and wrist pain is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the complex anatomy of the involved small structures. The American College of Radiology recommends MRI as the study of choice in patients with chronic wrist pain if radiographs are negative. Lately, state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems have been introduced and may help in the diagnosis of this selected indication. This retrospective study included 21 patients with nonspecific pain of the hand/wrist. The diagnosis of nonspecific wrist pain was made by the referring hand surgeon based on patient history, clinical examination, plain radiography and clinical guidelines. All patients received planar early-phase imaging and late-phase SPECT/CT imaging as well as MRI. Lesions were divided into major (causative) and minor (not causative) pathologies according to clinical follow-up. Furthermore, oedema-like bone marrow changes seen on MRI were compared with focally increased tracer uptake seen on SPECT/CT images. MRI yielded a quite high sensitivity (0.86), but a low specificity (0.20). In contrast, SPECT/CT yielded a high specificity (1.00) and a low sensitivity (0.71). Oedema-like bone marrow changes were detected in 15 lesions in 11 patients. In ten lesions with bone marrow oedema on MRI, foci of elevated tracer uptake were detected on SPECT/CT. Overall, MRI was more sensitive, but SPECT/CT was more specific in the evaluation of causative pathologies. In this initial comparison, SPECT/CT showed higher specificity than MRI in the evaluation of causative pathologies in patients with nonspecific wrist pain. However, MRI was more sensitive. Thus, SPECT/CT was shown to be a useful problem-solving tool in the diagnostic work-up of these patients. (orig.)

  18. SPECT/CT versus MRI in patients with nonspecific pain of the hand and wrist - a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Buerkert, Alexander; Schleich, Florian S.; Strobel, Klaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Schuerch, Maja; Hug, Urs; Wartburg, Urs von

    2012-01-01

    Hand and wrist pain is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the complex anatomy of the involved small structures. The American College of Radiology recommends MRI as the study of choice in patients with chronic wrist pain if radiographs are negative. Lately, state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems have been introduced and may help in the diagnosis of this selected indication. This retrospective study included 21 patients with nonspecific pain of the hand/wrist. The diagnosis of nonspecific wrist pain was made by the referring hand surgeon based on patient history, clinical examination, plain radiography and clinical guidelines. All patients received planar early-phase imaging and late-phase SPECT/CT imaging as well as MRI. Lesions were divided into major (causative) and minor (not causative) pathologies according to clinical follow-up. Furthermore, oedema-like bone marrow changes seen on MRI were compared with focally increased tracer uptake seen on SPECT/CT images. MRI yielded a quite high sensitivity (0.86), but a low specificity (0.20). In contrast, SPECT/CT yielded a high specificity (1.00) and a low sensitivity (0.71). Oedema-like bone marrow changes were detected in 15 lesions in 11 patients. In ten lesions with bone marrow oedema on MRI, foci of elevated tracer uptake were detected on SPECT/CT. Overall, MRI was more sensitive, but SPECT/CT was more specific in the evaluation of causative pathologies. In this initial comparison, SPECT/CT showed higher specificity than MRI in the evaluation of causative pathologies in patients with nonspecific wrist pain. However, MRI was more sensitive. Thus, SPECT/CT was shown to be a useful problem-solving tool in the diagnostic work-up of these patients. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Post-Stroke Wrist and Finger Spasticity after Ultrasonography-Guided BTX-A Injection and Rehabilitation Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eJiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Using ultrasonography (US to guide botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injection in patients with post-stroke wrist and finger flexor muscle spasticity and assessing clinical outcomes after the injection and rehabilitation intervention. Methods: Twenty-three patients with wrist and finger spasticity after stroke were recruited in this study from May 2012 to May 2013. Under US guidance, the proper dose (250U of BTX-A was injected into each spastic muscle at two injection sites. Then, conventional rehabilitation training started next day after BTX-A injection. The degree of spasticity was assessed by modified Ashworth scale (MAS and wrist and finger motor function by active rang of movement (AROM, and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA at the baseline, 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks after BTX-A injection. Results: Significant decreases (p < 0.02 in the MAS scores of both the finger flexor muscle tone and wrist flexor muscle tone measured at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks after the BTX-A injection were found in comparison with the baseline scores. Compared with the baseline, the AROM values of the wrist and finger extensions and the FMA scores of the wrist and hand significantly increased (p < 0.02 at 2, 4 and 12 weeks after the BTX-A injection. Conclusions: US-guided BTX-A injection combined with rehabilitation exercise decrease spasticity of the wrist and finger flexor muscles and improve their motor function in stroke patients up to 12 weeks following BTX-A injection.

  20. Evaluation of clinical outcomes of patients with post-stroke wrist and finger spasticity after ultrasonography-guided BTX-A injection and rehabilitation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Dou, Zu-Lin; Wang, Qing; Wang, Qiao-Yuan; Dai, Meng; Wang, Zhen; Wei, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Ying-Bei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Using ultrasonography (US) to guide botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection in patients with post-stroke wrist and finger flexor muscle spasticity and assessing clinical outcomes after the injection and rehabilitation intervention. Methods: Twenty-three patients with wrist and finger spasticity after stroke were recruited in this study from May 2012 to May 2013. Under US guidance, the proper dose (250 U) of BTX-A was injected into each spastic muscle at two injection sites. Then, conventional rehabilitation training started next day after BTX-A injection. The degree of spasticity was assessed by modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and wrist and finger motor function by active rang of movement (AROM), and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) at the baseline, 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks after BTX-A injection. Results: Significant decreases (p < 0.02) in the MAS scores of both the finger flexor muscle tone and wrist flexor muscle tone measured at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks after the BTX-A injection were found in comparison with the baseline scores. Compared with the baseline, the AROM values of the wrist and finger extensions and the FMA scores of the wrist and hand significantly increased (p < 0.02) at 2, 4 and 12 weeks after the BTX-A injection. Conclusions: US-guided BTX-A injection combined with rehabilitation exercise decrease spasticity of the wrist and finger flexor muscles and improve their motor function in stroke patients up to 12 weeks following BTX-A injection. PMID:26388761

  1. Trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by hand intramuscular intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan C Dulgeroglu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger wrist is a clinical entity characterized by triggering or the crackling of the wrist. Here, a case is reported of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma that caused trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome. This is the only case report where trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by the intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma were developed simultaneously. it is believed that that adhesive tenosynovitis developing in the tendons may have contributed to the triggering and carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist as a result of inflammation occuring as a consequence of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 107-109

  2. New method of measuring wrist joint position sense avoiding cutaneous and visual inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Andre; Harbst, Kimberly; Kaufman, Kenton R; Hansen, Diana K; Laskowski, Edward R; Berger, Richard A

    2010-02-10

    Aspects of afferent inputs, generally termed proprioception, are being increasingly studied. Extraneous factors such as cutaneous inputs can dramatically interfere while trying to design studies in order to determine the participation of the different structures involved in proprioception in the wrist position sense. We tried to determine validity and repeatability of a new wrist joint position measurement device using methodology designed to minimize extraneous factors and isolate muscle and joint inputs. In order to test the reliability of the system, eighty young-adult subjects without musculoskeletal or neurologic impairments affecting the right upper extremity were tested using a custom made motion tracking system. Testing consisted of two conditions: active reproduction of active placement and passive reproduction of passive placement. Subjects performed two repetitions of each target position (10, 20, and 30 degrees of flexion and extension) presented in a random order. Test- retest reliability was then tested. The average constant error in the passive condition was -0.7 degrees +/- 4.7 degrees as compared to the active condition at 3.7 degrees +/- 5.1 degrees. Average absolute error in the passive condition was 4.9 degrees +/- 2.9 degrees compared to the active condition in which absolute error was 5.9 degrees +/- 3.5 degrees. Test-retest repeatability in both conditions was less than the 5 degrees magnitude typical of clinical goniometry. Errors in the active condition (less than 2 degrees ) were slightly smaller than the passive condition, and the passive condition was also associated with poorer consistency between apparatus sensors and skin sensors. The current system for measurement of wrist joint proprioception allows the researcher to decrease extraneous influences that may affect joint position sense awareness, and will help in future study aiming to determine precisely the role of the different structure involved in proprioception.

  3. New method of measuring wrist joint position sense avoiding cutaneous and visual inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskowski Edward R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspects of afferent inputs, generally termed proprioception, are being increasingly studied. Extraneous factors such as cutaneous inputs can dramatically interfere while trying to design studies in order to determine the participation of the different structures involved in proprioception in the wrist position sense. We tried to determine validity and repeatability of a new wrist joint position measurement device using methodology designed to minimize extraneous factors and isolate muscle and joint inputs. Methods In order to test the reliability of the system, eighty young-adult subjects without musculoskeletal or neurologic impairments affecting the right upper extremity were tested using a custom made motion tracking system. Testing consisted of two conditions: active reproduction of active placement and passive reproduction of passive placement. Subjects performed two repetitions of each target position (10, 20, and 30° of flexion and extension presented in a random order. Test- retest reliability was then tested. Results The average constant error in the passive condition was -0.7° ± 4.7° as compared to the active condition at 3.7° ± 5.1°. Average absolute error in the passive condition was 4.9° ± 2.9° compared to the active condition in which absolute error was 5.9° ± 3.5°. Discussion Test-retest repeatability in both conditions was less than the 5° magnitude typical of clinical goniometry. Errors in the active condition (less than 2° were slightly smaller than the passive condition, and the passive condition was also associated with poorer consistency between apparatus sensors and skin sensors. Conclusions The current system for measurement of wrist joint proprioception allows the researcher to decrease extraneous influences that may affect joint position sense awareness, and will help in future study aiming to determine precisely the role of the different structure involved in proprioception.

  4. Meta-analysis: association between wrist posture and carpal tunnel syndrome among workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Doohee; Smith, Allan H; Rempel, David

    2014-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common work-related peripheral neuropathy. In addition to grip force and repetitive hand exertions, wrist posture (hyperextension and hyperflexion) may be a risk factor for CTS among workers. However, findings of studies evaluating the relationship between wrist posture and CTS are inconsistent. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to evaluate the evidence of the relationship between wrist posture at work and risk of CTS. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched to identify relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. The following search terms were used: "work related", "carpal tunnel syndrome", "wrist posture", and "epidemiology". The studies defined wrist posture as the deviation of the wrist in extension or flexion from a neutral wrist posture. Relative risk (RR) of individual studies for postural risk was pooled to evaluate the overall risk of wrist posture on CTS. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross-sectional or case-control designs and relied on self-report or observer's estimates for wrist posture assessment. The pooled RR of work-related CTS increased with increasing hours of exposure to wrist deviation or extension/flexion [RR = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.646-2.43; p Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  5. Injury patterns and the role of tendons in protecting neurovascular structures in wrist injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul Hyung; Cha, Soo Min; Shin, Hyun Dae

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anatomical features of injured structures, investigate the protection provided by the specific tendon of each corresponding important neurovascular structure (radial artery, median nerve, and ulnar nerve/artery) and to compare the results among the three categories of wrist injuries. This study included 114 patients who underwent primary repair for damaged wrist structures; 40 patients sustained accidental damage without intention (group 1), 40 had self-inflicted damage (group 2), and 34 patients had a stab or penetrating wound caused by a sharp instrument during a conflict or violent event involving another person (group 3). The basic demographic factors, distribution pattern, area, and depth of the injured structures were investigated and compared. The barrier roles of the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) for the radial artery, palmaris longus (PL) for the median nerve, and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) for the ulnar nerve were estimated. In group 1, FCU injury was the most common single-structure injury. In group 2, PL±median nerve injuries were the most common. Multiple-structure injuries involving more than five structures occurred more frequently in group 3 than in the other groups. FCU±ulnar nerve injuries were more common in group 3 than in the other groups. Radial-side structures were injured most frequently in group 3, and central-side injuries occurred most frequently in groups 1 and 2. Superficial- and middle-layer injuries occurred at similar frequencies among the three groups. Particularly, deep-layer injuries were most weakly related to group 2 injuries. The barrier effects of the FCR, PL, and FCU were confirmed, respectively. Wrist soft tissue injuries showed particular patterns of injured structures and depths according to the injury mechanism. These patterns included features such as single-structure injuries and the locations and depths of multiple-structure injuries with or without neurovascular injuries

  6. Spontaneous Extensor Tendon Rupture in the Rheumatoid Wrist: Risk Factors and Preventive Role of Extended Tenosynovectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Jung-Hua; Liu, Wen-Chung; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous extensor tendon rupture is often seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, but the risk factors are not clearly defined. We therefore collected the data of RA patients with previous extensor tendon rupture and those with tenosynovitis and analyzed the relationship between extended tenosynovectomy and spontaneous extensor tendon rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 17 spontaneous extensor tendon rupture episodes in 15 RA patients and 14 tenosynovitis episodes that required tenosynovectomy in 12 RA patients from 1997 to 2013. Correlations between the incidence of tendon rupture, X-ray findings, and clinical findings in the affected wrists before tendon rupture were analyzed statistically using the test for proportion. The following parameters were significantly correlated with spontaneous extensor tendon rupture: disease duration longer than 8 years, persistent tenosynovitis longer than 1 year duration, and Larsen grade greater than 4 (P = 0.02, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively). Dislocation of the distal end of the ulna, carpal collapse, and the scallop sign on X-ray contributed to a higher spontaneous extensor tendon rupture rate among RA patients (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.03, respectively). Extended tenosynovectomy was performed on 14 wrists in 12 RA patients with persistent tenosynovitis longer than 6 months, and Larsen grade did not deteriorate in this group compared with those who did not undergo the surgery. No spontaneous extensor tendon rupture occurred following the surgery. Risk factors of spontaneous extensor tendon rupture included disease duration longer than 8 years, persistent tenosynovitis longer than 1 year, and wrist Larsen grade greater than 4. Dislocation of the distal end of the ulna, carpal collapse, and the scallop sign on X-ray indicated a higher probability of extensor tendon rupture. Rheumatologists should consult with hand surgeons promptly to preserve hand function before tendon rupture. Prophylactic extended tenosynovectomy

  7. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin [Shandong University, Department of MR, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xu [Shandong Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  9. Objective Assessment of Strength Training Exercises using a Wrist-Worn Accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Scott A; Guo, Jun; Fulkerson, Scott M; Pedigo, Lauren; Chen, Hao; Bassett, David R

    2016-09-01

    The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that all adults perform muscle-strengthening exercises to work all of the major muscle groups of the body on at least 2 d·wk, in addition to aerobic activity. Studies using objective methods of monitoring physical activity have focused primarily on the assessment of aerobic activity. To date, a method for assessing resistance training (RT) exercises has not been developed using a wrist-worn activity monitor. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of a wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer-based activity monitor for classifying upper- and lower-body dumbbell RT exercises. Sixty participants performed 10 repetitions each of 12 different upper- and lower-body dynamic dumbbell exercises. Algorithms for classifying the exercises were developed using two different methods: support vector machine and cosine similarity. Confusion matrices were developed for each method, and intermethod reliabilities were assessed using Cohen's kappa. A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the predicted repetitions, identified from the largest acceleration peaks, with the actual repetitions. The results indicated that support vector machine and cosine similarity accurately classified the 12 different RT exercises 78% and 85% of the time, respectively. Both methods struggled to correctly differentiate bench press versus shoulder press and squat versus walking lunges. Repetition estimates were not significantly different for 8 of the 12 exercises. For the four exercises that were significantly different, the differences amount to less than 10%. This study demonstrated that RT exercises can be accurately classified using a single activity monitor worn on the wrist.

  10. Simplified approach to MR image quantification of the rheumatoid wrist: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamishima, Tamotsu; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo City (Japan); Tanimura, Kazuhide; Aoki, Yuko; Shimizu, Masato; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Fukae, Jun [Hokkaido Medical Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Sapporo City, Hokkaido (Japan); Kosaka, Naoki [Tokeidai Memorial Hospital, Sapporo City, Hokkaido (Japan); Kon, Yujiro [St. Thomas' Hospital, Lupus Research Unit, The Rayne Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    To determine an optimal threshold in a simplified 3D-based volumetry of abnormal signals in rheumatoid wrists utilizing contrast and non-contrast MR data, and investigate the feasibility and reliability of this method. MR images of bilateral hands of 15 active rheumatoid patients were assessed before and 5 months after the initiation of tocilizumab infusion protocol. The volumes of abnormal signals were measured on STIR and post-contrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the images was used for segmentation of the wrist by an MR technologist and a radiologist. Volumetric data were obtained with variable thresholding (1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, and 2 times the muscle signal), and were compared to clinical data and semiquantitative MR scoring (RAMRIS) of the wrist. Intra- and interobserver variability and time needed for volumetry measurements were assessed. The volumetric data correlated favorably with clinical parameters almost throughout the pre-determined thresholds. Interval differences in volumetric data correlated favorably with those of RAMRIS when the threshold was set at more than 1.5 times the muscle signal. The repeatability index was lower than the average of the interval differences in volumetric data when the threshold was set at 1.5-1.75 for STIR data. Intra- and interobserver variability for volumetry was 0.79-0.84. The time required for volumetry was shorter than that for RAMRIS. These results suggest that a simplified MR volumetric data acquisition may provide gross estimates of disease activity when the threshold is set properly. Such estimation can be achieved quickly by non-imaging specialists and without contrast administration. (orig.)

  11. [Design and application of hand-wrist caring moxibustion box].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xi-Yan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Gao, Ling; Ma, Qiao-Lin

    2013-11-01

    A hand-wrist moxibustion box is designed to effectively solve difficulty to have moxibustion at handwrist joint and problem of bad moxibustion effect as well as improve heat efficiency of moxibustion. The device is consisted of a box and protective screening. The box is hollow with opening on top and bottom. A reversible cover is fixed on the top of the box and support frames are put in the inner-middle. On the side wall there is a hole that is at the same horizontal level of support frames, and horizontal protective screening is put on the bottom. The design of this moxibustion box is novel and unique, simple and reasonable, which could give moxibustion on hand and wrist at the same time. Also it is easily made with low cost, easy to use and favorable effect. It is an innovation on moxibustion box.

  12. In Vivo Kinematics of the Scaphoid, Lunate, Capitate, and Third Metacarpal in Extreme Wrist Flexion and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow, Michael J; Kamal, Robin N; Leventhal, Evan; Akelman, Edward; Moore, Douglas C; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Insights into the complexity of active in vivo carpal motion have recently been gained using 3D imaging; however kinematics during extremes of motion have not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine motion of the carpus during extremes of wrist flexion and extension. Methods Computed tomography scans of 12 healthy wrists were obtained in neutral-grip, extreme loaded flexion, and extreme loaded extension. Three-dimensional bone surfaces and 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics were obtained for the radius and carpal bones. The flexion and extension rotation from neutral-grip to extreme flexion and extreme extension of the scaphoid and lunate was expressed as a percentage of capitate flexion and extension and then compared to previous studies of active wrist flexion and extension. We also tested the hypothesis that the capitate and third metacarpal function as a single rigid body. Finally, joint space metrics at the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints were used to describe arthrokinematics. Results In extreme flexion, the scaphoid and lunate flexed 70% and 46% of the amount the capitate flexed, respectively. In extreme extension, the scaphoid extended 74% and the lunate extended 42% of the amount the capitates extended, respectively. The third metacarpal extended 4° farther than the capitate in extreme extension. The joint contact area decreased at the radiocarpal joint during extreme flexion. The radioscaphoid joint contact center moved onto the radial styloid and volar ridge of the radius in extreme flexion from a more proximal and ulnar location in neutral. Conclusions The contributions of the scaphoid and lunate to capitate rotation were approximately 25% less in extreme extension compared to wrist motion through an active range of motion. More than half the motion of the carpus when the wrist was loaded in extension occured at the midcarpal joint. Clinical Relevance These findings highlight the difference in kinematics of the carpus during at

  13. A study on the measurement of wrist motion range using the iPhone 4 gyroscope application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Seob; Park, David Dae Hwan; Lee, Young Bae; Han, Dong Gil; Shim, Jeong Su; Lee, Young Jig; Kim, Peter Chan Woo

    2014-08-01

    Measuring the range of motion (ROM) of the wrist is an important physical examination conducted in the Department of Hand Surgery for the purpose of evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of patients. The most common method for performing this task is by using a universal goniometer. This study was performed using 52 healthy participants to compare wrist ROM measurement using a universal goniometer and the iPhone 4 Gyroscope application. Participants did not have previous wrist illnesses and their measured values for wrist motion were compared in each direction. Normal values for wrist ROM are 73 degrees of flexion, 71 degrees of extension, 19 degrees of radial deviation, 33 degrees of ulnar deviation, 140 degrees of supination, and 60 degrees of pronation.The average measurement values obtained using the goniometer were 74.2 (5.1) degrees for flexion, 71.1 (4.9) degrees for extension, 19.7 (3.0) degrees for radial deviation, 34.0 (3.7) degrees for ulnar deviation, 140.8 (5.6) degrees for supination, and 61.1 (4.7) degrees for pronation. The average measurement values obtained using the iPhone 4 Gyroscope application were 73.7 (5.5) degrees for flexion, 70.8 (5.1) degrees for extension, 19.5 (3.0) degrees for radial deviation, 33.7 (3.9) degrees for ulnar deviation, 140.4 (5.7) degrees for supination, and 60.8 (4.9) degrees for pronation. The differences between the measurement values by the Gyroscope application and average value were 0.7 degrees for flexion, -0.2 degrees for extension, 0.5 degrees for radial deviation, 0.7 degrees for ulnar deviation, 0.4 degrees for supination, and 0.8 degrees for pronation. The differences in average value were not statistically significant. The authors introduced a new method of measuring the range of wrist motion using the iPhone 4 Gyroscope application that is simpler to use and can be performed by the patient outside a clinical setting.

  14. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S.; Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  15. Intersection Syndrome: The Subtle Squeak of an Overused Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    Patient histories that include wrist pain can be pivotal in the distinction between intersection syndrome (IS) and the more common de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT). Presented here is a 26-year-old pregnant woman with a history of rowing who developed left radial/dorsal wrist pain and a rubbing/squeaking sensation. Nine months of conservative DQT therapy and a landmark-guided corticosteroid injection failed to relieve her symptoms. An in-clinic ultrasound showed tenosynovitis at the intersection of the first and second compartments, confirming a diagnosis of IS. She found immediate relief with ultrasound-guided saline hydrodissection, the injection of saline into the intercompartmental space to reduce adhesions. Both DQT and IS are overuse injuries caused by repetitive wrist extension, as occurs in rowing, and either condition can worsen after pregnancy. Distinguishing the subtleties between DQT and IS can be challenging. Close attention to the patient's description of the pain can guide treatment, potentially expediting recovery. In addition, saline hydrodissection can be both a diagnostic tool and a potentially therapeutic alternative to steroid injections for such tendinopathies. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Nagy, Ladislav [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  17. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja; Nagy, Ladislav

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic Causal Modeling of the Cortical Responses to Wrist Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations applied to the wrist joint typically evoke a stereotypical sequence of cortical and muscle responses. The early cortical responses (<100 ms are thought be involved in the “rapid” transcortical reaction to the perturbation while the late cortical responses (>100 ms are related to the “slow” transcortical reaction. Although previous studies indicated that both responses involve the primary motor cortex, it remains unclear if both responses are engaged by the same effective connectivity in the cortical network. To answer this question, we investigated the effective connectivity cortical network after a “ramp-and-hold” mechanical perturbation, in both the early (<100 ms and late (>100 ms periods, using dynamic causal modeling. Ramp-and-hold perturbations were applied to the wrist joint while the subject maintained an isometric wrist flexion. Cortical activity was recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG. We investigated how the perturbation modulated the effective connectivity for the early and late periods. Bayesian model comparisons suggested that different effective connectivity networks are engaged in these two periods. For the early period, we found that only a few cortico-cortical connections were modulated, while more complicated connectivity was identified in the cortical network during the late period with multiple modulated cortico-cortical connections. The limited early cortical network likely allows for a rapid muscle response without involving high-level cognitive processes, while the complexity of the late network may facilitate coordinated responses.

  19. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The ''rheumatoid'' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with PsA of

  20. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  1. Rheumatoid wrist deformity and risk of extensor tendon rupture evaluated by 3DCT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hajime; Abe, Asami; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Horizono, Hidehiro; Ishii, Katsushi; Seki, Eiko [Niigata Rheumatic Center, Department of Rheumatology, Shibata city, Niigata (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    Extensor tendon rupture on the dorsum of the wrist is commonly seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It causes immediate dysfunction of the hand and surgical reconstruction is usually required. The purpose of this study was to clarify the risk of extensor tendon rupture by quantifying wrist deformity on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) images. Three-dimensional CT images of 108 wrists in 102 patients with RA and 38 wrists in 38 healthy volunteers were analyzed retrospectively. All of the rheumatoid wrists had caused persistent pain for more than 6 months despite ongoing medical treatment. Extensor tendon rupture was noted in 49 wrists in 47 patients, and no rupture was noted in 59 wrists in 56 patients. The dorsal subluxation ratio (DSR) of the ulnar head and the carpal supination angle (CSA) were measured utilizing a new technique. The average DSR and CSA in the rupture group (n = 49), the non-rupture group (n = 59), and the normal wrist group (n = 38) were 37%, 19%, and 26%, and 15 , 11 , and 6 respectively. The cut-off values for extensor tendon rupture in the wrists of patients with RA were 32% (sensitivity; 70%, specificity; 75%) in the DSR, and 14 (71%, 68%) in the CSA. By utilizing 3DCT imaging of the rheumatoid wrist, these parameters can help improve our ability to predict extensor tendon rupture. (orig.)

  2. The comparisons between thermography and ultrasonography with physical examination for wrist joint assessment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Sungkarat, Witaya; Chitrapazt, Niyata; Fuangfa, Praman; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to assess infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonography (US) for detecting wrist arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Although IRT could help us in detecting joint inflammation, IRT studies in JIA patients with wrist arthritis are still limited. Currently, no validated US criteria exist for detecting arthritis, and the most useful parameters between gray-scale ultrasound (GSUS) or power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) remain unclear. Forty-six JIA patients were included in this study. Detecting wrist arthritis at varying degrees using IRT and US were compared with physical examination. Sixteen patients had previous wrist arthritis that is currently inactive and 30 still had wrist arthritis. The median ages (IQR) were 7.7 (4.3) and 10.2 (4.8) years, respectively. Fifteen healthy participants were included, with a median age (IQR) of 9.2 (2.0) years. Using IRT, mean temperature (T mean ) and maximum temperature (T max ) at skin surface in the region of interest (ROI) in the arthritis group were higher than in the inactive group and the healthy controls with p  <  0.05. When patients with arthritis were subgroup analyzed by disease severity based on physical examination, the moderate to severe arthritis had T mean and T max higher than the mild arthritis group with statistical significance. The heat distribution index (HDI), two standard deviations of all pixel temperature values in the ROI, in the moderate to severe arthritis group was higher than in the healthy controls (p  =  0.027). The receiver operating characteristic analysis in arthritis detection revealed diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and 71.4% and specificity of 80.0% and 93.3% at cut-off points of T mean   ⩾  31.0 °C and T max   ⩾  32.3 °C, respectively. For US, GSUS and PDUS are useful in detecting arthritis, providing high sensitivity (83.3%) and specificity (81.3%). Our study demonstrated that both IRT and US were applicable tools

  3. Isolate domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sahul Hamid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A set D of vertices of a graph G is called a dominating set of G if every vertex in V(G−D is adjacent to a vertex in D. A dominating set S such that the subgraph 〈S〉 induced by S has at least one isolated vertex is called an isolate dominating set. An isolate dominating set none of whose proper subset is an isolate dominating set is a minimal isolate dominating set. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a minimal isolate dominating set are called the isolate domination number γ0 and the upper isolate domination number Γ0 respectively. In this paper we initiate a study on these parameters.

  4. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  5. Testing of parameters of proposed robotic wrist based on the precision modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Semjon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of precision actuators in robotic arm comes from the need to ensure the resulting accuracy of the robot at the maximum speed of movement. The replacement of actuators by means of electrical module allows the use of carrier body of the module for gripping flanges or other modules. Development of new modules is based on the requirement of providing a complete solution for the customer’s needs. After the development of new modules, the producer checks the parameters, receives feedback, and uses the authentication options in the independent workplaces, which can provide impartial results. Based on this data, manufacturers can optimize their solutions and deliver the products to market, complying with not only their vision but mainly the needs of customers. This article describes how to verify the characteristics of the modules used in the construction of robotic wrist. It primarily focuses on verification of the accuracy of results and repeatability of position of the wrist on output flange end module. In addition, it presents the design of the testing stand and selection methodologies of measurement. The declared values are compared with the values measured during verification.

  6. [Short-term memory characteristics of vibration intensity tactile perception on human wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fei; Chen, Li-Juan; Lu, Wei; Song, Ai-Guo

    2014-12-25

    In this study, a recall experiment and a recognition experiment were designed to assess the human wrist's short-term memory characteristics of tactile perception on vibration intensity, by using a novel homemade vibrotactile display device based on the spatiotemporal combination vibration of multiple micro vibration motors as a test device. Based on the obtained experimental data, the short-term memory span, recognition accuracy and reaction time of vibration intensity were analyzed. From the experimental results, some important conclusions can be made: (1) The average short-term memory span of tactile perception on vibration intensity is 3 ± 1 items; (2) The greater difference between two adjacent discrete intensities of vibrotactile stimulation is defined, the better average short-term memory span human wrist gets; (3) There is an obvious difference of the average short-term memory span on vibration intensity between the male and female; (4) The mechanism of information extraction in short-term memory of vibrotactile display is to traverse the scanning process by comparison; (5) The recognition accuracy and reaction time performance of vibrotactile display compares unfavourably with that of visual and auditory. The results from this study are important for designing vibrotactile display coding scheme.

  7. [Middle field and low field magnetic resonance tomography in wrist injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Brigitte; Breitenseher, M; Trattnig, S; Gäbler, Ch; Kukla, Ch; Rand, Th; Imhof, H; Lechner, G

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnet resonance imaging in comparison of a dedicated 0.2-T unit and a 1.0-T unit in patients with clinically suspected scaphoid fractures and other wrist fractures. In 20 patients (14 m/6 f) with clinically suspected scaphoid fractures and a normal six view radiographic exam, magnet resonance imaging was performed first with the dedicated 1.0-T unit and afterwards with the 0.2-T unit within 7 days after trauma. T1 weighted spin-echo, STIR and T2-weighted 3D GRE sequences were performed. The 0.2 Tesla dedicated system is inferior to the 1.0 Tesla unit concerning the outcome of the 3 examiners. Especially the areas of bone bruise showed different results: each examiner detected at least two more cases of bone bruise with the 1.0 Telsa unit, which could not be defined with the 0.2 Tesla unit. This study shows, how utmost sensitive magnet resonance imaging is referring to unremoved fractures of the scaphoid and to other wrist abnormalities. Results with the 0.2 Tesla dedicated system was inferior compared to the 1.0 Tesla unit.

  8. Application of vibration to wrist and hand skin affects fingertip tactile sensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Lauer, Abigail W; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Webster, John G; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-01-01

    A recent study showed that fingertip pads’ tactile sensation can improve by applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to the skin at the wrist or dorsum of the hand in stroke patients. This study further examined this behavior by investigating the effect of both imperceptible and perceptible white-noise vibration applied to different locations within the distal upper extremity on the fingertip pads’ tactile sensation in healthy adults. In 12 healthy adults, white-noise vibration was applied to one of four locations (dorsum hand by the second knuckle, thenar and hypothenar areas, and volar wrist) at one of four intensities (zero, 60%, 80%, and 120% of the sensory threshold for each vibration location), while the fingertip sensation, the smallest vibratory signal that could be perceived on the thumb and index fingertip pads, was assessed. Vibration intensities significantly affected the fingertip sensation (P sensation (P sensation (P sensation (P > 0.01), all compared with the zero vibration condition. This effect with vibration intensity conforms to the stochastic resonance behavior. Nonspecificity to the vibration location suggests the white-noise vibration affects higher level neuronal processing for fingertip sensing. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural pathways for distal upper extremity vibration to impact fingertip pad tactile sensation. PMID:26177959

  9. Topics on domination

    CERN Document Server

    Hedetniemi, ST

    1991-01-01

    The contributions in this volume are divided into three sections: theoretical, new models and algorithmic. The first section focuses on properties of the standard domination number &ggr;(G), the second section is concerned with new variations on the domination theme, and the third is primarily concerned with finding classes of graphs for which the domination number (and several other domination-related parameters) can be computed in polynomial time.

  10. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  11. Dominating Sets and Domination Polynomials of Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Alikhani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Let G=(V,E be a simple graph. A set S⊆V is a dominating set of G, if every vertex in V\\S is adjacent to at least one vertex in S. Let 𝒫ni be the family of all dominating sets of a path Pn with cardinality i, and let d(Pn,j=|𝒫nj|. In this paper, we construct 𝒫ni, and obtain a recursive formula for d(Pn,i. Using this recursive formula, we consider the polynomial D(Pn,x=∑i=⌈n/3⌉nd(Pn,ixi, which we call domination polynomial of paths and obtain some properties of this polynomial.

  12. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    OpenAIRE

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Han, Roger; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discu...

  13. A rare localization of tuberculosis of the wrist: The scapholunate joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Sbai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tuberculosis of the hand and the wrist is a rare entity. Affecting the scapholunate joint is exceptional. It is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage of carpal destruction, due to slowly development of the symptoms. We report the case of a 58-year-old female, presenting as wrist pain for 3 months. Clinical study showed a local swelling in the left wrist, the mobility of the wrist was normal but painful at the end of motion. The diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis was suspected after radiological and biological study then confirmed after histological study. Antibacillary chemotherapy during 12 months promoted healing and good outcome.

  14. [Theoretical origin and clinical application of wrist-ankle acupuncture therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Qinghui

    2017-05-12

    The theory of wrist-ankle acupuncture is consistent with traditional meridian-collateral theory. For example, the body divisions of wrist-ankle acupuncture are corresponding to the distribution of 12 cutaneous regions of meridians, the needling sites of it are to the running courses of 12 meridians; the indications of it are to those of 12 meridians. The needling sites of wrist-ankle acupuncture are relevant with some special acupoints of acupuncture theory. For example, the 12-needling sites of wrist-ankle acupuncture are located similar to those of 12 meridian points and have very similar indications. The needling sites of it are located in the wrist and ankle regions, in which the five- shu points are located nearby, for meridian disorders. Most luo -connecting points are located near to the needling sites of wrist-ankle acupuncture or the needle tip points to. Additionally, the needling method of wrist-ankle acupuncture is consistent with some of the subcutaneous needling methods in traditional acupuncture therapy. On the basis of the aspects mentioned above, it is explained that wrist-ankle acupuncture is the development of traditional acupuncture and cannot be independent from the traditional theories of acupuncture and meridians. It is necessary to seek for the evidence from the traditional theories of TCM. The traditional theories of TCM are summarized from clinical practice, which can be newly verified from the practice of wrist-ankle acupuncture.

  15. The exercise point of reference measurement law of the wrist-joint with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    The malalignment of the carpal bones may restrict the motor function of the wrist joint. In evaluation of wrist joint function, the function of the flexion and extension of the joint is especially important. However, X-ray photograph provide limited information concerning the mobility of the wrist joint. In the current study, the flexion and extension of wrist joint function was evaluated utilizing MRI, by creating the apparatus to aid to do the flexion (-) and extension (+) of the wrist joint, and the measurement of the angle of the wrist joint was performed. MR images of the joint were obtained through sagittal plane. The angle of the wrist joint was altered between the angle from +60 deg. to -60 deg. Concerning the angle of the wrist joint, the angle between the radius and proximal, distal carpal bones were measured. The angle between the ulna and carpal bone were similarly measured. The flexion and extension movement of the wrist joint could be successfully visualized by making a graph. (author)

  16. The Optimal Speed for Cortical Activation of Passive Wrist Movements Performed by a Rehabilitation Robot: A Functional NIRS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyung Hun Chang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To advance development of rehabilitation robots, the conditions to induce appropriate brain activation during rehabilitation performed by robots should be optimized, based on the concept of brain plasticity. In this study, we examined differences in cortical activation according to the speed of passive wrist movements performed by a rehabilitation robot.Methods: Twenty three normal subjects participated in this study. Passive movements of the right wrist were performed by the wrist rehabilitation robot at three different speeds: 0.25 Hz; slow, 0.5 Hz; moderate and 0.75 Hz; fast. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy to measure the brain activity accompanying the passive movements performed by a robot. The relative changes in oxy-hemoglobin (HbO were measured in two regions of interest (ROI: the primary sensory-motor cortex (SM1 and premotor area (PMA.Results: In the left SM1 the HbO value was significantly higher at 0.5 Hz, compared with movements performed at 0.25 Hz and 0.75 Hz (p < 0.05, while no significant differences were observed in the left PMA (p > 0.05. In the group analysis, the left SM1 was activated during passive movements at three speeds (uncorrected p < 0.05 and the greatest activation in the SM1 was observed at 0.5 Hz.Conclusions: In conclusion, the contralateral SM1 showed the greatest activation by a moderate speed (0.5 Hz rather than slow (0.25 Hz and fast (0.75 Hz speed. Our results suggest an ideal speed for execution of the wrist rehabilitation robot. Therefore, our results might provide useful data for more effective and empirically-based robot rehabilitation therapy.

  17. Skeletal maturation in individuals with Down's syndrome: Comparison between PGS curve, cervical vertebrae and bones of the hand and wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinhena, Glauber; Siqueira, Danilo Furquim; Sannomiya, Eduardo Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study was conducted with the aim of adapting the methods developed by Martins and Sakima to assess skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae in the pubertal growth spurt (PGS) curve. It also aimed to test the reliability and agreement between those methods and the method of hand and wrist radiograph when compared two by two and all together. Methods The sample comprised 72 radiographs, with 36 lateral radiographs of the head and 36 hand-wrist radiographs of 36 subjects with Down's syndrome (DS), 13 female and 23 male, aged between 8 years and 6 months and 18 years and 7 months, with an average age of 13 years and 10 months. Results and Conclusions Results revealed that adapting the methods developed by Martins and Sakima to assess skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae in the curve of PGS is practical and useful in determining the stage of growth and development of individuals. The stages of maturation evaluated by cervical vertebrae and ossification centers observed in radiographs of the hand and wrist were considered reliable, with excellent level of agreement between the methods by Hassel and Farman as well as Baccetti, Franchi and McNamara Jr and Martins and Sakima. Additionally, results revealed an agreement that ranged between reasonable to good for the three methods used to assess the skeletal maturation, showing statistical significance. PMID:25279522

  18. Skeletal maturation in individuals with Down's syndrome: Comparison between PGS curve, cervical vertebrae and bones of the hand and wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauber Carinhena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study was conducted with the aim of adapting the methods developed by Martins and Sakima to assess skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae in the pubertal growth spurt (PGS curve. It also aimed to test the reliability and agreement between those methods and the method of hand and wrist radiograph when compared two by two and all together. METHODS: The sample comprised 72 radiographs, with 36 lateral radiographs of the head and 36 hand-wrist radiographs of 36 subjects with Down's syndrome (DS, 13 female and 23 male, aged between 8 years and 6 months and 18 years and 7 months, with an average age of 13 years and 10 months. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Results revealed that adapting the methods developed by Martins and Sakima to assess skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae in the curve of PGS is practical and useful in determining the stage of growth and development of individuals. The stages of maturation evaluated by cervical vertebrae and ossification centers observed in radiographs of the hand and wrist were considered reliable, with excellent level of agreement between the methods by Hassel and Farman as well as Baccetti, Franchi and McNamara Jr and Martins and Sakima. Additionally, results revealed an agreement that ranged between reasonable to good for the three methods used to assess the skeletal maturation, showing statistical significance.

  19. Validation and Comparison of Accelerometers Worn on the Hip, Thigh, and Wrists for Measuring Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H.K. Montoye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent evidence suggests that physical activity (PA and sedentary behavior (SB exert independent effects on health. Therefore, measurement methods that can accurately assess both constructs are needed. Objective: To compare the accuracy of accelerometers placed on the hip, thigh, and wrists, coupled with machine learning models, for measurement of PA intensity category (SB, light-intensity PA [LPA], and moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA [MVPA] and breaks in SB. Methods: Forty young adults (21 female; age 22.0 ± 4.2 years participated in a 90-minute semi-structured protocol, performing 13 activities (three sedentary, 10 non-sedentary for 3–10 minutes each. Participants chose activity order, duration, and intensity. Direct observation (DO was used as a criterion measure of PA intensity category, and transitions from SB to a non-sedentary activity were breaks in SB. Participants wore four accelerometers (right hip, right thigh, and both wrists, and a machine learning model was created for each accelerometer to predict PA intensity category. Sensitivity and specificity for PA intensity category classification were calculated and compared across accelerometers using repeated measures analysis of variance, and the number of breaks in SB was compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Sensitivity and specificity values for the thigh-worn accelerometer were higher than for wrist- or hip-worn accelerometers, > 99% for all PA intensity categories. Sensitivity and specificity for the hip-worn accelerometer were 87–95% and 93–97%. The left wrist-worn accelerometer had sensitivities and specificities of > 97% for SB and LPA and 91–95% for MVPA, whereas the right wrist-worn accelerometer had sensitivities and specificities of 93–99% for SB and LPA but 67–84% for MVPA. The thigh-worn accelerometer had high accuracy for breaks in SB; all other accelerometers overestimated breaks in SB. Conclusion: Coupled with

  20. Productive osseous changes about the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, R.M.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radiographs of 225 consecutive patients with adult-form rheumatoid arthritis were examined for evidence of productive osseous changes about the wrist. The prevalence of new bone on the ulnar styloid was 10%. This form of new bone is probably due to overlying chronic tenosynovitis. A collar of new bone around the ulnar head is a result of degenerative change in the distal radioulnar joint. In general, productive osseous changes in theumatoid arthritis may represent inflammatory periosteal bone formation, osteophytosis, or contact remodeling. We found no evidence of an association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and extensive productive osseous changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  1. Productive osseous changes about the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, R.M.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1987-07-01

    Radiographs of 225 consecutive patients with adult-form rheumatoid arthritis were examined for evidence of productive osseous changes about the wrist. The prevalence of new bone on the ulnar styloid was 10%. This form of new bone is probably due to overlying chronic tenosynovitis. A collar of new bone around the ulnar head is a result of degenerative change in the distal radioulnar joint. In general, productive osseous changes in theumatoid arthritis may represent inflammatory periosteal bone formation, osteophytosis, or contact remodeling. We found no evidence of an association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and extensive productive osseous changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Acute hand and wrist injuries in athletes: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W J; Slowman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Acute hand and wrist injuries in the athlete constitute a unique orthopaedic challenge. Because of the particular demands on the athlete (e.g., financial implications, coaching and administration pressures, self-esteem issues), a specialized management approach is often necessary. Common sites of injury include the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, metacarpals and phalanges, scaphoid, hamate, and distal radius. Treatment of these injuries varies depending on the patient's age, sport, position played, and level of competition, but departures from standard practice as regards surgery, rehabilitation, and return to competition should never compromise care.

  3. MR-Tech: A portable smart wrist rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraam, M.; Horodinca, M.; Preumont, A.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a novel patent-pending, computer controlled, MR-brake actuated, muscular rehabilitation and evaluation device that can be carried to and used at patient's home (without the immediate assistance of the physiotherapist), offering similar functionalities as existing stationary devices that can be found in hospitals (i.e. isometric, isotonic and isokinetic exercise modes). The first part of the paper describes in more details these various exercise modes. The second part is devoted to the design of the machine and the third part to its control. The last part presents preliminary results obtained for the wrist pronation/supination motion.

  4. Wear particles and osteolysis in patients with total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Toxværd, Anders; Bansal, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    tissue, the level of chrome and cobalt ions in the blood, and the possible role of infectious or rheumatoid activity in the development of PPO. METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the implant-bone interphase in 13 consecutive patients with total wrist arthroplasty and with at least 3 years' follow...... of the radiolucent zone. The blood levels of chrome and cobalt ions were normal. There was no evidence of infectious or rheumatoid activity. CONCLUSIONS: Polyethylene wear has been accepted as a major cause of osteolysis in total hip arthroplasty, and metallic debris has also been cited to be an underlying cause...

  5. OSTEOPOROTIC FRACTURES OF HIPS, WRISTS AND VERTEBRA WITH COST OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Ferk

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis becomes a serious illness when the patient breaks a bone. Osteoporotic fractures emerge in a larger number after the patients reach age 60 or above. The fracture of the wrist is the earliest osteoporotic fracture, vertebral fracture then follows and it is the most common fracture. The most serious and the most costly fracture is the hip fracture. The analysis of data on fractures of hips in General Hospital Maribor (GHM between the years 1968 and 2000 has shown that the number of fractures has been steadily increasing from 76 in the year 1968 to 258 in the year 2000. In 1968 the treatment was mainly conservative and the death rate was at 60%. With the introduction of operative treatment, which is being used on 95% of the patients nowadays, the death rate fell to 5%. The cost of acute treatment, as assessed by the Health Insurrance at the end of the year 2000, amounted to 599,360 tolars per case. The cost of the treatment of the vertebral fracture, which has been treated in outpatient’s department in 60% of the cases, amounted to 113,076 per case in the year 2000 in GHM. The cost of wrist fracture treatment, which has been handled in outpatient’s department in 90% of the cases, added up to 30,831 tolars per case.Conclusions. The osteoporotic fracture of the hip is caused by senile osteoporosis and it affects both men and women equally. That means that the menopausal osteoporosis does not have an important effect on the fracture of the hip. The number of hip fractures is increasing exponentially with the life span lengthening. With the introduction of operative treatment of hip fractures the early mortality decreased from 60% to only 5%. The cost of acute treatment of hip fracture has been three times lower in GHM compared to the same treatment in Great Britain in the year 2000. In 85% of the cases, the fracture of the wrist occurs in women shortly after the age of 60. This confirms the thesis that the menopausal

  6. Methods to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from high-frequency wrist accelerometer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudenmayer, John; He, Shai; Hickey, Amanda; Sasaki, Jeffer; Freedson, Patty

    2015-08-15

    This investigation developed models to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from three-axis high-frequency wrist-worn accelerometer data. The models were developed and tested on 20 participants (n = 10 males, n = 10 females, mean age = 24.1, mean body mass index = 23.9), who wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on their dominant wrist and an ActiGraph GT3X on the hip while performing a variety of scripted activities. Energy expenditure was concurrently measured by a portable indirect calorimetry system. Those calibration data were then used to develop and assess both machine-learning and simpler models with fewer unknown parameters (linear regression and decision trees) to estimate metabolic equivalent scores (METs) and to classify activity intensity, sedentary time, and locomotion time. The wrist models, applied to 15-s windows, estimated METs [random forest: root mean squared error (rSME) = 1.21 METs, hip: rMSE = 1.67 METs] and activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, hip: 60% correct) better than a previously developed model that used counts per minute measured at the hip. In a separate set of comparisons, the simpler decision trees classified activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, tree: 74% correct), sedentary time (random forest: 96% correct, decision tree: 97% correct), and locomotion time (random forest: 99% correct, decision tree: 96% correct) nearly as well or better than the machine-learning approaches. Preliminary investigation of the models' performance on two free-living people suggests that they may work well outside of controlled conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury. Die MRT von Hand und Handgelenk bei Sportkletterern. Darstellung von Verletzungen und Ueberlastungsfolgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie); Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Sportverletzungen)

    1992-05-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.).

  8. Diagnostic Performance of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris (ECU) Synergy Test to Detect Sonographic ECU Abnormalities in Chronic Dorsal Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon synergy test is a simple and unique diagnostic maneuver for evaluation of chronic dorsal ulnar-sided wrist pain, which applies isolated tension to the ECU without greatly stressing other structures. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance of the ECU synergy test to detect ECU abnormalities on sonography. Forty affected wrists from 39 consecutive patients with chronic dorsal ulnar-sided wrist pain that continued for greater than 1 month were examined with the ECU synergy test and sonography. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the ECU synergy test to detect ECU abnormalities were evaluated. We compared the results of the ECU synergy test between groups with and without ECU abnormalities and also compared the ages, sexes, and symptomatic durations of the patients between groups with positive and negative ECU synergy test results and between the groups with and without ECU abnormalities. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 73.7%, 85.7%, 82.4%, and 78.3%, respectively. There was significant difference in the ECU synergy test results between the groups with and without ECU abnormalities (P synergy test could be a useful provocative maneuver to detect ECU abnormalities in patients with chronic dorsal ulnar-sided wrist pain. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Trigger wrist caused by avascular necrosis of the capitate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yuichiro; Kawamura, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Kanako C; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2018-03-27

    Trigger wrist is a rare condition first described by Marti in 1960, and various causes have been reported. The condition mostly occurs with finger flexion and extension, and rarely with flexion and extension of the wrist itself. Avascular necrosis of the capitate is also a rare condition, first described by Jönsson in 1942. While some reports of this condition have been published, little is known about its etiology. Therefore, no established treatment exists. We report a case of trigger wrist caused by avascular necrosis of the capitate. A 16-year-old right-handed male who was a high school handball player was referred to our department from a nearby hospital 5 months after the onset of pain in the dorsal aspect of the right wrist, with an unknown cause. At the previous hospital, imaging findings led to a diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the capitate, and conservative treatment with a wrist brace did not improve the pain. At the initial visit to our department, the patient was noted to have a painful trigger wrist that was brought on by wrist flexion and extension. Preoperative imaging findings led to a diagnosis of trigger wrist caused by capitolunate instability secondary to avascular necrosis of the capitate. We performed a partial excision of the proximal capitate with tendon ball interposition. Two years after surgery, the patient's clinical outcome was favorable, with no recurrence of wrist pain or triggering. Both trigger wrist and avascular necrosis of the capitate are rare disorders. When a patient presents with painful triggering at the wrist, surgeons must bear in mind that avascular necrosis of the capitate may result in this phenomenon. We recommend partial excision of the proximal capitate with tendon ball interposition for the treatment of this lesion.

  10. Omitting histopathology in wrist ganglions. A risky proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Akbar J.; Kumar, Santosh; Mohib, Yasir; Rashid, Rizwan H.; Noordin, Shahryar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify incidence and utility of histopathology in wrist ganglions. Methods: A retrospective study of 112 patients operated for wrist swellings between January 2009 and March 2014 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, was conducted. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, history, location and associated symptoms, provisional diagnosis and operative details. Histopathology reports were reviewed to confirm the final diagnosis. Results: One hundred and twelve patients were included in the study (34 males and 78 females) with a mean age of 28 ± 12 years. Ninety-five percent of ganglia were dorsally located and 85% were solitary in nature. Histopathology reports confirmed 107 as ganglion cysts, whereas 3 had giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and 2 were reported to be tuberculous tenosynovitis. Conclusion: Although most of the time, the clinical diagnosis conforms to the final diagnosis, the possibility of an alternate diagnosis cannot be ignored (4% in this study). We suggest routine histopathological analysis so that such diagnoses are not missed. PMID:27464871

  11. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  12. Accuracy and Validity of Goniometer and Visual Assessments of Angular Joint Positions of the Hand and Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Kimberly H; Murray, Peter M; Heckman, Michael G; Rawal, Bhupendra; Peterson, Jeffrey J

    2016-04-01

    To compare goniometric and visual assessments of angular hand joint and wrist joint positions measured by board-certified hand surgeons and certified hand therapists. We hypothesized that visual estimation would be similar to the goniometric measurement accuracy of digital and wrist joint positions. The wrist, index finger metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, and index finger proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint were evaluated in different positions by 40 observers: 20 board-certified hand surgeons and 20 certified hand therapists. Each observer estimated the position of the wrist, index MCP joint, and index PIP joint of the same volunteer, who was positioned in low-profile orthoses to reproduce predetermined positions. Following visual estimation, the participants measured the same joint positions using a goniometer. The control measurement was digitally determined by a radiologist who obtained radiographs of the hand and wrist positions in each orthosis. Observers were blinded to the results of control measurements. When considering all joints at all positions, neither visual assessments nor goniometer assessments were consistently within ± 5° of the measurements obtained on control radiographs. When considering individual joints, goniometer measurements were significantly closer to control radiograph measurements than the visual assessments for all 3 PIP joint positions. There was no difference for the measurements at the wrist or for 2 of the 3 MCP joint positions. Significant differences between surgeon and therapist joint angle measurements were not observed when comparing visual and goniometer assessments to radiograph controls. Compared with radiograph measurements, neither visual nor goniometer assessment displayed high levels of accuracy. On average, visual assessment of the angular positions of the index MCP and wrist joint were as accurate as the goniometer assessment, whereas goniometer assessment of the angular position of the PIP joint was more

  13. The current role of high-resolution ultrasonography of the hand and wrist in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; van Dalen, A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the current role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and treatment of pathological changes in the wrist and hand. 39 patients (14 male and 25 female, mean age 35 yrs.) with ill-defined pain and/or swelling of the wrist or hand were examined using a high-definition ultrasound (US) instrument. 18

  14. MRI for the initial evaluation of acute wrist, knee, and ankle trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Nikken (Jeroen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we study the application of MRI in acute trauma of wrist, knee, and ankle, evaluating its potentials, its effects, and its costs. Our aim was to use MRI in all patients with acute trauma of wrist, knee, and ankle, without increasing the overall costs to society,

  15. Overuse wrist injuries in young athletes: What do sports physicians consider important signals and functional limitations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, Laura S.; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Opperman, Jip; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Maas, Mario; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2018-01-01

    This study's objective was to collect items from experienced sports physicians, relating to the presence and severity of overuse wrist injuries in young athletes, for developing a measurement instrument for signals of overuse wrist injury. Seven Dutch elite sports physicians involved in guidance and

  16. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a... as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and is limited to those prostheses intended for use with bone cement...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a one...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a one...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a one-piece...

  20. External validation of clinical decision rules for children with wrist trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, Marjolein A. M.; Walenkamp, Monique M. J.; Dubois, Bente F. H.; Slaar, Annelie; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical decision rules help to avoid potentially unnecessary radiographs of the wrist, reduce waiting times and save costs. The primary aim of this study was to provide an overview of all existing non-validated clinical decision rules for wrist trauma in children and to externally validate these

  1. External validation of clinical decision rules for children with wrist trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Mulders (Marjolein A. M.); M.M.J. Walenkamp (Monique); B.F.H. Dubois (Bente F. H.); A. Slaar (Annelie); J.C. Goslings (Carel); N.W.L. Schep (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Clinical decision rules help to avoid potentially unnecessary radiographs of the wrist, reduce waiting times and save costs. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to provide an overview of all existing non-validated clinical decision rules for wrist trauma in children

  2. Partial wrist arthrodesis versus arthroplasty for distal radius giant cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Chunlin; Zhao, Shichang; Dong, Yang; Zeng, Bingfang

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of using the proximal fibular graft for partial wrist arthrodesis or arthroplasty after the resection of giant cell tumours of the distal radius. Between February 2006 and August 2010, 14 patients (seven males, seven females; average age, 35.7 years) with grade II and III giant cell tumours of the distal radius were treated by tumour resection and autologous proximal fibular grafts to reconstruct the wrist in our hospital. Seven patients each were treated by wrist arthroplasty and partial wrist arthrodesis, and were followed up for 2.2-6.8 years (average, 3.9 years). All patients achieved primary healing. No tumour recurrence was observed during follow-up in any of the patients. No statistically significant difference in forearm rotation was observed between patients undergoing the two different treatments. However, wrist flexion-extension activities were significantly better and the wrist grip strengths were significantly worse in the arthroplasty group than in the arthrodesis group. The Musculoskeletal Tumour Society score did not significantly differ between the groups. Overall, joint arthroplasty remains a favourable treatment with regard to the functional outcome for giant cell tumours of the distal radius; however, some of these patients may have a weaker grip strength. In comparison, partial wrist fusion appears to provide a durable and stable wrist with good long-term functional outcome.

  3. Chronic wrist pain: diagnosis and management. Development and use of a new algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; Bijlsma, J. W.; van Vugt, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic wrist pain can be difficult to manage and the differential diagnosis is extensive. To provide guidelines for assessment of the painful wrist an algorithm was developed to encourage a structured approach to the diagnosis and management of these patients. A review of the literature on causes

  4. A Study of Repeated Wrist Temperature of Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Doris B.; Quinn, Jimmy L.

    While evidence exists that a person's peripheral temperature responds to his state of arousal or stress, it also responds to other environmental factors. Wrist temperature has been found to vary with ambient temperature, and to increase during the school day. Before wrist temperature can be established as a valid measure of anxiety, stress, or…

  5. The effect of tendon loading on in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foumani, M.; Blankevoort, L.; Stekelenburg, C.; Strackee, S. D.; Carelsen, B.; Jonges, R.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist provide valuable biomechanical data. Tendon loading is often applied during cadaver experiments to simulate natural stabilizing joint compression in the wrist joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tendon loading on

  6. A validation of wrist actigraphy against polysomnography in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sleep disturbances are frequent in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Actigraphy has been established as a generally reliable method to examine these disturbances across varying time spans, but the validity against polysomnography (PSG) is not well investigated...... for the number of awakenings, and low or zero for the other examined sleep variables. These findings were reproduced in the subgroup analyses that compared men and women, as well as patients with bipolar versus schizophrenia spectrum disorders. When excluding patients with extensive periods of wakefulness after...... for this population. We validated wrist-worn actigraphy against PSG in a population of chronic, medicated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From a clinical trial, we derived data from 37 patients with schizophrenia and five patients with bipolar disorder who were examined with one...

  7. Evaluating automated dynamic contrast enhanced wrist 3 T MRI in healthy volunteers: One-year longitudinal observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Anshul, E-mail: anshul.rastogi@bartshealth.nhs.uk [Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Kubassova, Olga, E-mail: olga@imageanalysis.org.uk [Image Analysis, Leeds (United Kingdom); Krasnosselskaia, Lada V., E-mail: solaguz@yahoo.com [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Lim, Adrian K.P., E-mail: a.lim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Satchithananda, Keshthra, E-mail: keshthra.satchithananda@imperial.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boesen, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.boesen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and the Parker Institute, Frederiksberg and Bispebjerg Hospitals (Denmark); Binks, Michael, E-mail: michael.h.binks@gsk.com [GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, SG1 2NY (United Kingdom); Hajnal, Joseph V., E-mail: jo.hajnal@kcl.ac.uk [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Peter C., E-mail: peter.taylor@kennedy.ox.ac.uk [Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Rational and Objective: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has great potential to provide quantitative measure of inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis. There is no current benchmark to establish the stability of signal in the joints of healthy subjects when imaged with DCE-MRI longitudinally, which is crucial so as to differentiate changes induced by treatment from the inherent variability of perfusion measures. The objective of this study was to test a pixel-by-pixel parametric map based approach for analysis of DCE-MRI (Dynamika) and to investigate the variability in signal characteristics over time in healthy controls using longitudinally acquired images. Materials and Methods: 10 healthy volunteers enrolled, dominant wrists were imaged with contrast enhanced 3T MRI at baseline, week 12, 24 and 52 and scored with RAMRIS, DCE-MRI was analysed using a novel quantification parametric map based approach. Radiographs were obtained at baseline and week 52 and scored using modified Sharp van der Heidje method. RAMRIS scores and dynamic MRI measures were correlated. Results: No erosions were seen on radiographs, whereas MRI showed erosion-like changes, low grade bone marrow oedema and low-moderate synovial enhancement. The DCE-MRI parameters were stable (baseline scores, variability) (mean ± st.dev); in whole wrist analysis, ME{sub mean} (1.3 ± 0.07, −0.08 ± 0.1 at week 24) and IRE{sub mean} (0.008 ± 0.004, −0.002 ± 0.005 at week 12 and 24). In the rough wrist ROI, ME{sub mean} (1.2 ± 0.07, 0.04 ± 0.02 at week 52) and IRE{sub mean} (0.001 ± 0.0008, 0.0006 ± 0.0009 at week 52) and precise wrist ROI, ME{sub mean} (1.2 ± 0.09, 0.04 ± 0.04 at week 52) and IRE{sub mean} (0.001 ± 0.0008, 0.0008 ± 0.001 at week 24 and 52). The Dynamic parameters obtained using fully automated analysis demonstrated strong, statistically significant correlations with RAMRIS synovitis scores. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that contrast enhancement does occur in

  8. Acute Effects of Hand Elevation and Wrist Position on Mean Arterial Pressure and Pulse Rate Measured in the Hand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shibley, Lee

    2000-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) to the wrist and hand are common among workers, and are associated with working conditions that use forceful, repetitive and extreme wrist joint postures that including end range flexion...

  9. Athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris subsheath: MRI findings and utility of gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeantroux, Jeremy; Guerini, Henri; Drape, Jean-Luc [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); Becce, Fabio [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Montalvan, Bernard [French Tennis Federation, Paris (France); Viet, Dominique Le [Hand Institute, Clinique Jouvenet, Paris (France)

    2011-01-15

    To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, assessing the utility of gadolinium-enhanced (Gd) fat-saturated (FS) T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Sixteen patients (13 male, three female; mean age 30.3 years) with athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath sustained between January 2003 and June 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Initial and follow-up 1.5-T wrist MRIs were performed with transverse T1-weighted and STIR sequences in pronation, and Gd FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Two radiologists assessed the type of injury (A to C), ECU tendon stability, associated lesions and rated pulse sequences using a three-point scale: 1 = poor, 2 = good and 3 = excellent. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted transverse sequences in supination (2.63) and pronation (2.56) were most valuable, compared with STIR (2.19) and T1-weighted (1.94). Nine type A, one type B and six type C injuries were found. There were trends towards diminution in size, signal intensity and enhancement of associated pouches on follow-up MRI and tendon stabilisation within the ulnar groove. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination are most valuable in assessing and follow-up athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath on 1.5-T MRI. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2 values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times.

  11. Sleep deficiency on school days in Icelandic youth, as assessed by wrist accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognvaldsdottir, Vaka; Gudmundsdottir, Sigridur L; Brychta, Robert J; Hrafnkelsdottir, Soffia M; Gestsdottir, Sunna; Arngrimsson, Sigurbjorn A; Chen, Kong Y; Johannsson, Erlingur

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively measure, with wrist-worn actigraphy, free-living sleeping patterns in Icelandic adolescents, and to compare sleep duration, sleep quality and clock times between school days (SchD) and non-school days (NSchD) and the association between sleep and body mass index (BMI). A cross-sectional study on 15.9-year-old (±0.3) adolescents from six schools in Reykjavík, Iceland, took place in the spring of 2015. Free-living sleep was measured on 301 subjects (122 boys and 179 girls) over seven days using wrist-worn actigraphy accelerometers. Total rest time (TRT), total sleep time (TST), sleep quality markers, and clock times for sleep were quantified and compared between SchD and NSchD and between the sexes, using paired and group t-tests as appropriate. Linear regression was used to assess the association between sleep parameters and BMI. On SchD, TST was 6.2 ± 0.7 h, with sleep efficiency (SLE) of 87.9 ± 4.4% for the group. On NSchD, TST increased to 7.3 ± 1.1 h (p sleep recommendations (8 h/night). There was no association between BMI and average sleep parameters. The majority of Icelandic adolescents did not get the recommended number of hours of sleep, especially on SchD. While TST increased on NSchD, many participants still did not achieve the recommendations. These findings provide information on the sleep patterns of adolescents and may serve as reference for development of policies and interventions to promote better sleep practices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. How repeated 15-minute assertiveness training sessions reduce wrist cutting in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masaya

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine a possible treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder who have wrist-cutting syndrome, a condition characterized by repeated, superficial wrist cutting in a non-suicidal fashion. Within the current healthcare system in Japan, the average amount of time a doctor can spend with a psychiatric outpatient is about 8 to 15 minutes. We, therefore, examined whether repeated 15-minute psychotherapy sessions to improve patient assertiveness would be effective for reducing wrist cutting and possibly other forms of self-mutilation. We treated 13 patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and wrist-cutting syndrome with assertiveness training during 15-minute, biweekly therapy sessions over a course of one to four years. At the conclusion of psychotherapeutic treatment, 69% of outpatients showed a statistically significant reduction in wrist-cutting behavior.

  13. [The reconstruction of the human body length from the wrist size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, M A; Anushkina, E S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the regression models for the reconstruction of the human body length from the wrist size taking into consideration the availability of the results of the measurements of the palm fragments or the wrist undergoing muscular contracture. The study included 106 Caucasoid subjects (41 men and 65 women) at the age varying from 18 to 76 years. The following parameters were measured: body length, wrist length, the length of the fingers and phalanges on the back of the hand, palmar length and width, ulnar edge size of the palm. It was shown that the selected longitudinal dimensions of the palm and fingers can be used to estimate the body length as accurately as from the wrist length. The high prognostic value of ulnar edge size of the palm was documented which allows this characteristic to be used in the cases of partial palm destruction or in the wrist with pronounced flexion contracture of the fingers. The most exact equations are those derived from the combination of the results of the measurement of the fingers and the ulnar edge size of the palm. Less accurate equations are based on the palmar dimensions alone and on the total wrist size with the exception of the equation for the wrist length with regard to the subject's sex. The gender information needs to be taken into account if the wrist is preserved to the extent that only the length of the palm and of the IV and V fingers can be measured or if the wrist is sufficiently long and wide (short and wide) and the gender is supposed to be masculine. In contrast, this information should be disregarded if the wrist is long and narrow (short and narrow) and the gender is supposedly feminine.

  14. Is poststroke complex regional pain syndrome the combination of shoulder pain and soft tissue injury of the wrist?: A prospective observational study: STROBE of ultrasonographic findings in complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Wook; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Jong Moon; Hong, Ji Seong; Lim, Hyun Sun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    Patients with poststroke complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show different symptoms compared to other types of CRPS, as they usually complain of shoulder and wrist pain with the elbow relatively spared. It is thus also known by the term "shoulder-hand syndrome."The aim of this study is to present a possible pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS through ultrasonographic observation of the affected wrist before and after steroid injection at the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon in patients suspected with poststroke CRPS.Prospective evaluation and observation, the STROBE guideline checklist was used.Twenty-three patients diagnosed as poststroke CRPS in accordance to clinical criteria were enrolled. They had a Three Phase Bone Scan (TPBS) done and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of EDC tendon was measured by using ultrasonography. They were then injected with steroid at the EDC tendon. The CSA of EDC tendon, visual analogue scale (VAS), and degree of swelling of the wrist were followed up 1 week after the injection.TPBS was interpreted as normal for 4 patients, suspected CRPS for 10 patients, and CRPS for 9 patients. Ultrasonographic findings of the affected wrist included swelling of the EDC tendon. After the injection of steroid to the wrist, CSA and swelling of the affected wrist compared to that before the treatment was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). The VAS score declined significantly after the injection (P < 0.001).Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS might be the combination of frozen shoulder or rotator cuff tear of shoulder and soft tissue injury of the wrist caused by the hemiplegic nature of patients with stroke.

  15. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  16. Prevalence, incidence and risk factors for overuse injuries of the wrist in young athletes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, Laura S.; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Maas, Mario; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Overuse wrist injuries can cause long-term symptoms in young athletes performing wrist-loading sports. Information on the prevalence, incidence and associated risk factors is required. We aimed to review the prevalence and incidence of overuse wrist injuries in young athletes and to identify

  17. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sueyoshi, E. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kohzaki, S. [Nagasaki Municipal Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  18. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, E.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kohzaki, S.

    1996-01-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  19. Elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand injuries among sport rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzhausen, L M; Noakes, T D

    1996-07-01

    Sport rock climbing with its repetitive high-torque movements in gaining the ascent of a rock face or wall, often in steep overhanging positions, is associated with a unique distribution and form of upper limb injuries. In this article, we review the biomechanical aspects of sport rock climbing and the types of injuries commonly encountered in the forearm, wrist, and hand regions of elite sport rock climbers. Because elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand injuries predominate, representing 62% of the total injuries encountered, these anatomical areas have been selected for review. The predominant source of data are the published work of Bollen et al. The remaining sources were obtained through electronic search of the Medline and Current Contents Databases (last searched May 1995). German and French articles were included in the search criteria. Only studies dealing with acute soft tissue and overuse injuries amongst sport rock climbers were selected. Data were extracted directly from the sourced articles. The following injuries have been described in detail with regard to their presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention amongst sport rock climbers: medial epicondylitis, brachialis tendonitis, biceps brachii tendonitis, ulnar collateral ligament sprain of the elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, digital flexor tendon pulley sheath tears, interphalangeal joint effusions, fixed flexion deformities of the interphalangeal joints, and collateral ligament tears of the interphalangeal joints. Many of the injuries are specific to the handhold types used by the rock climber. Accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of these unique injuries will be facilitated by a wider understanding of the biomechanical aspects of rock climbing and an awareness of the patterns and incidence of injuries in this sport.

  20. An Activity Recognition Framework Deploying the Random Forest Classifier and A Single Optical Heart Rate Monitoring and Triaxial AccelerometerWrist-Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrang, Saeed; Pietilä, Julia; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2018-02-22

    Wrist-worn sensors have better compliance for activity monitoring compared to hip, waist, ankle or chest positions. However, wrist-worn activity monitoring is challenging due to the wide degree of freedom for the hand movements, as well as similarity of hand movements in different activities such as varying intensities of cycling. To strengthen the ability of wrist-worn sensors in detecting human activities more accurately, motion signals can be complemented by physiological signals such as optical heart rate (HR) based on photoplethysmography. In this paper, an activity monitoring framework using an optical HR sensor and a triaxial wrist-worn accelerometer is presented. We investigated a range of daily life activities including sitting, standing, household activities and stationary cycling with two intensities. A random forest (RF) classifier was exploited to detect these activities based on the wrist motions and optical HR. The highest overall accuracy of 89.6 ± 3.9% was achieved with a forest of a size of 64 trees and 13-s signal segments with 90% overlap. Removing the HR-derived features decreased the classification accuracy of high-intensity cycling by almost 7%, but did not affect the classification accuracies of other activities. A feature reduction utilizing the feature importance scores of RF was also carried out and resulted in a shrunken feature set of only 21 features. The overall accuracy of the classification utilizing the shrunken feature set was 89.4 ± 4.2%, which is almost equivalent to the above-mentioned peak overall accuracy.

  1. A comparison of wrist function, range of motion and pain between sports and non sports wheelchair-dependent persons with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Okhovatian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome is common among handicapped people using wheelchair, and repeated wrist movements increase the risk of incidence of this syndrome. In present study, performance, pain and range of motion of wrist were compared between the athletes and non-athlete handicapped people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. Materials and Methods : In this descriptive study, all members of handicapped basketball team in Tehran (35 persons and 33 wheelchair-bound non-athlete handicapped persons residing in Tehran sanitariums were studied (similar with respect to age, weight, height, years of using wheelchair and level of disability.In this study, Clinical Questionnaire and Nerve Conduction Study were used for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome, VAS Scale for measuring pain, Goniometer for measuring range of motion of wrist, and Self-Administered Questionnaire for investigating severity of symptoms and performance.Results: The finings of this study indicated that there was no significant difference between two athlete and non-athlete handicapped groups with carpal tunnel syndrome in prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, severity of pain, performance and range of motion of wrist (p>0.05. Among 35 athletes, 6 persons (mean age: 36±3.11, mean weight: 68±4.74 and mean height: 172±7 and among 33 non-athletes, 5 persons (mean age: 41±7.1, mean weight: 73±3 and mean height: 173±5 had carpal tunnel syndrome.Conclusion : Unlike what is supposed, repeated movements of wrist is not the only factor predisposing the athlete handicapped people to carpal tunnel syndrome, So other influencing factors should be considered.

  2. Evaluation and diagnosis of wrist pain: a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Ramsey; Mirabelli, Mark H

    2013-04-15

    Patients with wrist pain commonly present with an acute injury or spontaneous onset of pain without a definite traumatic event. A fall onto an outstretched hand can lead to a scaphoid fracture, which is the most commonly fractured carpal bone. Conventional radiography alone can miss up to 30 percent of scaphoid fractures. Specialized views (e.g., posteroanterior in ulnar deviation, pronated oblique) and repeat radiography in 10 to 14 days can improve sensitivity for scaphoid fractures. If a suspected scaphoid fracture cannot be confirmed with plain radiography, a bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging can be used. Subacute or chronic wrist pain usually develops gradually with or without a prior traumatic event. In these cases, the differential diagnosis is wide and includes tendinopathy and nerve entrapment. Overuse of the muscles of the forearm and wrist may lead to tendinopathy. Radial pain involving mostly the first extensor compartment is commonly de Quervain tenosynovitis. The diagnosis is based on history and examination findings of a positive Finkelstein test and a negative grind test. Nerve entrapment at the wrist presents with pain and also with sensory and sometimes motor symptoms. In ulnar neuropathies of the wrist, the typical presentation is wrist discomfort with sensory changes in the fourth and fifth digits. Activities that involve repetitive or prolonged wrist extension, such as cycling, karate, and baseball (specifically catchers), may increase the risk of ulnar neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic tests identify the area of nerve entrapment and the extent of the pathology. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  3. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  4. Septic Arthritis of the Wrist: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Predictors of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, John D; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Tosti, Rick; Ilyas, Asif M

    2017-05-01

    Septic arthritis of the wrist can result in permanent damage to the joint, making timely diagnosis crucial to initiate empiric antibiotics and surgical intervention. Although septic arthritis is routinely included in the differential diagnosis of atraumatic wrist pain, the incidence is unknown. Unlike large joints, there is no consensus on cell count values considered pathognomonic for wrist septic arthritis. The goal of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of wrist septic arthritis and to identify the clinical, serum, and joint fluid values that predict infection. The records of patients who presented to a single urban hospital with a swollen, painful wrist without trauma during a 10-year period were reviewed. For patients who had a joint fluid analysis, the records were examined for history as well as demographic and laboratory data. Joint fluid analysis consisted of cell count, Gram stain, and cultures. Of 892 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 1.5% had wrist septic arthritis. Variables associated with septic arthritis included serum white blood cell count above 11,000/µL, core temperature above 100.4°F within 24 hours of aspiration, history of intravenous drug abuse, and smoking. No joint cell count analysis predicted septic arthritis, although patients with septic wrists had an elevated joint white blood cell count above 97,000/µL. Wrist septic arthritis is uncommon; however, objective factors can help identify patients at risk. Because joint cell count analysis cannot reliably predict a septic wrist, priority for joint aspirations with limited fluid should be given instead to Gram stain, culture, and crystal analysis. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e526-e531.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ya Lee

    Full Text Available The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP, radial deviation (RD, and ulnar deviation (UD. The root mean square (RMS of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC, normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint.

  6. Effect of wrist cooling on aerobic and anaerobic performance in elite sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anup; Singh, Krishan; Sharma, Deep; Upadhyay, Vivekanand; Singh, Amit

    2018-01-01

    Body cooling has been used to increase sporting performance and enhance recovery. Several studies have reported improvement in exercise capacities using forearm and hand cooling or only hand cooling. Wrist cooling has emerged as a portable light weight solution for precooling prior to sporting activity. The Astrand test for aerobic performance and the Wingate test for anaerobic performance are reliable and accurate tests for performance assessment. This study conducted on elite Indian athletes analyses the effects of wrist precooling on aerobic and anaerobic performance as tested by the Astrand test and the Wingate test before and after wrist precooling. 67 elite sportsmen were administered Wingate and Astrand test under standardised conditions with and without wrist precooling using a wrist cooling device (dhamaSPORT). Paired t -test was applied to study effect on aerobic [VO 2 (ml/min/kg)] and anaerobic performance [peak power (W/kg) and average power (W/kg)] and Cohen's d was used to calculate effect size of wrist precooling. After wrist precooling, significant increase of 0.22 ( p  = 0.014, 95% CI: 0.047, 0.398) in peak power (W/kg) and 0.22 ( p  performance. Wrist cooling effect size was smaller in VO 2 (Cohen's d  = 0.21), peak power (Cohen's d  = 0.31) and it was larger in average power (Cohen's d  = 0.71). Results show wrist precooling significantly improves anaerobic than aerobic performance of elite sportsmen.

  7. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khoshdel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ali Reza Khoshdel1,2, Shane Carney2, Alastair Gillies21Faculty of Medicine, Aja University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran; 2John Hunter Hospital, Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NS W, AustraliaAbstract: Despite the increasing popularity of blood pressure (BP wrist monitors for self-BP measurement at home, device validation and the effect of arm position remains an issue. This study focused on the validation of the Omron HEM-609 wrist BP device, including an evaluation of the impact of arm position and pulse pressure on BP measurement validation. Fifty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease were selected (age 65 ± 10 years. Each patient had two measurements with a mercury sphygmomanometer and three measurements with the wrist BP device (wrist at the heart level while the horizontal arm supported [HORIZONTAL], hand supported on the opposite shoulder [SHOULDER], and elbow placed on a desk [DESK], in random order. The achieved systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP wrist-cuff readings were compared to the mercury device and the frequencies of the readings within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg of the gold standard were computed and compared with the British Hypertension Society (BHS and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI protocols. The results showed while SBP readings with HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions were significantly different from the mercury device (mean difference = 7.1 and 13.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05, the DESK position created the closest reading to mercury (mean difference = 3.8, P > 0.1. Approximately 71% of SBP readings with the DESK position were within ±10 mmHg, whereas it was 62.5% and 34% for HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions, respectively. Wrist DBP attained category D with BHS criteria with all three arm positions. Bland–Altman plots illustrated that the wrist monitor systematically underestimated SBP and DBP values. However a reading adjustment of 5 and 10 mm

  8. [Cinematography, a new diagnostic procedure in evaluation of the injured painful wrist joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, K D; Wuttge-Hannig, A; Hannig, C

    1990-01-01

    By the X-ray Cineradiografie we are able to examine and to judge the dynamic of the wrist bones by 50 pictures/sec. in comparison to one another and also depending on their ligaments. We did an investigation of 170 patients with painful wrist. With the method we were able to make up a clear diagnosis and to propose the therapy. I.e.: If consecutive shortening of the radius after distal radius fracture resulting ingruency of the wrist joint is relevant, or a scaphoid pseudarthrosis is fixed elastically, or a scaphoic dissociation is effective. The variations were shown in comparison to normal circumstances.

  9. [Tuberculosis of the hand and wrist: different aspects of 30 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlimi, F; Bellarbi, S; Mahfoud, M; Berrada, M S; El Bardouni, A; El Yaacoubi, M

    2011-06-01

    Tuberculosis of the hand and wrist is a rare entity. We report 30 cases of tuberculosis of the hand and wrist, including ten cases of wrist osteoarthritis, ten cases of tenosynovitis, four cases of metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal osteoarthritis and six cases of metacarpal and phalangeal osteitis. The histological study after surgical biopsy revealed caseating giant cell granulomas with epitheloid cells confirming the diagnosis. Antibacillary chemotherapy promoted healing and good outcome in our patients. The aim of our work is to analyze the epidemiological, diagnostic, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of this disease through a series of 30 cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105, AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steyerberg, Ewout W. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jager, L.C. [University of Amsterdam, Emergency Department, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sosef, Nico L. [Spaarne Hospital, Department of Surgery, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Velde, Romuald van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Hilversum (Netherlands); Ultee, Jan M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, Niels W.L. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maasstadziekenhuis Rotterdam, Department of Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  11. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van; Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jager, L.C.; Sosef, Nico L.; Velde, Romuald van; Ultee, Jan M.; Schep, Niels W.L.

    2016-01-01

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  12. Adhesive taping vs. daily manual muscle stretching and splinting after botulinum toxin type A injection for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Picelli, Alessandro; Smania, Nicola; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two procedures increasing the botulinum toxin type A effect for wrist and finger flexor spasticity after stroke. A single-blind randomized trial. Seventy patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity. Adults with wrist and finger flexor muscles spasticity after stroke were submitted to botulinum toxin type A therapy. After the treatment, the subjects injected were randomly divided into two groups and submitted to adhesive taping (Group A) or daily muscle manual stretching, passive articular mobilization of wrist and fingers, and palmar splint (Group B) for 10 days. We measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale, related disability with Disability Assessment Scale, and fingers position at rest. The measurements were done at baseline, after two weeks, and after one month from the treatment session. After two weeks, subjects in Group A reported a significantly greater decrease in spasticity scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.3±0.6 vs. 2.1±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 1.7 ±0.6 vs. 2.3 ±0.8), and after one month in spasticity and disability scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.9 ±0.7 vs. 2.5 ±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 2.0 ±0.7 vs. 2.6 ±0.6; Disability Assessment Scale: 1.6 ±0.7 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) compared with Group B subjects. Subjects in Group A reported also a significantly improved fingers position at rest compared with Group B subjects after two weeks (2.8 ±0.9 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) and one month (2.3 ±0.7 vs. 1.5 ±0.6). Adhesive taping of wrist and finger flexor muscles appeared to enhance the effect of botulinum toxin type A therapy more than daily manual muscle stretching combined with passive articular mobilization and palmar splint. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Digitized hand-wrist radiographs: comparison of subjective and software-derived image quality at various compression ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Layne K; Scarfe, William C; Naylor, Rachel H; Scheetz, James P; Silveira, Anibal; Gillespie, Kevin R

    2007-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the effect of JPEG 2000 compression of hand-wrist radiographs on observer image quality qualitative assessment and to compare with a software-derived quantitative image quality index. Fifteen hand-wrist radiographs were digitized and saved as TIFF and JPEG 2000 images at 4 levels of compression (20:1, 40:1, 60:1, and 80:1). The images, including rereads, were viewed by 13 orthodontic residents who determined the image quality rating on a scale of 1 to 5. A quantitative analysis was also performed by using a readily available software based on the human visual system (Image Quality Measure Computer Program, version 6.2, Mitre, Bedford, Mass). ANOVA was used to determine the optimal compression level (P quality. When we used quantitative indexes, the JPEG 2000 images had lower quality at all compression ratios compared with the original TIFF images. There was excellent correlation (R2 >0.92) between qualitative and quantitative indexes. Image Quality Measure indexes are more sensitive than subjective image quality assessments in quantifying image degradation with compression. There is potential for this software-based quantitative method in determining the optimal compression ratio for any image without the use of subjective raters.

  14. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Erwin

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular and shear (lateral stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution

  15. The impact of whole-hand vibration exposure on the sense of angular position about the wrist joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Sasa; Day, Scott Jason; Johansson, Håkan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the impact of whole-hand vibration on the capacity of subjects to identify previously presented positions of the hand in both wrist flexion and extension. In each movement direction, targets of 15 or 30 degrees were presented with an imposed passive movement from the start position. During the second imposed movement, subjects were required to identify when the target position had been reached. For the vibration condition, 15 s of whole-hand vibration exposure was repeated immediately prior to each target position trial. Proprioceptive capacity was assessed by comparing the identified angular position with the reference position-angular distance expressed in terms of absolute error (AE), constant error (CE), and variable error (VE). For three of the four target positions (15 and 30 degrees flexion and 15 degrees extension), the absolute, constant, and VEs of target identification were insensitive to vibration, whereas for the 30 degrees extension target, both the absolute and CE were significantly different before and after the vibration application, showing the subjects overshooting previously presented target position. All three error measures were larger for the long targets than the short targets. Short-duration exposure to whole-hand vibration is insufficient to compromise post-vibration position sense in the wrist joint, except near the end range of joint movement in wrist extension. Complement contribution of different proprioceptive receptors (muscle, joint, and skin receptors) seems to be crucial for accuracy to reproduce passive movements, since the capacity of any individual class of receptor to deliver information about movement and position of the limbs is limited.

  16. Dynamic profiling of different ready-to-drink fermented dairy products: A comparative study using Temporal Check-All-That-Apply (TCATA), Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS) and Progressive Profile (PP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmerino, Erick A; Castura, John C; Ferraz, Juliana P; Tavares Filho, Elson R; Silva, Ramon; Cruz, Adriano G; Freitas, Mônica Q; Bolini, Helena M A

    2017-11-01

    Despite the several differences in ingredients, processes and nutritional values, dairy foods as yogurts, fermented milks and milk beverages are widely accepted worldwide, and although they have their sensory profiling normally covered by descriptive analyses, the temporal perception involved during the consumption are rarely considered. In this sense, the present work aimed to assess the dynamic sensory profile of three categories of fermented dairy products using different temporal methodologies: Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS), Progressive Profiling (PP), Temporal CATA (TCATA), and compare the results obtained. The findings showed that the different sensory characteristics among the products are basically related to their commercial identity. Regarding the methods, all of them collected the variations between samples with great correlation between data. In addition, to detect differences in intensities, TCATA showed to be the most sensitive method in detecting textural changes. When using PP, a balanced experimental design considering the number of attributes, time intervals, and food matrix must be weighed. The findings are of interest to guide sensory and consumer practitioners involved in the dairy production to formulate/reformulate their products and help them choosing the most suitable dynamic method to temporally evaluate them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Searching for world domination

    CERN Multimedia

    Quillen, E

    2004-01-01

    "Optimists might believe Microsoft suffered a setback last week that will impede its progress toward world domination, but I suspect the company has already found a way to prevail. At issue before the European Union was Microsoft's bundling of its Windows Media Player with its operating system" (1 page)

  18. Iron dominated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided

  19. Autosomal dominant polycystisk nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naver, Signe Vinsand; Ørskov, Bjarne; Jensen, Anja Møller

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder which causes end stage renal disease. In Denmark, estimated 5,000 patients are living with the disease. Most of the patients are in regular contact with physicians due to the progression of kidney failure...

  20. MRI features in de Quervain`s tenosynovitis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glajchen, N. [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schweitzer, M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain`s stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain`s synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain`s disease. De Quervain`s tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  1. Design of a Magnetic Resonance-Safe Haptic Wrist Manipulator for Movement Disorder Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, Dyon; Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Bour, Lo J.; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Lammertse, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Tremor, characterized by involuntary and rhythmical movements, is the most common movement disorder. Tremor can have peripheral and central oscillatory components which properly assessed may improve diagnostics. A magnetic resonance (MR)-safe haptic wrist manipulator enables simultaneous measurement

  2. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Disabilites of Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation questionnaires in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of 102 cases, we evaluated the QuickDASH. Furthermore, in a cross-sectional study and a test-retest on a subgroup of the patients, we...... evaluated the Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation. RESULTS: Internal consistency and reproducibility were very high (Cronbach's alpha 0.96/0.97; Spearman's rho 0.90/ 0.91; intraclass coefficient 0.91/0.92), and there were no floor or ceiling effects. The responsiveness of the QuickDASH was high (standardised...... patients scored significantly higher on the QuickDASH than other patients did. The scores of both questionnaires were very closely related. CONCLUSION: Both questionnaires are valid and equivalent for use in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. FUNDING: This research received no specific grant from any...

  3. COBRA-Bee Carpal-Wrist Gimbal for Astrobee, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes to develop a carpal-wrist gimbal payload for the Astrobee free-flier, called 'COBRA-Bee' to satisfy Astrobee mission needs for a lightweight, integrated...

  4. A complex suicide by vehicle assisted ligature strangulation and wrist-cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Akçan

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: A complete forensic investigation revealed the case was an unusual complex suicide by vehicle assisted ligature strangulation and wrist-cutting. The case was interesting in terms of involving car assisted ligature strangulation.

  5. Snapping wrist due to multiple accessory tendon of first extensor compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dhiyaneswaran Subramaniyam

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: There are various causes for snapping wrist syndrome. Multiple accessory tendon can also cause snapping as shown in this case report. Moreover am presenting this case to highlight the diagnostic failure with non dynamic radiological investigation and to consider multiple accessory tendon as differential diagnosis for snapping wrist syndrome. Also suggest dynamic study could be a better choice of investigation to diagnosis snapping syndrome. First compartment tunnel release with few accessory tendon slip tenotomy gives good result.

  6. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.; Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg; Uppsala Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles. (orig.)

  7. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint. New aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles.

  8. Determining Sincerity of Effort Based on Grip Strength Test in Three Wrist Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petcharatana Bhuanantanondh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several grip strength tests are commonly used for detecting sincerity of effort. However, there is still no widely accepted standardized sincerity of effort test. Therefore, this study aimed to examine whether grip strength test in three wrist positions could distinguish between maximal and submaximal efforts. Methods: Twenty healthy individuals (10 men and 10 women with a mean age of 26.7 ± 3.92 years participated in this study. All participants completed two test conditions (maximal and submaximal efforts in three wrist positions (neutral, flexion, and extension using both hands. Each participant exerted 100% effort in the maximal effort condition and 50% effort in the submaximal effort condition. The participants performed three repetitions of the grip strength test for each session. Results: The results showed that there is a significant main effect of the type of effort (p < 0.001, wrist position (p < 0.001, and hand (p = 0.028. There were also significant types of effort and wrist position interactions (p < 0.001 and effort and hand interactions (p < 0.028. The results also showed that grip strength was highest at the wrist in neutral position in both the maximal and the submaximal effort condition. Grip strength values of the three wrist positions in the maximal effort condition were noticeably greater than those in the submaximal effort condition. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that grip strength test in three wrist positions can differentiate a maximal effort from a submaximal effort. Thus, this test could potentially be used to detect sincerity of effort in clinical setting. Keywords: grip strength, maximal effort, sincerity of effort, submaximal effort, wrist position

  9. Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation of Hand Paralysis After Stroke Reduces Wrist Edema and Pain: A Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borboni, Alberto; Villafañe, Jorge H; Mullè, Chiara; Valdes, Kristin; Faglia, Rodolfo; Taveggia, Giovanni; Negrini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether passive robotic-assisted hand motion, in addition to standard rehabilitation, would reduce hand pain, edema, or spasticity in all patients following acute stroke, in patients with and without hand paralysis. Thirty-five participants, aged 45 to 80 years, with functional impairments of their upper extremities after a stroke were recruited for the study from September 2013 to October 2013. One group consisted of 16 patients (mean age ± SD, 68 ± 9 years) with full paralysis and the other groups included 14 patients (mean age ± SD, 67 ± 8 years) with partial paralysis. Patients in the both groups used the Gloreha device for passive mobilization of the hand twice a day for 2 consecutive weeks. The primary outcome measure was hand edema. Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity and spasticity. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and immediately after the intervention (2 weeks). Analysis of variance revealed that the partial paralysis group experienced a significantly greater reduction of edema at the wrist (P = .005) and pain (P = .04) when compared with the full paralysis group. Other outcomes were similar for the groups. The results of the current study suggest that the partial paralysis group experienced a significantly greater reduction of edema at the wrist and pain when compared with the full paralysis group. The reduction in pain did not meet the threshold of a minimal clinically important difference. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor.

  11. Augmented reality-based navigation system for wrist arthroscopy: feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Mathoulin, Christophe L; Obdeijn, Miryam; Liverneaux, Philippe A

    2013-11-01

    In video surgery, and more specifically in arthroscopy, one of the major problems is positioning the camera and instruments within the anatomic environment. The concept of computer-guided video surgery has already been used in ear, nose, and throat (ENT), gynecology, and even in hip arthroscopy. These systems, however, rely on optical or mechanical sensors, which turn out to be restricting and cumbersome. The aim of our study was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of a navigation system based on electromagnetic sensors in video surgery. We used an electromagnetic localization device (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada) to track the movements in space of both the camera and the instruments. We have developed a dedicated application in the Python language, using the VTK library for the graphic display and the OpenCV library for camera calibration. A prototype has been designed and evaluated for wrist arthroscopy. It allows display of the theoretical position of instruments onto the arthroscopic view with useful accuracy. The augmented reality view represents valuable assistance when surgeons want to position the arthroscope or locate their instruments. It makes the maneuver more intuitive, increases comfort, saves time, and enhances concentration.

  12. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Massy-Westropp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker’s compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection.

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: dedicated low-field (0.25-T) versus high-field (3.0-T) MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Griffith, James F.; Wang, D.F.; Yeung, David K.W. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, L. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Division of Neurology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Li, Edmund K.; Tam, L.S. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the assessment of wrist synovitis severity, synovial volume and synovial perfusion parameters on a dedicated low-field (0.25-T) to that of a high-field (3-T) whole-body MR system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-one patients (mean age 50.0 ± 9.8 years) with active RA were recruited prospectively. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examination of the most severely affected wrist was performed at both 0.25 T and 3 T. Three MRI-derived parameters, synovitis severity (RAMRIS grade), synovial volume (ml{sup 3}) and synovial perfusion indices (maximum enhancement and enhancement slope), were compared. Comparing 0.25- and 3-T MRI, there was excellent agreement for semiquantitative assessment (r: 0.80, p < 0.00001) of synovitis (RAMRIS) as well as quantitative assessment (r: 0.94, p < 0.00001) of synovial volume. Good agreement for synovial Emax (r: 0.6, p = 0.002) and fair agreement (r: 0.5, p = 0.02) for synovial Eslope was found. Imaging of the RA wrist at 0.25 T yields excellent correlation with 3 T with regard to the synovitis activity score (RAMRIS) and synovial volume measurement. Fair to good correlation between low- (0.25-T) and high-field (3-T) MR systems was found for perfusion parameters, being better for Emax than for Eslope. (orig.)

  14. Tendo-ligamentous pathologies of the wrist joint: Can ultrasonography replace magnetic resonance imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Characterization of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist remains problematic, despite advances in imaging. By using clinical history and imaging appearance, one can determine the diagnosis. USG is used as first imaging modality whereas MRI aids in making a specific diagnosis of few of the lesions. Aims: To investigate the etiological spectrum of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist on USG & MRI with statistical correlation. Patients and methods: 80 patients (male/female = 46/34 with complaint of swelling or pain in wrist were included and underwent USG and MRI of both the wrists. Results: The spectrum included ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, ligament tears and fibrosis. The analysis was done using kappa coefficient and spearman's rho correlation coefficient. The strength of agreement between USG and MRI for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis and tendinopathy was found to be very good. Conclusion: USG provides detailed depiction of superficial structures, is less expensive, and allows dynamic examinations of the wrist. It should be the first choice of investigation for majority of the cystic, tendinous, vascular, and fibrotic pathologies of the wrist. However, less promising results were observed for ligamentous pathologies on USG in our study. Keywords: Tendo-ligamentous pathologies, Ganglion cyst, Tenosynovitis, Ultrasonography, MRI

  15. Wrist position sense acuity and its relation to motor dysfunction in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Chen, Fu-Chen; Konczak, Jürgen

    2018-03-17

    This study obtained objective measures of wrist position sense to verify that children with DCD have proprioceptive deficits. In addition, it examined the relationship of wrist proprioceptive impairment with fine motor and balance function. Twenty children with DCD and thirty typically developing children (TD) aged 10-11 years old were recruited and screened using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC-2). The DCD group had total MABC-2 score below 5th percentile, and TD group was above 25th percentile. Wrist position sense was assessed under two conditions: 1) an ipsilateral wrist joint position matching requiring active movement to reproduce a reference position, and 2) a psychophysical discrimination threshold testing, in which the wrist joint was passively rotated. The results showed that, in comparison to TD controls, the DCD group showed an increased joint position error variability during active matching (p < 0.05) and highly elevated mean position sense threshold for passive displacement (+71%; p < 0.001). Position sense threshold data correlated significantly with manual dexterity (r = -0.4) and balance scores (r = -0.5). This study documents that DCD is associated with a proprioceptive dysfunction of the wrist/hand complex, which likely contributes to the fine motor problems in children with DCD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Concomitant Total Wrist and Total Elbow Arthroplasty in a Rheumatoid Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Patrick M; Stull, Justin D; Culp, Randall W

    2016-05-01

    Background Concomitant arthroplasty has been described to have several benefits over multistage procedures. Ipsilateral total elbow and total shoulder arthroplasty has been reported with good outcomes in upper extremity concomitant arthroplasty. Case Description A 65-year-old woman presented with ipsilateral left-sided wrist and elbow joint degeneration as a result of longstanding rheumatoid arthritis. Concomitant total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty was performed with satisfactory results at both joints. She tolerated the procedure well and had an uneventful clinical course postoperatively. Literature Review Currently, no literature exists that describes one-stage total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty. Individually, total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty have both been reported to result in good outcomes and patient satisfaction. Previous studies have reported the utility of concomitant ipsilateral upper extremity procedures with a one-stage total elbow and total shoulder arthroplasty having been identified as a cost-saving procedure with expedited return to functionality versus a two-stage procedure. Clinical Relevance Patients with ipsilateral degenerative changes in the wrist and elbow should be considered on an individual case basis for concomitant total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty.

  17. Concomitant Total Wrist and Total Elbow Arthroplasty in a Rheumatoid Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Patrick M.; Stull, Justin D.; Culp, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Concomitant arthroplasty has been described to have several benefits over multistage procedures. Ipsilateral total elbow and total shoulder arthroplasty has been reported with good outcomes in upper extremity concomitant arthroplasty. Case Description A 65-year-old woman presented with ipsilateral left-sided wrist and elbow joint degeneration as a result of longstanding rheumatoid arthritis. Concomitant total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty was performed with satisfactory results at both joints. She tolerated the procedure well and had an uneventful clinical course postoperatively. Literature Review Currently, no literature exists that describes one-stage total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty. Individually, total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty have both been reported to result in good outcomes and patient satisfaction. Previous studies have reported the utility of concomitant ipsilateral upper extremity procedures with a one-stage total elbow and total shoulder arthroplasty having been identified as a cost-saving procedure with expedited return to functionality versus a two-stage procedure. Clinical Relevance Patients with ipsilateral degenerative changes in the wrist and elbow should be considered on an individual case basis for concomitant total wrist and total elbow arthroplasty. PMID:27104080

  18. Snapping wrist due to multiple accessory tendon of first extensor compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyam, S Dhiyaneswaran; Purushothaman, Rajesh; Zacharia, Balaji

    2018-01-01

    Snapping phenomena result from the sudden impingement between anatomical and/or heterotopical structures with subsequent abrupt movement and noise. Snaps are variously perceived by patients, from mild discomfort to significant pain requiring surgical management. snapping syndrome occurs at various site like hip, knee, shoulder and wrist. There are many cadaveric studies shows accessory tendon in first extensor compartment of wrist. We present a 19 year old male presents catching sensation and occasional radial side wrist pain for 6 months. Finkelstein test was negative. Radiograph showed small bony projection over the radial styloid. MRI wrist was reported as normal but retrospective analysis of image shows multiple tendons. Intraopertively we found multiple accessory tendon of extensor pollicis brevis which is causing snapping. Fibrous tunnel release with tenotomy of few accessory tendons done. On table patients catching sensation was assessed and found to be relieved. Patient is not having snapping on his follow up visit and able to carry out his daily activity without difficulties. There are various causes for snapping wrist syndrome. Multiple accessory tendon can also cause snapping as shown in this case report. Moreover am presenting this case to highlight the diagnostic failure with non dynamic radiological investigation and to consider multiple accessory tendon as differential diagnosis for snapping wrist syndrome. Also suggest dynamic study could be a better choice of investigation to diagnosis snapping syndrome. First compartment tunnel release with few accessory tendon slip tenotomy gives good result. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Registration-based Bone Morphometry for Shape Analysis of the Bones of the Human Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand A.; Leahy, Richard M.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method that quantifies point-wise changes in surface morphology of the bones of the human wrist. The proposed method, referred to as Registration-based Bone Morphometry (RBM), consists of two steps: an atlas selection step and an atlas warping step. The atlas for individual wrist bones was selected based on the shortest l2 distance to the ensemble of wrist bones from a database of a healthy population of subjects. The selected atlas was then warped to the corresponding bones of individuals in the population using a non-linear registration method based on regularized l2 distance minimization. The displacement field thus calculated showed local differences in bone shape that then were used for the analysis of group differences. Our results indicate that RBM has potential to provide a standardized approach to shape analysis of bones of the human wrist. We demonstrate the performance of RBM for examining group differences in wrist bone shapes based on sex and between those of the right and left wrists in healthy individuals. We also present data to show the application of RBM for tracking bone erosion status in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26353369

  20. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Hand and Wrist Trauma: Is There Sufficient Evidence of Reliability, Validity, and Responsiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Davis, Tim

    2016-03-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are important tools for assessing outcomes following injuries to the hand and wrist. Many commonly used PROMs have no evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. This systematic review examines the PROMs used in the assessment of hand and wrist trauma patients, and the evidence for reliability, validity, and responsiveness of each measure in this population. A systematic review of Pubmed, Medline, and CINAHL searching for randomized controlled trials of patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist was carried out to identify the PROMs. For each identified PROM, evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness was identified using a further systematic review of the Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, and reverse citation trail audit procedure. The PROM used most often was the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire; the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Gartland and Werley score, Michigan Hand Outcomes score, Mayo Wrist Score, and Short Form 36 were also commonly used. Only the DASH and PRWE have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist; other measures either have incomplete evidence or evidence gathered in a nontraumatic population. The DASH and PRWE both have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. Other PROMs used to assess hand and wrist trauma patients do not. This should be considered when selecting a PROM for patients with traumatic hand and wrist pathology.

  1. Computation of term dominance in text documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Travis L [Albuquerque, NM; Benz, Zachary O [Albuquerque, NM; Verzi, Stephen J [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-04-24

    An improved entropy-based term dominance metric useful for characterizing a corpus of text documents, and is useful for comparing the term dominance metrics of a first corpus of documents to a second corpus having a different number of documents.

  2. [Dominant Thalamus and Aphasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Akiko; Shimomura, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that lesions of the dominant thalamus precipitate language disorders in a similar manner to transcortical aphasias, in a phenomenon known as "thalamic aphasia." In some cases, however, aphasia may not occur or may appear transiently following thalamic lesions. Furthermore, dominant thalamic lesions can produce changes in character, as observed in patients with amnesic disorder. Previous work has explored the utility of thalamic aphasia as a discriminative feature for classification of aphasia. Although the thalamus may be involved in the function of the brainstem reticular activating system and play a role in attentional network and in memory of Papez circuit or Yakovlev circuit, the mechanism by which thalamic lesion leads to the emergence of aphasic disorders is unclear. In this review, we we survey historical and recent literature on thalamic aphasia in an attempt to understand the neural processes affected by thalamic lesions.

  3. Autosomal dominant cramping disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, K; Moxley, R T

    1990-07-01

    A family was studied in which four generations (16 of 41 members) suffered from painful recurrent muscle cramping. A clear pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance was noted. The cramping first developed during adolescence or early adulthood. Electromyographic analysis indicated a neurogenic origin. The cramps seemed to be due to dysfunction of the motor neurons. The mechanisms underlying this alteration are unclear and require further investigation.

  4. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) an......) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain....

  5. Public owners will dominate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Stein Arne

    2003-01-01

    In ten years there will still be a dominating public ownership in the energy supply sector in Norway. Statkraft will be the big actor. Norway will then be integrated in an European power market through more cables and the power price will be lower and more stable. The market will be important, but within frames set by the politicians. This article quotes the views of two central figures in the energy sector on the energy supply industry in 2014

  6. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Small Text Medium Text Large Text Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease YESTERDAY Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) resulted ...

  7. Compliance of Adolescent Girls to Repeated Deployments of Wrist-worn Accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Alex V; Harrington, Deirdre M; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Davies, Melanie J; Sherar, Lauren B; Gorely, Trish; Khunti, Kamlesh; Edwardson, Charlotte L

    2018-02-23

    To determine the cross-sectional and cumulative compliance of adolescent girls to accelerometer wear at three deployment points and to identify variables associated with compliance. Girls from 20 secondary schools were recruited: 10 schools were participating in the 'Girls Active' intervention and 10 were control schools. Physical activity was measured using the GENEActiv accelerometer worn on the non-dominant wrist 24 hours/day for up to 7-days at baseline, 7-months and 14-months. Demographic and anthropometric characteristics were recorded. Seven valid days (≥16 hours) of accelerometer wear were obtained from 83%, 77% and 68% of girls at baseline (n = 1734), 7-months (n = 1381) and 14-months (n = 1326), respectively. 68% provided 7-valid days for both baseline and 7-months, 59% for baseline and 14-months and 52% for all three deployment points. Estimates of physical activity level from 3-days of measurement could be considered equivalent to a 7-day measure (i.e. they fell within a ±5% equivalence zone). Cross-sectionally, 3-valid days were obtained from at least 91% of girls; cumulatively, this was obtained from ≥88% of girls across any two deployment points and 84% of girls across all three deployment points. When controlling for clustering at school level and other potential predictors, physical activity level, being South Asian, being in the intervention group and prior compliance were positively associated with monitor wear. Compliance reduced across deployment points, with the reduction increasing as the deployment points got further apart. High prior compliance and high physical activity level were associated with the most additional wear-time.

  8. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Pelizzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG sensors to measure heart rate (HR in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years undergoing laparoscopy (n = 8 or open surgery (n = 22. HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG (r = 0.99 and SpO2R (r = 0.99 monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children < 8 years (r = 0.99, with a weight < 30 kg (r = 0.99 and when the HR was < 70 beats per minute (bpm (r = 0.91 or > 140 bpm (r = 0.99. PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention (r > 0.9. PFT–derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings.

  9. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, Gloria; Guddo, Anna; Puglisi, Aurora; Comparato, Calogero; Valenza, Mario; Bordonaro, Emanuele; Calcaterra, Valeria

    2018-01-01

    The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors to measure heart rate (HR) in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT) in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR) in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years) undergoing laparoscopy (n = 8) or open surgery (n = 22). HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R) were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG (r = 0.99) and SpO2R (r = 0.99) monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children 140 bpm (r = 0.99). PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention (r > 0.9). PFT–derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings. PMID:29518020

  10. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, Gloria; Guddo, Anna; Puglisi, Aurora; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Comparato, Calogero; Valenza, Mario; Bordonaro, Emanuele; Calcaterra, Valeria

    2018-03-08

    The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors to measure heart rate (HR) in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT) in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR) in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years) undergoing laparoscopy ( n = 8) or open surgery ( n = 22). HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R) were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG ( r = 0.99) and SpO2R ( r = 0.99) monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children r = 0.99), with a weight r = 0.99) and when the HR was r = 0.91) or > 140 bpm ( r = 0.99). PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention ( r > 0.9). PFT-derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings.

  11. Doppler ultrasound findings in healthy wrists and finger joints before and after use of two different contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terslev, L; Torp-Pedersen, S; Bang, N; Koenig, M; Nielsen, M; Bliddal, H

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of contrast agents on Doppler ultrasound findings in the synovial membrane in the wrist and fingers of healthy volunteers. Material and methods: Eleven healthy subjects were included in the study (5 women and 6 men, mean age 38 years, range (20–60)). They had no clinical signs of inflammatory or degenerative joint diseases. A total of 66 joints were examined—6 joints for each subject: wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints 1–5—before contrast injection and after Levovist and SonoVue injection with a 30 minute interval. Results: Colour Doppler activity was detected in 10/55 (18%) MCP joints before contrast injection and in 29/55 (53%) and 28/55 (51%) joints after Levovist (pSonoVue injection (p = 0.0001), respectively. A significant increase in Doppler activity in the radial (pSonoVue injections. With spectral Doppler no difference was found in the resistive index (RI) in the vessels measured before as compared with those only detected after contrast injection. Conclusion: The number of joints with colour Doppler activity in healthy volunteers was increased by the use of contrast agents. No changes in RI were detected. The value of contrast agents remains to be demonstrated in inflammatory diagnostics. PMID:15897304

  12. Assessment of the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of a communicating vessels volumeter to measure wrist-hand volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rogério Mendonca; Perez, Maria Del Carmen Janerio; Miranda, Fausto

    2012-10-01

    Traditional volumetry based on Archimedes' principle is the gold standard for the measurement of limb volume, but the routine use of this technique is discouraged because of several disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to evaluate intraobserver and interobserver reliability of direct measurements of wrist-hand volume using a new communicating vessels volumeter based on Pascal's law. A reliability study was conducted. To evaluate the reliability of the communicating vessels volumeter in generating measurements, 30 hands of 15 participants (9 women, 6 men) were measured 3 times each by 3 observers, totaling 270 volumetric results. Measurement time was short (X =3 minutes 42 seconds). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was .9977 for observer 1 and .9976 for observers 2 and 3. The interobserver ICC was .9998. The standard error of measurement was about 3 mL for all observers; the interobserver result was 1 mL. The interrater coefficient of variance (CV) was 1.15% for the series of 9 measurements collected for each segment; the intrarater CV was 1.20%. Limitations No swollen hands were measured, and measurements were not compared with the gold standard technique. Thus, accuracy of the new volumeter was not determined in this study. A new device has been developed for plethysmography of the extremities, and the results of its use to measure the volume of the wrist-hand segment were reliable in both intraobserver and interobserver analyses.

  13. The Effects of Counterforce Brace Size on the Wrist Range of Motility, Pain, Grip & Wrist Extension Sterngth in Normal Subjects and Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Jameh-Bozorgi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Counter force brace is one of the most usefull treatments for lateral opicondylitis (Tennis elbow because it decreases grip pain and increases the power of grip, power of wrist extension and Wrist Range of Motility. The purpose of this quasi experimental (repeated measurementsstudy was to determine the effect of 3 counterforce brace sizes on the wrist R.O.M, grip and wrist extension strength and pain intensity in two groups of healthy subjects and patients with tennis elbow. Materials & Methods: 18 normal subjects & 18 patients with tennis elbow were selected simple conveniently and were tested with no brace and 3 size of counterforce (1,2 and 3 inches. The R.O.M , strength and pain intensity were measured by jamar goniometry and Nicholas MMT dynamometry & VAS, respectively. Results: 1 With all sizes there was a significant decrease of R.O.M on normal subjects but no significant difference in patients. 2 There was a significant decrease of grip strength with 1-inch brace in normal subjects but a significant increase of grip strength with 2 and 3-inch brace in patiens. 3 All sizes of brace caused significant decrease of extension strength in normal subjects but increase in patients. 4All size caused significant decrease of pain intensity that was more considerable in the case of 2 and 3 inch size. Conclusion: The results shows that the counterforce brace may be considered as an effective treatment for increasing strength and decreasing pain in patients with tennis elbow.

  14. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Hand and wrist involvement in systemic sclerosis: US features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Véronique; Bazeli, Ramin; Elhai, Muriel; Campagna, Raphaël; Pessis, Éric; Avouac, Jérôme; Allanore, Yannick; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Guérini, Henri

    2013-12-01

    To characterize ultrasonographic (US) features in the hand of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to evaluate the sensitivity of US in the detection of calcinosis and acroosteolysis. The local ethics committee approved this study, and oral informed consent was obtained. A total of 44 consecutive patients with SSc (34 women; mean age, 56.1 years ± 12.1 [standard deviation]; 10 men; mean age, 45.0 years ± 14.0) and 30 healthy control subjects (20 women; mean age, 46.3 years ± 12.1; 10 men; mean age, 39.6 years ± 10.8) were included between October 2010 and December 2011. Bilateral US, including Doppler assessment of the wrists, hands, and fingers, was performed, and presence of synovitis, tenosynovitis with or without a layered appearance, calcifications, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization was recorded. Radiography of both hands was performed to assess for acroosteolysis and calcinosis. Frequency of US features, sensitivity of US for calcinosis and acroosteolysis, and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Synovitis was found in 17 patients (39%). Tenosynovitis was found in 12 patients (27%), and it had a layered pattern in 15 (41%) of 37 cases. Calcinosis was found in 17 patients (39%) with US, with a sensitivity of 89%. Acroosteolysis was found in nine (20%) patients with US and in 10 (23%) patients with radiography, with 90% sensitivity for US. Distal vascularization was detected in 26 patients (59%) and 30 control subjects (100%) and was in contact with the acroosteolysis bed in seven (78%) of nine patients with SSc. US can be used to assess features of SSc, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, calcinosis, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization and is sensitive for calcinosis and acroosteolysis detection. A layered pattern (similar to the appearance of an artichoke heart) of tenosynovitis was seen commonly. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  16. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative

  17. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-09-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative.

  18. 4D rotational x-ray imaging of wrist joint dynamic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelsen, Bart; Bakker, Niels H.; Strackee, Simon D.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Maas, Mario; Sabczynski, Joerg; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for imaging joint motion are limited to either two-dimensional (2D) video fluoroscopy, or to animated motions from a series of static three-dimensional (3D) images. 3D movement patterns can be detected from biplane fluoroscopy images matched with computed tomography images. This involves several x-ray modalities and sophisticated 2D to 3D matching for the complex wrist joint. We present a method for the acquisition of dynamic 3D images of a moving joint. In our method a 3D-rotational x-ray (3D-RX) system is used to image a cyclically moving joint. The cyclic motion is synchronized to the x-ray acquisition to yield multiple sets of projection images, which are reconstructed to a series of time resolved 3D images, i.e., four-dimensional rotational x ray (4D-RX). To investigate the obtained image quality parameters the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF) via the edge spread function and the contrast to noise ratio between air and phantom were determined on reconstructions of a bullet and rod phantom, using 4D-RX as well as stationary 3D-RX images. The CNR in volume reconstructions based on 251 projection images in the static situation and on 41 and 34 projection images of a moving phantom were 6.9, 3.0, and 2.9, respectively. The average FWHM of the PSF of these same images was, respectively, 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 mm orthogonal to the motion and parallel to direction of motion 0.6, 0.7, and 1.0 mm. The main deterioration of 4D-RX images compared to 3D-RX images is due to the low number of projection images used and not to the motion of the object. Using 41 projection images seems the best setting for the current system. Experiments on a postmortem wrist show the feasibility of the method for imaging 3D dynamic joint motion. We expect that 4D-RX will pave the way to improved assessment of joint disorders by detection of 3D dynamic motion patterns in joints

  19. Recognizing upper limb movements with wrist worn inertial sensors using k-means clustering classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Dwaipayan; Cranny, Andy; Gupta, Nayaab; Maharatna, Koushik; Achner, Josy; Klemke, Jasmin; Jöbges, Michael; Ortmann, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for recognizing three fundamental movements of the human forearm (extension, flexion and rotation) using pattern recognition applied to the data from a single wrist-worn, inertial sensor. We propose that this technique could be used as a clinical tool to assess rehabilitation progress in neurodegenerative pathologies such as stroke or cerebral palsy by tracking the number of times a patient performs specific arm movements (e.g. prescribed exercises) with their paretic arm throughout the day. We demonstrate this with healthy subjects and stroke patients in a simple proof of concept study in which these arm movements are detected during an archetypal activity of daily-living (ADL) - 'making-a-cup-of-tea'. Data is collected from a tri-axial accelerometer and a tri-axial gyroscope located proximal to the wrist. In a training phase, movements are initially performed in a controlled environment which are represented by a ranked set of 30 time-domain features. Using a sequential forward selection technique, for each set of feature combinations three clusters are formed using k-means clustering followed by 10 runs of 10-fold cross validation on the training data to determine the best feature combinations. For the testing phase, movements performed during the ADL are associated with each cluster label using a minimum distance classifier in a multi-dimensional feature space, comprised of the best ranked features, using Euclidean or Mahalanobis distance as the metric. Experiments were performed with four healthy subjects and four stroke survivors and our results show that the proposed methodology can detect the three movements performed during the ADL with an overall average accuracy of 88% using the accelerometer data and 83% using the gyroscope data across all healthy subjects and arm movement types. The average accuracy across all stroke survivors was 70% using accelerometer data and 66% using gyroscope data. We also use a Linear

  20. Hand and Wrist Injuries Among US High School Athletes: 2005/06-2015/16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bernadette K; Brou, Lina; Fields, Sarah K; Erkenbeck, Alexandria N; Comstock, R Dawn

    2017-12-01

    The risk of hand/wrist injuries is present across various sports. Little is known about the epidemiology of such injuries. The objective of this study was to calculate the rates of hand/wrist injuries and investigate injury patterns among high school athletes. Athlete exposure (AE) and hand/wrist injury data were collected during 11 academic years, 2005/06 through 2015/16, from a large sample of US high schools as part of the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study. There were 6723 hand/wrist injuries sustained during 40 195 806 AEs, a rate of 1.7 per 10 000 AEs. The rate of injury in competition (3.3) was higher than in practice (1.1) (95% confidence interval: 2.8-3.1). Rates of hand/wrist injuries varied by sport, with the highest rates in football (4.3), boys' lacrosse (1.9), girls' softball (1.9), wrestling (1.8), girls' field hockey (1.7), boys' ice hockey (1.7), and girls' basketball (1.7). The most common injuries were fracture (45.0%), contusion (11.6%), and ligament sprain (9.0%). Athletes most frequently returned to play in injuries kept athletes out ≥3 weeks. High school athletes are at risk for hand/wrist injuries. Such injuries can keep athletes out of play and many require substantial medical treatment. Stick and ball or puck sports and full contact sports have high rates of hand/wrist injuries relative to other sports, which is indicative of a need for sport-specific prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Kinesthetic Feedback During 2DOF Wrist Movements via a Novel MR-Compatible Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Andrew; O'Malley, Marcia K; Ress, David; Sergi, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the interaction control capabilities of the MR-SoftWrist, a novel MR-compatible robot capable of applying accurate kinesthetic feedback to wrist pointing movements executed during fMRI. The MR-SoftWrist, based on a novel design that combines parallel piezoelectric actuation with compliant force feedback, is capable of delivering 1.5 N [Formula: see text] of torque to the wrist of an interacting subject about the flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation axes. The robot workspace, defined by admissible wrist rotation angles, fully includes a circle with a 20 deg radius. Via dynamic characterization, we demonstrate capability for transparent operation with low (10% of maximum torque output) backdrivability torques at nominal speeds. Moreover, we demonstrate a 5.5 Hz stiffness control bandwidth for a 14 dB range of virtual stiffness values, corresponding to 25%-125% of the device's physical reflected stiffness in the nominal configuration. We finally validate the possibility of operation during fMRI via a case study involving one healthy subject. Our validation experiment demonstrates the capability of the device to apply kinesthetic feedback to elicit distinguishable kinetic and neural responses without significant degradation of image quality or task-induced head movements. With this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of MR-compatible devices like the MR-SoftWrist to be used in support of motor control experiments investigating wrist pointing under robot-applied force fields. Such future studies may elucidate fundamental neural mechanisms enabling robot-assisted motor skill learning, which is crucial for robot-aided neurorehabilitation.

  2. On dominator colorings in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A dominator coloring of a graph is a proper coloring of in which every vertex dominates every vertex of at least one color class. The minimum number of colors required for a dominator coloring of is called the dominator chromatic number of and is denoted by d ( G ) . In this paper we present several results on ...

  3. A 3-DOF hemi-constrained wrist motion/force detection device for deploying simultaneous myoelectric control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Dapeng; Liu, Yu; Liu, Hong

    2018-03-05

    For describing the state of the wrist, either the force or movement of wrist can be measured as the training target in the simultaneous electromyography control. However, the relationship between the force and movement is so complex that only the force or movement is not precise enough to describe its actual situations. In this paper, we propose a novel platform that can acquire three degrees of freedom (DOF) wrist motion/force synchronously with multi-channel electromyography signals in a hemi-constraint way. The self-made wrist force-movement mapping device establishes a stable relationship between the wrist movement and force. Meanwhile, the elicited wrist movement can be directly fed back to the subjects via laser cursor. The information of the cursor can directly reflect the 3-DOF movement of the wrist without any decoupling algorithms. Through this platform, the support vector regression model learned from the training data can well predict the arbitrary combinations of 3-DOF wrist movements. The cross-validation result indicates that the regression accuracy of free 3-DOF movements can reach a similar performance to that of 2-DOF regular movements (in terms of R 2 , regular movement vs. free movement, p > 0.1). Graphical abstract The hemi-constrained platform used for detecting 3-DOF wrist movements.

  4. MRI of the wrist and finger joints in inflammatory joint diseases at 1-year interval: MRI features to predict bone erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savnik, Anette; Malmskov, Hanne; Graff, Lykke B.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Nielsen, Henrik; Boesen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of MRI determined synovial volumes and bone marrow oedema to predict progressions in bone erosions after 1 year in patients with different types of inflammatory joint diseases. Eighty-four patients underwent MRI, laboratory and clinical examination at baseline and 1 year later. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist and finger joints was performed in 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis less than 3 years (group 1) who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, 18 patients with reactive arthritis or psoriatic arthritis (group 2), 22 patients with more than 3 years duration of rheumatoid arthritis, who fulfilled the ACR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (group 3), and 20 patients with arthralgia (group 4). The volume of the synovial membrane was outlined manually before and after gadodiamide injection on the T1-weighted sequences in the finger joints. Bones with marrow oedema were summed up in the wrist and fingers on short-tau inversion recovery sequences. These MRI features was compared with the number of bone erosions 1 year later. The MR images were scored independently under masked conditions. The synovial volumes in the finger joints assessed on pre-contrast images was highly predictive of bone erosions 1 year later in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (groups 1 and 3). The strongest individual predictor of bone erosions at 1-year follow-up was bone marrow oedema, if present at the wrist at baseline. Bone erosions on baseline MRI were in few cases reversible at follow-up MRI. The total synovial volume in the finger joints, and the presence of bone oedema in the wrist bones, seems to be predictive for the number of bone erosions 1 year later and may be used in screening. The importance of very early bone changes on MRI and the importance of the reversibility of these findings remain to be clarified. (orig.)

  5. Targeted brain activation using an MR-compatible wrist torque measurement device and isometric motor tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaar, Martijn P; Mugge, Winfred; Groot, Paul F C; Sharifi, Sarvi; Bour, Lo J; van der Helm, Frans C T; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Schouten, Alfred C

    2016-07-01

    Dedicated pairs of isometric wrist flexion tasks, with and without visual feedback of the exerted torque, were designed to target activation of the CBL and BG in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Selective activation of the cerebellum (CBL) and basal ganglia (BG), often implicated in movement disorders such as tremor and dystonia, may help identify pathological changes and expedite diagnosis. A prototyped MR-compatible wrist torque measurement device, free of magnetic and conductive materials, allowed safe execution of tasks during fMRI without causing artifacts. A significant increase of activity in CBL and BG was found in healthy volunteers during a constant torque task with visual feedback compared to a constant torque task without visual feedback. This study shows that specific pairs of motor tasks using MR-compatible equipment at the wrist allow for targeted activation of CBL and BG, paving a new way for research into the pathophysiology of movement disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostic performance of three-dimensional MR maximum intensity projection for the assessment of synovitis of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xubin, E-mail: lixb@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Reseaech Center for Cancer, Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Liu, Xia; Du, Xiangke [Department of Radiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Ye, Zhaoxiang [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Reseaech Center for Cancer, Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) MR maximum intensity projection (MIP) in the assessment of synovitis of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with RA underwent MR examinations. 3D MR MIP images were derived from the enhanced images. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists for the presence and location of synovitis of the hand and wrist. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 3D MIP were, respectively, calculated with the reference standard 3D CE-MRI. Results: In all subjects, 3D MIP images yielded directly and clearly the presence and location of synovitis with just one image. Synovitis demonstrated high signal intensity on MIP images. The k-values for the detection of articular synovitis indicated excellent interobserver agreements using 3D MIP images (k = 0.87) and CE-MR images (k = 0.91), respectively. 3D MIP demonstrated a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 91.07%, 98.57% and 96.0%, respectively, for the detection of synonitis. Conclusion: 3D MIP can provide a whole overview of lesion locations and a reliable diagnostic performance in the assessment of articular synovitis of the hand and wrist in patients with RA, which has potential value of clinical practice.

  7. Wrist sensor-based tremor severity quantification in Parkinson's disease using convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Byul; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Aryun; Lee, Hong Ji; Park, Hye Young; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Sang Kyong; Jeon, Beomseok; Park, Kwang S

    2018-04-01

    Tremor is a commonly observed symptom in patients of Parkinson's disease (PD), and accurate measurement of tremor severity is essential in prescribing appropriate treatment to relieve its symptoms. We propose a tremor assessment system based on the use of a convolutional neural network (CNN) to differentiate the severity of symptoms as measured in data collected from a wearable device. Tremor signals were recorded from 92 PD patients using a custom-developed device (SNUMAP) equipped with an accelerometer and gyroscope mounted on a wrist module. Neurologists assessed the tremor symptoms on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) from simultaneously recorded video footages. The measured data were transformed into the frequency domain and used to construct a two-dimensional image for training the network, and the CNN model was trained by convolving tremor signal images with kernels. The proposed CNN architecture was compared to previously studied machine learning algorithms and found to outperform them (accuracy = 0.85, linear weighted kappa = 0.85). More precise monitoring of PD tremor symptoms in daily life could be possible using our proposed method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthrographic effect induced by therapeutic ultrasound in magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist: a preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, L.M.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Ryan, S.J.; Lombardi, J.V.; Brossmann, J.; Resnick, D.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential arthrographic effect of therapeutic ultrasound applied before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist. Subjects and methods: MRI of the wrist was performed in 6 asymptomatic volunteers before and after ultrasound therapy of the carpus. For each patient, ultrasound therapy was performed by a trained physiotherapist for 10 minutes, with doses titrated to the maximum tolerated without pain. The amount of fluid within the wrist joints before and after therapy was assessed subjectively by 2 reviewers, as well as objectively by digital analysis. Results: Subjective appraisal of the images indicated that after ultrasound therapy there was an increase in joint fluid within the distal radioulnar joint in 4 volunteers, the midcarpal joint in 4 and the radiocarpal joint in 2. Computerized digital analysis of joint fluid confirmed an average volumetric increase in wrist joint fluid of 52.8% in 3 of the volunteers. The discomfort of the therapy was graded as 1/10 by 5 of the subjects and 4/10 by a single subject. Conclusions: Therapeutic ultrasound may be a useful adjuvant tool in the noninvasive induction of joint fluid before MRI of the wrist. (author)

  9. NMR findings in patients after wrist trauma with a negative plain radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markuszewski, Maciej; Kraus, Alexandra; Studniarek, Michał; Zawadzka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the prevalence and location of the injuries of the carpal bones and soft tissue of the wrist on NMR in patients with negative radiographs. A total of 89 patients (9–81years) were consecutively examined after wrist trauma. Radiograms were performed in four projections: AP, PA, oblique and lateral. In 63 cases of negative radiographs and persistent clinical problem, simplified NMR (T1,T2, STIR; in coronal plane) was conducted with a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Results were evaluated by two independent observers. A positive X-ray result was stated when at least one observer suggested bone fracture. The MR images were viewed for detection of possible bone fracture, bone edema and soft tissue injuries. Cohen’s kappa coefficient was calculated to assess the quality of chosen criteria by means of agreement between both observers and both methods. As many as 26 X-ray studies were classified as positive. Substantial agreement between independent observers was found (kappa=0.63). In 17 cases out of 63 with two negative wrist radiogram, the NMR result was positive (19%). The most frequently fractured or injured bone was scaphoid (10 cases) and distal radius (5 cases). Fair agreement was found between X-ray and NMR studies (kappa=0.37) due to different diagnostic information received in both methods. Simplified NMR imaging of the wrist proved to be strongly efficient in the detection of pathological changes in injured wrists

  10. Scoring of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions by MR imaging in clinically active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Sørensen, K

    1995-01-01

    MRI-scores of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions of the RA-wrist are introduced. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiography (CR) of the wrist were performed in 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 3 healthy controls. A MRI......-score of synovial membrane hypertrophy was obtained by summation of gradings of synovial hypertrophy in 6 regions of the wrist. The score was significantly higher in wrists with than in wrists without clinical signs of active arthritis. The score was 0 in all healthy controls. Each bone of the wrist was assessed...

  11. Neglected ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon mimics a soft tissue tumor in the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Chi-Lun; Yen, Tze-Hsun; Wu, Lien-Chen; Huang, Yi-You; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2014-04-01

    A wrist mass is rarely caused by a ruptured tendon in the forearm. The common pathologies are ganglia, tendon tenosynovitis, and giant cell tumors of tendon sheaths. Less common causes are nerve sheath tumors, vascular lesions, or an accessory muscle belly. The authors investigated a case of neglected ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon that mimics a mass in the wrist. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report in relevant literature. During investigation, the high-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasound suggested a soft tissue tumor or a ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon. The magnetic resonance imaging scan indicated an accessory flexor carpi ulnaris muscle belly. The diagnosis of ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon was confirmed by surgical exploration. This case indicates that ultrasound may be better suited than magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating a wrist mass for its accuracy, availability, and portability.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, N.R.; Crabbe, J.P.; McQueen, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Design and Research of Novel Industry Robot Wrist Force Multidimensional Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chuanlai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The main function of the wrist force sensor in robot remote operation is to realize the force feedback, one as a necessary part of the contact force of the process itself; another is the contact force as a robot gripper with respect to the environment the exact location of the information source, wrist force sensor provides information can reduce the robot to peripheral equipment precision requirement. Remote sensing operation environment, the manipulator and the environment from the direct effect of the information, the wrist force sensor detection, conversion, transmission to the master, for the establishment of virtual environment and the main basis and real-time interactive environment. The sensor circuit system design, designed the bridge circuit is applicable, overall on the measurement system is designed, and for sensor data acquisition software programming theory.

  14. Development of an Underactuated 2-DOF Wrist Joint using McKibben PAMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S. P.; Jain, S.; Ramasubramanian, S. N.; Johnson, B. V.; Dwivedy, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, model of an underactuated 2-DOF wrist joint with pneumatically actuated muscles is proposed. For the joint, McKibben-type artificial muscles are used in parallel configuration for the actuation. For each Degree of Freedom (DOF) one agonist-antagonist pair arrangement is usually used with a pulley mechanism. A mathematical model of wrist joint is derived using conventional forward kinematic analysis. The static model relating pressure in the muscle with the orientation of the wrist joint is obtained by combining the experimental data and mathematical model. Regulation of pressure can be achieved by pulse width modulation control of on/off solenoid valves. A set of free vibration experiments are done for the dynamic identification of the muscle characteristics.

  15. Frequency and spectrum of abnormalities in the bone marrow of the wrist: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, F.; Schweitzer, M.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Li Xiaoxian (Dept. of Radiology, Tangshan Gongren Hospital, Tangshan (China)); Malat, J. (Department of Radiology, Naples Radiologists, Naples (Italy)); Hussain, S.M. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1999-06-01

    Objective. To describe the frequency of marrow abnormalities on wrist MR imaging and the MR findings of these various abnormalities.Design and patients. Five hundred and nineteen patients were studied at 1.5 T. Two observers recorded the presence and location of avascular necrosis, occult fractures and arthritic edema [focal osteoarthritis, ulnolunate abutment, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, gouty arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC)].Results and conclusion. One hundred and eighty-seven (36%) patients demonstrated marrow abnormalities in the wrist, of which 101 were diagnosed as arthritis [64 (34%) as focal osteoarthritis, 17 (9%) as ulnolunate abutment, 15 (8%) as rheumatoid arthritis, 2 as septic arthritis, 2 as SLAC, and 1 as gouty arthritis]. Seventy-two patients had occult fractures and in 27 patients avascular necrosis was seen. MR imaging can reveal various abnormalities in bone marrow of the wrist when findings on radiography are normal or equivocal. (orig.) With 17 figs., 13 refs.

  16. Role of muscles in the stabilization of ligament-deficient wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, Mireia; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Lluch, Alex; Llusá Pérez, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a series of cadaver investigations aimed at clarifying the role of muscles in the stabilization of ligament-deficient wrists. According to these studies, isometric contraction of some forearm muscles induces midcarpal (MC) supination (ie, the abductor pollicis longus, extensor carpi radialis longus, and flexor carpi ulnaris), whereas other muscles induce MC pronation (ie, the extensor carpi ulnaris). Because MC supination implies tightening of the volar scaphoid-distal row ligaments, the MC supination muscles are likely to prevent scaphoid collapse of wrists with scapholunate ligament insufficiency. MC pronator muscles, by contrast, would be beneficial in stabilizing wrists with ulnar-sided ligament deficiencies owing to their ability to tighten the triquetrum-distal row ligaments. Should these laboratory findings be validated by additional clinical research, proprioceptive reeducation of selected muscles could become an important tool for the treatment of dynamic carpal instabilities. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency and spectrum of abnormalities in the bone marrow of the wrist: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, F.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Malat, J.; Hussain, S.M.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To describe the frequency of marrow abnormalities on wrist MR imaging and the MR findings of these various abnormalities.Design and patients. Five hundred and nineteen patients were studied at 1.5 T. Two observers recorded the presence and location of avascular necrosis, occult fractures and arthritic edema [focal osteoarthritis, ulnolunate abutment, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, gouty arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC)].Results and conclusion. One hundred and eighty-seven (36%) patients demonstrated marrow abnormalities in the wrist, of which 101 were diagnosed as arthritis [64 (34%) as focal osteoarthritis, 17 (9%) as ulnolunate abutment, 15 (8%) as rheumatoid arthritis, 2 as septic arthritis, 2 as SLAC, and 1 as gouty arthritis]. Seventy-two patients had occult fractures and in 27 patients avascular necrosis was seen. MR imaging can reveal various abnormalities in bone marrow of the wrist when findings on radiography are normal or equivocal. (orig.)

  18. Development and validation of a computer-based learning module for wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Alewijnse, J V; Mathoulin, C; Liverneaux, P; Tuijthof, G J M; Schijven, M P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a computer-based module for wrist arthroscopy to which a group of experts could consent. The need for such a module was assessed with members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS). The computer-based module was developed through several rounds of consulting experts on the content. The module's learning enhancement was tested in a randomized controlled trial with 28 medical students who were assigned to the computer-based module group or lecture group. The design process led to a useful tool, which is supported by a panel of experts. Although the computer based module did not enhance learning, the participants did find the module more pleasant to use. Developing learning tools such as this computer-based module can improve the teaching of wrist arthroscopy skills. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M

    2005-01-01

    , capitate, and a metacarpal base. In these bones, grades 0-3 of bone oedema are illustrated, and for bone erosion, grades 0-3 and examples of higher grades are presented. The presented reference images can be used to guide scoring of wrist joints according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system......This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis...... are illustrated in each of the three wrist joint areas defined in the scoring system-that is, the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, and the intercarpal-carpometacarpal joints. For reasons of feasibility, examples of bone abnormalities are limited to five selected bones: the radius, scaphoid, lunate...

  20. Radiographic assessment of skeletal maturation stages for orthodontic patients: hand-wrist bones or cervical vertebrae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Eddie Hsiang-Hua; Liu, Jen-Pei; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Tsai, Shih-Jaw; Yao, Chung-Chen Jane; Chen, Mu-Hsiung; Chen, Yi-Jane; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2008-04-01

    The skeletal maturation status of a growing patient can influence the selection of orthodontic treatment procedures. Either lateral cephalometric or hand-wrist radiography can be used to assess skeletal development. In this study, we examined the correlation between the maturation stages of cervical vertebrae and hand-wrist bones in Taiwanese individuals. The study group consisted of 330 male and 379 female subjects ranging in age from 8 to 18 years. A total of 709 hand-wrist and 709 lateral cephalometric radiographs were analyzed. Hand-wrist maturation stages were assessed using National Taiwan University Hospital Skeletal Maturation Index (NTUH-SMI). Cervical vertebral maturation stages were determined by the latest Cervical Vertebral Maturation Stage (CVMS) Index. Spearman's rank correlation was used to correlate the respective maturation stages assessed from the hand-wrist bones and the cervical vertebrae. The values of Spearman's rank correlation were 0.910 for males and 0.937 for females, respectively. These data confirmed a strong and significant correlation between CVMS and NTUH-SMI systems (p less than 0.001). After comparison of the mean ages of subjects in different stages of CVMS and NTU-SMI systems, we found that CVMS I corresponded to NTUH-SMI stages 1 and 2, CVMS II to NTUH-SMI stage 3, CVMS III to NTUHSMI stage 4, CVMS IV to NTUH-SMI stage 5, CVMS V to NTUH-SMI stages 6, 7 and 8, and CVMS VI to NTUH-SMI stage 9. Our results indicate that cervical vertebral maturation stages can be used to replace hand-wrist bone maturation stages for evaluation of skeletal maturity in Taiwanese individuals.

  1. Management of High-Voltage Burns of the Hand and Wrist with Negative Pressure Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Gümüş

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Negative pressure dressing stimulates wound healing by promoting cellular proliferation and regeneration. It also removes interstitial edema and increases local blood flow, resulting in rapid growth of the granulation tissue. We used the dressing method in deep hand and wrist burns caused by high-voltage electrical current, which leads to progressive tissue necrosis, elevated compartment pressure, and deep tissue edema, to reveal if subatmospheric pressure could limit the zone of injury or ongoing tissue necrosis after electrical burn. Material and Methods: Six hands of five patients, who came in contact with high-voltage electrical wire carrying more than 1000 volts, are presented in this study. Hands and wrists were seriously injured and contracted. After the initial treatment involving fluid resuscitation, fasciotomy, carpal tunnel release, and debridement, a negative pressure dressing was applied to the wounds of hand, wrist, and forearm with 125 mm Hg continuous pressure, and maintained for 20 days. Results: When negative pressure dressing was stopped on the 20th day, significant granulation tissue developed over the hand and forearm wounds. However, wrist wounds needed more debridement and repeated dressings because of the presence of necrosis. Edema of the hands subsided significantly during the use of negative pressure dressing. Time to closure for hand and forearm wounds decreased considerably. Moreover, in one wrist, spontaneous closure was achieved at about one month. All hands except one treated with negative pressure dressing could be saved from amputation; however, significant tissue loss developed, needing complex reconstruction procedures. One hand was amputated because of the permanent loss of blood perfusion. Conclusion: The management of high-voltage burns of hand and wrist with subatmospheric pressure appears to be capable of reducing hand edema and accelerating closure of the wounds. It seems that negative

  2. Manual physical therapy examination and intervention of a patient with radial wrist pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Clinical case report. To describe a manual physical therapy examination and intervention approach for a patient with radial-sided wrist pain. A 55-year-old woman with a 2-year history of chronic right wrist and forearm pain was referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of de Quervain's disease. Her current symptoms were present for 6 weeks despite primary care management with wrist splinting and medications. Previous episodes were partially resolved following occupational therapy treatments. Examination of the patient's wrist and hand revealed isolated radiocarpal, intercarpal, and carpometacarpal joint dysfunctions. Evaluation of the cervical spine, shoulder, and elbow were negative. Impairment-based treatment was provided during 8 visits over a 4-week period. These treatments consisted of manual physical therapy techniques and self-mobilizations applied to the radiocarpal, intercarpal, and carpometacarpal joints. The initial treatment session decreased the patient's numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) from 7/10 to 4/10 and improved her functional rating on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) from an average of 4/10 to 8.2/10. At treatment completion, she achieved a pain-free state (NPRS, 0/10) and nearly full function (PSFS, 9.8/10). These results were maintained at a long-term follow-up performed 10 months after treatment. Several diagnoses have the potential for causing or referring pain into the radial wrist and forearm region, often times mimicking de Quervain's disease. An impairment-based manual physical therapy model may be an effective approach in identifying joint dysfunctions and managing patients with radial wrist pain.

  3. Tendon ruptures and median nerve damage after Hamas total wrist arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, M; Lister, G D

    1987-05-01

    This article describes complications due to an incorrectly positioned Hamas-designed total wrist prosthesis in a 68-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis. At operation the median nerve was found to be directly impinged upon by the rim of the distal portion of the prosthesis. There were divisions of the superficialis tendon to all four fingers, the profundus tendon to the index finger, and partial division of the profundus to the long finger. The prosthesis was removed, and the wrist stabilized with a Steinmann pin in the radius and the second metacarpal.

  4. Ultrasonography of Hands and Wrists in the Diagnosis of Complications of Chikungunya Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogami, Roberto; Pereira Vaz, João Luiz; de Fátima Barcelos Chagas, Yêdda; de Abreu, Mirhelen Mendes; Torezani, Rodrigo Sperling; de Almeida Vieira, André; Junqueira Filho, Eduardo Alvarenga; Barbosa, Yasmin Baptista; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this series was to describe the ultrasonographic and radiographic manifestations of changes to the hands and wrists in 50 patients with chronic musculoskeletal symptoms secondary to Chikungunya fever during the 2016 outbreak that occurred in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Most of the plain radiographs were normal (62%). The most common ultrasonographic findings were small joint synovitis (84%), wrist synovitis (74%), finger tenosynovitis (70%), and cellulitis (50%). In most cases, power Doppler did not show an increase in synovial vascular flow. The plain radiographs showed no specific findings, whereas the ultrasound images revealed synovial compromise and neural thickening. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Diagnosis and management of intersection syndrome as a cause of overuse wrist pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Robin; Vyas, Jay

    2016-09-28

    Wrist pain due to repetitive motion or overuse is a common presentation in primary care. This case reports the rare condition of intersection syndrome as the cause of the wrist pain in an amateur tennis player. This is a non-infectious, inflammatory process that occurs where tendons in the first extensor compartment intersect the tendons in the second extensor compartment. Suitable history and examination provided the diagnosis, which was confirmed by MRI. Management consisted of early involvement of the multidisciplinary team, patient education, workplace and sporting adaptations, rest, analgesia, reduction of load, protection and immobilisation of the affected joint followed by a period of rehabilitation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Three-dimensional Doppler ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzboll-Danielsen, Mads; Janta, Iustina; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    interpretation of Doppler signals when diagnosing tenosynovitis. Method Forty healthy participants (20 women and 20 men age 23-67 years) without prior history of arthritis, tendon diseases or present pain in their hands were included. Twenty participants had 3D Doppler US of the second and third finger...... participant. No significant difference in feeding vessels was seen between the radial and carpal level in the wrist (p = 0.06) or between the second and third flexor tendon sheath (p = 0.84). Conclusion Doppler findings in or in close proximity to the tendon sheaths were common in wrists and fingers...

  7. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Disabilites of Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation questionnaires in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of 102 cases, we evaluated the QuickDASH. Furthermore, in a cross-sectional study and a test-retest on a subgroup of the patients, we...... response mean 1.06 and effect size 1.07). The construct validity of both scales was confirmed by three a priori formulated hypotheses: a moderate, negative correlation of scores with grip-strength; a moderate, positive correlation with pain and a very weak or no correlation with mobility. Rheumatoid...

  8. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  9. The effect of arm and wrist supports on the load of the upper extremity during VDU work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; de Korte, E.; van der Kraan, I.; Kuijer, P. [=P. Paul F. M.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of arm and wrist supports in reducing the workload during computer work. Female subjects (n=10) performed computer work in conditions with arm or wrist supports and in a condition without supports. Sustained muscle tension in the trapezius muscle is a risk factor for

  10. The effect of arm and wrist supports on the load of he upper extrimity during VDU work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; de Korte, E.; van der Kraan, I.; Kuijer, P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of arm and wrist supports in reducing the workload during computer work. Design. Female subjects (n=10) performed computer work in conditions with arm or wrist supports and in a condition without supports. Background. Sustained muscle tension in the trapezius

  11. On dominator colorings in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A dominator coloring of a graph G is a proper coloring of G in which every vertex dominates every vertex of at least one color class. The minimum number of colors required for a dominator coloring of G is called the dominator chromatic number of G and is denoted by χd(G). In this paper we present several results on graphs ...

  12. Primary motor cortex neurons during individuated finger and wrist movements: correlation of spike firing rates with the motion of individual digits versus their principal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan eKirsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The joints of the hand provide 24 mechanical degrees of freedom. Yet 2 to 7 principal components (PCs account for 80 to 95 % of the variance in hand joint motion during tasks that vary from grasping to finger spelling. Such findings have led to the hypothesis that the brain may simplify operation of the hand by preferentially controlling PCs. We tested this hypothesis using data recorded from the primary motor cortex (M1 during individuated finger and wrist movements. Principal component analysis (PCA of the simultaneous position of the 5 digits and the wrist showed relatively consistent kinematic synergies across recording sessions in two monkeys. The first 3 PCs typically accounted for 85% of the variance. Cross-correlations then were calculated between the firing rate of single neurons and the simultaneous flexion/extension motion of each of the 5 digits and the wrist, as well as with each of their 6 PCs. For each neuron, we then compared the maximal absolute value of the cross-correlations (MAXC achieved with the motion of any digit or the wrist to the MAXC achieved with motion along any PC axis. The MAXC with a digit and the MAXC with a PC were themselves highly correlated across neurons. A minority of neurons correlated more strongly with a principal component than with any digit. But for the populations of neurons sampled from each of two subjects, MAXCs with digits were slightly but significantly higher than those with PCs. We therefore reject the hypothesis that M1 neurons preferentially control PCs of hand motion. We cannot exclude the possibility that M1 neurons might control kinematic synergies identified using linear or non-linear methods other than PCA. We consider it more likely, however, that neurons in other centers of the motor system—such as the pontomedullary reticular formation and the spinal gray matter—drive synergies of movement and/or muscles, which M1 neurons act to fractionate in producing individuated finger and

  13. A New Rerouting Technique for the Extensor Pollicis Longus in Palliative Treatment for Wrist and Finger Extension Paralysis Resulting From Radial Nerve and C5C6C7 Root Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laravine, Jennifer; Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Belkheyar, Zoubir

    2016-03-01

    Wrist and finger extension paralysis is a consequence of an injury to the radial nerve or the C5C6C7 roots. Despite these 2 different levels of lesions, palliative treatment for this type of paralysis depends on the same tendon transfers. A large majority of the patients are able to compensate for a deficiency of the extension of the wrist and fingers. However, a deficiency in the opening of the first web space, which could be responsible for transfers to the abductor pollicis longus, the extensor pollicis brevis, and the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), frequently exists. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a new EPL rerouting technique outside of Lister's tubercle. Another aim was to verify whether this technique allows a better opening of the thumb-index pinch in this type of paralysis. In the first part, we performed an anatomic study comparing the EPL rerouting technique and the frequently used technique for wrist and finger extension paralyses. In the second part, we present 2 clinical cases in which this new technique will be practiced. Preliminary results during this study favor the EPL rerouting technique. This is a simple and reproducible technique that allows for good opening of the first web space in the treatment of wrist and finger extension paralysis.

  14. High-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist. Application of a 5-cm surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, J.; Bleschkowski, A.; Tempka, A.; Felix, R. [Medical Faculty of the Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-07-01

    In order to make a comparative analysis of transversal tomograms obtained by high-resolution MR imaging with frozen cross-sections of an anatomical forearm specimen, twenty-two healthy volunteers were also examined using the same coil system to test for a range of possible clinical applications and for the depiction of morphological and morphometrical values of normal anatomy in vivo. MR images of the carpal tunnel of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained with a 1.5-T whole-body system with a 5-cm surface coil. Measurements were recorded with a field-of-view between 50x50 mm{sup 2} and 60x60 mm{sup 2} in a 256x256 pixel matrix for the T1 sequence. A slice thickness of 2 mm was used. The images were acquired using a T1-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 500/38 ms) and a T2-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 2000/70 ms). Additionally, a formalin-fixed anatomical forearm specimen was imaged for anatomic correlation. The imaged transversal cross-section levels in the specimen were subsequently freeze-sectioned. The anatomical structures of the MR findings were identified and compared with the macroscopical sections of the specimen. Based on the good depiction of details at this coil system with a pixel size in T1 of 0.195x0.195 mm, high-resolution MR imaging enabled identification of the interior structures of the carpal tunnel, as well as delineation of connective tissue. The clinical value of high-resolution MR includes the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and inflammatory disorders of the wrist. Our results support the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist using small surface coils.

  15. High-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist. Application of a 5-cm surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, J.; Bleschkowski, A.; Tempka, A.; Felix, R.

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a comparative analysis of transversal tomograms obtained by high-resolution MR imaging with frozen cross-sections of an anatomical forearm specimen, twenty-two healthy volunteers were also examined using the same coil system to test for a range of possible clinical applications and for the depiction of morphological and morphometrical values of normal anatomy in vivo. MR images of the carpal tunnel of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained with a 1.5-T whole-body system with a 5-cm surface coil. Measurements were recorded with a field-of-view between 50x50 mm 2 and 60x60 mm 2 in a 256x256 pixel matrix for the T1 sequence. A slice thickness of 2 mm was used. The images were acquired using a T1-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 500/38 ms) and a T2-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 2000/70 ms). Additionally, a formalin-fixed anatomical forearm specimen was imaged for anatomic correlation. The imaged transversal cross-section levels in the specimen were subsequently freeze-sectioned. The anatomical structures of the MR findings were identified and compared with the macroscopical sections of the specimen. Based on the good depiction of details at this coil system with a pixel size in T1 of 0.195x0.195 mm, high-resolution MR imaging enabled identification of the interior structures of the carpal tunnel, as well as delineation of connective tissue. The clinical value of high-resolution MR includes the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and inflammatory disorders of the wrist. Our results support the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist using small surface coils

  16. Perfect secure domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Divya Rashmi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Let $G=(V,E$ be a graph. A subset $S$ of $V$ is a dominating set of $G$ if every vertex in $Vsetminus  S$ is adjacent to a vertex in $S.$ A dominating set $S$ is called a secure dominating set if for each $vin Vsetminus S$ there exists $uin S$ such that $v$ is adjacent to $u$ and $S_1=(Ssetminus{u}cup {v}$ is a dominating set. If further the vertex $uin S$ is unique, then $S$ is called a perfect secure dominating set. The minimum cardinality of a perfect secure dominating set of $G$ is called the perfect  secure domination number of $G$ and is denoted by $gamma_{ps}(G.$ In this paper we initiate a study of this parameter and present several basic results.

  17. Kinematic rate control of simulated robot hand at or near wrist singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, K.; Houck, J. A.; Carzoo, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A robot hand should obey movement commands from an operator on a computer program as closely as possible. However, when two of the three rotational axes of the robot wrist are colinear, the wrist loses a degree of freedom, and the usual resolved rate equations (used to move the hand in response to an operator's inputs) are indeterminant. Furthermore, rate limiting occurs in close vicinity to this singularity. An analysis shows that rate limiting occurs not only in the vicinity of this singularity but also substantially away from it, even when the operator commands rotational rates of the robot hand that are only a small percentage of the operational joint rate limits. Therefore, joint angle rates are scaled when they exceed operational limits in a real time simulation of a robot arm. Simulation results show that a small dead band avoids the wrist singularity in the resolved rate equations but can introduce a high frequency oscillation close to the singularity. However, when a coordinated wrist movement is used in conjunction with the resolved rate equations, the high frequency oscillation disappears.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of soft tissue changes in rheumatoid arthritis wrist joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2001-01-01

    , tendonitis, enthesitis, joint effusions, and ligament and tendon tears, can be visualized. Unfortunately, the image resolution in most clinically available MR units is insufficient for evaluation of wrist joint cartilage. Preliminary data suggest that MRI is a valuable tool in the diagnosis...

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: MRI has been proposed as the imaging method of choice to evaluate the long-term outcome in patients with early arthritis. The role of dynamic MRI, performed at presentation, in predicting the outcome of patients with early arthritis has been addressed in the present study. Methods: 39 patients with early arthritis, involving at least one wrist, were studied with clinical visits and laboratory investigations, every 3 months. Dynamic MRI was performed with a low-field (0.2T, extremity-dedicated machine (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy equipped with a permanent magnet and with a dedicated hand and wrist coil. During the intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA, twenty consecutive fast images of 3 slices of the wrist were acquired. The synovial contrast enhancement ratio was calculated both as rate of early enhancement (REE per second during the first 55” and as relative enhancement (RE at t seconds. Results: In our cohort of patients, REE and RE were significantly lower than those observed in a historical cohort of 36 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. In univariate analysis, low RE predicted complete remission of arthritis. In multivariate analysis, fulfillment of RA criteria during follow-up was predicted by high RE. The need for immunosuppressive treatment at the end of follow-up was predicted by both low RE and high REE. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI may be used to predict several outcomes of early arthritis involving the wrist

  20. Portable and Reconfigurable Wrist Robot Improves Hand Function for Post-Stroke Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Kang Xiang; Chin, Patrick Jun Hua; Yeong, Che Fai; Su, Eileen Lee Ming; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Abdul Rahman, Hisyam; Khan, Qamer Iqbal

    2017-10-01

    Rehabilitation robots have become increasingly popular for stroke rehabilitation. However, the high cost of robots hampers their implementation on a large scale. This paper implements the concept of a modular and reconfigurable robot, reducing its cost and size by adopting different therapeutic end effectors for different training movements using a single robot. The challenge is to increase the robot's portability and identify appropriate kinds of modular tools and configurations. Because literature on the effectiveness of this kind of rehabilitation robot is still scarce, this paper presents the design of a portable and reconfigurable rehabilitation robot and describes its use with a group of post-stroke patients for wrist and forearm training. Seven stroke subjects received training using a reconfigurable robot for 30 sessions, lasting 30 min per session. Post-training, statistical analysis showed significant improvement of 3.29 points (16.20%, p = 0.027) on the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for forearm and wrist components. Significant improvement of active range of motion was detected in both pronation-supination (75.59%, p = 0.018) and wrist flexion-extension (56.12%, p = 0.018) after the training. These preliminary results demonstrate that the developed reconfigurable robot could improve subjects' wrist and forearm movement.

  1. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Khal, Hessa A.; Wong, Ricky W.K.; Rabie, A.B.M. [University of Hong Kong, Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-03-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys = 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  2. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Khal, Hessa A.; Wong, Ricky W.K.; Rabie, A.B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  3. Finite-element analysis of some pneumatically-actuated wrist-rehabilitation equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Ovidiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some wrist-rehabilitation equipment, actuated by a pneumatic muscle. This one drives, through a rack-pinion mechanism, a Fin Ray-type mechanism, with a view to mobilizing the injured palm. Unlike other rehabilitation equipments, the one presented in this paper, ensures the movement of both palm and fingers.

  4. Detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures by a wireless wrist accelerometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Polster, T.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the clinical reliability of a wrist-worn, wireless accelerometer sensor for detecting generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Seventy-three consecutive patients (age 6-68 years; median 37 years) at risk of having GTCS and who were admitted to the long-term video-elec...

  5. Flexion Deformities of the Wrist and Fingers in Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Protocol of Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Tarek Hassan; Elbeshry, Shady Samir; Mahran, Mahmoud; Aly, Ahmad Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Literature is confusing regarding grading and treatment of flexion deformities of wrist and fingers in spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The most established classification is that described by Zancolli; unfortunately, it has its shortcomings which we experienced in the beginning of our approach to manage this rather difficult deformity. We thus modified Zancolli's classification and developed a classification system and treatment protocol. Thirty patients with spastic CP were operated upon due to flexion deformity of the wrist and fingers and were included in this study. Age ranged from 4 to 14 years, average 7 years. There were twenty boys and ten girls. The average followup was 18 months (range 9 months - 3 years). The power of wrist dorsiflexion, the "House's classification of upper extremity functional use" and the clinical assessment of hand function were used for evaluation; they improved in all patients and this improvement was statistically significant. In all patients, cosmetic appearance improved without any residual flexion deformity. This study introduces a new grading system for flexion deformity of wrist and fingers in spastic CP that correlates with severity of the condition and allows a treatment protocol to be established.

  6. A New Computed Tomography-Based Radiographic Method to Detect Early Loosening of Total Wrist Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivecrona, H.; Noz, M.E.; Maguire, G.Q. Jr; Zeleznik, M.P.; Sollerman, C.; Olivecrona, L. [Dept. of Hand Surgery, Soedersjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-11-15

    Background: Diagnosis of loosening of total wrist implants is usually late using routine radiographs. Switching modality to computed tomography (CT) should aid in early diagnosis. Purpose: To propose and evaluate the accuracy of a new CT method for assessing loosening of the carpal component in total wrist arthroplasty. Material and Methods: A protocol encompassing volume registration of paired CT scans of patients with unexplained pain in a prosthetically replaced wrist (used in clinical routine) is presented. Scans are acquired as a dynamic examination under torsional load. Using volume registration, the carpal component of the prosthesis is brought into spatial alignment. After registration, prosthetic loosening is diagnosed by a shift in position of the bones relative to the prosthesis. This study is a preclinical validation of this method using a human cadaverous arm with a cemented total wrist implant and tantalum markers. Seven CT scans of the arm were acquired. The scans were combined into 21 pairs of CT volumes. The carpal component was registered in each scan pair, and the residual mismatch of the surrounding tantalum markers and bone was analyzed both visually and numerically. Results: The detection limit for prosthetic movement was less than 1 mm. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that CT volume registration holds promise to improve detection of movement of the carpal component at an earlier stage than is obtainable with plain radiography.

  7. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  8. The distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap for wrist defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Durga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the wrist with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represents a challenge to plastic surgeons, and such defects necessitate flap coverage to preserve hand functions and to protect its vital structures. We evaluated the use of a distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap in patients with volar soft tissue defects around the wrist. Materials and Methods: Between June 2004 and June 2006, seven patients of soft tissue defects on the volar aspect of the wrist underwent distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap. Out of seven patients, five were male and two patients were female. This flap was used in the reconstruction of the post road traffic accident defects in four patients and post electric burn defects in three patients. Flap was raised on one or two perforators and was rotated to 180°. Results: All flaps survived completely. Donor sites were closed primarily without donor site morbidity. Conclusion: The distally-based island Ulnar artery perforator flap is convenient, reliable, easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the volar aspect of the wrist. Early use of this flap allows preservation of vital structures, decreases morbidity and allows for early rehabilitation.

  9. Total Domination Versus Paired-Domination in Regular Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyman Joanna

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A subset S of vertices of a graph G is a dominating set of G if every vertex not in S has a neighbor in S, while S is a total dominating set of G if every vertex has a neighbor in S. If S is a dominating set with the additional property that the subgraph induced by S contains a perfect matching, then S is a paired-dominating set. The domination number, denoted γ(G, is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G, while the minimum cardinalities of a total dominating set and paired-dominating set are the total domination number, γt(G, and the paired-domination number, γpr(G, respectively. For k ≥ 2, let G be a connected k-regular graph. It is known [Schaudt, Total domination versus paired domination, Discuss. Math. Graph Theory 32 (2012 435–447] that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ (2k/(k+1. In the special case when k = 2, we observe that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ 4/3, with equality if and only if G ≅ C5. When k = 3, we show that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ 3/2, with equality if and only if G is the Petersen graph. More generally for k ≥ 2, if G has girth at least 5 and satisfies γpr(G/γt(G = (2k/(k + 1, then we show that G is a diameter-2 Moore graph. As a consequence of this result, we prove that for k ≥ 2 and k ≠ 57, if G has girth at least 5, then γpr(G/γt(G ≤ (2k/(k +1, with equality if and only if k = 2 and G ≅ C5 or k = 3 and G is the Petersen graph.

  10. Impact of novel shift handle laparoscopic tool on wrist ergonomics and task performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Denny; Lowndes, Bethany; Morrow, Missy; Kaufman, Kenton; Bingener, Juliane; Hallbeck, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic tool handles causing wrist flexion and extension more than 15° from neutral are considered “at-risk” for musculoskeletal strain. Therefore this study measured the impact of laparoscopic tool handle angles on wrist postures and task performance. Methods Eight surgeons performed standard and modified Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) tasks with laparoscopic tools. Tool A had three adjustable handle angle configurations, i.e., in-line 0° (A0), 30° (A30), and pistol-grip 70° (A70). Tool B was a fixed pistol-grip grasper. Participants performed FLS peg transfer, inverted peg transfer, and inverted circle-cut with each tool and handle angle. Inverted tasks were adapted from standard FLS tasks to simulate advanced tasks observed during abdominal wall surgeries, e.g., ventral hernia. Motion tracking, video-analysis, and modified NASA-TLX workload questionnaires were used to measure postures, performance (e.g., completion time and errors), and workload. Results Task performance did not differ among tools. For FLS peg transfer, self-reported physical workload was lower for B than A70, and mean wrist postures showed significantly higher flexion for in-line than pistol-grip tools (B and A70). For inverted peg transfer, workload was higher for all configurations. However, less time was spent in at-risk wrist postures for in-line (47%) than pistol-grip (93-94%), and most participants preferred Tool A. For inverted circle cut, workload did not vary across configurations, mean wrist posture was 10° closer to neutral for A0 than B, and median time in at-risk wrist postures was significantly less for A0 (43%) than B (87%). Conclusion The best ergonomic wrist positions for FLS (floor) tasks are provided by pistol-grip tools and for tasks on the abdominal wall (ventral surface) by in-line handles. Adjustable handle angle laparoscopic tools can reduce ergonomic risks for musculoskeletal strain and allow versatility for tasks alternating between

  11. User surveys support designing a prosthetic wrist that incorporates the Dart Thrower's Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew; Bodine, Cathy; Weir, Richard F Ff

    2018-03-07

    Prosthetic devices are not meeting the needs of people with upper limb amputations. Due to controlsidelimitations, prosthetic wrists cannot yet be fully articulated. This study sought to determine which wrist motions users felt were most important for completing activities of daily living. We specifically invstigated whether adding a combinationof flexion and deviation known as the Dart Thrower's Motion to a prosthetic wrist would help improve functionality. Fifteen participants with a trans-radial amputation, aged 25-64 years, who use a prosthesis completed an online survey and answered interview questions to determine which types of tasks pose particular challenges. Participants were asked what kinds of improvements they would like to see in a new prosthesis. A subset of five participants were interviewed in-depth to provide further information about difficulties they face using their device. The survey showed that participants had difficulty performing activities of daily living that involve a combination of wrist flexion and deviation known as the "Dart Throwers Motion". Interview responses confirmed that users have difficulty performing these tasks, especially those that require tools. Additionally, users said that they were more interested in having flexion and deviation than rotation in a prosthetic wrist. This research indicates that including the Dart Thrower's Motion in future designs of prosthetic wrists would improve these devices and people with upper limb amputations would be excited to see this improvement in their devices. Implications for Rehabilitation • Over one third of people with upper limb amputations do not use a prosthesis because prosthetic devices do not meet their needs.• The number of motions possible in state of the art prosthetic devices is limited by the small number of control sites available.• The Dart Thrower?s Motion is a wrist motion used for many activities of daily living but unavailable in commercial prosthetics

  12. Nonlinear coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity during isotonic wrist flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been demonstrated to be highly nonlinear. A full assessment of corticomuscular coupling, including the nonlinear part, is essential to understand the neuronal communication within the sensorimotor system. In this study, we applied the recently developed n:m coherence method to assess nonlinear corticomuscular coupling during isotonic wrist flexion. The n:m coherence is a generalized metric for quantifying nonlinear cross-frequency coupling as well as linear iso-frequency coupling. By using independent component analysis and equivalent current dipole source localization, we identify four sensorimotor related brain areas based on the locations of the dipoles, i.e. the contralateral primary sensorimotor areas, supplementary motor area, prefrontal area and posterior parietal cortex. For all these areas, linear coupling between EEG and EMG is present with peaks in the beta band (15-35 Hz, while nonlinear coupling is detected with both integer (1:2, 1:3, 1:4 and non-integer (2:3 harmonics. Significant differences between brain areas is shown in linear coupling with stronger coherence for the primary sensorimotor areas and motor association cortices (supplementary motor area, prefrontal area compared to the sensory association area (posterior parietal cortex; but not for the nonlinear coupling. Moreover, the detected nonlinear coupling is similar to previously reported nonlinear coupling of cortical activity to somatosensory stimuli. We suggest that the descending motor pathways mainly contribute to linear corticomuscular coupling, while nonlinear coupling likely originates from sensory feedback.

  13. Bilateral hand/wrist heat and cold hyperalgesia, but not hypoesthesia, in unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Padua, Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate bilaterally warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds over the hand/wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A total of 25 women with strictly unilateral CTS (mean 42 +/- 10 years), and 20 healthy matched women (mean 41 +/- 8 years) were recruited. Warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence in a blinded design. Self-reported measures included both clinical pain history (intensity, location and area) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. No significant differences between groups for both warm and cold detection thresholds in either carpal tunnel or thenar eminence (P > 0.5) were found. Further, significant differences between groups, but not between sides, for both heat and cold pain thresholds in both the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence were found (all P < 0.001). Heat pain thresholds (P < 0.01) were negatively correlated, whereas cold pain thresholds (P < 0.001) were positively correlated with hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms. Our findings revealed bilateral thermal hyperalgesia (lower heat pain and reduced cold pain thresholds) but not hypoesthesia (normal warm/cold detection thresholds) in patients with strictly unilateral CTS when compared to controls. We suggest that bilateral heat and cold hyperalgesia may reflect impairments in central nociceptive processing in patients with unilateral CTS. The bilateral thermal hyperalgesia associated with pain intensity and duration of pain history supports a role of generalized sensitization mechanisms in the initiation, maintenance and spread of pain in CTS.

  14. [The application of the Multi-Touch pad for the evaluation of the fine motor activity of the wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseevich, G V; Mozheiko, E Yu; Prokopenko, S V; Shul'min, A V; Gavrilyuk, O A; Alekseevich, G Yu

    The objective of the present study was to elaborate the method for the evaluation of the fine motor activity of the wrist in the patients presenting with wrist movement disorders resulting from central hemiparesis and to demonstratee the reliability of such method through the calculation of the standard error of measurements and minimal the detectable change (MDC95%). The study population was comprised of 42 patients who had undergone ischaemic stroke and suffered from the impairment of the upper limb functions . The deficit of the fine motor skills was estimated with the use of the original multi-touch diagnostic technique. The results of the assessment were compared with those of the measurement of upper limb motor activity based on the validated scales, such as the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale and the Nine Hole Peg Test (PHT). The study with the application of the multi-touch method for diagnostics of the fine motor skills has demonstrated the high internal consistency of the measurements, with the Cronbach's Alpha Reliability Coefficient amounting to 0.98. The re-test reliability was high, with the ICC=0.98 (95% CI 0.97-0.99). The Spearman rank-order correlation with the locomotion scale estimates gave evidence of the good associative links, with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale correlation coefficient making 0.55-0.66 and the Nine Hole Peg Test findings being -0.7. The Minimal Detectable Change (MDC95%) for the multi-touch method was found to be 12.67%. The objective diagnostics of the fine motor skill disturbances with the use of the original multi-touch method has demonstrated its high reliability and a high degree of correlation with the estimates obtained with the application of the modern validated scales in the patients who had undergone ischaemic stroke. Therefore, this method can be recommended for clinical use.

  15. Post-Surgical Language Reorganization Occurs in Tumors of the Dominant and Non-Dominant Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramescu-Murphy, M; Hattingen, E; Forster, M-T; Oszvald, A; Anti, S; Frisch, S; Russ, M O; Jurcoane, A

    2017-09-01

    Surgical resection of brain tumors may shift the location of cortical language areas. Studies of language reorganization primarily investigated left-hemispheric tumors irrespective of hemispheric language dominance. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how tumors influence post-surgical language reorganization in relation to the dominant language areas. A total of, 17 patients with brain tumors (16 gliomas, one metastasis) in the frontotemporal and lower parietal lobes planned for awake surgery underwent pre-surgical and post-surgical language fMRI. Language activation post-to-pre surgery was evaluated visually and quantitatively on the statistically thresholded images on patient-by-patient basis. Results were qualitatively compared between three patient groups: temporal, with tumors in the dominant temporal lobe, frontal, with tumors in the dominant frontal lobe and remote, with tumors in the non-dominant hemisphere. Post-to-pre-surgical distributions of activated voxels changed in all except the one patient with metastasis. Changes were more pronounced in the dominant hemisphere for all three groups, showing increased number of activated voxels and also new activation areas. Tumor resection in the dominant hemisphere (frontal and temporal) shifted the activation from frontal towards temporal, whereas tumor resection in the non-dominant hemisphere shifted the activation from temporal towards frontal dominant areas. Resection of gliomas in the dominant and in the non-dominant hemisphere induces postsurgical shifts and increase in language activation, indicating that infiltrating gliomas have a widespread influence on the language network. The dominant hemisphere gained most of the language activation irrespective of tumor localization, possibly reflecting recovery of pre-surgical tumor-induced suppression of these activations.

  16. Anatomical variation of radial wrist extensor muscles: a study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The tendons of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles are quite useful in tendon transfer, such as in correction of finger clawing and restoration of thumb opposition. Knowledge of additional radial wrist extensor muscle bellies with independent tendons is useful in the above-mentioned surgical procedures. METHODS: The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and antebrachial fascia of 48 (24 on the right side and 24 on left side male upper limb forearms were dissected. The following aspects were then analyzed: (a the presence of additional muscle bellies of radial wrist extensors, (b the origin and insertion of the additional muscle, and (c measurements of the muscle bellies and their tendons. RESULTS: Five out of 48 upper limbs (10.41% had additional radial wrist extensors; this occurred in 3 out of 24 left upper limbs (12.5% and 2 out of 24 right upper limbs (8.3%. In one of the right upper limbs, two additional muscles were found. The length and width of each additional muscle belly and its tendon ranged between 2 - 15cm by 0.35 - 6.4cm and 2.8 - 20.8cm by 0.2 0.5cm, respectively. The additional radial wrist extensor tendons in our study basically originated either from the extensor carpi radialis longus or brevis muscles and were inserted at the base of the 2nd or 3rd metacarpal bone. CONCLUSION: The present study will inform surgeons about the different varieties of additional radial wrist extensors and the frequency of their occurrence.

  17. Chronologic age and skeletal maturation of the cervical vertebrae and hand-wrist: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tancan; Ramoglu, Sabri Ilhan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Sari, Zafer

    2006-11-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the relationship between chronologic age and maturation of cervical vertebrae, (2) to identify the relationship between chronologic age and maturation stage evaluated by hand-wrist radiographs, and (3) to determine whether the maturation of cervical vertebrae correlates with maturation indicated by hand-wrist radiographs in a Turkish population. The samples were derived from lateral cephalometric and hand-wrist radiographs of 503 subjects (213 male, 290 female; ages, 5.3-24.1 years). Cervical vertebral development was evaluated by the method of Hassel and Farman. Skeletal maturation of each hand-wrist radiograph was determined according to the method described by Björk and Grave, and Brown's system. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were estimated separately for males and females to measure the relationships among chronologic age, cervical vertebral maturation, and the skeletal maturation measured at the hand-wrist. The Spearman correlation coefficients were 0.72 (P cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, and 0.79 (P maturation via hand-wrist radiographs. The correlation coefficient between hand-wrist and cervical-vertebrae maturation was 0.86 (P cervical-vertebrae maturation stages are clinically useful maturity indicators of the pubertal growth period Turkish subjects.

  18. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, Lauren P.; Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn; Gyr, Bettina M.; Gardner, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  19. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lauren P. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Triad Radiology Associates, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gyr, Bettina M. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gardner, Alison [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  20. The many shades of enhancement: timing of post-gadolinium images strongly influences the scoring of juvenile idiopathic arthritis wrist involvement on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieter, Jasper F.M.M.; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Avenarius, Derk F.M. [Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe (Norway); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Radiology Department, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, K1, Bergen (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    Potential long-term side effects of treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis are concerning. This has necessitated accurate tools, such as MRI, to monitor treatment response and allow for personalized therapy. To examine the extent to which timing of post-contrast MR images influences the scoring of inflammatory change in the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We studied two sets of post-contrast 3-D gradient echo MRI series of the wrist in 34 children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These images were obtained immediately after administration of intravenous contrast material and again after approximately 10 min. The dataset was drawn from a prospective multicenter project conducted 2006-2010. We assessed five wrist locations for synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation. Examinations were scored by one radiologist in two sessions - the first was based on the early post-contrast images, and the later session, for which the previous findings were masked, was based on the later post-contrast images. Fifty-two of the 170 locations (30.6%) received a higher synovial enhancement score based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early images. Sixty of the 170 (35%) locations received a higher total inflammation score. The mean scores of synovial enhancement and total inflammation were significantly higher when based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early post-contrast images. An MRI-based scoring system for the presence and degree of synovitis should be based on a standardized MR-protocol with a fixed interval between intravenous contrast injection and post-contrast images. (orig.)

  1. Intra-articular distribution pattern after ultrasound-guided injections in wrist joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Jensen, Karl Erik; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution of an ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) injection in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: An ultrasound-guided IA drug injection into the wrist joint was performed in 17 patients with 1 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg....../ml), 0.5 ml Lidocaine (5mg/ml) and 0.15 ml gadolinium (Omniscan 0.5 mmol/ml). The drug solution was placed in the central proximal part of the wrist between the distal radius and the lunate bone. Coronal and axial MRI sequences were performed after the injection to visualize the distribution. Carpal...

  2. Dominance Hierarchies in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Murray S.; Omark, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    This study uses the ethological approach of seeking species characteristics and phylogenetic continuities in an investigation of human behavior. Among primates a striking consistency is the presence of some form of dominance hierarchy in many species. The present study examines peer group dominance hierarchies as they are perceived by children in…

  3. Dominant Leadership Style in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2006-01-01

    The dominant leadership style is defined by the situation and the kind of organizational environment and climate. This, however, does not sufficiently define the leadership qualities in school organizations. There are other factors which also determine the dominant leadership style, which are the traits and style, teachers commitments, pass out…

  4. Core Dominance Parameter for -Ray Loud Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this paper, we compiled 572 blazars that have known core dominance parameter (log ), out of which 121 blazars are -ray loud blazars. We compared log between 121 blazars and the rest with non -ray detections, and found that -ray loud blazars showed a different distribution, and their average ...

  5. Anatomy of the ulnar tunnel and the influence of wrist motion on its morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombaba, Jackson; Kuo, Meiying; Rayan, Ghazi

    2010-05-01

    To examine the anatomy of the ulnar tunnel, with emphasis on the pisohamate arcade and pisohamate hiatus, and study the influence of wrist kinematics on the morphology of these structures. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric hands were dissected. The dimensions and relationships of the ulnar tunnel, pisohamate arcade, and pisohamate hiatus were recorded. The effect of 4 wrist positions on these dimensions and relationships was investigated. The ulnar tunnel has 3 compartments--proximal, middle, and distal relative to the pisiform-with variable morphologies, dimensions, and boundaries. In wrist neutral position, the length of the ulnar tunnel was 45 mm (range, 42 to 51 mm). The middle compartment was found to be the narrowest; the proximal, the widest, averaging 5.0 mm; and the pisohamate hiatus that separates the middle and distal compartments, highly dynamic. The length of the pisohamate arcade was 21.5 mm (range, 18.0 to 26.0 mm), and the length and width of the pisohamate hiatus were 11.0 mm (range, 9.8-11.5 mm) and 6.0 mm (range, 5.3 to 7.2 mm), respectively. During wrist extension, the ulnar nerve was under tension. Wrist flexion was the position that caused the most change in ulnar tunnel and pisohamate arcade and hiatus anatomy, causing the width of the proximal compartment to increase from 5.0 to 10.0 mm. During this motion, the shape of the pisohamate arcade changed from a C shape to linear, and the length increased to 24.5 mm (range, 19.3 to 28.5 mm). The pisohamate hiatus narrowed, its width decreased to 1.5 mm, and the deep branch of the ulnar nerve was somewhat compressed. The ulnar tunnel is a dynamic space with dimensions and relationships that are influenced by wrist motion. During ulnar tunnel surgery, all 3 compartments of the ulnar tunnel should be explored and decompressed, including the pisohamate hiatus, by releasing the pisohamate arcade. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Distinct Thalamo-Cortical Controls for Shoulder, Elbow, and Wrist during Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloozerova, Irina N.; Stout, Erik E.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent data from this laboratory on differential controls for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist exerted by the thalamo-cortical network during locomotion is presented, based on experiments involving chronically instrumented cats walking on a flat surface and along a horizontal ladder. The activity of the following three groups of neurons is characterized: (1) neurons of the motor cortex that project to the pyramidal tract (PTNs), (2) neurons of the ventrolateral thalamus (VL), many identified as projecting to the motor cortex (thalamo-cortical neurons, TCs), and (3) neurons of the reticular nucleus of thalamus (RE), which inhibit TCs. Neurons were grouped according to their receptive field into shoulder-, elbow-, and wrist/paw-related categories. During simple locomotion, shoulder-related PTNs were most active in the late stance and early swing, and on the ladder, often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically remained similar on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing, and on the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. In the VL, shoulder-related neurons were more active during the transition from swing-to-stance. Elbow-related cells tended to be more active during the transition from stance-to-swing and on the ladder often decreased their activity and increased modulation. Wrist-related neurons were more active throughout the stance phase. In the RE, shoulder-related cells had low discharge rates and depths of modulation and long periods of activity distributed evenly across the cycle. In sharp contrast, wrist/paw-related cells discharged synchronously during the end of stance and swing with short periods of high activity, high modulation, and frequent sleep-type bursting. We conclude that thalamo-cortical network processes information related to different segments of the

  7. Effects of chronic flexed wrist posture on the elasticity and crosssectional area of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel among chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Hulya; Analan, Pinar Doruk

    2018-02-04

    To investigate the effects of chronic flexed wrist posture following spasticity on the elasticity and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel among chronic stroke patients. This prospective study included 24 consecutive patients (mean age, 56.5±11.56 years) with unilateral wrist spasticity following a stroke in a chronic phase. The CSA of the median nerve was measured by ultrasound (US). The elasticity was measured by Virtual Touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). SWV and CSA of the median nerves of the affected and unaffected sides for each patient were compared. The correlations between duration of time since the stroke, SWV and CSA of the median nerve were assessed. The interobserver agreement was assessed. The CSA of the median nerve at the affected side was significantly lower than that of the unaffected side (p = 0.03). The SWV of the median nerve at the affected side was significantly higher than that on the unaffected side (p < 0.001). The interobserver agreement was excellent for both CSA and SWV measurements. There was a negatively fair correlation between CSA at the affected side and duration of time since stroke (r = -0.58, p < 0.05). The SWV of the median nerve at the affected side was not correlated with the duration of time since stroke (r ≤ 0.3, p ≥ 0.05). These results suggest that chronic flexed wrist posture may cause atrophy of the median nerve due to chronic compression after stroke and increase in the stiffness of the median nerve.

  8. A validation of wrist actigraphy against polysomnography in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baandrup L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lone Baandrup,1,2 Poul Jørgen Jennum3 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research (CNSR, 2Center for Clinical Intervention and Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research (CINS, Copenhagen University Hospital, Mental Health Center Glostrup, Mental Health Services – Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Denmark; 3Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Center for Healthy Ageing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark Purpose: Sleep disturbances are frequent in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Actigraphy has been established as a generally reliable method to examine these disturbances across varying time spans, but the validity against polysomnography (PSG is not well investigated for this population. We validated wrist-worn actigraphy against PSG in a population of chronic, medicated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Patients and methods: From a clinical trial, we derived data from 37 patients with schizophrenia and five patients with bipolar disorder who were examined with one-night PSG and concomitant actigraphy. The following sleep variables were compared between the two methods: total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep latency, number of awakenings, and time awake after sleep onset. The degree of consistency between the two methods was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland–Altman plots. Subgroup analyses included splitting the analyses according to sex, diagnosis, and duration of wakefulness after sleep onset. PSG was considered the gold standard. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient was high for total sleep time, moderate for the number of awakenings, and low or zero for the other examined sleep variables. These findings were reproduced in the subgroup analyses that compared men and women, as well as patients with bipolar versus schizophrenia spectrum disorders. When excluding

  9. A Note on Isolate Domination

    OpenAIRE

    Sahul Hamid, Ismail; Balamurugan, S; Navaneethakrishnan, A

    2016-01-01

    A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ such that $\\left\\langle S\\right\\rangle$ has an isolated vertex is called an \\emph{isolate set} of $G$. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate set are called the \\emph{isolate number} $i_0(G)$ and the \\emph{upper isolate number} $I_0(G)$ respectively. An isolate set that is also a dominating set (an irredundant set) is an $\\emph{isolate dominating set} \\ (\\emph{an isolate irredundant set})$. The \\emph{isolate domination number} $\\gamma_0(G...

  10. Domination criticality in product graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Chithra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A connected dominating set is an important notion and has many applications in routing and management of networks. Graph products have turned out to be a good model of interconnection networks. This motivated us to study the Cartesian product of graphs G with connected domination number, γc(G=2,3 and characterize such graphs. Also, we characterize the k−γ-vertex (edge critical graphs and k−γc-vertex (edge critical graphs for k=2,3 where γ denotes the domination number of G. We also discuss the vertex criticality in grids.

  11. Dominantly inherited cystoid macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G A; Goldberg, M F; Trautmann, J C

    1979-01-01

    Four patients of Greek ancestry had dominantly inherited cystoid macular edema. Characteristics of this syndrome include the following: an early onset and prolonged course of cystoid changes in the macula, followed by atrophy of the macula in later stages. Some patients also show leakage of fluorescein from the optic disc capillaries, subnormal EOG Lp/Dt ratios, elevated rod dark adaptation thresholds, red-green and blue-yellow color deficiencies, normal ERG findings, hyperopia, peripheral pigmentary retinopathy, and vitreous opacities. Dominantly inherited cystoid macular edema is a distinct genetic trait among the dominantly inherited macular dystrophies.

  12. Evaluation of lesions of the internal ligaments of the wrist; conventional magnetic resonance imaging versus MR arthrography (MRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Ahmed Kamal

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: MR arthrography is a potent additional tool facilitating the diagnosis of different pathologic entities affecting the major internal ligaments of the wrist joint and helps to reduce arthroscopic interventions.

  13. Severe psychogenic tremor of both wrists in a 13-year-old girl treated successfully with a customized wrist brace: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafflhuber Caroline

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Psychogenic movement disorders in childhood have been little researched. As there are few courses of treatment which have been evaluated, further examination and case studies about the treatment and clinical course of this rare occurrence of severe psychogenic tremor in childhood and adolescence are much needed. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian girl with tremor in both wrists, severe enough to prevent her from attending school, was sent to our hospital. After a complete neurological and psychiatric examination, in-patient child-psychotherapeutic treatment was started, with careful consideration given to both chronic and acute stress factors which constitute her performance and exam anxiety in school as well as the girl's parents' conflicted relationship. With the aid of a customized wrist brace our patient was able to go to school and write despite the presence of a marked tremor, which in turn reduced her avoidance behavior and exam anxiety. By the end of her in-patient treatment, the tremor was still noticeable, but markedly reduced in severity (reduction 80%. Two weeks after she was discharged from hospital, the tremor had completely disappeared. Conclusion After careful clinical diagnostics, this kind of dissociative disorder should be treated appropriately with age-adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy to achieve positive and lasting benefits.

  14. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A.; Steinbach, L.; Stoller, D.; Genant, H.; Neumann, C.

    1989-02-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results.

  15. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Steinbach, L.; Stoller, D.; Genant, H.

    1989-01-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results. (orig.) [de

  16. Volz total wrist arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis: a long-term review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, D A; Ferlic, D C; Clayton, M L

    1986-07-01

    The results of 30 Volz total wrist arthroplasties in 23 patients with stage III or stage IV rheumatoid arthritis were reviewed 36 to 106 months after the operation (average 69 months). Sixty percent were rated good or excellent, 27% were rated fair, and 13% were rated poor. Good or excellent results were achieved in 77% with single-prong metacarpal components, but in only 47% of the double-prong group. Wrist imbalance was the primary cause of poorer results with the double-prong metacarpal component. Pain relief and patient satisfaction were achieved in 86% of the cases. Typical radiologic patterns of deterioration were resorption of bone under the collar of the radial component (79%, average 3.7 mm) and metacarpal component loosening (24%). Most patients with component loosening had little or no discomfort. Complications occurred in 12 cases but affected the final outcome in only three patients.

  17. Wrist extension strength required for power grip: a study using a radial nerve block model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Kunishi, T; Kakizaki, J; Iwakura, N; Takahashi, J; Kuniyoshi, K

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of wrist extension strength (WES) and grip strength (GS) using a radial nerve block, and to determine the WES required to prevent the "wrist flexion phenomenon" (antagonistic WES) when making a fist. We tested 14 arms in seven healthy males. WES and GS were measured before blocking as standard WES and standard GS. All participants then had radial nerve blocks with mepivacaine hydrochloride. During the recovery process from radial nerve blockade, WES and GS were recorded every 5 minutes. There was a very strong correlation between WES and GS (p < 0.0001). The mean antagonistic WES was 51% of standard WES, and the mean GS, recorded at the same time, was 66% of standard GS.

  18. Mechanical design of EFW Exo II: A hybrid exoskeleton for elbow-forearm-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hui; Chen, Ziye; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Tieshi

    2017-07-01

    The use of rehabilitation exoskeleton has become an important means for the treatment of stroke patients. A hybrid exoskeleton named EFW Exo II is developed for the motor function rehabilitation of elbow, forearm and wrist. The EFW Exo II is based on a parallel 2-URR/RRS mechanism and a serial R mechanism. It could fit both left and right arms for the symmetrical and open structure, and the distance between the elbow and wrist could automatically adjust for different forearm length. Details of the mechanical design are introduced. Brushless DC servo motors with planetary gear reducer are used as the actuators of the exoskeleton. Gear drive and belt drive are used for power transmission. A three dimensional force sensor is mounted in the handle to regulate the interaction between the exoskeleton and patient. The EFW Exo II can realize rehabilitation exercise for each joint and the ranges of motion meet the rehabilitation demands of daily living.

  19. Wrist injuries: a comparison between high- and low-impact sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Laura W

    2013-03-01

    Wrist injuries can be categorized as those caused by high- or low-impact sports. High-impact sports include auto racing, motorcross or bicycle racing, in-line skating, gymnastics, football, soccer, ice skating, snowboarding, and alpine skiing. Low-impact sports include tennis, track and field, and golf. High-impact injuries of the wrist range from displaced fractures and dislocations to ligamentous and acute tendinous tears. Low-impact sports typically result in nondisplaced or occult fractures, contusions, stress reaction, ligamentous sprain, tendinopathy, tenosynovitis, or tendon subluxation. Imaging modalities for detection of injuries include radiography, computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance CT arthrography, and skeletal scintigraphy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validity of Modified Ashworth Scale as a Measure of Wrist Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are some controversies about the value of modified Ashworth Scale (MAS for assessing spasticity. The goal of this study was to investigate if there is any correlation between scores obtained from MAS for wrist spasticity and electrophysiological recordings as the objective measure of spasticity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 34 stroke patients were employed. Wrist spasticity was clinically measured by means of MAS. Also, an electromyogram (EMG machine was used to elicit Hmax and Mmax from the flexor carpi radialis muscle. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used to investigate potential correlation between clinically and electrophysiologically measures of spasticity. Results: The observed relation between MAS and EMG recordings was not statistically significant (rho=0.183, P>0.05. Discussion: Our findings suggest that MAS may be a useful tool for grading hypertonia, but it is not a valid measure of spasticity in selected patients.

  1. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo [Diagnostica per Immagini, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16100 Genova (Italy); Serafini, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Diagnostica per Immagini, Ospedale Santa Corona, Via XXV Aprile 38, 17037 Pietra Ligure, Savona (Italy); Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Oncologiche e Gastroenterologiche, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Giustiniani, Padova (Italy); Garlaschi, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Scienze per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Cimmino, Marco Amedeo [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria, E-mail: io@lucasconfienza.it [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand.

  2. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Mingyu; Mei, Tao; McCoul, David; Qin, Shihao; Zhao, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Jianwen

    2017-11-23

    Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs) are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  3. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  4. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Mauri, Giovanni; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand

  5. Wrist Drop as a Manifestation of Behçet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Daher

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Radial mononeuropathy most commonly manifesting as wrist drop is generally secondary to penetrating trauma to the radial nerve or compression injuries. It may also involve sensory changes depending on the location of the lesion. However, it has never been described as a sign of an inflammatory process, in particular an autoimmune disease. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man who was admitted for wrist drop with bilateral paraesthesia of the upper extremities. Based on his medical history, we diagnosed Behçet’s disease and subsequently neuro-Behçet’s disease. He is receiving treatment with notable improvement. Neurological involvement in Behçet’s disease is common but frequently undiagnosed.

  6. Wrist Tenosynovitis due to Mycobacterium bovis Infection: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Derviş Güner, MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tuberculosis infections are still one of the most important public health problems among developing countries. Musculoskeletal involvement represents 10–15% of all extrapulmonary cases. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis is usually misdiagnosed as nonspecific tenosynovitis. To avoid misdiagnosis and mistreatment, it is important to be alert for mycobacterial infections. This article presents 3 patients with wrist tenosynovitis, which was caused by Mycobacterium bovis infection. The article also includes review of the literature.

  7. Wrist Tenosynovitis due to Mycobacterium bovis Infection: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Mehmet Derviş; Bektaş, Umut; Akmeşe, Ramazan; Armangil, Mehmet; Ay, Şadan

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Tuberculosis infections are still one of the most important public health problems among developing countries. Musculoskeletal involvement represents 10–15% of all extrapulmonary cases. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis is usually misdiagnosed as nonspecific tenosynovitis. To avoid misdiagnosis and mistreatment, it is important to be alert for mycobacterial infections. This article presents 3 patients with wrist tenosynovitis, which was caused by Mycobacterium bovis infection. The article also includes review of the literature. PMID:25587496

  8. At-home computer-aided myoelectric training system for wrist prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Vilouras, Anastasios; Heidari, Hadi; Navaraj, William Taube; Dahiya, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Development of tools for rehabilitation and restoration of the movement after amputation can benefit from the real time interactive virtual animation model of the human hand. Here, we report a computer-aided training/learning system for wrist disarticulated amputees, using the open source integrated development environment called “Processing”. This work also presents the development of a low-cost surface Electro-MyoGraphic (sEMG) interface, which is an ideal tool for training and rehabilitati...

  9. Use of the mini C-arm for wrist fractures - Establishing a diagnostic reference level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G. J.; Pillai, A.; Gibson, S.

    2008-01-01

    The establishment of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for all typical radiological examinations became mandatory following the implementation of the Ionising Radiations (Medical Exposure) Regulations Act 2000. At present, there are no national dosage guidelines in the UK regarding use of fluoroscopy in orthopaedic trauma. The increasing popularity of the mini C-arm image intensifier amongst surgeons has led to concerns regarding use of ionizing radiation by personnel who have not been trained in radiation protection. It is therefore essential to have formal protocols for use of the mini C-arm to comply with the law and to maintain safe clinical practice. It is attempted to provide dose data for wrist fracture manipulations that may be used as a basis for setting a DRL for this procedure. Screening times were recorded for 80 wrist manipulations in a fracture clinic setting using a mini C-arm image intensifier. A DRL was set using the third quartile value for screening time. The median screening time for wrist fractures was 20 s with a range from 1 to 177 s. The third quartile value for screening time was 34 s. This value can be used as a provisional DRL for wrist fracture manipulations. The DRL is a quantitative guide for the optimisation of radiological protection. IR(ME)R 2000 states that if it is consistently exceeded by an individual operator or a piece of equipment, investigation and remedial action must be taken. We recommend that trauma units establish their own local DRLs for common procedures as made mandatory by legislation. (authors)

  10. Investigation of Polymer Thick-film Piezoresistors for Medical Wrist Rehabilitation and Artificial Knee Load Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Jacq, Caroline; Maeder, Thomas; Emery, Simon; Simoncini, Matteo; Meurville, Eric; Ryser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Readily-available and low-cost commercial polymer-based composite materials, such as standard epoxy-fibreglass printed circuit board (PCB) substrates and resin-carbon thick-film piezoresistors, were evaluated as a solution for medical force sensors, such as a wrist rehabilitation device and an implantable wireless artificial knee force sensor. We show that such materials have high sensitivity, and sufficient short-term stability – provided careful mechanical design and materials selection are...

  11. Rasch Analysis of the Wrist and Hand Fugl-Meyer: Dimensionality and Item-Level Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persch, Andrew C; Gugiu, P Cristian; Velozo, Craig A; Page, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Clinical administration of the wrist stability, wrist mobility, and hand items of the upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer (W/H UE FM) may provide a rigorous, easily administered, bedside measure of motor impairment in mildly impaired stroke survivors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the item structure of the W/H UE FM to better understand its measurement properties using Rasch analysis. This was a secondary analysis of W/H UE FM data arising from clinical trials of mildly impaired stroke survivors using latent parallel analysis, ordinal factor analysis, and partial credit model Rasch analyses. Latent parallel analysis and ordinal factor analysis indicated that all W/H UE FM items represent a single unidimensional construct, wrist and hand motor ability. Rasch analysis of data from 150 mildly impaired stroke survivors (94 men; mean age, 57.1 ± 11.4 years; mean time since stroke, 19.5 months) revealed that the W/H UE FM operated as a reliable, valid, and effective measure of wrist and hand motor ability. These data were compatible with Rasch model assumptions and are consistent with previous W/H UE FM research. Mass flexion and extension movements were the least difficult W/H UE FM items while the radial and hook grasp items were the most difficult. The W/H UE FM is well suited to mildly impaired stroke survivors who exhibit the ability to perform mass flexion and mass extension movements. The full-scale UE FM may be preferable for stroke survivors with lower levels of ability.Video abstract available for additional insight from the authors (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A108).

  12. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  13. Validation of the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 wrist blood pressure measuring devices in adults according to the International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunkan, Sekip; Ilman, Nevzat; Altunkan, Erkan

    2007-04-01

    A variety of automatic blood measurement devices with diverse features have been introduced to the medical markets recently. Among these devices, models that measure at the wrist have become increasingly popular in self measurements. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 wrist blood pressure devices against the mercury sphygmomanometer in adults according to the International Protocol criteria. Fifty-four patients over 30 years of age were studied and classified based on the International Protocol range. Blood pressure measurements at the wrist with the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 were compared with the results obtained by two trained observers using a mercury sphygmomanometer. Nine sequential blood pressure measurements were taken. A total of 33 participants with randomly distributed arm circumferences were selected for both of the validation studies. During each validation study, 99 measurements were obtained for comparison from 33 participants. The first phase was performed on 15 participants and if the device passed this phase, 18 more participants were selected. Mean discrepancies and standard deviations of the device-sphygmomanometer were 0.9+/-9.2 and -2.7+/-9.3 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -1.4+/-8.0 mmHg and 1.4+/-5.7 for diastolic blood pressure in the Samsung and Microlife study groups, respectively. The Samsung SBM-100A passed Phase 1 in 15 participants. Despite the fact that Microlife BP 3BU1-5 passed Phase 1 for diastolic pressure, it failed according to the systolic pressure criteria. Eighteen patients were added and Phase 2 was continued, in which Samsung SBM-100A failed to meet the criteria of Phases 2.1 and 2.2 for adults in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It was found that the Microlife BP 3BU1-5 does not meet the criteria of either of Phases 2.1 and 2.2 for systolic blood pressure and Phase 2.2 for diastolic blood pressure. In this study, Samsung SBM

  14. Differences in wrist mechanics during the golf swing based on golf handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorcik, Gregory G; Queen, Robin M; Abbey, Alicia N; Moorman, Claude T; Ruch, David S

    2012-05-01

    Variation in swing mechanics between golfers of different skill levels has been previously reported. To investigate if differences in three-dimensional wrist kinematics and the angle of golf club descent between low and high handicap golfers. A descriptive laboratory study was performed with twenty-eight male golfers divided into two groups, low handicap golfers (handicap = 0-5, n = 15) and high handicap golfers (handicap ≥ 10, n = 13). Bilateral peak three-dimensional wrist mechanics, bilateral wrist mechanics at ball contact (BC), peak angle of descent from the end of the backswing to ball contact, and the angle of descent when the forearm was parallel to the ground (DEC-PAR) were determined using an 8 camera motion capture system. Independent t-tests were completed for each study variable (α = 0.05). Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between golf handicap and each of the study variables. The peak lead arm radial deviation (5.7 degrees, p = 0.008), lead arm radial deviation at ball contact (7.1 degrees, p = 0.001), and DEC-PAR (15.8 degrees, p = 0.002) were significantly greater in the high handicap group. In comparison with golfers with a low handicap, golfers with a high handicap have increased radial deviation during the golf swing and at ball contact. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomical Basis and Clinical Application of Synovial Flaps in the Wrist and Distal Forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, David L; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Colen, Lawrence B

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic symptoms after median nerve repair at the wrist or secondary to refractory carpal tunnel syndrome may become debilitating. These symptoms develop because of perineural adhesions, intraneural fibrosis, and fixation of the nerve to the transverse carpal ligament after surgery, and often require neurolysis. Interposition of vascularized soft tissue over the median nerve at the time of neurolysis prevents recurrence of such adhesions. The synovial flap, fashioned from the synovial lining of the flexor tendon sheath, is an ideal tissue for this purpose. Previous authors have described the surgical technique of the synovial flap, but the anatomical basis and design of the flap have not been previously discussed. Twenty fresh cadaver upper extremities were injected with Microfil to analyze the arterial anatomy, flap dimensions, and arc of rotation of the flexor tendon synovium mobilized as a flap suitable for coverage of the median nerve at the wrist. The authors determined that both radial and ulnar-based flaps are clinically useful for providing coverage in the wrist and distal forearm. This flap was used in 18 patients with complicated median nerve lesions in this region. All patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Of 13 patients treated for posttraumatic median nerve neuromas, all but two had significant resolution of symptoms. When used as a vascularized flap, the flexor tendon synovium provides adequate protection of the median nerve. Flap dimensions and vascularity of this tissue make it an ideal local flap option when performing reoperative surgery on the median nerve.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  17. Indirect wrist MR arthrography: the effects of passive motion versus active exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.E.; Natale, P.; Winalski, C.S.; Culp, R. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. In the wrist, to determine whether passive motion or active exercise yields a better indirect MR arthrographic effect following intravenous gadolinium administration.Design and patients. Twenty-six consecutive patients were studied by indirect wrist MR arthrography. In half active exercise and in half passive motion was performed. Four regions of interest were studied including the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, the midcarpal joint, and the triangular fibrocartilage. Ranges and means of signal intensity were calculated. Surgical follow-up was performed in 22 patients.Results. The joint fluid intensity was greatest in the distal radioulnar joint. Fluid signal intensity was greater and more consistent in the passive motion group although the results did not achieve statistical significance. Imaging accuracy appeared similar in the two groups and was excellent for the triangular fibrocartilage (100%) and scapholunate ligaments (96%).Conclusion. Active exercise and passive motion yield similar degrees of wrist arthrographic effect, but the effect of passive motion is somewhat more consistent. Preliminary data show good accuracy for internal derangements. (orig.)

  18. Interrater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) for patients with wrist flexor muscle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Soofia; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Azarnia, Somayye; Kazemnejad, Anoushiravan

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of spasticity is part of the neurological examination of patients with disorders of the central nervous system. Recently, the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) was developed for the characterization of muscle spasticity. The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of the MMAS in the assessment of wrist flexor muscle spasticity in adult patients after upper motoneuron lesions resulted in hemiplegia. Thirty hemiplegic patients (17 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 55.6+/-7.8 years participated in this study. The wrist flexor spasticity was assessed according to MMAS by two female physiotherapists. The raters gave 23 patients the same spasticity score (weighted percentage agreement=97.4%). The most agreement occurred for scores 3 (46.7%) and 0 (16.7%), respectively. The agreement between raters was very good (weighted kappa=0.92, SE=0.03, p<0.0001). In conclusion, the MMAS has very good interrater reliability for the assessment of wrist flexor muscle spasticity.

  19. Bone SPECT-CT: An additional diagnostic tool for undiagnosed wrist pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, R A; Dhawan, R T; Rodrigues, J N; Evans, D M

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosis of wrist pain can be difficult to determine with clinical examination and conventional imaging techniques alone. Bone SPECT-CT (single-photon emission tomography with computerized tomography) is a hybrid imaging technique that overlays functional bone scintigraphy in tomographic/3D mode with conventional CT. Data from the two modalities are complementary; areas of abnormal bone metabolism can be localized with anatomical precision, hitherto lacking in conventional bone scans, while structural information from the CT scan further embellishes the diagnostic information. Over the last 6 years, one surgeon (David Evans) has used bone SPECT and later bone SPECT-CT as an additional line of investigation. This is a series of 21 consecutive patients with wrist pain that could not be diagnostically resolved with the usual combination of history, examination, and conventional imaging, and therefore underwent bone SPECT-CT. Clinical and imaging findings, management, and outcomes of these cases are discussed to explore the potential role of this hybrid functional modality in hand and wrist surgical practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Generalized Feature Extraction for Wrist Pulse Analysis: From 1-D Time Series to 2-D Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimin Wang; Zhang, David; Guangming Lu

    2017-07-01

    Traditional Chinese pulse diagnosis, known as an empirical science, depends on the subjective experience. Inconsistent diagnostic results may be obtained among different practitioners. A scientific way of studying the pulse should be to analyze the objectified wrist pulse waveforms. In recent years, many pulse acquisition platforms have been developed with the advances in sensor and computer technology. And the pulse diagnosis using pattern recognition theories is also increasingly attracting attentions. Though many literatures on pulse feature extraction have been published, they just handle the pulse signals as simple 1-D time series and ignore the information within the class. This paper presents a generalized method of pulse feature extraction, extending the feature dimension from 1-D time series to 2-D matrix. The conventional wrist pulse features correspond to a particular case of the generalized models. The proposed method is validated through pattern classification on actual pulse records. Both quantitative and qualitative results relative to the 1-D pulse features are given through diabetes diagnosis. The experimental results show that the generalized 2-D matrix feature is effective in extracting both the periodic and nonperiodic information. And it is practical for wrist pulse analysis.

  1. Accuracy of digital arm and wrist manometers: clinical implications for the dental hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgeson, Danielle; Mickels-Foster, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    Utilization of digital manometers chairside is fast becoming a standard of care in dental hygiene education. It is imperative to ensure accurate blood pressure measurements regardless of modality to avoid medical emergencies in the dental chair. This study sought to determine the accuracy of the automated digital arm and wrist cuffs utilized by students in the University of Maine at Augusta, Bangor Campus Dental Health Programs' dental hygiene clinic. After institutional review board approval, 121 subjects were recruited, with 21 excluded for a total of 100 subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to different test modalities upon check-in. Initial blood pressure measurements were taken with a calibrated aneroid control device by a principal investigator. A second measurement was taken with the randomized arm or wrist manometer 5 minutes later. Investigators were blinded to the modality of test manometer and measurements obtained from the second reading. All readings were taken according to manufacturers' instructions to ensure technique consistency. Data indicated lower readings for each modality from the control for both systolic and diastolic measurements. The differences in the systolic and diastolic readings for the wrist modality were significantly lower than the control with (p= 0.000) and (p=0.000), respectively. Automated digital manometers should be used with caution as a screening tool in the dental setting, particularly when administration of pharmacological agents such as local anesthesia may be used during the course of treatment. These automated modalities should not be used for patients with cardiac or hypertensive conditions.

  2. Measurements of wrist and forearm positions and movements: effect of, and compensation for, goniometer crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, G-A; Balogh, I; Ohlsson, K; Skerfving, S

    2004-06-01

    Flexible biaxial goniometers are extensively used for measuring wrist positions and movements. However, they display an inherent crosstalk error. The aim was to evaluate the effect, of this error, on summary measures used for characterizing manual work. A goniometer and a torsiometer were combined into one device. An algorithm that effectively compensated for crosstalk was developed. Recordings from 25 women, performing five worktasks, were analyzed, both with and without compensation for crosstalk. The errors in the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the flexion/extension distributions were small, on average <1 degrees. The ulnar/radial deviation distributions were weakly dependent on forearm position. The flexion/extension velocity measures were, for the 50th and 90th percentiles, as well as the mean velocity, consistently underestimated by, on average, 3.9%. For ulnar/radial deviation, the velocity errors were less consistent. Mean power frequency, which is a measure of repetitiveness, was insensitive (error <1%) to crosstalk. The forearm supination/pronation angular distributions were wider, and the velocities higher, than for the wrists. Considering wrist/hand exposure in epidemiologic studies, as well as for establishing and surveillance of exposure limits for prevention of work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, the crosstalk error can, when considering other errors and sources to variation, be disregarded.

  3. Social Dominance and Sexual Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Dickins, Thomas E.; Sergeant, Mark J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Heterosexual males are reported to display higher levels of physical aggression and lower levels of empathy than homosexual males. A characteristic linked to both aggression and empathy is social dominance orientation (SDO). A significant sex difference has been reported for SDO, with heterosexual males scoring higher than heterosexual females. The precise relationship between dominance and aggression is currently contested. Given the association between SDO, aggression and empathy, and the d...

  4. The anatomy of the fibrous and osseous components of the first extensor compartment of the wrist: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, Ilke A; Coskun, Osman; Gayretli, Ozcan; Kale, Aysin; Ozturk, Adnan

    2015-09-01

    De Quervain disease is the stenosing tenosynovitis of the first extensor compartment of the wrist. It is diagnosed with a history of pain at the radial aspect of the wrist and a positive Finkelstein test. Although anatomic variations, such as a septum within the compartment, are considered as risk factors, bony anatomy of distal radius and its correlation with the septa are studied scarcely in the literature. We dissected 50 wrists of 26 cadavers. Presence and location of a septum within the compartment was evaluated. We also observed the grooves at distal radius and their relation to the first extensor compartment and its content. The septum was absent in 23 wrists (46%). A septum was present in 27 (54%) wrists (15 incomplete 30%, 12 complete 24%). At the distal radius, we classified three radial groove types as Type 1 on 28 (56%), Type 2 on 14 (28%), and as Type 3 on 8 (16%) wrists. There was a statistically significant relation between complete type of septa and Type 1 grooves (p = 0.002). We investigated the bony structures of the compartment along with its content and we believe our results might guide clinicians who diagnose and treat de Quervain tenosynovitis.

  5. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  6. A note on isolate domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sahul Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ such that $\\left\\langle S\\right\\rangle$ has an isolated vertex is called an \\emph{isolate set} of $G$. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate set are called the \\emph{isolate number} $i_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate number} $I_0(G$ respectively. An isolate set that is also a dominating set (an irredundant set is an $\\emph{isolate dominating set} \\ (\\emph{an isolate irredundant set}$. The \\emph{isolate domination number} $\\gamma_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate domination number} $\\Gamma_0(G$ are respectively the minimum and maximum cardinality of a minimal isolate dominating set while the \\emph{isolate irredundance number} $ir_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate irredundance number} $IR_0(G$ are the minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate irredundant set of $G$. The notion of isolate domination was introduced in \\cite{sb} and the remaining were introduced in \\cite{isrn}. This paper further extends a study of these parameters.   

  7. Musculoskeletal ultrasound on the hand and wrist in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Ultrasound was more accurate than clinical examination and conventional radiography in the detection of subclinical synovitis, tenosynovitis, and the underlying fibrotic changes of tendon friction rub. In SSc patients, on using MSUS, articular involvement was found to be less frequent compared with that in RA patients, with specific appearance of sclerosing tenosynovitis in SSc patients.

  8. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei

    2014-01-01

    . Using the method of Lagrange multipliers and considering all the mobile components, the equations of motion of the manipulator are derived to investigate the dynamic characteristics efficiently. The developed dynamic model is numerically illustrated and compared with its simplified formulation to show...

  9. Identification of an IMPDH1 mutation in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP10) revealed following comparative microarray analysis of transcripts derived from retinas of wild-type and Rho(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennan, Avril; Aherne, Aileen; Palfi, Arpad; Humphries, Marian; McKee, Alex; Stitt, Alan; Simpson, David A C; Demtroder, Karin; Orntoft, Torben; Ayuso, Carmen; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane; Humphries, Pete

    2002-03-01

    Comparative analysis of the transcriptional profiles of approximately 6000 genes in the retinas of wild-type mice with those carrying a targeted disruption of the rhodopsin gene was undertaken by microarray analysis. This revealed a series of transcripts, of which some were derived from genes known to map at retinopathy loci, levels of which were reduced or elevated in the retinas of Rho(-/-) mice lacking functional photoreceptors. The human homologue of one of these genes, encoding inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase type 1 (IMPDH1), maps to the region of 7q to which an adRP gene (RP10) had previously been localized. Mutational screening of DNA from the Spanish adRP family, originally used to localize the RP10 gene, revealed an Arg224Pro substitution co-segregating with the disease phenotype. The amino acid at position 224 of the IMPDH1 protein is conserved among species and the substitution is not present in healthy, unrelated individuals of European origin. These data provide strong evidence that mutations within the IMPDH1 gene cause adRP, and validate approaches to mutation detection involving comparative analysis of global transcription profiles in normal and degenerating retinal tissues. Other genes showing significant alterations in expression include some with anti-apoptotic functions and many encoding components of the extracellular matrix or cytoskeleton, a possible reflection of a response by Muller cells to preserve the remaining outer nuclear layer of the retina. We suggest that those genes identified are prime candidates for etiological involvement in degenerative retinal disease.

  10. Intra-rater reliability of ultrasound imaging of wrist extensor muscles in patients with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Timmons, Mark K; Michener, Lori A; Ericksen, Jeffery J; Gater, David R

    2014-02-01

    (i) To determine the intra-rater reliability and precision of the ultrasound cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements of the wrist extensors in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), and (ii) to determine whether tetraplegia has a negative influence on the reliability and precision for these measurements. A repeated-measures cross-sectional study. Clinical hospital and academic settings. The study was conducted with 20 men with SCI (9 paraplegia and 11 tetraplegia) and 10 able-bodied controls. Ultrasound images were captured of the right side extensor carpi radialis-longus (ECRL) and the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) were captured in 2 sessions separated by 48-72 hours. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the CSA measurements of the ECRL and EDC muscles were greater than 0.87 for all 3 groups. The standard error of the measure (SEM) ranged from 0.11-0.22 cm(2) for the ECRL and 0.13-0.27 cm(2) for the EDC. The minimal detectable change of ECL ranged from 0.16 to 0.31 cm(2) and of EDC from 0.19 to 0.38 cm(2). The group differences in muscle CSA of both muscles were found; these differences were greater than the calculated minimal detectable changes. The intraclass correlation coefficients were lower and the SEMs and minimal detectable changes were higher for the group with tetraplegia compared with the able-bodied controls and the group with paraplegia. This study documented substantial intra-rater reliability of measurements of the ECRL and ECD CSA by using ultrasound images, which support the use of this technique to effectively evaluate the musculoskeletal changes after SCI and during rehabilitation. Skeletal muscle atrophy in persons with tetraplegia might have a negative influence on the reliability and precision of these CSA measurements; however, these differences in reliability and precision are not of clinical significance. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Age dependent T2 changes of bone marrow in pediatric wrist MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabshin, Nogah; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperintensity of the bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences can be seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during childhood, even in the absence of bone pathology. They can be related to hematopoietic marrow, normal and abnormal bone remodeling. We sought to investigate whether hyper intensity of the bone marrow on MRI of the wrist is age-dependent and to evaluate if this signal follows a consistent age-related pattern. Thirty-one wrist 1.5 T MR images of children (7-18 years) without suspected bone pathology were evaluated for foci of hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive coronal sequences using a scale of 1-3. Correlation of frequency, location and intensity of these foci with age was obtained. Results were analyzed for distribution in single bones and in the following regions: distal forearm, first/second carpal rows, and metacarpal bases. A total of 448 bones were evaluated. Eighty-eight out of 448 (21 out of 31 wrists) showed hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive sequences. The distribution was: radius in 19, ulna in 19, first metacarpal base in 11, scaphoid in 9, lunate in 6, pisiform in 6, and fifth metacarpal base in 1. The involvement of the first and second carpal rows and the metacarpal bases was almost similar (13, 12, and 12 respectively). In the distal forearm, the intensity was similar to or higher than that in the wrist (2.2 vs. 2.0). Frequency decreased with age (100% at 7-9 and 25% at 16-18 years). Foci of hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive sequences can be seen on MRI of the wrist during childhood even without apparent symptoms. It shows a consistent pattern with maturation: frequency and intensity decrease and there is distal-to-proximal resolution. This may be a normal finding that may represent normal bone remodeling or decreasing hematopoietic marrow and should not be confused with pathological bone marrow edema. (orig.)

  12. Highly dominating, highly authoritarian personalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemeyer, Bob

    2004-08-01

    The author considered the small part of the population whose members score highly on both the Social Dominance Orientation scale and the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale. Studies of these High SDO-High RWAs, culled from samples of nearly 4000 Canadian university students and over 2600 of their parents and reported in the present article, reveal that these dominating authoritarians are among the most prejudiced persons in society. Furthermore, they seem to combine the worst elements of each kind of personality, being power-hungry, unsupportive of equality, manipulative, and amoral, as social dominators are in general, while also being religiously ethnocentric and dogmatic, as right-wing authoritarians tend to be. The author suggested that, although they are small in number, such persons can have considerable impact on society because they are well-positioned to become the leaders of prejudiced right-wing political movements.

  13. Novel transcriptional profile in wrist muscles from cerebral palsy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Shankar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a progressive movement disorder. Secondary to the neurological insult, muscles from CP patients often become spastic. Spastic muscle is characterized by an increased resistance to stretch, but often develops the further complication of contracture which represents a prominent disability in children with CP. This study's purpose is to characterize alterations of spastic muscle on the transcriptional level. Increased knowledge of spastic muscle may lead to novel therapies to improve the quality of life for children with CP. Method The transcriptional profile of spastic muscles were defined in children with cerebral palsy and compared to control patients using Affymetrix U133A chips. Expression data were verified using quantitative-PCR (QPCR and validated with SDS-PAGE for select genes. Significant genes were determined using a 2 × 2 ANOVA and results required congruence between 3 preprocessing algorithms. Results CP patients clustered independently and 205 genes were significantly altered, covering a range of cellular processes. Placing gene expression in the context of physiological pathways, the results demonstrated that spastic muscle in CP adapts transcriptionally by altering extracellular matrix, fiber type, and myogenic potential. Extracellular matrix adaptations occur primarily in the basal lamina although there is increase in fibrillar collagen components. Fiber type is predominately fast compared to normal muscle as evidenced by contractile gene isoforms and decrease in oxidative metabolic gene transcription, despite a paradoxical increased transcription of slow fiber pathway genes. We also found competing pathways of fiber hypertrophy with an increase in the anabolic IGF1 gene in parallel with a paradoxical increase in myostatin, a gene responsible for stopping muscle growth. We found evidence that excitation-contraction coupling genes are altered in

  14. Using Fitness Trackers and Smartwatches to Measure Physical Activity in Research: Analysis of Consumer Wrist-Worn Wearables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, André; Haugen Mikalsen, Martin; Woldaregay, Ashenafi Zebene; Muzny, Miroslav; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Hopstock, Laila Arnesdatter; Grimsgaard, Sameline

    2018-03-22

    New fitness trackers and smartwatches are released to the consumer market every year. These devices are equipped with different sensors, algorithms, and accompanying mobile apps. With recent advances in mobile sensor technology, privately collected physical activity data can be used as an addition to existing methods for health data collection in research. Furthermore, data collected from these devices have possible applications in patient diagnostics and treatment. With an increasing number of diverse brands, there is a need for an overview of device sensor support, as well as device applicability in research projects. The objective of this study was to examine the availability of wrist-worn fitness wearables and analyze availability of relevant fitness sensors from 2011 to 2017. Furthermore, the study was designed to assess brand usage in research projects, compare common brands in terms of developer access to collected health data, and features to consider when deciding which brand to use in future research. We searched for devices and brand names in six wearable device databases. For each brand, we identified additional devices on official brand websites. The search was limited to wrist-worn fitness wearables with accelerometers, for which we mapped brand, release year, and supported sensors relevant for fitness tracking. In addition, we conducted a Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and ClinicalTrials search to determine brand usage in research projects. Finally, we investigated developer accessibility to the health data collected by identified brands. We identified 423 unique devices from 132 different brands. Forty-seven percent of brands released only one device. Introduction of new brands peaked in 2014, and the highest number of new devices was introduced in 2015. Sensor support increased every year, and in addition to the accelerometer, a photoplethysmograph, for estimating heart rate, was the most common sensor. Out of the

  15. Multidimensional first-order dominance comparisons of population wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Thomas Channing; Siersbæk, Nikolaj; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    In this paper, we convey the concept of first-order dominance (FOD) with particular focus on applications to multidimensional population welfare comparisons. We give an account of the fundamental equivalent definitions of FOD, illustrated with simple numerical examples. An implementable method...... for detecting dominances is explained along with a bootstrapping procedure that yields additional information relative to what can be obtained from dominance comparisons alone. We discuss strengths and weaknesses of FOD, compared to other multidimensional population comparison concepts, and describe practical...

  16. Can paper replace laser film to communicate the results of wrist radiographs in trauma cases? A reproducibility study of the reading of wrist trauma case radiographs on a PACS workstation, laser film, and paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro; Zabel, Jean-Philippe; Baumann, Cédric; Albizzati, Stéphane; Coudane, Henry; Winninger, Daniel; Blum, Alain

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the reading of wrist trauma case radiographs using three different media: laser film, a picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstation, and paper with an optimized layout. The study was conducted retrospectively in 200 consecutive patients consulting at the emergency department for wrist trauma and who underwent wrist X-ray investigation using a computed radiography system. There were 82 men and 118 women. The mean age was 48.3 years (16-95 years). Our institutional review board does not require patient approval or informed consent for retrospective review of case records. The readings were made by two independent readers who analyzed the 200 patient radiographs consecutively in one session for each type of media: paper, laser film, and on a PACS dual-screen workstation. The inter-reader agreements were substantial or almost perfect, with kappa values of 0.83 (0.76-0.90) for the PACS, 0.83 (0.76-0.90) for film, and 0.80 (0.72-0.87) for paper. The inter-technique agreement was almost perfect in all cases. There is a high interobserver agreement between PACS, laser film, and paper readings for wrist trauma cases. With a layout of one radiograph on each sheet, paper could replace laser films to communicate the results of wrist radiographs in trauma cases for outpatients.

  17. Visual dominance in olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, N; Gabassi, P G

    1987-08-01

    The object of the present study was to verify the emergence of a 'visual dominance' effect in memory tests involving different sensory modes (sight and smell), brought about the preattentive mechanisms which select the visual sensory mode regardless of the recall task.

  18. Vector-meson dominance revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terschlüsen Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mesons with electromagnetism is often well described by the concept of vector-meson dominance (VMD. However, there are also examples where VMD fails. A simple chiral Lagrangian for pions, rho and omega mesons is presented which can account for the respective agreement and disagreement between VMD and phenomenology in the sector of light mesons.

  19. Testing for Stochastic Dominance Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Post (Thierry); O. Linton; Y-J. Whang

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new test of the stochastic dominance efficiency of a given portfolio over a class of portfolios. We establish its null and alternative asymptotic properties, and define a method for consistently estimating critical values. We present some numerical evidence that our

  20. Textile electrode straps for wrist-to-ankle bioimpedance measurements for Body Composition Analysis. Initial validation & experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, J C; Ferreira, J; Seoane, F; Buendia, R; Lindecrantz, K

    2010-01-01

    Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) is one of the non-invasive monitoring technologies that could benefit from the emerging textile based measurement systems. If reliable and reproducible EBI measurements could be done with textile electrodes, that would facilitate the utilization of EBI-based personalized healthcare monitoring applications. In this work the performance of a custom-made dry-textile electrode prototype is tested. Four-electrodes ankle-to-wrist EBI measurements have been taken on healthy subjects with the Impedimed spectrometer SFB7 in the frequency range 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The EBI spectroscopy measurements taken with dry electrodes were analyzed via the Cole and Body Composition Analysis (BCA) parameters, which were compared with EBI measurements obtained with standard electrolytic electrodes. The analysis of the obtained results indicate that even when dry textile electrodes may be used for EBI spectroscopy measurements, the measurements present remarkable differences that influence in the Cole parameter estimation process and in the final production of the BCA parameters. These initial results indicate that more research work must be done to in order to obtain a textile-based electrode that ensures reliable and reproducible EBI spectroscopy measurements.

  1. Wrist-Ankle Acupuncture for the Treatment of Pain Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bing Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Routine acupuncture incorporates wrist-ankle acupuncture (WAA for its analgesic effect, but WAA is not widely used in clinics due to incomplete knowledge of its effectiveness and concerns about less clinical research and because less people know it. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and possible adverse effects of WAA or WAA adjuvants in the treatment of pain symptoms. This study compared WAA or WAA adjuvant with the following therapies: western medication (WM, sham acupuncture (SA, or body acupuncture (BA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were searched systematically in related electronic databases by two independent reviewers. 33 RCTs were finally included, in which 7 RCTs were selected for meta-analysis. It was found that WAA or WAA adjuvant was significantly more effective than WM, SA, or BA in pain relief. There was nothing different between WAA and SA in adverse events, but WAA was marginally significantly safer than WM. Although both WAA and WAA adjuvant appeared to be more effective than WM, SA, or BA in the treatment of pain symptoms with few side effects, further studies with better and more rigorously designed are still necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety issue of WAA due to the poor methodology and small sample size of previous studies.

  2. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gazzoni

    Full Text Available The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1 the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2 the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1 it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2 hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  3. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  4. Impairment of gradual muscle adjustment during wrist circumduction in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i cerebrally coded task performance and (ii final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication and healthy subjects (N = 16 concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction--defined as muscle activity differentiation--was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in

  5. New developmental evidence clarifies the evolution of wrist bones in the dinosaur-bird transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Ossa-Fuentes, Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-León, Daniel; Salinas-Saavedra, Miguel; Ruiz-Flores, Macarena; Vargas, Alexander O

    2014-09-01

    From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal-anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal-anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur-bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2). The distal-posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as "element x," but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal-posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal-posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological data illuminate

  6. New Developmental Evidence Clarifies the Evolution of Wrist Bones in the Dinosaur–Bird Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Ossa-Fuentes, Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-León, Daniel; Salinas-Saavedra, Miguel; Ruiz-Flores, Macarena; Vargas, Alexander O.

    2014-01-01

    From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal–anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal–anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur–bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2). The distal–posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as “element x,” but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal–posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal–posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological

  7. Low dose MDCT of the wrist-An ex vivo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolte, H.; Sattler, E.-M.; Jahnke, T.; Roeger, I.; Biederer, J.; Jochens, A.; Dischinger, J.; Schuenke, M.; Sedlmair, M.; Heller, M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate, if in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the wrist a good image quality can be maintained while radiation dose is substantially reduced. In a second approach one solely parameter change that allows for the best trade-off between dose reduction and image quality should be identified. Twenty wrist specimens were examined with a 16-slice MDCT in different parameter combinations: 120 and 100 kV, 100, 70 and 40 electronic mA s, pitch factor 0.9 and 1.5. Images were reconstructed in four standard planes (slice thickness 1.0 mm, increment 0.5 mm, hard kernel) resulting into a total number of 960 images. Two observers evaluated image quality in a blinded and randomized consensus scheme. Detail quality of corticalis, spongiosa, articular surface and soft tissues was graded according to a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = sufficient, and 4 = poor). The scan protocol with the best trade-off between radiation exposure and image quality had a parameter constellation of 100 kV, 70 electronic mA s (78 effective mA s) and a pitch of 0.9 (DLP 63 mGy cm). This represented a dose reduction of 55%. A solely decrease of voltage lead to a dose reduction of 36% without any loss of image quality. An increase of the pitch factor to 1.5 and a decrease from 70 to 40 mA s caused the most distinct impairment of image quality. In MDCT of the wrist good image quality could be maintained while radiation dose was considerably reduced. A reduction of voltage offers the best result for a solely parameter change.

  8. New developmental evidence clarifies the evolution of wrist bones in the dinosaur-bird transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Francisco Botelho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal-anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal-anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur-bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2. The distal-posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as "element x," but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal-posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal-posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological

  9. Validity of a wrist digital monitor for blood pressure measurement in comparison to a mercury sphygmomanometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ana M B; Dumith, Samuel C; Noal, Ricardo B; Nunes, Ana Paula; Mendonça, Fernanda I; Araújo, Cora L P; Duval, Marta A; Caruso, Paulo E; Hallal, Pedro C

    2010-03-01

    Valid measurements of blood pressure, both at clinical and community settings, are essential for monitoring this variable at the population level. To evaluate the validity of a wrist digital monitor for measuring blood pressure among adolescents in comparison to a mercury sphygmomanometer. A validation study was carried out in the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Blood pressure was measured twice using two different sphygmomanometers; an OMRON wrist digital and a desktop BD mercury one. Half of the sample was measured first with the digital manometer and subsequently with the mercury one, whereas the remaining half was evaluated in the opposite order. Agreement between both measures was evaluated using the Bland and Altman method. 120 adolescents aged 14 to 15 years were included (50% of each sex). Mean systolic blood pressure among boys was 113.7 mmHg (SD 14.2) when using the mercury manometer and 115.5 mmHg (SD 15.2) when using the digital one. Equivalent values for diastolic blood pressure were 61.5 mmHg (SD 9.9) and 69.6 mmHg (10.2), respectively. Among girls, the mean systolic blood pressure was 104.7 mmHg (SD 10.1) when using the mercury manometer and 102.4 mmHg (SD 11.9) when using the digital device. Values for diastolic blood pressure were 60.0 mmHg (SD 10.4) and 65.7 mmHg (SD 7.7), respectively. The digital device showed a high level of agreement with the mercury manometer when measuring systolic blood pressure. The level of agreement was lower for diastolic blood pressure. The use of correction equations may be an alternative for studies using this wrist digital monitor in adolescent patients.

  10. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist: How to make it simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Messina, Carmelo; Mauri, Giovanni; Aliprandi, Alberto; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • US allows for rapid, cost-effective, and non-invasive assessment of wrist ligaments. • Knowledge of landmarks and dynamic manoeuvres is basic for a systematic examination. • A sequential approach is effective, timesaving and feasible in clinical practice. - Abstract: Wrist ligaments are crucial structures for the maintenance of carpal stability. They are classified into extrinsic ligaments, connecting the carpus with the forearm bones or distal radioulnar ligaments, and intrinsic ligaments, entirely situated within the carpus. Lesions of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist have been demonstrated to occur largely, mostly in patients with history of trauma and carpal instability, or rheumatoid arthritis. Ultrasound allows for rapid, cost-effective, non-invasive and dynamic evaluation of the wrist, and may represent a valuable diagnostic tool. Although promising results have been published, ultrasound of wrist ligaments is not performed in routine clinical practice, maybe due to its technical feasibility regarded as quite complex. This review article aims to enlighten readers about the normal sonographic appearance of intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments, and describe a systematic approach for their sonographic assessment with detailed anatomic landmarks, dynamic manoeuvres and scanning technique.

  11. Multiplanar wrist joint proprioception: The effect of anesthetic blockade of the posterior interosseous nerve or skin envelope surrounding the joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kenneth F; Meyer, Vanessa M; Smith, Laurel B; Lustik, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Contribution of the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) and surrounding skin envelope to wrist proprioception is a topic of debate and the primary focus of this research. We performed a double-blinded, placebo control study in which subjects underwent baseline multiplanar testing of wrist proprioception. They were randomized to receive either anesthetic blockade of the PIN within the fourth dorsal compartment, or circumferential topical anesthetic blockade of skin surrounding the wrist. Corresponding opposite wrists underwent placebo intervention with saline injection or inert ultrasound gel. Subjects repeated proprioceptive testing. Eighty subjects, 45 male and 35 female, mean age 33 years (range, 19-64 years), completed testing. The percentage of measurements falling outside a ±18° range did not differ between pre-treatment and post-treatment PIN blockade or for circumferential skin anesthesia. Wrist proprioception appears to be a multifactorial phenomenon. Surgeons may sacrifice the PIN without concern for effect on joint proprioception. Level I. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. All rights reserved.

  12. Posterior Radioscaphoid Angle as a Predictor of Wrist Degenerative Joint Disease in Patients With Scapholunate Ligament Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; De Verbizier, Jacques; Aptel, Sabine; Wack, Maxime; Dap, François; Dautel, Gilles; Blum, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the posterior radioscaphoid angle, a marker of posterior displacement of the scaphoid, is associated with degenerative joint disease in patients with scapholunate ligament tears. Images from 150 patients with wrist pain who underwent CT arthrography and radiography were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with and without scapholunate ligament ruptures were divided into two groups according to CT arthrography findings. The presence of degenerative changes (scapholunate advanced collapse [SLAC] wrist) was evaluated and graded on conventional radiographs. Images were evaluated by two readers independently, and an adjudicator analyzed the discordant cases. Posterior radioscaphoid angle values were correlated with CT arthrography and radiographic findings. The association between posterior radioscaphoid angle and degenerative joint disease was evaluated. Scapholunate and radiolunate angles were considered in the analysis. The posterior radioscaphoid angle was measurable in all patients, with substantial interobserver agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.75). The posterior radioscaphoid angle performed better than did the scapholunate and radiolunate angles in the differentiation of patients with and without SLAC wrist (p degenerative wrist disease, with potential prognostic implications in patients with wrist trauma and scapholunate ligament ruptures.

  13. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist: How to make it simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitto, Salvatore, E-mail: sal.gitto@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Festa del Perdono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Messina, Carmelo [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Festa del Perdono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Dipartimento di Radiologia Interventistica, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milano (Italy); Aliprandi, Alberto [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Pascal 36, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Pascal 36, 20133 Milano (Italy); Unità Operativa di Radiologia/Diagnostica per Immagini con Servizio di Radiologia Interventistica, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Via Riccardo Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • US allows for rapid, cost-effective, and non-invasive assessment of wrist ligaments. • Knowledge of landmarks and dynamic manoeuvres is basic for a systematic examination. • A sequential approach is effective, timesaving and feasible in clinical practice. - Abstract: Wrist ligaments are crucial structures for the maintenance of carpal stability. They are classified into extrinsic ligaments, connecting the carpus with the forearm bones or distal radioulnar ligaments, and intrinsic ligaments, entirely situated within the carpus. Lesions of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist have been demonstrated to occur largely, mostly in patients with history of trauma and carpal instability, or rheumatoid arthritis. Ultrasound allows for rapid, cost-effective, non-invasive and dynamic evaluation of the wrist, and may represent a valuable diagnostic tool. Although promising results have been published, ultrasound of wrist ligaments is not performed in routine clinical practice, maybe due to its technical feasibility regarded as quite complex. This review article aims to enlighten readers about the normal sonographic appearance of intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments, and describe a systematic approach for their sonographic assessment with detailed anatomic landmarks, dynamic manoeuvres and scanning technique.

  14. [Tremor Suppression on Multi-DoF Wrist Joint Based on Functional Electrical Stimulation: A Simulation Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dingguo; Liu, Jianrong

    2015-04-01

    An automatic control system was designed to suppress pathological tremor on wrist joint with two degrees of freedom (DoF) using functional electrical stimulation (FES). The tremor occurring in the wrist flexion-extension and adduction-abduction was expected to be suppressed. A musculoskeletal model of wrist joint was developed to serve as the control plant, which covered four main muscles (extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris). A second-order mechanical impedance model was used to describe the wrist skeletal dynamics. The core work was to design the controller and a hybrid control strategy was proposed, which combined inverse model based on feed forward control and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control. Performance of the system was tested under different input conditions (step signal, sinusoidal signal, and real data of a patient)., The results indicated that the proposed hybrid controller could attenuate over 94% of the tremor amplitude on multi-DoF wrist joint.

  15. Effect of wrist posture, rate of force development/relaxation, and isotonic contractions on finger force independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Stephen E; Keir, Peter J

    2018-02-01

    The multi-articular anatomy and inter-connections of the extrinsic finger muscles suggests that wrist posture may affect enslaved finger forces. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of (i) wrist posture on enslaved finger forces during ramp and isotonic exertions, and (ii) the rate of force development on enslaved forces and error. Twelve men performed 3 repetitions of isometric finger flexion and extension force with index and ring fingers with the wrist in 30° flexion, neutral, and 30° extension. Trials consisted of an isotonic contraction at 25% of maximum, and two ramp contractions performed at 25% MVC/s and 10% MVC/s up to 50% MVC, returning to zero at the same rate. Electromyography was recorded from compartments of extensor digitorum (ED) and flexor digitorum superficialis and analyzed at 25% MVC. Wrist posture significantly affected enslaving effect (EE) during extension exertions (F 4, 44  > 2.6, p < .05) with higher EE, error, and muscle activity of ED in wrist extension. Contraction condition significantly affected EE for index and ring finger exertions (p = .001). In fingers adjacent to the task finger, descending phase EE was higher than ascending phase, independent of muscle activity. Mechanical factors such as posture, and neural factors both contribute to enslaved finger actions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. From nature-dominated to human-dominated environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Bruno; Grosjean, Martin; Hofer, Thomas; Núñez, Lautaro; Pfister, Christian

    2000-01-01

    To what extent is it realistic and useful to view human history as a sequence of changes from highly vulnerable societies of hunters and gatherers through periods with less vulnerable, well buffered and highly productive agrarian-urban societies to a world with regions of extreme overpopulation and overuse of life support systems, so that vulnerability to climatic-environmental changes and extreme events is again increasing? This question cannot be fully answered in our present state of knowledge, but at least we can try to illustrate, with three case studies from different continents, time periods and ecosystems, some fundamental changes in the relationship between natural processes and human activities that occur, as we pass from a nature-dominated to a human dominated environment. 1. Early-mid Holocene: Nature dominated environment — human adaptation, mitigation, and migration. In the central Andes, the Holocene climate changed from humid (10,800-8000 BP) to extreme arid (8000-3600 BP) conditions. Over the same period, prehistoric hunting communities adopted a more sedentary pattern of resource use by settling close to the few perennial water bodies, where they began the process of domesticating camelids around 5000 BP and irrigation from about 3100 BP. 2. Historical period: An agrarian society in transition from an "enduring" to an innovative human response. Detailed documentary evidence from Western Europe may be used to reconstruct quite precisely the impacts of climatic variations on agrarian societies. The period considered spans a major transition from an apparently passive response to the vagaries of the environment during the 16th century to an active and innovative attitude from the onset of the agrarian revolution in the late 18th century through to the present day. The associated changes in technology and in agricultural practices helped to create a society better able to survive the impact of climatic extremes. 3. The present day: A human dominated

  17. A wrist-worn biosensor system for assessment of neurological status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, D; Pouyan, M Baran; Nourani, M; Harvey, J

    2014-01-01

    EEG based monitoring for the purpose of assessing a patient's neurological status is conspicuous and uncomfortable at best. We are analyzing a set of physiological signals that may be monitored comfortably by a wrist worn device. We have found that these signals and machine based classification allows us to accurately discriminate among four stress states of individuals. Further, we have found a clear change in these signals during the 70 minutes preceding a single convulsive epileptic seizure. Our classification accuracy on all data has been greater than 90% to date.

  18. Advanced two-arm servomanipulator having new multi-joints and ingenious wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, H.; Igarashi, M.; Nomizu, T.; Maeda, M.; Kawai, S.; Amano, K.; Takahashi, J.; Yamao, T.

    1984-01-01

    The prototype of an advanced two-arm servomanipulator having a new joint mechanism will be introduced. Developed cooperatively by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Meidensha in Japan, the special features of the manipulator are its small size and light weight and its 15 to 20 kg load handling capacity. A new structure of the wrist joint portion has four degrees of freedom in total, i.e., two degrees of bending freedom and continuous rotation and grasping by parallel fingers

  19. Parameter identification of the testbed of a novel gearless pitch-roll wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vikram; Hajzargarbashi, Seyedhossein; Angeles, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The work reported here pertains to the low-frequency dynamic analysis of the testbed for a novel gearless pitch-roll wrist (PRW). The testbed is excited with harmonic inputs that produce periodic responses of the multiple-input multiple-output system. The input-output data measured are then processed to identify damping and stiffness values of the flexible components of the testbed. The inertial parameters are computed from the 3D CAD model of the mechanism. The paper highlights a novel approach of averaging the response data in order to obtain the best parameter estimates of the linear mechanical system under test.

  20. Connected domination stable graphs upon edge addition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A set S of vertices in a graph G is a connected dominating set of G if S dominates G and the subgraph induced by S is connected. We study the graphs for which adding any edge does not change the connected domination number. Keywords: Connected domination, connected domination stable, edge addition ...

  1. On dominator colorings in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graph coloring and domination are two major areas in graph theory that have been ... independent set if no two vertices in S are adjacent. ... independent set. The corona G1 ◦ G2 of two graphs G1 and G2 is defined to be the graph. G obtained by taking one copy of G1 and |V(G1)| copies of G2, and then joining the i-th.

  2. Untangling Partnership and Domination Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Loye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Riane Eisler’s (1987 cultural transformation theory is an effective framework for understanding many of the constructs that shape society. This article uses Eisler’s theory to explain the formation of morality and the construction of conscience. It contrasts partnership morality and domination morality, and describes the factors that shape our tendency to embrace one or the other. The article helps us understand that we have a choice, and invites us to choose partnership morality.

  3. Wrist arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 73. Review Date 4/18/2017 Updated by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department ...

  4. Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, Andreas; Harridge, Stephen D R; Mizuno, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Paretic human muscle rapidly loses strength and oxidative endurance, and electrical stimulation training may partly reverse this. We evaluated the effects of two training protocols on the contractile and metabolic properties of the wrist extensor in 12 C-5/6 tetraplegic individuals. The wrist...... by (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMRS) during and following a continuous 40-s 10-HZ contraction. In the Hr group the cost of contraction decreased by 38% (P ... induced stimulation of the wrist extensor muscles in spinal cord injury (SCI) increases fatigue resistance independent of training pattern. However, only the Hr protocol increased muscle strength and was shown to improve muscle aerobic metabolism after training. Muscle Nerve 27: 72-80, 2003...

  5. Imaging diagnostics of the wrist: MRI and Arthrography/Arthro-CT; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Handgelenkes: MRT und Arthrographie/Arthro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H.M.; Balas, R.; Neugebauer, F. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Betzdorf (Germany); Vrsalovic, V. [Handchirugie, Marienhospital Siegen, Siegen (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with arthrography and arthro-CT (AG/ACT) in patients with wrist pain. Methods: MRI and arthrography/arthro-CT (AG/ACT) of the wrist joint were retrospectively evaluated in 346 patients over a three-year period. Imaging findings were correlated to surgical results (n=78) or clinical course in an at least 6-month follow-up. Results: For tears of the triangular fibrocartilage, arthrography, arthro-CT, and MRI demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of more than 0.96. Only the positive predictive value was superior for arthrography/arthro-CT (0.99 and 0.98, respectively) compared with MRI (0.94). Arthrography was superior for functional diagnosis of scapho-lunate ligament tears (n=25). Ulno-lunate and ulno-triquetral ligament defects were demonstrated more exactly by arthrography. Traumatic osseous defects, particularly scaphoid fractures (n=33) and avascular necrosis (n=17), were better diagnosed using MRI. Conclusion: For suspected lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, AG/ACT is slightly more reliable than MRI. However, MRI was found to be highly accurate in diagnosing TFC tears, and is superior to AG/ACT in detecting traumatic and vascular lesions of the wrist. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Untersuchung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft von Magnetresonanz-Tomographie (MRT), Arthrographie (AG) und Arthro-CT (ACT) bei Erkrankungen des Handgelenkes. Methodik: Insgesamt 346 Untersuchungen des Handgelenkes wurden fuer einen dreijaehrigen Beobachtungszeitraum retrospektiv ausgewertet. Es wurden 211 MRT, 151 Arthrographien (AG) und 126 Arthro-CT (ACT) durchgefuehrt. Alle Diagnosen wurden operativ (n=78) oder durch den klinischen Verlauf in einer 6-monatigen Nachbeobachtung gesichert. Ergebnisse: Fuer die Diagnostik von Laesionen des diskoulnaren Komplexes lag die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet von AG, ACT und MRT ueber 0,96. Lediglich der positive Vorhersagewert differierte, allerdings nicht

  6. Flexor Tenosynovitis Due to Tuberculosis in Hand and Wrist: Is Tenosynovectomy Imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakaş, Fatih; Uğurlar, Meriç; Turan, Derya Bayirli; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Mersa, Berkan; Özçelik, İsmail Bülent

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of flexor tenosynovitis in the hand and wrist due to tuberculosis is controversial. Although some authors recommend the antituberculous chemotherapy, the others recommend the surgical treatment. In this article, 12 patients with synovial tuberculosis of the flexor aspect of the hand and the wrist were evaluated with respect to diagnosis and treatment modalities. None of the patients had a history of tuberculosis, concomitant disease, immunosuppressive drug use, drug abuse, and human immunodefficiency virus positivity. A chest x-ray and family screening were performed in all of the cases, none had evidence of tuberculosis in the lung. The biopsy, histopathological examination, acid-fast bacillus staining, and BACTEC tuberculosis culture were performed. Antituberculous chemotherapy was initiated in patients diagnosed with tuberculosis by either histological or microbiological examinations. The patients did not undergo any further surgery after biopsy procedures. The lesions regressed totally in all patients after 3 months of treatment. Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms and signs recruited at five months of treatment. In patients with flexor tuberculosis tenosynovitis, it is possible to achieve good results by applying only medical therapy after a biopsy, and without the need for further surgery.

  7. Reproducibility of X-rays and CT arthrography in SLAC, SNAC, SCAC wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaouane, R; Lebeau, N; Maes-Clavier, C; Hustin, C; Krief, E; Bonnaire, B; Warin, M; Rotari, V; David, E

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility of the interpretation of CT arthrography and plain X-rays for scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC), scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) and scaphoid chondrocalcinosis advanced collapse (SCAC) wrist conditions, as well as the clinical relevance of these imaging modalities. The CT and X-rays images were reviewed twice in a blinded and randomized manner by two experienced orthopedic surgeons specialized in hand surgery, two orthopedic surgery residents and two experienced radiologists specialized in bone and joint imaging. Cohen's kappa and Fleiss' kappa coefficients were used to analyze the reproducibility of interpretation of the radiological examinations. With CT arthrography, the overall diagnosis was often a problem, in terms of both inter- or intra-observer reproducibility. The assessment of the joint line appeared to be fairly reproducible for each observer but was poorly reproducible between different observers. Plain X-rays are not sufficient to assess cartilage quality in degenerative wrist disease. CT arthrography is a reliable examination, but its interpretation is not always standardized. Diagnostic arthroscopy may be justified in doubtful cases. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. An anatomic and biomechanic study of the wrist extensor retinaculum septa and tendon compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Morris, Randal P; Andersen, Clark; Patterson, Rita M; Viegas, Steven F

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the extensor retinaculum of the wrist has been described previously; the purpose of this study was to describe the specific anatomy of the septal attachments on the radius and to investigate the mechanical strength of each septal attachment on the radius and each of the 6 compartments of the extensor retinaculum. Thirty-four wrists from 24 fresh-frozen and 10 embalmed cadavers were used. First, anatomic measurements of the individual extensor retinaculum septums were performed with calipers and a 3-dimensional digitizer. Next each extensor retinaculum septum was excised as a bone-retinaculum-bone autograft and was tested in tension to failure with a materials testing machine. Finally the 6 extensor retinaculum compartments were tested to failure. Septum 1/2 had the largest radial surface area and septum 3/4 had the smallest. Septum 1/2 also was found to have the highest failure strength at 51.3 +/- 15.3 N. In compartment testing, compartments 1 and 2 had the highest overall resistance to failure and compartment 5 had the lowest. Compartment 6, which was thought to be the weakest because of clinically observed subluxation of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, had stronger failure data than expected. This study offers detailed analysis of the extensor retinaculum compartments and 3-dimensional anatomy of the septal attachments. Clinically this study lends insight to the strength of bone-retinaculum-bone autografts and the etiology of extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation.

  9. Erosion or normal variant? 4-year MRI follow-up of the wrists in healthy children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenarius, Derk F.M.; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Rosendahl, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of healthy children have wrist changes on MRI, namely carpal depressions, findings that have been described as pathological in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We performed follow-up imaging in a cohort of healthy children to evaluate carpal surface depressions over time, focusing on the presence of overlying cartilage as a potential discriminator between normal variants and true erosions. 74 of the initial cohort of 89 healthy children (83%) had a re-scan of their wrists using the same protocol, including coronal T1 and fat-saturated T2 sequences. A cartilage-selective sequence was added for this study. We registered number and location of bony depressions and presence of overlying cartilage. The total number of carpal depressions increased by age group and over time; their location was unchanged in 370 of 487 (76%) carpal sites and 91 of 117 (78%) metacarpal sites. In total, 426 of the 1,087 (39.2%) bony depressions were covered by cartilage, with a decreasing percentage by age (P = 0.001). Normal appearances during growth, such as bony depressions, should not be mistaken for pathology. There must be additional findings to support a diagnosis of disease. A cartilage sequence may add to the diagnostic image analysis. (orig.)

  10. Dose evaluation in occupationally exposed workers through dosimeters ring and wrist type with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, R.; Gastelo, E.; Paucar, R.; Tolentino, D.; Herrera, J.; Armas, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the Nuclear Medicine service of the Clinica San Pablo (Peru), the occupationally exposed workers carried out the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals to patients, so it is vital to measure the equivalent dose to the hands during the procedures in order to optimize the exposure to the ionizing radiation and execute the Radiological Safety Regulation (D.S. No. 009-97-Em) and the standard IR 002.2012 of radiation protection and safety in nuclear medicine. In this paper was designed and built a hand anthropomorphic phantom made of paraffin following the description given for the standard man, later were placed dosimeters ring and wrist type UD-807 model, Panasonic brand. Then we proceeded to irradiate using vial containers of Tc-99 and I-131. The obtained results showed the difference between the equivalent dose obtained among the ring and wrist dosimeter also getting a dose of 153 mSv /year when working with 99m Tc and of 61 mSv /year when working with iodine-131. Was also demonstrated that the ring dosimeter shows the average dose received in the hand with less dispersion. It was found that under the national regulation on Requirements of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety in Medicine article 63, indicates that higher doses of 150 mSv /year the occupationally exposed workers should have hand dosimetry. Finally the individual dose limit of 500 mSv /year in extremities can be overcome if adequate radiation protection standards do not apply. (author)

  11. Erosion or normal variant? 4-year MRI follow-up of the wrists in healthy children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenarius, Derk F.M. [University of Tromsoe, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department for Radiology and Intervention, Oslo (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine K1, Bergen (Norway)

    2016-03-15

    A large proportion of healthy children have wrist changes on MRI, namely carpal depressions, findings that have been described as pathological in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We performed follow-up imaging in a cohort of healthy children to evaluate carpal surface depressions over time, focusing on the presence of overlying cartilage as a potential discriminator between normal variants and true erosions. 74 of the initial cohort of 89 healthy children (83%) had a re-scan of their wrists using the same protocol, including coronal T1 and fat-saturated T2 sequences. A cartilage-selective sequence was added for this study. We registered number and location of bony depressions and presence of overlying cartilage. The total number of carpal depressions increased by age group and over time; their location was unchanged in 370 of 487 (76%) carpal sites and 91 of 117 (78%) metacarpal sites. In total, 426 of the 1,087 (39.2%) bony depressions were covered by cartilage, with a decreasing percentage by age (P = 0.001). Normal appearances during growth, such as bony depressions, should not be mistaken for pathology. There must be additional findings to support a diagnosis of disease. A cartilage sequence may add to the diagnostic image analysis. (orig.)

  12. Use of Particulated Juvenile Articular Cartilage Allograft for Osteochondral Lesions of the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Daniel E; Werner, Brian C; Deal, D Nicole

    2017-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries are a common injury among young, active patients, and the most appropriate treatment for these injuries remains controversial. A promising new technology in the treatment of high-grade cartilage injuries is particulated juvenile articular cartilage (PJAC) allograft (DeNovo NT, Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana). This has been shown to be successful in multiple joints including the knee, talus, and elbow. No studies or case reports exist in supporting or discouraging its use in injuries of the wrist, in specific, the scaphoid. The use of PJAC allograft is described for the treatment of an active 21-year-old male with an Outerbridge Grade IV chondral lesion on the proximal pole of his right scaphoid and right distal radius scaphoid facet who had failed conservative management. The patient was followed clinically and radiographically for 21 months. The patient had return to full sport (jujutsu) and full range-of-motion, both of which represented an improvement from his preoperative exam. Radiographically, the chondral lucency seen had decreased in size and was almost completely absent on radiographs after 21 months. The results of this case suggest that PJAC can be used safely and effectively in the wrist thereby potentially broadening the indications for its use.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for the wrist joint of the coal miners in vibration department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.Z.; Liu, R.L.; Hu, S.D.; Zhang, W.; Xu, W.X.; Ge, L.X. [Central Hospital of Zaozhuang Mine Corporation, Zaozhuang (China)

    2006-04-15

    To study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the wrist joint of coal miners who work in excavation and vibration department. Forty-three coal miners with the hand-arm vibration disease served as the observation group while 20 workers who were not working in the vibration department acted as the control group. The patients in the observation group were divided into five subgroups according to the time when they received vibration. The regularity of the development of signs and symptoms of MRI was observed and analyzed. The hydroarthrosis was most found in MRI. There were significant difference in hydroarthrosis osteoporosis and osteomyelitis between the observation group and the control group. The edema of bone marrow and the avascular necrosis of ossa carpi were found only in the observation group and not found in the control group. The hydroarthrosis and the edema of bone marrow occurred most in the early stage of vibration. The signal in the edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius was decreased in the GE sequence with the specificity. Changes in the wrist joint occur in the early stage of the vibration work, and can be found in the MRI. The edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius is of great value in the diagnosis of the hand-arm vibration disease.

  14. A new concept for an old pain: "Carpalgia"; pain in the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizo Alemán, L

    The idea of this article is to propose to the general use of a new term to semiologically describe musculoskeletal wrist pain. The use of terms with Greco-Latin roots is common in the medical field. The result is expressed in the newly coined word (neologism) "carpalgia", defined as musculoskeletal pain in the region of the wrist. The use of other terms related to musculoskeletal pain of the shoulder (omalgia), knee (gonalgia), metatarsus (metatarsalgia), spine (cervicalgia, lumbalgia), or hip (coxalgia) terms have demonstrated their importance through their applicability in different medical journals in recent years. Supported by the large number of cases that are seen by doctors, the application of the term "carpalgia" is an aid to scientific communication, as well as the publication and search for new article related to the topic. The use of this neologism will obtain favourable and reliable results on being supported by this work future. Of course, it is expected that like any process of universalisation, a review or update will involve the participation of medical societies and the members themselves for its gradual inclusion. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Design and control of a 3-DOF rehabilitation robot for forearm and wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincong Luo; Liang Peng; Zengguang Hou; Weiqun Wang

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a 3-DOF compact rehabilitation robot, involving mechanical structure design, control system design and gravity compensation analysis. The robot can simultaneously provide assistance for pronation/supination(P/S), flexion/extension(F/E) and adduction/abduction(A/A) joints rehabilitation training. The P/S and F/E joints are designed to be driven by cable transmission to gain a high backdrivability, and an adjustment plate is adopted to decrease the distance between the rotation axis of F/E joint of the human wrist and the robot. In addition, gravity compensation is considered to offset the impact of self-gravity on the performance of the controller. A "moving window" control strategy based on impedance control is proposed and implemented on the robot. A comparison between the "moving window" control and classical impedance control indicates that the former has more potential to stimulate the voluntary efforts of the participant, and has a less limitation moving in a fixed reference trajectory. Meanwhile, the results also validate the feasibility and safety of the wrist robot system.

  16. Arm and wrist surface potential mapping for wearable ECG rhythm recording devices: a pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, W. D.; Escalona, O. J.; McEneaney, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses an important question in the development of a ECG device that enables long term monitoring of cardiac rhythm. This device would utilise edge sensor technologies for dry, non-irritant skin contact suitable for distal limb application and would be supported by embedded ECG denoising processes. Contemporary ECG databases including those provided by MIT-BIH and Physionet are focused on interpretation of cardiac disease and rhythm tracking. The data is recorded using chest leads as in standard clinical practise. For the development of a peripherally located heart rhythm monitor, such data would be of limited use. To provide a useful database adequate for the development of the above mentioned cardiac monitoring device a unipolar body surface potential map from the left arm and wrist was gathered in 37 volunteer patients and characterized in this study. For this, the reference electrode was placed at the wrist. Bipolar far-field electrogram leads were derived and analysed. Factors such as skin variability, 50Hz noise interference, electrode contact noise, motion artifacts and electromyographic noise, presented a challenge. The objective was quantify the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the far-field locations. Preliminary results reveal that an electrogram indicative of the QRS complex can be recorded on the distal portion of the left arm when denoised using signal averaging techniques.

  17. Weighted wrist cuffs for tremor reduction during eating in adults with static brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGruder, Juli; Cors, Denise; Tiernan, Anne M; Tomlin, George

    2003-01-01

    This study examined whether weighting the forearm during feeding decreased tremors and increased functional feeding in adults with intention tremor caused by static brain lesions. Five individuals with various diagnoses, ages 30-81, were videotaped during 8 or 16 meal sessions, alternating treatment and control conditions within each meal. In this single-case design, treatment consisted of application of a weighted fabric wrist cuff and the baseline (control) condition employed an identical cuff with the weights removed. Dependent variables studied were time to acquire and deliver a bite, grams of food eaten, number of times food was spilled, number of times a compensatory technique was used, participant self-rating, and investigator rating of the severity of the tremor. All five participants demonstrated improvement during treatment in one or more of the dependent variables. t Tests of the means of baseline and treatment half-sessions incorporating conservative control of Type I error revealed the following statistically significant improvements under the weighted condition: Participants 3, 4, and 5 took less time to acquire a bite; Participants 4 and 5 made fewer spills; Participants 3 and 5 showed a diminished tremor. There were no statistically significant decreases in function on any variable for any participants during the weighted condition. The application of weight to the wrist of a person with upper-extremity tremor is accompanied by some functional improvement in self-feeding for some individuals. The size of benefit seems to be sensitive to the amount of weight used.

  18. Design and Kinematic Evaluation of a Novel Joint-Specific Play Controller: Application for Wrist and Forearm Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Costa, Laura; Kerman, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The wrist extensors and flexors are profoundly affected in most children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and are the major target of physical therapists' and occupational therapists' efforts to restore useful hand functions. A limitation of any therapeutic or exercise program can be the level of the child's engagement or adherence. The proposed approach capitalizes on the primary learning avenue for children: toy play. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the measurement accuracy of innovative, motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. Design objectives of the play controller included a cost-effective, home-based supplement to physical therapy, the ability to calibrate the controller so that play can be accomplished with any active range of motion, and the capability of logging play activity and wrist motion over week-long periods. Accuracy of the play controller in measuring wrist flexion-extension was evaluated in 6 children who were developing in a typical manner, using optical motion capture of the wrist and forearm as the gold standard. The error of the play controller was estimated at approximately 5 degrees in both maximum wrist flexion and extension. Measurements were taken during a laboratory session, with children without CP, and no toy or computer game was interfaced with the play controller. Therefore, the potential engagement of the proposed approach for therapy remains to be evaluated. This study presented the concept, development, and wrist tracking accuracy of an inexpensive approach to extremity therapy that may have a health benefit for children with hemiparesis, and potentially for patients of any age with a wide range of extremity neuromotor impairments. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. Surgical Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through a Minimal Incision on the Distal Wrist Crease: An Anatomical and Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Mi Yoo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAn anatomical analysis of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL and the surrounding structures might help in identifying effective measures to minimize complications. Here, we present a surgical technique based on an anatomical study that was successfully applied in clinical settings.MethodsUsing 13 hands from 8 formalin-fixed cadavers, we measured the TCL length and thickness, correlation between the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL, and distance between the distal end of the TCL and the palmar arch; the TCL cross sections and the thickest parts were also examined. Clinically, fasciotomy was performed on the relevant parts of 15 hands from 13 patients by making a minimally invasive incision on the distal wrist crease. Postoperatively, a two-point discrimination check was conducted in which the sensations of the first, second, and third fingertips and the palmar cutaneous branch injuries were monitored (average duration, 7 months.ResultsIn the 13 cadaveric hands, the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL were placed in the same location. The average length of the TCL and the distance from the distal TCL to the superficial palmar arch were 35.30±2.59 mm and 9.50±2.13 mm, respectively. The thickest part of the TCL was a region 25 mm distal to the distal wrist crease (average thickness, 4.00±0.57 mm. The 13 surgeries performed in the clinical settings yielded satisfactory results.ConclusionsThis peri-TCL anatomical study confirmed the safety of fasciotomy with a minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease. The clinical application of the technique indicated that the minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease was efficacious in the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  20. Longitudinal, lateral and transverse axes of forearm muscles influence the crosstalk in the mechanomyographic signals during isometric wrist postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Anamul; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, R Badlishah; Sundaraj, Sebastian; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Ali, Md Asraf

    2014-01-01

    In mechanomyography (MMG), crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity. The aim of the present study was two-fold: i) to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals from the longitudinal (Lo), lateral (La) and transverse (Tr) axes of the extensor d